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Sample records for complex dna repair

  1. Drug-induced DNA repair: X-ray structure of a DNA-ditercalinium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Q; Williams, L D; Egli, M; Rabinovich, D; Chen, S L; Quigley, G J; Rich, A

    1991-01-01

    Ditercalinium is a synthetic anticancer drug that binds to DNA by bis-intercalation and activates DNA repair processes. In prokaryotes, noncovalent DNA-ditercalinium complexes are incorrectly recognized by the uvrABC repair system as covalent lesions on DNA. In eukaryotes, mitochondrial DNA is degraded by excess and futile DNA repair. Using x-ray crystallography, we have determined, to 1.7 A resolution, the three-dimensional structure of a complex of ditercalinium bound to the double-stranded DNA fragment [d(CGCG)]2. The DNA in the complex with ditercalinium is kinked (by 15 degrees) and severely unwound (by 36 degrees) with exceptionally wide major and minor grooves. Recognition of the DNA-ditercalinium complex by uvrABC in prokaryotes, and by mitochondrial DNA repair systems in eukaryotes, might be related to drug-induced distortion of the DNA helix. Images PMID:2006181

  2. Response of base excision repair enzymes to complex DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Weinfeld, M; Rasouli-Nia, A; Chaudhry, M A; Britten, R A

    2001-11-01

    There is now increasing evidence that ionizing radiation generates complex DNA damage, i.e. two or more lesions--single-strand breaks or modified nucleosides--located within one to two helical turns on the same strand or on opposite strands. Double-strand breaks are the most readily recognizable clustered lesions, but they may constitute a relatively minor fraction of the total. It is anticipated that clustered lesions may play a significant role in cellular response to ionizing radiation since they may present a major challenge to the DNA repair machinery. The degree of lesion complexity increases with increasing LET. This has potential implications for space travel because of exposure to high-LET cosmic radiation. It is therefore critical that we begin to understand the consequences of such damaged sites, including their influence on DNA repair enzymes. This paper presents a short review of our current knowledge of the action of purified DNA repair enzymes belonging to the base excision repair pathway, including DNA glycosylases and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases, on model complex lesions.

  3. Repair synthesis step involving ERCC1-XPF participates in DNA repair of the Top1-DNA damage complex.

    PubMed

    Takahata, Chiaki; Masuda, Yuji; Takedachi, Arato; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2015-08-01

    Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) is the intercellular target of camptothecins (CPTs). CPT blocks DNA religation in the Top1-DNA complex and induces Top1-attached nick DNA lesions. In this study, we demonstrate that excision repair cross complementing 1 protein-xeroderma pigmentosum group F (ERCC1-XPF) endonuclease and replication protein A (RPA) participate in the repair of Top1-attached nick DNA lesions together with other nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors. ERCC1-XPF shows nuclease activity in the presence of RPA on a 3'-phosphotyrosyl bond nick-containing DNA (Tyr-nick DNA) substrate, which mimics a Top1-attached nick DNA lesion. In addition, ERCC1-XPF and RPA form a DNA/protein complex on the nick DNA substrate in vitro, and co-localize in CPT-treated cells in vivo. Moreover, the DNA repair synthesis of Tyr-nick DNA lesions occurred in the presence of NER factors, including ERCC1-XPF, RPA, DNA polymerase delta, flap endonuclease 1 and DNA ligase 1. Therefore, some of the NER repair machinery might be an alternative repair pathway for Top1-attached nick DNA lesions. Clinically, these data provide insights into the potential of ERCC1 as a biomarker during CPT regimens.

  4. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays for Protein–DNA Complexes Involved in DNA Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun; Smider, Vaughn; Hwang, Byung Joon; Chu, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) can be used to study proteins that bind to DNA structures created by DNA-damaging agents. UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB), which is involved in nucleotide excision repair, binds to DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation or the anticancer drug cisplatin. Ku, XRCC4/Ligase IV, and DNA–PKcs, which are involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end joining, assemble in complexes at DNA ends. This chapter will describe several EMSA protocols for detecting different DNA repair protein–DNA complexes. To obtain additional information, one can apply variations of the EMSA, which include the reverse EMSA to detect binding of 35S-labeled protein to damaged DNA, and the antibody supershift assay to detect the presence of a specific protein in the protein–DNA complex. PMID:22941596

  5. Cryo-EM Imaging of DNA-PK DNA Damage Repair Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Phoebe L. Stewart

    2005-06-27

    Exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation causes DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that must be repaired for cell survival. Higher eukaryotes respond to DSBs by arresting the cell cycle, presumably to repair the DNA lesions before cell division. In mammalian cells, the nonhomologous end-joining DSB repair pathway is mediated by the 470 kDa DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) together with the DNA-binding factors Ku70 and Ku80. Mouse knock-out models of these three proteins are all exquisitely sensitive to low doses of ionizing radiation. In the presence of DNA ends, Ku binds to the DNA and then recruits DNA-PKcs. After formation of the complex, the kinase activity associated with DNA-PKcs becomes activated. This kinase activity has been shown to be essential for repairing DNA DSBs in vivo since expression of a kinase-dead form of DNA-PKcs in a mammalian cell line that lacks DNA-PKcs fails to complement the radiosensitive phenotype. The immense size of DNA-PKcs suggests that it may also serve as a docking site for other DNA repair proteins. Since the assembly of the DNA-PK complex onto DNA is a prerequisite for DSB repair, it is critical to obtain structural information on the complex. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single particle reconstruction methods provide a powerful way to image large macromolecular assemblies at near atomic (10-15 ?) resolution. We have already used cryo-EM methods to examine the structure of the isolated DNA-PKcs protein. This structure reveals numerous cavities throughout the protein that may allow passage of single or double-stranded DNA. Pseudo two-fold symmetry was found for the monomeric protein, suggesting that DNA-PKcs may interact with two DNA ends or two Ku heterodimers simultaneously. Here we propose to study the structure of the cross-linked DNA-PKcs/Ku/DNA complex. Difference imaging with our published DNA-PKcs structure will enable us to elucidate the architecture of the complex. A second

  6. Crystal Structures of DNA-Whirly Complexes and Their Role in Arabidopsis Organelle Genome Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Cappadocia, Laurent; Maréchal, Alexandre; Parent, Jean-Sébastien; Lepage, Étienne; Sygusch, Jurgen; Brisson, Normand

    2010-09-07

    DNA double-strand breaks are highly detrimental to all organisms and need to be quickly and accurately repaired. Although several proteins are known to maintain plastid and mitochondrial genome stability in plants, little is known about the mechanisms of DNA repair in these organelles and the roles of specific proteins. Here, using ciprofloxacin as a DNA damaging agent specific to the organelles, we show that plastids and mitochondria can repair DNA double-strand breaks through an error-prone pathway similar to the microhomology-mediated break-induced replication observed in humans, yeast, and bacteria. This pathway is negatively regulated by the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding proteins from the Whirly family, thus indicating that these proteins could contribute to the accurate repair of plant organelle genomes. To understand the role of Whirly proteins in this process, we solved the crystal structures of several Whirly-DNA complexes. These reveal a nonsequence-specific ssDNA binding mechanism in which DNA is stabilized between domains of adjacent subunits and rendered unavailable for duplex formation and/or protein interactions. Our results suggest a model in which the binding of Whirly proteins to ssDNA would favor accurate repair of DNA double-strand breaks over an error-prone microhomology-mediated break-induced replication repair pathway.

  7. Mutant Cockayne syndrome group B protein inhibits repair of DNA topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complex.

    PubMed

    Horibata, Katsuyoshi; Saijo, Masafumi; Bay, Mui N; Lan, Li; Kuraoka, Isao; Brooks, Philip J; Honma, Masamitsu; Nohmi, Takehiko; Yasui, Akira; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2011-01-01

    Two UV-sensitive syndrome patients who have mild photosensitivity without detectable somatic abnormalities lack detectable Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB) protein because of a homozygous null mutation in the CSB gene. In contrast, mutant CSB proteins are produced in CS-B patients with the severe somatic abnormalities of Cockayne syndrome and photosensitivity. It is known that the piggyBac transposable element derived 3 is integrated within the CSB intron 5, and that CSB-piggyBac transposable element derived 3 fusion (CPFP) mRNA is produced by alternative splicing. We found that CPFP or truncated CSB protein derived from CPFP mRNA was stably produced in CS-B patients, and that wild-type CSB, CPFP, and truncated CSB protein interacted with DNA topoisomerase I. We also found that CPFP inhibited repair of a camptothecin-induced topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complex. The inhibition was suppressed by the presence of wild-type CSB, consistent with the autosomal recessive inheritance of Cockayne syndrome. These results suggested that reduced repair of a DNA topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complex because of truncated CSB proteins is involved in the pathogenesis of CS-B. PMID:21143350

  8. Stochastic and reversible assembly of a multiprotein DNA repair complex ensures accurate target site recognition and efficient repair

    PubMed Central

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; von Bornstaedt, Gesa; Gourdin, Audrey M.; Politi, Antonio Z.; Moné, Martijn J.; Warmerdam, Daniël O.; Goedhart, Joachim; Vermeulen, Wim

    2010-01-01

    To understand how multiprotein complexes assemble and function on chromatin, we combined quantitative analysis of the mammalian nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) machinery in living cells with computational modeling. We found that individual NER components exchange within tens of seconds between the bound state in repair complexes and the diffusive state in the nucleoplasm, whereas their net accumulation at repair sites evolves over several hours. Based on these in vivo data, we developed a predictive kinetic model for the assembly and function of repair complexes. DNA repair is orchestrated by the interplay of reversible protein-binding events and progressive enzymatic modifications of the chromatin substrate. We demonstrate that faithful recognition of DNA lesions is time consuming, whereas subsequently, repair complexes form rapidly through random and reversible assembly of NER proteins. Our kinetic analysis of the NER system reveals a fundamental conflict between specificity and efficiency of chromatin-associated protein machineries and shows how a trade off is negotiated through reversibility of protein binding. PMID:20439997

  9. Stochastic and reversible assembly of a multiprotein DNA repair complex ensures accurate target site recognition and efficient repair.

    PubMed

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; von Bornstaedt, Gesa; Gourdin, Audrey M; Politi, Antonio Z; Moné, Martijn J; Warmerdam, Daniël O; Goedhart, Joachim; Vermeulen, Wim; van Driel, Roel; Höfer, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    To understand how multiprotein complexes assemble and function on chromatin, we combined quantitative analysis of the mammalian nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER) machinery in living cells with computational modeling. We found that individual NER components exchange within tens of seconds between the bound state in repair complexes and the diffusive state in the nucleoplasm, whereas their net accumulation at repair sites evolves over several hours. Based on these in vivo data, we developed a predictive kinetic model for the assembly and function of repair complexes. DNA repair is orchestrated by the interplay of reversible protein-binding events and progressive enzymatic modifications of the chromatin substrate. We demonstrate that faithful recognition of DNA lesions is time consuming, whereas subsequently, repair complexes form rapidly through random and reversible assembly of NER proteins. Our kinetic analysis of the NER system reveals a fundamental conflict between specificity and efficiency of chromatin-associated protein machineries and shows how a trade off is negotiated through reversibility of protein binding. PMID:20439997

  10. The RSC and INO80 chromatin-remodeling complexes in DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Anna L; Downs, Jessica A

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into chromatin and is therefore relatively inaccessible to DNA repair enzymes. In order to perform efficient DNA repair, ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes are required to alter the chromatin structure near the site of damage to facilitate processing and allow access to repair enzymes. Two of the best-studied remodeling complexes involved in repair are RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) and INO80 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which are both conserved in higher eukaryotes. RSC is very rapidly recruited to breaks and mobilizes nucleosomes to promote phosphorylation of H2A S129 and resection. INO80 enrichment at a break occurs later and is dependent on phospho-S129 H2A. INO80 activity at the break site also facilitates resection. Consequently, both homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining are defective in rsc mutants, while subsets of these repair pathways are affected in ino80 mutants.

  11. How to Relate Complex DNA Repair Genotypes to Pathway Function and, Ultimately, Health Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, IM

    2002-01-09

    of this pilot project was to obtain preliminary data on genetic variation in DNA repair function in human cells that might encourage our efforts to establish a research program to relate DNA repair function to complex DNA repair genotype and ultimately to cancer risk of radiation exposure.

  12. Characterization of DNA binding and pairing activities associated with the native SFPQ•NONO DNA repair protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Durga; Dynan, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks. We have previously shown that a complex of SFPQ (PSF) and NONO (p54nrb) cooperates with Ku protein at an early step of NHEJ, forming a committed preligation complex and stimulating end-joining activity by 10-fold or more. SFPQ and NONO show no resemblance to other repair factors, and their mechanism of action is uncertain. Here, we use an optimized microwell-based assay to characterize the in vitro DNA binding behavior of the native SFPQ•NONO complex purified from human (HeLa) cells. SFPQ•NONO and Ku protein bind independently to DNA, with little evidence of cooperativity and only slight mutual interference at high concentration. Whereas Ku protein requires free DNA ends for binding, SFPQ•NONO does not. Both Ku and SFPQ•NONO have pairing activity, as measured by the ability of DNA-bound protein to capture a second DNA fragment in a microwell-based assay. Additionally, SFPQ•NONO stimulates DNA-dependent protein kinase autophosphorylation, consistent with the ability to promote formation of a synaptic complex formation without occluding the DNA termini proper. These findings suggest that SFPQ•NONO promotes end joining by binding to internal DNA sequences and cooperating with other repair proteins to stabilize a synaptic pre-ligation complex. PMID:25998385

  13. Sufficient Amounts of Functional HOP2/MND1 Complex Promote Interhomolog DNA Repair but Are Dispensable for Intersister DNA Repair during Meiosis in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Uanschou, Clemens; Ronceret, Arnaud; Von Harder, Mona; De Muyt, Arnaud; Vezon, Daniel; Pereira, Lucie; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Kobayashi, Wataru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Schlögelhofer, Peter; Grelon, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous recombination (HR) is essential to repair programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and a dedicated protein machinery ensures that the homologous chromosome is favored over the nearby sister chromatid as a repair template. The HOMOLOGOUS-PAIRING PROTEIN2/MEIOTIC NUCLEAR DIVISION PROTEIN1 (HOP2/MND1) protein complex has been identified as a crucial factor of meiotic HR in Arabidopsis thaliana, since loss of either MND1 or HOP2 results in failure of DNA repair. We isolated two mutant alleles of HOP2 (hop2-2 and hop2-3) that retained the capacity to repair meiotic DSBs via the sister chromatid but failed to use the homologous chromosome. We show that in these alleles, the recombinases RADIATION SENSITIVE51 (RAD51) and DISRUPTED MEIOTIC cDNA1 (DMC1) are loaded, but only the intersister DNA repair pathway is activated. The hop2-2 phenotype is correlated with a decrease in HOP2/MND1 complex abundance. In hop2-3, a truncated HOP2 protein is produced that retains its ability to bind to DMC1 and DNA but forms less stable complexes with MND1 and fails to efficiently stimulate DMC1-driven D-loop formation. Genetic analyses demonstrated that in the absence of DMC1, HOP2/MND1 is dispensable for RAD51-mediated intersister DNA repair, while in the presence of DMC1, a minimal amount of functional HOP2/MND1 is essential to drive intersister DNA repair. PMID:24363313

  14. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Woo; Xu, Guozhou; Persky, Nicole S.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Rudge, Derek G.; Buzovetsky, Olga; Elledge, Stephen J.; Pavletich, Nikola P.

    2011-08-29

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  15. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    W Joo; G Xu; n Persky; A Smogorzewska; D Rudge; O Buzovetsky; S Elledge; N Pavletich

    2011-12-31

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  16. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear–plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems. PMID:26893456

  17. Architecture of the human XPC DNA repair and stem cell coactivator complex

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Grob, Patricia; Fong, Yick W.; Nogales, Eva; Tjian, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) complex is a versatile factor involved in both nucleotide excision repair and transcriptional coactivation as a critical component of the NANOG, OCT4, and SOX2 pluripotency gene regulatory network. Here we present the structure of the human holo-XPC complex determined by single-particle electron microscopy to reveal a flexible, ear-shaped structure that undergoes localized loss of order upon DNA binding. We also determined the structure of the complete yeast homolog Rad4 holo-complex to find a similar overall architecture to the human complex, consistent with their shared DNA repair functions. Localized differences between these structures reflect an intriguing phylogenetic divergence in transcriptional capabilities that we present here. Having positioned the constituent subunits by tagging and deletion, we propose a model of key interaction interfaces that reveals the structural basis for this difference in functional conservation. Together, our findings establish a framework for understanding the structure-function relationships of the XPC complex in the interplay between transcription and DNA repair. PMID:26627236

  18. The DNA repair complex Ku70/86 modulates Apaf1 expression upon DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    De Zio, D; Bordi, M; Tino, E; Lanzuolo, C; Ferraro, E; Mora, E; Ciccosanti, F; Fimia, G M; Orlando, V; Cecconi, F

    2011-01-01

    Apaf1 is a key regulator of the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, as it activates executioner caspases by forming the apoptotic machinery apoptosome. Its genetic regulation and its post-translational modification are crucial under the various conditions where apoptosis occurs. Here we describe Ku70/86, a mediator of non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA repair, as a novel regulator of Apaf1 transcription. Through analysing different Apaf1 promoter mutants, we identified an element repressing the Apaf1 promoter. We demonstrated that Ku70/86 is a nuclear factor able to bind this repressing element and downregulating Apaf1 transcription. We also found that Ku70/86 interaction with Apaf1 promoter is dynamically modulated upon DNA damage. The effect of this binding is a downregulation of Apaf1 expression immediately following the damage to DNA; conversely, we observed Apaf1 upregulation and apoptosis activation when Ku70/86 unleashes the Apaf1-repressing element. Therefore, besides regulating DNA repair, our results suggest that Ku70/86 binds to the Apaf1 promoter and represses its activity. This may help to inhibit the apoptosome pathway of cell death and contribute to regulate cell survival. PMID:20966962

  19. Structural insights into the functions of the FANCM-FAAP24 complex in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Zhang, Tianlong; Tao, Ye; Wang, Fang; Tong, Liang; Ding, Jianping

    2013-12-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder associated with deficiencies in the FA complementation group network. FA complementation group M (FANCM) and FA-associated protein 24 kDa (FAAP24) form a stable complex to anchor the FA core complex to chromatin in repairing DNA interstrand crosslinks. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the C-terminal segment of FANCM in complex with FAAP24. The C-terminal segment of FANCM and FAAP24 both consist of a nuclease domain at the N-terminus and a tandem helix-hairpin-helix (HhH)2 domain at the C-terminus. The FANCM-FAAP24 complex exhibits a similar architecture as that of ApXPF. However, the variations of several key residues and the electrostatic property at the active-site region render a catalytically inactive nuclease domain of FANCM, accounting for the lack of nuclease activity. We also show that the first HhH motif of FAAP24 is a potential binding site for DNA, which plays a critical role in targeting FANCM-FAAP24 to chromatin. These results reveal the mechanistic insights into the functions of FANCM-FAAP24 in DNA repair. PMID:24003026

  20. Quantitative characterization of protein–protein complexes involved in base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Nina A.; Vasil'eva, Inna A.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Antson, Alfred A.; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2015-01-01

    Base Excision Repair (BER) efficiently corrects the most common types of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Step-by-step coordination of BER is facilitated by multiple interactions between enzymes and accessory proteins involved. Here we characterize quantitatively a number of complexes formed by DNA polymerase β (Polβ), apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), using fluorescence- and light scattering-based techniques. Direct physical interactions between the APE1-Polβ, APE1-TDP1, APE1-PARP1 and Polβ-TDP1 pairs have been detected and characterized for the first time. The combined results provide strong evidence that the most stable complex is formed between XRCC1 and Polβ. Model DNA intermediates of BER are shown to induce significant rearrangement of the Polβ complexes with XRCC1 and PARP1, while having no detectable influence on the protein–protein binding affinities. The strength of APE1 interaction with Polβ, XRCC1 and PARP1 is revealed to be modulated by BER intermediates to different extents, depending on the type of DNA damage. The affinity of APE1 for Polβ is higher in the complex with abasic site-containing DNA than after the APE1-catalyzed incision. Our findings advance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying coordination and regulation of the BER process. PMID:26013813

  1. Quantitative characterization of protein-protein complexes involved in base excision DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Moor, Nina A; Vasil'eva, Inna A; Anarbaev, Rashid O; Antson, Alfred A; Lavrik, Olga I

    2015-07-13

    Base Excision Repair (BER) efficiently corrects the most common types of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Step-by-step coordination of BER is facilitated by multiple interactions between enzymes and accessory proteins involved. Here we characterize quantitatively a number of complexes formed by DNA polymerase β (Polβ), apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), using fluorescence- and light scattering-based techniques. Direct physical interactions between the APE1-Polβ, APE1-TDP1, APE1-PARP1 and Polβ-TDP1 pairs have been detected and characterized for the first time. The combined results provide strong evidence that the most stable complex is formed between XRCC1 and Polβ. Model DNA intermediates of BER are shown to induce significant rearrangement of the Polβ complexes with XRCC1 and PARP1, while having no detectable influence on the protein-protein binding affinities. The strength of APE1 interaction with Polβ, XRCC1 and PARP1 is revealed to be modulated by BER intermediates to different extents, depending on the type of DNA damage. The affinity of APE1 for Polβ is higher in the complex with abasic site-containing DNA than after the APE1-catalyzed incision. Our findings advance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying coordination and regulation of the BER process.

  2. DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    MARINUS, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair functions to correct replication errors in newly synthesized DNA and to prevent recombination between related, but not identical (homeologous), DNA sequences. The mechanism of mismatch repair is best understood in Escherichia coli and is the main focus of this review. The early genetic studies of mismatch repair are described as a basis for the subsequent biochemical characterization of the system. The effects of mismatch repair on homologous and homeologous recombination are described. The relationship of mismatch repair to cell toxicity induced by various drugs is included. The VSP (Very Short Patch) repair system is described in detail. PMID:26442827

  3. Crystal Structures of DNA-Whirly Complexes and Their Role in Arabidopsis Organelle Genome Repair[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Cappadocia, Laurent; Maréchal, Alexandre; Parent, Jean-Sébastien; Lepage, Étienne; Sygusch, Jurgen; Brisson, Normand

    2010-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks are highly detrimental to all organisms and need to be quickly and accurately repaired. Although several proteins are known to maintain plastid and mitochondrial genome stability in plants, little is known about the mechanisms of DNA repair in these organelles and the roles of specific proteins. Here, using ciprofloxacin as a DNA damaging agent specific to the organelles, we show that plastids and mitochondria can repair DNA double-strand breaks through an error-prone pathway similar to the microhomology-mediated break-induced replication observed in humans, yeast, and bacteria. This pathway is negatively regulated by the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding proteins from the Whirly family, thus indicating that these proteins could contribute to the accurate repair of plant organelle genomes. To understand the role of Whirly proteins in this process, we solved the crystal structures of several Whirly-DNA complexes. These reveal a nonsequence-specific ssDNA binding mechanism in which DNA is stabilized between domains of adjacent subunits and rendered unavailable for duplex formation and/or protein interactions. Our results suggest a model in which the binding of Whirly proteins to ssDNA would favor accurate repair of DNA double-strand breaks over an error-prone microhomology-mediated break-induced replication repair pathway. PMID:20551348

  4. Nuclear compartmentalization of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kalousi, Alkmini; Soutoglou, Evi

    2016-04-01

    The continuous threats on genome integrity by endogenous and exogenous sources have rendered cells competent to overcome these challenges by activating DNA repair pathways. A complex network of proteins and their modifications participate in orchestrated signaling cascades, which are induced in response to DNA damage and may determine the choice of repair pathway. In this review, we summarize recent findings in the field of DNA Double Strand Break repair with regard to the positioning of the break in the highly compartmentalized nucleus. We aim to highlight the importance of chromatin state along with the nuclear position of the DNA lesions on the choice of DNA repair pathway and maintenance of genome integrity. PMID:27266837

  5. Human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Wood, R D; Mitchell, M; Sgouros, J; Lindahl, T

    2001-02-16

    Cellular DNA is subjected to continual attack, both by reactive species inside cells and by environmental agents. Toxic and mutagenic consequences are minimized by distinct pathways of repair, and 130 known human DNA repair genes are described here. Notable features presently include four enzymes that can remove uracil from DNA, seven recombination genes related to RAD51, and many recently discovered DNA polymerases that bypass damage, but only one system to remove the main DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light. More human DNA repair genes will be found by comparison with model organisms and as common folds in three-dimensional protein structures are determined. Modulation of DNA repair should lead to clinical applications including improvement of radiotherapy and treatment with anticancer drugs and an advanced understanding of the cellular aging process. PMID:11181991

  6. Optimality in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Richard, Morgiane; Fryett, Matthew; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian; Grebogi, Celso; Moura, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    DNA within cells is subject to damage from various sources. Organisms have evolved a number of mechanisms to repair DNA damage. The activity of repair enzymes carries its own risk, however, because the repair of two nearby lesions may lead to the breakup of DNA and result in cell death. We propose a mathematical theory of the damage and repair process in the important scenario where lesions are caused in bursts. We use this model to show that there is an optimum level of repair enzymes within cells which optimises the cell's response to damage. This optimal level is explained as the best trade-off between fast repair and a low probability of causing double-stranded breaks. We derive our results analytically and test them using stochastic simulations, and compare our predictions with current biological knowledge. PMID:21945337

  7. Sequential and ordered assembly of a large DNA repair complex on undamaged chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Ziani, Salim; Nagy, Zita; Alekseev, Sergey; Soutoglou, Evi; Egly, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    In nucleotide excision repair (NER), damage recognition by XPC-hHR23b is described as a critical step in the formation of the preincision complex (PInC) further composed of TFIIH, XPA, RPA, XPG, and ERCC1-XPF. To obtain new molecular insights into the assembly of the PInC, we analyzed its formation independently of DNA damage by using the lactose operator/repressor reporter system. We observed a sequential and ordered self-assembly of the PInC operating upon immobilization of individual NER factors on undamaged chromatin and mimicking that functioning on a bona fide NER substrate. We also revealed that the recruitment of the TFIIH subunit TTDA, involved in trichothiodystrophy group A disorder (TTD-A), was key in the completion of the PInC. TTDA recruits XPA through its first 15 amino acids, depleted in some TTD-A patients. More generally, these results show that proteins forming large nuclear complexes can be recruited sequentially on chromatin in the absence of their natural DNA target and with no reciprocity in their recruitment. PMID:25154395

  8. ATM protein is indispensable to repair complex-type DNA double strand breaks induced by high LET heavy ion irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Fujimori, Akira; Anzai, Kazunori; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated) protein responsible for a rare genetic disease with hyperradiosensitivity, is the one of the earliest repair proteins sensing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). ATM is known to phosphorylate DNA repair proteins such as MRN complex (Mre11, Rad50 and NBS1), 53BP1, Artemis, Brca1, gamma-H2AX, and MDC. We studied the interactions between ATM and DNA-PKcs, a crucial NHEJ repair protein, after cells exposure to high and low LET irradiation. Normal human (HFL III, MRC5VA) and AT homozygote (AT2KY, AT5BIVA, AT3BIVA) cells were irradiated with X-rays and high LET radiation (carbon ions: 290MeV/n initial energy at 70 keV/um, and iron ions: 500MeV/n initial energy at 200KeV/um), and several critical end points were examined. AT cells with high LET irradiation showed a significantly higher radiosensitivity when compared with normal cells. The behavior of DNA DSB repair was monitored by immuno-fluorescence techniques using DNA-PKcs (pThr2609, pSer2056) and ATM (pSer1981) antibodies. In normal cells, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs was clearly detected after high LET irradiation, though the peak of phosphorylation was delayed when compared to X-irradiation. In contrast, almost no DNA-PKcs phosphorylation foci were detected in AT cells irradiated with high LET radiation. A similar result was also observed in normal cells treated with 10 uM ATM kinase specific inhibitor (KU55933) one hour before irradiation. These data suggest that the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with low LET X-rays is mostly ATM-independent, and the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with high LET radiation seems to require ATM probably due to its complex nature of DSB induced. Our study indicates that high LET heavy ion irradiation which we can observe in the space environment would provide a useful tool to study the fundamental mechanism associated with DNA DSB repair.

  9. Twist-open mechanism of DNA damage recognition by the Rad4/XPC nucleotide excision repair complex.

    PubMed

    Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Chen, Xuejing; Slogoff Sevilla, Phillip; Min, Jung-Hyun; Ansari, Anjum

    2016-04-19

    DNA damage repair starts with the recognition of damaged sites from predominantly normal DNA. In eukaryotes, diverse DNA lesions from environmental sources are recognized by the xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) nucleotide excision repair complex. Studies of Rad4 (radiation-sensitive 4; yeast XPC ortholog) showed that Rad4 "opens" up damaged DNA by inserting a β-hairpin into the duplex and flipping out two damage-containing nucleotide pairs. However, this DNA lesion "opening" is slow (˜5-10 ms) compared with typical submillisecond residence times per base pair site reported for various DNA-binding proteins during 1D diffusion on DNA. To address the mystery as to how Rad4 pauses to recognize lesions during diffusional search, we examine conformational dynamics along the lesion recognition trajectory using temperature-jump spectroscopy. Besides identifying the ˜10-ms step as the rate-limiting bottleneck towards opening specific DNA site, we uncover an earlier ˜100- to 500-μs step that we assign to nonspecific deformation (unwinding/"twisting") of DNA by Rad4. The β-hairpin is not required to unwind or to overcome the bottleneck but is essential for full nucleotide-flipping. We propose that Rad4 recognizes lesions in a step-wise "twist-open" mechanism, in which preliminary twisting represents Rad4 interconverting between search and interrogation modes. Through such conformational switches compatible with rapid diffusion on DNA, Rad4 may stall preferentially at a lesion site, offering time to open DNA. This study represents the first direct observation, to our knowledge, of dynamical DNA distortions during search/interrogation beyond base pair breathing. Submillisecond interrogation with preferential stalling at cognate sites may be common to various DNA-binding proteins. PMID:27035942

  10. Twist-open mechanism of DNA damage recognition by the Rad4/XPC nucleotide excision repair complex

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Chen, Xuejing; Slogoff Sevilla, Phillip; Min, Jung-Hyun; Ansari, Anjum

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage repair starts with the recognition of damaged sites from predominantly normal DNA. In eukaryotes, diverse DNA lesions from environmental sources are recognized by the xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) nucleotide excision repair complex. Studies of Rad4 (radiation-sensitive 4; yeast XPC ortholog) showed that Rad4 “opens” up damaged DNA by inserting a β-hairpin into the duplex and flipping out two damage-containing nucleotide pairs. However, this DNA lesion “opening” is slow (˜5–10 ms) compared with typical submillisecond residence times per base pair site reported for various DNA-binding proteins during 1D diffusion on DNA. To address the mystery as to how Rad4 pauses to recognize lesions during diffusional search, we examine conformational dynamics along the lesion recognition trajectory using temperature-jump spectroscopy. Besides identifying the ˜10-ms step as the rate-limiting bottleneck towards opening specific DNA site, we uncover an earlier ˜100- to 500-μs step that we assign to nonspecific deformation (unwinding/“twisting”) of DNA by Rad4. The β-hairpin is not required to unwind or to overcome the bottleneck but is essential for full nucleotide-flipping. We propose that Rad4 recognizes lesions in a step-wise “twist-open” mechanism, in which preliminary twisting represents Rad4 interconverting between search and interrogation modes. Through such conformational switches compatible with rapid diffusion on DNA, Rad4 may stall preferentially at a lesion site, offering time to open DNA. This study represents the first direct observation, to our knowledge, of dynamical DNA distortions during search/interrogation beyond base pair breathing. Submillisecond interrogation with preferential stalling at cognate sites may be common to various DNA-binding proteins. PMID:27035942

  11. The Slx5-Slx8 Complex Affects Sumoylation of DNA Repair Proteins and Negatively Regulates Recombination▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Rebecca C.; Rahman, Sadia; Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2007-01-01

    Recombination is important for repairing DNA lesions, yet it can also lead to genomic rearrangements. This process must be regulated, and recently, sumoylation-mediated mechanisms were found to inhibit Rad51-dependent recombination. Here, we report that the absence of the Slx5-Slx8 complex, a newly identified player in the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) pathway, led to increased Rad51-dependent and Rad51-independent recombination. The increases were most striking during S phase, suggesting an accumulation of DNA lesions during replication. Consistent with this view, Slx8 protein localized to replication centers. In addition, like SUMO E2 mutants, slx8Δ mutants exhibited clonal lethality, which was due to the overamplification of 2μm, an extrachromosomal plasmid. Interestingly, in both SUMO E2 and slx8Δ mutants, clonal lethality was rescued by deleting genes required for Rad51-independent recombination but not those involved in Rad51-dependent events. These results suggest that sumoylation negatively regulates Rad51-independent recombination, and indeed, the Slx5-Slx8 complex affected the sumoylation of several enzymes involved in early steps of Rad51-independent recombination. We propose that, during replication, the Slx5-Slx8 complex helps prevent DNA lesions that are acted upon by recombination. In addition, the complex inhibits Rad51-independent recombination via modulating the sumoylation of DNA repair proteins. PMID:17591698

  12. [A Nobel Prize for DNA repair].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    This year's Nobel Prize for chemistry recognizes the seminal contributions of three researchers who discovered the existence and the basic mechanisms of DNA repair: base excision repair, mismatch repair, and nucleotide excision repair. They have since been joined by many scientists elucidating diverse aspects of these complex mechanisms that now constitute a thriving research field with many applications, notably for understanding oncogenesis and devising more effective therapies. PMID:26850617

  13. [A Nobel Prize for DNA repair].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    This year's Nobel Prize for chemistry recognizes the seminal contributions of three researchers who discovered the existence and the basic mechanisms of DNA repair: base excision repair, mismatch repair, and nucleotide excision repair. They have since been joined by many scientists elucidating diverse aspects of these complex mechanisms that now constitute a thriving research field with many applications, notably for understanding oncogenesis and devising more effective therapies.

  14. The C-terminal Domain (CTD) of Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL1 Is Required for Forming BERosome Repair Complex with DNA Replication Proteins at the Replicating Genome

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Pavana M.; Dutta, Arijit; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Joy; Adhikari, Sanjay; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Li, Guo-Min; Boldogh, Istvan; Hazra, Tapas K.; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L.

    2015-01-01

    The human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 was recently demonstrated to initiate prereplicative base excision repair (BER) of oxidized bases in the replicating genome, thus preventing mutagenic replication. A significant fraction of NEIL1 in cells is present in large cellular complexes containing DNA replication and other repair proteins, as shown by gel filtration. However, how the interaction of NEIL1 affects its recruitment to the replication site for prereplicative repair was not investigated. Here, we show that NEIL1 binarily interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen clamp loader replication factor C, DNA polymerase δ, and DNA ligase I in the absence of DNA via its non-conserved C-terminal domain (CTD); replication factor C interaction results in ∼8-fold stimulation of NEIL1 activity. Disruption of NEIL1 interactions within the BERosome complex, as observed for a NEIL1 deletion mutant (N311) lacking the CTD, not only inhibits complete BER in vitro but also prevents its chromatin association and reduced recruitment at replication foci in S phase cells. This suggests that the interaction of NEIL1 with replication and other BER proteins is required for efficient repair of the replicating genome. Consistently, the CTD polypeptide acts as a dominant negative inhibitor during in vitro repair, and its ectopic expression sensitizes human cells to reactive oxygen species. We conclude that multiple interactions among BER proteins lead to large complexes, which are critical for efficient BER in mammalian cells, and the CTD interaction could be targeted for enhancing drug/radiation sensitivity of tumor cells. PMID:26134572

  15. RAG2 and XLF/Cernunnos interplay reveals a novel role for the RAG complex in DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Lescale, Chloé; Abramowski, Vincent; Bedora-Faure, Marie; Murigneux, Valentine; Vera, Gabriella; Roth, David B.; Revy, Patrick; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Deriano, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    XRCC4-like factor (XLF) functions in classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ) but is dispensable for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated during V(D)J recombination. A long-standing hypothesis proposes that, in addition to its canonical nuclease activity, the RAG1/2 proteins participate in the DNA repair phase of V(D)J recombination. Here we show that in the context of RAG2 lacking the C-terminus domain (Rag2c/c mice), XLF deficiency leads to a profound lymphopenia associated with a severe defect in V(D)J recombination and, in the absence of p53, increased genomic instability at V(D)J sites. In addition, Rag2c/c XLF−/− p53−/− mice develop aggressive pro-B cell lymphomas bearing complex chromosomal translocations and gene amplifications involving Igh and c-myc/pvt1 loci. Our results reveal an unanticipated functional interplay between the RAG complex and XLF in repairing RAG-induced DSBs and maintaining genome integrity during antigen receptor gene assembly. PMID:26833222

  16. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E protein (XPE/DDB2): purification of various complexes of XPE and analyses of their damaged DNA binding and putative DNA repair properties.

    PubMed

    Kulaksiz, Gülnihal; Reardon, Joyce T; Sancar, Aziz

    2005-11-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum is characterized by increased sensitivity of the affected individuals to sunlight and light-induced skin cancers and, in some cases, to neurological abnormalities. The disease is caused by a mutation in genes XPA through XPG and the XP variant (XPV) gene. The proteins encoded by the XPA, -B, -C, -D, -F, and -G genes are required for nucleotide excision repair, and the XPV gene encodes DNA polymerase eta, which carries out translesion DNA synthesis. In contrast, the mechanism by which the XPE gene product prevents sunlight-induced cancers is not known. The gene (XPE/DDB2) encodes the small subunit of a heterodimeric DNA binding protein with high affinity to UV-damaged DNA (UV-damaged DNA binding protein [UV-DDB]). The DDB2 protein exists in at least four forms in the cell: monomeric DDB2, DDB1-DDB2 heterodimer (UV-DDB), and as a protein associated with both the Cullin 4A (CUL4A) complex and the COP9 signalosome. To better define the role of DDB2 in the cellular response to DNA damage, we purified all four forms of DDB2 and analyzed their DNA binding properties and their effects on mammalian nucleotide excision repair. We find that DDB2 has an intrinsic damaged DNA binding activity and that under our assay conditions neither DDB2 nor complexes that contain DDB2 (UV-DDB, CUL4A, and COP9) participate in nucleotide excision repair carried out by the six-factor human excision nuclease. PMID:16260596

  17. Role of intercalation and redox potential in DNA photosensitization by ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes: assessment using DNA repair protein tests.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, Etienne; Souchard, Jean-Pierre; Magnusson, Fay; Chemaly, Jad; Calsou, Patrick; Vicendo, Patricia

    2013-08-01

    Here we report that the photoreactivity of ruthenium(II) complexes with nucleobases may not only be modulated by their photoredox properties but also by their DNA binding mode. The damage resulting from photolysis of synthetic oligonucleotides and plasmid DNA by [Ru(bpz)3](2+), [Ru(bipy)3](2+) and the two DNA intercalating agents [Ru(bpz)2dppz](2+) and [Ru(bipy)2dppz](2+) has been monitored by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by tests using proteins involved in DNA repair processes (DNA-PKCs, Ku80, Ku70, and PARP-1). The data show that intercalation controls the nature of the DNA damage photo-induced by ruthenium(II) complexes reacting with DNA via an electron transfer process. The intercalating agent [Ru(bpz)2dppz](2+) is a powerful DNA breaker inducing the formation of both single and double (DSBs) strand breaks which are recognized by the PARP-1 and DNA-PKCs proteins respectively. [Ru(bpz)2dppz](2+) is the first ruthenium(II) complex described in the literature that is able to induce DSBs by an electron transfer process. In contrast, its non-intercalating parent compound, [Ru(bpz)3](2+), is mostly an efficient DNA alkylating agent. Photoadducts are recognized by the proteins Ku70 and Ku80 as with cisplatin adducts. This result suggests that photoaddition of [Ru(bpz)2dppz](2+) is strongly affected by its DNA intercalation whereas its photonuclease activity is exalted. The data clearly show that DNA intercalation decreases drastically the photonuclease activity of ruthenium(II) complexes oxidizing guanine via the production of singlet oxygen. Interestingly, the DNA sequencing data revealed that the ligand dipyridophenazine exhibits on single-stranded oligonucleotides a preference for the 5'-TGCGT-3' sequence. Moreover the use of proteins involved in DNA repair processes to detect DNA damage was a powerful tool to examine the photoreactivity of ruthenium(II) complexes with nucleic acids. PMID:23835850

  18. Binding of mismatch repair protein MutS to mispaired DNA adducts of intercalating ruthenium(II) arene complexes.

    PubMed

    Castellano-Castillo, Maria; Kostrhunova, Hana; Marini, Victoria; Kasparkova, Jana; Sadler, Peter J; Malinge, Jean-Marc; Brabec, Viktor

    2008-08-01

    The present study was performed to examine the affinity of Escherichia coli mismatch repair (MMR) protein MutS for DNA damaged by an intercalating compound. We examined the binding properties of this protein with various DNA substrates containing a single centrally located adduct of ruthenium(II) arene complexes [(eta(6)-arene)Ru(II)(en)Cl][PF(6)] [arene is tetrahydroanthracene (THA) or p-cymene (CYM); en is ethylenediamine]. These two complexes were chosen as representatives of two different classes of monofunctional ruthenium(II) arene compounds which differ in DNA-binding modes: one that involves combined coordination to G N7 along with noncovalent, hydrophobic interactions, such as partial arene intercalation (tricyclic-ring Ru-THA), and the other that binds to DNA only via coordination to G N7 and does not interact with double-helical DNA by intercalation (monoring Ru-CYM). Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we examined the binding properties of MutS protein with various DNA duplexes (homoduplexes or mismatched duplexes) containing a single centrally located adduct of ruthenium(II) arene compounds. We have shown that presence of the ruthenium(II) arene adducts decreases the affinity of MutS for ruthenated DNA duplexes that either have a regular sequence or contain a mismatch and that intercalation of the arene contributes considerably to this inhibitory effect. Since MutS initiates MMR by recognizing DNA lesions, the results of the present work support the view that DNA damage due to intercalation is removed from DNA by a mechanism(s) other than MMR.

  19. GTF2E2 Mutations Destabilize the General Transcription Factor Complex TFIIE in Individuals with DNA Repair-Proficient Trichothiodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kuschal, Christiane; Botta, Elena; Orioli, Donata; Digiovanna, John J; Seneca, Sara; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Tamura, Deborah; Heller, Elizabeth; Khan, Sikandar G; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Lanzafame, Manuela; Nardo, Tiziana; Ricotti, Roberta; Peverali, Fiorenzo A; Stephens, Robert; Zhao, Yongmei; Lehmann, Alan R; Baranello, Laura; Levens, David; Kraemer, Kenneth H; Stefanini, Miria

    2016-04-01

    The general transcription factor IIE (TFIIE) is essential for transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) via direct interaction with the basal transcription/DNA repair factor IIH (TFIIH). TFIIH harbors mutations in two rare genetic disorders, the cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and the cancer-free, multisystem developmental disorder trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The phenotypic complexity resulting from mutations affecting TFIIH has been attributed to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect as well as to impaired transcription. Here, we report two unrelated children showing clinical features typical of TTD who harbor different homozygous missense mutations in GTF2E2 (c.448G>C [p.Ala150Pro] and c.559G>T [p.Asp187Tyr]) encoding the beta subunit of transcription factor IIE (TFIIEβ). Repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage was normal in the GTF2E2 mutated cells, indicating that TFIIE was not involved in NER. We found decreased protein levels of the two TFIIE subunits (TFIIEα and TFIIEβ) as well as decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα in cells from both children. Interestingly, decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα was also seen in TTD cells with mutations in ERCC2, which encodes the XPD subunit of TFIIH, but not in XP cells with ERCC2 mutations. Our findings support the theory that TTD is caused by transcriptional impairments that are distinct from the NER disorder XP. PMID:26996949

  20. GTF2E2 Mutations Destabilize the General Transcription Factor Complex TFIIE in Individuals with DNA Repair-Proficient Trichothiodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kuschal, Christiane; Botta, Elena; Orioli, Donata; Digiovanna, John J; Seneca, Sara; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Tamura, Deborah; Heller, Elizabeth; Khan, Sikandar G; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Lanzafame, Manuela; Nardo, Tiziana; Ricotti, Roberta; Peverali, Fiorenzo A; Stephens, Robert; Zhao, Yongmei; Lehmann, Alan R; Baranello, Laura; Levens, David; Kraemer, Kenneth H; Stefanini, Miria

    2016-04-01

    The general transcription factor IIE (TFIIE) is essential for transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) via direct interaction with the basal transcription/DNA repair factor IIH (TFIIH). TFIIH harbors mutations in two rare genetic disorders, the cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and the cancer-free, multisystem developmental disorder trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The phenotypic complexity resulting from mutations affecting TFIIH has been attributed to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect as well as to impaired transcription. Here, we report two unrelated children showing clinical features typical of TTD who harbor different homozygous missense mutations in GTF2E2 (c.448G>C [p.Ala150Pro] and c.559G>T [p.Asp187Tyr]) encoding the beta subunit of transcription factor IIE (TFIIEβ). Repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage was normal in the GTF2E2 mutated cells, indicating that TFIIE was not involved in NER. We found decreased protein levels of the two TFIIE subunits (TFIIEα and TFIIEβ) as well as decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα in cells from both children. Interestingly, decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα was also seen in TTD cells with mutations in ERCC2, which encodes the XPD subunit of TFIIH, but not in XP cells with ERCC2 mutations. Our findings support the theory that TTD is caused by transcriptional impairments that are distinct from the NER disorder XP.

  1. GTF2E2 Mutations Destabilize the General Transcription Factor Complex TFIIE in Individuals with DNA Repair-Proficient Trichothiodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kuschal, Christiane; Botta, Elena; Orioli, Donata; Digiovanna, John J.; Seneca, Sara; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Tamura, Deborah; Heller, Elizabeth; Khan, Sikandar G.; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Lanzafame, Manuela; Nardo, Tiziana; Ricotti, Roberta; Peverali, Fiorenzo A.; Stephens, Robert; Zhao, Yongmei; Lehmann, Alan R.; Baranello, Laura; Levens, David; Kraemer, Kenneth H.; Stefanini, Miria

    2016-01-01

    The general transcription factor IIE (TFIIE) is essential for transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) via direct interaction with the basal transcription/DNA repair factor IIH (TFIIH). TFIIH harbors mutations in two rare genetic disorders, the cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and the cancer-free, multisystem developmental disorder trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The phenotypic complexity resulting from mutations affecting TFIIH has been attributed to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect as well as to impaired transcription. Here, we report two unrelated children showing clinical features typical of TTD who harbor different homozygous missense mutations in GTF2E2 (c.448G>C [p.Ala150Pro] and c.559G>T [p.Asp187Tyr]) encoding the beta subunit of transcription factor IIE (TFIIEβ). Repair of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage was normal in the GTF2E2 mutated cells, indicating that TFIIE was not involved in NER. We found decreased protein levels of the two TFIIE subunits (TFIIEα and TFIIEβ) as well as decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα in cells from both children. Interestingly, decreased phosphorylation of TFIIEα was also seen in TTD cells with mutations in ERCC2, which encodes the XPD subunit of TFIIH, but not in XP cells with ERCC2 mutations. Our findings support the theory that TTD is caused by transcriptional impairments that are distinct from the NER disorder XP. PMID:26996949

  2. Role for the Mammalian Swi5-Sfr1 Complex in DNA Strand Break Repair through Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Yufuko; Jasin, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In fission yeast, the Swi5-Sfr1 complex plays an important role in homologous recombination (HR), a pathway crucial for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here we identify and characterize mammalian Swi5 and Sfr1 homologues. Mouse Swi5 and Sfr1 are nuclear proteins that form a complex in vivo and in vitro. Swi5 interacts in vitro with Rad51, the DNA strand-exchange protein which functions during HR. By generating Swi5−/− and Sfr1−/− embryonic stem cell lines, we found that both proteins are mutually interdependent for their stability. Importantly, the Swi5-Sfr1 complex plays a role in HR when Rad51 function is perturbed in vivo by expression of a BRC peptide from BRCA2. Swi5−/− and Sfr1−/− cells are selectively sensitive to agents that cause DNA strand breaks, in particular ionizing radiation, camptothecin, and the Parp inhibitor olaparib. Consistent with a role in HR, sister chromatid exchange induced by Parp inhibition is attenuated in Swi5−/− and Sfr1−/− cells, and chromosome aberrations are increased. Thus, Swi5-Sfr1 is a newly identified complex required for genomic integrity in mammalian cells with a specific role in the repair of DNA strand breaks. PMID:20976249

  3. Structural biology of disease-associated repetitive DNA sequences and protein-DNA complexes involved in DNA damage and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Santhana Mariappan, S.V.; Chen, X.; Catasti, P.; Silks, L.A. III; Moyzis, R.K.; Bradbury, E.M.; Garcia, A.E.

    1997-07-01

    This project is aimed at formulating the sequence-structure-function correlations of various microsatellites in the human (and other eukaryotic) genomes. Here the authors have been able to develop and apply structure biology tools to understand the following: the molecular mechanism of length polymorphism microsatellites; the molecular mechanism by which the microsatellites in the noncoding regions alter the regulation of the associated gene; and finally, the molecular mechanism by which the expansion of these microsatellites impairs gene expression and causes the disease. Their multidisciplinary structural biology approach is quantitative and can be applied to all coding and noncoding DNA sequences associated with any gene. Both NIH and DOE are interested in developing quantitative tools for understanding the function of various human genes for prevention against diseases caused by genetic and environmental effects.

  4. Structure of p15PAF-PCNA complex and implications for clamp sliding during DNA replication and repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Biasio, Alfredo; de Opakua, Alain Ibáñez; Mortuza, Gulnahar B.; Molina, Rafael; Cordeiro, Tiago N.; Castillo, Francisco; Villate, Maider; Merino, Nekane; Delgado, Sandra; Gil-Cartón, David; Luque, Irene; Diercks, Tammo; Bernadó, Pau; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2015-03-01

    The intrinsically disordered protein p15PAF regulates DNA replication and repair by binding to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) sliding clamp. We present the structure of the human p15PAF-PCNA complex. Crystallography and NMR show the central PCNA-interacting protein motif (PIP-box) of p15PAF tightly bound to the front-face of PCNA. In contrast to other PCNA-interacting proteins, p15PAF also contacts the inside of, and passes through, the PCNA ring. The disordered p15PAF termini emerge at opposite faces of the ring, but remain protected from 20S proteasomal degradation. Both free and PCNA-bound p15PAF binds DNA mainly through its histone-like N-terminal tail, while PCNA does not, and a model of the ternary complex with DNA inside the PCNA ring is consistent with electron micrographs. We propose that p15PAF acts as a flexible drag that regulates PCNA sliding along the DNA and facilitates the switch from replicative to translesion synthesis polymerase binding.

  5. Mutagenic DNA repair in enterobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Sedgwick, S G; Ho, C; Woodgate, R

    1991-01-01

    Sixteen species of enterobacteria have been screened for mutagenic DNA repair activity. In Escherichia coli, mutagenic DNA repair is encoded by the umuDC operon. Synthesis of UmuD and UmuC proteins is induced as part of the SOS response to DNA damage, and after induction, the UmuD protein undergoes an autocatalytic cleavage to produce the carboxy-terminal UmuD' fragment needed for induced mutagenesis. The presence of a similar system in other species was examined by using a combined approach of inducible-mutagenesis assays, cross-reactivity to E. coli UmuD and UmuD' antibodies to test for induction and cleavage of UmuD-like proteins, and hybridization with E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium umu DNA probes to map umu-like genes. The results indicate a more widespread distribution of mutagenic DNA repair in other species than was previously thought. They also show that umu loci can be more complex in other species than in E. coli. Differences in UV-induced mutability of more than 200-fold were seen between different species of enteric bacteria and even between multiple natural isolates of E. coli, and yet some of the species which display a poorly mutable phenotype still have umu-like genes and proteins. It is suggested that umDC genes can be curtailed in their mutagenic activities but that they may still participate in some other, unknown process which provides the continued stimulus for their retention. Images PMID:1885540

  6. A DNA Repair Complex Functions as an Oct4/Sox2 Coactivator in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Yick W.; Inouye, Carla; Yamaguchi, Teppei; Cattoglio, Claudia; Grubisic, Ivan; Tjian, Robert

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The transcriptional activators Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog cooperate with a wide array of cofactors to orchestrate an embryonic stem (ES) cell-specific gene expression program that forms the molecular basis of pluripotency. Here we report using an unbiased in vitro transcription-biochemical complementation assay to discover a multi-subunit stem cell coactivator complex (SCC) that is selectively required for the synergistic activation of the Nanog gene by Oct4 and Sox2. Purification, identification and reconstitution of SCC revealed this coactivator to be the trimeric XPC-nucleotide excision repair complex. SCC interacts directly with Oct4 and Sox2 and is recruited to the Nanog and Oct4 promoters as well as a majority of genomic regions that are occupied by Oct4 and Sox2. Depletion of SCC/XPC compromised both pluripotency in ES cells and somatic cell reprogramming of fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This study identifies a transcriptional coactivator with diversified functions in maintaining ES cell pluripotency and safeguarding genome integrity. PMID:21962512

  7. DNA repair in cultured keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.C.; Parsons, S.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1983-07-01

    Most of our understanding of DNA repair mechanisms in human cells has come from the study of these processes in cultured fibroblasts. The unique properties of keratinocytes and their pattern of terminal differentiation led us to a comparative examination of their DNA repair properties. The relative repair capabilities of the basal cells and the differentiated epidermal keratinocytes as well as possible correlations of DNA repair capacity with respect to age of the donor have been examined. In addition, since portions of human skin are chronically exposed to sunlight, the repair response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (254 nm) when the cells are conditioned by chronic low-level UV irradiation has been assessed. The comparative studies of DNA repair in keratinocytes from infant and aged donors have revealed no significant age-related differences for repair of UV-induced damage to DNA. Sublethal UV conditioning of cells from infant skin had no appreciable effect on either the repair or normal replication response to higher, challenge doses of UVL. However, such conditioning resulted in attenuated repair in keratinocytes from adult skin after UV doses above 25 J/m2. In addition, a surprising enhancement in replication was seen in conditioned cells from adult following challenge UV doses.

  8. DNA Damage and Repair in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Painter, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Damage in DNA after irradiation can be classified into five kinds: base damage, single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, DNA–DNA cross-linking, and DNA-protein cross-linking. Of these, repair of base damage is the best understood. In eukaryotes, at least three repair systems are known that can deal with base damage: photoreactivation, excision repair, and post-replication repair. Photoreactivation is specific for UV-induced damage and occurs widely throughout the biosphere, although it seems to be absent from placental mammals. Excision repair is present in prokaryotes and in animals but does not seem to be present in plants. Post-replication repair is poorly understood. Recent reports indicate that growing points in mammalian DNA simply skip past UV-induced lesions, leaving gaps in newly made DNA that are subsequently filled in by de novo synthesis. Evidence that this concept is oversimplified or incorrect is presented.—Single-strand breaks are induced by ionizing radiation but most cells can rapidly repair most or all of them, even after supralethal doses. The chemistry of the fragments formed when breaks are induced by ionizing radiation is complex and poorly understood. Therefore, the intermediate steps in the repair of single-strand breaks are unknown. Double-strand breaks and the two kinds of cross-linking have been studied very little and almost nothing is known about their mechanisms for repair.—The role of mammalian DNA repair in mutations is not known. Although there is evidence that defective repair can lead to cancer and/or premature aging in humans, the relationship between the molecular defects and the diseased state remains obscure. PMID:4442699

  9. DNA repair in cultured keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, S C; Parsons, S; Hanawalt, P C

    1983-07-01

    Most of our understanding of DNA repair mechanisms in human cells has come from the study of these processes in cultured fibroblasts. The unique properties of keratinocytes and their pattern of terminal differentiation led us to a comparative examination of their DNA repair properties. We have examined the relative repair capabilities of the basal cells and the differentiated epidermal keratinocytes as well as possible correlations of DNA repair capacity with respect to age of the donor. In addition, since portions of human skin are chronically exposed to sunlight, we have assessed the repair response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (254 nm) when the cells are conditioned by chronic low-level UV irradiation. The methods of Liu and Karasek were used to grow pure keratinocytes on collagen gels following their isolation from abdominal skin of newborns and adults at autopsy. Density labeling with 5-bromodeoxyuridine was used to resolve repair replication from the semiconservative mode. We found similar repair characteristics in human epidermal keratinocytes to those previously reported for cultured fibroblasts. However, the DNA repair response in basal cells was much greater than that in differentiated cells from the same skin preparation. Our comparative studies of DNA repair in keratinocytes from infant and aged donors have revealed no significant age-related differences for repair of UV-induced damage to DNA. Sublethal UV conditioning of cells from infant skin had no appreciable effect on either the repair or normal replication response to higher, challenge doses of UVL. However, such conditioning resulted in attenuated repair in keratinocytes from adult skin after UV doses above 25 J/m2. In addition, a surprising enhancement in replication was seen in conditioned cells from adult following challenge UV doses.

  10. DNA repair meets the RNA world.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chow H

    2014-02-01

    The ability to repair damaged DNA and to maintain genome stability is the utmost importance for the survival of any species. Hence, it is not surprising to find that DNA repair mechanisms are evolutionarily conserved and are expected to evolve to maintain the existence of species. In the last few years, there has been an exponential increase in the evidence linking RNA processing with DNA repair programs. For instance, the well-studied DNA base excision repair (BER) enzyme apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 can cleave RNA molecules, regulate mRNA levels, and associate physically with proteins involved in RNA processing. It is now clear that not only the expression of noncoding RNAs are changed upon DNA damage, they can modulate the expression of genes involved in the genome stability programs. The five reviews in this Forum provide the up-to-date knowledge on DNA repair, with a focus on BER, and a perspective on how the two ancient biochemical pathways are linked. The contributions demonstrate the complexity of such interactions, but also pointed out the opportunities for new therapeutic interventions. Future in vivo studies on the link between DNA repair processes and RNA metabolism should contribute to our basic understanding of physiology, disease, and treatment strategies.

  11. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  12. DNA repair in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA repair is essential for the maintenance of genome stability in all living beings. Genome size as well as the repertoire and abundance of DNA repair components may vary among prokaryotic species. The bacteria of the Mollicutes class feature a small genome size, absence of a cell wall, and a parasitic lifestyle. A small number of genes make Mollicutes a good model for a “minimal cell” concept. Results In this work we studied the DNA repair system of Mycoplasma gallisepticum on genomic, transcriptional, and proteomic levels. We detected 18 out of 22 members of the DNA repair system on a protein level. We found that abundance of the respective mRNAs is less than one per cell. We studied transcriptional response of DNA repair genes of M. gallisepticum at stress conditions including heat, osmotic, peroxide stresses, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin treatment, stationary phase and heat stress in stationary phase. Conclusions Based on comparative genomic study, we determined that the DNA repair system M. gallisepticum includes a sufficient set of proteins to provide a cell with functional nucleotide and base excision repair and mismatch repair. We identified SOS-response in M. gallisepticum on ciprofloxacin, which is a known SOS-inducer, tetracycline and heat stress in the absence of established regulators. Heat stress was found to be the strongest SOS-inducer. We found that upon transition to stationary phase of culture growth transcription of DNA repair genes decreases dramatically. Heat stress does not induce SOS-response in a stationary phase. PMID:24148612

  13. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  14. Energy and Technology Review: Unlocking the mysteries of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.A.

    1993-04-01

    DNA, the genetic blueprint, has the remarkable property of encoding its own repair following diverse types of structural damage induced by external agents or normal metabolism. We are studying the interplay of DNA damaging agents, repair genes, and their protein products to decipher the complex biochemical pathways that mediate such repair. Our research focuses on repair processes that correct DNA damage produced by chemical mutagens and radiation, both ionizing and ultraviolet. The most important type of DNA repair in human cells is called excision repair. This multistep process removes damaged or inappropriate pieces of DNA -- often as a string of 29 nucleotides containing the damage -- and replaces them with intact ones. We have isolated, cloned, and mapped several human repair genes associated with the nucleotide excision repair pathway and involved in the repair of DNA damage after exposure to ultraviolet light or mutagens in cooked food. We have shown that a defect in one of these repair genes, ERCC2, is responsible for the repair deficiency in one of the groups of patients with the recessive genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP group D). We are exploring ways to purify sufficient quantities (milligrams) of the protein products of these and other repair genes so that we can understand their functions. Our long-term goals are to link defective repair proteins to human DNA repair disorders that predispose to cancer, and to produce DNA-repair-deficient mice that can serve as models for the human disorders.

  15. Repair pathways independent of the Fanconi anemia nuclear core complex play a predominant role in mitigating formaldehyde-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Taichi; Takahashi, Akihisa; Kondo, Natsuko; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Ohnishi, Ken; Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z.; Thompson, Larry H.; Helleday, Thomas; Asada, Hideo; and others

    2011-01-07

    The role of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway for DNA damage induced by formaldehyde was examined in the work described here. The following cell types were used: mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-}, FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-}, FANCD2{sup -/-} and their parental cells, the Chinese hamster cell lines FANCD1 mutant (mt), FANCGmt, their revertant cells, and the corresponding wild-type (wt) cells. Cell survival rates were determined with colony formation assays after formaldehyde treatment. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected with an immunocytochemical {gamma}H2AX-staining assay. Although the sensitivity of FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-} and FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-} cells to formaldehyde was comparable to that of proficient cells, FANCD1mt, FANCGmt and FANCD2{sup -/-} cells were more sensitive to formaldehyde than the corresponding proficient cells. It was found that homologous recombination (HR) repair was induced by formaldehyde. In addition, {gamma}H2AX foci in FANCD1mt cells persisted for longer times than in FANCD1wt cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde-induced DSBs are repaired by HR through the FA repair pathway which is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. -- Research highlights: {yields} We examined to clarify the repair pathways of formaldehyde-induced DNA damage. Formaldehyde induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). {yields} DSBs are repaired through the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway. {yields} This pathway is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. {yields} We also found that homologous recombination repair was induced by formaldehyde.

  16. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-09-18

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span.

  17. Recruitment Kinetics of DNA Repair Proteins Mdc1 and Rad52 but Not 53BP1 Depend on Damage Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Hable, Volker; Drexler, Guido A.; Brüning, Tino; Burgdorf, Christian; Greubel, Christoph; Derer, Anja; Seel, Judith; Strickfaden, Hilmar; Cremer, Thomas; Friedl, Anna A.; Dollinger, Günther

    2012-01-01

    The recruitment kinetics of double-strand break (DSB) signaling and repair proteins Mdc1, 53BP1 and Rad52 into radiation-induced foci was studied by live-cell fluorescence microscopy after ion microirradiation. To investigate the influence of damage density and complexity on recruitment kinetics, which cannot be done by UV laser irradiation used in former studies, we utilized 43 MeV carbon ions with high linear energy transfer per ion (LET = 370 keV/µm) to create a large fraction of clustered DSBs, thus forming complex DNA damage, and 20 MeV protons with low LET (LET  = 2.6 keV/µm) to create mainly isolated DSBs. Kinetics for all three proteins was characterized by a time lag period T0 after irradiation, during which no foci are formed. Subsequently, the proteins accumulate into foci with characteristic mean recruitment times τ1. Mdc1 accumulates faster (T0 = 17±2 s, τ1 = 98±11 s) than 53BP1 (T0 = 77±7 s, τ1 = 310±60 s) after high LET irradiation. However, recruitment of Mdc1 slows down (T0 = 73±16 s, τ1 = 1050±270 s) after low LET irradiation. The recruitment kinetics of Rad52 is slower than that of Mdc1, but exhibits the same dependence on LET. In contrast, the mean recruitment time τ1 of 53BP1 remains almost constant when varying LET. Comparison to literature data on Mdc1 recruitment after UV laser irradiation shows that this rather resembles recruitment after high than low LET ionizing radiation. So this work shows that damage quality has a large influence on repair processes and has to be considered when comparing different studies. PMID:22860035

  18. Envisioning the dynamics and flexibility of Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 complex to decipher its roles in DNA replication and repair

    PubMed Central

    Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Williams, Gareth J.

    2015-01-01

    The Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex is a dynamic macromolecular machine that acts in the first steps of DNA double strand break repair, and each of its components has intrinsic dynamics and flexibility properties that are directly linked with their functions. As a result, deciphering the functional structural biology of the MRN complex is driving novel and integrated technologies to define the dynamic structural biology of protein machinery interacting with DNA. Rad50 promotes dramatic long-range allostery through its coiled-coil and zinc-hook domains. Its ATPase activity drives dynamic transitions between monomeric and dimeric forms that can be modulated with mutants modifying the ATPase rate to control end joining versus resection activities. The biological functions of Mre11’s dual endo- and exonuclease activities in repair pathway choice were enigmatic until recently, when they were unveiled by the development of specific nuclease inhibitors. Mre11 dimer flexibility, which may be regulated in cells to control MRN function, suggests new inhibitor design strategies for cancer intervention. Nbs1 has FHA and BRCT domains to bind multiple interaction partners that further regulate MRN. One of them, CtIP, modulates the Mre11 excision activity for homologous recombination repair. Overall, these combined properties suggest novel therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, they collectively help to explain how MRN regulates DNA repair pathway choice with implications for improving the design and analysis of cancer clinical trials that employ DNA damaging agents or target the DNA damage response. PMID:25576492

  19. DNA repair in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Fábio Teixeira; Carvalho, Fabíola Marques de; Bezerra e Silva, Uaska; Scortecci, Kátia Castanho; Blaha, Carlos Alfredo Galindo; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella; Batistuzzo de Medeiros, Silvia Regina

    2004-03-31

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a Gram-negative beta-proteobacterium that inhabits a variety of ecosystems in tropical and subtropical regions, including the water and banks of the Negro River in the Brazilian Amazon. This bacterium has been the subject of extensive study over the last three decades, due to its biotechnological properties, including the characteristic violacein pigment, which has antimicrobial and anti-tumoral activities. C. violaceum promotes the solubilization of gold in a mercury-free process, and has been used in the synthesis of homopolyesters suitable for the production of biodegradable polymers. The complete genome sequence of this organism has been completed by the Brazilian National Genome Project Consortium. The aim of our group was to study the DNA repair genes in this organism, due to their importance in the maintenance of genomic integrity. We identified DNA repair genes involved in different pathways in C. violaceum through a similarity search against known sequences deposited in databases. The phylogenetic analyses were done using programs of the PHILYP package. This analysis revealed various metabolic pathways, including photoreactivation, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, recombinational repair, and the SOS system. The similarity between the C. violaceum sequences and those of Neisserie miningitidis and Ralstonia solanacearum was greater than that between the C. violaceum and Escherichia coli sequences. The peculiarities found in the C. violaceum genome were the absence of LexA, some horizontal transfer events and a large number of repair genes involved with alkyl and oxidative DNA damage.

  20. Functional and mechanistic studies of XPC DNA-repair complex as transcriptional coactivator in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cattoglio, Claudia; Zhang, Elisa T.; Grubisic, Ivan; Chiba, Kunitoshi; Fong, Yick W.; Tjian, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic stem cell (ESC) state is transcriptionally controlled by OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG with cofactors, chromatin regulators, noncoding RNAs, and other effectors of signaling pathways. Uncovering components of these regulatory circuits and their interplay provides the knowledge base to deploy ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells. We recently identified the DNA-repair complex xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC)-RAD23B-CETN2 as a stem cell coactivator (SCC) required for OCT4/SOX2 transcriptional activation. Here we investigate the role of SCC genome-wide in murine ESCs by mapping regions bound by RAD23B and analyzing transcriptional profiles of SCC-depleted ESCs. We establish OCT4 and SOX2 as the primary transcription factors recruiting SCC to regulatory regions of pluripotency genes and identify the XPC subunit as essential for interaction with the two proteins. The present study reveals new mechanistic and functional aspects of SCC transcriptional activity, and thus underscores the diversified functions of this regulatory complex. PMID:25901318

  1. Functional and mechanistic studies of XPC DNA-repair complex as transcriptional coactivator in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cattoglio, Claudia; Zhang, Elisa T; Grubisic, Ivan; Chiba, Kunitoshi; Fong, Yick W; Tjian, Robert

    2015-05-01

    The embryonic stem cell (ESC) state is transcriptionally controlled by OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG with cofactors, chromatin regulators, noncoding RNAs, and other effectors of signaling pathways. Uncovering components of these regulatory circuits and their interplay provides the knowledge base to deploy ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells. We recently identified the DNA-repair complex xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC)-RAD23B-CETN2 as a stem cell coactivator (SCC) required for OCT4/SOX2 transcriptional activation. Here we investigate the role of SCC genome-wide in murine ESCs by mapping regions bound by RAD23B and analyzing transcriptional profiles of SCC-depleted ESCs. We establish OCT4 and SOX2 as the primary transcription factors recruiting SCC to regulatory regions of pluripotency genes and identify the XPC subunit as essential for interaction with the two proteins. The present study reveals new mechanistic and functional aspects of SCC transcriptional activity, and thus underscores the diversified functions of this regulatory complex.

  2. Challenges and complexities in estimating both the functional impact and the disease risk associated with the extensive genetic variation in human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Mohrenweiser, Harvey W; Wilson, David M; Jones, Irene M

    2003-05-15

    Individual risk and the population incidence of disease result from the interaction of genetic susceptibility and exposure. DNA repair is an example of a cellular process where genetic variation in families with extreme predisposition is documented to be associated with high disease likelihood, including syndromes of premature aging and cancer. Although the identification and characterization of new genes or variants in cancer families continues to be important, the focus of this paper is the current status of efforts to define the impact of polymorphic amino acid substitutions in DNA repair genes on individual and population cancer risk. There is increasing evidence that mild reductions in DNA repair capacity, assumed to be the consequence of common genetic variation, affect cancer predisposition. The extensive variation being found in the coding regions of DNA repair genes and the large number of genes in each of the major repair pathways results in complex genotypes with potential to impact cancer risk in the general population. The implications of this complexity for molecular epidemiology studies, as well as concepts that may make these challenges more manageable, are discussed. The concepts include both experimental and computational approaches that could be employed to develop predictors of disease susceptibility based on DNA repair genotype, focusing initially on studies to assess functional impact on individual proteins and pathways and then on molecular epidemiology studies to assess exposure-dependent health risk. In closing, we raise some of the non-technical challenges to the utilization of the full richness of the genetic variation to reduce disease occurrence and ultimately improve health care. PMID:12714187

  3. Rad54B targeting to DNA double-strand break repair sites requires complex formation with S100A11.

    PubMed

    Murzik, Ulrike; Hemmerich, Peter; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Ulbricht, Tobias; Bussen, Wendy; Hentschel, Julia; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Melle, Christian

    2008-07-01

    S100A11 is involved in a variety of intracellular activities such as growth regulation and differentiation. To gain more insight into the physiological role of endogenously expressed S100A11, we used a proteomic approach to detect and identify interacting proteins in vivo. Hereby, we were able to detect a specific interaction between S100A11 and Rad54B, which could be confirmed under in vivo conditions. Rad54B, a DNA-dependent ATPase, is described to be involved in recombinational repair of DNA damage, including DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Treatment with bleomycin, which induces DSBs, revealed an increase in the degree of colocalization between S100A11 and Rad54B. Furthermore, S100A11/Rad54B foci are spatially associated with sites of DNA DSB repair. Furthermore, while the expression of p21(WAF1/CIP1) was increased in parallel with DNA damage, its protein level was drastically down-regulated in damaged cells after S100A11 knockdown. Down-regulation of S100A11 by RNA interference also abolished Rad54B targeting to DSBs. Additionally, S100A11 down-regulated HaCaT cells showed a restricted proliferation capacity and an increase of the apoptotic cell fraction. These observations suggest that S100A11 targets Rad54B to sites of DNA DSB repair sites and identify a novel function for S100A11 in p21-based regulation of cell cycle. PMID:18463164

  4. Rad54B Targeting to DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Sites Requires Complex Formation with S100A11

    PubMed Central

    Murzik, Ulrike; Hemmerich, Peter; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Ulbricht, Tobias; Bussen, Wendy; Hentschel, Julia; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2008-01-01

    S100A11 is involved in a variety of intracellular activities such as growth regulation and differentiation. To gain more insight into the physiological role of endogenously expressed S100A11, we used a proteomic approach to detect and identify interacting proteins in vivo. Hereby, we were able to detect a specific interaction between S100A11 and Rad54B, which could be confirmed under in vivo conditions. Rad54B, a DNA-dependent ATPase, is described to be involved in recombinational repair of DNA damage, including DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Treatment with bleomycin, which induces DSBs, revealed an increase in the degree of colocalization between S100A11 and Rad54B. Furthermore, S100A11/Rad54B foci are spatially associated with sites of DNA DSB repair. Furthermore, while the expression of p21WAF1/CIP1 was increased in parallel with DNA damage, its protein level was drastically down-regulated in damaged cells after S100A11 knockdown. Down-regulation of S100A11 by RNA interference also abolished Rad54B targeting to DSBs. Additionally, S100A11 down-regulated HaCaT cells showed a restricted proliferation capacity and an increase of the apoptotic cell fraction. These observations suggest that S100A11 targets Rad54B to sites of DNA DSB repair sites and identify a novel function for S100A11 in p21-based regulation of cell cycle. PMID:18463164

  5. Beyond DNA repair: DNA-PK function in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Jonathan F.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a pivotal component of the DNA repair machinery that governs the response to DNA damage, serving to maintain genome integrity. However, the DNA-PK kinase component was initially isolated with transcriptional complexes, and recent findings have illuminated the impact of DNA-PK-mediated transcriptional regulation on tumor progression and therapeutic response. DNA-PK expression has also been correlated with poor outcome in selected tumor types, further underscoring the importance of understanding its role in disease. Herein, the molecular and cellular consequence of DNA-PK will be considered, with an eye toward discerning the rationale for therapeutic targeting of DNA-PK. PMID:25168287

  6. The Transcriptional Histone Acetyltransferase Cofactor TRRAP Associates with the MRN Repair Complex and Plays a Role in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Flavie; Hardy, Sara; Nagy, Zita; Baldeyron, Céline; Murr, Rabih; Déry, Ugo; Masson, Jean-Yves; Papadopoulo, Dora; Herceg, Zdenko; Tora, Làszlò

    2006-01-01

    Transactivation-transformation domain-associated protein (TRRAP) is a component of several multiprotein histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes implicated in transcriptional regulation. TRRAP was shown to be required for the mitotic checkpoint and normal cell cycle progression. MRE11, RAD50, and NBS1 (product of the Nijmegan breakage syndrome gene) form the MRN complex that is involved in the detection, signaling, and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By using double immunopurification, mass spectrometry, and gel filtration, we describe the stable association of TRRAP with the MRN complex. The TRRAP-MRN complex is not associated with any detectable HAT activity, while the isolated other TRRAP complexes, containing either GCN5 or TIP60, are. TRRAP-depleted extracts show a reduced nonhomologous DNA end-joining activity in vitro. Importantly, small interfering RNA knockdown of TRRAP in HeLa cells or TRRAP knockout in mouse embryonic stem cells inhibit the DSB end-joining efficiency and the precise nonhomologous end-joining process, further suggesting a functional involvement of TRRAP in the DSB repair processes. Thus, TRRAP may function as a molecular link between DSB signaling, repair, and chromatin remodeling. PMID:16382133

  7. Nonhomologous end joining of complex DNA double-strand breaks with proximal thymine glycol and interplay with base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Almohaini, Mohammed; Chalasani, Sri Lakshmi; Bafail, Duaa; Akopiants, Konstantin; Zhou, Tong; Yannone, Steven M; Ramsden, Dale A; Hartman, Matthew C T; Povirk, Lawrence F

    2016-05-01

    DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation are often accompanied by ancillary oxidative base damage that may prevent or delay their repair. In order to better define the features that make some DSBs repair-resistant, XLF-dependent nonhomologous end joining of blunt-ended DSB substrates having the oxidatively modified nonplanar base thymine glycol at the first (Tg1), second (Tg2), third (Tg3) or fifth (Tg5) positions from one 3' terminus, was examined in human whole-cell extracts. Tg at the third position had little effect on end-joining even when present on both ends of the break. However, Tg as the terminal or penultimate base was a major barrier to end joining (>10-fold reduction in ligated products) and an absolute barrier when present at both ends. Dideoxy trapping of base excision repair intermediates indicated that Tg was excised from Tg1, Tg2 and Tg3 largely if not exclusively after DSB ligation. However, Tg was rapidly excised from the Tg5 substrate, resulting in a reduced level of DSB ligation, as well as slow concomitant resection of the opposite strand. Ligase reactions containing only purified Ku, XRCC4, ligase IV and XLF showed that ligation of Tg3 and Tg5 was efficient and only partially XLF-dependent, whereas ligation of Tg1 and Tg2 was inefficient and only detectable in the presence of XLF. Overall, the results suggest that promoting ligation of DSBs with proximal base damage may be an important function of XLF, but that Tg can still be a major impediment to repair, being relatively resistant to both trimming and ligation. Moreover, it appears that base excision repair of Tg can sometimes interfere with repair of DSBs that would otherwise be readily rejoined. PMID:27049455

  8. Complex formation by the human Rad51B and Rad51C DNA repair proteins and their activities in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Mazin, Alexander V.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Chen, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The human Rad51 protein is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination. In addition to Rad51 protein, five paralogs have been identified: Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2, Rad51D/Rad51L3, XRCC2, and XRCC3. To further characterize a subset of these proteins, recombinant Rad51, Rad51B-(His)(6), and Rad51C proteins were individually expressed employing the baculovirus system, and each was purified from Sf9 insect cells. Evidence from nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid pull-down experiments demonstrates a highly stable Rad51B.Rad51C heterodimer, which interacts weakly with Rad51. Rad51B and Rad51C proteins were found to bind single- and double-stranded DNA and to preferentially bind 3'-end-tailed double-stranded DNA. The ability to bind DNA was elevated with mixed Rad51 and Rad51C, as well as with mixed Rad51B and Rad51C, compared with that of the individual protein. In addition, both Rad51B and Rad51C exhibit DNA-stimulated ATPase activity. Rad51C displays an ATP-independent apparent DNA strand exchange activity, whereas Rad51B shows no such activity; this apparent strand exchange ability results actually from a duplex DNA destabilization capability of Rad51C. By analogy to the yeast Rad55 and Rad57, our results suggest that Rad51B and Rad51C function through interactions with the human Rad51 recombinase and play a crucial role in the homologous recombinational repair pathway.

  9. Final report [DNA Repair and Mutagenesis - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Graham C.

    2001-05-30

    The meeting, titled ''DNA Repair and Mutagenesis: Mechanism, Control, and Biological Consequences'', was designed to bring together the various sub-disciplines that collectively comprise the field of DNA Repair and Mutagenesis. The keynote address was titled ''Mutability Doth Play Her Cruel Sports to Many Men's Decay: Variations on the Theme of Translesion Synthesis.'' Sessions were held on the following themes: Excision repair of DNA damage; Transcription and DNA excision repair; UmuC/DinB/Rev1/Rad30 superfamily of DNA polymerases; Cellular responses to DNA damage, checkpoints, and damage tolerance; Repair of mismatched bases, mutation; Genome-instability, and hypermutation; Repair of strand breaks; Replicational fidelity, and Late-breaking developments; Repair and mutation in challenging environments; and Defects in DNA repair: consequences for human disease and aging.

  10. The Cockayne syndrome B protein, involved in transcription-coupled DNA repair, resides in an RNA polymerase II-containing complex.

    PubMed

    van Gool, A J; Citterio, E; Rademakers, S; van Os, R; Vermeulen, W; Constantinou, A; Egly, J M; Bootsma, D; Hoeijmakers, J H

    1997-10-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR), a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) defective in Cockayne syndrome A and B (CSA and CSB), is responsible for the preferential removal of DNA lesions from the transcribed strand of active genes, permitting rapid resumption of blocked transcription. Here we demonstrate by microinjection of antibodies against CSB and CSA gene products into living primary fibroblasts, that both proteins are required for TCR and for recovery of RNA synthesis after UV damage in vivo but not for basal transcription itself. Furthermore, immunodepletion showed that CSB is not required for in vitro NER or transcription. Its central role in TCR suggests that CSB interacts with other repair and transcription proteins. Gel filtration of repair- and transcription-competent whole cell extracts provided evidence that CSB and CSA are part of large complexes of different sizes. Unexpectedly, there was no detectable association of CSB with several candidate NER and transcription proteins. However, a minor but significant portion (10-15%) of RNA polymerase II was found to be tightly associated with CSB. We conclude that within cell-free extracts, CSB is not stably associated with the majority of core NER or transcription components, but is part of a distinct complex involving RNA polymerase II. These findings suggest that CSB is implicated in, but not essential for, transcription, and support the idea that Cockayne syndrome is due to a combined repair and transcription deficiency. PMID:9312053

  11. Zinc finger transcription factor CASZ1 interacts with histones, DNA repair proteins and recruits NuRD complex to regulate gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhihui; Lam, Norris; Thiele, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor CASZ1 has been found to control neural fate-determination in flies, regulate murine and frog cardiac development, control murine retinal cell progenitor expansion and function as a tumor suppressor gene in humans. However, the molecular mechanism by which CASZ1 regulates gene transcription to exert these diverse biological functions has not been described. Here we identify co-factors that are recruited by CASZ1b to regulate gene transcription using co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and mass spectrometry assays. We find that CASZ1b binds to the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex, histones and DNA repair proteins. Mutagenesis of the CASZ1b protein assay demonstrates that the N-terminus of CASZ1b is required for NuRD binding, and a poly(ADP-ribose) binding motif in the CASZ1b protein is required for histone H3 and DNA repair proteins binding. The N-terminus of CASZ1b fused to an artificial DNA-binding domain (GAL4DBD) causes a significant repression of transcription (5xUAS-luciferase assay), which could be blocked by treatment with an HDAC inhibitor. Realtime PCR results show that the transcriptional activity of CASZ1b mutants that abrogate NuRD or histone H3/DNA binding is significantly decreased. This indicates a model in which CASZ1b binds to chromatin and recruits NuRD complexes to orchestrate epigenetic-mediated transcriptional programs. PMID:26296975

  12. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  13. DNA repair mechanisms in cancer development and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Torgovnick, Alessandro; Schumacher, Björn

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage has been long recognized as causal factor for cancer development. When erroneous DNA repair leads to mutations or chromosomal aberrations affecting oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, cells undergo malignant transformation resulting in cancerous growth. Genetic defects can predispose to cancer: mutations in distinct DNA repair systems elevate the susceptibility to various cancer types. However, DNA damage not only comprises a root cause for cancer development but also continues to provide an important avenue for chemo- and radiotherapy. Since the beginning of cancer therapy, genotoxic agents that trigger DNA damage checkpoints have been applied to halt the growth and trigger the apoptotic demise of cancer cells. We provide an overview about the involvement of DNA repair systems in cancer prevention and the classes of genotoxins that are commonly used for the treatment of cancer. A better understanding of the roles and interactions of the highly complex DNA repair machineries will lead to important improvements in cancer therapy. PMID:25954303

  14. Protein oxidation, UVA and human DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Karran, Peter; Brem, Reto

    2016-08-01

    Solar UVB is carcinogenic. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) counteracts the carcinogenicity of UVB by excising potentially mutagenic UVB-induced DNA lesions. Despite this capacity for DNA repair, non-melanoma skin cancers and apparently normal sun-exposed skin contain huge numbers of mutations that are mostly attributable to unrepaired UVB-induced DNA lesions. UVA is about 20-times more abundant than UVB in incident sunlight. It does cause some DNA damage but this does not fully account for its biological impact. The effects of solar UVA are mediated by its interactions with cellular photosensitizers that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induce oxidative stress. The proteome is a significant target for damage by UVA-induced ROS. In cultured human cells, UVA-induced oxidation of DNA repair proteins inhibits DNA repair. This article addresses the possible role of oxidative stress and protein oxidation in determining DNA repair efficiency - with particular reference to NER and skin cancer risk.

  15. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease.

  16. Role of Deubiquitinating Enzymes in DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Both proteolytic and nonproteolytic functions of ubiquitination are essential regulatory mechanisms for promoting DNA repair and the DNA damage response in mammalian cells. Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) have emerged as key players in the maintenance of genome stability. In this minireview, we discuss the recent findings on human DUBs that participate in genome maintenance, with a focus on the role of DUBs in the modulation of DNA repair and DNA damage signaling. PMID:26644404

  17. The Cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal Syndrome Point Mutation F231L in the ERCC1 DNA Repair Protein Causes Dissociation of the ERCC1-XPF Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Faridounnia, Maryam; Wienk, Hans; Kovačič, Lidija; Folkers, Gert E.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; Kaptein, Robert; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Boelens, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The ERCC1-XPF heterodimer, a structure-specific DNA endonuclease, is best known for its function in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. The ERCC1 point mutation F231L, located at the hydrophobic interaction interface of ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) and XPF (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F), leads to severe NER pathway deficiencies. Here, we analyze biophysical properties and report the NMR structure of the complex of the C-terminal tandem helix-hairpin-helix domains of ERCC1-XPF that contains this mutation. The structures of wild type and the F231L mutant are very similar. The F231L mutation results in only a small disturbance of the ERCC1-XPF interface, where, in contrast to Phe231, Leu231 lacks interactions stabilizing the ERCC1-XPF complex. One of the two anchor points is severely distorted, and this results in a more dynamic complex, causing reduced stability and an increased dissociation rate of the mutant complex as compared with wild type. These data provide a biophysical explanation for the severe NER deficiencies caused by this mutation. PMID:26085086

  18. The Cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal Syndrome Point Mutation F231L in the ERCC1 DNA Repair Protein Causes Dissociation of the ERCC1-XPF Complex.

    PubMed

    Faridounnia, Maryam; Wienk, Hans; Kovačič, Lidija; Folkers, Gert E; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Kaptein, Robert; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Boelens, Rolf

    2015-08-14

    The ERCC1-XPF heterodimer, a structure-specific DNA endonuclease, is best known for its function in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. The ERCC1 point mutation F231L, located at the hydrophobic interaction interface of ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) and XPF (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F), leads to severe NER pathway deficiencies. Here, we analyze biophysical properties and report the NMR structure of the complex of the C-terminal tandem helix-hairpin-helix domains of ERCC1-XPF that contains this mutation. The structures of wild type and the F231L mutant are very similar. The F231L mutation results in only a small disturbance of the ERCC1-XPF interface, where, in contrast to Phe(231), Leu(231) lacks interactions stabilizing the ERCC1-XPF complex. One of the two anchor points is severely distorted, and this results in a more dynamic complex, causing reduced stability and an increased dissociation rate of the mutant complex as compared with wild type. These data provide a biophysical explanation for the severe NER deficiencies caused by this mutation.

  19. Loading clamps for DNA replication and repair.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Linda B

    2009-05-01

    Sliding clamps and clamp loaders were initially identified as DNA polymerase processivity factors. Sliding clamps are ring-shaped protein complexes that encircle and slide along duplex DNA, and clamp loaders are enzymes that load these clamps onto DNA. When bound to a sliding clamp, DNA polymerases remain tightly associated with the template being copied, but are able to translocate along DNA at rates limited by rates of nucleotide incorporation. Many different enzymes required for DNA replication and repair use sliding clamps. Clamps not only increase the processivity of these enzymes, but may also serve as an attachment point to coordinate the activities of enzymes required for a given process. Clamp loaders are members of the AAA+ family of ATPases and use energy from ATP binding and hydrolysis to catalyze the mechanical reaction of loading clamps onto DNA. Many structural and functional features of clamps and clamp loaders are conserved across all domains of life. Here, the mechanism of clamp loading is reviewed by comparing features of prokaryotic and eukaryotic clamps and clamp loaders.

  20. Coordination and processing of DNA ends during double-strand break repair: the role of the bacteriophage T4 Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex.

    PubMed

    Almond, Joshua R; Stohr, Bradley A; Panigrahi, Anil K; Albrecht, Dustin W; Nelson, Scott W; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2013-11-01

    The in vivo functions of the bacteriophage T4 Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex (gp46/47) in double-strand-end processing, double-strand break repair, and recombination-dependent replication were investigated. The complex is essential for T4 growth, but we wanted to investigate the in vivo function during productive infections. We therefore generated a suppressed triple amber mutant in the Rad50 subunit to substantially reduce the level of complex and thereby reduce phage growth. Growth-limiting amounts of the complex caused a concordant decrease in phage genomic recombination-dependent replication. However, the efficiencies of double-strand break repair and of plasmid-based recombination-dependent replication remained relatively normal. Genetic analyses of linked markers indicated that double-strand ends were less protected from nuclease erosion in the depleted infection and also that end coordination during repair was compromised. We discuss models for why phage genomic recombination-dependent replication is more dependent on Mre11/Rad50 levels when compared to plasmid recombination-dependent replication. We also tested the importance of the conserved histidine residue in nuclease motif I of the T4 Mre11 protein. Substitution with multiple different amino acids (including serine) failed to support phage growth, completely blocked plasmid recombination-dependent replication, and led to the stabilization of double-strand ends. We also constructed and expressed an Mre11 mutant protein with the conserved histidine changed to serine. The mutant protein was found to be completely defective for nuclease activities, but retained the ability to bind the Rad50 subunit and double-stranded DNA. These results indicate that the nuclease activity of Mre11 is critical for phage growth and recombination-dependent replication during T4 infections.

  1. Robustness of DNA repair through collective rate control.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Paul; Heinemann, Tim; Manders, Erik; von Bornstaedt, Gesa; van Driel, Roel; Höfer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair and other chromatin-associated processes are carried out by enzymatic macromolecular complexes that assemble at specific sites on the chromatin fiber. How the rate of these molecular machineries is regulated by their constituent parts is poorly understood. Here we quantify nucleotide-excision DNA repair in mammalian cells and find that, despite the pathways' molecular complexity, repair effectively obeys slow first-order kinetics. Theoretical analysis and data-based modeling indicate that these kinetics are not due to a singular rate-limiting step. Rather, first-order kinetics emerge from the interplay of rapidly and reversibly assembling repair proteins, stochastically distributing DNA lesion repair over a broad time period. Based on this mechanism, the model predicts that the repair proteins collectively control the repair rate. Exploiting natural cell-to-cell variability, we corroborate this prediction for the lesion-recognition factor XPC and the downstream factor XPA. Our findings provide a rationale for the emergence of slow time scales in chromatin-associated processes from fast molecular steps and suggest that collective rate control might be a widespread mode of robust regulation in DNA repair and transcription.

  2. Recognition and repair of chemically heterogeneous structures at DNA ends

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Sara N.; Schellenberg, Matthew J.; Wallace, Bret D.; Tumbale, Percy; Williams, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to environmental toxicants and stressors, radiation, pharmaceutical drugs, inflammation, cellular respiration, and routine DNA metabolism all lead to the production of cytotoxic DNA strand breaks. Akin to splintered wood, DNA breaks are not “clean”. Rather, DNA breaks typically lack DNA 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl moieties required for DNA synthesis and DNA ligation. Failure to resolve damage at DNA ends can lead to abnormal DNA replication and repair, and is associated with genomic instability, mutagenesis, neurological disease, ageing and carcinogenesis. An array of chemically heterogeneous DNA termini arises from spontaneously generated DNA single-strand and double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs), and also from normal and/or inappropriate DNA metabolism by DNA polymerases, DNA ligases and topoisomerases. As a front line of defense to these genotoxic insults, eukaryotic cells have accrued an arsenal of enzymatic first responders that bind and protect damaged DNA termini, and enzymatically tailor DNA ends for DNA repair synthesis and ligation. These nucleic acid transactions employ direct damage reversal enzymes including Aprataxin (APTX), Polynucleotide kinase phosphatase (PNK), the tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterases (TDP1 and TDP2), the Ku70/80 complex and DNA polymerase β (POLβ). Nucleolytic processing enzymes such as the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1/CtIP complex, Flap endonuclease (FEN1) and the apurinic endonucleases (APE1 and APE2) also act in the chemical "cleansing" of DNA breaks to prevent genomic instability and disease, and promote progression of DNA- and RNA-DNA damage response (DDR and RDDR) pathways. Here, we provide an overview of cellular first responders dedicated to the detection and repair of abnormal DNA termini. PMID:25111769

  3. Active DNA demethylation by DNA repair: Facts and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Schuermann, David; Weber, Alain R; Schär, Primo

    2016-08-01

    Pathways that control and modulate DNA methylation patterning in mammalian cells were poorly understood for a long time, although their importance in establishing and maintaining cell type-specific gene expression was well recognized. The discovery of proteins capable of converting 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to putative substrates for DNA repair introduced a novel and exciting conceptual framework for the investigation and ultimate discovery of molecular mechanisms of DNA demethylation. Against the prevailing notion that DNA methylation is a static epigenetic mark, it turned out to be dynamic and distinct mechanisms appear to have evolved to effect global and locus-specific DNA demethylation. There is compelling evidence that DNA repair, in particular base excision repair, contributes significantly to the turnover of 5mC in cells. By actively demethylating DNA, DNA repair supports the developmental establishment as well as the maintenance of DNA methylation landscapes and gene expression patterns. Yet, while the biochemical pathways are relatively well-established and reviewed, the biological context, function and regulation of DNA repair-mediated active DNA demethylation remains uncertain. In this review, we will thus summarize and critically discuss the evidence that associates active DNA demethylation by DNA repair with specific functional contexts including the DNA methylation erasure in the early embryo, the control of pluripotency and cellular differentiation, the maintenance of cell identity, and the nuclear reprogramming. PMID:27247237

  4. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  5. Molecular mechanisms of DNA repair inhibition by caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, C.P.; Sancar, A. )

    1990-05-01

    Caffeine potentiates the mutagenic and lethal effects of genotoxic agents. It is thought that this is due, at least in some organisms, to inhibition of DNA repair. However, direct evidence for inhibition of repair enzymes has been lacking. Using purified Escherichia coli DNA photolyase and (A)BC excinuclease, we show that the drug inhibits photoreactivation and nucleotide excision repair by two different mechanisms. Caffeine inhibits photoreactivation by interfering with the specific binding of photolyase to damaged DNA, and it inhibits nucleotide excision repair by promoting nonspecific binding of the damage-recognition subunit, UvrA, of (A)BC excinuclease. A number of other intercalators, including acriflavin and ethidium bromide, appear to inhibit the excinuclease by a similar mechanism--that is, by trapping the UvrA subunit in nonproductive complexes on undamaged DNA.

  6. Oxidative DNA Damage and Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Melis, Joost P.M.; Luijten, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative DNA damage is repaired by multiple, overlapping DNA repair pathways. Accumulating evidence supports the hypothesis that nucleotide excision repair (NER), besides base excision repair (BER), is also involved in neutralizing oxidative DNA damage. Recent Advances: NER includes two distinct sub-pathways: transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) and global genome repair (GG-NER). The CSA and CSB proteins initiate the onset of TC-NER. Recent findings show that not only CSB, but also CSA is involved in the repair of oxidative DNA lesions, in the nucleus as well as in mitochondria. The XPG protein is also of importance for the removal of oxidative DNA lesions, as it may enhance the initial step of BER. Substantial evidence exists that support a role for XPC in NER and BER. XPC deficiency not only results in decreased repair of oxidative lesions, but has also been linked to disturbed redox homeostasis. Critical Issues: The role of NER proteins in the regulation of the cellular response to oxidative (mitochondrial and nuclear) DNA damage may be the underlying mechanism of the pathology of accelerated aging in Cockayne syndrome patients, a driving force for internal cancer development in XP-A and XP-C patients, and a contributor to the mixed exhibited phenotypes of XP-G patients. Future Directions: Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA repair factors can be involved in multiple DNA repair pathways. However, the distinct detailed mechanism and consequences of these additional functions remain to be elucidated and can possibly shine a light on clinically related issues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2409–2419. PMID:23216312

  7. Antibody specific for a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-07-11

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  8. Nuclear position dictates DNA repair pathway choice

    PubMed Central

    Lemaître, Charlène; Grabarz, Anastazja; Tsouroula, Katerina; Andronov, Leonid; Furst, Audrey; Pankotai, Tibor; Heyer, Vincent; Rogier, Mélanie; Attwood, Kathleen M.; Kessler, Pascal; Dellaire, Graham; Klaholz, Bruno; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo; Soutoglou, Evi

    2014-01-01

    Faithful DNA repair is essential to avoid chromosomal rearrangements and promote genome integrity. Nuclear organization has emerged as a key parameter in the formation of chromosomal translocations, yet little is known as to whether DNA repair can efficiently occur throughout the nucleus and whether it is affected by the location of the lesion. Here, we induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at different nuclear compartments and follow their fate. We demonstrate that DSBs induced at the nuclear membrane (but not at nuclear pores or nuclear interior) fail to rapidly activate the DNA damage response (DDR) and repair by homologous recombination (HR). Real-time and superresolution imaging reveal that DNA DSBs within lamina-associated domains do not migrate to more permissive environments for HR, like the nuclear pores or the nuclear interior, but instead are repaired in situ by alternative end-joining. Our results are consistent with a model in which nuclear position dictates the choice of DNA repair pathway, thus revealing a new level of regulation in DSB repair controlled by spatial organization of DNA within the nucleus. PMID:25366693

  9. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

  10. DNA repair variants and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Anne; Richardson, Harriet; Schuetz, Johanna M; Burstyn, Igor; Spinelli, John J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J

    2016-05-01

    A functional DNA repair system has been identified as important in the prevention of tumour development. Previous studies have hypothesized that common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could play a role in breast cancer risk and also identified the potential for interactions between these polymorphisms and established breast cancer risk factors such as physical activity. Associations with breast cancer risk for 99 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genes in ten DNA repair pathways were examined in a case-control study including both Europeans (644 cases, 809 controls) and East Asians (299 cases, 160 controls). Odds ratios in both additive and dominant genetic models were calculated separately for participants of European and East Asian ancestry using multivariate logistic regression. The impact of multiple comparisons was assessed by correcting for the false discovery rate within each DNA repair pathway. Interactions between several breast cancer risk factors and DNA repair SNPs were also evaluated. One SNP (rs3213282) in the gene XRCC1 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in the dominant model of inheritance following adjustment for the false discovery rate (P < 0.05), although no associations were observed for other DNA repair SNPs. Interactions of six SNPs in multiple DNA repair pathways with physical activity were evident prior to correction for FDR, following which there was support for only one of the interaction terms (P < 0.05). No consistent associations between variants in DNA repair genes and breast cancer risk or their modification by breast cancer risk factors were observed. PMID:27060854

  11. DNA repair variants and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Anne; Richardson, Harriet; Schuetz, Johanna M; Burstyn, Igor; Spinelli, John J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J

    2016-05-01

    A functional DNA repair system has been identified as important in the prevention of tumour development. Previous studies have hypothesized that common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could play a role in breast cancer risk and also identified the potential for interactions between these polymorphisms and established breast cancer risk factors such as physical activity. Associations with breast cancer risk for 99 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genes in ten DNA repair pathways were examined in a case-control study including both Europeans (644 cases, 809 controls) and East Asians (299 cases, 160 controls). Odds ratios in both additive and dominant genetic models were calculated separately for participants of European and East Asian ancestry using multivariate logistic regression. The impact of multiple comparisons was assessed by correcting for the false discovery rate within each DNA repair pathway. Interactions between several breast cancer risk factors and DNA repair SNPs were also evaluated. One SNP (rs3213282) in the gene XRCC1 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in the dominant model of inheritance following adjustment for the false discovery rate (P < 0.05), although no associations were observed for other DNA repair SNPs. Interactions of six SNPs in multiple DNA repair pathways with physical activity were evident prior to correction for FDR, following which there was support for only one of the interaction terms (P < 0.05). No consistent associations between variants in DNA repair genes and breast cancer risk or their modification by breast cancer risk factors were observed.

  12. Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Martin; Lukasova, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    The genetic information of cells continuously undergoes damage induced by intracellular processes including energy metabolism, DNA replication and transcription, and by environmental factors such as mutagenic chemicals and UV and ionizing radiation. This causes numerous DNA lesions, including double strand breaks (DSBs). Since cells cannot escape this damage or normally function with a damaged genome, several DNA repair mechanisms have evolved. Although most "single-stranded" DNA lesions are rapidly removed from DNA without permanent damage, DSBs completely break the DNA molecule, presenting a real challenge for repair mechanisms, with the highest risk among DNA lesions of incorrect repair. Hence, DSBs can have serious consequences for human health. Therefore, in this chapter, we will refer only to this type of DNA damage. In addition to the biochemical aspects of DSB repair, which have been extensively studied over a long period of time, the spatio-temporal organization of DSB induction and repair, the importance of which was recognized only recently, will be considered in terms of current knowledge and remaining questions.

  13. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Chromatin Remodeling, DNA Damage Repair and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baohua; Yip, Raymond KH; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to a variety of environmental and endogenous conditions causing DNA damage, which is detected and repaired by conserved DNA repair pathways to maintain genomic integrity. Chromatin remodeling is critical in this process, as the organization of eukaryotic DNA into compact chromatin presents a natural barrier to all DNA-related events. Studies on human premature aging syndromes together with normal aging have suggested that accumulated damages might lead to exhaustion of resources that are required for physiological functions and thus accelerate aging. In this manuscript, combining the present understandings and latest findings, we focus mainly on discussing the role of chromatin remodeling in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulation of aging. PMID:23633913

  15. Global genome nucleotide excision repair is organized into domains that promote efficient DNA repair in chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shirong; Evans, Katie; Bennett, Mark; Webster, Richard M.; Leadbitter, Matthew; Teng, Yumin; Waters, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The rates at which lesions are removed by DNA repair can vary widely throughout the genome, with important implications for genomic stability. To study this, we measured the distribution of nucleotide excision repair (NER) rates for UV-induced lesions throughout the budding yeast genome. By plotting these repair rates in relation to genes and their associated flanking sequences, we reveal that, in normal cells, genomic repair rates display a distinctive pattern, suggesting that DNA repair is highly organized within the genome. Furthermore, by comparing genome-wide DNA repair rates in wild-type cells and cells defective in the global genome–NER (GG-NER) subpathway, we establish how this alters the distribution of NER rates throughout the genome. We also examined the genomic locations of GG-NER factor binding to chromatin before and after UV irradiation, revealing that GG-NER is organized and initiated from specific genomic locations. At these sites, chromatin occupancy of the histone acetyl-transferase Gcn5 is controlled by the GG-NER complex, which regulates histone H3 acetylation and chromatin structure, thereby promoting efficient DNA repair of UV-induced lesions. Chromatin remodeling during the GG-NER process is therefore organized into these genomic domains. Importantly, loss of Gcn5 significantly alters the genomic distribution of NER rates; this has implications for the effects of chromatin modifiers on the distribution of mutations that arise throughout the genome. PMID:27470111

  16. DNA glycosylases in the base excision repair of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Krokan, H E; Standal, R; Slupphaug, G

    1997-01-01

    A wide range of cytotoxic and mutagenic DNA bases are removed by different DNA glycosylases, which initiate the base excision repair pathway. DNA glycosylases cleave the N-glycosylic bond between the target base and deoxyribose, thus releasing a free base and leaving an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site. In addition, several DNA glycosylases are bifunctional, since they also display a lyase activity that cleaves the phosphodiester backbone 3' to the AP site generated by the glycosylase activity. Structural data and sequence comparisons have identified common features among many of the DNA glycosylases. Their active sites have a structure that can only bind extrahelical target bases, as observed in the crystal structure of human uracil-DNA glycosylase in a complex with double-stranded DNA. Nucleotide flipping is apparently actively facilitated by the enzyme. With bacteriophage T4 endonuclease V, a pyrimidine-dimer glycosylase, the enzyme gains access to the target base by flipping out an adenine opposite to the dimer. A conserved helix-hairpin-helix motif and an invariant Asp residue are found in the active sites of more than 20 monofunctional and bifunctional DNA glycosylases. In bifunctional DNA glycosylases, the conserved Asp is thought to deprotonate a conserved Lys, forming an amine nucleophile. The nucleophile forms a covalent intermediate (Schiff base) with the deoxyribose anomeric carbon and expels the base. Deoxyribose subsequently undergoes several transformations, resulting in strand cleavage and regeneration of the free enzyme. The catalytic mechanism of monofunctional glycosylases does not involve covalent intermediates. Instead the conserved Asp residue may activate a water molecule which acts as the attacking nucleophile. PMID:9224623

  17. DNA repair genes in the Megavirales pangenome.

    PubMed

    Blanc-Mathieu, Romain; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The order 'Megavirales' represents a group of eukaryotic viruses with a large genome encoding a few hundred up to two thousand five hundred genes. Several members of Megavirales possess genes involved in major DNA repair pathways. Some of these genes were likely inherited from an ancient virus world and some others were derived from the genomes of their hosts. Here we examine molecular phylogenies of key DNA repair enzymes in light of recent hypotheses on the origin of Megavirales, and propose that the last common ancestors of the individual families of the order Megavirales already possessed DNA repair functions to achieve and maintain a moderately large genome and that this repair capacity gradually increased, in a family-dependent manner, during their recent evolution.

  18. DNA repair of oxidative DNA damage in human carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Sevilya, Ziv; Leitner-Dagan, Yael; Elinger, Dalia; Roisman, Laila; Livneh, Zvi

    2008-01-01

    Efficient DNA repair mechanisms comprise a critical component in the protection against human cancer, as indicated by the high predisposition to cancer of individuals with germ-line mutations in DNA repair genes. This includes biallelic germ-line mutations in the MUYH gene, encoding a DNA glycosylase that is involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage, which strongly predispose humans to a rare hereditary form of colorectal cancer. Extensive research efforts including biochemical, enzymological and genetic studies in model organisms established that the oxidative DNA lesion 8-oxoguanine is mutagenic, and that several DNA repair mechanisms operate to prevent its potentially mutagenic and carcinogenic outcome. Epidemiological studies on the association with sporadic cancers of single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes such as OGG1, involved in the repair of 8-oxoguanine yielded conflicting results, and suggest a minor effect at best. A new approach based on the functional analysis of DNA repair enzymatic activity showed that reduced activity of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG) is a risk factor in lung and head and neck cancer. Moreover, the combination of smoking and low OGG activity was associated with a higher risk, suggesting a potential strategy for risk assessment and prevention of lung cancer, as well as other types of cancer. PMID:18374480

  19. Eukaryotic damaged DNA-binding proteins: DNA repair proteins or transcription factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Protic, M.

    1994-12-31

    Recognition and removal of structural defects in the genome, caused by diverse physical and chemical agents, are among the most important cell functions. Proteins that recognize and bind to modified DNA, and thereby initiate damage-induced recovery processes, have been identified in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Damaged DNA-binding (DDB) proteins from prokaryotes are either DNA repair enzymes or noncatalytic subunits of larger DNA repair complexes that participate in excision repair, or in recombinational repair and SOS-mutagenesis. Although the methods employed may not have allowed detection of all eukaryotic DDB proteins and identification of their functions, it appears that during evolution cells have developed a wide array of DDB proteins that can discriminate among the diversity of DNA conformations found in the eukaryotic nucleus, as well as a gene-sharing feature found in DDB proteins that also act as transcription factors.

  20. Targeting backup DNA repair in cancer.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    New research shows that DNA polymerase θ is a key player in PARP-mediated DNA damage repair and essential for the survival of cancer cells where homologous recombination is compromised. Polθ could be a biomarker for PARP-inhibitor response, and is a potential therapeutic target for overcoming resistance to these drugs.

  1. Hsp90: A New Player in DNA Repair?

    PubMed Central

    Pennisi, Rosa; Ascenzi, Paolo; di Masi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an evolutionary conserved molecular chaperone that, together with Hsp70 and co-chaperones makes up the Hsp90 chaperone machinery, stabilizing and activating more than 200 proteins, involved in protein homeostasis (i.e., proteostasis), transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodeling, and DNA repair. Cells respond to DNA damage by activating complex DNA damage response (DDR) pathways that include: (i) cell cycle arrest; (ii) transcriptional and post-translational activation of a subset of genes, including those associated with DNA repair; and (iii) triggering of programmed cell death. The efficacy of the DDR pathways is influenced by the nuclear levels of DNA repair proteins, which are regulated by balancing between protein synthesis and degradation as well as by nuclear import and export. The inability to respond properly to either DNA damage or to DNA repair leads to genetic instability, which in turn may enhance the rate of cancer development. Multiple components of the DNA double strand breaks repair machinery, including BRCA1, BRCA2, CHK1, DNA-PKcs, FANCA, and the MRE11/RAD50/NBN complex, have been described to be client proteins of Hsp90, which acts as a regulator of the diverse DDR pathways. Inhibition of Hsp90 actions leads to the altered localization and stabilization of DDR proteins after DNA damage and may represent a cell-specific and tumor-selective radiosensibilizer. Here, the role of Hsp90-dependent molecular mechanisms involved in cancer onset and in the maintenance of the genome integrity is discussed and highlighted. PMID:26501335

  2. The awakening of DNA repair at Yale.

    PubMed

    Hanawalt, Philip C

    2013-12-13

    As a graduate student with Professor Richard Setlow at Yale in the late 1950s, I studied the effects of ultraviolet and visible light on the syntheses of DNA, RNA, and protein in bacteria. I reflect upon my research in the Yale Biophysics Department, my subsequent postdoctoral experiences, and the eventual analyses in the laboratories of Setlow, Paul Howard-Flanders, and myself that constituted the discovery of the ubiquitous pathway of DNA excision repair in the early 1960s. I then offer a brief perspective on a few more recent developments in the burgeoning DNA repair field and their relationships to human disease.

  3. The Awakening of DNA Repair at Yale

    PubMed Central

    Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2013-01-01

    As a graduate student with Professor Richard Setlow at Yale in the late 1950s, I studied the effects of ultraviolet and visible light on the syntheses of DNA, RNA, and protein in bacteria. I reflect upon my research in the Yale Biophysics Department, my subsequent postdoctoral experiences, and the eventual analyses in the laboratories of Setlow, Paul Howard-Flanders, and myself that constituted the discovery of the ubiquitous pathway of DNA excision repair in the early 1960s. I then offer a brief perspective on a few more recent developments in the burgeoning DNA repair field and their relationships to human disease. PMID:24348216

  4. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  5. DNA Repair and Personalized Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Xia; Sjolund, Ashley; Harris, Lyndsay; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized cancer therapy is likely to be one of the next big advances in our search for a cure for cancer. To be able to treat people in an individualized manner, researchers need to know a great deal about their genetic constitution and the DNA repair status of their tumors. Specific knowledge is required regarding the polymorphisms individuals carry and how these polymorphisms influence responses to therapy. Researchers are actively engaged in biomarker discovery and validation for this purpose. In addition, the design of clinical trials must be reassessed to include new information on biomarkers and drug responses. In this review, we focus on personalized breast cancer therapy. The hypothesis we focus upon in this review is that there is connection between the DNA repair profile of individuals, their breast tumor subtypes, and their responses to cancer therapy. We first briefly review cellular DNA repair pathways that are likely to be impacted by breast cancer therapies. Next, we review the phenotypes of breast tumor subtypes with an emphasis on how a DNA repair deficiency might result in tumorigenesis itself and lead to the chemotherapeutic responses that are observed. Specific examples of breast tumor subtypes and their responses to cancer therapy are given, and we discuss possible DNA repair mechanisms that underlie the responses of tumors to various chemotherapeutic agents. Much is known about breast cancer subtypes and the way each of these subtypes responds to chemotherapy. In addition, we discuss novel design of clinical trials that incorporates rapidly emerging information on biomarkers. PMID:20872853

  6. Genotoxic stress in plants: shedding light on DNA damage, repair and DNA repair helicases.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Narendra; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Panda, Brahma B; Tuteja, Renu

    2009-01-01

    Plant cells are constantly exposed to environmental agents and endogenous processes that inflict damage to DNA and cause genotoxic stress, which can reduce plant genome stability, growth and productivity. Plants are most affected by solar UV-B radiation, which damage the DNA by inducing the formation of two main UV photoproducts such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also generated extra- or intra-cellularly, which constitute yet another source of genotoxic stress. As a result of this stress, the cellular DNA-damage responses (DDR) are activated, which transiently arrest the cell cycle and allow cells to repair DNA before proceeding into mitosis. DDR requires the activation of Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and Rad3-related (ATR) genes, which regulate the cell cycle and transmit the damage signals to downstream effectors of cell-cycle progression. Since genomic protection and stability are fundamental to ensure and sustain plant diversity and productivity, therefore, repair of DNA damages is essential. In plants the bulky DNA lesions, CPDs and 6-4PPs, are repaired by a simple and error-free mechanism: photoreactivation, which is a light-dependent mechanism and requires CPD or 6-4PP specific photolyases. In addition to this direct repair process, the plants also have sophisticated light-independent general repair mechanisms, such as the nucleotide excision repair (NER) and base excision repair (BER). The completed plant genome sequences reveal that most of the genes involved in NER and BER are present in higher plants, which suggests that the network of in-built DNA-damage repair mechanisms is conserved. This article describes the insight underlying the DNA damage and repair pathways in plants. The comet assay to measure the DNA damage and the role of DNA repair helicases such as XPD and XPB are also covered.

  7. Epigenetic reduction of DNA repair in progression to gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Carol; Bernstein, Harris

    2015-01-01

    Deficiencies in DNA repair due to inherited germ-line mutations in DNA repair genes cause increased risk of gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. In sporadic GI cancers, mutations in DNA repair genes are relatively rare. However, epigenetic alterations that reduce expression of DNA repair genes are frequent in sporadic GI cancers. These epigenetic reductions are also found in field defects that give rise to cancers. Reduced DNA repair likely allows excessive DNA damages to accumulate in somatic cells. Then either inaccurate translesion synthesis past the un-repaired DNA damages or error-prone DNA repair can cause mutations. Erroneous DNA repair can also cause epigenetic alterations (i.e., epimutations, transmitted through multiple replication cycles). Some of these mutations and epimutations may cause progression to cancer. Thus, deficient or absent DNA repair is likely an important underlying cause of cancer. Whole genome sequencing of GI cancers show that between thousands to hundreds of thousands of mutations occur in these cancers. Epimutations that reduce DNA repair gene expression and occur early in progression to GI cancers are a likely source of this high genomic instability. Cancer cells deficient in DNA repair are more vulnerable than normal cells to inactivation by DNA damaging agents. Thus, some of the most clinically effective chemotherapeutic agents in cancer treatment are DNA damaging agents, and their effectiveness often depends on deficient DNA repair in cancer cells. Recently, at least 18 DNA repair proteins, each active in one of six DNA repair pathways, were found to be subject to epigenetic reduction of expression in GI cancers. Different DNA repair pathways repair different types of DNA damage. Evaluation of which DNA repair pathway(s) are deficient in particular types of GI cancer and/or particular patients may prove useful in guiding choice of therapeutic agents in cancer therapy. PMID:25987950

  8. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Regulation of DNA repair by parkin

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Shyan-Yuan

    2009-05-01

    Mutation of parkin is one of the most prevalent causes of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that acts on a variety of substrates, resulting in polyubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome or monoubiquitination and regulation of biological activity. However, the cellular functions of parkin that relate to its pathological involvement in PD are not well understood. Here we show that parkin is essential for optimal repair of DNA damage. Parkin-deficient cells exhibit reduced DNA excision repair that can be restored by transfection of wild-type parkin, but not by transfection of a pathological parkin mutant. Parkin also protects against DNA damage-induced cell death, an activity that is largely lost in the pathological mutant. Moreover, parkin interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a protein that coordinates DNA excision repair. These results suggest that parkin promotes DNA repair and protects against genotoxicity, and implicate DNA damage as a potential pathogenic mechanism in PD.

  10. Error-Prone Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Kasey; McVey, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    Preserving the integrity of the DNA double helix is crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability. Therefore, DNA double-strand breaks represent a serious threat to cells. In this review, we describe the two major strategies used to repair double strand breaks: non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination, emphasizing the mutagenic aspects of each. We focus on emerging evidence that homologous recombination, long thought to be an error-free repair process, can in fact be highly mutagenic, particularly in contexts requiring large amounts of DNA synthesis. Recent investigations have begun to illuminate the molecular mechanisms by which error-prone double-strand break repair can create major genomic changes, such as translocations and complex chromosome rearrangements. We highlight these studies and discuss proposed models that may explain some of the more extreme genetic changes observed in human cancers and congenital disorders.

  11. DNA damage and repair after high LET radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis; Anderson, Jennifer

    Predictions from biophysical models of interactions of radiation tracks with cellular DNA indicate that clustered DNA damage sites, defined as two or more lesions formed within one or two helical turns of the DNA by passage of a single radiation track, are formed in mammalian cells. These complex DNA damage sites are regarded as a signature of ionizing radiation exposure particularly as the likelihood of clustered damage sites arising endogenously is low. For instance, it was predicted from biophysical modelling that 30-40% of low LET-induced double strand breaks (DSB), a form of clustered damage, are complex with the yield increasing to >90% for high LET radiation, consistent with the reduced reparability of DSB with increasing ionization density of the radiation. The question arises whether the increased biological effects such as mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and lethality is in part related to DNA damage complexity and/or spatial distribution of the damage sites, which may lead to small DNA fragments. With particle radiation it is also important to consider not only delta-rays which may cause clustered damaged sites and may be highly mutagenic but the non-random spatial distribution of DSB which may lead to deletions. In this overview I will concentrate on the molecular aspects of the variation of the complexity of DNA damage on radiation quality and the challenges this complexity presents the DNA damage repair pathways. I will draw on data from micro-irradiations which indicate that the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining is highly regulated with pathway choice and kinetics of repair dependent on the chemical complexity of the DSB. In summary the aim is to emphasis the link between the spatial distribution of energy deposition events related to the track, the molecular products formed and the consequence of damage complexity contributing to biological effects and to present some of the outstanding molecular challenges with particle radiation.

  12. DNA ligases in the repair and replication of DNA.

    PubMed

    Timson, D J; Singleton, M R; Wigley, D B

    2000-08-30

    DNA ligases are critical enzymes of DNA metabolism. The reaction they catalyse (the joining of nicked DNA) is required in DNA replication and in DNA repair pathways that require the re-synthesis of DNA. Most organisms express DNA ligases powered by ATP, but eubacteria appear to be unique in having ligases driven by NAD(+). Interestingly, despite protein sequence and biochemical differences between the two classes of ligase, the structure of the adenylation domain is remarkably similar. Higher organisms express a variety of different ligases, which appear to be targetted to specific functions. DNA ligase I is required for Okazaki fragment joining and some repair pathways; DNA ligase II appears to be a degradation product of ligase III; DNA ligase III has several isoforms, which are involved in repair and recombination and DNA ligase IV is necessary for V(D)J recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Sequence and structural analysis of DNA ligases has shown that these enzymes are built around a common catalytic core, which is likely to be similar in three-dimensional structure to that of T7-bacteriophage ligase. The differences between the various ligases are likely to be mediated by regions outside of this common core, the structures of which are not known. Therefore, the determination of these structures, along with the structures of ligases bound to substrate DNAs and partner proteins ought to be seen as a priority.

  13. DNA Repair Deficiency and Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Preface Responding to genotoxic stress is a prerequisite for development of the nervous system. Mutations in a variety of DNA repair factors can lead to human diseases that are characterized by pronounced neuropathology. In many of these syndromes the neurological component is amongst the most deleterious aspects of the disease. The nervous system poses a particular challenge in terms of clinical intervention, as the neuropathology often arises during nervous system development, and can be fully penetrant by childhood. Understanding how DNA repair deficiency impacts the nervous system will provide a rationale basis for therapies targeted at ameliorating the neurological problems in these syndromes. PMID:19145234

  14. The ups and downs of DNA repair biomarkers for PARP inhibitor therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XiaoZhe; Weaver, David T

    2011-01-01

    PARP inhibitors are emerging as a valuable new drug class in the treatment of cancer. Recent discoveries make a compelling case for the complexity of DNA repair biomarker evaluation and underscore the need to examine at multiple biomarkers in a relational manner. This review updates the current trends in DNA repair biomarker strategies in use for the PARP inhibitors and describes the impact of many DNA repair biomarkers on PARP inhibitor benefit in the cancer clinic. PMID:21968427

  15. Induction of the SOS DNA repair response in Escherichia coli by nitric oxide donating agents: dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands and S-nitrosothiols.

    PubMed

    Lobysheva, I I; Stupakova, M V; Mikoyan, V D; Vasilieva, S V; Vanin, A F

    1999-07-01

    The ability of nitric oxide (NO) donor compounds to induce the SOS DNA repair response in Escherichia coli is reported. Dinitrosyl iron complexes with glutathione and cysteine (DNIC) are the most potent SOS-inducers. S-Nitrosothiols (RSNO) mediate a similar response at 10-100 microM, but the response decreases sharply at concentrations above 0.5 mM. Pretreatment of the cells with the chelating agent o-phenanthroline (OP) prevents induction of the SOS response by all agents used. On the other hand, the toxicity of S-nitrosothiols is higher than that of DNIC. The EPR study shows the appearance of an EPR DNIC-type signal after incubation of the cells with S-nitrosoglutathione because of mutual transformation between RSNO and DNIC in the presence of accessible iron inside the cells. Pretreatment of the cells with OP leads to a decrease in this signal. Analysis of NO donor effects reveals a dual role of the iron ions in reactivity and toxicity of the compounds studied, i.e. (i) stabilization of the cytotoxic RSNO and (ii) generation of the SOS signal. PMID:10431802

  16. DNA repair, immunosuppression, and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Yarosh, Daniel B

    2004-11-01

    UV radiation (UVR) produces erythema within the first 24 hours of exposure, suppression of the immune system within the first 10 days, and, for many people, over the course of decades, skin cancer. Although UVR damages many skin targets, DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) is an important mediator of these sequelae. The action spectrum for erythema parallels the action spectrum for CPD formation in skin, and in the absence of repair, as in the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), skin cancer rates are dramatically increased. DNA repair in skin can be enhanced by the delivery of DNA repair enzymes encapsulated in liposomes. Used in this way, photoreactivation of CPDs greatly diminishes erythema and the suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CHS). UV endonucleases delivered by liposomes also prevent UV-induced suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity. In a clinical study of patients with XP, T4 endonuclease V (T4N5) liposome lotion applied for one year reduced the rates of actinic keratosis (AK) and skin cancer compared with placebo. These results showed that strategies to increase sun protection should include measures to reduce DNA damage and increase the rate of DNA repair.

  17. Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage and Cancer: Recent Progress in DNA Base Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Timothy L.; Rangaswamy, Suganya; Wicker, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by exogenous and environmental genotoxins, but also arise from mitochondria as byproducts of respiration in the body. ROS generate DNA damage of which pathological consequence, including cancer is well established. Research efforts are intense to understand the mechanism of DNA base excision repair, the primary mechanism to protect cells from genotoxicity caused by ROS. Recent Advances: In addition to the notion that oxidative DNA damage causes transformation of cells, recent studies have revealed how the mitochondrial deficiencies and ROS generation alter cell growth during the cancer transformation. Critical Issues: The emphasis of this review is to highlight the importance of the cellular response to oxidative DNA damage during carcinogenesis. Oxidative DNA damage, including 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine, play an important role during the cellular transformation. It is also becoming apparent that the unusual activity and subcellular distribution of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1, an essential DNA repair factor/redox sensor, affect cancer malignancy by increasing cellular resistance to oxidative stress and by positively influencing cell proliferation. Future Directions: Technological advancement in cancer cell biology and genetics has enabled us to monitor the detailed DNA repair activities in the microenvironment. Precise understanding of the intracellular activities of DNA repair proteins for oxidative DNA damage should provide help in understanding how mitochondria, ROS, DNA damage, and repair influence cancer transformation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 708–726. PMID:23901781

  18. The RASSF1A Tumor Suppressor Regulates XPA-Mediated DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Donninger, Howard; Clark, Jennifer; Rinaldo, Francesca; Nelson, Nicholas; Barnoud, Thibaut; Schmidt, M. Lee; Hobbing, Katharine R.; Vos, Michele D.; Sils, Brian

    2014-01-01

    RASSF1A may be the most frequently inactivated tumor suppressor identified in human cancer so far. It is a proapoptotic Ras effector and plays an important role in the apoptotic DNA damage response (DDR). We now show that in addition to DDR regulation, RASSF1A also plays a key role in the DNA repair process itself. We show that RASSF1A forms a DNA damage-regulated complex with the key DNA repair protein xeroderma pigmentosum A (XPA). XPA requires RASSF1A to exert full repair activity, and RASSF1A-deficient cells exhibit an impaired ability to repair DNA. Moreover, a cancer-associated RASSF1A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variant exhibits differential XPA binding and inhibits DNA repair. The interaction of XPA with other components of the repair complex, such as replication protein A (RPA), is controlled in part by a dynamic acetylation/deacetylation cycle. We found that RASSF1A and its SNP variant differentially regulate XPA protein acetylation, and the SNP variant hyperstabilizes the XPA-RPA70 complex. Thus, we identify two novel functions for RASSF1A in the control of DNA repair and protein acetylation. As RASSF1A modulates both apoptotic DDR and DNA repair, it may play an important and unanticipated role in coordinating the balance between repair and death after DNA damage. PMID:25368379

  19. Nobel Recognizes Seminal Work in DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Three scientists will share this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry for pioneering research that established the inherent instability of DNA and the cellular mechanisms underlying its repair. Their discoveries of how living cells function have aided in developing new cancer therapies.

  20. FEN1 participates in repair of the 5'-phosphotyrosyl terminus of DNA single-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Kametani, Yukiko; Takahata, Chiaki; Narita, Takashi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Etoposide is a widely used anticancer drug and a DNA topoisomerase II (Top2) inhibitor. Etoposide produces Top2-attached single-strand breaks (Top2-SSB complex) and double-strand breaks (Top2-DSB complex) that are thought to induce cell death in tumor cells. The Top2-SSB complex is more abundant than the Top2-DSB complex. Human tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) is required for efficient repair of Top2-DSB complexes. However, the identities of the proteins involved in the repair of Top2-SSB complexes are unknown, although yeast genetic data indicate that 5' to 3' structure-specific DNA endonuclease activity is required for alternative repair of Top2 DNA damage. In this study, we purified a flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) in the 5' to 3' structure-specific DNA endonuclease family and synthesized single-strand break DNA substrates containing a 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond, mimicking the Top2-SSB complex. We found that FEN1 and XPG did not remove the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing DSB substrates but removed the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing SSB substrates. Under DNA repair conditions, FEN1 efficiently repaired the 5'-phoshotyrosyl bond-containing SSB substrates in the presence of DNA ligase and DNA polymerase. Therefore, FEN1 may play an important role in the repair of Top2-SSB complexes in etoposide-treated cells.

  1. Managing DNA polymerases: coordinating DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Sutton, M D; Walker, G C

    2001-07-17

    Two important and timely questions with respect to DNA replication, DNA recombination, and DNA repair are: (i) what controls which DNA polymerase gains access to a particular primer-terminus, and (ii) what determines whether a DNA polymerase hands off its DNA substrate to either a different DNA polymerase or to a different protein(s) for the completion of the specific biological process? These questions have taken on added importance in light of the fact that the number of known template-dependent DNA polymerases in both eukaryotes and in prokaryotes has grown tremendously in the past two years. Most notably, the current list now includes a completely new family of enzymes that are capable of replicating imperfect DNA templates. This UmuC-DinB-Rad30-Rev1 superfamily of DNA polymerases has members in all three kingdoms of life. Members of this family have recently received a great deal of attention due to the roles they play in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), the potentially mutagenic replication over DNA lesions that act as potent blocks to continued replication catalyzed by replicative DNA polymerases. Here, we have attempted to summarize our current understanding of the regulation of action of DNA polymerases with respect to their roles in DNA replication, TLS, DNA repair, DNA recombination, and cell cycle progression. In particular, we discuss these issues in the context of the Gram-negative bacterium, Escherichia coli, that contains a DNA polymerase (Pol V) known to participate in most, if not all, of these processes.

  2. A history of the DNA repair and mutagenesis field: The discovery of base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the early history of the discovery of an DNA repair pathway designated as base excision repair (BER), since in contrast to the enzyme-catalyzed removal of damaged bases from DNA as nucleotides [called nucleotide excision repair (NER)], BER involves the removal of damaged or inappropriate bases, such as the presence of uracil instead of thymine, from DNA as free bases.

  3. Xeroderma pigmentosum and the role of DNA repair in oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, F

    1978-01-01

    Biochemical and genetic information on xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) has been briefly reviewed. This indicates that 80 to 90 percent of all XP patients are defective in the excision repair of pyrimidine dimers and are unable to perform the first step of this process as shown, for example, by their inability to undergo the DNA superhelical changes which accompany the initiation of excision repair in normal cells. However, in spite of its apparent biochemical homogeneity, XP is genetically heterogeneous and many genes appear to be responsible for the function of the factor defective in XP. Ten to 20 percent of all XP patients (called XP-variants) are capable of "dimer excision repair" but have difficulties in replicating UV-damaged DNA. The defects of XP and XP-variant affect also the repair of DNA damage caused by a number of chemical mutagens and carcinogens. This has important theoretical and practical implications since it indicates, for example, that the repair systems defective in XP must have broad specificity and that even XP cells not exposed to the harmful effect of light may suffer from poor repair of DNA damage. With regard to cancer, two questions have been considered. Namely, does XP provide a valid general model for UV-carcinogenesis in man and does it show how DNA damage leads to malignant transformation? The first question was answered in the affirmative in view of some clinical but, mainly, of cell biological data indicating that normal and excision defective XP cells differ, more quantitatively than qualitatively, in their response to UV-light. With regard to the second question XP seems to provide some support for various theories on carcinogenesis and, DNA repair defects may favour actinic carcinogenesis in a complex, non-univocous manner. Possibly the most important lesson imparted by XP is that, in man, the stability of the genetic material is dependent on the function of repair systems whose failure may predispose to cancer. In addition, the

  4. Repair of nonreplicating UV-irradiated DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.J.; Hays, J.B.

    1986-05-01

    Repair of irradiated phage lambda DNA in E. coli has been studied by a repressed-infection system: superinfection of homoimmune lysogenic bacteria; assay for restoration of transcribility to phage-encoded lac genes; extraction of DNA and assay for infectivity in transfection of uvrB/sup -/ recA/sup -/ recB/sup -/ spheroplasts, and for removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CBP-dimers) by UV-endonuclease treatment and alkaline sedimentation. In uvr/sup +/ repressed infections with 254-nm irradiated phages (60 J/m/sup 2/) lac transcription was rapidly returned to undamaged levels, concomitant with restoration of infectivity and removal of CBP-dimers. In uvrD/sup -/ cells, the frequency of phage gene inactivation corresponded to the estimated frequency of CBP-dimers per gene. In uvrA/sup -/ bacteria, however, lac expression was only 1/10 to 1/3 of that predicted by the expected frequency of gene inactivation, as if damage elsewhere affected transcription; recovery of infectivity and removal of CBP-dimers was almost completely inhibited. lac/sup +/ and lacUV5 phages, expected to respond oppositely to changes in superhelical density, were constructed as probes for topological changes during DNA repair. The assays for transfection infectivity and CBP-dimer-removal have been extended to studies of repair of UV-irradiated phage DNA injected into oocytes of the frog Xenopus laevis.

  5. DNA Repair-Protein Relocalization After Heavy Ion Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metting, N. F.

    1999-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is good at making DNA double strand breaks, and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations such as heavy ion particles are particularly efficient. For this reason, the proteins belonging to repair systems that deal with double strand breaks are of particular interest. One such protein is Ku, a component in the non-homologous recombination repair system. The Ku protein is an abundant, heterodimeric DNA end-binding complex, composed of one 70 and one 86 kDa subunit. Ku protein binds to DNA ends, nicks, gaps, and regions of transition between single and double-stranded structure. These binding properties suggest an important role in DNA repair. The Ku antigen is important in this study because it is present in relatively large copy numbers and it is part of a double-strand-break repair system. More importantly, we consistently measure an apparent upregulation in situ that is not verified by whole-cell-lysate immunoblot measurements. This apparent upregulation is triggered by very low doses of radiation, thus showing a potentially useful high sensitivity. However, elucidation of the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is still to be done.

  6. ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Özge Z; Vermeulen, Wim; Lans, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of chromatin structure is an essential component of the DNA damage response (DDR), which effectively preserves the integrity of DNA by a network of multiple DNA repair and associated signaling pathways. Within the DDR, chromatin is modified and remodeled to facilitate efficient DNA access, to control the activity of repair proteins and to mediate signaling. The mammalian ISWI family has recently emerged as one of the major ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex families that function in the DDR, as it is implicated in at least 3 major DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and nucleotide excision repair. In this review, we discuss the various manners through which different ISWI complexes regulate DNA repair and how they are targeted to chromatin containing damaged DNA. PMID:25486562

  7. ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Özge Z; Vermeulen, Wim; Lans, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of chromatin structure is an essential component of the DNA damage response (DDR), which effectively preserves the integrity of DNA by a network of multiple DNA repair and associated signaling pathways. Within the DDR, chromatin is modified and remodeled to facilitate efficient DNA access, to control the activity of repair proteins and to mediate signaling. The mammalian ISWI family has recently emerged as one of the major ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex families that function in the DDR, as it is implicated in at least 3 major DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and nucleotide excision repair. In this review, we discuss the various manners through which different ISWI complexes regulate DNA repair and how they are targeted to chromatin containing damaged DNA.

  8. DNA damage, homology-directed repair, and DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, Concetta; Porcellini, Antonio; Angrisano, Tiziana; Morano, Annalisa; Lee, Bongyong; Di Pardo, Alba; Messina, Samantha; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Fusco, Alfredo; Santillo, Maria R; Muller, Mark T; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Gottesman, Max E; Avvedimento, Enrico V

    2007-07-01

    To explore the link between DNA damage and gene silencing, we induced a DNA double-strand break in the genome of Hela or mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells using I-SceI restriction endonuclease. The I-SceI site lies within one copy of two inactivated tandem repeated green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes (DR-GFP). A total of 2%-4% of the cells generated a functional GFP by homology-directed repair (HR) and gene conversion. However, approximately 50% of these recombinants expressed GFP poorly. Silencing was rapid and associated with HR and DNA methylation of the recombinant gene, since it was prevented in Hela cells by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. ES cells deficient in DNA methyl transferase 1 yielded as many recombinants as wild-type cells, but most of these recombinants expressed GFP robustly. Half of the HR DNA molecules were de novo methylated, principally downstream to the double-strand break, and half were undermethylated relative to the uncut DNA. Methylation of the repaired gene was independent of the methylation status of the converting template. The methylation pattern of recombinant molecules derived from pools of cells carrying DR-GFP at different loci, or from an individual clone carrying DR-GFP at a single locus, was comparable. ClustalW analysis of the sequenced GFP molecules in Hela and ES cells distinguished recombinant and nonrecombinant DNA solely on the basis of their methylation profile and indicated that HR superimposed novel methylation profiles on top of the old patterns. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA analysis revealed that DNA methyl transferase 1 was bound specifically to HR GFP DNA and that methylation of the repaired segment contributed to the silencing of GFP expression. Taken together, our data support a mechanistic link between HR and DNA methylation and suggest that DNA methylation in eukaryotes marks homologous recombined segments. PMID:17616978

  9. DNA Damage, Homology-Directed Repair, and DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Angrisano, Tiziana; Morano, Annalisa; Lee, Bongyong; Pardo, Alba Di; Messina, Samantha; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Fusco, Alfredo; Santillo, Maria R; Muller, Mark T; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Gottesman, Max E; Avvedimento, Enrico V

    2007-01-01

    To explore the link between DNA damage and gene silencing, we induced a DNA double-strand break in the genome of Hela or mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells using I-SceI restriction endonuclease. The I-SceI site lies within one copy of two inactivated tandem repeated green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes (DR-GFP). A total of 2%–4% of the cells generated a functional GFP by homology-directed repair (HR) and gene conversion. However, ~50% of these recombinants expressed GFP poorly. Silencing was rapid and associated with HR and DNA methylation of the recombinant gene, since it was prevented in Hela cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. ES cells deficient in DNA methyl transferase 1 yielded as many recombinants as wild-type cells, but most of these recombinants expressed GFP robustly. Half of the HR DNA molecules were de novo methylated, principally downstream to the double-strand break, and half were undermethylated relative to the uncut DNA. Methylation of the repaired gene was independent of the methylation status of the converting template. The methylation pattern of recombinant molecules derived from pools of cells carrying DR-GFP at different loci, or from an individual clone carrying DR-GFP at a single locus, was comparable. ClustalW analysis of the sequenced GFP molecules in Hela and ES cells distinguished recombinant and nonrecombinant DNA solely on the basis of their methylation profile and indicated that HR superimposed novel methylation profiles on top of the old patterns. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA analysis revealed that DNA methyl transferase 1 was bound specifically to HR GFP DNA and that methylation of the repaired segment contributed to the silencing of GFP expression. Taken together, our data support a mechanistic link between HR and DNA methylation and suggest that DNA methylation in eukaryotes marks homologous recombined segments. PMID:17616978

  10. BRCA1-CtIP interaction in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomas; Gautier, Jean

    2016-07-01

    DNA termini at double-strand breaks are often chemically heterogeneous and require processing before initiation of repair. In a recent report, we demonstrated that CtIP and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) nuclease complex cooperate with BRCA1 to specifically repair topoisomerase II-DNA adducted breaks. In contrast, BRCA1 is dispensable for repair of restriction endonuclease-generated double-strand breaks. PMID:27652321

  11. BRCA1-CtIP interaction in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Tomas; Gautier, Jean

    2016-07-01

    DNA termini at double-strand breaks are often chemically heterogeneous and require processing before initiation of repair. In a recent report, we demonstrated that CtIP and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) nuclease complex cooperate with BRCA1 to specifically repair topoisomerase II-DNA adducted breaks. In contrast, BRCA1 is dispensable for repair of restriction endonuclease-generated double-strand breaks.

  12. Small Molecules, Inhibitors of DNA-PK, Targeting DNA Repair, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, David; Amrein, Lilian; Panasci, Lawrence; Aloyz, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    Many current chemotherapies function by damaging genomic DNA in rapidly dividing cells ultimately leading to cell death. This therapeutic approach differentially targets cancer cells that generally display rapid cell division compared to normal tissue cells. However, although these treatments are initially effective in arresting tumor growth and reducing tumor burden, resistance and disease progression eventually occur. A major mechanism underlying this resistance is increased levels of cellular DNA repair. Most cells have complex mechanisms in place to repair DNA damage that occurs due to environmental exposures or normal metabolic processes. These systems, initially overwhelmed when faced with chemotherapy induced DNA damage, become more efficient under constant selective pressure and as a result chemotherapies become less effective. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair pathways using target specific small molecule inhibitors may overcome cellular resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapies. Non-homologous end joining a major mechanism for the repair of double-strand breaks (DSB) in DNA is regulated in part by the serine/threonine kinase, DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). The DNA-PK holoenzyme acts as a scaffold protein tethering broken DNA ends and recruiting other repair molecules. It also has enzymatic activity that may be involved in DNA damage signaling. Because of its’ central role in repair of DSBs, DNA-PK has been the focus of a number of small molecule studies. In these studies specific DNA-PK inhibitors have shown efficacy in synergizing chemotherapies in vitro. However, compounds currently known to specifically inhibit DNA-PK are limited by poor pharmacokinetics: these compounds have poor solubility and have high metabolic lability in vivo leading to short serum half-lives. Future improvement in DNA-PK inhibition will likely be achieved by designing new molecules based on the recently reported crystallographic structure of DNA-PK. Computer based drug

  13. Damage and repair of ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David; Willerslev, Eske; Hansen, Anders

    2005-04-01

    Under certain conditions small amounts of DNA can survive for long periods of time and can be used as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) substrates for the study of phylogenetic relationships and population genetics of extinct plants and animals, including hominids. Because of extensive DNA degradation, these studies are limited to species that lived within the past 10(4)-10(5) years (Late Pleistocene), although DNA sequences from 10(6) years have been reported. Ancient DNA (aDNA) has been used to study phylogenetic relationships of protists, fungi, algae, plants, and higher eukaryotes such as extinct horses, cave bears, the marsupial wolf, the moa, and Neanderthal. In the past few years, this technology has been extended to the study of infectious disease in ancient Egyptian and South American mummies, the dietary habits of ancient animals, and agricultural practices and population dynamics of early native Americans. Hence, ancient DNA contains information pertinent to numerous fields of study including evolution, population genetics, ecology, climatology, medicine, archeology, and behavior. The major obstacles to the study of aDNA are its extremely low yield, contamination with modern DNA, and extensive degradation. In the course of this review, we will discuss the current aDNA literature describing the importance of aDNA studies as they relate to important biological questions and the difficulties associated with extracting useful information from highly degraded and damaged substrates derived from limited sources. In addition, we will present some of our own preliminary and published data on mechanisms of DNA degradation and some speculative thoughts on strategies for repair and restoration of aDNA.

  14. Targeting DNA repair pathways for cancer treatment: what's new?

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Mark R; Logsdon, Derek; Fishel, Melissa L

    2014-01-01

    Disruptions in DNA repair pathways predispose cells to accumulating DNA damage. A growing body of evidence indicates that tumors accumulate progressively more mutations in DNA repair proteins as cancers progress. DNA repair mechanisms greatly affect the response to cytotoxic treatments, so understanding those mechanisms and finding ways to turn dysregulated repair processes against themselves to induce tumor death is the goal of all DNA repair inhibition efforts. Inhibition may be direct or indirect. This burgeoning field of research is replete with promise and challenge, as more intricacies of each repair pathway are discovered. In an era of increasing concern about healthcare costs, use of DNA repair inhibitors can prove to be highly effective stewardship of R&D resources and patient expenses. PMID:24947262

  15. Identification of novel DNA repair proteins via primary sequence, secondary structure, and homology

    PubMed Central

    Brown, JB; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2009-01-01

    proteins that are highly likely to be involved in the repair process. A new web service, INTREPED, has been made available for the immediate search and annotation of DNA repair proteins in newly sequenced genomes. Conclusion Despite complexity due to a multitude of repair pathways, combinations of sequence, structure, and homology with Support Vector Machines offer good methods in addition to existing homology searches for DNA repair protein identification and functional annotation. Most importantly, this study has uncovered relationships between the size of a genome and a genome's available repair repetoire, and offers a number of new predictions as well as a prediction service, both which reduce the search time and cost for novel repair genes and proteins. PMID:19154573

  16. DNA excision repair: where do all the dimers go?

    PubMed

    Kemp, Michael G; Sancar, Aziz

    2012-08-15

    Exposure of cells to UV light from the sun causes the formation of pyrimidine dimers in DNA that have the potential to lead to mutation and cancer. In humans, pyrimidine dimers are removed from the genome in the form of ~30 nt-long oligomers by concerted dual incisions. Though nearly 50 y of excision repair research has uncovered many details of UV photoproduct damage recognition and removal, the fate of the excised oligonucleotides and, in particular, the ultimate fate of the chemically very stable pyrimidine dimers remain unknown. Physiologically relevant UV doses introduce hundreds of thousands of pyrimidine dimers in diploid human cells, which are excised from the genome within ~24 h. Once removed from the genome, "where do all the dimers go?" In a recent study we addressed this question. Although our study did not determine the fate of the dimer itself, it revealed that the excised ~30-mer is released from the duplex in a tight complex with the transcription/repair factor TFIIH. This finding combined with recent reports that base and oligonucleotide products of the base and double-strand break repair pathways also make stable complexes with the cognate repair enzymes, and that these complexes activate the MAP kinase and checkpoint signaling pathways, respectively, raises the possibility that TFIIH-30-mer excision complexes may play a role in signaling reactions in response to UV damage.

  17. DNA repair in species with extreme lifespan differences.

    PubMed

    MacRae, Sheila L; Croken, Matthew McKnight; Calder, R B; Aliper, Alexander; Milholland, Brandon; White, Ryan R; Zhavoronkov, Alexander; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Vijg, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Differences in DNA repair capacity have been hypothesized to underlie the great range of maximum lifespans among mammals. However, measurements of individual DNA repair activities in cells and animals have not substantiated such a relationship because utilization of repair pathways among animals--depending on habitats, anatomical characteristics, and life styles--varies greatly between mammalian species. Recent advances in high-throughput genomics, in combination with increased knowledge of the genetic pathways involved in genome maintenance, now enable a comprehensive comparison of DNA repair transcriptomes in animal species with extreme lifespan differences. Here we compare transcriptomes of liver, an organ with high oxidative metabolism and abundant spontaneous DNA damage, from humans, naked mole rats, and mice, with maximum lifespans of ~120, 30, and 3 years, respectively, with a focus on genes involved in DNA repair. The results show that the longer-lived species, human and naked mole rat, share higher expression of DNA repair genes, including core genes in several DNA repair pathways. A more systematic approach of signaling pathway analysis indicates statistically significant upregulation of several DNA repair signaling pathways in human and naked mole rat compared with mouse. The results of this present work indicate, for the first time, that DNA repair is upregulated in a major metabolic organ in long-lived humans and naked mole rats compared with short-lived mice. These results strongly suggest that DNA repair can be considered a genuine longevity assurance system. PMID:26729707

  18. DNA repair in species with extreme lifespan differences

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Sheila L.; Croken, Matthew McKnight; Calder, R.B.; Aliper, Alexander; Milholland, Brandon; White, Ryan R.; Zhavoronkov, Alexander; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Zhang, Zhengdong D.; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Differences in DNA repair capacity have been hypothesized to underlie the great range of maximum lifespans among mammals. However, measurements of individual DNA repair activities in cells and animals have not substantiated such a relationship because utilization of repair pathways among animals—depending on habitats, anatomical characteristics, and life styles—varies greatly between mammalian species. Recent advances in high-throughput genomics, in combination with increased knowledge of the genetic pathways involved in genome maintenance, now enable a comprehensive comparison of DNA repair transcriptomes in animal species with extreme lifespan differences. Here we compare transcriptomes of liver, an organ with high oxidative metabolism and abundant spontaneous DNA damage, from humans, naked mole rats, and mice, with maximum lifespans of ∼120, 30, and 3 years, respectively, with a focus on genes involved in DNA repair. The results show that the longer-lived species, human and naked mole rat, share higher expression of DNA repair genes, including core genes in several DNA repair pathways. A more systematic approach of signaling pathway analysis indicates statistically significant upregulation of several DNA repair signaling pathways in human and naked mole rat compared with mouse. The results of this present work indicate, for the first time, that DNA repair is upregulated in a major metabolic organ in long-lived humans and naked mole rats compared with short-lived mice. These results strongly suggest that DNA repair can be considered a genuine longevity assurance system. PMID:26729707

  19. Nucleotide excision repair of DNA: The very early history.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Errol C

    2011-07-15

    This article, taken largely from the book Correcting the Blueprint of Life: An Historical Account of the Discovery of DNA Repair Mechanisms, summarizes the very early history of the discovery of nucleotide excision repair.

  20. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  1. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  2. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  3. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  4. RNA-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Gui; Qi, Yijun

    2015-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most deleterious DNA lesions, which if unrepaired or repaired incorrectly can cause cell death or genome instability that may lead to cancer. To counteract these adverse consequences, eukaryotes have evolved a highly orchestrated mechanism to repair DSBs, namely DNA-damage-response (DDR). DDR, as defined specifically in relation to DSBs, consists of multi-layered regulatory modes including DNA damage sensors, transducers and effectors, through which DSBs are sensed and then repaired via DNAprotein interactions. Unexpectedly, recent studies have revealed a direct role of RNA in the repair of DSBs, including DSB-induced small RNA (diRNA)-directed and RNA-templated DNA repair. Here, we summarize the recent discoveries of RNA-mediated regulation of DSB repair and discuss the potential impact of these novel RNA components of the DSB repair pathway on genomic stability and plasticity.

  5. RNA-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Gui; Qi, Yijun

    2015-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most deleterious DNA lesions, which if unrepaired or repaired incorrectly can cause cell death or genome instability that may lead to cancer. To counteract these adverse consequences, eukaryotes have evolved a highly orchestrated mechanism to repair DSBs, namely DNA-damage-response (DDR). DDR, as defined specifically in relation to DSBs, consists of multi-layered regulatory modes including DNA damage sensors, transducers and effectors, through which DSBs are sensed and then repaired via DNAprotein interactions. Unexpectedly, recent studies have revealed a direct role of RNA in the repair of DSBs, including DSB-induced small RNA (diRNA)-directed and RNA-templated DNA repair. Here, we summarize the recent discoveries of RNA-mediated regulation of DSB repair and discuss the potential impact of these novel RNA components of the DSB repair pathway on genomic stability and plasticity. PMID:25960340

  6. Drosophila Hold'em Is Required for a Subset of Meiotic Crossovers and Interacts With the DNA Repair Endonuclease Complex Subunits MEI-9 and ERCC1

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Eric F.; Tanneti, S. Nikhila; McKim, Kim S.

    2009-01-01

    Three Drosophila proteins, ERCC1, MUS312, and MEI-9, function in a complex proposed to resolve double-Holliday-junction intermediates into crossovers during meiosis. We report here the characterization of hold'em (hdm), whose protein product belongs to a single-strand-DNA-binding superfamily of proteins. Mutations in hdm result in reduced meiotic crossover formation and sensitivity to the DNA-damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate. Furthermore, HDM physically interacts with both MEI-9 and ERCC1 in a yeast two-hybrid assay. We conclude that HDM, MEI-9, MUS312, and ERCC1 form a complex that resolves meiotic recombination intermediates into crossovers. PMID:18957705

  7. Dynamic DNA binding licenses a repair factor to bypass roadblocks in search of DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Maxwell W; Kim, Yoori; Williams, Gregory M; Huck, John D; Surtees, Jennifer A; Finkelstein, Ilya J

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins search for specific targets via facilitated diffusion along a crowded genome. However, little is known about how crowded DNA modulates facilitated diffusion and target recognition. Here we use DNA curtains and single-molecule fluorescence imaging to investigate how Msh2-Msh3, a eukaryotic mismatch repair complex, navigates on crowded DNA. Msh2-Msh3 hops over nucleosomes and other protein roadblocks, but maintains sufficient contact with DNA to recognize a single lesion. In contrast, Msh2-Msh6 slides without hopping and is largely blocked by protein roadblocks. Remarkably, the Msh3-specific mispair-binding domain (MBD) licences a chimeric Msh2-Msh6(3MBD) to bypass nucleosomes. Our studies contrast how Msh2-Msh3 and Msh2-Msh6 navigate on a crowded genome and suggest how Msh2-Msh3 locates DNA lesions outside of replication-coupled repair. These results also provide insights into how DNA repair factors search for DNA lesions in the context of chromatin. PMID:26837705

  8. Dynamic DNA binding licenses a repair factor to bypass roadblocks in search of DNA lesions

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Maxwell W.; Kim, Yoori; Williams, Gregory M.; Huck, John D.; Surtees, Jennifer A.; Finkelstein, Ilya J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins search for specific targets via facilitated diffusion along a crowded genome. However, little is known about how crowded DNA modulates facilitated diffusion and target recognition. Here we use DNA curtains and single-molecule fluorescence imaging to investigate how Msh2–Msh3, a eukaryotic mismatch repair complex, navigates on crowded DNA. Msh2–Msh3 hops over nucleosomes and other protein roadblocks, but maintains sufficient contact with DNA to recognize a single lesion. In contrast, Msh2–Msh6 slides without hopping and is largely blocked by protein roadblocks. Remarkably, the Msh3-specific mispair-binding domain (MBD) licences a chimeric Msh2–Msh6(3MBD) to bypass nucleosomes. Our studies contrast how Msh2–Msh3 and Msh2–Msh6 navigate on a crowded genome and suggest how Msh2–Msh3 locates DNA lesions outside of replication-coupled repair. These results also provide insights into how DNA repair factors search for DNA lesions in the context of chromatin. PMID:26837705

  9. DNA repair of a single UV photoproduct in a designed nucleosome

    SciTech Connect

    Kosmoskil, Joseph V.; Ackerman, Eric J. ); Smerdon, Michael J.

    2001-08-28

    Eukaryotic DNA repair enzymes must interact with the architectural hierarchy of chromatin. The challenge of finding damaged DNA complexed with histone proteins in nucleosomes is complicated by the need to maintain local chromatin structures involved in regulating other DNA processing events. The heterogeneity of lesions induced by DNA-damaging agents has led us to design homogeneously damaged substrates to directly compare repair of naked DNA with that of nucleosomes. Here we report that nucleotide excision repair in Xenopus nuclear extracts can effectively repair a single UV radiation photoproduct located 5 bases from the dyad center of a positioned nucleosome, although the nucleosome is repaired at about half the rate at which the naked DNA fragment is. Extract repair within the nucleosome is > 50-fold more rapid than either enzymatic photoreversal or endonuclease cleavage of the lesion in vitro. Furthermore, nucleosome formation occurs (after repair) only on damaged naked DNA ( 165-bp fragments) during a 1-h incubation in these extracts, even in the presence of a large excess of undamaged DNA. This is an example of selective nucleosome assembly by Xenopus nuclear extracts on a short linear DNA fragment containing a DNA lesion.

  10. Comet assay to measure DNA repair: approach and applications

    PubMed Central

    Azqueta, Amaya; Slyskova, Jana; Langie, Sabine A. S.; O’Neill Gaivão, Isabel; Collins, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cellular repair enzymes remove virtually all DNA damage before it is fixed; repair therefore plays a crucial role in preventing cancer. Repair studied at the level of transcription correlates poorly with enzyme activity, and so assays of phenotype are needed. In a biochemical approach, substrate nucleoids containing specific DNA lesions are incubated with cell extract; repair enzymes in the extract induce breaks at damage sites; and the breaks are measured with the comet assay. The nature of the substrate lesions defines the repair pathway to be studied. This in vitro DNA repair assay has been modified for use in animal tissues, specifically to study the effects of aging and nutritional intervention on repair. Recently, the assay was applied to different strains of Drosophila melanogaster proficient and deficient in DNA repair. Most applications of the repair assay have been in human biomonitoring. Individual DNA repair activity may be a marker of cancer susceptibility; alternatively, high repair activity may result from induction of repair enzymes by exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Studies to date have examined effects of environment, nutrition, lifestyle, and occupation, in addition to clinical investigations. PMID:25202323

  11. Comet assay to measure DNA repair: approach and applications.

    PubMed

    Azqueta, Amaya; Slyskova, Jana; Langie, Sabine A S; O'Neill Gaivão, Isabel; Collins, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cellular repair enzymes remove virtually all DNA damage before it is fixed; repair therefore plays a crucial role in preventing cancer. Repair studied at the level of transcription correlates poorly with enzyme activity, and so assays of phenotype are needed. In a biochemical approach, substrate nucleoids containing specific DNA lesions are incubated with cell extract; repair enzymes in the extract induce breaks at damage sites; and the breaks are measured with the comet assay. The nature of the substrate lesions defines the repair pathway to be studied. This in vitro DNA repair assay has been modified for use in animal tissues, specifically to study the effects of aging and nutritional intervention on repair. Recently, the assay was applied to different strains of Drosophila melanogaster proficient and deficient in DNA repair. Most applications of the repair assay have been in human biomonitoring. Individual DNA repair activity may be a marker of cancer susceptibility; alternatively, high repair activity may result from induction of repair enzymes by exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Studies to date have examined effects of environment, nutrition, lifestyle, and occupation, in addition to clinical investigations.

  12. N-Butyrate alters chromatin accessibility to DNA repair enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Current evidence suggests that the complex nature of mammalian chromatin can result in the concealment of DNA damage from repair enzymes and their co-factors. Recently it has been proposed that the acetylation of histone proteins in chromatin may provide a surveillance system whereby damaged regions of DNA become exposed due to changes in chromatin accessibility. This hypothesis has been tested by: (i) using n-butyrate to induce hyperacetylation in human adenocarcinoma (HT29) cells; (ii) monitoring the enzymatic accessibility of chromatin in permeabilised cells; (iii) measuring u.v. repair-associated nicking of DNA in intact cells and (iv) determining the effects of n-butyrate on cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. The results indicate that the accessibility of chromatin to Micrococcus luteus u.v. endonuclease is enhanced by greater than 2-fold in n-butyrate-treated cells and that there is a corresponding increase in u.v. repair incision rates in intact cells exposed to the drug. Non-toxic levels of n-butyrate induce a block to G1 phase transit and there is a significant growth delay on removal of the drug. Resistance of HT29 cells to u.v.-radiation and adriamycin is enhanced in n-butyrate-treated cells whereas X-ray sensitivity is increased. Although changes in the responses of cells to DNA damaging agents must be considered in relation to the effects of n-butyrate on growth rate and cell-cycle distribution, the results are not inconsistent with the proposal that increased enzymatic-accessibility/repair is biologically favourable for the resistance of cells to u.v.-radiation damage. Overall the results support the suggested operation of a histone acetylation-based chromatin surveillance system in human cells.

  13. Pathophysiology of Bronchoconstriction: Role of Oxidatively Damaged DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bacsi, Attila; Pan, Lang; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview on the present understanding of roles of oxidative DNA damage repair in cell signaling underlying bronchoconstriction common to, but not restricted to various forms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Recent findings Bronchoconstriction is a tightening of smooth muscle surrounding the bronchi and bronchioles with consequent wheezing and shortness of breath. Key stimuli include air pollutants, viral infections, allergens, thermal and osmotic changes, and shear stress of mucosal epithelium, triggering a wide range of cellular, vascular and neural events. Although activation of nerve fibers, the role of G-proteins, protein kinases and Ca++, and molecular interaction within contracting filaments of muscle are well defined, the overarching mechanisms by which a wide range of stimuli initiate these events are not fully understood. Many, if not all, stimuli increase levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are signaling and oxidatively modifying macromolecules, including DNA. The primary ROS target in DNA is guanine, and 8-oxoguanine is one of the most abundant base lesions. It is repaired by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase1 (OGG1) during base excision repair processes. The product, free 8-oxoG base, is bound by OGG1 with high affinity, and the complex then functions as an activator of small GTPases, triggering pathways for inducing gene expression and contraction of intracellular filaments in mast and smooth muscle cells. Summary Oxidative DNA damage repair-mediated cell activation signaling result in gene expression that “primes” the mucosal epithelium and submucosal tissues to generate mediators of airway smooth muscle contractions. PMID:26694039

  14. TOPBP1 takes RADical command in recombinational DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Smolka, Marcus B

    2016-02-01

    TOPBP1 is a key player in DNA replication and DNA damage signaling. In this issue, Moudry et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201507042) uncover a crucial role for TOPBP1 in DNA repair by revealing its requirement for RAD51 loading during repair of double strand breaks by homologous recombination. PMID:26811424

  15. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M.; Chen, D.S.

    1993-02-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  16. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. ); Chen, D.S. . Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  17. Structure of the DNA repair helicase XPD.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanting; Rudolf, Jana; Johnson, Kenneth A; McMahon, Stephen A; Oke, Muse; Carter, Lester; McRobbie, Anne-Marie; Brown, Sara E; Naismith, James H; White, Malcolm F

    2008-05-30

    The XPD helicase (Rad3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is a component of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH), which functions in transcription initiation and Nucleotide Excision Repair in eukaryotes, catalyzing DNA duplex opening localized to the transcription start site or site of DNA damage, respectively. XPD has a 5' to 3' polarity and the helicase activity is dependent on an iron-sulfur cluster binding domain, a feature that is conserved in related helicases such as FancJ. The xpd gene is the target of mutation in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, trichothiodystrophy, and Cockayne's syndrome, characterized by a wide spectrum of symptoms ranging from cancer susceptibility to neurological and developmental defects. The 2.25 A crystal structure of XPD from the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii, presented here together with detailed biochemical analyses, allows a molecular understanding of the structural basis for helicase activity and explains the phenotypes of xpd mutations in humans. PMID:18510925

  18. Lack of CAK complex accumulation at DNA damage sites in XP-B and XP-B/CS fibroblasts reveals differential regulation of CAK anchoring to core TFIIH by XPB and XPD helicases during nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qianzheng; Wani, Gulzar; Sharma, Nidhi; Wani, Altaf

    2012-12-01

    Transcription factor II H (TFIIH) is composed of core TFIIH and Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complexes. Besides transcription, TFIIH also participates in nucleotide excision repair (NER), verifying DNA lesions through its helicase components XPB and XPD. The assembly state of TFIIH is known to be affected by truncation mutations in xeroderma pigmentosum group G/Cockayne syndrome (XP-G/CS). Here, we showed that CAK component MAT1 was rapidly recruited to UV-induced DNA damage sites, co-localizing with core TFIIH component p62, and dispersed from the damage sites upon completion of DNA repair. While the core TFIIH-CAK association remained intact, MAT1 failed to accumulate at DNA damage sites in fibroblasts harboring XP-B or XP-B/CS mutations. Nevertheless, MAT1, XPD and XPC as well as XPG were able to accumulate at damage sites in XP-D fibroblasts, in which the core TFIIH-CAK association also remained intact. Interestingly, XPG recruitment was impaired in XP-B/CS fibroblasts derived from patients with mild phenotype, but persisted in XP-B/CS fibroblasts from severely affected patients resulting in a nonfunctional preincision complex. An examination of steady-state levels of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) indicated that UV-induced RNAPII phosphorylation was dramatically reduced in XP-B/CS fibroblasts. These results demonstrated that the CAK rapidly disassociates from the core TFIIH upon assembly of nonfunctional preincision complex in XP-B and XP-B/CS cells. The persistency of nonfunctional preincision complex correlates with the severity exhibited by XP-B patients. The results suggest that XPB and XPD helicases differentially regulate the anchoring of CAK to core TFIIH during damage verification step of NER. PMID:23083890

  19. Functions of single-strand DNA-binding proteins in DNA replication, recombination, and repair.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Aimee H

    2012-01-01

    Double-stranded (ds) DNA contains all of the necessary genetic information, although practical use of this information requires unwinding of the duplex DNA. DNA unwinding creates single-stranded (ss) DNA intermediates that serve as templates for myriad cellular functions. Exposure of ssDNA presents several problems to the cell. First, ssDNA is thermodynamically less stable than dsDNA, which leads to spontaneous formation of duplex secondary structures that impede genome maintenance processes. Second, relative to dsDNA, ssDNA is hypersensitive to chemical and nucleolytic attacks that can cause damage to the genome. Cells deal with these potential problems by encoding specialized ssDNA-binding proteins (SSBs) that bind to and stabilize ssDNA structures required for essential genomic processes. SSBs are essential proteins found in all domains of life. SSBs bind ssDNA with high affinity and in a sequence-independent manner and, in doing so, SSBs help to form the central nucleoprotein complex substrate for DNA replication, recombination, and repair processes. While SSBs are found in every organism, the proteins themselves share surprisingly little sequence similarity, subunit composition, and oligomerization states. All SSB proteins contain at least one DNA-binding oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) fold, which consists minimally of a five stranded beta-sheet arranged as a beta barrel capped by a single alpha helix. The OB fold is responsible for both ssDNA binding and oligomerization (for SSBs that operate as oligomers). The overall organization of OB folds varies between bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea. As part of SSB/ssDNA cellular structures, SSBs play direct roles in the DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In many cases, SSBs have been found to form specific complexes with diverse genome maintenance proteins, often helping to recruit SSB/ssDNA-processing enzymes to the proper cellular sites of action. This clustering of genome maintenance

  20. Chromatin structure following UV-induced DNA damage-repair or death?

    PubMed

    Farrell, Andrew W; Halliday, Gary M; Lyons, James Guy

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is compacted into a complex structure known as chromatin. The unravelling of DNA is a crucial step in DNA repair, replication, transcription and recombination as this allows access to DNA for these processes. Failure to package DNA into the nucleosome, the individual unit of chromatin, can lead to genomic instability, driving a cell into apoptosis, senescence, or cellular proliferation. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation damage causes destabilisation of chromatin integrity. UV irradiation induces DNA damage such as photolesions and subjects the chromatin to substantial rearrangements, causing the arrest of transcription forks and cell cycle arrest. Highly conserved processes known as nucleotide and base excision repair (NER and BER) then begin to repair these lesions. However, if DNA repair fails, the cell may be forced into apoptosis. The modification of various histones as well as nucleosome remodelling via ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling complexes are required not only to repair these UV-induced DNA lesions, but also for apoptosis signalling. Histone modifications and nucleosome remodelling in response to UV also lead to the recruitment of various repair and pro-apoptotic proteins. Thus, the way in which a cell responds to UV irradiation via these modifications is important in determining its fate. Failure of these DNA damage response steps can lead to cellular proliferation and oncogenic development, causing skin cancer, hence these chromatin changes are critical for a proper response to UV-induced injury.

  1. Participation of DNA repair in the response to 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Michael D.; Wilson, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The anti-metabolite 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is employed clinically to manage solid tumors including colorectal and breast cancer. Intracellular metabolites of 5-FU can exert cytotoxic effects via inhibition of thymidylate synthetase, or through incorporation into RNA and DNA, events that ultimately activate apoptosis. In this review, we cover the current data implicating DNA repair processes in cellular responsiveness to 5-FU treatment. Evidence points to roles for base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR). However, mechanistic details remain unexplained, and other pathways have not been exhaustively interrogated. Homologous recombination is of particular interest, because it resolves unrepaired DNA intermediates not properly dealt with by BER or MMR. Furthermore, crosstalk among DNA repair pathways and S-phase checkpoint signaling has not been examined. Ongoing efforts aim to design approaches and reagents that (i) approximate repair capacity and (ii) mediate strategic regulation of DNA repair in order to improve the efficacy of current anti-cancer treatments. PMID:18979208

  2. SIRT6 stabilizes DNA-dependent Protein Kinase at chromatin for DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Ronald A.; Michishita, Eriko; Hong, Tao; Berber, Elisabeth; Boxer, Lisa D.; Kusumoto, Rika; Guan, Shenheng; Shi, Xiaobing; Gozani, Or; Burlingame, Alma L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Chua, Katrin F.

    2009-01-01

    The Sir2 chromatin regulatory factor links maintenance of genomic stability to life span extension in yeast. The mammalian Sir2 family member SIRT6 has been proposed to have analogous functions, because SIRT6-deficiency leads to shortened life span and an aging-like degenerative phenotype in mice, and SIRT6 knockout cells exhibit genomic instability and DNA damage hypersensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not fully understood. Here, we show that SIRT6 forms a macromolecular complex with the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase) and promotes DNA DSB repair. In response to DSBs, SIRT6 associates dynamically with chromatin and is necessary for an acute decrease in global cellular acetylation levels on histone H3 Lysine 9. Moreover, SIRT6 is required for mobilization of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to chromatin in response to DNA damage and stabilizes DNA-PKcs at chromatin adjacent to an induced site-specific DSB. Abrogation of these SIRT6 activities leads to impaired resolution of DSBs. Together, these findings elucidate a mechanism whereby regulation of dynamic interaction of a DNA repair factor with chromatin impacts on the efficiency of repair, and establish a link between chromatin regulation, DNA repair, and a mammalian Sir2 factor. PMID:20157594

  3. DNA repair: From genome maintenance to biomarker and therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Shadia; Earley, Jennifer N.; Turchi, John J.

    2011-01-01

    A critical link exists between an individual's ability to repair cellular DNA damage and cancer development, progression and response to therapy. Knowledge gained regarding the proteins involved and types of damage repaired by the individual DNA repair pathways has led to the development of a variety of assays aimed at determining an individual's DNA repair capacity. These assays and their use in the analysis of clinical samples has yielded useful though somewhat conflicting data. In this review article, we discuss the major DNA repair pathways, the proteins and genes required for each, assays used to assess activity and the relevant clinical studies to date. With the recent results from clinical trials targeting specific DNA repair proteins for the treatment of cancer, accurate, reproducible and relevant analysis of DNA repair takes on an even greater significance. We highlight the strengths and limitations of these DNA repair studies and assays with respect to the clinical assessment of DNA repair capacity to determine cancer development and response to therapy. PMID:21908578

  4. DNA Repair and Genome Maintenance in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Lenhart, Justin S.; Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Walsh, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: From microbes to multicellular eukaryotic organisms, all cells contain pathways responsible for genome maintenance. DNA replication allows for the faithful duplication of the genome, whereas DNA repair pathways preserve DNA integrity in response to damage originating from endogenous and exogenous sources. The basic pathways important for DNA replication and repair are often conserved throughout biology. In bacteria, high-fidelity repair is balanced with low-fidelity repair and mutagenesis. Such a balance is important for maintaining viability while providing an opportunity for the advantageous selection of mutations when faced with a changing environment. Over the last decade, studies of DNA repair pathways in bacteria have demonstrated considerable differences between Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. Here we review and discuss the DNA repair, genome maintenance, and DNA damage checkpoint pathways of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We present their molecular mechanisms and compare the functions and regulation of several pathways with known information on other organisms. We also discuss DNA repair during different growth phases and the developmental program of sporulation. In summary, we present a review of the function, regulation, and molecular mechanisms of DNA repair and mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria, with a strong emphasis on B. subtilis. PMID:22933559

  5. UV-induced DNA damage and repair: a review.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Häder, Donat P

    2002-04-01

    Increases in ultraviolet radiation at the Earth's surface due to the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer have recently fuelled interest in the mechanisms of various effects it might have on organisms. DNA is certainly one of the key targets for UV-induced damage in a variety of organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. UV radiation induces two of the most abundant mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions such as cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PPs) and their Dewar valence Isomers. However, cells have developed a number of repair or tolerance mechanism to counteract the DNA damage caused by UV or any other stressors. Photoreactivation with the help of the enzyme photolyase is one of the most important and frequently occurring repair mechanisms in a variety of organisms. Excision repair, which can be distinguished into base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER), also plays an important role in DNA repair in several organisms with the help of a number of glycosylases and polymerases, respectively. In addition, mechanisms such as mutagenic repair or dimer bypass, recombinational repair, cell-cycle checkpoints, apoptosis and certain alternative repair pathways are also operative in various organisms. This review deals with UV-induced DNA damage and the associated repair mechanisms as well as methods of detecting DNA damage and its future perspectives.

  6. Investigating the effects of the presence of foreign DNA on DNA methylation and DNA repair events in cultured eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Du Toit, J; van der Westhuizen, F H; Pretorius, P J

    2013-01-01

    Methylation of DNA in eukaryotic cells, global as well as gene-specific, is affected by endogenous and endogenous factors. In this paper, it is reported that deviations in DNA methylation and expression of genes involved in DNA repair and the cell cycle are affected in 143B cultured cells containing an expression vector. Global DNA methylation analysis with cytosine-extension assay revealed a decreased global DNA methylation in the presence of the expression vector. Less promoter-specific methylation, as measured by bisulfite-MS PCR, was observed for MGMT and p16INK4a in vector-containing cells. Comet assay investigations revealed a negative effect on the DNA repair capacity of both BER and NER in Complex III compromised cells. This was reflected in the down-regulation of hOGG1 and ERCC1 expression. The results presented in this paper support the existence of a strong relationship between impaired mitochondrial function and deviations in DNA methylation and extend this relationship to impaired DNA repair.

  7. MRN, CtIP, and BRCA1 mediate repair of topoisomerase II–DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Tomas; Baer, Richard; Gottesman, Max

    2016-01-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with complex ends poses a special challenge, as additional processing is required before DNA ligation. For example, protein–DNA adducts must be removed to allow repair by either nonhomologous end joining or homology-directed repair. Here, we investigated the processing of topoisomerase II (Top2)–DNA adducts induced by treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent etoposide. Through biochemical analysis in Xenopus laevis egg extracts, we establish that the MRN (Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1) complex, CtIP, and BRCA1 are required for both the removal of Top2–DNA adducts and the subsequent resection of Top2-adducted DSB ends. Moreover, the interaction between CtIP and BRCA1, although dispensable for resection of endonuclease-generated DSB ends, is required for resection of Top2-adducted DSBs, as well as for cellular resistance to etoposide during genomic DNA replication. PMID:26880199

  8. DNA repair systems as targets of cadmium toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Gatzidou, Elisavet; Theocharis, Stamatios . E-mail: theocharis@ath.forthnet.gr

    2006-06-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a heavy metal and a potent carcinogen implicated in tumor development through occupational and environmental exposure. Recent evidence suggests that proteins participating in the DNA repair systems, especially in excision and mismatch repair, are sensitive targets of Cd toxicity. Cd by interfering and inhibiting these DNA repair processes might contribute to increased risk for tumor formation in humans. In the present review, the information available on the interference of Cd with DNA repair systems and their inhibition is summarized. These actions could possibly explain the indirect contribution of Cd to mutagenic effects and/or carcinogenicity.

  9. Mutations in two Ku homologs define a DNA end-joining repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Milne, G T; Jin, S; Shannon, K B; Weaver, D T

    1996-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in mammalian cells is dependent on the Ku DNA binding protein complex. However, the mechanism of Ku-mediated repair is not understood. We discovered a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene (KU80) that is structurally similar to the 80-kDa mammalian Ku subunit. Ku8O associates with the product of the HDF1 gene, forming the major DNA end-binding complex of yeast cells. DNA end binding was absent in ku80delta, hdf1delta, or ku80delta hdf1delta strains. Antisera specific for epitope tags on Ku80 and Hdf1 were used in supershift and immunodepletion experiments to show that both proteins are directly involved in DNA end binding. In vivo, the efficiency of two DNA end-joining processes were reduced >10-fold in ku8Odelta, hdfldelta, or ku80delta hdf1delta strains: repair of linear plasmid DNA and repair of an HO endonuclease-induced chromosomal DSB. These DNA-joining defects correlated with DNA damage sensitivity, because ku80delta and hdf1delta strains were also sensitive to methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). Ku-dependent repair is distinct from homologous recombination, because deletion of KU80 and HDF1 increased the MMS sensitivity of rad52delta. Interestingly, rad5Odelta, also shown here to be defective in end joining, was epistatic with Ku mutations for MMS repair and end joining. Therefore, Ku and Rad50 participate in an end-joining pathway that is distinct from homologous recombinational repair. Yeast DNA end joining is functionally analogous to DSB repair and V(D)J recombination in mammalian cells. PMID:8754818

  10. DNA Damage Repair in the Context of Plant Chromatin1

    PubMed Central

    Donà, Mattia; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of DNA molecules is constantly challenged. All organisms have developed mechanisms to detect and repair multiple types of DNA lesions. The basic principles of DNA damage repair (DDR) in prokaryotes and unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes are similar, but the association of DNA with nucleosomes in eukaryotic chromatin requires mechanisms that allow access of repair enzymes to the lesions. This is achieved by chromatin-remodeling factors, and their necessity for efficient DDR has recently been demonstrated for several organisms and repair pathways. Plants share many features of chromatin organization and DNA repair with fungi and animals, but they differ in other, important details, which are both interesting and relevant for our understanding of genome stability and genetic diversity. In this Update, we compare the knowledge of the role of chromatin and chromatin-modifying factors during DDR in plants with equivalent systems in yeast and humans. We emphasize plant-specific elements and discuss possible implications. PMID:26089404

  11. Formation and Repair of Tobacco Carcinogen-Derived Bulky DNA Adducts

    DOE PAGES

    Hang, Bo

    2010-01-01

    DNA adducts play a central role in chemical carcinogenesis. The analysis of formation and repair of smoking-related DNA adducts remains particularly challenging as both smokers and nonsmokers exposed to smoke are repetitively under attack from complex mixtures of carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and N -nitrosamines. The bulky DNA adducts, which usually have complex structure, are particularly important because of their biological relevance. Several known cellular DNA repair pathways have been known to operate in human cells on specific types of bulky DNA adducts, for example, nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and direct reversal involving O 6more » -alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase or AlkB homologs. Understanding the mechanisms of adduct formation and repair processes is critical for the assessment of cancer risk resulting from exposure to cigarette smoke, and ultimately for developing strategies of cancer prevention. This paper highlights the recent progress made in the areas concerning formation and repair of bulky DNA adducts in the context of tobacco carcinogen-associated genotoxic and carcinogenic effects.« less

  12. Formation and Repair of Tobacco Carcinogen-Derived Bulky DNA Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Bo

    2010-01-01

    DNA adducts play a central role in chemical carcinogenesis. The analysis of formation and repair of smoking-related DNA adducts remains particularly challenging as both smokers and nonsmokers exposed to smoke are repetitively under attack from complex mixtures of carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and N-nitrosamines. The bulky DNA adducts, which usually have complex structure, are particularly important because of their biological relevance. Several known cellular DNA repair pathways have been known to operate in human cells on specific types of bulky DNA adducts, for example, nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and direct reversal involving O6-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase or AlkB homologs. Understanding the mechanisms of adduct formation and repair processes is critical for the assessment of cancer risk resulting from exposure to cigarette smoke, and ultimately for developing strategies of cancer prevention. This paper highlights the recent progress made in the areas concerning formation and repair of bulky DNA adducts in the context of tobacco carcinogen-associated genotoxic and carcinogenic effects. PMID:21234336

  13. ZRF1 mediates remodeling of E3 ligases at DNA lesion sites during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Gracheva, Ekaterina; Chitale, Shalaka; Wilhelm, Thomas; Rapp, Alexander; Byrne, Jonathan; Stadler, Jens; Medina, Rebeca; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Faithful DNA repair is essential to maintain genome integrity. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation elicits both the recruitment of DNA repair factors and the deposition of histone marks such as monoubiquitylation of histone H2A at lesion sites. Here, we report how a ubiquitin E3 ligase complex specific to DNA repair is remodeled at lesion sites in the global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) pathway. Monoubiquitylation of histone H2A (H2A-ubiquitin) is catalyzed predominantly by a novel E3 ligase complex consisting of DDB2, DDB1, CUL4B, and RING1B (UV–RING1B complex) that acts early during lesion recognition. The H2A-ubiquitin binding protein ZRF1 mediates remodeling of this E3 ligase complex directly at the DNA lesion site, causing the assembly of the UV–DDB–CUL4A E3 ligase complex (DDB1–DDB2–CUL4A-RBX1). ZRF1 is an essential factor in GG-NER, and its function at damaged chromatin sites is linked to damage recognition factor XPC. Overall, the results shed light on the interplay between epigenetic and DNA repair recognition factors at DNA lesion sites. PMID:27091446

  14. DNA repair in cancer: emerging targets for personalized therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abbotts, Rachel; Thompson, Nicola; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is under constant threat from endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. Mammalian cells have evolved highly conserved DNA repair machinery to process DNA damage and maintain genomic integrity. Impaired DNA repair is a major driver for carcinogenesis and could promote aggressive cancer biology. Interestingly, in established tumors, DNA repair activity is required to counteract oxidative DNA damage that is prevalent in the tumor microenvironment. Emerging clinical data provide compelling evidence that overexpression of DNA repair factors may have prognostic and predictive significance in patients. More recently, DNA repair inhibition has emerged as a promising target for anticancer therapy. Synthetic lethality exploits intergene relationships where the loss of function of either of two related genes is nonlethal, but loss of both causes cell death. Exploiting this approach by targeting DNA repair has emerged as a promising strategy for personalized cancer therapy. In the current review, we focus on recent advances with a particular focus on synthetic lethality targeting in cancer. PMID:24600246

  15. Mitochondrial DNA repair and association with aging - an update

    PubMed Central

    Gredilla, Ricardo; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is constantly exposed to oxidative injury. Due to its location close to the main site of reactive oxygen species, the inner mitochondrial membrane, mtDNA is more susceptible than nuclear DNA to oxidative damage. The accumulation of DNA damage is thought to play a critical role in the aging process and to be particularly deleterious in post-mitotic cells. Thus, DNA repair is an important mechanism for maintenance of genomic integrity. Despite the importance of mitochondria in the aging process, it was thought for many years that mitochondria lacked an enzymatic DNA repair system comparable to that in the nuclear compartment. However, it is now well established that DNA repair actively takes place in mitochondria. Oxidative DNA damage processing, base excision repair mechanisms were the first to be described in these organelles, and consequently the best understood. However, new proteins and novel DNA repair pathways, thought to be exclusively present in the nucleus, have recently been described also to be present in mitochondria. Here we review the main mitochondrial DNA repair pathways and their association with the aging process. PMID:20096766

  16. DNA repair: Dynamic defenders against cancer and aging

    SciTech Connect

    Fuss, Jill O.; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2006-04-01

    You probably weren't thinking about your body's cellular DNA repair systems the last time you sat on the beach in the bright sunshine. Fortunately, however, while you were subjecting your DNA to the harmful effects of ultraviolet light, your cells were busy repairing the damage. The idea that our genetic material could be damaged by the sun was not appreciated in the early days of molecular biology. When Watson and Crick discovered the structure of DNA in 1953 [1], it was assumed that DNA is fundamentally stable since it carries the blueprint of life. However, over 50 years of research have revealed that our DNA is under constant assault by sunlight, oxygen, radiation, various chemicals, and even our own cellular processes. Cleverly, evolution has provided our cells with a diverse set of tools to repair the damage that Mother Nature causes. DNA repair processes restore the normal nucleotide sequence and DNA structure of the genome after damage [2]. These responses are highly varied and exquisitely regulated. DNA repair mechanisms are traditionally characterized by the type of damage repaired. A large variety of chemical modifications can alter normal DNA bases and either lead to mutations or block transcription if not repaired, and three distinct pathways exist to remove base damage. Base excision repair (BER) corrects DNA base alterations that do not distort the overall structure of the DNA helix such as bases damaged by oxidation resulting from normal cellular metabolism. While BER removes single damaged bases, nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes short segments of nucleotides (called oligonucleotides) containing damaged bases. NER responds to any alteration that distorts the DNA helix and is the mechanism responsible for repairing bulky base damage caused by carcinogenic chemicals such as benzo [a]pyrene (found in cigarette smoke and automobile exhaust) as well as covalent linkages between adjacent pyrimidine bases resulting from the ultraviolet (UV

  17. Decreased DNA repair gene expression among individuals exposed to arsenic in United States drinking water.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Angeline S; Karagas, Margaret R; Hamilton, Joshua W

    2003-04-10

    Arsenic is well established as a human carcinogen, but its precise mechanism of action remains unknown. Arsenic does not directly damage DNA, but may act as a carcinogen through inhibition of DNA repair mechanisms, leading indirectly to increased mutations from other DNA damaging agents. The molecular mechanism underlying arsenic inhibition of nucleotide excision repair after UV irradiation (Hartwig et al., Carcinogenesis 1997;18:399-405) is unknown, but could be due to decreased expression of critical genes involved in nucleotide excision repair of damaged DNA. This hypothesis was tested by analyzing expression of repair genes and arsenic exposure in a subset of 16 individuals enrolled in a population based case-control study investigating arsenic exposure and cancer risk in New Hampshire. Toenail arsenic levels were inversely correlated with expression of critical members of the nucleotide excision repair complex, ERCC1 (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001), XPF (r(2) = 0.56, p < 0.002), and XPB (r(2) = 0.75, p < 0.0001). The internal dose marker, toenail arsenic level, was more strongly associated with changes in expression of these genes than drinking water arsenic concentration. Our findings, based on human exposure to arsenic in a US population, show an association between biomarkers of arsenic exposure and expression of DNA repair genes. Although our findings need verification in a larger study group, they are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of DNA repair capacity is a potential mechanism for the co-carcinogenic activity of arsenic.

  18. DNA Polymerase POLN Participates in Cross-Link Repair and Homologous Recombination ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, George-Lucian; Madhavan, Mahesh V.; Mirchandani, Kanchan D.; McCaffrey, Ryan M.; Vinciguerra, Patrizia; D'Andrea, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    All cells rely on DNA polymerases to duplicate their genetic material and to repair or bypass DNA lesions. In humans, 16 polymerases have been identified, and each bears specific functions in genome maintenance. We identified here the recently discovered polymerase POLN to be involved in repair of DNA cross-links. Such DNA lesions are highly toxic and are believed to be repaired by the sequential activity of nucleotide excision repair, translesion synthesis, and homologous recombination mechanisms. By functionally assaying its role in these processes, we unraveled an unexpected involvement of POLN in homologous recombination. Moreover, we obtained evidence for physical and functional interaction of POLN with factors belonging to the Fanconi anemia pathway, a master regulator of cross-link repair. Finally, we show that POLN interacts and cooperates in DNA repair with the helicase HEL308, which shares a common origin with POLN in the Drosophila mus308 gene. Our data indicate that this novel polymerase-helicase complex participates in homologous recombination repair and is essential for cellular protection against DNA cross-links. PMID:19995904

  19. The Role of the COP9 Signalosome and Neddylation in DNA Damage Signaling and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Dudley; Dellaire, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of genomic integrity is an important process in organisms as failure to sense and repair damaged DNA can result in a variety of diseases. Eukaryotic cells have developed complex DNA repair response (DDR) mechanisms to accurately sense and repair damaged DNA. Post-translational modifications by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins, such as SUMO and NEDD8, have roles in coordinating the progression of DDR. Proteins in the neddylation pathway have also been linked to regulating DDR. Of interest is the COP9 signalosome (CSN), a multi-subunit metalloprotease present in eukaryotes that removes NEDD8 from cullins and regulates the activity of cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRLs). This in turn regulates the stability and turnover of a host of CRL-targeted proteins, some of which have established roles in DDR. This review will summarize the current knowledge on the role of the CSN and neddylation in DNA repair. PMID:26437438

  20. Dynamic binding of replication protein a is required for DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ran; Subramanyam, Shyamal; Elcock, Adrian H.; Spies, Maria; Wold, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is essential for replication, repair and recombination. High-affinity ssDNA-binding by RPA depends on two DNA binding domains in the large subunit of RPA. Mutation of the evolutionarily conserved aromatic residues in these two domains results in a separation-of-function phenotype: aromatic residue mutants support DNA replication but are defective in DNA repair. We used biochemical and single-molecule analyses, and Brownian Dynamics simulations to determine the molecular basis of this phenotype. Our studies demonstrated that RPA binds to ssDNA in at least two modes characterized by different dissociation kinetics. We also showed that the aromatic residues contribute to the formation of the longer-lived state, are required for stable binding to short ssDNA regions and are needed for RPA melting of partially duplex DNA structures. We conclude that stable binding and/or the melting of secondary DNA structures by RPA is required for DNA repair, including RAD51 mediated DNA strand exchange, but is dispensable for DNA replication. It is likely that the binding modes are in equilibrium and reflect dynamics in the RPA–DNA complex. This suggests that dynamic binding of RPA to DNA is necessary for different cellular functions. PMID:27131385

  1. Transcription bypass of DNA lesions enhances cell survival but attenuates transcription coupled DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wentao; Selvam, Kathiresan; Ko, Tengyu; Li, Shisheng

    2014-01-01

    Transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) is a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) dedicated to rapid removal of DNA lesions in the transcribed strand of actively transcribed genes. The precise nature of the TCR signal and how the repair machinery gains access to lesions imbedded in stalled RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) complexes in eukaryotic cells are still enigmatic. RNAP II has an intrinsic capacity for transcription bypass of DNA lesions by incorporation or misincorporation of nucleotides across the lesions. It has been suggested that transcription bypass of lesions, which exposes the lesions, may be required for TCR. Here, we show that E1103G mutation of Rpb1, the largest subunit of RNAP II, which promotes transcription bypass of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), increases survival of UV irradiated yeast cells but attenuates TCR. The increased cell survival is independent of any NER subpathways. In contrast, G730D mutation of Rpb1, which impairs transcription bypass of CPDs, enhances TCR. Our results suggest that transcription bypass of lesions attenuates TCR but enhances cell tolerance to DNA lesions. Efficient stalling of RNAP II is essential for efficient TCR. PMID:25389266

  2. Chromatin modifications and DNA repair: beyond double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    House, Nealia C. M.; Koch, Melissa R.; Freudenreich, Catherine H.

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair must take place in the context of chromatin, and chromatin modifications and DNA repair are intimately linked. The study of double-strand break repair has revealed numerous histone modifications that occur after induction of a DSB, and modification of the repair factors themselves can also occur. In some cases the function of the modification is at least partially understood, but in many cases it is not yet clear. Although DSB repair is a crucial activity for cell survival, DSBs account for only a small percentage of the DNA lesions that occur over the lifetime of a cell. Repair of single-strand gaps, nicks, stalled forks, alternative DNA structures, and base lesions must also occur in a chromatin context. There is increasing evidence that these repair pathways are also regulated by histone modifications and chromatin remodeling. In this review, we will summarize the current state of knowledge of chromatin modifications that occur during non-DSB repair, highlighting similarities and differences to DSB repair as well as remaining questions. PMID:25250043

  3. Effect of aging and dietary restriction on DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Weraarchakul, N.; Strong, R.; Wood, W.G.; Richardson, A.

    1989-03-01

    DNA repair was studied as a function of age in cells isolated from both the liver and the kidney of male Fischer F344 rats. DNA repair was measured by quantifying unscheduled DNA synthesis induced by UV irradiation. Unscheduled DNA synthesis decreased approximately 50% between the ages of 5 and 30 months in both hepatocytes and kidney cells. The age-related decline in unscheduled DNA synthesis in cells isolated from the liver and kidney was compared in rats fed ad libitum and rats fed a calorie-restricted diet; calorie restriction has been shown to increase the survival of rodents. The level of unscheduled DNA synthesis was significantly higher in hepatocytes and kidney cells isolated from the rats fed the restricted diet. Thus, calorie restriction appears to retard the age-related decline in DNA repair.

  4. Structural and Functional Interaction Between the Human DNA Repair Proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, P.; Meesala, S; Dauvillier, S; Modesti, M; Andres, S; Huang, Y; Sekiguchi, J; Calsou, P; Salles, B; Junop, M

    2009-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  5. A review of DNA repair and possible DNA-repair adjuvants and selected natural anti-oxidants.

    PubMed

    Emanuel, Patrick; Scheinfeld, Noah

    2007-01-01

    Few other organs have the environmental exposure-neoplasia relationship that has been observed between epithelial cutaneous malignancy and UVB exposure. A significant DNA type of defective linking of DNA nucleotides involves pyrimidine dimers. Important insight into the molecular processes that affect the response of cells to UVB have been provided by the study of rare inherited diseases characterized by DNA repair defects. Nucleotide excision repair is the best characterized of these and its importance is illustrated by the disease, xeroderma pigmentosum. This heterogenous disorder clinically characterized by malignant tumor development and molecularly by distinct alterations in the nucleotide excision repair apparatus. More recently, other DNA mechanisms have been shown to have some role in skin cancer, such as DNA-mismatch repair and double-stranded DNA breaks. Herein, we discuss the DNA-repair adjuvants a aqueous extract of Urcaria tomentosa (AC-11, Optigenex, Inc.), and T4 endonuclease V that is prepared in a liposome lotion (Dimericine, Applied Genetics Inc. Dermatics). The positive effects on the integrity DNA of other substances (from nature, heat shock proteins and cytokines) including IL-12, Polypodium leucotomos, and ubiquitin are also reviewed. Understanding DNA repair mechanisms is far from complete; further understanding will provide insight into the pathogenesis of cancer and pave the way for efficacious therapeutic agents.

  6. Symposium overview: genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hu, J J; Mohrenweiser, H W; Bell, D A; Leadon, S A; Miller, M S

    2002-11-15

    A symposium, Genetic Polymorphisms in DNA Repair and Cancer Risk, was presented at the 40th Annual Meeting of the Society of Toxicology, held in San Francisco, California, in March 2001. A brief report of the symposium was published (Kaiser, Science 292, 837-838, 2001). Molecular epidemiological studies have shown that polymorphic variants of genes involved in the metabolism and repair of carcinogens can act as cancer susceptibility genes. These variants of drug metabolic and DNA-repair enzymes either increase the activation of chemical carcinogens or decrease the cells' ability to detoxify/repair mutagenic damages. Although on an individual basis these variant alleles may only slightly change catalytic activity and increase cancer risk, their polymorphic frequency in the human population may contribute to a high proportion of cancer cases. Studies conducted over the past few years have identified variant alleles for a number of DNA-repair genes, some of which have been shown to change DNA-repair capacity. Identifying these genotypic alterations in DNA-repair enzymes and their association with cancer may help to elucidate the mechanisms of cancer etiology and to predict both disease risk and response to cancer therapy, since most antineoplastic treatments mediate their effects through DNA damage.

  7. Methods to alter levels of a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-10-17

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  8. The Rad9 protein enhances survival and promotes DNA repair following exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Patrick D.; Helt, Christopher E.; Keng, Peter C.; Bambara, Robert A. . E-mail: robert_bambara@urmc.rochester.edu

    2006-08-18

    Following DNA damage cells initiate cell cycle checkpoints to allow time to repair sustained lesions. Rad9, Rad1, and Hus1 proteins form a toroidal complex, termed the 9-1-1 complex, that is involved in checkpoint signaling. 9-1-1 shares high structural similarity to the DNA replication protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and 9-1-1 has been shown in vitro to stimulate steps of the repair process known as long patch base excision repair. Using a system that allows conditional repression of the Rad9 protein in human cell culture, we show that Rad9, and by extension, the 9-1-1 complex, enhances cell survival, is required for efficient exit from G2-phase arrest, and stimulates the repair of damaged DNA following ionizing radiation. These data provide in vivo evidence that the human 9-1-1 complex participates in DNA repair in addition to its previously described role in DNA damage sensing.

  9. The role of DNA repair in brain related disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Misiak, Magdalena; Ferrarelli, Leslie K; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2013-08-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is implicated in brain aging, neurodegeneration and neurological diseases. Damage can be created by normal cellular metabolism, which accumulates with age, or by acute cellular stress conditions which create bursts of oxidative damage. Brain cells have a particularly high basal level of metabolic activity and use distinct oxidative damage repair mechanisms to remove oxidative damage from DNA and dNTP pools. Accumulation of this damage in the background of a functional DNA repair response is associated with normal aging, but defective repair in brain cells can contribute to neurological dysfunction. Emerging research strongly associates three common neurodegenerative conditions, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and stroke, with defects in the ability to repair chronic or acute oxidative damage in neurons. This review explores the current knowledge of the role of oxidative damage repair in preserving brain function and highlights the emerging models and methods being used to advance our knowledge of the pathology of neurodegenerative disease.

  10. Induced DNA repair pathway in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Overberg, R.

    1985-01-01

    The survival of cultured rat kangaroo cells (PtK-2) and human xeroderma pigmentosum cells incubated with 5 ..mu..M cycloheximide subsequent to ultraviolet irradiation is lower than that of cells incubated without cycloheximide. The drop in survival is considerably larger than that produced by incubation of unirradiated cells with cycloheximide. The phenomenon was also observed when PtK-2 cells were incubated with emetine, another protein synthesis inhibitor, or with 5,6-dichloro-1-..beta..-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a RNA synthesis inhibitor. PtK cells which received a preliminary UV treatment followed by an incubation period without cycloheximide and then a second irradiation and 24 hour incubation with cycloheximide, survived the effects of the second irradiation better than cells which were incubated in the presence of cycloheximide after the first and second UV irradiation. The application of cycloheximide for 24 hours after UV irradiation of PtK cells resulted in one-half as many 6-thioguanine resistant cells as compared to the number of 6-thioguanine resistant cells found when cycloheximide was not used. These experiments indicate that a UV-inducible cycloheximide-sensitive DNA repair pathway is present in PtK and xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which is error-prone in PtK cells.

  11. The molecular origin of high DNA-repair efficiency by photolyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chuang; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Guo, Xunmin; Wang, Lijuan; Sancar, Aziz; Zhong, Dongping

    2015-06-01

    The primary dynamics in photomachinery such as charge separation in photosynthesis and bond isomerization in sensory photoreceptor are typically ultrafast to accelerate functional dynamics and avoid energy dissipation. The same is also true for the DNA repair enzyme, photolyase. However, it is not known how the photoinduced step is optimized in photolyase to attain maximum efficiency. Here, we analyse the primary reaction steps of repair of ultraviolet-damaged DNA by photolyase using femtosecond spectroscopy. With systematic mutations of the amino acids involved in binding of the flavin cofactor and the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer substrate, we report our direct deconvolution of the catalytic dynamics with three electron-transfer and two bond-breaking elementary steps and thus the fine tuning of the biological repair function for optimal efficiency. We found that the maximum repair efficiency is not enhanced by the ultrafast photoinduced process but achieved by the synergistic optimization of all steps in the complex repair reaction.

  12. The molecular origin of high DNA-repair efficiency by photolyase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chuang; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Guo, Xunmin; Wang, Lijuan; Sancar, Aziz; Zhong, Dongping

    2015-01-01

    The primary dynamics in photomachinery such as charge separation in photosynthesis and bond isomerization in sensory photoreceptor are typically ultrafast to accelerate functional dynamics and avoid energy dissipation. The same is also true for the DNA repair enzyme, photolyase. However, it is not known how the photoinduced step is optimized in photolyase to attain maximum efficiency. Here, we analyse the primary reaction steps of repair of ultraviolet-damaged DNA by photolyase using femtosecond spectroscopy. With systematic mutations of the amino acids involved in binding of the flavin cofactor and the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer substrate, we report our direct deconvolution of the catalytic dynamics with three electron-transfer and two bond-breaking elementary steps and thus the fine tuning of the biological repair function for optimal efficiency. We found that the maximum repair efficiency is not enhanced by the ultrafast photoinduced process but achieved by the synergistic optimization of all steps in the complex repair reaction. PMID:26065359

  13. Imaging of DNA and Protein–DNA Complexes with Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of DNA structure and dynamics and protein–DNA complexes, including recent advances in the visualization of protein–DNA complexes with the use of cutting-edge, high-speed AFM. Special emphasis is given to direct nanoscale visualization of dynamics of protein–DNA complexes. In the area of DNA structure and dynamics, structural studies of local non-B conformations of DNA and the interplay of local and global DNA conformations are reviewed. The application of time-lapse AFM nanoscale imaging of DNA dynamics is illustrated by studies of Holliday junction branch migration. Structure and dynamics of protein–DNA interactions include problems related to site-specific DNA recombination, DNA replication, and DNA mismatch repair. Studies involving the structure and dynamics of chromatin are also described. PMID:27278886

  14. Molecular Regulation of UV-Induced DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Palak; He, Yu-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight is a major etiologic factor for skin cancer, the most prevalent cancer in the U.S., as well as premature skin aging. In particular, UVB radiation causes formation of specific DNA damage photoproducts between pyrimidine bases. These DNA damage photoproducts are repaired by a process called nucleotide excision repair, also known as UV-induced DNA repair. When left unrepaired, UVB-induced DNA damage leads to accumulation of mutations, predisposing people to carcinogenesis as well as to premature aging. Genetic loss of nucleotide excision repair leads to severe disorders, namely, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), trichothiodystrophy (TTD) and Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are associated with predisposition to skin carcinogenesis at a young age as well as developmental and neurological conditions. Regulation of nucleotide excision repair is an attractive avenue to preventing or reversing these detrimental consequences of impaired nucleotide excision repair. Here we review recent studies on molecular mechanisms regulating nucleotide excision repair by extracellular cues and intracellular signaling pathways, with a special focus on the molecular regulation of individual repair factors. PMID:25534312

  15. Radiation-Induced Survivin Nuclear Accumulation is Linked to DNA Damage Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Reichert, Sebastian; Roedel, Claus

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Increased expression of survivin has been identified as a negative prognostic marker in a variety of human cancers. We have previously shown that survivin is a radiation-resistance factor and that the therapeutic effect of survivin knock-down might result from an impaired DNA repair capacity. In this study, we aimed to elucidate an interrelationship between survivin's cellular localization and DNA double-strand break repair. Methods and Materials: Survivin's cellular distribution and nuclear complex formation were assayed by Western blotting of subcellular fractions, by immunofluorescence staining, and co-immunoprecipitation in SW480 colorectal cancer cells. DNA repair capacity was analyzed by kinetics of gamma-H2AX foci formation, and by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) assays in the presence of survivin-specific or nonspecific control siRNA. Results: Following irradiation, we observed a rapid nuclear accumulation of survivin and subsequent phosphorylation of the protein in the nucleus. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses from nuclear extracts revealed an interaction among survivin, Ku70, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, and DNA-PKcs that was confirmed by immunofluorescence co-localization in nuclear foci. Survivin knock down by siRNA resulted in an impaired DNA double strand break repair, as demonstrated by an increased detection of gamma-H2AX foci/nucleus at 60 min and a higher amount of residual gamma-H2AX foci at 24 hr postirradiation. Furthermore, we detected in survivin-depleted cells a hampered S2056 autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs and a significantly decreased DNA-PKcs kinase activity. Conclusion: These data indicate that nuclear survivin is linked to DNA double-strand break repair by interaction with members of the DNA double-strand breaks repair machinery, thus regulating DNA-PKcs activity.

  16. p53 in the DNA-Damage-Repair Process.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ashley B; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The cells in the human body are continuously challenged by a variety of genotoxic attacks. Erroneous repair of the DNA can lead to mutations and chromosomal aberrations that can alter the functions of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes, thus causing cancer development. As a central tumor suppressor, p53 guards the genome by orchestrating a variety of DNA-damage-response (DDR) mechanisms. Already early in metazoan evolution, p53 started controlling the apoptotic demise of genomically compromised cells. p53 plays a prominent role as a facilitator of DNA repair by halting the cell cycle to allow time for the repair machineries to restore genome stability. In addition, p53 took on diverse roles to also directly impact the activity of various DNA-repair systems. It thus appears as if p53 is multitasking in providing protection from cancer development by maintaining genome stability.

  17. p53 in the DNA-Damage-Repair Process.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ashley B; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The cells in the human body are continuously challenged by a variety of genotoxic attacks. Erroneous repair of the DNA can lead to mutations and chromosomal aberrations that can alter the functions of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes, thus causing cancer development. As a central tumor suppressor, p53 guards the genome by orchestrating a variety of DNA-damage-response (DDR) mechanisms. Already early in metazoan evolution, p53 started controlling the apoptotic demise of genomically compromised cells. p53 plays a prominent role as a facilitator of DNA repair by halting the cell cycle to allow time for the repair machineries to restore genome stability. In addition, p53 took on diverse roles to also directly impact the activity of various DNA-repair systems. It thus appears as if p53 is multitasking in providing protection from cancer development by maintaining genome stability. PMID:27048304

  18. p53 in the DNA damage repair process

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ashley B.; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The cells in the human body are continuously challenged by a variety of genotoxic attacks. Erroneous repair of the DNA can lead to mutations and chromosomal aberrations that can alter the functions of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes, thus causing cancer development. As a central tumor suppressor, p53 guards the genome by orchestrating a variety of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms. Already early in metazoan evolution, p53 started controlling the apoptotic demise of genomically compromised cells. p53 plays a prominent role as a facilitator of DNA repair by halting the cell cycle to allow time for the repair machineries to restore genome stability. In addition, p53 took on diverse roles to also directly impact the activity of various DNA repair systems. It thus appears as if p53 is multitasking in protecting from cancer development by maintaining genome stability. PMID:27048304

  19. D-ribose inhibits DNA repair synthesis in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zunica, G.; Marini, M.; Brunelli, M.A.; Chiricolo, M.; Franceschi, C.

    1986-07-31

    D-ribose is cytotoxic for quiescent human lymphocytes and severely inhibits their PHA-induced proliferation at concentrations (25-50 mM) at which other simple sugars are ineffective. In order to explain these effects, DNA repair synthesis was evaluated in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes treated with hydroxyurea and irradiated. D-ribose, in contrast to other reducing sugars, did not induce repair synthesis and therefore did not apparently damage DNA in a direct way, although it markedly inhibited gamma ray-induced repair. Taking into account that lymphocytes must rejoin physiologically-formed DNA strand breaks in order to enter the cell cycle, we suggest that D-ribose exerts its cytotoxic activity by interfering with metabolic pathways critical for the repair of DNA breaks.

  20. Impact of Alternative DNA Structures on DNA Damage, DNA Repair, and Genetic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive genomic sequences can adopt a number of alternative DNA structures that differ from the canonical B-form duplex (i.e. non-B DNA). These non-B DNA-forming sequences have been shown to have many important biological functions related to DNA metabolic processes; for example, they may have regulatory roles in DNA transcription and replication. In addition to these regulatory functions, non-B DNA can stimulate genetic instability in the presence or absence of DNA damage, via replication-dependent and/or replication-independent pathways. This review focuses on the interactions of non-B DNA conformations with DNA repair proteins and how these interactions impact genetic instability. PMID:24767258

  1. Defective DNA repair and increased chromatin binding of DNA repair factors in Down syndrome fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Necchi, Daniela; Pinto, Antonella; Tillhon, Micol; Dutto, Ilaria; Serafini, Melania Maria; Lanni, Cristina; Govoni, Stefano; Racchi, Marco; Prosperi, Ennio

    2015-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is characterized by genetic instability, neurodegeneration, and premature aging. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to this phenotype are not yet well understood. Here, we report that DS fibroblasts from both fetal and adult donors show the presence of oxidative DNA base damage, such as dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxodG), and activation of a DNA damage response (DDR), already during unperturbed growth conditions. DDR with checkpoint activation was indicated by histone H2AX and Chk2 protein phosphorylation, and by increased p53 protein levels. In addition, both fetal and adult DS fibroblasts were more sensitive to oxidative DNA damage induced by potassium bromate, and were defective in the removal of 8-oxodG, as compared with age-matched cells from control healthy donors. The analysis of core proteins participating in base excision repair (BER), such as XRCC1 and DNA polymerase β, showed that higher amounts of these factors were bound to chromatin in DS than in control cells, even in the absence of DNA damage. These findings occurred in concomitance with increased levels of phosphorylated XRCC1 detected in DS cells. These results indicate that DS cells exhibit a BER deficiency, which is associated with prolonged chromatin association of core BER factors.

  2. Heavy Metal Exposure Influences Double Strand Break DNA Repair Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Maria E.; Derbes, Rebecca S.; Ade, Catherine M.; Ortego, Jonathan C.; Stark, Jeremy; Deininger, Prescott L.; Roy-Engel, Astrid M.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel are classified as carcinogens. Although the precise mechanism of carcinogenesis is undefined, heavy metal exposure can contribute to genetic damage by inducing double strand breaks (DSBs) as well as inhibiting critical proteins from different DNA repair pathways. Here we take advantage of two previously published culture assay systems developed to address mechanistic aspects of DNA repair to evaluate the effects of heavy metal exposures on competing DNA repair outcomes. Our results demonstrate that exposure to heavy metals significantly alters how cells repair double strand breaks. The effects observed are both specific to the particular metal and dose dependent. Low doses of NiCl2 favored resolution of DSBs through homologous recombination (HR) and single strand annealing (SSA), which were inhibited by higher NiCl2 doses. In contrast, cells exposed to arsenic trioxide preferentially repaired using the “error prone” non-homologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) while inhibiting repair by HR. In addition, we determined that low doses of nickel and cadmium contributed to an increase in mutagenic recombination-mediated by Alu elements, the most numerous family of repetitive elements in humans. Sequence verification confirmed that the majority of the genetic deletions were the result of Alu-mediated non-allelic recombination events that predominantly arose from repair by SSA. All heavy metals showed a shift in the outcomes of alt-NHEJ repair with a significant increase of non-templated sequence insertions at the DSB repair site. Our data suggest that exposure to heavy metals will alter the choice of DNA repair pathway changing the genetic outcome of DSBs repair. PMID:26966913

  3. DNA repair proficiency: A potential susceptibility factor for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Helzlsouer, K.J.; Perry, H.; Harris, E.L. |

    1994-09-01

    A family study and a case-control study were conducted to examine the association between sub-optimal repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage and the development of breast cancer. A familial cluster of breast cancer was investigated in which breast cancer occurred in 4 of 6 sisters, some of whom were exposed to ionizing radiation from repeated chest fluoroscopic examinations during adolescence and early adulthood. DNA repair proficiency was measured among available family members and correlated with their history of radiation exposure. DNA repair proficiency was also measured among 16 breast cancer cases, 5 women with a family history of breast cancer and 12 controls. The results of the family study suggest an association between poor DNA repair proficiency and increased sensitivity to the carcinogenic effects of early radiation exposure on breast tissue. The case-control study showed that a significantly higher percentage of women with breast cancer (63%) and women with a family history of breast cancer (80%) had poor repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage than control women (17%) (P-value=0.02). Sub-optimal repair of DNA damage may be a host susceptibility factor predisposing individuals to breast cancer through increased sensitivity to carcinogenic damage from environmental exposures such as ionizing radiation.

  4. Purification of mammalian DNA repair protein XRCC1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I.

    1995-11-01

    Malfunctioning DNA repair systems lead to cancer mutations, and cell death. XRCC1 (X-ray Repair Cross Complementing) is a human DNA repair gene that has been found to fully correct the x-ray repair defect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutant EM9. The corresponding protein (XRCC1) encoded by this gene has been linked to a DNA repair pathway known as base excision repair, and affects the activity of DNA ligase III. Previously, an XRCC1 cDNA minigene (consisting of the uninterrupted coding sequence for XRCC1 protein followed by a decahistidine tag) was constructed and cloned into vector pET-16b for the purpose of: (1) overproduction of XRCC1 in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; and (2) to facilitate rapid purification of XRCC1 from these systems. A vector is basically a DNA carrier that allows recombinant protein to be cloned and overexpressed in host cells. In this study, XRCC1 protein was overexpressed in E. coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Currently, the XRCC1 minigene is being inserted into a new vector [pET-26b(+)] in hopes to increase overexpression and improve purification. Once purified XRCC1 can be crystallized for structural studies, or studied in vitro for its biological function.

  5. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria protects cells against oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mansour; Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Desler, Claus; Hickson, Ian D; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is the most prominent DNA repair pathway in human mitochondria. BER also results in a temporary generation of AP-sites, single-strand breaks and nucleotide gaps. Thus, incomplete BER can result in the generation of DNA repair intermediates that can disrupt mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription and generate mutations. We carried out BER analysis in highly purified mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines U2OS and HeLa, and mouse brain using a circular DNA substrate containing a lesion at a specific position. We found that DNA ligation is significantly slower than the preceding mitochondrial BER steps. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria improved the rate of overall BER, increased cell survival after menadione induced oxidative stress and reduced autophagy following the inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I by rotenone. Our results suggest that the amount of DNA ligase III in mitochondria may be critical for cell survival following prolonged oxidative stress, and demonstrate a functional link between mitochondrial DNA damage and repair, cell survival upon oxidative stress, and removal of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy.

  6. The cutting edges in DNA repair, licensing, and fidelity: DNA and RNA repair nucleases sculpt DNA to measure twice, cut once.

    PubMed

    Tsutakawa, Susan E; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Tainer, John A

    2014-07-01

    To avoid genome instability, DNA repair nucleases must precisely target the correct damaged substrate before they are licensed to incise. Damage identification is a challenge for all DNA damage response proteins, but especially for nucleases that cut the DNA and necessarily create a cleaved DNA repair intermediate, likely more toxic than the initial damage. How do these enzymes achieve exquisite specificity without specific sequence recognition or, in some cases, without a non-canonical DNA nucleotide? Combined structural, biochemical, and biological analyses of repair nucleases are revealing their molecular tools for damage verification and safeguarding against inadvertent incision. Surprisingly, these enzymes also often act on RNA, which deserves more attention. Here, we review protein-DNA structures for nucleases involved in replication, base excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair (DSBR), and telomere maintenance: apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), Endonuclease IV (Nfo), tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP2), UV Damage endonuclease (UVDE), very short patch repair endonuclease (Vsr), Endonuclease V (Nfi), Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), RNase T and Meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11). DNA and RNA structure-sensing nucleases are essential to life with roles in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Increasingly these enzymes are employed as advanced tools for synthetic biology and as targets for cancer prognosis and interventions. Currently their structural biology is most fully illuminated for DNA repair, which is also essential to life. How DNA repair enzymes maintain genome fidelity is one of the DNA double helix secrets missed by James Watson and Francis Crick, that is only now being illuminated though structural biology and mutational analyses. Structures reveal motifs for repair nucleases and mechanisms whereby these enzymes follow the old carpenter adage: measure twice, cut once. Furthermore, to measure

  7. The cutting edges in DNA repair, licensing, and fidelity: DNA and RNA repair nucleases sculpt DNA to measure twice, cut once

    PubMed Central

    Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien

    2014-01-01

    To avoid genome instability, DNA repair nucleases must precisely target the correct damaged substrate before they are licensed to incise. Damage identification is a challenge for all DNA damage response proteins, but especially for nucleases that cut the DNA and necessarily create a cleaved DNA repair intermediate, likely more toxic than the initial damage. How do these enzymes achieve exquisite specificity without specific sequence recognition or, in some cases, without a non-canonical DNA nucleotide? Combined structural, biochemical, and biological analyses of repair nucleases are revealing their molecular tools for damage verification and safeguarding against inadvertent incision. Surprisingly, these enzymes also often act on RNA, which deserves more attention. Here, we review protein-DNA structures for nucleases involved in replication, base excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair (DSBR), and telomere maintenance: apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), Endonuclease IV (Nfo), tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP2), UV Damage endonuclease (UVDE), very short patch repair endonuclease (Vsr), Endonuclease V (Nfi), Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), RNase T and Meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11). DNA and RNA structure-sensing nucleases are essential to life with roles in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Increasingly these enzymes are employed as advanced tools for synthetic biology and as targets for cancer prognosis and interventions. Currently their structural biology is most fully illuminated for DNA repair, which is also essential to life. How DNA repair enzymes maintain genome fidelity is one of the DNA double helix secrets missed by Watson-Crick, that is only now being illuminated though structural biology and mutational analyses. Structures reveal motifs for repair nucleases and mechanisms whereby these enzymes follow the old carpenter adage: measure twice, cut once. Furthermore, to measure twice these nucleases

  8. Missing piece of first-responder DNA repair machine revealed

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Scripps Research Institute have revealed the role played by the least-understood part of a first-responder molecule that rushes in to bind and repair breaks in DNA strands, a process that helps people avoid cancer. With this final piece of the puzzle in place, scientists can better understand how the repair mechanism fends off cancer in healthy people, and conversely, how it helps cancer cells resist chemotherapy. This could enable researchers to develop more effective therapies with fewer side effects. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/10/01/dna-repair-uncovered/

  9. DNA repair mechanisms in dividing and non-dividing cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyama, Teruaki; Wilson, David M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage created by endogenous or exogenous genotoxic agents can exist in multiple forms, and if allowed to persist, can promote genome instability and directly lead to various human diseases, particularly cancer, neurological abnormalities, immunodeficiency and premature aging. To avoid such deleterious outcomes, cells have evolved an array of DNA repair pathways, which carry out what is typically a multiple-step process to resolve specific DNA lesions and maintain genome integrity. To fully appreciate the biological contributions of the different DNA repair systems, one must keep in mind the cellular context within they operate. For example, the human body is composed of non-dividing and dividing cell types, including, in the brain, neurons and glial cells. We describe herein the molecular mechanisms of the different DNA repair pathways, and review their roles in non-dividing and dividing cells, with an eye towards how these pathways may regulate the development of neurological disease. PMID:23684800

  10. DNA repair: front and center and not going away!

    PubMed

    Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-01-01

    This introduction to the book: DNA repair protocols: third edition, edited by Bjergbaek, discusses the history and more recent developments in the field of DNA repair. This research field started in the 1950 and developed from a small group of researchers interested in the damage caused to DNA by ultraviolet irradiation from the sun to become a large field of research today. DNA damage and its repair are now thought to play an important role in the etiologies of cancer, aging, and neurodegeneration and there is a great deal of interest in this venture. Thus, understanding of DNA processing is now a central field in molecular and cellular biology, and the field is still growing.

  11. DNA repair mechanisms in dividing and non-dividing cells.

    PubMed

    Iyama, Teruaki; Wilson, David M

    2013-08-01

    DNA damage created by endogenous or exogenous genotoxic agents can exist in multiple forms, and if allowed to persist, can promote genome instability and directly lead to various human diseases, particularly cancer, neurological abnormalities, immunodeficiency and premature aging. To avoid such deleterious outcomes, cells have evolved an array of DNA repair pathways, which carry out what is typically a multiple-step process to resolve specific DNA lesions and maintain genome integrity. To fully appreciate the biological contributions of the different DNA repair systems, one must keep in mind the cellular context within which they operate. For example, the human body is composed of non-dividing and dividing cell types, including, in the brain, neurons and glial cells. We describe herein the molecular mechanisms of the different DNA repair pathways, and review their roles in non-dividing and dividing cells, with an eye toward how these pathways may regulate the development of neurological disease.

  12. DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Tomas; Baer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Summary Since DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) contribute to the genomic instability that drives cancer development, DSB repair pathways serve as important mechanisms for tumor suppression. Thus, genetic lesions, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, that disrupt DSB repair are often associated with cancer susceptibility. In addition, recent evidence suggests that DSB “mis-repair”, in which DSBs are resolved by an inappropriate repair pathway, can also promote genomic instability and presumably tumorigenesis. This notion has gained currency from recent cancer genome sequencing studies which have uncovered numerous chromosomal rearrangements harboring pathological DNA repair signatures. In this perspective, we discuss the factors that regulate DSB repair pathway choice and their consequences for genome stability and cancer. PMID:24746645

  13. DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Gange, R.W.; Freeman, S.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  14. UV protective effects of DNA repair enzymes and RNA lotion.

    PubMed

    Ke, Malcolm S; Camouse, Melissa M; Swain, Freddie R; Oshtory, Shaheen; Matsui, Mary; Mammone, Thomas; Maes, Daniel; Cooper, Kevin D; Stevens, Seth R; Baron, Elma D

    2008-01-01

    Solar UV radiation is known to cause immune suppression, believed to be a critical factor in cutaneous carcinogenesis. Although the mechanism is not entirely understood, DNA damage is clearly involved. Sunscreens function by attenuating the UV radiation that reaches the epidermis. However, once DNA damage ensues, repair mechanisms become essential for prevention of malignant transformation. DNA repair enzymes have shown efficacy in reducing cutaneous neoplasms among xeroderma pigmentosum patients. In vitro studies suggest that RNA fragments increase the resistance of human keratinocytes to UVB damage and enhance DNA repair but in vivo data are lacking. This study aimed to determine the effect of topical formulations containing either DNA repair enzymes (Micrococcus luteus) or RNA fragments (UVC-irradiated rabbit globin mRNA) on UV-induced local contact hypersensitivity (CHS) suppression in humans as measured in vivo using the contact allergen dinitrochlorobenzene. Immunohistochemistry was also employed in skin biopsies to evaluate the level of thymine dimers after UV. Eighty volunteers completed the CHS portion. A single 0.75 minimum erythema dose (MED) simulated solar radiation exposure resulted in 64% CHS suppression in unprotected subjects compared with unirradiated sensitized controls. In contrast, UV-induced CHS suppression was reduced to 19% with DNA repair enzymes, and 7% with RNA fragments. Sun protection factor (SPF) testing revealed an SPF of 1 for both formulations, indicating that the observed immune protection cannot be attributed to sunscreen effects. Biopsies from an additional nine volunteers showed an 18% decrease in thymine dimers by both DNA repair enzymes and RNA fragments, relative to unprotected UV-irradiated skin. These results suggest that RNA fragments may be useful as a photoprotective agent with in vivo effects comparable to DNA repair enzymes.

  15. Deficient DNA repair in the human progeroid disorder, Werner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2005-09-01

    The study of how DNA repair mechanisms change with aging is central to our understanding of the aging process. Here, I review the molecular functions of a key aging protein, Werner protein (WRN), which is deficient in the premature aging disorder, Werner syndrome (WS). This protein plays a significant role in DNA repair, particularly in base excision repair and in recombination. WRN may be a key regulatory factor in these processes and may also play a role in coordinating them. WRN belongs to the RecQ helicase family of proteins, often referred to as the guardians of the genome. These proteins appear to integrate with the more classic DNA repair pathways and proteins.

  16. DNA repair: a changing geography? (1964-2008).

    PubMed

    Maisonobe, Marion; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Eckert, Denis

    2013-07-01

    This article aims to explain the current state of DNA Repair studies' global geography by focusing on the genesis of the community. Bibliometric data is used to localize scientific activities related to DNA Repair at the city level. The keyword "DNA Repair" was introduced first by American scientists. It started to spread after 1964 that is to say, after P. Howard-Flanders (Yale University), P. Hanawalt (Stanford University) and R. Setlow (Oak Ridge Laboratories) found evidence for Excision Repair mechanisms. It was the first stage in the emergence of an autonomous scientific community. In this article, we will try to assess to what extent the geo-history of this scientific field is determinant in understanding its current geography. In order to do so, we will localize the places where the first "DNA Repair" publications were signed fifty years ago and the following spatial diffusion process, which led to the current geography of the field. Then, we will focus on the evolution of the research activity of "early entrants" in relation to the activity of "latecomers". This article is an opportunity to share with DNA Repair scientists some research results of a dynamic field in Science studies: spatial scientometrics.

  17. PP2A-B56ϵ complex is involved in dephosphorylation of γ-H2AX in the repair process of CPT-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuying; Nan, Anuo; Xiao, Ying; Chen, Yongzhong; Lai, Yandong

    2015-05-01

    Phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) in response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) should be eliminated from the sites of DNA damage to fulfill the DNA repair and release cells from the growth arrest. Previous study showed that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) interact with γ-H2AX that lead to the dephosphorylation of γ-H2AX. Here, we examined the effects of suppression of PP2A regulatory subunits on dephosphorylation of γ-H2AX in human embryonic kidney epithelial cells (HEK) treated by topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin (CPT). We found that cells with suppression of B55α or B56ϵ were more sensitive to DNA damage agents. Suppression of B56ϵ led to persistence of γ-H2AX, resulting in prolonged DSBs repair and increased chromatin instability measured by comet assay. In addition, the deficiency of B56ϵ impaired the cell cycle regulation and the DNA repair pathway of homologous recombination (HR). Notably, we detected that PP2A B56ϵ subunit was involved directly in dephosphorylation of γ-H2AX and translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus upon the treatment of CPT. Our findings demonstrate that PP2A holoenzyme containing B56ϵ is responsible for the dephosphorylation of γ-H2AX and regulation of DNA repair of DSBs induced by CPT.

  18. DNA Binding Properties of the Actin-Related Protein Arp8 and Its Role in DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Hirokazu; Otawa, Kenji; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Oma, Yukako; Nishijima, Hitoshi; Shibahara, Kei-ich; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Harata, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Actin and actin-related proteins (Arps), which are members of the actin family, are essential components of many of these remodeling complexes. Actin, Arp4, Arp5, and Arp8 are found to be evolutionarily conserved components of the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, which is involved in transcriptional regulation, DNA replication, and DNA repair. A recent report showed that Arp8 forms a module in the INO80 complex and this module can directly capture a nucleosome. In the present study, we showed that recombinant human Arp8 binds to DNAs, and preferentially binds to single-stranded DNA. Analysis of the binding of adenine nucleotides to Arp8 mutants suggested that the ATP-binding pocket, located in the evolutionarily conserved actin fold, plays a regulatory role in the binding of Arp8 to DNA. To determine the cellular function of Arp8, we derived tetracycline-inducible Arp8 knockout cells from a cultured human cell line. Analysis of results obtained after treating these cells with aphidicolin and camptothecin revealed that Arp8 is involved in DNA repair. Together with the previous observation that Arp8, but not γ-H2AX, is indispensable for recruiting INO80 complex to DSB in human, results of our study suggest an individual role for Arp8 in DNA repair. PMID:25299602

  19. BRG1 promotes the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by facilitating the replacement of RPA with RAD51

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wenjing; Wang, Ruoxi; Chen, Hongyu; Wang, Xiaolin; Xiao, Ting; Boldogh, Istvan; Ba, Xueqing; Han, Liping; Zeng, Xianlu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are a type of lethal DNA damage. The repair of DSBs requires tight coordination between the factors modulating chromatin structure and the DNA repair machinery. BRG1, the ATPase subunit of the chromatin remodelling complex Switch/Sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF), is often linked to tumorigenesis and genome instability, and its role in DSB repair remains largely unclear. In the present study, we show that BRG1 is recruited to DSB sites and enhances DSB repair. Using DR-GFP and EJ5-GFP reporter systems, we demonstrate that BRG1 facilitates homologous recombination repair rather than nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair. Moreover, the BRG1–RAD52 complex mediates the replacement of RPA with RAD51 on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to initiate DNA strand invasion. Loss of BRG1 results in a failure of RAD51 loading onto ssDNA, abnormal homologous recombination repair and enhanced DSB-induced lethality. Our present study provides a mechanistic insight into how BRG1, which is known to be involved in chromatin remodelling, plays a substantial role in the homologous recombination repair pathway in mammalian cells. PMID:25395584

  20. Sources of DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Models of Recombinational DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anuja; Haber, James E.

    2014-01-01

    DNA is subject to many endogenous and exogenous insults that impair DNA replication and proper chromosome segregation. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most toxic of these lesions and must be repaired to preserve chromosomal integrity. Eukaryotes are equipped with several different, but related, repair mechanisms involving homologous recombination, including single-strand annealing, gene conversion, and break-induced replication. In this review, we highlight the chief sources of DSBs and crucial requirements for each of these repair processes, as well as the methods to identify and study intermediate steps in DSB repair by homologous recombination. PMID:25104768

  1. Evidence implying DNA polymerase beta function in excision repair.

    PubMed

    Siedlecki, J A; Szyszko, J; Pietrzykowska, I; Zmudzka, B

    1980-01-25

    Comparison was made of the ability of calf thymus DNA polymerases alpha and beta to replicate the following templates: native E. coli CR-34 DNA (T-DNA), calf thymus DNA activated by DNase I (act.DNA), BU-DNA (from E. coli CR-34 cells cultured on BUdR-containing medium) with damages resulting from incomplete excision repair, as well as thermally denatured act.DNA and BU-DNA (s.s.act.DNA and s.s.BU-DNA). 3H-TTP incorporation during extensive replication of act.DNA was similar for both enzymes, being, as expected, 40 times higher than for T-DNA. Likewise, the differences in the yield of the s.s.act.DNA or s.s.BU-DNA replication between both enzymes were negligible. In contrast, damaged native DNA was 6 - 30 times more extensively replicated by DNA polymerase beta than alpha. We propose that this is due to the greater ability of DNA polymerase beta compared with alpha to replicate single-stranded gaps, the presence of which is more likely in damaged BU-DNA than in T-DNA and act.DNA.

  2. Loss of Urokinase Receptor Sensitizes Cells to DNA Damage and Delays DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Pavan B.; Hodjat, Mahshid; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna; Kiyan, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage induced by numerous exogenous or endogenous factors may have irreversible consequences on the cell leading to cell cycle arrest, senescence and cell death. The DNA damage response (DDR) is powerful signaling machinery triggered in response to DNA damage, to provide DNA damage recognition, signaling and repair. Most anticancer drugs induce DNA damage, and DNA repair in turn attenuates therapeutic efficiency of those drugs. Approaches delaying DNA repair are often used to increase efficiency of treatment. Recent data show that ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for signaling and repair of DNA damage. However, mechanisms providing regulation of proteasome intracellular localization, activity, and recruitment to DNA damage sites are elusive. Even less investigated are the roles of extranuclear signaling proteins in these processes. In this study, we report the involvement of the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in DDR-associated regulation of proteasome. We show that in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) uPAR activates DNA single strand break repair signaling pathway. We provide evidence that uPAR is essential for functional assembly of the 26S proteasome. We further demonstrate that uPAR mediates DNA damage-induced phosphorylation, nuclear import, and recruitment of the regulatory subunit PSMD6 to proteasome. We found that deficiency of uPAR and PSMD6 delays DNA repair and leads to decreased cell survival. These data may offer new therapeutic approaches for diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24987841

  3. RECQL4 Promotes DNA End Resection in Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huiming; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Keijzers, Guido; Anand, Roopesh; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Cejka, Petr; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2016-06-28

    The RecQ helicase RECQL4, mutated in Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, regulates genome stability, aging, and cancer. Here, we identify a crucial role for RECQL4 in DNA end resection, which is the initial and an essential step of homologous recombination (HR)-dependent DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR). Depletion of RECQL4 severely reduces HR-mediated repair and 5' end resection in vivo. RECQL4 physically interacts with MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN), which senses DSBs and initiates DNA end resection with CtIP. The MRE11 exonuclease regulates the retention of RECQL4 at laser-induced DSBs. RECQL4 also directly interacts with CtIP via its N-terminal domain and promotes CtIP recruitment to the MRN complex at DSBs. Moreover, inactivation of RECQL4's helicase activity impairs DNA end processing and HR-dependent DSBR without affecting its interaction with MRE11 and CtIP, suggesting an important role for RECQL4's unwinding activity in the process. Thus, we report that RECQL4 is an important participant in HR-dependent DSBR.

  4. DNA mismatch repair: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Peggy

    2012-09-14

    In this issue, Peña-Diaz et al. (2012) describe a pathway for somatic mutation in nonlymphoid cells termed noncanonical DNA mismatch repair, whereby the error-prone translesion polymerase Pol-η substitutes for high-fidelity replicative polymerases to resynthesize excised regions opposite DNA damage. PMID:22980456

  5. Exploiting DNA repair defects for novel cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    van Gent, Dik C.; Kanaar, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Most human tumors accumulate a multitude of genetic changes due to defects in the DNA damage response. Recently, small-molecule inhibitors have been developed that target cells with specific DNA repair defects, providing hope for precision treatment of such tumors. Here we discuss the rationale behind these therapies and how an important bottleneck—patient selection—can be approached. PMID:27418635

  6. RecFOR proteins load RecA protein onto gapped DNA to accelerate DNA strand exchange: a universal step of recombinational repair.

    PubMed

    Morimatsu, Katsumi; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2003-05-01

    Genetic evidence suggests that the RecF, RecO, and RecR (RecFOR) proteins participate in a common step of DNA recombination and repair, yet the biochemical event requiring collaboration of all three proteins is unknown. Here, we show that the concerted action of the RecFOR complex directs the loading of RecA protein specifically onto gapped DNA that is coated with single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) protein, thereby accelerating DNA strand exchange. The RecFOR complex recognizes the junction between the ssDNA and dsDNA regions and requires a base-paired 5' terminus at the junction. Thus, the RecFOR complex is a structure-specific mediator that targets recombinational repair to ssDNA-dsDNA junctions. This reaction reconstitutes the initial steps of recombinational gapped DNA repair and uncovers an event also common to the repair of ssDNA-tailed intermediates of dsDNA-break repair. We propose that the behavior of the RecFOR proteins is mimicked by functional counterparts that exist in all organisms. PMID:12769856

  7. Interplay of DNA repair with transcription: from structures to mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Deaconescu, Alexandra M.; Artsimovitch, Irina; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    Many DNA transactions are crucial for maintaining genomic integrity and faithful transfer of genetic information but remain poorly understood. An example is the interplay between nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription, also known as transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR). Discovered decades ago, the mechanisms for TCR have remained elusive, not in small part due to the scarcity of structural studies of key players. Here we summarize recent structural information on NER/TCR factors, focusing on bacterial systems, and integrate it with existing genetic, biochemical, and biophysical data to delineate the mechanisms at play. We also review emerging, alternative modalities for recruitment of NER proteins to DNA lesions. PMID:23084398

  8. Genomic survey and expression analysis of DNA repair genes in the genus Leptospira.

    PubMed

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Schons-Fonseca, Luciane; da Silva, Josefa B; Domingos, Renan H; Momo, Leonardo Hiroyuki Santos; Simões, Ana Carolina Quirino; Ho, Paulo Lee; da Costa, Renata M A

    2016-04-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis with important economic and public health consequences and is caused by pathogenic leptospires. The genus Leptospira belongs to the order Spirochaetales and comprises saprophytic (L. biflexa), pathogenic (L. interrogans) and host-dependent (L. borgpetersenii) members. Here, we present an in silico search for DNA repair pathways in Leptospira spp. The relevance of such DNA repair pathways was assessed through the identification of mRNA levels of some genes during infection in animal model and after exposition to spleen cells. The search was performed by comparison of available Leptospira spp. genomes in public databases with known DNA repair-related genes. Leptospires exhibit some distinct and unexpected characteristics, for instance the existence of a redundant mechanism for repairing a chemically diverse spectrum of alkylated nucleobases, a new mutS-like gene and a new shorter version of uvrD. Leptospira spp. shares some characteristics from Gram-positive, as the presence of PcrA, two RecQ paralogs and two SSB proteins; the latter is considered a feature shared by naturally competent bacteria. We did not find a significant reduction in the number of DNA repair-related genes in both pathogenic and host-dependent species. Pathogenic leptospires were enriched for genes dedicated to base excision repair and non-homologous end joining. Their evolutionary history reveals a remarkable importance of lateral gene transfer events for the evolution of the genus. Up-regulation of specific DNA repair genes, including components of SOS regulon, during infection in animal model validates the critical role of DNA repair mechanisms for the complex interplay between host/pathogen.

  9. DNA repair in murine embryonic stem cells and differentiated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tichy, Elisia D. Stambrook, Peter J.

    2008-06-10

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are rapidly proliferating, self-renewing cells that have the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers to form the embryo proper. Since these cells are critical for embryo formation, they must have robust prophylactic mechanisms to ensure that their genomic integrity is preserved. Indeed, several studies have suggested that ES cells are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents and readily undergo apoptosis to eliminate damaged cells from the population. Other evidence suggests that DNA damage can cause premature differentiation in these cells. Several laboratories have also begun to investigate the role of DNA repair in the maintenance of ES cell genomic integrity. It does appear that ES cells differ in their capacity to repair damaged DNA compared to differentiated cells. This minireview focuses on repair mechanisms ES cells may use to help preserve genomic integrity and compares available data regarding these mechanisms with those utilized by differentiated cells.

  10. The effect of acute dose charge particle radiation on expression of DNA repair genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad Akram; Soedipe, Ayodotun; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu; Zhang, Ye; Shishodia, Shishir; Gridley, Daila S; Pourmand, Nader; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2011-03-01

    The space radiation environment consists of trapped particle radiation, solar particle radiation, and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), in which protons are the most abundant particle type. During missions to the moon or to Mars, the constant exposure to GCR and occasional exposure to particles emitted from solar particle events (SPE) are major health concerns for astronauts. Therefore, in order to determine health risks during space missions, an understanding of cellular responses to proton exposure is of primary importance. The expression of DNA repair genes in response to ionizing radiation (X-rays and gamma rays) has been studied, but data on DNA repair in response to protons is lacking. Using qPCR analysis, we investigated changes in gene expression induced by positively charged particles (protons) in four categories (0, 0.1, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy) in nine different DNA repair genes isolated from the testes of irradiated mice. DNA repair genes were selected on the basis of their known functions. These genes include ERCC1 (5' incision subunit, DNA strand break repair), ERCC2/NER (opening DNA around the damage, Nucleotide Excision Repair), XRCC1 (5' incision subunit, DNA strand break repair), XRCC3 (DNA break and cross-link repair), XPA (binds damaged DNA in preincision complex), XPC (damage recognition), ATA or ATM (activates checkpoint signaling upon double strand breaks), MLH1 (post-replicative DNA mismatch repair), and PARP1 (base excision repair). Our results demonstrate that ERCC1, PARP1, and XPA genes showed no change at 0.1 Gy radiation, up-regulation at 1.0 Gy radiation (1.09 fold, 7.32 fold, 0.75 fold, respectively), and a remarkable increase in gene expression at 2.0 Gy radiation (4.83 fold, 57.58 fold and 87.58 fold, respectively). Expression of other genes, including ATM and XRCC3, was unchanged at 0.1 and 1.0 Gy radiation but showed up-regulation at 2.0 Gy radiation (2.64 fold and 2.86 fold, respectively). We were unable to detect gene expression for the

  11. Electron Transfer Mechanisms of DNA Repair by Photolyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Dongping

    2015-04-01

    Photolyase is a flavin photoenzyme that repairs two DNA base damage products induced by ultraviolet (UV) light: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts. With femtosecond spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis, investigators have recently made significant advances in our understanding of UV-damaged DNA repair, and the entire enzymatic dynamics can now be mapped out in real time. For dimer repair, six elementary steps have been characterized, including three electron transfer reactions and two bond-breaking processes, and their reaction times have been determined. A unique electron-tunneling pathway was identified, and the critical residues in modulating the repair function at the active site were determined. The dynamic synergy between the elementary reactions for maintaining high repair efficiency was elucidated, and the biological nature of the flavin active state was uncovered. For 6-4 photoproduct repair, a proton-coupled electron transfer repair mechanism has been revealed. The elucidation of electron transfer mechanisms and two repair photocycles is significant and provides a molecular basis for future practical applications, such as in rational drug design for curing skin cancer.

  12. Writers, Readers, and Erasers of Histone Ubiquitylation in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Smeenk, Godelieve; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions, whose faulty repair may alter the content and organization of cellular genomes. To counteract this threat, numerous signaling and repair proteins are recruited hierarchically to the chromatin areas surrounding DSBs to facilitate accurate lesion repair and restoration of genome integrity. In vertebrate cells, ubiquitin-dependent modifications of histones adjacent to DSBs by RNF8, RNF168, and other ubiquitin ligases have a key role in promoting the assembly of repair protein complexes, serving as direct recruitment platforms for a range of genome caretaker proteins and their associated factors. These DNA damage-induced chromatin ubiquitylation marks provide an essential component of a histone code for DSB repair that is controlled by multifaceted regulatory circuits, underscoring its importance for genome stability maintenance. In this review, we provide a comprehensive account of how DSB-induced histone ubiquitylation is sensed, decoded and modulated by an elaborate array of repair factors and regulators. We discuss how these mechanisms impact DSB repair pathway choice and functionality for optimal protection of genome integrity, as well as cell and organismal fitness. PMID:27446204

  13. Repair of mismatched basepairs in mammalian DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H.; Hare, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    We have concentrated on three specific areas of our research plan. Our greatest emphasis is on the role of single strand nicks in influencing template strand selection in mismatch repair. We have found, that the ability of a nick in one strand to influence which strand is repaired is not a simple function of distance from the mismatched site but rather that an hot spot where a nick is more likely to have an influence can exist. The second line was production of single-genotype heteroduplexes in order to examine independently the repair of T/G and A/C mispairs within the same sequence context as in our mixed mispair preparations. We have shown preparations of supercoiled heteroduplex can be prepared that were exclusively T/G or exclusively A/C at the mispair site. The third effort has been to understand the difference in repair bias of different cell lines or different transfection conditions as it may relate to different repair systems in the cell. We have identified some of the sources of variation, including cell cycle position. We hope to continue this work to more precisely identify the phase of the cell cycle.

  14. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Nicholas C.; Corbett, Anita H.; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. PMID:26519467

  15. New discoveries linking transcription to DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan E; Walker, Graham C

    2011-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the transcription elongation factor NusA is associated with all elongating RNA polymerases where it functions in transcription termination and antitermination. Here, we review our recent results implicating NusA in the recruitment of DNA repair and damage tolerance mechanisms to sites of stalled transcription complexes.

  16. Base Excision Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    David, Sheila S.; O’Shea, Valerie L.; Kundu, Sucharita

    2010-01-01

    Base excision repair plays an important role in preventing mutations associated with the common product of oxidative damage, 8-oxoguanine. Recent structural studies have shown that 8-oxoguanine glycosylases use an intricate series of steps to efficiently search and locate 8-oxoguanine lesions within the multitude of undamaged bases. The importance of prevention of mutations associated with 8-oxoguanine has also been illustrated by direct connections between defects in the BER glycosylase MUTYH and colorectal cancer. In addition, the properties of other guanine oxidation products and the BER glycosylases that remove them are being uncovered. This work is providing surprising and intriguing new insights into the process of base excision repair. PMID:17581577

  17. Thermodynamics of the DNA Damage Repair Steps of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A.; Vorobjev, Yuri N.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2014-01-01

    Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) is a key enzyme responsible for initiating the base excision repair of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine (oxoG). In this study a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of hOGG1 with specific and non-specific DNA-substrates is performed based on stopped-flow kinetic data. The standard Gibbs energies, enthalpies and entropies of specific stages of the repair process were determined via kinetic measurements over a temperature range using the van’t Hoff approach. The three steps which are accompanied with changes in the DNA conformations were detected via 2-aminopurine fluorescence in the process of binding and recognition of damaged oxoG base by hOGG1. The thermodynamic analysis has demonstrated that the initial step of the DNA substrates binding is mainly governed by energy due to favorable interactions in the process of formation of the recognition contacts, which results in negative enthalpy change, as well as due to partial desolvation of the surface between the DNA and enzyme, which results in positive entropy change. Discrimination of non-specific G base versus specific oxoG base is occurring in the second step of the oxoG-substrate binding. This step requires energy consumption which is compensated by the positive entropy contribution. The third binding step is the final adjustment of the enzyme/substrate complex to achieve the catalytically competent state which is characterized by large endothermicity compensated by a significant increase of entropy originated from the dehydration of the DNA grooves. PMID:24911585

  18. Thermodynamics of the DNA damage repair steps of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Vorobjev, Yuri N; Krasnoperov, Lev N; Fedorova, Olga S

    2014-01-01

    Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) is a key enzyme responsible for initiating the base excision repair of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine (oxoG). In this study a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of hOGG1 with specific and non-specific DNA-substrates is performed based on stopped-flow kinetic data. The standard Gibbs energies, enthalpies and entropies of specific stages of the repair process were determined via kinetic measurements over a temperature range using the van't Hoff approach. The three steps which are accompanied with changes in the DNA conformations were detected via 2-aminopurine fluorescence in the process of binding and recognition of damaged oxoG base by hOGG1. The thermodynamic analysis has demonstrated that the initial step of the DNA substrates binding is mainly governed by energy due to favorable interactions in the process of formation of the recognition contacts, which results in negative enthalpy change, as well as due to partial desolvation of the surface between the DNA and enzyme, which results in positive entropy change. Discrimination of non-specific G base versus specific oxoG base is occurring in the second step of the oxoG-substrate binding. This step requires energy consumption which is compensated by the positive entropy contribution. The third binding step is the final adjustment of the enzyme/substrate complex to achieve the catalytically competent state which is characterized by large endothermicity compensated by a significant increase of entropy originated from the dehydration of the DNA grooves. PMID:24911585

  19. Sensitive voltammetric detection of DNA damage at carbon electrodes using DNA repair enzymes and an electroactive osmium marker.

    PubMed

    Havran, Ludek; Vacek, Jan; Cahová, Katerina; Fojta, Miroslav

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a new approach to electrochemical sensing of DNA damage, using osmium DNA markers and voltammetric detection at the pyrolytic graphite electrode. The technique is based on enzymatic digestion of DNA with a DNA repair enzyme exonuclease III (exoIII), followed by single-strand (ss) selective DNA modification by a complex of osmium tetroxide with 2,2'-bipyridine. In double-stranded DNA possessing free 3'-ends, the exoIII creates ss regions that can accommodate the electroactive osmium marker. Intensity of the marker signal measured at the pyrolytic graphite electrode responded well to the extent of DNA damage. The technique was successfully applied for the detection of (1) single-strand breaks (ssb) introduced in plasmid DNA by deoxyribonuclease I, and (2) apurinic sites generated in chromosomal calf thymus DNA upon treatment with the alkylating agent dimethyl sulfate. The apurinic sites were converted into the ssb by DNA repair endonuclease activity of the exoIII enzyme. We show that the presented technique is capable of detection of one lesion per approximately 10(5) nucleotides in supercoiled plasmid DNA.

  20. MicroRNA expression and its association with DNA repair in preimplantation embryos

    PubMed Central

    TULAY, Pinar; SENGUPTA, Sioban B.

    2016-01-01

    Active DNA repair pathways are crucial for preserving genomic integrity and are likely among the complex mechanisms involved in the normal development of preimplantation embryos. MicroRNAs (miRNA), short non-coding RNAs, are key regulators of gene expression through the post-transcriptional and post-translational modification of mRNA. The association of miRNA expression with infertility or polycystic ovarian syndrome has been widely investigated; however, there are limited data regarding the importance of miRNA regulation in DNA repair during preimplantation embryo development. In this article, we review normal miRNA biogenesis and consequences of aberrant miRNA expression in the regulation of DNA repair in gametes and preimplantation embryos. PMID:26853522

  1. Modifying the function of DNA repair nanomachines for therapeutic benefit.

    PubMed

    Dynan, William S; Takeda, Yoshihiko; Li, Shuyi

    2006-06-01

    This article, which is based on a presentation at the First Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Nanomedicine, is divided into three parts. First, we describe naturally occurring DNA repair nanomachines, using as an example the nanomachine that executes the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) reaction for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Second, we discuss therapeutic benefits that may be derived from the ability to modify the behavior of naturally occurring nanomachines, using as an example the concept of delaying DSB repair in rapidly dividing cancer cells to increase their natural sensitivity to radiation therapy. Third, we discuss similarities in the overall size, shape, and design of different nanomachines that manipulate DNA and RNA, and the possibility of developing nanomachines with new specificities not found in nature.

  2. Stress and DNA repair biology of the Fanconi anemia pathway

    PubMed Central

    Longerich, Simonne; Li, Jian; Xiong, Yong; Sung, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) represents a paradigm of rare genetic diseases, where the quest for cause and cure has led to seminal discoveries in cancer biology. Although a total of 16 FA genes have been identified thus far, the biochemical function of many of the FA proteins remains to be elucidated. FA is rare, yet the fact that 5 FA genes are in fact familial breast cancer genes and FA gene mutations are found frequently in sporadic cancers suggest wider applicability in hematopoiesis and oncology. Establishing the interaction network involving the FA proteins and their associated partners has revealed an intersection of FA with several DNA repair pathways, including homologous recombination, DNA mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, and translesion DNA synthesis. Importantly, recent studies have shown a major involvement of the FA pathway in the tolerance of reactive aldehydes. Moreover, despite improved outcomes in stem cell transplantation in the treatment of FA, many challenges remain in patient care. PMID:25237197

  3. Metabolism, genomics, and DNA repair in the mouse aging liver.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Michel; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2011-01-01

    The liver plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of nutrients, drugs, hormones, and metabolic waste products, thereby maintaining body homeostasis. The liver undergoes substantial changes in structure and function within old age. Such changes are associated with significant impairment of many hepatic metabolic and detoxification activities, with implications for systemic aging and age-related disease. It has become clear, using rodent models as biological tools, that genetic instability in the form of gross DNA rearrangements or point mutations accumulate in the liver with age. DNA lesions, such as oxidized bases or persistent breaks, increase with age and correlate well with the presence of senescent hepatocytes. The level of DNA damage and/or mutation can be affected by changes in carcinogen activation, decreased ability to repair DNA, or a combination of these factors. This paper covers some of the DNA repair pathways affecting liver homeostasis with age using rodents as model systems.

  4. An interplay of the base excision repair and mismatch repair pathways in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Grin, Inga; Ishchenko, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation (ADDM) in mammals occurs via hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) by TET and/or deamination by AID/APOBEC family enzymes. The resulting 5mC derivatives are removed through the base excision repair (BER) pathway. At present, it is unclear how the cell manages to eliminate closely spaced 5mC residues whilst avoiding generation of toxic BER intermediates and whether alternative DNA repair pathways participate in ADDM. It has been shown that non-canonical DNA mismatch repair (ncMMR) can remove both alkylated and oxidized nucleotides from DNA. Here, a phagemid DNA containing oxidative base lesions and methylated sites are used to examine the involvement of various DNA repair pathways in ADDM in murine and human cell-free extracts. We demonstrate that, in addition to short-patch BER, 5-hydroxymethyluracil and uracil mispaired with guanine can be processed by ncMMR and long-patch BER with concomitant removal of distant 5mC residues. Furthermore, the presence of multiple mispairs in the same MMR nick/mismatch recognition region together with BER-mediated nick formation promotes proficient ncMMR resulting in the reactivation of an epigenetically silenced reporter gene in murine cells. These findings suggest cooperation between BER and ncMMR in the removal of multiple mismatches that might occur in mammalian cells during ADDM. PMID:26843430

  5. DNA damage repair and genetic polymorphisms: Assessment of individual sensitivity and repair capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Cornetta, Tommaso; Festa, Fabiola; Testa, Antonella; Cozzi, Renata Prof. . E-mail: cozzi@uniroma3.it

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To study the repair capacity after X-ray irradiation in human peripheral blood cells of healthy subjects, in relation to their genotypes. Methods and Materials: The peripheral blood of 50 healthy subjects was irradiated in vitro with 2 Gy of X rays and the induced DNA damage was measured by Comet assay immediately after irradiation. DNA repair was detected by analyzing the cells at defined time intervals after the exposure. Furthermore, all subjects were genotyped for XRCC1, OGG1, and XPC genes. Results: After X-ray irradiation, persons bearing XRCC1 homozygous variant (codon 399) genotype exhibited significantly lower Tail DNA values than those bearing wild-type and heterozygous genotypes. These results are also confirmed at 30 and 60 min after irradiation. Furthermore, XPC heterozygous subjects (variant codon 939) showed lower residual DNA damage 60 min after irradiation compared with wild-type and homozygous genotypes. Conclusion: The results of the present study show that polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could influence individual DNA repair capacity.

  6. A chiroptical photoswitchable DNA complex.

    PubMed

    Mammana, Angela; Carroll, Gregory T; Areephong, Jetsuda; Feringa, Ben L

    2011-10-13

    The interesting structural, electronic, and optical properties of DNA provide fascinating opportunities for developing nanoscale smart materials by integrating DNA with opto-electronic components. In this article we demonstrate the electrostatic binding of an amine-terminated dithienylethene (DET) molecular switch to double-stranded synthetic polynucleotides. The DET switch can undergo photochemical ring-closure and opening reactions. Circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis spectroscopy show that both the open, 1o, and the closed, 1c, forms of the switch bind to DNA. Upon addition of DNA to a solution of 1o or 1c, the UV-vis spectrum displays a hypochromic effect, indicative of an interaction between the switch and the DNA. The chirality of the DNA double-helix is transmitted to the switching unit which displays a well-defined CD signal upon supramolecular complexation to the DNA. Additionally, the CD signal of the DNA attenuates, demonstrating that both components of the complex mutually influence each other's structure; the DNA induces chirality in the switch, and the switch modifies the structure of the DNA. Modulation of the chiroptical properties of the complex is achieved by photochemically switching the DET between its ring open and closed isomers. A pH dependence study of the binding shows that when the pH is increased the switches lose their binding ability, indicating that electrostatic interactions between protonated amines and the negatively charged phosphate backbone are the dominant driving force for binding to the DNA. A comparison of poly(deoxyguanylic-deoxycytidylic) acid [poly(dGdC)(2)] polynucleotides with poly(deoxyadenylic-deoxythymidylic) acid [poly(dAdT)(2)] shows distinct differences in the CD spectra of the complexes. PMID:21879715

  7. Repairing DNA double-strand breaks by the prokaryotic non-homologous end-joining pathway.

    PubMed

    Brissett, Nigel C; Doherty, Aidan J

    2009-06-01

    The NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) pathway is one of the major mechanisms for repairing DSBs (double-strand breaks) that occur in genomic DNA. In common with eukaryotic organisms, many prokaryotes possess a conserved NHEJ apparatus that is essential for the repair of DSBs arising in the stationary phase of the cell cycle. Although the bacterial NHEJ complex is much more minimal than its eukaryotic counterpart, both pathways share a number of common mechanistic features. The relative simplicity of the prokaryotic NHEJ complex makes it a tractable model system for investigating the cellular and molecular mechanisms of DSB repair. The present review describes recent advances in our understanding of prokaryotic end-joining, focusing primarily on biochemical, structural and cellular aspects of the mycobacterial NHEJ repair pathway.

  8. DNA damage and repair in telomeres: relation to aging.

    PubMed Central

    Kruk, P A; Rampino, N J; Bohr, V A

    1995-01-01

    We have established a method for the detection of DNA damage and its repair in human telomeres, the natural ends of chromosomes which are necessary for replication and critical for chromosomal stability. We find that ultraviolet light-induced pyrimidine dimers in telomeric DNA are repaired less efficiently than endogenous genes but more efficiently than inactive, noncoding regions. We have also measured telomeric length, telomeric DNA damage, and its repair in relation to the progression of aging. Telomeres are shorter in fibroblasts from an old donor compared to fibroblasts from a young donor, shortest in cells from a patient with the progeroid disorder Werner syndrome, and relatively long in fibroblasts from a patient with Alzheimer disease. Telomeric DNA repair efficiency is lower in cells from an old donor than in cells from a young donor, normal in Alzheimer cells, and slightly lower in Werner cells. It is possible that this decline in telomeric repair with aging is of functional significance to an age-related decline in genomic stability. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7816828

  9. Dynamic control of strand excision during human DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Martín-López, Juana V; Lee, Ryanggeun; Oh, Jungsic; Hanne, Jeungphill; Fishel, Richard; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2016-03-22

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is activated by evolutionarily conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS). MSH recognizes mismatched nucleotides and form extremely stable sliding clamps that may be bound by MLH/PMS to ultimately authorize strand-specific excision starting at a distant 3'- or 5'-DNA scission. The mechanical processes associated with a complete MMR reaction remain enigmatic. The purified human (Homo sapien or Hs) 5'-MMR excision reaction requires the HsMSH2-HsMSH6 heterodimer, the 5' → 3' exonuclease HsEXOI, and the single-stranded binding heterotrimer HsRPA. The HsMLH1-HsPMS2 heterodimer substantially influences 5'-MMR excision in cell extracts but is not required in the purified system. Using real-time single-molecule imaging, we show that HsRPA or Escherichia coli EcSSB restricts HsEXOI excision activity on nicked or gapped DNA. HsMSH2-HsMSH6 activates HsEXOI by overcoming HsRPA/EcSSB inhibition and exploits multiple dynamic sliding clamps to increase tract length. Conversely, HsMLH1-HsPMS2 regulates tract length by controlling the number of excision complexes, providing a link to 5' MMR.

  10. Both genetic and dietary factors underlie individual differences in DNA damage levels and DNA repair capacity.

    PubMed

    Slyskova, Jana; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Karlsen, Anette; Carlsen, Monica H; Novosadova, Vendula; Blomhoff, Rune; Vodicka, Pavel; Collins, Andrew R

    2014-04-01

    The interplay between dietary habits and individual genetic make-up is assumed to influence risk of cancer, via modulation of DNA integrity. Our aim was to characterize internal and external factors that underlie inter-individual variability in DNA damage and repair and to identify dietary habits beneficial for maintaining DNA integrity. Habitual diet was estimated in 340 healthy individuals using a food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers of antioxidant status were quantified in fasting blood samples. Markers of DNA integrity were represented by DNA strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines and a sum of all three as total DNA damage. DNA repair was characterized by genetic variants and functional activities of base and nucleotide excision repair pathways. Sex, fruit-based food consumption and XPG genotype were factors significantly associated with the level of DNA damage. DNA damage was higher in women (p=0.035). Fruit consumption was negatively associated with the number of all measured DNA lesions, and this effect was mediated mostly by β-cryptoxanthin and β-tocopherol (p<0.05). XPG 1104His homozygotes appeared more vulnerable to DNA damage accumulation (p=0.001). Sex and individual antioxidants were also associated with DNA repair capacity; both the base and nucleotide excision repairs were lower in women and the latter increased with higher plasma levels of ascorbic acid and α-carotene (p<0.05). We have determined genetic and dietary factors that modulate DNA integrity. We propose that the positive health effect of fruit intake is partially mediated via DNA damage suppression and a simultaneous increase in DNA repair capacity. PMID:24674629

  11. SPOC1 modulates DNA repair by regulating key determinants of chromatin compaction and DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Mund, Andreas; Schubert, Tobias; Staege, Hannah; Kinkley, Sarah; Reumann, Kerstin; Kriegs, Malte; Fritsch, Lauriane; Battisti, Valentine; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Hoffbeck, Anne-Sophie; Soutoglou, Evi; Will, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Survival time-associated plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein in Ovarian Cancer 1 (SPOC1, also known as PHF13) is known to modulate chromatin structure and is essential for testicular stem-cell differentiation. Here we show that SPOC1 is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in an ATM-dependent manner. Moreover, SPOC1 localizes at endogenous repair foci, including OPT domains and accumulates at large DSB repair foci characteristic for delayed repair at heterochromatic sites. SPOC1 depletion enhances the kinetics of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF) formation after γ-irradiation (γ-IR), non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair activity, and cellular radioresistance, but impairs homologous recombination (HR) repair. Conversely, SPOC1 overexpression delays IRIF formation and γH2AX expansion, reduces NHEJ repair activity and enhances cellular radiosensitivity. SPOC1 mediates dose-dependent changes in chromatin association of DNA compaction factors KAP-1, HP1-α and H3K9 methyltransferases (KMT) GLP, G9A and SETDB1. In addition, SPOC1 interacts with KAP-1 and H3K9 KMTs, inhibits KAP-1 phosphorylation and enhances H3K9 trimethylation. These findings provide the first evidence for a function of SPOC1 in DNA damage response (DDR) and repair. SPOC1 acts as a modulator of repair kinetics and choice of pathways. This involves its dose-dependent effects on DNA damage sensors, repair mediators and key regulators of chromatin structure. PMID:23034801

  12. Modeling DNA Repair: Approaching In Vivo Techniques in the Hyperthermophile Sulfolobus Solfataricus

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, J.; Fuss, J.; Yannone, S.M.; Tainer, J.A.; Cooper, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    Archaea are found in some of the most extreme environments on earth and represent a third domain of life distinct from Eukarya and Eubacteria. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, isolated from acidic hot springs (80oC, pH 3) in Yellowstone National Park, has emerged as a potential model system for studying human DNA repair processes. Archaea are more closely related to Eukarya than to Eubacteria, suggesting that archaeal DNA repair machinery may model the complex human system much more closely than that of other prokaryotes. DNA repair requires coordinated protein-protein interactions that are frequently transient. Protein complexes that are transient at extreme temperatures where archaea thrive may be more stable at room temperature, allowing for the characterization of otherwise short-lived complexes. However, characterization of these systems in archaea has been limited by the absence of a stable in vivo transformation and expression system. The work presented here is a pilot study in gene cloning and recombinant protein expression in S. solfataricus. Three genes associated with DNA repair were selected for expression: MRE11, PCNA1, and a putative CSB homologue. Though preparation of these recombinant genes followed standard methods, preparation of a suitable vector proved more challenging. The shuttle vector pSSV64, derived from the SSV1 virus and the E. coli vector pBSSK+, was most successfully isolated from the DH5α E. coli strain. Currently, alternative vectors are being designed for more efficient genetic manipulations in S. solfataricus.

  13. Rad51 Regulates Reprogramming Efficiency through DNA Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Young; Kim, Dae-Kwan; Ko, Jeong-Jae; Kim, Keun Pil; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Rad51 is a key component of homologous recombination (HR) to repair DNA double-strand breaks and it forms Rad51 recombinase filaments of broken single-stranded DNA to promote HR. In addition to its role in DNA repair and cell cycle progression, Rad51 contributes to the reprogramming process during the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. In light of this, we performed reprogramming experiments to examine the effect of co-expression of Rad51 and four reprogramming factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, on the reprogramming efficiency. Co-expression of Rad51 significantly increased the numbers of alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies and embryonic stem cell-like colonies during the process of reprogramming. Co-expression ofRad51 significantly increased the expression of epithelial markers at an early stage of reprogramming compared with control cells. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), which initiates the DNA double-strand break repair system, was highly accumulated in reprogramming intermediates upon co-expression of Rad51. This study identified a novel role of Rad51 in enhancing the reprogramming efficiency, possibly by facilitating mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and by regulating a DNA damage repair pathway during the early phase of the reprogramming process. PMID:27660832

  14. Rad51 Regulates Reprogramming Efficiency through DNA Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Young; Kim, Dae-Kwan; Ko, Jeong-Jae; Kim, Keun Pil; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2016-06-01

    Rad51 is a key component of homologous recombination (HR) to repair DNA double-strand breaks and it forms Rad51 recombinase filaments of broken single-stranded DNA to promote HR. In addition to its role in DNA repair and cell cycle progression, Rad51 contributes to the reprogramming process during the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. In light of this, we performed reprogramming experiments to examine the effect of co-expression of Rad51 and four reprogramming factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, on the reprogramming efficiency. Co-expression of Rad51 significantly increased the numbers of alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies and embryonic stem cell-like colonies during the process of reprogramming. Co-expression ofRad51 significantly increased the expression of epithelial markers at an early stage of reprogramming compared with control cells. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), which initiates the DNA double-strand break repair system, was highly accumulated in reprogramming intermediates upon co-expression of Rad51. This study identified a novel role of Rad51 in enhancing the reprogramming efficiency, possibly by facilitating mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and by regulating a DNA damage repair pathway during the early phase of the reprogramming process. PMID:27660832

  15. Circadian Modulation of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Manzella, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Ledda, Caterina; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Tomasetti, Marco; Stevens, Richard G.; Santarelli, Lory

    2015-01-01

    The DNA base excision repair pathway is the main system involved in the removal of oxidative damage to DNA such as 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) primarily via the 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). Our goal was to investigate whether the repair of 8-oxoG DNA damage follow a circadian rhythm. In a group of 15 healthy volunteers, we found a daily variation of Ogg1 expression and activity with higher levels in the morning compared to the evening hours. Consistent with this, we also found lower levels of 8-oxoG in morning hours compared to those in the evening hours. Lymphocytes exposed to oxidative damage to DNA at 8:00 AM display lower accumulation of 8-oxoG than lymphocytes exposed at 8:00 PM. Furthermore, altered levels of Ogg1 expression were also observed in a group of shift workers experiencing a deregulation of circadian clock genes compared to a control group. Moreover, BMAL1 knockdown fibroblasts with a deregulated molecular clock showed an abolishment of circadian variation of Ogg1 expression and an increase of OGG1 activity. Our results suggest that the circadian modulation of 8-oxoG DNA damage repair, according to a variation of Ogg1 expression, could render humans less susceptible to accumulate 8-oxoG DNA damage in the morning hours. PMID:26337123

  16. DNA Polymerases λ and β: The Double-Edged Swords of DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Mentegari, Elisa; Kissova, Miroslava; Bavagnoli, Laura; Maga, Giovanni; Crespan, Emmanuele

    2016-01-01

    DNA is constantly exposed to both endogenous and exogenous damages. More than 10,000 DNA modifications are induced every day in each cell's genome. Maintenance of the integrity of the genome is accomplished by several DNA repair systems. The core enzymes for these pathways are the DNA polymerases. Out of 17 DNA polymerases present in a mammalian cell, at least 13 are specifically devoted to DNA repair and are often acting in different pathways. DNA polymerases β and λ are involved in base excision repair of modified DNA bases and translesion synthesis past DNA lesions. Polymerase λ also participates in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. However, recent data have revealed that, depending on their relative levels, the cell cycle phase, the ratio between deoxy- and ribo-nucleotide pools and the interaction with particular auxiliary proteins, the repair reactions carried out by these enzymes can be an important source of genetic instability, owing to repair mistakes. This review summarizes the most recent results on the ambivalent properties of these enzymes in limiting or promoting genetic instability in mammalian cells, as well as their potential use as targets for anticancer chemotherapy. PMID:27589807

  17. DNA Polymerases λ and β: The Double-Edged Swords of DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mentegari, Elisa; Kissova, Miroslava; Bavagnoli, Laura; Maga, Giovanni; Crespan, Emmanuele

    2016-01-01

    DNA is constantly exposed to both endogenous and exogenous damages. More than 10,000 DNA modifications are induced every day in each cell’s genome. Maintenance of the integrity of the genome is accomplished by several DNA repair systems. The core enzymes for these pathways are the DNA polymerases. Out of 17 DNA polymerases present in a mammalian cell, at least 13 are specifically devoted to DNA repair and are often acting in different pathways. DNA polymerases β and λ are involved in base excision repair of modified DNA bases and translesion synthesis past DNA lesions. Polymerase λ also participates in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. However, recent data have revealed that, depending on their relative levels, the cell cycle phase, the ratio between deoxy- and ribo-nucleotide pools and the interaction with particular auxiliary proteins, the repair reactions carried out by these enzymes can be an important source of genetic instability, owing to repair mistakes. This review summarizes the most recent results on the ambivalent properties of these enzymes in limiting or promoting genetic instability in mammalian cells, as well as their potential use as targets for anticancer chemotherapy. PMID:27589807

  18. Breaking bad: The mutagenic effect of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Furano, Anthony V

    2015-08-01

    Species survival depends on the faithful replication of genetic information, which is continually monitored and maintained by DNA repair pathways that correct replication errors and the thousands of lesions that arise daily from the inherent chemical lability of DNA and the effects of genotoxic agents. Nonetheless, neutrally evolving DNA (not under purifying selection) accumulates base substitutions with time (the neutral mutation rate). Thus, repair processes are not 100% efficient. The neutral mutation rate varies both between and within chromosomes. For example it is 10-50 fold higher at CpGs than at non-CpG positions. Interestingly, the neutral mutation rate at non-CpG sites is positively correlated with CpG content. Although the basis of this correlation was not immediately apparent, some bioinformatic results were consistent with the induction of non-CpG mutations by DNA repair at flanking CpG sites. Recent studies with a model system showed that in vivo repair of preformed lesions (mismatches, abasic sites, single stranded nicks) can in fact induce mutations in flanking DNA. Mismatch repair (MMR) is an essential component for repair-induced mutations, which can occur as distant as 5 kb from the introduced lesions. Most, but not all, mutations involved the C of TpCpN (G of NpGpA) which is the target sequence of the C-preferring single-stranded DNA specific APOBEC deaminases. APOBEC-mediated mutations are not limited to our model system: Recent studies by others showed that some tumors harbor mutations with the same signature, as can intermediates in RNA-guided endonuclease-mediated genome editing. APOBEC deaminases participate in normal physiological functions such as generating mutations that inactivate viruses or endogenous retrotransposons, or that enhance immunoglobulin diversity in B cells. The recruitment of normally physiological error-prone processes during DNA repair would have important implications for disease, aging and evolution. This perspective

  19. Breaking bad: The mutagenic effect of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Furano, Anthony V

    2015-08-01

    Species survival depends on the faithful replication of genetic information, which is continually monitored and maintained by DNA repair pathways that correct replication errors and the thousands of lesions that arise daily from the inherent chemical lability of DNA and the effects of genotoxic agents. Nonetheless, neutrally evolving DNA (not under purifying selection) accumulates base substitutions with time (the neutral mutation rate). Thus, repair processes are not 100% efficient. The neutral mutation rate varies both between and within chromosomes. For example it is 10-50 fold higher at CpGs than at non-CpG positions. Interestingly, the neutral mutation rate at non-CpG sites is positively correlated with CpG content. Although the basis of this correlation was not immediately apparent, some bioinformatic results were consistent with the induction of non-CpG mutations by DNA repair at flanking CpG sites. Recent studies with a model system showed that in vivo repair of preformed lesions (mismatches, abasic sites, single stranded nicks) can in fact induce mutations in flanking DNA. Mismatch repair (MMR) is an essential component for repair-induced mutations, which can occur as distant as 5 kb from the introduced lesions. Most, but not all, mutations involved the C of TpCpN (G of NpGpA) which is the target sequence of the C-preferring single-stranded DNA specific APOBEC deaminases. APOBEC-mediated mutations are not limited to our model system: Recent studies by others showed that some tumors harbor mutations with the same signature, as can intermediates in RNA-guided endonuclease-mediated genome editing. APOBEC deaminases participate in normal physiological functions such as generating mutations that inactivate viruses or endogenous retrotransposons, or that enhance immunoglobulin diversity in B cells. The recruitment of normally physiological error-prone processes during DNA repair would have important implications for disease, aging and evolution. This perspective

  20. Interactions of RecF protein with RecO, RecR, and single-stranded DNA binding proteins reveal roles for the RecF-RecO-RecR complex in DNA repair and recombination.

    PubMed

    Hegde, S P; Qin, M H; Li, X H; Atkinson, M A; Clark, A J; Rajagopalan, M; Madiraju, M V

    1996-12-10

    The products of the recF, recO, and recR genes are thought to interact and assist RecA in the utilization of single-stranded DNA precomplexed with single-stranded DNA binding protein (Ssb) during synapsis. Using immunoprecipitation, size-exclusion chromatography, and Ssb protein affinity chromatography in the absence of any nucleotide cofactors, we have obtained the following results: (i) RecF interacts with RecO, (ii) RecF interacts with RecR in the presence of RecO to form a complex consisting of RecF, RecO, and RecR (RecF-RecO-RecR); (iii) RecF interacts with Ssb protein in the presence of RecO. These data suggested that RecO mediates the interactions of RecF protein with RecR and with Ssb proteins. Incubation of RecF, RecO, RecR, and Ssb proteins resulted in the formation of RecF-RecO-Ssb complexes; i.e., RecR was excluded. Preincubation of RecF, RecO, and RecR proteins prior to addition of Ssb protein resulted in the formation of complexes consisting of RecF, RecO, RecR, and Ssb proteins. These data suggest that one role of RecF is to stabilize the interaction of RecR with RecO in the presence of Ssb protein. Finally, we found that interactions of RecF with RecO are lost in the presence of ATP. We discuss these results to explain how the RecF-RecO-RecR complex functions as an anti-Ssb factor. PMID:8962075

  1. DNA repair in reduced genome: the Mycoplasma model.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fabíola Marques; Fonseca, Marbella Maria; Batistuzzo De Medeiros, Sílvia; Scortecci, Kátia Castanho; Blaha, Carlos Alfredo Galindo; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella

    2005-11-01

    The occurrence of bacteria with a reduced genome, such as that found in Mycoplasmas, raises the question as to which genes should be enough to guarantee the genomic stability indispensable for the maintenance of life. The aim of this work was to compare nine Mycoplasma genomes in regard to DNA repair genes. An in silico analysis was done using six Mycoplasma species, whose genomes are accessible at GenBank, and M. synoviae, and two strains of M. hyopneumoniae, whose genomes were recently sequenced by The Brazilian National Genome Project Consortium and Southern Genome Investigation Program (Brazil) respectively. Considering this reduced genome model, our comparative analysis suggests that the DNA integrity necessary for life can be primarily maintained by nucleotide excision repair (NER), which is the only complete repair pathway. Furthermore, some enzymes involved with base excision repair (BER) and recombination are also present and can complement the NER activity. The absence of RecR and RecO-like ORFs was observed only in M. genitalium and M. pneumoniae, which can be involved with the conservation of gene order observed between these two species. We also obtained phylogenetic evidence for the recent acquisition of the ogt gene in M. pulmonis and M. penetrans by a lateral transference event. In general, the presence or nonexistence of repair genes is shared by all species analyzed, suggesting that the loss of the majority of repair genes was an ancestral event, which occurred before the divergence of the Mycoplasma species. PMID:16153783

  2. DNA damage and repair in Stylonychia lemnae (Ciliata, Protozoa)

    SciTech Connect

    Ammermann, D.

    1988-05-01

    Irradiation with X rays, UV irradiation after incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BU) into the DNA, and cis-platinum (cis-Pt) treatment each cause the loss of micronuclei of Stylonychia lemnae while the macronuclei are not severely affected. The abilities of both nuclei to repair DNA were investigated. Unscheduled DNA synthesis could not be demonstrated after X-ray irradiation, but it was found after treatment with BU/UV and cis-Pt in macro- and micronuclei. The extent of the repair process in the micro- and macronuclei was alike, as indicated by grain counts of (6-/sup 3/H)thymidine-treated cells. One reason for the different sensitivity of both nuclei to DNA-damaging treatment may be the different number of gene copies in the macro- and micronuclei.

  3. DNA Repair at Telomeres: Keeping the Ends Intact

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Christopher J.; Wu, Yun; Zakian, Virginia A.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular era of telomere biology began with the discovery that telomeres usually consist of G-rich simple repeats and end with 3′ single-stranded tails. Enormous progress has been made in identifying the mechanisms that maintain and replenish telomeric DNA and the proteins that protect them from degradation, fusions, and checkpoint activation. Although telomeres in different organisms (or even in the same organism under different conditions) are maintained by different mechanisms, the disparate processes have the common goals of repairing defects caused by semiconservative replication through G-rich DNA, countering the shortening caused by incomplete replication, and postreplication regeneration of G tails. In addition, standard DNA repair mechanisms must be suppressed or modified at telomeres to prevent their being recognized and processed as DNA double-strand breaks. Here, we discuss the players and processes that maintain and regenerate telomere structure. PMID:23732473

  4. Functional interactions and signaling properties of mammalian DNA mismatch repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Bellacosa, A

    2001-11-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) system promotes genomic fidelity by repairing base-base mismatches, insertion-deletion loops and heterologies generated during DNA replication and recombination. This function is critically dependent on the assembling of multimeric complexes involved in mismatch recognition and signal transduction to downstream repair events. In addition, MMR proteins coordinate a complex network of physical and functional interactions that mediate other DNA transactions, such as transcription-coupled repair, base excision repair and recombination. MMR proteins are also involved in activation of cell cycle checkpoint and induction of apoptosis when DNA damage overwhelms a critical threshold. For this reason, they play a role in cell death by alkylating agents and other chemotherapeutic drugs, including cisplatin. Inactivation of MMR genes in hereditary and sporadic cancer is associated with a mutator phenotype and inhibition of apoptosis. In the future, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms and functional interactions of MMR proteins will lead to the development of more effective cancer prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:11687886

  5. WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of

  6. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription-coupled DNA Repair Abrogate the Impact of DNA Damage on Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Aditi; Burns, John A.; Gandolfi, Alberto; Chowdhury, Moinuddin A.; Cartularo, Laura; Berens, Christian; Geacintov, Nicholas E.; Scicchitano, David A.

    2016-01-01

    DNA adducts derived from carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]Ph) impede replication and transcription, resulting in aberrant cell division and gene expression. Global nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) are among the DNA repair pathways that evolved to maintain genome integrity by removing DNA damage. The interplay between global NER and TCR in repairing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-derived DNA adducts (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA, which is subject to NER and blocks transcription in vitro, and (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N6-dA, which is a poor substrate for NER but also blocks transcription in vitro, was tested. The results show that both adducts inhibit transcription in human cells that lack both NER and TCR. The (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA lesion exhibited no detectable effect on transcription in cells proficient in NER but lacking TCR, indicating that NER can remove the lesion in the absence of TCR, which is consistent with in vitro data. In primary human cells lacking NER, (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA exhibited a deleterious effect on transcription that was less severe than in cells lacking both pathways, suggesting that TCR can repair the adduct but not as effectively as global NER. In contrast, (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N6-dA dramatically reduces transcript production in cells proficient in global NER but lacking TCR, indicating that TCR is necessary for the removal of this adduct, which is consistent with in vitro data showing that it is a poor substrate for NER. Hence, both global NER and TCR enhance the recovery of gene expression following DNA damage, and TCR plays an important role in removing DNA damage that is refractory to NER. PMID:26559971

  7. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription-coupled DNA Repair Abrogate the Impact of DNA Damage on Transcription.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Aditi; Burns, John A; Gandolfi, Alberto; Chowdhury, Moinuddin A; Cartularo, Laura; Berens, Christian; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Scicchitano, David A

    2016-01-01

    DNA adducts derived from carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]Ph) impede replication and transcription, resulting in aberrant cell division and gene expression. Global nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) are among the DNA repair pathways that evolved to maintain genome integrity by removing DNA damage. The interplay between global NER and TCR in repairing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-derived DNA adducts (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA, which is subject to NER and blocks transcription in vitro, and (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N(6)-dA, which is a poor substrate for NER but also blocks transcription in vitro, was tested. The results show that both adducts inhibit transcription in human cells that lack both NER and TCR. The (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA lesion exhibited no detectable effect on transcription in cells proficient in NER but lacking TCR, indicating that NER can remove the lesion in the absence of TCR, which is consistent with in vitro data. In primary human cells lacking NER, (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA exhibited a deleterious effect on transcription that was less severe than in cells lacking both pathways, suggesting that TCR can repair the adduct but not as effectively as global NER. In contrast, (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N(6)-dA dramatically reduces transcript production in cells proficient in global NER but lacking TCR, indicating that TCR is necessary for the removal of this adduct, which is consistent with in vitro data showing that it is a poor substrate for NER. Hence, both global NER and TCR enhance the recovery of gene expression following DNA damage, and TCR plays an important role in removing DNA damage that is refractory to NER.

  8. Repair of DNA lesions in chromosomal DNA impact of chromatin structure and Cockayne syndrome proteins.

    PubMed

    Fousteri, Maria; van Hoffen, Anneke; Vargova, Hana; Mullenders, Leon H F

    2005-07-28

    Decondensation of chromatin is essential to facilitate access to DNA metabolizing processes such as transcription and DNA repair. Disruption of histone-DNA contacts by histone modification or by ATP dependent chromatin remodelling allows DNA-binding proteins to compete with histones for DNA. The efficiency of global genome nucleotide excision repair (GGR) that removes a variety of helix distorting DNA lesions is known to be affected by chromatin structure most notably demonstrated by the slow repair of heterochromatin. In addition, the efficiency of GGR to repair lesions in transcriptionally active genes requires functional CSA and B proteins. We found that repair of UV-photolesions in both strands of the active adenosine deaminase gene was delayed in CS cells when compared to normal human fibroblasts. We suggest that the lack of transcription recovery characteristic for CS cells exposed to DNA damaging agents, might lead to changes in the chromatin structure of active genes, causing less efficient repair of lesions in these genes when compared to normal cells. PMID:15961352

  9. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in teratogenesis and neurodevelopmental deficits.

    PubMed

    Wells, Peter G; McCallum, Gordon P; Lam, Kyla C H; Henderson, Jeffrey T; Ondovcik, Stephanie L

    2010-06-01

    Several teratogenic agents, including ionizing radiation and xenobiotics such as phenytoin, benzo[a]pyrene, thalidomide, and methamphetamine, can initiate the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules including DNA. Oxidative DNA damage, and particularly the most prevalent 8-oxoguanine lesion, may adversely affect development, likely via alterations in gene transcription rather than via a mutational mechanism. Contributions from oxidative DNA damage do not exclude roles for alternative mechanisms of initiation like receptor-mediated processes or the formation of covalent xenobiotic-macromolecular adducts, damage to other macromolecular targets like proteins and lipids, and other effects of ROS like altered signal transduction. Even in the absence of teratogen exposure, endogenous developmental oxidative stress can have embryopathic consequences in the absence of key pathways for detoxifying ROS or repairing DNA damage. Critical proteins in pathways for DNA damage detection/repair signaling, like p53 and ataxia telangiectasia mutated, and DNA repair itself, like oxoguanine glycosylase 1 and Cockayne syndrome B, can often, but not always, protect the embryo from ROS-initiating teratogens. Protection may be variably dependent upon such factors as the nature of the teratogen and its concentration within the embryo, the stage of development, the species, strain, gender, target tissue and cell type, among other factors.

  10. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  11. Prognostic value of DNA repair based stratification of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhuo; Xu, Shi-Hao; Wang, Hai-Qing; Cai, Yi-Jing; Ying, Li; Song, Mei; Wang, Yu-Qun; Du, Shan-Jie; Shi, Ke-Qing; Zhou, Meng-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of DNA repair is frequently associated with tumor progression and response to therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Bioinformatics analyses of HCC data in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were performed to define DNA repair based molecular classification that could predict the prognosis of patients with HCC. Furthermore, we tested its predictive performance in 120 independent cases. Four molecular subgroups were identified on the basis of coordinate DNA repair cluster (CDRC) comprising 15 genes in TCGA dataset. Increasing expression of CDRC genes were significantly associated with TP53 mutation. High CDRC was significantly correlated with advanced tumor grades, advanced pathological stage and increased vascular invasion rate. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that the molecular subgrouping was an independent prognostic parameter for both overall survival (p = 0.004, hazard ratio (HR): 2.989) and tumor-free survival (p = 0.049, HR: 3.366) in TCGA dataset. Similar results were also obtained by analyzing the independent cohort. These data suggest that distinct dysregulation of DNA repair constituents based molecular classes in HCC would be useful for predicting prognosis and designing clinical trials for targeted therapy. PMID:27174663

  12. p53 downregulates the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Sara; Toufektchan, Eléonore; Lejour, Vincent; Bardot, Boris; Toledo, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations affecting telomere maintenance or DNA repair may, respectively, cause dyskeratosis congenita or Fanconi anaemia, two clinically related bone marrow failure syndromes. Mice expressing p53Δ31, a mutant p53 lacking the C terminus, model dyskeratosis congenita. Accordingly, the increased p53 activity in p53Δ31/Δ31 fibroblasts correlated with a decreased expression of 4 genes implicated in telomere syndromes. Here we show that these cells exhibit decreased mRNA levels for additional genes contributing to telomere metabolism, but also, surprisingly, for 12 genes mutated in Fanconi anaemia. Furthermore, p53Δ31/Δ31 fibroblasts exhibit a reduced capacity to repair DNA interstrand crosslinks, a typical feature of Fanconi anaemia cells. Importantly, the p53-dependent downregulation of Fanc genes is largely conserved in human cells. Defective DNA repair is known to activate p53, but our results indicate that, conversely, an increased p53 activity may attenuate the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway, defining a positive regulatory feedback loop. PMID:27033104

  13. Base excision repair in Archaea: back to the future in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Stefano; Tell, Gianluca

    2014-09-01

    Together with Bacteria and Eukarya, Archaea represents one of the three domain of life. In contrast with the morphological difference existing between Archaea and Eukarya, these two domains are closely related. Phylogenetic analyses confirm this evolutionary relationship showing that most of the proteins involved in DNA transcription and replication are highly conserved. On the contrary, information is scanty about DNA repair pathways and their mechanisms. In the present review the most important proteins involved in base excision repair, namely glycosylases, AP lyases, AP endonucleases, polymerases, sliding clamps, flap endonucleases, and ligases, will be discussed and compared with bacterial and eukaryotic ones. Finally, possible applications and future perspectives derived from studies on Archaea and their repair pathways, will be taken into account.

  14. Growth retardation, early death, and DNA repair defects in mice deficient for the nucleotide excision repair enzyme XPF.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ming; Shinkura, Reiko; Shinkura, Nobuhiko; Alt, Frederick W

    2004-02-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a human genetic disease which is caused by defects in nucleotide excision repair. Since this repair pathway is responsible for removing UV irradiation-induced damage to DNA, XP patients are hypersensitive to sunlight and are prone to develop skin cancer. Based on the underlying genetic defect, the disease can be divided into the seven complementation groups XPA through XPG. XPF, in association with ERCC1, constitutes a structure-specific endonuclease that makes an incision 5' to the photodamage. XPF-ERCC1 has also been implicated in both removal of interstrand DNA cross-links and homology-mediated recombination and in immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR). To study the function of XPF in vivo, we inactivated the XPF gene in mice. XPF-deficient mice showed a severe postnatal growth defect and died approximately 3 weeks after birth. Histological examination revealed that the liver of mutant animals contained abnormal cells with enlarged nuclei. Furthermore, embryonic fibroblasts defective in XPF are hypersensitive to UV irradiation and mitomycin C treatment. No defect in CSR was detected, suggesting that the nuclease is dispensable for this recombination process. These phenotypes are identical to those exhibited by the ERCC1-deficient mice, consistent with the functional association of the two proteins. The complex phenotype suggests that XPF-ERCC1 is involved in multiple DNA repair processes.

  15. CC3/TIP30 affects DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pro-apoptotic protein CC3/TIP30 has an unusual cellular function as an inhibitor of nucleocytoplasmic transport. This function is likely to be activated under conditions of stress. A number of studies support the notion that CC3 acts as a tumor and metastasis suppressor in various types of cancer. The yeast homolog of CC3 is likely to be involved in responses to DNA damage. Here we examined the potential role of CC3 in regulation of cellular responses to genotoxic stress. Results We found that forced expression of CC3 in CC3-negative cells strongly delays the repair of UV-induced DNA damage. Exogenously introduced CC3 negatively affects expression levels of DDB2/XPE and p21CIP1, and inhibits induction of c-FOS after UV exposure. In addition, exogenous CC3 prevents the nuclear accumulation of P21CIP in response to UV. These changes in the levels/localization of relevant proteins resulting from the enforced expression of CC3 are likely to contribute to the observed delay in DNA damage repair. Silencing of CC3 in CC3-positive cells has a modest delaying effect on repair of the UV induced damage, but has a much more significant negative affect on the translesion DNA synthesis after UV exposure. This could be related to the higher expression levels and increased nuclear localization of p21CIP1 in cells where expression of CC3 is silenced. Expression of CC3 also inhibits repair of oxidative DNA damage and leads to a decrease in levels of nucleoredoxin, that could contribute to the reduced viability of CC3 expressing cells after oxidative insult. Conclusions Manipulation of the cellular levels of CC3 alters expression levels and/or subcellular localization of proteins that exhibit nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. This results in altered responses to genotoxic stress and adversely affects DNA damage repair by affecting the recruitment of adequate amounts of required proteins to proper cellular compartments. Excess of cellular CC3 has a significant negative

  16. A clickable psoralen to directly quantify DNA interstrand crosslinking and repair.

    PubMed

    Evison, Benjamin J; Actis, Marcelo L; Fujii, Naoaki

    2016-03-01

    DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) represent physical obstacles to advancing replication forks and transcription complexes. A range of ICL-inducing agents have successfully been incorporated into cancer therapeutics. While studies have adopted UVA-activated psoralens as model ICL-inducing agents for investigating ICL repair, direct detection of the lesion has often been tempered by tagging the psoralen scaffold with a relatively large reporter group that may perturb the biological activity of the parent psoralen. Here a minimally-modified psoralen probe was prepared featuring a small alkyne handle suitable for click chemistry. The psoralen probe, designated 8-propargyloxypsoralen (8-POP), can be activated by UVA in vitro to generate ICLs that are susceptible to post-labeling with an azide-tagged fluorescent reporter via a copper-catalyzed reaction. A modified alkaline comet assay demonstrated that UVA-activated 8-POP proficiently generated ICLs in cells. Cellular 8-POP-DNA lesions were amenable to click-mediated ligation to fluorescent reporters in situ, which permitted their detection and quantitation by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Small molecule DNA repair inhibitors to 8-POP-treated cells attenuated the removal of 8-POP-DNA lesions, validating 8-POP as an appropriate probe for investigating cellular ICL repair. The post-labeling strategy applied in this study is inexpensive, rapid and highly modular in nature with the potential for multiple applications in DNA repair studies. PMID:26833244

  17. Spatiotemporal analysis of DNA repair using charged particle radiation.

    PubMed

    Tobias, F; Durante, M; Taucher-Scholz, G; Jakob, B

    2010-01-01

    Approaches to visualise the dynamics of the DNA lesion processing substantially contributes to the understanding of the hierarchical organisation of the DNA damage response pathways. Charged particle irradiation has recently emerged as a tool to generate discrete sites of subnuclear damage by its means of extremely localised dose deposition at low energies, thus facilitating the spatiotemporal analysis of repair events. In addition, they are of high interest for risk estimations of human space exploration (e.g. mars mission) in the high energy regime (HZE). In this short review we will give examples for the application of charged particle irradiation to study spatiotemporal aspects of DNA damage recognition and repair in the context of recent achievements in this field. Beamline microscopy allows determining the exact kinetics of repair-related proteins after irradiation with different charged particles that induce different lesion densities. The classification into fast recruited proteins like DNA-PK or XRCC1 or slower recruited ones like 53BP1 or MDC1 helps to establish the hierarchical organisation of damage recognition and subsequent repair events. Additionally, motional analysis of DNA lesions induced by traversing particles proved information about the mobility of DSBs. Increased mobility or the absence of large scale motion has direct consequences on the formation of chromosomal translocations and, thus, on mechanisms of cancer formation. Charged particle microbeams offer the interesting perspective of precise nuclear or subnuclear targeting with a defined number of ions, avoiding the Poisson distribution of traversals inherent to broad beam experiments. With the help of the microbeam, geometrical patterns of traversing ions can be applied facilitating the analysis of spatial organisation of repair. PMID:19944777

  18. Differential age-related changes in mitochondrial DNA repair activities in mouse brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Gredilla, Ricardo; Garm, Christian; Holm, Rikke; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2008-01-01

    Aging in the brain is characterized by increased susceptibility to neuronal loss and functional decline, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are thought to play an important role in these processes. Due to the proximity of mtDNA to the main sites of mitochondrial free radical generation, oxidative stress is a major source of DNA mutations in mitochondria. The base excision repair (BER) pathway removes oxidative lesions from mtDNA, thereby constituting an important mechanism to avoid accumulation of mtDNA mutations. The complexity of the brain implies that exposure and defence against oxidative stress varies among brain regions and hence some regions may be particularly prone to accumulation of mtDNA damages. In the current study we investigated the efficiency of the BER pathway throughout the murine lifespan in mitochondria from cortex and hippocampus, regions that are central in mammalian cognition, and which are severely affected during aging and in neurodegenerative diseases. A regional specific regulation of mitochondrial DNA repair activities was observed with aging. In cortical mitochondria, DNA glycosylase activities peaked at middle-age followed by a significant drop at old age. However, only minor changes were observed in hippocampal mitochondria during the whole lifespan of the animals. Furthermore, DNA glycosylase activities were lower in hippocampal than in cortical mitochondria. Mitochondrial AP endonuclease activity increased in old animals in both brain regions. Our data suggest an important regional specific regulation of mitochondrial BER during aging. PMID:18701195

  19. GADD45α inhibition of DNMT1 dependent DNA methylation during homology directed DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bongyong; Morano, Annalisa; Porcellini, Antonio; Muller, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we examine regulation of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) by the DNA damage inducible protein, GADD45α. We used a system to induce homologous recombination (HR) at a unique double-strand DNA break in a GFP reporter in mammalian cells. After HR, the repaired DNA is hypermethylated in recombinant clones showing low GFP expression (HR-L expressor class), while in high expressor recombinants (HR-H clones) previous methylation patterns are erased. GADD45α, which is transiently induced by double-strand breaks, binds to chromatin undergoing HR repair. Ectopic overexpression of GADD45α during repair increases the HR-H fraction of cells (hypomethylated repaired DNA), without altering the recombination frequency. Conversely, silencing of GADD45α increases methylation of the recombined segment and amplifies the HR-L expressor (hypermethylated) population. GADD45α specifically interacts with the catalytic site of DNMT1 and inhibits methylation activity in vitro. We propose that double-strand DNA damage and the resulting HR process involves precise, strand selected DNA methylation by DNMT1 that is regulated by GADD45α. Since GADD45α binds with high avidity to hemimethylated DNA intermediates, it may also provide a barrier to spreading of methylation during or after HR repair. PMID:22135303

  20. Complex DNA structures and structures of DNA complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chazin, W.J.; Carlstroem, G.; Shiow-Meei Chen; Miick, S.; Gomez-Paloma, L.; Smith, J.; Rydzewski, J.

    1994-12-01

    Complex DNA structures (for example, triplexes, quadruplexes, junctions) and DNA-ligand complexes are more difficult to study by NMR than standard DNA duplexes are because they have high molecular weights, show nonstandard or distorted local conformations, and exhibit large resonance linewidths and severe {sup 1}H spectral overlap. These systems also tend to have limited solubility and may require specialized solution conditions to maintain favorable spectral characteristics, which adds to the spectroscopic difficulties. Furthermore, with more atoms in the system, both assignment and structure calculation become more challenging. In this article, we focus on demonstrating the current status of NMR studies of such systems and the limitations to further progress; we also indicate in what ways isotopic enrichment can be useful.

  1. FTIR study of light-dependent activation and DNA repair processes of (6-4) photolyase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Iwata, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Junpei; Hitomi, Kenichi; Iwai, Shigenori; Todo, Takeshi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Kandori, Hideki

    2011-05-10

    The UV component of sunlight threatens all life on the earth by damaging DNA. The photolyase (PHR) DNA repair proteins maintain genetic integrity by harnessing blue light to restore intact bases from the major UV-induced photoproducts, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), and (6-4) photoproducts ((6-4) PPs). The (6-4) PHR must catalyze not only covalent bond cleavage between two pyrmidine bases but also hydroxyl or amino group transfer from the 5'- to 3'-pyrimidine base, requiring a more complex mechanism than that postulated for CPD PHR. In this paper, we apply Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to (6-4) PHR and report difference FTIR spectra that correspond to its photoactivation, substrate binding, and light-dependent DNA repair processes. The presence of DNA carrying a single (6-4) PP uniquely influences vibrations of the protein backbone and a protonated carboxylic acid, whereas photoactivation produces IR spectral changes for the FAD cofactor and the surrounding protein. Difference FTIR spectra for the light-dependent DNA damage repair reaction directly show significant DNA structural changes in the (6-4) lesion and the neighboring phosphate group. Time-dependent illumination of samples with different enzyme:substrate stoichiometries successfully distinguished signals characteristic of structural changes in the protein and the DNA resulting from binding and catalysis. PMID:21462921

  2. Base excision repair: NMR backbone assignments of Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Wallace, Susan S.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2002-03-01

    Oxidative damage is emerging as one of the most important mechanisms responsible for mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, aging, and various diseases (Farr and Kogma, 1991). One of the potential targets for oxidation is cellular DNA. While exposure to exogenous agents, such as ionizing radiation and chemicals, contributes to damaging DNA, the most important oxidative agents are endogenous, such as the reactive free radicals produced during normal oxidative metabolism (Adelman et., 1988). To mitigate the potentially deleterious effects of oxidative DNA damage virtually all aerobic organisms have developed complex repair mechanisms (Petit and Sancar, 1999). One repair mechanism, base excision repair (BER), appears to be responsible for replacing most oxidative DNA damage (David and Williams, 1998). Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), a 269-residue metalloprotein with a molecular weight of 30.2 kDa, is a key BER enzyme in prokaryotes (Boiteaux et al., 1987). Substrates recognized and released by Fpg include 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), 2,6 diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamido pyrimidine (Fapy-G), the adenine equivalents 8-oxoA and Fapy-A, 5-hydroxycytosine, 5-hydroxyuracil, B ureidoisobutiric acid, and a-R-hydroxy-B-ureidoisobutiric acid (Freidberg et al., 1995). In vitro Fpg bind double-stranded DNA and performs three catalytic activities: (i) DNA glycosylase, (ii) AP lyase, and (iii) deoxyribophosphodiesterase.

  3. Assays for DNA double-strand break repair by microhomology-based end-joining repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kostyrko, Kaja; Mermod, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    DNA double stranded breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of DNA lesions. The main pathways responsible for repairing these breaks in eukaryotic cells are homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, a third group of still poorly characterized DSB repair pathways, collectively termed microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ), relies on short homologies for the end-joining process. Here, we constructed GFP reporter assays to characterize and distinguish MMEJ variant pathways, namely the simple MMEJ and the DNA synthesis-dependent (SD)-MMEJ mechanisms. Transfection of these assay vectors in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and characterization of the repaired DNA sequences indicated that while simple MMEJ is able to mediate relatively efficient DSB repair if longer microhomologies are present, the majority of DSBs were repaired using the highly error-prone SD-MMEJ pathway. To validate the involvement of DNA synthesis in the repair process, siRNA knock-down of different genes proposed to play a role in MMEJ were performed, revealing that the knock-down of DNA polymerase θ inhibited DNA end resection and repair through simple MMEJ, thus favoring the other repair pathway. Overall, we conclude that this approach provides a convenient assay to study MMEJ-related DNA repair pathways.

  4. DNA repair in spermatocytes and spermatids of the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Sega, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    When male mice are exposed to chemical agents that reach the germ cells several outcomes are possible in terms of the germ cell unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) response and removal of DNA adducts. It is possible that: the chemical binds to the DNA and induces a UDS response with concomittant removal of DNA adducts; the chemical binds to the DNA but no UDS response is induced; or the chemical does not bind to DNA and no UDS is induced. Many mutagens have been shown to induce a UDS response in postgonial germ cell stages of the male mouse up through midspermatids, but the relationship between this UDS and the repair of genetic damage within the germ cells is still unknown. While some mutagens appear to have an effect only in germ-cell stages where no UDS occurs, others are able to induce genetic damage in stages where UDS has been induced.

  5. Involvement of DNA-PK(sub cs) in DSB Repair Following Fe-56 Ion Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Peter; Harper, Jane; Anderson, Jennifer a.; Cucinnota, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    When cells are exposed to radiation, cellular lesions are induced in the DNA including double strand breaks (DSBs), single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage, which if not repaired with high fidelity may lead to detrimental biological consequences. Complex DSBs are induced by ionizing radiation and characterized by the presence of base lesions close to the break termini. They are believed to be one of the major causes of the biological effects of IR. The complexity of DSBs increases with the ionization density of the radiation and these complex DSBs are distinct from the damage induced by sparsely ionizing gamma-radiation. It has been hypothesized that complex DSBs produced by heavy ions in space pose problems to the DNA repair machinery. We have used imm uno-cyto-chemical staining of phosphorylated histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX) foci, as a marker of DSBs. We have investigated the formation and loss of gamma-H2AX foci and RAD51 foci (a protein involved in the homologous recombination pathway) in mammalian cells induced by low fluences of low-LET gamma-radiation and high-LET Fe-56 ions (1GeV/n, 151 keV/micron LET). M059J and M059K cells, which are deficient and proficient in DNA-PK(sub cs) activity respectively, were used to examine the role of DNA-PK(sub cs), a key protein in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway of DSB repair, along with HF19 human fibroblasts. Followi ng irradiation with Fe-56 ions the rate of repair was slower in M059J cells compared with that in M059K, indicating a role for DNA-PK(sub cs) in the repair of DSB induced by Fe-56 ions. However a small percentage of DSBs induced are rejoined within 5 h although many DSBs still persist up to 24 h. When RAD51 was examined in M059J/K cells, RAD51 foci are visible 24 hours after irradiation in approximately 40% of M059J cells compared with <5% of M059K cells indicating that persistent DSBs or those formed at stalled replication forks recruit RAD51 in DNA-PK(sub cs) deficient cells. Following 1 Gy

  6. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, recreational physical activity and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Lauren E; Santella, Regina M; Cleveland, Rebecca J; Millikan, Robert C; Olshan, Andrew F; North, Kari E; Bradshaw, Patrick T; Eng, Sybil M; Terry, Mary Beth; Shen, Jing; Crew, Katherine D; Rossner, Pavel; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Neugut, Alfred I; Gammon, Marilie D

    2014-02-01

    The mechanisms driving the inverse association between recreational physical activity (RPA) and breast cancer risk are complex. While exercise is associated with increased reactive oxygen species production it may also improve damage repair systems, particularly those that operate on single-strand breaks including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Of these repair pathways, the role of MMR in breast carcinogenesis is least investigated. Polymorphisms in MMR or other DNA repair gene variants may modify the association between RPA and breast cancer incidence. We investigated the individual and joint effects of variants in three MMR pathway genes (MSH3, MLH1 and MSH2) on breast cancer occurrence using resources from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. We additionally characterized interactions between RPA and genetic polymorphisms in MMR, BER and NER pathways. We found statistically significant multiplicative interactions (p < 0.05) between MSH2 and MLH1, as well as between postmenopausal RPA and four variants in DNA repair (XPC-Ala499Val, XPF-Arg415Gln, XPG-Asp1104His and MLH1-lle219Val). Significant risk reductions were observed among highly active women with the common genotype for XPC (OR = 0.54; 95% CI, 0.36-0.81) and XPF (OR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.44-0.87), as well as among active women who carried at least one variant allele in XPG (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.29-0.77) and MLH1 (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.30-0.71). Our data show that women with minor alleles in both MSH2 and MLH1 could be at increased breast cancer risk. RPA may be modified by genes in the DNA repair pathway, and merit further investigation.

  7. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes, Recreational Physical Activity and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Lauren E.; Santella, Regina M.; Cleveland, Rebecca J.; Millikan, Robert C.; Olshan, Andrew F.; North, Kari E.; Bradshaw, Patrick T.; Eng, Sybil M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Shen, Jing; Crew, Katherine D.; Rossner, Pavel; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms driving the inverse association between recreational physical activity (RPA) and breast cancer risk are complex. While exercise is associated with increased reactive oxygen species production it may also improve damage repair systems, particularly those that operate on single-strand breaks including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Of these repair pathways, the role of MMR in breast carcinogenesis is least investigated. Polymorphisms in MMR or other DNA repair gene variants may modify the association between RPA and breast cancer incidence. We investigated the individual and joint effects of variants in three MMR pathway genes (MSH3, MLH1 and MSH2) on breast cancer occurrence using resources from the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. We additionally characterized interactions between RPA and genetic polymorphisms in MMR, BER and NER pathways. We found statistically significant multiplicative interactions (p<0.05) between MSH2 and MLH1, as well as between postmenopausal RPA and four variants in DNA repair (XPC-Ala499Val, XPF-Arg415Gln, XPG-Asp1104His and MLH1-lle219Val). Significant risk reductions were observed among highly active women with the common genotype for XPC (OR=0.54; 95% CI, 0.36–0.81) and XPF (OR=0.62; 95% CI, 0.44–0.87), as well as among active women who carried at least one variant allele in XPG (OR=0.46; 95% CI, 0.29–0.77) and MLH1 (OR=0.46; 95% CI, 0.30–0.71). Our data show that women with minor alleles in both MSH2 and MLH1 could be at increased breast cancer risk. RPA may be modified by genes in the DNA repair pathway, and merit further investigation. PMID:23852586

  8. FIGNL1-containing protein complex is required for efficient homologous recombination repair

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingsong; Chen, Junjie

    2013-01-01

    The RAD51 recombinase plays a central role in homologous recombination (HR), which is critical for repair of DNA double-strand breaks, maintenance of genomic stability, and prevention of developmental disorders and cancer. Here, we report the identification of an RAD51-binding protein fidgetin-like 1 (FIGNL1). FIGNL1 specifically interacts with RAD51 through its conserved RAD51 binding domain. Cells depleted of FIGNL1 show defective HR repair. Interestingly, FIGNL1 is recruited to sites of DNA damage in a manner that is independent of breast cancer 2, early onset, RAD51, and probably, RAD51 paralogs. Conversely, FIGNL1 depletion does not affect the loading of RAD51 onto ssDNA. Our additional analysis uncovered KIAA0146, also known as scaffolding protein involved in DNA repair (SPIDR), as a binding partner of FIGNL1 and established that KIAA0146/SPIDR acts with FIGNL1 in HR repair. Collectively, our study uncovers a protein complex, which consists of FIGNL1 and KIAA0146/SPIDR, in DNA repair and provides potential directions for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:23754376

  9. Hypomorphic PCNA mutation underlies a human DNA repair disorder

    PubMed Central

    Baple, Emma L.; Chambers, Helen; Cross, Harold E.; Fawcett, Heather; Nakazawa, Yuka; Chioza, Barry A.; Harlalka, Gaurav V.; Mansour, Sahar; Sreekantan-Nair, Ajith; Patton, Michael A.; Muggenthaler, Martina; Rich, Phillip; Wagner, Karin; Coblentz, Roselyn; Stein, Constance K.; Last, James I.; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Ogi, Tomoo; Lehmann, Alan R.; Green, Catherine M.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous human disorders, including Cockayne syndrome, UV-sensitive syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, and trichothiodystrophy, result from the mutation of genes encoding molecules important for nucleotide excision repair. Here, we describe a syndrome in which the cardinal clinical features include short stature, hearing loss, premature aging, telangiectasia, neurodegeneration, and photosensitivity, resulting from a homozygous missense (p.Ser228Ile) sequence alteration of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). PCNA is a highly conserved sliding clamp protein essential for DNA replication and repair. Due to this fundamental role, mutations in PCNA that profoundly impair protein function would be incompatible with life. Interestingly, while the p.Ser228Ile alteration appeared to have no effect on protein levels or DNA replication, patient cells exhibited marked abnormalities in response to UV irradiation, displaying substantial reductions in both UV survival and RNA synthesis recovery. The p.Ser228Ile change also profoundly altered PCNA’s interaction with Flap endonuclease 1 and DNA Ligase 1, DNA metabolism enzymes. Together, our findings detail a mutation of PCNA in humans associated with a neurodegenerative phenotype, displaying clinical and molecular features common to other DNA repair disorders, which we showed to be attributable to a hypomorphic amino acid alteration. PMID:24911150

  10. Molecular Understanding of Efficient DNA Repair Machinery of Photolyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chuang; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Guo, Xunmin; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2012-06-01

    Photolyases repair the UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in damage DNA with high efficiency, through a cylic light-driven electron transfer radical mechanism. We report here our systematic studies of the repair dynamics in E. coli photolyase with mutation of five active-site residues. The significant loss of repair efficiency by the mutation indicates that those active-site residues play an important role in the DNA repair by photolyase. To understand how the active-site residues modulate the efficiency, we mapped out the entire evolution of each elementary step during the repair in those photolyase mutants with femtosecond resolution. We completely analyzed the electron transfer dynamics using the Sumi-Marcus model. The results suggest that photolyase controls the critical electron transfer and the ring-splitting of pyrimidine dimer through modulation of the redox potentials and reorganization energies, and stabilization of the anionic intermediates, maintaining the dedicated balance of all the reaction steps and achieving the maximum function activity.

  11. Cycling with BRCA2 from DNA repair to mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyunsook

    2014-11-15

    Genetic integrity in proliferating cells is guaranteed by the harmony of DNA replication, appropriate DNA repair, and segregation of the duplicated genome. Breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 is a unique tumor suppressor that is involved in all three processes. Hence, it is critical in genome maintenance. The functions of BRCA2 in DNA repair and homology-directed recombination (HDR) have been reviewed numerous times. Here, I will briefly go through the functions of BRCA2 in HDR and focus on the emerging roles of BRCA2 in telomere homeostasis and mitosis, then discuss how BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in a cell-cycle specific manner in the maintenance of genomic integrity. - Highlights: • BRCA2 is a multifaceted tumor suppressor and is crucial in genetic integrity. • BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in cell cycle-specific manner. • Mitotic kinases regulate diverse functions of BRCA2 in mitosis and cytokinesis.

  12. DNA Double Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice Is Directed by Distinct MRE11 Nuclease Activities

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Atsushi; Moiani, Davide; Arvai, Andrew S.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Harding, Shane M.; Genois, Marie-Michelle; Maity, Ranjan; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari; Kertokalio, Aryandi; Romoli, Filippo; Ismail, Amani; Ismalaj, Ermal; Petricci, Elena; Matthew, J Neale; Bristow, Robert G; Masson, Jean-Yves; Wyman, Claire; Jeggo, Penny; Tainer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY MRE11 within the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex acts in DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR), detection and signaling; yet, how its endo- and exonuclease activities regulate DSB repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) versus homologous recombination (HR) remains enigmatic. Here we employed structure-based design with a focused chemical library to discover specific MRE11 endo- or exonuclease inhibitors. With these inhibitors we examined repair pathway choice at DSBs generated in G2 following radiation exposure. Whilst endo- or exonuclease inhibition impairs radiation-induced RPA chromatin binding, suggesting diminished resection, the inhibitors surprisingly direct different repair outcomes. Endonuclease inhibition promotes NHEJ in lieu of HR, whilst exonuclease inhibition confers a repair defect. Collectively, the results describe nuclease-specific MRE11 inhibitors, define distinct nuclease roles in DSB repair, and support a mechanism whereby MRE11 endonuclease initiates resection, thereby licensing HR followed by MRE11 exo and EXO1/BLM bidirectional resection towards and away from the DNA end, which commits to HR. PMID:24316220

  13. Breaking bad: The mutagenic effect of DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Species survival depends on the faithful replication of genetic information, which is continually monitored and maintained by DNA repair pathways thatcorrect replication errors and the thousands of lesions that arise daily from the inherent chemical lability of DNA and the effects of genotoxic agents. Nonetheless,neutrally evolving DNA (not under purifying selection) accumulates base substitutions with time (the neutral mutation rate). Thus, repair processes are not 100% efficient. The neutral mutation rate varies both between and within chromosomes. For example it is 10 – 50 fold higher at CpGsthan at non-CpG positions. Interestingly, the neutral mutation rate at non-CpG sites is positively correlated with CpG content. Althoughthe basis of this correlation was not immediately apparent,some bioinformatic results were consistent with the induction of non-CpGmutations byDNA repairat flanking CpG sites. Recent studies with a model system showed that in vivo repair of preformed lesions (mismatches, abasic sites, single stranded nicks) can in factinduce mutations in flanking DNA. Mismatch repair (MMR) is an essential component for repair-induced mutations, which can occur as distant as 5 kb from the introduced lesions. Most, but not all, mutations involved the C of TpCpN (G of NpGpA) which is the target sequence of the C-preferringsingle-stranded DNA specific APOBEC deaminases. APOBEC-mediated mutations are not limited to our model system: Recent studies by others showed that some tumors harbor mutations with the same signature, as can intermediates in RNA-guided endonuclease-mediated genome editing. APOBEC deaminases participate in normal physiological functions such as generating mutations that inactivate viruses or endogenous retrotransposons, or that enhance immunoglobulin diversity in B cells. The recruitment of normally physiological errorprone processes during DNA repairwould have important implications for disease, aging and evolution. This perspective briefly

  14. Histone modifications and DNA double-strand break repair after exposure to ionizing radiations.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Clayton R; Ramnarain, Deepti; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Iyengar, Puneeth; Pandita, Raj K; Shay, Jerry W; Pandita, Tej K

    2013-04-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure induces highly lethal DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in all phases of the cell cycle. After DSBs are detected by the cellular machinery, these breaks are repaired by either of two mechanisms: (1) nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which re-ligates the broken ends of the DNA and (2) homologous recombination (HR), that makes use of an undamaged identical DNA sequence as a template to maintain the fidelity of DNA repair. DNA DSB repair must occur within the context of the natural cellular DNA structure. Among the major factors influencing DNA organization are specific histone and nonhistone proteins that form chromatin. The overall chromatin structure regulates DNA damage responses since chromatin status can impede DNA damage site access by repair proteins. During the process of DNA DSB repair, several chromatin alterations are required to sense damage and facilitate accessibility of the repair machinery. The DNA DSB response is also facilitated by hierarchical signaling networks that orchestrate chromatin structural changes that may coordinate cell-cycle checkpoints involving multiple enzymatic activities to repair broken DNA ends. During DNA damage sensing and repair, histones undergo posttranslational modifications (PTMs) including phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation and ubiquitylation. Such histone modifications represent a histone code that directs the recruitment of proteins involved in DNA damage sensing and repair processes. In this review, we summarize histone modifications that occur during DNA DSB repair processes.

  15. The Mechanism of Double-Strand DNA Break Repair by the Nonhomologous DNA End Joining Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Double-strand DNA breaks are common events in eukaryotic cells, and there are two major pathways for repairing them: homologous recombination and nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ). The diverse causes of DSBs result in a diverse chemistry of DNA ends that must be repaired. Across NHEJ evolution, the enzymes of the NHEJ pathway exhibit a remarkable degree of structural tolerance in the range of DNA end substrate configurations upon which they can act. In vertebrate cells, the nuclease, polymerases and ligase of NHEJ are the most mechanistically flexible and multifunctional enzymes in each of their classes. Unlike repair pathways for more defined lesions, NHEJ repair enzymes act iteratively, act in any order, and can function independently of one another at each of the two DNA ends being joined. NHEJ is critical not only for the repair of pathologic DSBs as in chromosomal translocations, but also for the repair of physiologic DSBs created during V(D)J recombination and class switch recombination. Therefore, patients lacking normal NHEJ are not only sensitive to ionizing radiation, but also severely immunodeficient. PMID:20192759

  16. The Shu complex promotes error-free tolerance of alkylation-induced base excision repair products.

    PubMed

    Godin, Stephen K; Zhang, Zhuying; Herken, Benjamin W; Westmoreland, James W; Lee, Alison G; Mihalevic, Michael J; Yu, Zhongxun; Sobol, Robert W; Resnick, Michael A; Bernstein, Kara A

    2016-09-30

    Here, we investigate the role of the budding yeast Shu complex in promoting homologous recombination (HR) upon replication fork damage. We recently found that the Shu complex stimulates Rad51 filament formation during HR through its physical interactions with Rad55-Rad57. Unlike other HR factors, Shu complex mutants are primarily sensitive to replicative stress caused by MMS and not to more direct DNA breaks. Here, we uncover a novel role for the Shu complex in the repair of specific MMS-induced DNA lesions and elucidate the interplay between HR and translesion DNA synthesis. We find that the Shu complex promotes high-fidelity bypass of MMS-induced alkylation damage, such as N3-methyladenine, as well as bypassing the abasic sites generated after Mag1 removes N3-methyladenine lesions. Furthermore, we find that the Shu complex responds to ssDNA breaks generated in cells lacking the abasic site endonucleases. At each lesion, the Shu complex promotes Rad51-dependent HR as the primary repair/tolerance mechanism over error-prone translesion DNA polymerases. Together, our work demonstrates that the Shu complex's promotion of Rad51 pre-synaptic filaments is critical for high-fidelity bypass of multiple replication-blocking lesion.

  17. The Shu complex promotes error-free tolerance of alkylation-induced base excision repair products

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Stephen K.; Zhang, Zhuying; Herken, Benjamin W.; Westmoreland, James W.; Lee, Alison G.; Mihalevic, Michael J.; Yu, Zhongxun; Sobol, Robert W.; Resnick, Michael A.; Bernstein, Kara A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate the role of the budding yeast Shu complex in promoting homologous recombination (HR) upon replication fork damage. We recently found that the Shu complex stimulates Rad51 filament formation during HR through its physical interactions with Rad55-Rad57. Unlike other HR factors, Shu complex mutants are primarily sensitive to replicative stress caused by MMS and not to more direct DNA breaks. Here, we uncover a novel role for the Shu complex in the repair of specific MMS-induced DNA lesions and elucidate the interplay between HR and translesion DNA synthesis. We find that the Shu complex promotes high-fidelity bypass of MMS-induced alkylation damage, such as N3-methyladenine, as well as bypassing the abasic sites generated after Mag1 removes N3-methyladenine lesions. Furthermore, we find that the Shu complex responds to ssDNA breaks generated in cells lacking the abasic site endonucleases. At each lesion, the Shu complex promotes Rad51-dependent HR as the primary repair/tolerance mechanism over error-prone translesion DNA polymerases. Together, our work demonstrates that the Shu complex's promotion of Rad51 pre-synaptic filaments is critical for high-fidelity bypass of multiple replication-blocking lesion. PMID:27298254

  18. Effects of hyperthermia on DNA repair pathways: one treatment to inhibit them all.

    PubMed

    Oei, Arlene L; Vriend, Lianne E M; Crezee, Johannes; Franken, Nicolaas A P; Krawczyk, Przemek M

    2015-01-01

    The currently available arsenal of anticancer modalities includes many DNA damaging agents that can kill malignant cells. However, efficient DNA repair mechanisms protect both healthy and cancer cells against the effects of treatment and contribute to the development of drug resistance. Therefore, anti-cancer treatments based on inflicting DNA damage can benefit from inhibition of DNA repair. Hyperthermia - treatment at elevated temperature - considerably affects DNA repair, among other cellular processes, and can thus sensitize (cancer) cells to DNA damaging agents. This effect has been known and clinically applied for many decades, but how heat inhibits DNA repair and which pathways are targeted has not been fully elucidated. In this review we attempt to summarize the known effects of hyperthermia on DNA repair pathways relevant in clinical treatment of cancer. Furthermore, we outline the relationships between the effects of heat on DNA repair and sensitization of cells to various DNA damaging agents. PMID:26245485

  19. BRCA1 is Required for Post-replication Repair After UV-induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pathania, Shailja; Nguyen, Jenna; Hill, Sarah J.; Scully, Ralph; Feunteun, Jean; Livingston, David M.

    2011-01-01

    BRCA1 contributes to the response to UV irradiation. Utilizing its BRCT motifs, it is recruited during S/G2 to UV-damaged sites in a DNA replication-dependent, but nucleotide excision repair- independent manner. More specifically, at UV- stalled replication forks, it promotes photoproduct excision, suppression of translesion synthesis, and the localization and activation of replication factor C complex (RFC) subunits. The last function, in turn, triggers post-UV checkpoint activation and post- replicative repair. These BRCA1 functions differ from those required for DSBR. PMID:21963239

  20. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, B A; Wilson, III, D M

    2004-05-13

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker have led to estimates varying over 3-4 orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our results show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  1. BRCA Mutations, DNA Repair Deficiency, and Ovarian Aging1

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Kutluk; Turan, Volkan; Titus, Shiny; Stobezki, Robert; Liu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte aging has a significant impact on reproductive outcomes both quantitatively and qualitatively. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the age-related decline in reproductive success have not been fully addressed. BRCA is known to be involved in homologous DNA recombination and plays an essential role in double-strand DNA break repair. Given the growing body of laboratory and clinical evidence, we performed a systematic review on the current understanding of the role of DNA repair in human reproduction. We find that BRCA mutations negatively affect ovarian reserve based on convincing evidence from in vitro and in vivo results and prospective studies. Because decline in the function of the intact gene occurs at an earlier age, women with BRCA1 mutations exhibit accelerated ovarian aging, unlike those with BRCA2 mutations. However, because of the still robust function of the intact allele in younger women and because of the masking of most severe cases by prophylactic oophorectomy or cancer, it is less likely one would see an effect of BRCA mutations on fertility until later in reproductive age. The impact of BRCA2 mutations on reproductive function may be less visible because of the delayed decline in the function of normal BRCA2 allele. BRCA1 function and ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-mediated DNA repair may also be important in the pathogenesis of age-induced increase in aneuploidy. BRCA1 is required for meiotic spindle assembly, and cohesion function between sister chromatids is also regulated by ATM family member proteins. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest the implication of BRCA and DNA repair malfunction in ovarian aging. PMID:26224004

  2. DNA repair mechanisms in eukaryotes: Special focus in Entamoeba histolytica and related protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    López-Camarillo, César; Lopez-Casamichana, Mavil; Weber, Christian; Guillen, Nancy; Orozco, Esther; Marchat, Laurence A

    2009-12-01

    Eukaryotic cell viability highly relies on genome stability and DNA integrity maintenance. The cellular response to DNA damage mainly consists of six biological conserved pathways known as homologous recombination repair (HRR), non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER), mismatch repair (MMR), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and methyltransferase repair that operate in a concerted way to minimize genetic information loss due to a DNA lesion. Particularly, protozoan parasites survival depends on DNA repair mechanisms that constantly supervise chromosomes to correct damaged nucleotides generated by cytotoxic agents, host immune pressure or cellular processes. Here we reviewed the current knowledge about DNA repair mechanisms in the most relevant human protozoan pathogens. Additionally, we described the recent advances to understand DNA repair mechanisms in Entamoeba histolytica with special emphasis in the use of genomic approaches based on bioinformatic analysis of parasite genome sequence and microarrays technology.

  3. DNA damage and Repair Modify DNA methylation and Chromatin Domain of the Targeted Locus: Mechanism of allele methylation polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Giusi; Landi, Rosaria; Pezone, Antonio; Morano, Annalisa; Zuchegna, Candida; Romano, Antonella; Muller, Mark T.; Gottesman, Max E.; Porcellini, Antonio; Avvedimento, Enrico V.

    2016-01-01

    We characterize the changes in chromatin structure, DNA methylation and transcription during and after homologous DNA repair (HR). We find that HR modifies the DNA methylation pattern of the repaired segment. HR also alters local histone H3 methylation as well chromatin structure by inducing DNA-chromatin loops connecting the 5′ and 3′ ends of the repaired gene. During a two-week period after repair, transcription-associated demethylation promoted by Base Excision Repair enzymes further modifies methylation of the repaired DNA. Subsequently, the repaired genes display stable but diverse methylation profiles. These profiles govern the levels of expression in each clone. Our data argue that DNA methylation and chromatin remodelling induced by HR may be a source of permanent variation of gene expression in somatic cells. PMID:27629060

  4. DNA damage and Repair Modify DNA methylation and Chromatin Domain of the Targeted Locus: Mechanism of allele methylation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Russo, Giusi; Landi, Rosaria; Pezone, Antonio; Morano, Annalisa; Zuchegna, Candida; Romano, Antonella; Muller, Mark T; Gottesman, Max E; Porcellini, Antonio; Avvedimento, Enrico V

    2016-01-01

    We characterize the changes in chromatin structure, DNA methylation and transcription during and after homologous DNA repair (HR). We find that HR modifies the DNA methylation pattern of the repaired segment. HR also alters local histone H3 methylation as well chromatin structure by inducing DNA-chromatin loops connecting the 5' and 3' ends of the repaired gene. During a two-week period after repair, transcription-associated demethylation promoted by Base Excision Repair enzymes further modifies methylation of the repaired DNA. Subsequently, the repaired genes display stable but diverse methylation profiles. These profiles govern the levels of expression in each clone. Our data argue that DNA methylation and chromatin remodelling induced by HR may be a source of permanent variation of gene expression in somatic cells. PMID:27629060

  5. A unified view of base excision repair: lesion-dependent protein complexes regulated by post-translational modification

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Karen H.; Sobol, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) proteins act upon a significantly broad spectrum of DNA lesions that result from endogenous and exogenous sources. Multiple sub-pathways of BER (short-path or long-patch) and newly designated DNA repair pathways (e.g., SSBR and NIR) that utilize BER proteins complicate any comprehensive understanding of BER and its role in genome maintenance, chemotherapeutic response, neurodegeneration, cancer or aging. Herein, we propose a unified model of BER, comprised of three functional processes: Lesion Recognition/Strand Scission, Gap Tailoring and DNA Synthesis/Ligation, each represented by one or more multiprotein complexes and coordinated via the XRCC1/DNA Ligase III and PARP1 scaffold proteins. BER therefore may be represented by a series of repair complexes that assemble at the site of the DNA lesion and mediates repair in a coordinated fashion involving protein-protein interactions that dictate subsequent steps or sub-pathway choice. Complex formation is influenced by post-translational protein modifications that arise from the cellular state or the DNA damage response, providing an increase in specificity and efficiency to the BER pathway. In this review, we have summarized the reported BER protein-protein interactions and protein post-translational modifications and discuss the impact on DNA repair capacity and complex formation. PMID:17337257

  6. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1 protein impairs DNA repair mediated through the inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanaga, Kentaro; Sueoka, Naoko; Sato, Akemi; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo . E-mail: sueokae@post.saga-med.ac.jp

    2005-08-05

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1, an RNA binding protein, is overexpressed from the early stage of lung cancers; it is evident even in bronchial dysplasia, a premalignant lesion. We evaluated the proteins bound with hnRNP B1 and found that hnRNP B1 interacted with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex, and recombinant hnRNP B1 protein dose-dependently inhibited DNA-PK activity in vitro. To test the effect of hnRNP B1 on DNA repair, we performed comet assay after irradiation, using normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1: reduction of hnRNP B1 treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1 induced faster DNA repair in normal HBE cells. Considering these results, we assume that overexpression of hnRNP B1 occurring in the early stage of carcinogenesis inhibits DNA-PK activity, resulting in subsequent accumulation of erroneous rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks, causing tumor progression.

  7. Replication factor C recruits DNA polymerase delta to sites of nucleotide excision repair but is not required for PCNA recruitment.

    PubMed

    Overmeer, René M; Gourdin, Audrey M; Giglia-Mari, Ambra; Kool, Hanneke; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Siegal, Gregg; Fousteri, Maria I; Mullenders, Leon H F; Vermeulen, Wim

    2010-10-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) operates through coordinated assembly of repair factors into pre- and postincision complexes. The postincision step of NER includes gap-filling DNA synthesis and ligation. However, the exact composition of this NER-associated DNA synthesis complex in vivo and the dynamic interactions of the factors involved are not well understood. Using immunofluorescence, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and live-cell protein dynamic studies, we show that replication factor C (RFC) is implicated in postincision NER in mammalian cells. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of RFC impairs upstream removal of UV lesions and abrogates the downstream recruitment of DNA polymerase delta. Unexpectedly, RFC appears dispensable for PCNA recruitment yet is required for the subsequent recruitment of DNA polymerases to PCNA, indicating that RFC is essential to stably load the polymerase clamp to start DNA repair synthesis at 3' termini. The kinetic studies are consistent with a model in which RFC exchanges dynamically at sites of repair. However, its persistent localization at stalled NER complexes suggests that RFC remains targeted to the repair complex even after loading of PCNA. We speculate that RFC associates with the downstream 5' phosphate after loading; such interaction would prevent possible signaling events initiated by the RFC-like Rad17 and may assist in unloading of PCNA. PMID:20713449

  8. Replication Factor C Recruits DNA Polymerase δ to Sites of Nucleotide Excision Repair but Is Not Required for PCNA Recruitment▿

    PubMed Central

    Overmeer, René M.; Gourdin, Audrey M.; Giglia-Mari, Ambra; Kool, Hanneke; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Siegal, Gregg; Fousteri, Maria I.; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) operates through coordinated assembly of repair factors into pre- and postincision complexes. The postincision step of NER includes gap-filling DNA synthesis and ligation. However, the exact composition of this NER-associated DNA synthesis complex in vivo and the dynamic interactions of the factors involved are not well understood. Using immunofluorescence, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and live-cell protein dynamic studies, we show that replication factor C (RFC) is implicated in postincision NER in mammalian cells. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of RFC impairs upstream removal of UV lesions and abrogates the downstream recruitment of DNA polymerase delta. Unexpectedly, RFC appears dispensable for PCNA recruitment yet is required for the subsequent recruitment of DNA polymerases to PCNA, indicating that RFC is essential to stably load the polymerase clamp to start DNA repair synthesis at 3′ termini. The kinetic studies are consistent with a model in which RFC exchanges dynamically at sites of repair. However, its persistent localization at stalled NER complexes suggests that RFC remains targeted to the repair complex even after loading of PCNA. We speculate that RFC associates with the downstream 5′ phosphate after loading; such interaction would prevent possible signaling events initiated by the RFC-like Rad17 and may assist in unloading of PCNA. PMID:20713449

  9. β2-spectrin depletion impairs DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Horikoshi, Nobuo; Pandita, Raj K.; Mujoo, Kalpana; Hambarde, Shashank; Sharma, Dharmendra; Mattoo, Abid R.; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Charaka, Vijaya; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2016-01-01

    β2-Spectrin (β2SP/SPTBN1, gene SPTBN1) is a key TGF-β/SMAD3/4 adaptor and transcriptional cofactor that regulates TGF-β signaling and can contribute to liver cancer development. Here we report that cells deficient in β2-Spectrin (β2SP) are moderately sensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) and extremely sensitive to agents that cause interstrand cross-links (ICLs) or replication stress. In response to treatment with IR or ICL agents (formaldehyde, cisplatin, camptothecin, mitomycin), β2SP deficient cells displayed a higher frequency of cells with delayed γ-H2AX removal and a higher frequency of residual chromosome aberrations. Following hydroxyurea (HU)-induced replication stress, β2SP-deficient cells displayed delayed disappearance of γ-H2AX foci along with defective repair factor recruitment (MRE11, CtIP, RAD51, RPA, and FANCD2) as well as defective restart of stalled replication forks. Repair factor recruitment is a prerequisite for initiation of DNA damage repair by the homologous recombination (HR) pathway, which was also defective in β2SP deficient cells. We propose that β2SP is required for maintaining genomic stability following replication fork stalling, whether induced by either ICL damage or replicative stress, by facilitating fork regression as well as DNA damage repair by homologous recombination. PMID:27248179

  10. DNA repair activity in fish and interest in ecotoxicology: a review.

    PubMed

    Kienzler, Aude; Bony, Sylvie; Devaux, Alain

    2013-06-15

    The knowledge of DNA repair in a target species is of first importance as it is the primary line of defense against genotoxicants, and a better knowledge of DNA repair capacity in fish could help to interpret genotoxicity data and/or assist in the choice of target species, developmental stage and tissues to focus on, both for environmental biomonitoring studies and DNA repair testing. This review focuses in a first part on what is presently known on a mechanistic basis, about the various DNA repair systems in fish, in vivo and in established cell lines. Data on base excision repair (BER), direct reversal with O⁶-alkylguanine transferase and double strand breaks repair, although rather scarce, are being reviewed, as well as nucleotide excision repair (NER) and photoreactivation repair (PER), which are by far the most studied repair mechanisms in fish. Most of these repair mechanisms seem to be strongly species and tissue dependent; they also depend on the developmental stage of the organisms. BER is efficient in vivo, although no data has been found on in vitro models. NER activity is quite low or even inexistent depending on the studies; however this lack is partly compensated by a strong PER activity, especially in early developmental stage. In a second part, a survey of the ecotoxicological studies integrating DNA repair as a parameter responding to single or mixture of contaminant is realized. Three main approaches are being used: the measurement of DNA repair gene expression after exposure, although it has not yet been clearly established whether gene expression is indicative of repair capacity; the monitoring of DNA damage removal by following DNA repair kinetics; and the modulation of DNA repair activity following exposure in situ, in order to assess the impact of exposure history on DNA repair capacity. Since all DNA repair processes are possible targets for environmental pollutants, we can also wonder at which extent such a modulation of repair capacities

  11. DNA mismatch repair: molecular mechanisms and biological function.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Mark J; Hsieh, Peggy

    2003-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) guards the integrity of the genome in virtually all cells. It contributes about 1000-fold to the overall fidelity of replication and targets mispaired bases that arise through replication errors, during homologous recombination, and as a result of DNA damage. Cells deficient in MMR have a mutator phenotype in which the rate of spontaneous mutation is greatly elevated, and they frequently exhibit microsatellite instability at mono- and dinucleotide repeats. The importance of MMR in mutation avoidance is highlighted by the finding that defects in MMR predispose individuals to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. In addition to its role in postreplication repair, the MMR machinery serves to police homologous recombination events and acts as a barrier to genetic exchange between species. PMID:14527292

  12. Crystal Structure of the Human Hsmar1-Derived Transposase Domain in the DNA Repair Enzyme Metnase

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Kristie D.; He, Hongzhen; Imasaki, Tsuyoshi; Lee, Suk-Hee; Georgiadis, Millie M.

    2010-08-12

    Although the human genome is littered with sequences derived from the Hsmar1 transposon, the only intact Hsmar1 transposase gene exists within a chimeric SET-transposase fusion protein referred to as Metnase or SETMAR. Metnase retains many of the transposase activities including terminal inverted repeat (TIR) specific DNA-binding activity, DNA cleavage activity, albeit uncoupled from TIR-specific binding, and the ability to form a synaptic complex. However, Metnase has evolved as a DNA repair protein that is specifically involved in nonhomologous end joining. Here, we present two crystal structures of the transposase catalytic domain of Metnase revealing a dimeric enzyme with unusual active site plasticity that may be involved in modulating metal binding. We show through characterization of a dimerization mutant, F460K, that the dimeric form of the enzyme is required for its DNA cleavage, DNA-binding, and nonhomologous end joining activities. Of significance is the conservation of F460 along with residues that we propose may be involved in the modulation of metal binding in both the predicted ancestral Hsmar1 transposase sequence as well as in the modern enzyme. The Metnase transposase has been remarkably conserved through evolution; however, there is a clustering of substitutions located in alpha helices 4 and 5 within the putative DNA-binding site, consistent with loss of transposition specific DNA cleavage activity and acquisition of DNA repair specific cleavage activity.

  13. A novel cell permeable DNA replication and repair marker

    PubMed Central

    Herce, Henry D; Rajan, Malini; Lättig-Tünnemann, Gisela; Fillies, Marion; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is a key protein in DNA replication and repair. The dynamics of replication and repair in live cells is usually studied introducing translational fusions of PCNA. To obviate the need for transfection and bypass the problem of difficult to transfect and/or short lived cells, we have now developed a cell permeable replication and/or repair marker. The design of this marker has three essential molecular components: (1) an optimized artificial PCNA binding peptide; (2) a cell-penetrating peptide, derived from the HIV-1 Trans Activator of Transcription (TAT); (3) an in vivo cleavable linker, linking the two peptides. The resulting construct was taken up by human, hamster and mouse cells within minutes of addition to the media. Inside the cells, the cargo separated from the vector peptide and bound PCNA effectively. Both replication and repair sites could be directly labeled in live cells making it the first in vivo cell permeable peptide marker for these two fundamental cellular processes. Concurrently, we also introduced a quick peptide based PCNA staining method as an alternative to PCNA antibodies for immunofluorescence applications. In summary, we present here a versatile tool to instantaneously label repair and replication processes in fixed and live cells. PMID:25484186

  14. Genome-wide Transcriptome Profiling of Homologous Recombination DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guang; Lin, Curtis Chun-Jen; Mo, Wei; Dai, Hui; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, Soo-Mi; Peng, Yang; Mo, Qianxing; Siwko, Stefan; Hu, Ruozhen; Lee, Ju-Seog; Hennessy, Bryan; Hanash, Samir; Mills, Gordon B.; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repair deficiency predisposes to cancer development, but also sensitizes cancer cells to DNA-damage-inducing therapeutics. Here we identify an HR-defect (HRD) gene signature, which can be used to functionally assess HR repair status without interrogating individual genetic alterations in cells. By using this HRD gene signature as a functional network analysis tool, we discover that simultaneous loss of two major tumor suppressors BRCA1 and PTEN extensively rewire the HR repair-deficient phenotype, which is found in cells with defects in either BRCA1 or PTEN alone. Moreover, the HRD gene signature serves as an effective drug discovery platform to identify agents targeting HR repair as potential chemo/radio-sensitizers. More importantly, this HRD gene signature is able to predict clinical outcomes across multiple cancer lineages. Our findings, therefore, provide a molecular profile of HR repair to assess its status at a functional network level, which can provide both biological insights and have clinical implications in cancer. PMID:24553445

  15. Repair of DNA Damage Induced by the Cytidine Analog Zebularine Requires ATR and ATM in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Hsin; Finke, Andreas; Díaz, Mariana; Rozhon, Wilfried; Poppenberger, Brigitte; Baubec, Tuncay; Pecinka, Ales

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage repair is an essential cellular mechanism that maintains genome stability. Here, we show that the nonmethylable cytidine analog zebularine induces a DNA damage response in Arabidopsis thaliana, independent of changes in DNA methylation. In contrast to genotoxic agents that induce damage in a cell cycle stage-independent manner, zebularine induces damage specifically during strand synthesis in DNA replication. The signaling of this damage is mediated by additive activity of ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED AND RAD3-RELATED and ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED kinases, which cause postreplicative cell cycle arrest and increased endoreplication. The repair requires a functional STRUCTURAL MAINTENANCE OF CHROMOSOMES5 (SMC5)-SMC6 complex and is accomplished predominantly by synthesis-dependent strand-annealing homologous recombination. Here, we provide insight into the response mechanism for coping with the genotoxic effects of zebularine and identify several components of the zebularine-induced DNA damage repair pathway. PMID:26023162

  16. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  17. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  18. The Dynamics of DNA Damage Repair and Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Shanbhag, Niraj M.; Greenberg, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances have led to several systems to study transcription from defined loci in living cells. It has now become possible to address long-standing questions regarding the interplay between the processes of DNA damage repair and transcription—two disparate processes that can occur on the same stretch of chromatin and which both lead to extensive chromatin change. Here we describe the development of a system to create enzymatically induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at a site of inducible transcription and methods to study the interplay between these processes. PMID:23980011

  19. Genomic landscape of DNA repair genes in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chae, Young Kwang; Anker, Jonathan F; Carneiro, Benedito A; Chandra, Sunandana; Kaplan, Jason; Kalyan, Aparna; Santa-Maria, Cesar A; Platanias, Leonidas C; Giles, Francis J

    2016-04-26

    DNA repair genes are frequently mutated in cancer, yet limited data exist regarding the overall genomic landscape and functional implications of these alterations in their entirety. We created comprehensive lists of DNA repair genes and indirect caretakers. Mutation, copy number variation (CNV), and expression frequencies of these genes were analyzed in COSMIC. Mutation co-occurrence, clinical outcomes, and mutation burden were analyzed in TCGA. We report the 20 genes most frequently with mutations (n > 19,689 tumor samples for each gene), CNVs (n > 1,556), or up- or down-regulated (n = 7,998). Mutual exclusivity was observed as no genes displayed both high CNV gain and loss or high up- and down-regulation, and CNV gain and loss positively correlated with up- and down-regulation, respectively. Co-occurrence of mutations differed between cancers, and mutations in many DNA repair genes were associated with higher total mutation burden. Mutation and CNV frequencies offer insights into which genes may play tumor suppressive or oncogenic roles, such as NEIL2 and RRM2B, respectively. Mutual exclusivities within CNV and expression frequencies, and correlations between CNV and expression, support the functionality of these genomic alterations. This study provides comprehensive lists of candidate genes as potential biomarkers for genomic instability, novel therapeutic targets, or predictors of immunotherapy efficacy.

  20. Genomic landscape of DNA repair genes in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Benedito A.; Chandra, Sunandana; Kaplan, Jason; Kalyan, Aparna; Santa-Maria, Cesar A.; Platanias, Leonidas C.; Giles, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair genes are frequently mutated in cancer, yet limited data exist regarding the overall genomic landscape and functional implications of these alterations in their entirety.  We created comprehensive lists of DNA repair genes and indirect caretakers.  Mutation, copy number variation (CNV), and expression frequencies of these genes were analyzed in COSMIC. Mutation co-occurrence, clinical outcomes, and mutation burden were analyzed in TCGA. We report the 20 genes most frequently with mutations (n > 19,689 tumor samples for each gene), CNVs (n > 1,556), or up- or down-regulated (n = 7,998).  Mutual exclusivity was observed as no genes displayed both high CNV gain and loss or high up- and down-regulation, and CNV gain and loss positively correlated with up- and down-regulation, respectively. Co-occurrence of mutations differed between cancers, and mutations in many DNA repair genes were associated with higher total mutation burden. Mutation and CNV frequencies offer insights into which genes may play tumor suppressive or oncogenic roles, such as NEIL2 and RRM2B, respectively.  Mutual exclusivities within CNV and expression frequencies, and correlations between CNV and expression, support the functionality of these genomic alterations. This study provides comprehensive lists of candidate genes as potential biomarkers for genomic instability, novel therapeutic targets, or predictors of immunotherapy efficacy. PMID:27004405

  1. DNA repair inhibition by UVA photoactivated fluoroquinolones and vemurafenib

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, Matthew; Brem, Reto; Macpherson, Peter; Karran, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous photosensitization is a common side effect of drug treatment and can be associated with an increased skin cancer risk. The immunosuppressant azathioprine, the fluoroquinolone antibiotics and vemurafenib—a BRAF inhibitor used to treat metastatic melanoma—are all recognized clinical photosensitizers. We have compared the effects of UVA radiation on cultured human cells treated with 6-thioguanine (6-TG, a DNA-embedded azathioprine surrogate), the fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin and vemurafenib. Despite widely different structures and modes of action, each of these drugs potentiated UVA cytotoxicity. UVA photoactivation of 6-TG, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin was associated with the generation of singlet oxygen that caused extensive protein oxidation. In particular, these treatments were associated with damage to DNA repair proteins that reduced the efficiency of nucleotide excision repair. Although vemurafenib was also highly phototoxic to cultured cells, its effects were less dependent on singlet oxygen. Highly toxic combinations of vemurafenib and UVA caused little protein carbonylation but were nevertheless inhibitory to nucleotide excision repair. Thus, for three different classes of drugs, photosensitization by at least two distinct mechanisms is associated with reduced protection against potentially mutagenic and carcinogenic DNA damage. PMID:25414333

  2. Clinical Radiation Sensitivity With DNA Repair Disorders: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, Julianne M.; Gatti, Richard A.

    2009-08-01

    Adverse reactions to radiotherapy represent a confounding phenomenon in radiation oncology. These reactions are rare, and many have been associated with individuals with DNA repair disorders such as ataxia-telangiectasia and Nijmegen Breakage syndrome. A paucity of published data is available detailing such circumstances. This overview describes four exemplary situations, a comprehensive list of 32 additional cases, and some insights gleaned from this overall experience. Fanconi anemia was associated with more than one-half of the reports. The lowest dose given to a patient that resulted in a reaction was 3 Gy, given to an ataxia-telangiectasia patient. Most patients died within months of exposure. It is clear that the patients discussed in this report had complicated illnesses, in addition to cancer, and the radiotherapy administered was most likely their best option. However, the underlying DNA repair defects make conventional radiation doses dangerous. Our findings support previous wisdom that radiotherapy should either be avoided or the doses should be selected with great care in the case of these radiosensitive genotypes, which must be recognized by their characteristic phenotypes, until more rapid, reliable, and functional assays of DNA repair become available.

  3. Clinical Radiation Sensitivity with DNA Repair Disorders: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Julianne M.; Gatti, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Adverse reactions to radiation therapy represent a confounding phenomenon in Radiation Oncology. These reactions are rare, and many have been associated with individuals with DNA repair disorders such as Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS). There is a paucity of literature detailing such circumstances. This overview describes four exemplary situations, a comprehensive list of 32 additional cases, and some insights gleaned from this overall experience. Fanconi Anemia was associated with over half of the reports. The lowest dose given to a patient that resulted in a reaction was 3 Gy, given to an A-T patient. Most patients died within months of exposure. It is clear that the patients discussed in this paper had complicated illnesses in addition to cancer, and the radiation therapy that administered was most likely their best option. However, the underlying DNA repair defects make conventional radiation therapy doses dangerous. Our review supports prior wisdom that radiation therapy should either be avoided, or doses should be selected with great care in the case of these radiosensitive genotypes which must be recognized with their characteristic phenotypes, until more rapid, reliable and functional assays of DNA repair become available. PMID:19616740

  4. Detection of the early stage of recombinational DNA repair by silicon nanowire transistors.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Marco; Cardenas, Paula P; Otón, Francisco; Martinez, Javier; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Garcia, Fernando; Alonso, Juan C; Rovira, Concepció; Garcia, Ricardo

    2012-03-14

    A silicon nanowire-based biosensor has been designed and applied for label-free and ultrasensitive detection of the early stage of recombinational DNA repair by RecA protein. Silicon nanowires transistors were fabricated by atomic force microscopy nanolithography and integrated into a microfluidic environment. The sensor operates by measuring the changes in the resistance of the nanowire as the biomolecular reactions proceed. We show that the nanoelectronic sensor can detect and differentiate several steps in the binding of RecA to a single-stranded DNA filament taking place on the nanowire-aqueous interface. We report relative changes in the resistance of 3.5% which are related to the interaction of 250 RecA·single-stranded DNA complexes. Spectroscopy data confirm the presence of the protein-DNA complexes on the functionalized silicon surfaces.

  5. Structural complexity of DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Liou, Cheng-Yuan; Tseng, Shen-Han; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Tsai, Huai-Ying

    2013-01-01

    In modern bioinformatics, finding an efficient way to allocate sequence fragments with biological functions is an important issue. This paper presents a structural approach based on context-free grammars extracted from original DNA or protein sequences. This approach is radically different from all those statistical methods. Furthermore, this approach is compared with a topological entropy-based method for consistency and difference of the complexity results. PMID:23662161

  6. Structural Complexity of DNA Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Cheng-Yuan; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Tsai, Huai-Ying

    2013-01-01

    In modern bioinformatics, finding an efficient way to allocate sequence fragments with biological functions is an important issue. This paper presents a structural approach based on context-free grammars extracted from original DNA or protein sequences. This approach is radically different from all those statistical methods. Furthermore, this approach is compared with a topological entropy-based method for consistency and difference of the complexity results. PMID:23662161

  7. A hormone-DNA repair circuit governs the response to genotoxic insult

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Jonathan F.; Schiewer, Matthew J.; Dean, Jeffry L.; Schrecengost, Randy S.; de Leeuw, Renee; Han, Sumin; Ma, Teng; Den, Robert B.; Dicker, Adam P.; Feng, Felix Y.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in DNA repair promote tumor development, but the impact on tumor progression is poorly understood. Here, discovery of a biochemical circuit linking hormone signaling to DNA repair and therapeutic resistance is reported. Findings demonstrate that androgen receptor (AR) activity is induced by DNA damage, and promotes expression and activation of a gene expression program governing DNA repair. Subsequent investigation revealed that activated AR promotes resolution of double-strand breaks and resistance to DNA damage both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, DNAPKcs was identified as a key target of AR after damage, controlling AR-mediated DNA repair and cell survival after genotoxic insult. Finally, DNAPKcs was shown to potentiate AR function, consistent with a dual role in both DNA repair and transcriptional regulation. Combined, these studies identify the AR-DNAPKcs circuit as a major effector of DNA repair and therapeutic resistance, and establish a new node for therapeutic intervention in advanced disease. PMID:24027197

  8. The Architectural Chromatin Factor High Mobility Group A1 Enhances DNA Ligase IV Activity Influencing DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Silvia; Pegoraro, Silvia; Ros, Gloria; Penzo, Carlotta; Triolo, Gianluca; Demarchi, Francesca; Sgarra, Riccardo; Vindigni, Alessandro; Manfioletti, Guidalberto

    2016-01-01

    The HMGA1 architectural transcription factor is an oncogene overexpressed in the vast majority of human cancers. HMGA1 is a highly connected node in the nuclear molecular network and the key aspect of HMGA1 involvement in cancer development is that HMGA1 simultaneously confers cells multiple oncogenic hits, ranging from global chromatin structural and gene expression modifications up to the direct functional alterations of key cellular proteins. Interestingly, HMGA1 also modulates DNA damage repair pathways. In this work, we provide evidences linking HMGA1 with Non-Homologous End Joining DNA repair. We show that HMGA1 is in complex with and is a substrate for DNA-PK. HMGA1 enhances Ligase IV activity and it counteracts the repressive histone H1 activity towards DNA ends ligation. Moreover, breast cancer cells overexpressing HMGA1 show a faster recovery upon induction of DNA double-strand breaks, which is associated with a higher survival. These data suggest that resistance to DNA-damaging agents in cancer cells could be partially attributed to HMGA1 overexpression thus highlighting the relevance of considering HMGA1 expression levels in the selection of valuable and effective pharmacological regimens. PMID:27723831

  9. Chromatin dynamics during repair of chromosomal DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Manisha; Peterson, Craig L

    2010-01-01

    The integrity of a eukaryotic genome is often challenged by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Even a single, unrepaired DSB can be a lethal event, or such unrepaired damage can result in chromosomal instability and loss of genetic information. Furthermore, defects in the pathways that respond to and repair DSBs can lead to the onset of several human pathologic disorders with pleiotropic clinical features, including age-related diseases and cancer. For decades, studies have focused on elucidating the enzymatic mechanisms involved in recognizing, signaling and repairing DSBs within eukaryotic cells. The majority of biochemical and genetic studies have used simple, DNA substrates, whereas only recently efforts have been geared towards understanding how the repair machinery deals with DSBs within chromatin fibers, the nucleoprotein complex that packages DNA within the eukaryotic nucleus. The aim of this review is to discuss our recent understanding of the relationship between chromatin structure and the repair of DSBs by homologous recombination. In particular, we discuss recent studies implicating specialized roles for several, distinct ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes in facilitating multiple steps within the homologous recombination process. PMID:20495614

  10. Understanding the molecular mechanism of formaldehyde-induced DNA-protein crosslink repair

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde induces DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) in several experimental in vitro and in vivo test systems, as well as in exposed human workers. DPCs are repaired by several DNA repair pathways in different species, but the molecular understanding of DPC repair in human tissues...

  11. Repairing of N-mustard derivative BO-1055 induced DNA damage requires NER, HR, and MGMT-dependent DNA repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ching-Ying; Chou, Wen-Cheng; Wu, Chin-Chung; Wong, Teng-Song; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Lee, Te-Chang; Su, Tsann-Long; Wang, Hui-Chun

    2015-09-22

    Alkylating agents are frequently used as first-line chemotherapeutics for various newly diagnosed cancers. Disruption of genome integrity by such agents can lead to cell lethality if DNA lesions are not removed. Several DNA repair mechanisms participate in the recovery of mono- or bi-functional DNA alkylation. Thus, DNA repair capacity is correlated with the therapeutic response. Here, we assessed the function of novel water-soluble N-mustard BO-1055 (ureidomustin) in DNA damage response and repair mechanisms. As expected, BO-1055 induces ATM and ATR-mediated DNA damage response cascades, including downstream Chk1/Chk2 phosphorylation, S/G2 cell-cycle arrest, and cell death. Further investigation revealed that cell survival sensitivity to BO-1055 is comparable to that of mitomycin C. Both compounds require nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination, but not non-homologous end-joining, to repair conventional cross-linking DNA damage. Interestingly and unlike mitomycin C and melphalan, MGMT activity was also observed in BO-1055 damage repair systems, which reflects the occurrence of O-alkyl DNA lesions. Combined treatment with ATM/ATR kinase inhibitors significantly increases BO-1055 sensitivity. Our study pinpoints that BO-1055 can be used for treating tumors that with deficient NER, HR, and MGMT DNA repair genes, or for synergistic therapy in tumors that DNA damage response have been suppressed. PMID:26208482

  12. Repairing of N-mustard derivative BO-1055 induced DNA damage requires NER, HR, and MGMT-dependent DNA repair mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin-Chung; Wong, Teng-Song; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Lee, Te-Chang; Su, Tsann-Long; Wang, Hui-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents are frequently used as first-line chemotherapeutics for various newly diagnosed cancers. Disruption of genome integrity by such agents can lead to cell lethality if DNA lesions are not removed. Several DNA repair mechanisms participate in the recovery of mono- or bi-functional DNA alkylation. Thus, DNA repair capacity is correlated with the therapeutic response. Here, we assessed the function of novel water-soluble N-mustard BO-1055 (ureidomustin) in DNA damage response and repair mechanisms. As expected, BO-1055 induces ATM and ATR-mediated DNA damage response cascades, including downstream Chk1/Chk2 phosphorylation, S/G2 cell-cycle arrest, and cell death. Further investigation revealed that cell survival sensitivity to BO-1055 is comparable to that of mitomycin C. Both compounds require nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination, but not non-homologous end-joining, to repair conventional cross-linking DNA damage. Interestingly and unlike mitomycin C and melphalan, MGMT activity was also observed in BO-1055 damage repair systems, which reflects the occurrence of O-alkyl DNA lesions. Combined treatment with ATM/ATR kinase inhibitors significantly increases BO-1055 sensitivity. Our study pinpoints that BO-1055 can be used for treating tumors that with deficient NER, HR, and MGMT DNA repair genes, or for synergistic therapy in tumors that DNA damage response have been suppressed. PMID:26208482

  13. The COP9 signalosome is vital for timely repair of DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Michal; Galanty, Yaron; Kashani, Lior; Blank, Michael; Khosravi, Rami; Fernández-Ávila, María Jesús; Cruz-García, Andrés; Star, Ayelet; Shochot, Lea; Thomas, Yann; Garrett, Lisa J.; Chamovitz, Daniel A.; Bodine, David M.; Kurz, Thimo; Huertas, Pablo; Ziv, Yael; Shiloh, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response is vigorously activated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The chief mobilizer of the DSB response is the ATM protein kinase. We discovered that the COP9 signalosome (CSN) is a crucial player in the DSB response and an ATM target. CSN is a protein complex that regulates the activity of cullin ring ubiquitin ligase (CRL) complexes by removing the ubiquitin-like protein, NEDD8, from their cullin scaffold. We find that the CSN is physically recruited to DSB sites in a neddylation-dependent manner, and is required for timely repair of DSBs, affecting the balance between the two major DSB repair pathways—nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination repair (HRR). The CSN is essential for the processivity of deep end-resection—the initial step in HRR. Cullin 4a (CUL4A) is recruited to DSB sites in a CSN- and neddylation-dependent manner, suggesting that CSN partners with CRL4 in this pathway. Furthermore, we found that ATM-mediated phosphorylation of CSN subunit 3 on S410 is critical for proper DSB repair, and that loss of this phosphorylation site alone is sufficient to cause a DDR deficiency phenotype in the mouse. This novel branch of the DSB response thus significantly affects genome stability. PMID:25855810

  14. Melatonin enhances DNA repair capacity possibly by affecting genes involved in DNA damage responsive pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Melatonin, a hormone-like substance involved in the regulation of the circadian rhythm, has been demonstrated to protect cells against oxidative DNA damage and to inhibit tumorigenesis. Results In the current study, we investigated the effect of melatonin on DNA strand breaks using the alkaline DNA comet assay in breast cancer (MCF-7) and colon cancer (HCT-15) cell lines. Our results demonstrated that cells pretreated with melatonin had significantly shorter Olive tail moments compared to non-melatonin treated cells upon mutagen (methyl methanesulfonate, MMS) exposure, indicating an increased DNA repair capacity after melatonin treatment. We further examined the genome-wide gene expression in melatonin pretreated MCF-7 cells upon carcinogen exposure and detected altered expression of many genes involved in multiple DNA damage responsive pathways. Genes exhibiting altered expression were further analyzed for functional interrelatedness using network- and pathway-based bioinformatics analysis. The top functional network was defined as having relevance for “DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair, Gene Expression, [and] Cancer”. Conclusions These findings suggest that melatonin may enhance DNA repair capacity by affecting several key genes involved in DNA damage responsive pathways. PMID:23294620

  15. Redox activation of Fos-Jun DNA binding activity is mediated by a DNA repair enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Xanthoudakis, S; Miao, G; Wang, F; Pan, Y C; Curran, T

    1992-01-01

    The DNA binding activity of Fos and Jun is regulated in vitro by a post-translational mechanism involving reduction-oxidation. Redox regulation occurs through a conserved cysteine residue located in the DNA binding domain of Fos and Jun. Reduction of this residue by chemical reducing agents or by a ubiquitous nuclear redox factor (Ref-1) recently purified from Hela cells, stimulates AP-1 DNA binding activity in vitro, whereas oxidation or chemical modification of the cysteine has an inhibitory effect on DNA binding activity. Here we demonstrate that the protein product of the ref-1 gene stimulates the DNA binding activity of Fos-Jun heterodimers, Jun-Jun homodimers and Hela cell AP-1 proteins as well as that of several other transcription factors including NF-kappa B, Myb and members of the ATF/CREB family. Furthermore, immunodepletion analysis indicates that Ref-1 is the major AP-1 redox activity in Hela nuclear extracts. Interestingly, Ref-1 is a bifunctional protein; it also possesses an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease DNA repair activity. However, the redox and DNA repair activities of Ref-1 can, in part, be distinguished biochemically. This study suggests a novel link between transcription factor regulation, oxidative signalling and DNA repair processes in higher eukaryotes. Images PMID:1380454

  16. DNA repair by the cryptic endonuclease activity of Mu transposase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wonyoung; Harshey, Rasika M

    2010-06-01

    Phage Mu transposes by two distinct pathways depending on the specific stage of its life cycle. A common strand transfer intermediate is resolved differentially in the two pathways. During lytic growth, the intermediate is resolved by replication of Mu initiated within the flanking target DNA; during integration of infecting Mu, it is resolved without replication, by removal and repair of DNA from a previous host that is still attached to the ends of the incoming Mu genome. We have discovered that the cryptic endonuclease activity reported for the isolated C-terminal domain of the transposase MuA [Wu Z, Chaconas G (1995) A novel DNA binding and nuclease activity in domain III of Mu transposase: Evidence for a catalytic region involved in donor cleavage. EMBO J 14:3835-3843], which is not observed in the full-length protein or in the assembled transpososome in vitro, is required in vivo for removal of the attached host DNA or "5'flap" after the infecting Mu genome has integrated into the E. coli chromosome. Efficient flap removal also requires the host protein ClpX, which is known to interact with the C-terminus of MuA to remodel the transpososome for replication. We hypothesize that ClpX constitutes part of a highly regulated mechanism that unmasks the cryptic nuclease activity of MuA specifically in the repair pathway. PMID:20167799

  17. Dual daughter strand incision is processive and increases the efficiency of DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Nicolaas; Laffeber, Charlie; Cristovão, Michele; Artola-Borán, Mariela; Mardenborough, Yannicka; Ikpa, Pauline; Jaddoe, Aruna; Winterwerp, Herrie H K; Wyman, Claire; Jiricny, Josef; Kanaar, Roland; Friedhoff, Peter; Lebbink, Joyce H G

    2016-08-19

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is an evolutionarily-conserved process responsible for the repair of replication errors. In Escherichia coli, MMR is initiated by MutS and MutL, which activate MutH to incise transiently-hemimethylated GATC sites. MMR efficiency depends on the distribution of these GATC sites. To understand which molecular events determine repair efficiency, we quantitatively studied the effect of strand incision on unwinding and excision activity. The distance between mismatch and GATC site did not influence the strand incision rate, and an increase in the number of sites enhanced incision only to a minor extent. Two GATC sites were incised by the same activated MMR complex in a processive manner, with MutS, the closed form of MutL and MutH displaying different roles. Unwinding and strand excision were more efficient on a substrate with two nicks flanking the mismatch, as compared to substrates containing a single nick or two nicks on the same side of the mismatch. Introduction of multiple nicks by the human MutLα endonuclease also contributed to increased repair efficiency. Our data support a general model of prokaryotic and eukaryotic MMR in which, despite mechanistic differences, mismatch-activated complexes facilitate efficient repair by creating multiple daughter strand nicks.

  18. Resection is a major repair pathway of heavy ion-induced DNA lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco; Averbeck, Nicole; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    Space radiation include densely ionizing heavy ions, which can produce clustered DNA damage with high frequency in human cells. Repair of these complex lesions is generally assumed to be more difficult than for simple double-strand breaks. We show here that human cells use break resection with increasing frequency after exposure to heavy ions. Resection can lead to misrepair of the DNA lesion, via microhomology mediated end-joining. Resection can therefore be responsible for the increased effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of mutations and genetic late effects.

  19. Structure determination of uracil-DNA N-glycosylase from Deinococcus radiodurans in complex with DNA.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Hege Lynum; Johnson, Kenneth A; McVey, Colin E; Leiros, Ingar; Moe, Elin

    2015-10-01

    Uracil-DNA N-glycosylase (UNG) is a DNA-repair enzyme in the base-excision repair (BER) pathway which removes uracil from DNA. Here, the crystal structure of UNG from the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans (DrUNG) in complex with DNA is reported at a resolution of 1.35 Å. Prior to the crystallization experiments, the affinity between DrUNG and different DNA oligonucleotides was tested by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). As a result of this analysis, two 16 nt double-stranded DNAs were chosen for the co-crystallization experiments, one of which (16 nt AU) resulted in well diffracting crystals. The DNA in the co-crystal structure contained an abasic site (substrate product) flipped into the active site of the enzyme, with no uracil in the active-site pocket. Despite the high resolution, it was not possible to fit all of the terminal nucleotides of the DNA complex into electron density owing to disorder caused by a lack of stabilizing interactions. However, the DNA which was in contact with the enzyme, close to the active site, was well ordered and allowed detailed analysis of the enzyme-DNA interaction. The complex revealed that the interaction between DrUNG and DNA is similar to that in the previously determined crystal structure of human UNG (hUNG) in complex with DNA [Slupphaug et al. (1996). Nature (London), 384, 87-92]. Substitutions in a (here defined) variable part of the leucine loop result in a shorter loop (eight residues instead of nine) in DrUNG compared with hUNG; regardless of this, it seems to fulfil its role and generate a stabilizing force with the minor groove upon flipping out of the damaged base into the active site. The structure also provides a rationale for the previously observed high catalytic efficiency of DrUNG caused by high substrate affinity by demonstrating an increased number of long-range electrostatic interactions between the enzyme and the DNA. Interestingly, specific interactions between residues

  20. Green tea and skin cancer: photoimmunology, angiogenesis and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Suchitra; Elmets, Craig A; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2007-05-01

    Human skin is constantly exposed to numerous noxious physical, chemical and environmental agents. Some of these agents directly or indirectly adversely affect the skin. Cutaneous overexposure to environmental solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation (290-400 nm) has a variety of adverse effects on human health, including the development of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. Therefore, there is a need to develop measures or strategies, and nutritional components are increasingly being explored for this purpose. The polyphenols present in green tea (Camellia sinensis) have been shown to have numerous health benefits, including protection from UV carcinogenesis. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the major and most photoprotective polyphenolic component of green tea. In this review article, we have discussed the most recent investigations and mechanistic studies that define and support the photoprotective efficacy of green tea polyphenols (GTPs) against UV carcinogenesis. The oral administration of GTPs in drinking water or the topical application of EGCG prevents UVB-induced skin tumor development in mice, and this prevention is mediated through: (a) the induction of immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin (IL) 12; (b) IL-12-dependent DNA repair following nucleotide excision repair mechanism; (c) the inhibition of UV-induced immunosuppression through IL-12-dependent DNA repair; (d) the inhibition of angiogenic factors; and (e) the stimulation of cytotoxic T cells in a tumor microenvironment. New mechanistic information strongly supports and explains the chemopreventive activity of GTPs against photocarcinogenesis.

  1. DNA polymerase θ (POLQ), double-strand break repair, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Richard D; Doublié, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    DNA polymerase theta (pol θ) is encoded in the genomes of many eukaryotes, though not in fungi. Pol θ is encoded by the POLQ gene in mammalian cells. The C-terminal third of the protein is a family A DNA polymerase with additional insertion elements relative to prokaryotic homologs. The N-terminal third is a helicase-like domain with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Pol θ is important in the repair of genomic double-strand breaks (DSBs) from many sources. These include breaks formed by ionizing radiation and topoisomerase inhibitors, breaks arising at stalled DNA replication forks, breaks introduced during diversification steps of the mammalian immune system, and DSB induced by CRISPR-Cas9. Pol θ participates in a route of DSB repair termed "alternative end-joining" (altEJ). AltEJ is independent of the DNA binding Ku protein complex and requires DNA end resection. Pol θ is able to mediate joining of two resected 3' ends harboring DNA sequence microhomology. "Signatures" of Pol θ action during altEJ are the frequent utilization of longer microhomologies, and the insertion of additional sequences at joining sites. The mechanism of end-joining employs the ability of Pol θ to tightly grasp a 3' terminus through unique contacts in the active site, allowing extension from minimally paired primers. Pol θ is involved in controlling the frequency of chromosome translocations and preserves genome integrity by limiting large deletions. It may also play a backup role in DNA base excision repair. POLQ is a member of a cluster of similarly upregulated genes that are strongly correlated with poor clinical outcome for breast cancer, ovarian cancer and other cancer types. Inhibition of pol θ is a compelling approach for combination therapy of radiosensitization. PMID:27264557

  2. Topical liposomal DNA-repair enzymes in polymorphic light eruption.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Angelika; Legat, Franz J; Gruber-Wackernagel, Alexandra; Quehenberger, Franz; Wolf, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Polymorphic light eruption (PLE) is a very frequent photodermatosis in Europe whose pathogenesis may involve resistance to UV-induced immune suppression and simultaneous immune reactions against skin photoneoantigens. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled intra-individual half-body trial to investigate the protective effect of an after-sun (AS) lotion containing DNA-repair enzymes (photolyase from Anacystis nidulans and Micrococcus luteus extract with endonuclease activity). Fourteen PLE patients were exposed to suberythemal doses of solar-simulated UV radiation on 4 consecutive days at 4 symmetrically located PLE-prone test fields per patient. The test fields were treated with (i) active AS lotion or (ii) a placebo lotion immediately after each UV exposure, or (iii) an SPF30 sunscreen before UV exposure or left untreated. All test fields were exposed to photoactivating blue light 1 h after each UV exposure. As shown by a newly established specific PLE test score (AA + SI + 0.4P [range, 0-12], where AA is affected area score [range, 0-4], SI is skin infiltration score [range, 0-4], and P is pruritus score on a visual analogue scale [range, 0-10]), PLE symptoms were significantly fewer on test sites treated with active AS lotion than on untreated (P = 0.00049) or placebo-treated test sites (P = 0.024). At 144 h after first UV exposure (the time point of maximal PLE symptoms), the mean test scores for untreated, active AS lotion-treated, and placebo-treated test fields were 4.39, 1.73 (61% reduction; 95% confidence interval (CI), 36% to 85%), and 3.20 (27% reduction; 95% CI, 3% to 51%), respectively. Pretreatment with SPF30 sunscreen completely prevented PLE symptoms in all patients. The present results indicate that DNA damage may trigger PLE and that the application of topical liposomes containing DNA repair enzymes to increase DNA repair may effectively prevent PLE.

  3. DNA Damage Response and DNA Repair in Skeletal Myocytes From a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayzullina, Saniya; Martin, Lee J

    2016-09-01

    We studied DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair capacities of skeletal muscle cells from a mouse model of infantile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) caused by loss-of-function mutation of survival of motor neuron (Smn). Primary myocyte cultures derived from skeletal muscle satellite cells of neonatal control and mutant SMN mice had similar myotube length, myonuclei, satellite cell marker Pax7 and differentiated myotube marker myosin, and acetylcholine receptor clustering. DNA damage was induced in differentiated skeletal myotubes by γ-irradiation, etoposide, and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Unexposed control and SMA myotubes had stable genome integrity. After γ-irradiation and etoposide, myotubes repaired most DNA damage equally. Control and mutant myotubes exposed to MMS exhibited equivalent DNA damage without repair. Control and SMA myotube nuclei contained DDR proteins phospho-p53 and phospho-H2AX foci that, with DNA damage, dispersed and then re-formed similarly after recovery. We conclude that mouse primary satellite cell-derived myotubes effectively respond to and repair DNA strand-breaks, while DNA alkylation repair is underrepresented. Morphological differentiation, genome stability, genome sensor, and DNA strand-break repair potential are preserved in mouse SMA myocytes; thus, reduced SMN does not interfere with myocyte differentiation, genome integrity, and DNA repair, and faulty DNA repair is unlikely pathogenic in SMA. PMID:27452406

  4. SUMO-mediated regulation of DNA damage repair and responses

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Prabha; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Sumoylation plays important roles during DNA damage repair and responses. Recent broad-scope and substrate-based studies have shed light on the regulation and significance of sumoylation during these processes. An emerging paradigm is that sumoylation of many DNA metabolism proteins is controlled by DNA engagement. Such “on-site modification” can explain low substrate modification levels and has important implications in sumoylation mechanisms and effects. New studies also suggest that sumoylation can regulate a process through an ensemble effect or via major substrates. Additionally, we describe new trends in the functional effects of sumoylation, such as bi-directional changes in biomolecule binding and multi-level coordination with other modifications. These emerging themes and models will stimulate our thinking and research in sumoylation and genome maintenance. PMID:25778614

  5. The tight linkage between DNA replication and double-strand break repair in bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    George, James W.; Stohr, Bradley A.; Tomso, Daniel J.; Kreuzer, Kenneth N.

    2001-01-01

    Double-strand break (DSB) repair and DNA replication are tightly linked in the life cycle of bacteriophage T4. Indeed, the major mode of phage DNA replication depends on recombination proteins and can be stimulated by DSBs. DSB-stimulated DNA replication is dramatically demonstrated when T4 infects cells carrying two plasmids that share homology. A DSB on one plasmid triggered extensive replication of the second plasmid, providing a useful model for T4 recombination-dependent replication (RDR). This system also provides a view of DSB repair in T4-infected cells and revealed that the DSB repair products had been replicated in their entirety by the T4 replication machinery. We analyzed the detailed structure of these products, which do not fit the simple predictions of any of three models for DSB repair. We also present evidence that the T4 RDR system functions to restart stalled or inactivated replication forks. First, we review experiments involving antitumor drug-stabilized topoisomerase cleavage complexes. The results suggest that forks blocked at cleavage complexes are resolved by recombinational repair, likely involving RDR. Second, we show here that the presence of a T4 replication origin on one plasmid substantially stimulated recombination events between it and a homologous second plasmid that did not contain a T4 origin. Furthermore, replication of the second plasmid was increased when the first plasmid contained the T4 origin. Our interpretation is that origin-initiated forks become inactivated at some frequency during replication of the first plasmid and are then restarted via RDR on the second plasmid. PMID:11459966

  6. How Trypanosoma cruzi deals with oxidative stress: Antioxidant defence and DNA repair pathways.

    PubMed

    Machado-Silva, Alice; Cerqueira, Paula Gonçalves; Grazielle-Silva, Viviane; Gadelha, Fernanda Ramos; Peloso, Eduardo de Figueiredo; Teixeira, Santuza Maria Ribeiro; Machado, Carlos Renato

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is an obligatory intracellular parasite with a digenetic life cycle. Due to the variety of host environments, it faces several sources of oxidative stress. In addition to reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by its own metabolism, T. cruzi must deal with high ROS levels generated as part of the host's immune responses. Hence, the conclusion that T. cruzi has limited ability to deal with ROS (based on the lack of a few enzymes involved with oxidative stress responses) seems somewhat paradoxical. Actually, to withstand such variable sources of oxidative stress, T. cruzi has developed complex defence mechanisms. This includes ROS detoxification pathways that are distinct from the ones in the mammalian host, DNA repair pathways and specialized polymerases, which not only protect its genome from the resulting oxidative damage but also contribute to the generation of genetic diversity within the parasite population. Recent studies on T. cruzi's DNA repair pathways as mismatch repair (MMR) and GO system suggested that, besides a role associated with DNA repair, some proteins of these pathways may also be involved in signalling oxidative damage. Recent data also suggested that an oxidative environment might be beneficial for parasite survival within the host cell as it contributes to iron mobilization from the host's intracellular storages. Besides contributing to the understanding of basic aspects of T. cruzi biology, these studies are highly relevant since oxidative stress pathways are part of the poorly understood mechanisms behind the mode of action of drugs currently used against this parasite. By unveiling new peculiar aspects of T. cruzi biology, emerging data on DNA repair pathways and other antioxidant defences from this parasite have revealed potential new targets for a much needed boost in drug development efforts towards a better treatment for Chagas disease. PMID:27036062

  7. Crystal Structure of the Vaccinia Virus Uracil-DNA Glycosylase in Complex with DNA.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, Wim P; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Fender, Pascal; Contesto-Richefeu, Céline; Peyrefitte, Christophe N; Iseni, Frédéric

    2015-07-17

    Vaccinia virus polymerase holoenzyme is composed of the DNA polymerase catalytic subunit E9 associated with its heterodimeric co-factor A20·D4 required for processive genome synthesis. Although A20 has no known enzymatic activity, D4 is an active uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG). The presence of a repair enzyme as a component of the viral replication machinery suggests that, for poxviruses, DNA synthesis and base excision repair is coupled. We present the 2.7 Å crystal structure of the complex formed by D4 and the first 50 amino acids of A20 (D4·A201-50) bound to a 10-mer DNA duplex containing an abasic site resulting from the cleavage of a uracil base. Comparison of the viral complex with its human counterpart revealed major divergences in the contacts between protein and DNA and in the enzyme orientation on the DNA. However, the conformation of the dsDNA within both structures is very similar, suggesting a dominant role of the DNA conformation for UNG function. In contrast to human UNG, D4 appears rigid, and we do not observe a conformational change upon DNA binding. We also studied the interaction of D4·A201-50 with different DNA oligomers by surface plasmon resonance. D4 binds weakly to nonspecific DNA and to uracil-containing substrates but binds abasic sites with a Kd of <1.4 μm. This second DNA complex structure of a family I UNG gives new insight into the role of D4 as a co-factor of vaccinia virus DNA polymerase and allows a better understanding of the structural determinants required for UNG action.

  8. Disruption of Maternal DNA Repair Increases Sperm-DerivedChromosomal Aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Essers, Jeroun; Kanaar, Roland; Wyrobek,Andrew J.

    2007-02-07

    The final weeks of male germ cell differentiation occur in aDNA repair-deficient environment and normal development depends on theability of the egg to repair DNA damage in the fertilizing sperm. Geneticdisruption of maternal DNA double-strand break repair pathways in micesignificantly increased the frequency of zygotes with chromosomalstructural aberrations after paternal exposure to ionizing radiation.These findings demonstrate that radiation-induced DNA sperm lesions arerepaired after fertilization by maternal factors and suggest that geneticvariation in maternal DNA repair can modulate the risk of early pregnancylosses and of children with chromosomal aberrations of paternalorigin.

  9. A moonlighting metabolic protein influences repair at DNA double-stranded breaks

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Machorro, Ana Lilia; Aris, John P.; Pillus, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Catalytically active proteins with divergent dual functions are often described as ‘moonlighting’. In this work we characterize a new, chromatin-based function of Lys20, a moonlighting protein that is well known for its role in metabolism. Lys20 was initially described as homocitrate synthase (HCS), the first enzyme in the lysine biosynthetic pathway in yeast. Its nuclear localization led to the discovery of a key role for Lys20 in DNA damage repair through its interaction with the MYST family histone acetyltransferase Esa1. Overexpression of Lys20 promotes suppression of DNA damage sensitivity of esa1 mutants. In this work, by taking advantage of LYS20 mutants that are active in repair but not in lysine biosynthesis, the mechanism of suppression of esa1 was characterized. First we analyzed the chromatin landscape of esa1 cells, finding impaired histone acetylation and eviction. Lys20 was recruited to sites of DNA damage, and its overexpression promoted enhanced recruitment of the INO80 remodeling complex to restore normal histone eviction at the damage sites. This study improves understanding of the evolutionary, structural and biological relevance of independent activities in a moonlighting protein and links metabolism to DNA damage repair. PMID:25628362

  10. Replication Protein A: Single-stranded DNA's first responder : Dynamic DNA-interactions allow Replication Protein A to direct single-strand DNA intermediates into different pathways for synthesis or repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ran; Wold, Marc S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Replication Protein A (RPA), the major single-stranded DNA-binding protein in eukaryotic cells, is required for processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediates found in replication, repair and recombination. Recent studies have shown that RPA binding to ssDNA is highly dynamic and that more than high-affinity binding is needed for function. Analysis of DNA binding mutants identified forms of RPA with reduced affinity for ssDNA that are fully active, and other mutants with higher affinity that are inactive. Single molecule studies showed that while RPA binds ssDNA with high affinity, the RPA complex can rapidly diffuse along ssDNA and be displaced by other proteins that act on ssDNA. Finally, dynamic DNA binding allows RPA to prevent error-prone repair of double-stranded breaks and promote error-free repair. Together, these findings suggest a new paradigm where RPA acts as a first responder at sites with ssDNA, thereby actively coordinating DNA repair and DNA synthesis. PMID:25171654

  11. Biochemical studies of DNA strand break repair and molecular characterization of mei-41, a gene involved in DNA break repair

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveri, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to repair X-irradiation induced single-strand DNA breaks was examined in mutagen-sensitive mutants of Drosophila melanogaster. This analysis demonstrated that examined stocks possess a normal capacity to repair X-ray induced single-strand breaks. One of the mutants in this study, mei-41, has been shown to be involved in a number of DNA metabolizing functions. A molecular characterization of this mutant is presented. A cDNA hybridizing to genomic DNA both proximal and distal to a P element inducing a mei-41 mutation was isolated from both embryonic and adult female recombinant lambda phage libraries. A 2.2 kilobase embryonic cDNA clone was sequenced; the sequence of an open reading frame was identified which would predict a protein of 384 amino acids with a molecular weight of 43,132 daltons. An examination of homologies to sequences in protein and nucleic acid data bases revealed no sequences with significant homology to mei-41, however, two potential Zinc-finger domains were identified. Analysis of RNA hybridizing to the embryonic cDNA demonstrated the existence of a major 2.2 kilobase transcript expressed primarily in embryos and adult flies. An examination of the transcription of this gene in mei-41 mutants revealed significant variation from wild-type, an indication that the embryonic cDNA does represent a mei-41 transcript. Expression in tissues from adult animals demonstrated that the 2.2 kilobase RNA is expressed primarily in reproductive tissues. A 3.8kb transcript is the major species of RNA in the adult head and thorax. Evidence is presented which implies that expression of the mei-41 gene is strongly induced by exposure of certain cells to mutagens.

  12. DNA bending propensity in the presence of base mismatches: implications for DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Predeus, Alexander V; Mukherjee, Shayantani; Feig, Michael

    2013-05-23

    DNA bending is believed to facilitate the initial recognition of the mismatched base for repair. The repair efficiencies are dependent on both the mismatch type and neighboring nucleotide sequence. We have studied bending of several DNA duplexes containing canonical matches: A:T and G:C; various mismatches: A:A, A:C, G:A, G:G, G:T, C:C, C:T, and T:T; and a bis-abasic site: X:X. Free-energy profiles were generated for DNA bending using umbrella sampling. The highest energetic cost associated with DNA bending is observed for canonical matches while bending free energies are lower in the presence of mismatches, with the lowest value for the abasic site. In all of the sequences, DNA duplexes bend toward the major groove with widening of the minor groove. For homoduplexes, DNA bending is observed to occur via smooth deformations, whereas for heteroduplexes, kinks are observed at the mismatch site during strong bending. In general, pyrimidine:pyrimidine mismatches are the most destabilizing, while purine:purine mismatches lead to intermediate destabilization, and purine:pyrimidine mismatches are the least destabilizing. The ease of bending is partially correlated with the binding affinity of MutS to the mismatch pairs and subsequent repair efficiencies, indicating that intrinsic DNA bending propensities are a key factor of mismatch recognition.

  13. Interactions between branched DNAs and peptide inhibitors of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kepple, Kevin V; Patel, Namita; Salamon, Peter; Segall, Anca M

    2008-09-01

    The RecG helicase of Escherichia coli unwinds both Holliday junction (HJ) and replication fork DNA substrates. Our lab previously identified and characterized peptides (WRWYCR and KWWCRW) that block the activity of RecG on these substrates. We determined that the peptides bind HJ DNA and prevent the binding of RecG. Herein, we present further evidence that the peptides are competitive inhibitors of RecG binding to its substrates. We have generated structural models of interactions between WRWYCR and a junction substrate. Using the fluorescent probe 2-aminopurine, we show that inhibitors interact with highest affinity with HJs (K(d) = 14 nM) and approximately 4- to 9-fold more weakly with replication fork substrates. The fluorescence assay results agree with the structural model, and predict the molecular basis for interactions between HJ-trapping peptides and branched DNA molecules. Specifically, aromatic amino acids in the peptides stack with bases at the center of the DNA substrates. These interactions are stabilized by hydrogen bonds to the DNA and by intrapeptide interactions. These peptides inhibit several proteins involved in DNA repair in addition to RecG, have been useful as tools to dissect recombination, and possess antibiotic activity. Greater understanding of the peptides' mechanism of action will further increase their utility.

  14. Rif1: A Conserved Regulator of DNA Replication and Repair Hijacked by Telomeres in Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Mattarocci, Stefano; Hafner, Lukas; Lezaja, Aleksandra; Shyian, Maksym; Shore, David

    2016-01-01

    Rap1-interacting factor 1 (Rif1) was originally identified in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a telomere-binding protein that negatively regulates telomerase-mediated telomere elongation. Although this function is conserved in the distantly related fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, recent studies, both in yeasts and in metazoans, reveal that Rif1 also functions more globally, both in the temporal control of DNA replication and in DNA repair. Rif1 proteins are large and characterized by N-terminal HEAT repeats, predicted to form an elongated alpha-helical structure. In addition, all Rif1 homologs contain two short motifs, abbreviated RVxF/SILK, that are implicated in recruitment of the PP1 (yeast Glc7) phosphatase. In yeasts the RVxF/SILK domains have been shown to play a role in control of DNA replication initiation, at least in part through targeted de-phosphorylation of proteins in the pre-Replication Complex. In human cells Rif1 is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks through an interaction with 53BP1 where it counteracts DNA resection, thus promoting repair by non-homologous end-joining. This function requires the N-terminal HEAT repeat-containing domain. Interestingly, this domain is also implicated in DNA end protection at un-capped telomeres in yeast. We conclude by discussing the deployment of Rif1 at telomeres in yeasts from both an evolutionary perspective and in light of its recently discovered global functions. PMID:27066066

  15. Unscheduled DNA Synthesis: The Clinical and Functional Assay for Global Genomic DNA Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Latimer, Jean J.; Kelly, Crystal M.

    2016-01-01

    The unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay measures the ability of a cell to perform global genomic nucleotide excision repair (NER). This chapter provides instructions for the application of this technique by creating 6-4 photoproducts and pyrimidine dimers using UV-C irradiation. This procedure is designed specifically for quantification of the 6-4 photoproducts. Repair is quantified by the amount of radioactive thymidine incorporated during repair synthesis after this insult, and radioactivity is evaluated by grain counting after autoradiography. The results are used to clinically diagnose human DNA repair deficiency disorders and provide a basis for investigation of repair deficiency in human tissues or tumors. No other functional assay is available that directly measures the capacity to perform NER on the entire genome without the use of specific antibodies. Since live cells are required for this assay, explant culture techniques must be previously established. Host cell reactivation (HCR), as discussed in Chapter 37, is not an equivalent technique, as it measures only transcription-coupled repair (TCR) at active genes, a small subset of total NER. PMID:24623250

  16. Immunodetection of DNA repair endonuclease ERCC1-XPF in human tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Nikhil R.; Roginskaya, Vera Y.; Acquafondata, Marie B.; Dhir, Rajiv; Wood, Richard D.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    The high incidence of resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapeutic drugs and severe side effects of chemotherapy have led to a search for biomarkers able to predict which patients are most likely to respond to therapy. ERCC1-XPF nuclease is required for nucleotide excision repair of helix-distorting DNA damage and the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. Thus it is essential for several pathways of repair of DNA damage by cisplatin and related drugs, which are widely used in treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma and other late stage tumors. Consequently, there is tremendous interest in measuring ERCC1-XPF expression in tumor samples. Many immunohistochemistry studies have been performed, but the antibodies for ERCC1-XPF were not been rigorously tested for antigen specificity. Herein we survey a battery of antibodies raised against human ERCC1 or XPF for their specificity, using ERCC1-XPF deficient cells as a negative control. Antibodies were tested for the following applications: immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation from cell extracts, immunofluorescence detection in fixed cells, co-localization of ERCC1-XPF with UV radiation-induced DNA damage in fixed cells, and immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded samples. Although several commercially available antibodies are suitable for immunodetection of ERCC1-XPF in some applications, only a select subset is appropriate for detection of this repair complex in fixed specimens. The most commonly used antibody, 8F1, is not suitable for immunodetection in tissue. The results with validated antibodies reveal marked differences in ERCC1-XPF protein levels between samples and cell types. PMID:19723666

  17. Whole transcriptome analysis reveals a role for OGG1-initiated DNA repair signaling in airway remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Hosoki, Koa; Bacsi, Attila; Radák, Zsolt; Sur, Sanjiv; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Tian, Bing; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Brasier, Allan R.; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by environmental exposures, and endogenously as by-products of respiration, oxidatively modify biomolecules including DNA. Accumulation of ROS-induced DNA damage has been implicated in various diseases that involve inflammatory processes, and efficient DNA repair is considered critical in preventing such diseases. One of the most abundant DNA base lesions is 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), which is repaired by the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1)-initiated base-excision repair (OGG1-BER) pathway. Recent studies have shown that the OGG1-BER byproduct 8-oxoG base forms a complex with cytosolic OGG1, activating small GTPases and downstream cell signaling in cultured cells and lungs. This implies that persistent OGG1-BER could result in signaling leading to histological changes in airways. To test this, we mimicked OGG1-BER by repeatedly challenging airways with its repair product 8-oxoG base. Gene expression was analyzed by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and qRT-PCR, and datasets were evaluated by gene ontology and statistical tools. RNA-Seq analysis identified 3252 differentially expressed transcripts (2435 up- and 817 downregulated, Z3-fold change). Among the upregulated transcripts, 2080 mRNAs were identified whose encoded protein products were involved in modulation of the actin family cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, cell adhesion, cadherin, and cell junctions, affecting biological processes such as tissue development, cell-to-cell adhesion, cell communication, and the immune system. These data are supported by histological observations showing epithelial alterations, subepithelial fibrosis, and collagen deposits in the lungs. These data imply that continuous challenge by the environment and consequent OGG1-BER-driven signaling trigger gene expression consistent with airway remodeling. PMID:26187872

  18. Solar UVB-induced DNA damage and photoenzymatic DNA repair in antarctic zooplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, K.D.; Holman, M.A.; Mitchell, D.

    1997-02-18

    The detrimental effects of elevated intensities of mid-UV radiation (UVB), a result of stratospheric ozone depletion during the austral spring, on the primary producers of the Antarctic marine ecosystem have been well documented. Here we report that natural populations of Antarctic zooplankton also sustain significant DNA damage [measured as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs)] during periods of increased UVB flux. This is the first direct evidence that increased solar UVB may result in damage to marine organisms other than primary producers in Antarctica. The extent of DNA damage in pelagic icefish eggs correlated with daily incident UVB irradiance, reflecting the difference between acquisition and repair of CPDs. Patterns of DNA damage in fish larvae did not correlated with daily UVB flux, possibly due to different depth distributions and/or different capacities for DNA repair. Clearance of CPDs by Antarctic fish and krill was mediated primarily by the photoenzymatic repair system. Although repair rates were large for all species evaluated, they were apparently inadequate to prevent the transient accumulation of substantial CPD burdens. The capacity for DNA repair in Antarctic organisms was highest in those species whose early life history stages occupy the water column during periods of ozone depletion (austral spring) and lowest in fish species whose eggs and larvae are abundant during winter. Although the potential reduction in fitness of Antarctic zooplankton resulting from DNA damage is unknown, we suggest that increased solar UV may reduce recruitment and adversely affect trophic transfer of productivity by affecting heterotrophic species as well as primary producers. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Solar UVB-induced DNA damage and photoenzymatic DNA repair in antarctic zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Malloy, K D; Holman, M A; Mitchell, D; Detrich, H W

    1997-02-18

    The detrimental effects of elevated intensities of mid-UV radiation (UVB), a result of stratospheric ozone depletion during the austral spring, on the primary producers of the Antarctic marine ecosystem have been well documented. Here we report that natural populations of Antarctic zooplankton also sustain significant DNA damage [measured as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs)] during periods of increased UVB flux. This is the first direct evidence that increased solar UVB may result in damage to marine organisms other than primary producers in Antarctica. The extent of DNA damage in pelagic icefish eggs correlated with daily incident UVB irradiance, reflecting the difference between acquisition and repair of CPDs. Patterns of DNA damage in fish larvae did not correlate with daily UVB flux, possibly due to different depth distributions and/or different capacities for DNA repair. Clearance of CPDs by Antarctic fish and krill was mediated primarily by the photoenzymatic repair system. Although repair rates were large for all species evaluated, they were apparently inadequate to prevent the transient accumulation of substantial CPD burdens. The capacity for DNA repair in Antarctic organisms was highest in those species whose early life history stages occupy the water column during periods of ozone depletion (austral spring) and lowest in fish species whose eggs and larvae are abundant during winter. Although the potential reduction in fitness of Antarctic zooplankton resulting from DNA damage is unknown, we suggest that increased solar UV may reduce recruitment and adversely affect trophic transfer of productivity by affecting heterotrophic species as well as primary producers. PMID:9037040

  20. Antibiotic persistence: the role of spontaneous DNA repair response.

    PubMed

    Debbia, E A; Roveta, S; Schito, A M; Gualco, L; Marchese, A

    2001-01-01

    Persisters are a small proportion of a bacterial population that exists in a physiological state permitting survival despite the lethal activity of antibiotics. To explain this phenomenon, it has been suggested that persisters are bacteria repairing spontaneous errors of DNA synthesis. To verify this assumption, Escherichia coli AB1157 and its lexA3 derivative were exposed to a dose 6x MIC of various antibiotics representative of different molecular mechanisms of action (ampicillin, ceftriaxone, meropenem, amikacin, ciprofloxacin). Bacterial cell counts, after 24 hr of exposure to the antimicrobials, revealed a reduction of about 90% of viable organisms in the lexA3 strains in comparison to the lexA+. In several cases, the number of colony-forming units decreased below the limit of assay. This behavior was noted with all antibiotics used, alone or in combination (amikacin plus ceftriaxone and amikacin plus ciprofloxacin). The same experiments were repeated using E. coli AB1157 cultured in the presence of mitomycin C (0.25x MIC), and the number of survivors exceeded by about 90% the values found in the nonexposed control. In contrast, in the sulA background, mitomycin C reacted synergically with all the antibiotics tested causing a strong reduction of the survivors in comparison with the control. The addition of chloramphenicol (0.125x MIC), on the contrary, caused a reduction of the number of survivors of about 90%. These findings indicate that, when DNA repair is active (a mechanism known to block cell division), the number of survivors is greater than that observed with lexA3. Thus, in addition to other possible explanations, persisters might be a fraction of bacteria that during antibiotic treatment are not growing because they are repairing spontaneous errors of DNA synthesis.

  1. Integrating Multi-omics Data to Dissect Mechanisms of DNA repair Dysregulation in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Rohart, Florian; Simpson, Peter T.; Khanna, Kum Kum; Ragan, Mark A.; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair genes and pathways that are transcriptionally dysregulated in cancer provide the first line of evidence for the altered DNA repair status in tumours, and hence have been explored intensively as a source for biomarker discovery. The molecular mechanisms underlying DNA repair dysregulation, however, have not been systematically investigated in any cancer type. In this study, we performed a statistical analysis to dissect the roles of DNA copy number alteration (CNA), DNA methylation (DM) at gene promoter regions and the expression changes of transcription factors (TFs) in the differential expression of individual DNA repair genes in normal versus tumour breast samples. These gene-level results were summarised at pathway level to assess whether different DNA repair pathways are affected in distinct manners. Our results suggest that CNA and expression changes of TFs are major causes of DNA repair dysregulation in breast cancer, and that a subset of the identified TFs may exert global impacts on the dysregulation of multiple repair pathways. Our work hence provides novel insights into DNA repair dysregulation in breast cancer. These insights improve our understanding of the molecular basis of the DNA repair biomarkers identified thus far, and have potential to inform future biomarker discovery. PMID:27666291

  2. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in primary melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Nicotinamide is a safe, widely available vitamin that reduces the immune suppressive effects of UV, enhances DNA repair in keratinocytes and has shown promise in the chemoprevention of non-melanoma skin cancer. Here, we report the effect of nicotinamide on DNA damage and repair in primary human melanocytes. Nicotinamide significantly enhanced the repair of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV exposure. It also enhanced the repair of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine induced by the culture conditions in unirradiated melanocytes. A significant increase in the percentage of melanocytes undergoing unscheduled but not scheduled DNA synthesis was observed, confirming that nicotinamide enhances DNA repair in human melanocytes. In summary, nicotinamide, by enhancing DNA repair in melanocytes, is a potential agent for the chemoprevention of cutaneous melanoma.

  3. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in primary melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Nicotinamide is a safe, widely available vitamin that reduces the immune suppressive effects of UV, enhances DNA repair in keratinocytes and has shown promise in the chemoprevention of non-melanoma skin cancer. Here, we report the effect of nicotinamide on DNA damage and repair in primary human melanocytes. Nicotinamide significantly enhanced the repair of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV exposure. It also enhanced the repair of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine induced by the culture conditions in unirradiated melanocytes. A significant increase in the percentage of melanocytes undergoing unscheduled but not scheduled DNA synthesis was observed, confirming that nicotinamide enhances DNA repair in human melanocytes. In summary, nicotinamide, by enhancing DNA repair in melanocytes, is a potential agent for the chemoprevention of cutaneous melanoma. PMID:24798949

  4. ATP-dependent DNA binding, unwinding, and resection by the Mre11/Rad50 complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaqi; Sung, Sihyun; Kim, Youngran; Li, Fuyang; Gwon, Gwanghyun; Jo, Aera; Kim, Ae-Kyoung; Kim, Taeyoon; Song, Ok-Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Cho, Yunje

    2016-04-01

    ATP-dependent DNA end recognition and nucleolytic processing are central functions of the Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex in DNA double-strand break repair. However, it is still unclear how ATP binding and hydrolysis primes the MR function and regulates repair pathway choice in cells. Here,Methanococcus jannaschii MR-ATPγS-DNA structure reveals that the partly deformed DNA runs symmetrically across central groove between two ATPγS-bound Rad50 nucleotide-binding domains. Duplex DNA cannot access the Mre11 active site in the ATP-free full-length MR complex. ATP hydrolysis drives rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain and induces the DNA melting so that the substrate DNA can access Mre11. Our findings suggest that the ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational changes in both DNA and the MR complex coordinate the melting and endonuclease activity. PMID:26717941

  5. ATP-dependent DNA binding, unwinding, and resection by the Mre11/Rad50 complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaqi; Sung, Sihyun; Kim, Youngran; Li, Fuyang; Gwon, Gwanghyun; Jo, Aera; Kim, Ae-Kyoung; Kim, Taeyoon; Song, Ok-Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Cho, Yunje

    2016-04-01

    ATP-dependent DNA end recognition and nucleolytic processing are central functions of the Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex in DNA double-strand break repair. However, it is still unclear how ATP binding and hydrolysis primes the MR function and regulates repair pathway choice in cells. Here,Methanococcus jannaschii MR-ATPγS-DNA structure reveals that the partly deformed DNA runs symmetrically across central groove between two ATPγS-bound Rad50 nucleotide-binding domains. Duplex DNA cannot access the Mre11 active site in the ATP-free full-length MR complex. ATP hydrolysis drives rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain and induces the DNA melting so that the substrate DNA can access Mre11. Our findings suggest that the ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational changes in both DNA and the MR complex coordinate the melting and endonuclease activity.

  6. 3-Aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, is a stimulator, not an inhibitor, of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaver, J.E.; Morgan, W.F. )

    1987-10-01

    An inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis, 3-aminobenzamide (3AB), at low concentrations was found to reduce strand-break frequencies and increase repair replication in human lymphoid cells damaged by methyl methanoesulfonate. A concentration of 0.1 mM 3AB was adequate to produce a maximum effect on strand-break frequencies and repair replication. This evidence, together with previous measurements, demonstrates that 3AB cannot be regarded as an inhibitor of DNA repair; rather, it actually accelerates the ligation of DNA repair patches. Previous considerations of 3AB as a repair inhibitor may have derived from the use of excessive concentrations above 1 mM that may have stimulated additional damage and from the use of ethyl alcohol as a solvent for 3AB. Interpretations of the role of single-strand breaks and poly(ADP-ribose) in DNA repair, differentiation, and gene activity may need reevaluation because they have frequently been based on an erroneous notion of 3AB as a repair inhibitor, when its mode of action is, in fact, more complex.

  7. Complex kinetics of DNA condensation revealed through DNA twist tracing.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wong, Wei Juan; Lim, Ci Ji; Ju, Hai-Peng; Li, Ming; Yan, Jie; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2015-08-01

    Toroid formation is an important mechanism for DNA condensation in cells. The length change during DNA condensation was investigated in previous single-molecule experiments. However, DNA twist is key to understanding the topological kinetics of DNA condensation. In this study, DNA twist as well as DNA length was traced during the DNA condensation by the freely orbiting magnetic tweezers and the tilted magnetic tweezers combined with Brownian dynamics simulations. The experimental results disclose the complex relationship between DNA extension and backbone rotation. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the toroid formation follows a wiggling pathway which leads to the complex DNA backbone rotation as revealed in our experiments. These findings provide the complete description of multivalent cation-dependent DNA toroid formation under tension.

  8. Visualization of mismatch repair complexes using fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Tobias T; Hombauer, Hans

    2016-02-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is a surveillance mechanism present in most living organisms, which repairs errors introduced by DNA polymerases. Importantly, loss of MMR function due to inactivating mutations and/or epigenetic silencing results in the accumulation of mutations and as consequence increased cancer susceptibility, as observed in Lynch syndrome patients. During the past decades important progress has been made in the MMR field resulting in the identification and characterization of essential MMR components, culminating in the in vitro reconstitution of 5' and 3' nick-directed MMR. However, several mechanistic aspects of the MMR reaction remain not fully understood, therefore alternative approaches and further investigations are needed. Recently, the use of imaging techniques and, more specifically, visualization of MMR components in living cells, has broadened our mechanistic understanding of the repair reaction providing more detailed information about the spatio-temporal organization of MMR in vivo. In this review we would like to comment on mechanistic aspects of the MMR reaction in light of these and other recent findings. Moreover, we will discuss the current limitations and provide future perspectives regarding imaging of mismatch repair components in diverse organisms. PMID:26725956

  9. In vivo dynamics of chromatin-associated complex formation in mammalian nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Moné, Martijn J.; Bernas, Tytus; Dinant, Christoffel; Goedvree, Feliks A.; Manders, Erik M. M.; Volker, Marcel; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Vermeulen, Wim; van Driel, Roel

    2004-01-01

    Chromatin is the substrate for many processes in the cell nucleus, including transcription, replication, and various DNA repair systems, all of which require the formation of multiprotein machineries on the chromatin fiber. We have analyzed the kinetics of in vivo assembly of the protein complex that is responsible for nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Assembly is initiated by UV irradiation of a small area of the cell nucleus, after which the accumulation of GFP-tagged NER proteins in the DNA-damaged area is measured, reflecting the establishment of the dual-incision complex. The dynamic behavior of two NER proteins, ERCC1-XPF and TFIIH, was studied in detail. Results show that the repair complex is assembled with a rate of ≈30 complexes per second and is not diffusion limited. Furthermore, we provide in vivo evidence that not only binding of TFIIH, but also its helicase activity, is required for the recruitment of ERCC1-XPF. These studies give quantitative insight into the de novo assembly of a chromatin-associated protein complex in living cells. PMID:15520397

  10. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2016-02-01

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder. PMID:26746812

  11. Oxidative Stress, DNA Damage and DNA Repair in Female Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Grindel, Annemarie; Guggenberger, Bianca; Eichberger, Lukas; Pöppelmeyer, Christina; Gschaider, Michaela; Tosevska, Anela; Mare, George; Briskey, David; Brath, Helmut; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) is associated with oxidative stress which in turn can lead to DNA damage. The aim of the present study was to analyze oxidative stress, DNA damage and DNA repair in regard to hyperglycemic state and diabetes duration. Methods Female T2DM patients (n = 146) were enrolled in the MIKRODIAB study and allocated in two groups regarding their glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level (HbA1c≤7.5%, n = 74; HbA1c>7.5%, n = 72). In addition, tertiles according to diabetes duration (DD) were created (DDI = 6.94±3.1 y, n = 49; DDII = 13.35±1.1 y, n = 48; DDIII = 22.90±7.3 y, n = 49). Oxidative stress parameters, including ferric reducing ability potential, malondialdehyde, oxidized and reduced glutathione, reduced thiols, oxidized LDL and F2-Isoprostane as well as the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were measured. Damage to DNA was analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and whole blood with single cell gel electrophoresis. DNA base excision repair capacity was tested with the modified comet repair assay. Additionally, mRNA expressions of nine genes related to base excision repair were analyzed in a subset of 46 matched individuals. Results No significant differences in oxidative stress parameters, antioxidant enzyme activities, damage to DNA and base excision repair capacity, neither between a HbA1c cut off />7.5%, nor between diabetes duration was found. A significant up-regulation in mRNA expression was found for APEX1, LIG3 and XRCC1 in patients with >7.5% HbA1c. Additionally, we observed higher total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, LDL/HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, Framingham risk score, systolic blood pressure, BMI and lower HDL-cholesterol in the hyperglycemic group. Conclusion BMI, blood pressure and blood lipid status were worse in hyperglycemic individuals. However, no major disparities regarding oxidative stress, damage to DNA and DNA repair were present which

  12. DNA-PK is involved in repairing a transient surge of DNA breaks induced by deceleration of DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Martin, Melvenia; Torres, Michael J.; Gu, Cory; Pluth, Janice M; DeBernardi, Maria; McDonald, Jeoffrey S.; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cells that suffer substantial inhibition of DNA replication halt their cell cycle via a checkpoint response mediated by the PI3 kinases ATM and ATR. It is unclear how cells cope with milder replication insults, which are under the threshold for ATM and ATR activation. A third PI3 kinase, DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), is also activated following replication inhibition, but the role DNA-PK might play in response to perturbed replication is unclear since this kinase does not activate the signaling cascades involved in the S-phase checkpoint. Here we report that mild, transient drug-induced perturbation of DNA replication rapidly induced DNA breaks that promptly disappeared in cells that contained a functional DNA-PK whereas such breaks persisted in cells that were deficient in DNA-PK activity. After the initial transient burst of DNA breaks, cells with a functional DNA-PK did not halt replication and continued to synthesize DNA at a slow pace in the presence of replication inhibitors. In contrast, DNA-PK deficient cells subject to low levels of replication inhibition halted cell cycle progression via an ATR-mediated S-phase checkpoint. The ATM kinase was dispensable for the induction of the initial DNA breaks. These observations suggest that DNA-PK is involved in setting a high threshold for the ATR-Chk1-mediated S-phase checkpoint by promptly repairing DNA breaks that appear immediately following inhibition of DNA replication. PMID:17280685

  13. Kub5-Hera, the human Rtt103 homolog, plays dual functional roles in transcription termination and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Morales, Julio C; Richard, Patricia; Rommel, Amy; Fattah, Farjana J; Motea, Edward A; Patidar, Praveen L; Xiao, Ling; Leskov, Konstantin; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Hittelman, Walter N; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Manley, James L; Boothman, David A

    2014-04-01

    Functions of Kub5-Hera (In Greek Mythology Hera controlled Artemis) (K-H), the human homolog of the yeast transcription termination factor Rtt103, remain undefined. Here, we show that K-H has functions in both transcription termination and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. K-H forms distinct protein complexes with factors that repair DSBs (e.g. Ku70, Ku86, Artemis) and terminate transcription (e.g. RNA polymerase II). K-H loss resulted in increased basal R-loop levels, DSBs, activated DNA-damage responses and enhanced genomic instability. Significantly lowered Artemis protein levels were detected in K-H knockdown cells, which were restored with specific K-H cDNA re-expression. K-H deficient cells were hypersensitive to cytotoxic agents that induce DSBs, unable to reseal complex DSB ends, and showed significantly delayed γ-H2AX and 53BP1 repair-related foci regression. Artemis re-expression in K-H-deficient cells restored DNA-repair function and resistance to DSB-inducing agents. However, R loops persisted consistent with dual roles of K-H in transcription termination and DSB repair.

  14. Kub5-Hera, the human Rtt103 homolog, plays dual functional roles in transcription termination and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Morales, Julio C; Richard, Patricia; Rommel, Amy; Fattah, Farjana J; Motea, Edward A; Patidar, Praveen L; Xiao, Ling; Leskov, Konstantin; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Hittelman, Walter N; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Manley, James L; Boothman, David A

    2014-04-01

    Functions of Kub5-Hera (In Greek Mythology Hera controlled Artemis) (K-H), the human homolog of the yeast transcription termination factor Rtt103, remain undefined. Here, we show that K-H has functions in both transcription termination and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. K-H forms distinct protein complexes with factors that repair DSBs (e.g. Ku70, Ku86, Artemis) and terminate transcription (e.g. RNA polymerase II). K-H loss resulted in increased basal R-loop levels, DSBs, activated DNA-damage responses and enhanced genomic instability. Significantly lowered Artemis protein levels were detected in K-H knockdown cells, which were restored with specific K-H cDNA re-expression. K-H deficient cells were hypersensitive to cytotoxic agents that induce DSBs, unable to reseal complex DSB ends, and showed significantly delayed γ-H2AX and 53BP1 repair-related foci regression. Artemis re-expression in K-H-deficient cells restored DNA-repair function and resistance to DSB-inducing agents. However, R loops persisted consistent with dual roles of K-H in transcription termination and DSB repair. PMID:24589584

  15. Estrogen Receptor Expression Is Associated with DNA Repair Capacity in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Jaime; Morales, Luisa; Ortiz, Carmen; Adams, Damian; Vargas, Wanda; Casbas, Patricia; Dutil, Julie; Echenique, Miguel; Suárez, Erick

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) tumors employ complex signaling that engages in crosstalk with multiple pathways through genomic and non-genomic regulation. A greater understanding of these pathways is important for developing improved biomarkers that can better determine treatment choices, risk of recurrence and cancer progression. Deficiencies in DNA repair capacity (DRC) is a hallmark of breast cancer (BC); therefore, in this work we tested whether ER signaling influences DRC. We analyzed the association between ER positivity (% receptor activation) and DRC in 270 BC patients, then further stratified our analysis by HER2 receptor status. Our results show that among HER2 negative, the likelihood of having low DRC values among ER- women is 1.92 (95% CI: 1.03, 3.57) times the likelihood of having low DRC values among ER+ women, even adjusting for different potential confounders (p<0.05); however, a contrary pattern was observed among HER2 positives women. In conclusion, there is an association between DRC levels and ER status, and this association is modified by HER2 receptor status. Adding a DNA repair capacity test to hormone receptor testing may provide new information on defective DNA repair phenotypes, which could better stratify BC patients who have ER+ tumors. ER+/HER2- tumors are heterogeneous, incompletely defined, and clinically challenging to treat; the addition of a DRC test could better characterize and classify these patients as well as help clinicians select optimal therapies, which could improve outcomes and reduce recurrences. PMID:27032101

  16. C. elegans whole-genome sequencing reveals mutational signatures related to carcinogens and DNA repair deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Bettina; Cooke, Susanna L.; Weiss, Joerg; Bailly, Aymeric P.; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Marshall, John; Raine, Keiran; Maddison, Mark; Anderson, Elizabeth; Stratton, Michael R.; Campbell, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutation is associated with developmental and hereditary disorders, aging, and cancer. While we understand some mutational processes operative in human disease, most remain mysterious. We used Caenorhabditis elegans whole-genome sequencing to model mutational signatures, analyzing 183 worm populations across 17 DNA repair-deficient backgrounds propagated for 20 generations or exposed to carcinogens. The baseline mutation rate in C. elegans was approximately one per genome per generation, not overtly altered across several DNA repair deficiencies over 20 generations. Telomere erosion led to complex chromosomal rearrangements initiated by breakage–fusion–bridge cycles and completed by simultaneously acquired, localized clusters of breakpoints. Aflatoxin B1 induced substitutions of guanines in a GpC context, as observed in aflatoxin-induced liver cancers. Mutational burden increased with impaired nucleotide excision repair. Cisplatin and mechlorethamine, DNA crosslinking agents, caused dose- and genotype-dependent signatures among indels, substitutions, and rearrangements. Strikingly, both agents induced clustered rearrangements resembling “chromoanasynthesis,” a replication-based mutational signature seen in constitutional genomic disorders, suggesting that interstrand crosslinks may play a pathogenic role in such events. Cisplatin mutagenicity was most pronounced in xpf-1 mutants, suggesting that this gene critically protects cells against platinum chemotherapy. Thus, experimental model systems combined with genome sequencing can recapture and mechanistically explain mutational signatures associated with human disease. PMID:25030888

  17. The FEN-1 family of structure-specific nucleases in eukaryotic DNA replication, recombination and repair.

    PubMed

    Lieber, M R

    1997-03-01

    Unlike the most well-characterized prokaryotic polymerase, E. coli DNA pol l, none of the eukaryotic polymerases have their own 5' to 3' exonuclease domain for nick translation and Okazaki fragment processing. In eukaryotes, FEN-1 is an endo- and exonuclease that carries out this function independently of the polymerase molecules. Only seven nucleases have been cloned from multicellular eukaryotic cells. Among these, FEN-1 is intriguing because it has complex structural preferences; specifically, it cleaves at branched DNA structures. The cloning of FEN-1 permitted establishment of the first eukaryotic nuclease family, predicting that S. cerevisiae RAD2 (S. pombe Rad13) and its mammalian homolog, XPG, would have similar structural specificity. The FEN-1 nuclease family includes several similar enzymes encoded by bacteriophages. The crystal structures of two enzymes in the FEN-1 nuclease family have been solved and they provide a structural basis for the interesting steric requirements of FEN-1 substrates. Because of their unique structural specificities, FEN-1 and its family members have important roles in DNA replication, repair and, potentially, recombination. Recently, FEN-1 was found to specifically associate with PCNA, explaining some aspects of FEN-1 function during DNA replication and potentially in DNA repair.

  18. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Early DNA Damage Response Proteins on Complex DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Frank; Löb, Daniel; Lengert, Nicor; Durante, Marco; Drossel, Barbara; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Jakob, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    The response of cells to ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is determined by the activation of multiple pathways aimed at repairing the injury and maintaining genomic integrity. Densely ionizing radiation induces complex damage consisting of different types of DNA lesions in close proximity that are difficult to repair and may promote carcinogenesis. Little is known about the dynamic behavior of repair proteins on complex lesions. In this study we use live-cell imaging for the spatio-temporal characterization of early protein interactions at damage sites of increasing complexity. Beamline microscopy was used to image living cells expressing fluorescently-tagged proteins during and immediately after charged particle irradiation to reveal protein accumulation at damaged sites in real time. Information on the mobility and binding rates of the recruited proteins was obtained from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Recruitment of the DNA damage sensor protein NBS1 accelerates with increasing lesion density and saturates at very high damage levels. FRAP measurements revealed two different binding modalities of NBS1 to damage sites and a direct impact of lesion complexity on the binding. Faster recruitment with increasing lesion complexity was also observed for the mediator MDC1, but mobility was limited at very high damage densities due to nuclear-wide binding. We constructed a minimal computer model of the initial response to DSB based on known protein interactions only. By fitting all measured data using the same set of parameters, we can reproduce the experimentally characterized steps of the DNA damage response over a wide range of damage densities. The model suggests that the influence of increasing lesion density accelerating NBS1 recruitment is only dependent on the different binding modes of NBS1, directly to DSB and to the surrounding chromatin via MDC1. This elucidates an impact of damage clustering on repair without the

  19. Tetrameric Ctp1 coordinates DNA binding and bridging in DNA double strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Sara N.; Appel, C. Denise; Westmoreland, Jim; Williams, Jessica S.; Nguyen, Yvonne; Robertson, Patrick D.; Resnick, Michael A.; Williams, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Ctp1 (aka CtIP or Sae2) collaborates with Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 to initiate repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), but its function(s) remain enigmatic. We report that tetrameric Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ctp1 harbors multivalent DNA-binding and bridging activities. Through structural and biophysical analyses of the Ctp1 tetramer we define the salient features of Ctp1 architecture: an N-terminal interlocking tetrameric helical dimer-of-dimers (THDD) domain and a central intrinsically disordered region (IDR) linked to C-terminal “RHR” DNA interaction motifs. The THDD, IDR and RHR are required for Ctp1 DNA bridging activity in vitro and both the THDD and RHR are required for efficient DSB repair in S. pombe. Our results establish non-nucleolytic roles for Ctp1 in binding and coordination of DSB repair intermediates and suggest that ablation of human CtIP DNA binding by truncating mutations underlie the CTIP-linked Seckel and Jawad syndromes. PMID:25580577

  20. DNA damage, repair and photoadaptation in a Xiphophorus fish hybrid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David L; Paniker, Lakshmi; Douki, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to sunlight is responsible for most cutaneous malignant melanomas in the human population. It is very likely that DNA damage is an initial event in melanomagenesis, however, the role played by this damage is an open question. To this end, we used a hemipigmented F(1) hybrid of the fish genus Xiphophorus and HPLC tandem mass spectrometry to examine the effects of melanin on the induction and repair of the predominant UV-induced photoproducts formed in skin cell DNA. We found that heavily pigmented skin cells had about half the damage of nonpigmented cells and the relative induction of the major photoproducts was independent of the degree of pigmentation. The efficiency of photoenzymatic repair was the same in nonpigmented and pigmented areas of the fish. We found no evidence of residual damage at 10 days after the last exposure. Most striking was that repeated exposure to multiple doses of UVB caused a very significant photoadaptive response. Rather than an accumulation of damage after five doses of UVB we saw a significant reduction in the amount of damage induced after the final dose compared with the initial dose. The relevance of these observations is discussed in the context of melanoma susceptibility and UVB thresholds.

  1. Cerebellar neurodegeneration in human hereditary DNA repair disorders.

    PubMed

    Kohji, T; Hayashi, M; Shioda, K; Minagawa, M; Morimatsu, Y; Tamagawa, K; Oda, M

    1998-02-27

    Recent findings have focused attention on the role of apoptosis in neurodegenerative diseases, however, the apoptotic process in child-onset brain disorders has been little investigated. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) are hereditary disorders characterized by impaired DNA repair and neurodegeneration. We investigated apoptotic cell death in the cerebellum of five cases of XP group A (XPA), four cases of CS, and twelve controls, using TdT-mediated DIG-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) and immunohistochemical staining for bcl-2, bcl-x, p53, bax, BDNF and Trk B. The TUNEL-positive cells were found in the granule cells of the cerebellar cortex of two patients with XPA and two patients with CS, whereas such cells were not detected in the cerebellar cortex in controls. Upregulation of bcl-2 or BDNF was not observed, and bcl-x expression was not altered. Some patients showed nuclear expression of p53 in the granule cells and/or molecular layer, bax-positive glial cells in the cerebellar white matter, and a few Trk B-positive cells in the granular layer. These findings suggest that apoptotic cell death can be involved in the cerebellar degeneration in patients with hereditary defects in DNA repair mechanisms.

  2. [DNA repair--a fundamental factor in ageing and development of cancer].

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Stevnsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2006-06-12

    Advanced age and increased incidence of many illnesses such as cancer are closely linked. The reasons for such a link are numerous but one important factor is DNA repair. DNA repair pathways in both nuclei and mitochondria ensure that genomic instability is minimised, thus preventing transformation and premature cellular decay. However, overall cellular DNA repair capacity decreases with age; moreover, some individuals are born with defects in repair systems. The resulting lower capacity for repair of DNA damage increases mutation load and changes normal cellular functions such as transcription, thereby contributing to the ageing process as well to the onset of various cancers. DNA repair capacity is an important cellular marker that should be considered as a standard clinical test.

  3. Exploration of methods to identify polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair capacity phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Irene M; Thomas, Cynthia B; Xi, Tina; Mohrenweiser, Harvey W; Nelson, David O

    2007-03-01

    Elucidating the relationship between polymorphic sequences and risk of common disease is a challenge. For example, although it is clear that variation in DNA repair genes is associated with familial cancer, aging and neurological disease, progress toward identifying polymorphisms associated with elevated risk of sporadic disease has been slow. This is partly due to the complexity of the genetic variation, the existence of large numbers of mostly low frequency variants and the contribution of many genes to variation in susceptibility. There has been limited development of methods to find associations between genotypes having many polymorphisms and pathway function or health outcome. We have explored several statistical methods for identifying polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair phenotypes. The model system used was 80 cell lines that had been resequenced to identify variation; 191 single nucleotide substitution polymorphisms (SNPs) are included, of which 172 are in 31 base excision repair pathway genes, 19 in 5 anti-oxidation genes, and DNA repair phenotypes based on single strand breaks measured by the alkaline Comet assay. Univariate analyses were of limited value in identifying SNPs associated with phenotype variation. Of the multivariable model selection methods tested: the easiest that provided reduced error of prediction of phenotype was simple counting of the variant alleles predicted to encode proteins with reduced activity, which led to a genotype including 52 SNPs; the best and most parsimonious model was achieved using a two-step analysis without regard to potential functional relevance: first SNPs were ranked by importance determined by random forests regression (RFR), followed by cross-validation in a second round of RFR modeling that included ever more SNPs in declining order of importance. With this approach six SNPs were found to minimize prediction error. The results should encourage research into utilization of multivariate

  4. Exploration of methods to identify polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair capacity phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Xi, T; Mohrenweiser, H W; Nelson, D O

    2006-07-03

    Elucidating the relationship between polymorphic sequences and risk of common disease is a challenge. For example, although it is clear that variation in DNA repair genes is associated with familial cancer, aging and neurological disease, progress toward identifying polymorphisms associated with elevated risk of sporadic disease has been slow. This is partly due to the complexity of the genetic variation, the existence of large numbers of mostly low frequency variants and the contribution of many genes to variation in susceptibility. There has been limited development of methods to find associations between genotypes having many polymorphisms and pathway function or health outcome. We have explored several statistical methods for identifying polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair phenotypes. The model system used was 80 cell lines that had been resequenced to identify variation; 191 single nucleotide substitution polymorphisms (SNPs) are included, of which 172 are in 31 base excision repair pathway genes, 19 in 5 anti-oxidation genes, and DNA repair phenotypes based on single strand breaks measured by the alkaline Comet assay. Univariate analyses were of limited value in identifying SNPs associated with phenotype variation. Of the multivariable model selection methods tested: the easiest that provided reduced error of prediction of phenotype was simple counting of the variant alleles predicted to encode proteins with reduced activity, which led to a genotype including 52 SNPs; the best and most parsimonious model was achieved using a two-step analysis without regard to potential functional relevance: first SNPs were ranked by importance determined by Random Forests Regression (RFR), followed by cross-validation in a second round of RFR modeling that included ever more SNPs in declining order of importance. With this approach 6 SNPs were found to minimize prediction error. The results should encourage research into utilization of multivariate

  5. Alterations in Chromosomal Synapses and DNA Repair in Apoptotic Spermatocytes of Mus m. Domesticus

    PubMed Central

    Ayarza, E.; González, M.; López, F.; Fernández-Donoso, R.; Page, J.; Berrios, S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether apoptotic spermatocytes from the mouse Mus m. domesticus presented alterations in chromosomal synapses and DNA repair. To enrich for apoptotic spermatocytes, the scrotum’s temperature was raised by partially exposing animals for 15 min to a 42ºC water bath. Spermatocytes in initial apoptosis were identified in situ by detecting activated caspase-9. SYCP1 and SYCP3 were markers for evaluating synapses or the structure of synaptonemal complexes and Rad51 and γH2AX for detecting DNA repair and chromatin remodeling. Apoptotic spermatocytes were concentrated in spermatogenic cycle stages III-IV (50.3%), XI-XII (44.1%) and IX-X (4.2%). Among apoptotic spermatocytes, 48% were in middle pachytene, 44% in metaphase and 6% in diplotene. Moreover, apoptotic spermatocytes showed several structural anomalies in autosomal bivalents, including splitting of chromosomal axes and partial asynapses between homologous chromosomes. γH2AX and Rad51 were atypically distributed during pachytene and as late as diplotene and associated with asynaptic chromatin, single chromosome axes or discontinuous chromosome axes. Among apoptotic spermatocytes at pachytene, 70% showed changes in the structure of synapses, 67% showed changes in γH2AX and Rad51 distribution and 50% shared alterations in both synapses and DNA repair. Our results showed that apoptotic spermatocytes from Mus m. domesticus contain a high frequency of alterations in chromosomal synapses and in the recruitment and distribution of DNA repair proteins. Together, these observations suggest that these alterations may have been detected by meiotic checkpoints triggering apoptosis. PMID:27349323

  6. Alterations in chromosomal synapses and DNA repair in apoptotic spermatocytes of Mus m. domesticus.

    PubMed

    Ayarza, E; González, M; López, F; Fernández-Donoso, R; Page, J; Berrios, S

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether apoptotic spermatocytes from the mouse Mus m. domesticus presented alterations in chromosomal synapses and DNA repair. To enrich for apoptotic spermatocytes, the scrotum's temperature was raised by partially exposing animals for 15 min to a 42ºC water bath. Spermatocytes in initial apoptosis were identified in situ by detecting activated Caspase-9.  SYCP1 and SYCP3 were markers for evaluating synapses or the structure of synaptonemal complexes and Rad51 and γH2AX for detecting DNA repair and chromatin remodeling. Apoptotic spermatocytes were concentrated in spermatogenic cycle stages III-IV (50.3%), XI-XII (44.1%) and IX-X (4.2%). Among apoptotic spermatocytes, 48% were in middle pachytene, 44% in metaphase and 6% in diplotene. Moreover, apoptotic spermatocytes showed several structural anomalies in autosomal bivalents, including splitting of chromosomal axes and partial asynapses between homologous chromosomes. gH2AX and Rad51 were atypically distributed during pachytene and as late as diplotene and associated with asynaptic chromatin, single chromosome axes or discontinuous chromosome axes. Among apoptotic spermatocytes at pachytene, 70% showed changes in the structure of synapses, 67% showed changes in gH2AX and Rad51 distribution and 50% shared alterations in both synapses and DNA repair. Our results showed that apoptotic spermatocytes from Mus m. domesticus contain a high frequency of alterations in chromosomal synapses and in the recruitment and distribution of DNA repair proteins. Together, these observations suggest that these alterations may have been detected by meiotic checkpoints triggering apoptosis. PMID:27349323

  7. DNA Repair Profiling Reveals Nonrandom Outcomes at Cas9-Mediated Breaks.

    PubMed

    van Overbeek, Megan; Capurso, Daniel; Carter, Matthew M; Thompson, Matthew S; Frias, Elizabeth; Russ, Carsten; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Nye, Christopher; Gradia, Scott; Vidal, Bastien; Zheng, Jiashun; Hoffman, Gregory R; Fuller, Christopher K; May, Andrew P

    2016-08-18

    The repair outcomes at site-specific DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated by the RNA-guided DNA endonuclease Cas9 determine how gene function is altered. Despite the widespread adoption of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to induce DSBs for genome engineering, the resulting repair products have not been examined in depth. Here, the DNA repair profiles of 223 sites in the human genome demonstrate that the pattern of DNA repair following Cas9 cutting at each site is nonrandom and consistent across experimental replicates, cell lines, and reagent delivery methods. Furthermore, the repair outcomes are determined by the protospacer sequence rather than genomic context, indicating that DNA repair profiling in cell lines can be used to anticipate repair outcomes in primary cells. Chemical inhibition of DNA-PK enabled dissection of the DNA repair profiles into contributions from c-NHEJ and MMEJ. Finally, this work elucidates a strategy for using "error-prone" DNA-repair machinery to generate precise edits. PMID:27499295

  8. Mechanisms of DNA Repair by Photolyase and Excision Nuclease (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Sancar, Aziz

    2016-07-18

    Ultraviolet light damages DNA by converting two adjacent thymines into a thymine dimer which is potentially mutagenic, carcinogenic, or lethal to the organism. This damage is repaired by photolyase and the nucleotide excision repair system in E. coli by nucleotide excision repair in humans. The work leading to these results is presented by Aziz Sancar in his Nobel Lecture. PMID:27337655

  9. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  10. Mechanisms of DNA Repair by Photolyase and Excision Nuclease (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Sancar, Aziz

    2016-07-18

    Ultraviolet light damages DNA by converting two adjacent thymines into a thymine dimer which is potentially mutagenic, carcinogenic, or lethal to the organism. This damage is repaired by photolyase and the nucleotide excision repair system in E. coli by nucleotide excision repair in humans. The work leading to these results is presented by Aziz Sancar in his Nobel Lecture.

  11. Photoprotection by topical DNA repair enzymes: molecular correlates of clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Yarosh, D B; O'Connor, A; Alas, L; Potten, C; Wolf, P

    1999-02-01

    A new approach to photoprotection is to repair DNA damage after UV exposure. This can be accomplished by delivery of a DNA repair enzyme with specificity to UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers into skin by means of specially engineered liposomes. Treatment of DNA-repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum patients or skin cancer patients with T4N5 liposome lotion containing such DNA repair liposomes increases the removal of DNA damage in the first few hours after treatment. In these studies, a DNA repair effect was observed in some patients treated with heat-inactivated enzyme. Unexpectedly, it was discovered that the heat-inactivated T4 endonuclease V enzyme refolds and recovers enzymatic activity. These studies demonstrate that measurements of molecular changes induced by biological drugs are useful adjuvants to clinical studies.

  12. A novel bisindole-PBD conjugate causes DNA damage induced apoptosis via inhibition of DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Pranjal; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Kamal, Ahmed; Bhadra, Utpal; Bhadra, Manika Pal

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) that includes cell cycle check points, DNA repair, apoptosis, and senescence is intimately linked with cancer. It shields an organism against cancer development when genomic integrity fails. DNA repair pathways protect the cells from tumor progression caused as a result of DNA damage induced by irradiation or due to chemotherapeutic treatment. Many promising anticancer agents have been identified that target specific DNA repair pathways in response to DNA damage thereby leading to apoptosis. Here we identified a novel bisindole-PBD conjugate that possess potent anticancer activity in breast cancer cells. Further studies aimed at understanding the mechanism of action of the molecule showed its role in DNA damage induced apoptosis via inhibition of DNA repair pathway. Trypan blue and BrdU assay exhibited a dose-dependent effect. Single-stranded DNA damage was observed by COMET assay. In addition DNA damage induced ROS generation with simultaneous activation of ATM and ATR upon compound treatment was observed. Further downregulation of Bcl-XL and activation of Bax showed DNA damage induced apoptosis in MCF-7 and MDAMB-231 cells. In conclusion, it can be summarized that bisindole-PBD conjugate induces DNA damage in a dose dependent (2, 4, and 8 μM) manner by inhibiting the DNA repair genes. PMID:25010292

  13. Influence of calorie reduction on DNA repair capacity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Matt, Katja; Burger, Katharina; Gebhard, Daniel; Bergemann, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restrictive feeding prolongs the lifespan of a variety of model organisms like rodents and invertebrates. It has been shown that caloric restriction reduces age-related as well as overall-mortality, reduces oxidative stress and influences DNA repair ability positively. There are numerous studies underlining this, but fewer studies involving humans exist. To contribute to a better understanding of the correlation of calorie reduction and DNA repair in humans, we adapted the host cell reactivation assay to an application with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, we used this reliable and reproducible assay to research the influence of a special kind of calorie reduction, namely F. X. Mayr therapy, on DNA repair capacity. We found a positive effect in all persons with low pre-existing DNA repair capacity. In individuals with normal pre-existing DNA repair capacity, no effect on DNA repair capacity was detectable. Decline of DNA repair, accumulation of oxidative DNA damages, mitochondrial dysfunction, telomere shortening as well as caloric intake are widely thought to contribute to aging. With regard to that, our results can be considered as a strong indication that calorie reduction may support DNA repair processes and thus contribute to a healthier aging.

  14. The Impact of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway on DNA Repair Mechanisms in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Erhong; Hanna, Ann; Samant, Rajeev S.; Shevde, Lalita A.

    2015-01-01

    Defined cellular mechanisms have evolved that recognize and repair DNA to protect the integrity of its structure and sequence when encountering assaults from endogenous and exogenous sources. There are five major DNA repair pathways: mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, direct repair, base excision repair and DNA double strand break repair (including non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination repair). Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is a feature of many cancer types. The Hh pathway has been documented to be indispensable for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion and metastasis, cancer stemness, and chemoresistance. The functional transcription activators of the Hh pathway include the GLI proteins. Inhibition of the activity of GLI can interfere with almost all DNA repair types in human cancer, indicating that Hh/GLI functions may play an important role in enabling tumor cells to survive lethal types of DNA damage induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Thus, Hh signaling presents an important therapeutic target to overcome DNA repair-enabled multi-drug resistance and consequently increase chemotherapeutic response in the treatment of cancer. PMID:26197339

  15. Chromatin remodelling complex RSC promotes base excision repair in chromatin of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Wioletta; Mao, Peng; Smerdon, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway is a conserved DNA repair system required to maintain genomic integrity and prevent mutagenesis in all eukaryotic cells. Nevertheless, how BER operates in vivo (i.e. in the context of chromatin) is poorly understood. We have investigated the role of an essential ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling (ACR) complex RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) in BER of intact yeast cells. We show that depletion of STH1, the ATPase subunit of RSC, causes enhanced sensitivity to the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and results in a substantial inhibition of BER, at the GAL1 locus and in the genome overall. Consistent with this observation, the DNA in chromatin is less accessible to micrococcal nuclease digestion in the absence of RSC. Quantitative PCR results indicate that repair deficiency in STH1 depleted cells is not due to changes in the expression of BER genes. Collectively, our data indicates the RSC complex promotes efficient BER in chromatin. These results provide, for the first time, a link between ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling and BER in living cells.

  16. Prereplicative repair of oxidized bases in the human genome is mediated by NEIL1 DNA glycosylase together with replication proteins.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Muralidhar L; Hegde, Pavana M; Bellot, Larry J; Mandal, Santi M; Hazra, Tapas K; Li, Guo-Min; Boldogh, Istvan; Tomkinson, Alan E; Mitra, Sankar

    2013-08-13

    Base oxidation by endogenous and environmentally induced reactive oxygen species preferentially occurs in replicating single-stranded templates in mammalian genomes, warranting prereplicative repair of the mutagenic base lesions. It is not clear how such lesions (which, unlike bulky adducts, do not block replication) are recognized for repair. Furthermore, strand breaks caused by base excision from ssDNA by DNA glycosylases, including Nei-like (NEIL) 1, would generate double-strand breaks during replication, which are not experimentally observed. NEIL1, whose deficiency causes a mutator phenotype and is activated during the S phase, is present in the DNA replication complex isolated from human cells, with enhanced association with DNA in S-phase cells and colocalization with replication foci containing DNA replication proteins. Furthermore, NEIL1 binds to 5-hydroxyuracil, the oxidative deamination product of C, in replication protein A-coated ssDNA template and inhibits DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase δ. We postulate that, upon encountering an oxidized base during replication, NEIL1 initiates prereplicative repair by acting as a "cowcatcher" and preventing nascent chain growth. Regression of the stalled replication fork, possibly mediated by annealing helicases, then allows lesion repair in the reannealed duplex. This model is supported by our observations that NEIL1, whose deficiency slows nascent chain growth in oxidatively stressed cells, is stimulated by replication proteins in vitro. Furthermore, deficiency of the closely related NEIL2 alone does not affect chain elongation, but combined NEIL1/2 deficiency further inhibits DNA replication. These results support a mechanism of NEIL1-mediated prereplicative repair of oxidized bases in the replicating strand, with NEIL2 providing a backup function.

  17. Encounter and extrusion of an intrahelical lesion by a DNA repair enzyme.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yan; Spong, Marie C; Nam, Kwangho; Banerjee, Anirban; Jiralerspong, Sao; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L

    2009-12-10

    How living systems detect the presence of genotoxic damage embedded in a million-fold excess of undamaged DNA is an unresolved question in biology. Here we have captured and structurally elucidated a base-excision DNA repair enzyme, MutM, at the stage of initial encounter with a damaged nucleobase, 8-oxoguanine (oxoG), nested within a DNA duplex. Three structures of intrahelical oxoG-encounter complexes are compared with sequence-matched structures containing a normal G base in place of an oxoG lesion. Although the protein-DNA interfaces in the matched complexes differ by only two atoms-those that distinguish oxoG from G-their pronounced structural differences indicate that MutM can detect a lesion in DNA even at the earliest stages of encounter. All-atom computer simulations show the pathway by which encounter of the enzyme with the lesion causes extrusion from the DNA duplex, and they elucidate the critical free energy difference between oxoG and G along the extrusion pathway. PMID:20010681

  18. Roles of DNA adenine methylation in host-pathogen interactions: mismatch repair, transcriptional regulation, and more

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, Martin G.; Casadesus, Josep

    2010-01-01

    The Dam methylase of gamma-proteobacteria and the CcrM methylase of alpha-proteobacteria catalyze an identical reaction (methylation of adenosine moieties using S-adenosyl-methionine as methyl donor) at similar DNA targets (GATC and GANTC, respectively). Dam and CcrM are of independent evolutionary origin. Each may have evolved from an ancestral restriction-modification system that lost its restriction component, leaving an “orphan” methylase devoted solely to epigenetic genome modification. Formation of 6-methyladenine lowers the thermodynamic stability of DNA and changes DNA curvature. As a consequence, the methylation state of specific adenosine moieties can affect DNA-protein interactions. Well known examples include binding of the replication initiation complex to the methylated oriC, recognition of hemimethylated GATCs in newly replicated DNA by the MutHLS mismatch repair complex, and discrimination of methylation states in promoters and regulatory DNA motifs by RNA polymerase and transcription factors. In recent years, Dam and CcrM have been shown to play roles in host-pathogen interactions. These roles are diverse and only partially understood. Especially intriguing is the evidence that Dam methylation regulates virulence genes in E. coli, Salmonella, and Yersinia at the postranscriptional level. PMID:19175412

  19. Longevity and resistance to stress correlate with DNA repair capacity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Moonjung; Lee, Jihyun; Lee, Kyungjin; May, Alfred; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Ahn, Byungchan

    2008-03-01

    DNA repair is an important mechanism by which cells maintain genomic integrity. Decline in DNA repair capacity or defects in repair factors are thought to contribute to premature aging in mammals. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a good model for studying longevity and DNA repair because of key advances in understanding the genetics of aging in this organism. Long-lived C. elegans mutants have been identified and shown to be resistant to oxidizing agents and UV irradiation, suggesting a genetically determined correlation between DNA repair capacity and life span. In this report, gene-specific DNA repair is compared in wild-type C. elegans and stress-resistant C. elegans mutants for the first time. DNA repair capacity is higher in long-lived C. elegans mutants than in wild-type animals. In addition, RNAi knockdown of the nucleotide excision repair gene xpa-1 increased sensitivity to UV and reduced the life span of long-lived C. elegans mutants. These findings support that DNA repair capacity correlates with longevity in C. elegans.

  20. Disruption of PARP1 function inhibits base excision repair of a sub-set of DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Pamela; Cooper, Sarah; Lomax, Martine; O'Neill, Peter

    2015-04-30

    The repair of endogenously induced DNA damage is essential to maintain genomic integrity. It has been shown that XRCC1 and PARP1 are involved in the repair of base lesions and SSBs, although the exact mode of action has yet to be determined. Here we show that XRCC1 is involved in the repair of base lesions and SSBs independent of the cell cycle. However, the rate of repair of damage requiring XRCC1 does reflect the damage complexity. The repair of induced DNA damage occurs by PARP1-dependent and PARP1-independent sub-pathways of BER. It is suggested that the repair of SSBs and purine base damage is by a sub-pathway of BER that requires both XRCC1 and PARP1. Repair of pyrimidine base damage may require XRCC1 but does not require PARP1 activity. Therefore, although BER of simple lesions occurs rapidly, pathway choice and the involvement of PARP1 are highly dependent on the types of lesion induced.

  1. Application of a molecular biology concept for the detection of DNA damage and repair during UV disinfection.

    PubMed

    Süss, Jacqueline; Volz, Sabrina; Obst, Ursula; Schwartz, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    As nucleic acids are major targets in bacteria during standardised UV disinfection (254 nm), inactivation rates also depend on bacterial DNA repair. Due to UV-related DNA modifications, PCR-based approaches allow for a direct detection of DNA damage and repair during UV disinfection. By applying different primer sets, the correlation between amplicon length and PCR amplification became obvious. The longer the targeted DNA fragment was, the more UV-induced DNA lesions inhibited the PCR. Regeneration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecium, and complex wastewater communities was recorded over a time period of 66 h. While phases of intensive repair and proliferation were found for P. aeruginosa, no DNA repair was detected by qPCR in E. faecium. Cultivation experiments verified these results. Despite high UV mediated inactivation rates original wastewater bacteria seem to express an enhanced robustness against irradiation. Regeneration of dominant and proliferation of low-abundant, probably UV-resistant species contributed to a strong post-irradiation recovery accompanied by a selection for beta-Proteobacteria.

  2. Distinct kinetics of human DNA ligases I, IIIalpha, IIIbeta, and IV reveal direct DNA sensing ability and differential physiological functions in DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi; Ballin, Jeff D.; Della-Maria, Julie; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; White, Elizabeth J.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2009-05-11

    The three human LIG genes encode polypeptides that catalyze phosphodiester bond formation during DNA replication, recombination and repair. While numerous studies have identified protein partners of the human DNA ligases (hLigs), there has been little characterization of the catalytic properties of these enzymes. In this study, we developed and optimized a fluorescence-based DNA ligation assay to characterize the activities of purified hLigs. Although hLigI joins DNA nicks, it has no detectable activity on linear duplex DNA substrates with short, cohesive single-strand ends. By contrast, hLigIII{beta} and the hLigIII{alpha}/XRCC1 and hLigIV/XRCC4 complexes are active on both nicked and linear duplex DNA substrates. Surprisingly, hLigIV/XRCC4, which is a key component of the major non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway, is significantly less active than hLigIII on a linear duplex DNA substrate. Notably, hLigIV/XRCC4 molecules only catalyze a single ligation event in the absence or presence of ATP. The failure to catalyze subsequent ligation events reflects a defect in the enzyme-adenylation step of the next ligation reaction and suggests that, unless there is an in vivo mechanism to reactivate DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 following phosphodiester bond formation, the cellular NHEJ capacity will be determined by the number of adenylated DNA ligaseIV/XRCC4 molecules.

  3. How SUMOylation Fine-Tunes the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Kate E; Huang, Tony T

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare human genetic disorder characterized by developmental defects, bone marrow failure and cancer predisposition, primarily due to a deficiency in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). ICL repair through the FA DNA repair pathway is a complicated multi-step process, involving at least 19 FANC proteins and coordination of multiple DNA repair activities, including homologous recombination, nucleotide excision repair and translesion synthesis (TLS). SUMOylation is a critical regulator of several DNA repair pathways, however, the role of this modification in controlling the FA pathway is poorly understood. Here, we summarize recent advances in the fine-tuning of the FA pathway by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) and other SUMO-related interactions, and discuss the implications of these findings in the design of novel therapeutics for alleviating FA-associated condition, including cancer. PMID:27148358

  4. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Karen L; Dashner, Erica J; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye; Hudson, Laurie G

    2016-01-15

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; <10 μM) is not cytotoxic to human embryonic kidney cells or normal human keratinocytes; however, uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations.

  5. Chromosomal Aberrations in DNA Repair Defective Cell Lines: Comparisons of Dose Rate and Radiation Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K. A.; Hada, M.; Patel, Z.; Huff, J.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome aberration yields were assessed in DNA double-strand break repair (DSB) deficient cells after acute doses of gamma-rays or high-LET iron nuclei, or low dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma-rays. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post-irradiation and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma radiation induced higher yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both chromosome exchange types were significantly higher for the ATM and NBS defective lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges in the NBS cells. Large increases in the quadratic dose response terms indicate the important roles of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. Differences in the response of AT and NBS deficient cells at lower doses suggests important questions about the applicability of observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low dose exposures. For all iron nuclei irradiated cells, regression models preferred purely linear and quadratic dose responses for simple and complex exchanges, respectively. All the DNA repair defective cell lines had lower Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values than normal cells, the lowest being for the DNA-PK-deficient cells, which was near unity. To further

  6. Comparison of phosphorylation kinetics in DNA repair proteins after exposure to high and low LET radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, R.; Okabe, A.; Takakura, K.

    We irradiated plateau phase normal human fibroblasts with 2 Gy X-rays 70 keV um carbon 290MeV n and 200 keV um iron ions 500 MeV n and observed the kinetics of phosphorylation in various proteins associated with DNA double strand break DSB repair GammaH2AX foci a marker for DSBs were detected immediately after irradiation and the peak of phosphorylation was seen 30 to 60 min post-irradiation for three kinds of radiations Disappearance of gamma-H2AX foci was much faster for X-irradiated samples than that for heavy ion irradiated samples the phosphorylation kinetics for carbon and iron ions are similar for gamma-H2AX foci In contrast phosphorylation of an NHEJ protein DNA-PKcs threonine 2609 was significantly delayed in carbon and iron irradiated cells when compared to X-irradiated cells Disappearance of DNA-PKcs sites was much faster in X-irradiated samples than carbon and iron samples which showed a similar pattern as in the case of gamma-H2AX Furthermore in the case of ATM protein phosphorylation serine 1981 iron irradiation alone caused a significant initial delay but the kinetics of disappearance is similar for iron and carbon samples with much higher remaining number of foci in iron samples than those for X-rays and carbon ions These results suggest that 1 high LET irradiation induces complex and or severe DNA DSB damage which affects the function of DSB repair proteins 2 Both ATM and DNA-PKcs may recognize the complexity of DSBs but ATM may be more sensitive to detecting the complexity of DSB damage 3 gamma-H2AX may

  7. Reconstitution of initial steps of dsDNA break repair by the RecF pathway of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Handa, Naofumi; Morimatsu, Katsumi; Lovett, Susan T; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2009-05-15

    The RecF pathway of Escherichia coli is important for recombinational repair of DNA breaks and gaps. Here ;we reconstitute in vitro a seven-protein reaction that recapitulates early steps of dsDNA break repair using purified RecA, RecF, RecO, RecR, RecQ, RecJ, and SSB proteins, components of the RecF system. Their combined action results in processing of linear dsDNA and its homologous pairing with supercoiled DNA. RecA, RecO, RecR, and RecJ are essential for joint molecule formation, whereas SSB and RecF are stimulatory. This reconstituted system reveals an unexpected essential function for RecJ exonuclease: the capability to resect duplex DNA. RecQ helicase stimulates this processing, but also disrupts joint molecules. RecO and RecR have two indispensable functions: They mediate exchange of RecA for SSB to form the RecA nucleoprotein filament, and act with RecF to load RecA onto the SSB-ssDNA complex at processed ssDNA-dsDNA junctions. The RecF pathway has many parallels with recombinational repair in eukaryotes. PMID:19451222

  8. Targeting the DNA Repair Pathway in Ewing Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Elizabeth; Goshorn, Ross; Bradley, Cori; Griffiths, Lyra M.; Benavente, Claudia; Twarog, Nathaniel R.; Miller, Gregory M.; Caufield, William; Freeman, Burgess B.; Bahrami, Armita; Pappo, Alberto; Wu, Jianrong; Loh, Amos; Karlström, Åsa; Calabrese, Chris; Gordon, Brittney; Tsurkan, Lyudmila; Hatfield, M. Jason; Potter, Philip M.; Snyder, Scott; Thiagarajan, Suresh; Shirinifard, Abbas; Sablauer, Andras; Shelat, Anang A.; Dyer, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma (EWS) is a tumor of the bone and soft-tissue that primarily affects adolescents and young adults. With current therapies, 70% of patients with localized disease survive, but patients with metastatic or recurrent disease have a poor outcome. We found that EWS cell lines are defective in DNA break repair and are sensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPis). PARPi-induced cytotoxicity in EWS cells was 10- to 1,000-fold higher after administration of the DNA-damaging agents irinotecan or temozolomide. We developed an orthotopic EWS mouse model and performed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies using 3 different PARPis that are in clinical development for pediatric cancer. Irinotecan administered on a low-dose, protracted schedule previously optimized for pediatric patients was an effective DNA-damaging agent when combined with PARPis; it was also better tolerated than combinations with temozolomide. Combining PARPis with irinotecan and temozolomide gave complete and durable responses in more than 80% of the mice. PMID:25437539

  9. Emerging models for DNA repair: Dictyostelium discoideum as a model for nonhomologous end-joining.

    PubMed

    Pears, Catherine J; Lakin, Nicholas D

    2014-05-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are a particularly cytotoxic variety of DNA lesion that can be repaired by homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). HR utilises sequences homologous to the damage DNA template to facilitate repair. In contrast, NHEJ does not require homologous sequences for repair but instead functions by directly re-joining DNA ends. These pathways are critical to resolve DSBs generated intentionally during processes such as meiotic and site-specific recombination. However, they are also utilised to resolve potentially pathological DSBs generated by mutagens and errors during DNA replication. The importance of DSB repair is underscored by the findings that defects in these pathways results in chromosome instability that contributes to a variety of disease states including malignancy. The general principles of NHEJ are conserved in eukaryotes. As such, relatively simple model organisms have been instrumental in identifying components of these pathways and providing a mechanistic understanding of repair that has subsequently been applied to vertebrates. However, certain components of the NHEJ pathway are absent or show limited conservation in the most commonly used invertebrate models exploited to study DNA repair. Recently, however, it has become apparent that vertebrate DNA repair pathway components, including those involved in NHEJ, are unusually conserved in the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Traditionally, this genetically tractable organism has been exploited to study the molecular basis of cell type specification, cell motility and chemotaxis. Here we discuss the use of this organism as an additional model to study DNA repair, with specific reference to NHEJ.

  10. Lifespan and Stress Resistance in Drosophila with Overexpressed DNA Repair Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Proshkina, Ekaterina; Shilova, Lyubov; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair declines with age and correlates with longevity in many animal species. In this study, we investigated the effects of GAL4-induced overexpression of genes implicated in DNA repair on lifespan and resistance to stress factors in Drosophila melanogaster. Stress factors included hyperthermia, oxidative stress, and starvation. Overexpression was either constitutive or conditional and either ubiquitous or tissue-specific (nervous system). Overexpressed genes included those involved in recognition of DNA damage (homologs of HUS1, CHK2), nucleotide and base excision repair (homologs of XPF, XPC and AP-endonuclease-1), and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (homologs of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80 and WRNexo). The overexpression of different DNA repair genes led to both positive and negative effects on lifespan and stress resistance. Effects were dependent on GAL4 driver, stage of induction, sex, and role of the gene in the DNA repair process. While the constitutive/neuron-specific and conditional/ubiquitous overexpression of DNA repair genes negatively impacted lifespan and stress resistance, the constitutive/ubiquitous and conditional/neuron-specific overexpression of Hus1, mnk, mei-9, mus210, and WRNexo had beneficial effects. This study demonstrates for the first time the effects of overexpression of these DNA repair genes on both lifespan and stress resistance in D. melanogaster. PMID:26477511

  11. Lifespan and Stress Resistance in Drosophila with Overexpressed DNA Repair Genes.

    PubMed

    Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Proshkina, Ekaterina; Shilova, Lyubov; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair declines with age and correlates with longevity in many animal species. In this study, we investigated the effects of GAL4-induced overexpression of genes implicated in DNA repair on lifespan and resistance to stress factors in Drosophila melanogaster. Stress factors included hyperthermia, oxidative stress, and starvation. Overexpression was either constitutive or conditional and either ubiquitous or tissue-specific (nervous system). Overexpressed genes included those involved in recognition of DNA damage (homologs of HUS1, CHK2), nucleotide and base excision repair (homologs of XPF, XPC and AP-endonuclease-1), and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (homologs of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80 and WRNexo). The overexpression of different DNA repair genes led to both positive and negative effects on lifespan and stress resistance. Effects were dependent on GAL4 driver, stage of induction, sex, and role of the gene in the DNA repair process. While the constitutive/neuron-specific and conditional/ubiquitous overexpression of DNA repair genes negatively impacted lifespan and stress resistance, the constitutive/ubiquitous and conditional/neuron-specific overexpression of Hus1, mnk, mei-9, mus210, and WRNexo had beneficial effects. This study demonstrates for the first time the effects of overexpression of these DNA repair genes on both lifespan and stress resistance in D. melanogaster. PMID:26477511

  12. Low-fidelity compensatory backup alternative DNA repair pathways may unify current carcinogenesis theories.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiaxi; Starr, Shane

    2014-05-01

    The somatic mutation carcinogenesis theory has dominated for decades. The alternative theory, tissue organization field theory, argues that the development of cancer is determined by the surrounding microenvironment. However, neither theory can explain all features of cancer. As cancers share the features of uncontrolled proliferation and genomic instability, they are likely to have the same pathogenesis. It has been found that various DNA repair pathways within a cell crosstalk with one another, forming a DNA repair network. When one DNA repair pathways is defective, the others may work as compensatory backups. The latter pathways are explored for synthetic lethal anticancer therapy. In this article, we extend the concept of compensatory alternative DNA repair to unify the theories. We propose that the microenvironmental stress can activate low-fidelity compensatory alternative DNA repair, causing mutations. If the mutation occurs to a DNA repair gene, this secondarily mutated gene can lead to even more mutated genes, including those related to other DNA repair pathways, eventually destabilizing the genome. Therefore, the low-fidelity compensatory alternative DNA repair may mediate microenvironment-dependent carcinogenesis. The proposal seems consistent with the view of evolution: the environmental stress causes mutations to adapt to the changing environment.

  13. Role of the yeast DNA repair protein Nej1 in end processing during the repair of DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Trujillo, Kelly M.; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Osley, Mary Ann; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB)s often require end processing prior to joining during their repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although the yeast proteins, Pol4, a Pol X family DNA polymerase, and Rad27, a nuclease, participate in the end processing reactions of NHEJ, the mechanisms underlying the recruitment of these factors to DSBs are not known. Here we demonstrate that Nej1, a NHEJ factor that interacts with and modulates the activity of the NHEJ DNA ligase complex (Dnl4/Lif1), physically and functionally interacts with both Pol4 and Rad27. Notably, Nej1 and Dnl4/Lif1, which also interacts with both Pol4 and Rad27, independently recruit the end processing factors to in vivo DSBs via mechanisms that are additive rather than redundant. As was observed with Dnl4/Lif1, the activities of both Pol4 and Rad27 were enhanced by the interaction with Nej1. Furthermore, Nej1 increased the joining of incompatible DNA ends in reconstituted reactions containing Pol4, Rad27 and Dnl4/Lif1, indicating that the stimulatory activities of Nej1 and Dnl4/Lif1 are also additive. Together our results reveal novel roles for Nej1 in the recruitment of Pol4 and Rad27 to in vivo DSBs and the coordination of the end processing and ligation reactions of NHEJ. PMID:25942368

  14. DNA Damage Response Factors from Diverse Pathways, Including DNA Crosslink Repair, Mediate Alternative End Joining

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Sean M.; Yanez, Diana A.; Stark, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative end joining (Alt-EJ) chromosomal break repair involves bypassing classical non-homologous end joining (c-NHEJ), and such repair causes mutations often with microhomology at the repair junction. Since the mediators of Alt-EJ are not well understood, we have sought to identify DNA damage response (DDR) factors important for this repair event. Using chromosomal break reporter assays, we surveyed an RNAi library targeting known DDR factors for siRNAs that cause a specific decrease in Alt-EJ, relative to an EJ event that is a composite of Alt-EJ and c-NHEJ (Distal-EJ between two tandem breaks). From this analysis, we identified several DDR factors that are specifically important for Alt-EJ relative to Distal-EJ. While these factors are from diverse pathways, we also found that most of them also promote homologous recombination (HR), including factors important for DNA crosslink repair, such as the Fanconi Anemia factor, FANCA. Since bypass of c-NHEJ is likely important for both Alt-EJ and HR, we disrupted the c-NHEJ factor Ku70 in Fanca-deficient mouse cells and found that Ku70 loss significantly diminishes the influence of Fanca on Alt-EJ. In contrast, an inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) causes a decrease in Alt-EJ that is enhanced by Ku70 loss. Additionally, the helicase/nuclease DNA2 appears to have distinct effects from FANCA and PARP on both Alt-EJ, as well as end resection. Finally, we found that the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib, a cancer therapeutic that has been shown to disrupt FANC signaling, causes a significant reduction in both Alt-EJ and HR, relative to Distal-EJ, as well as a substantial loss of end resection. We suggest that several distinct DDR functions are important for Alt-EJ, which include promoting bypass of c-NHEJ and end resection. PMID:25629353

  15. DNA-Damage Foci to Detect and Characterize DNA Repair Alterations in Children Treated for Pediatric Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Mareike; Betten, Dominik; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Rübe, Christian; Graf, Norbert; Rübe, Claudia E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In children diagnosed with cancer, we evaluated the DNA damage foci approach to identify patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging radio- and chemotherapy. In one patient with Fanconi anemia (FA) suffering relapsing squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity we also characterized the repair defect in biopsies of skin, mucosa and tumor. Methods and Materials In children with histologically confirmed tumors or leukemias and healthy control-children DSB repair was investigated by counting γH2AX-, 53BP1- and pATM-foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after ex-vivo irradiation. This DSB repair capacity was correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses. For the FA patient the defective repair was also characterized in tissue biopsies by analyzing DNA damage response proteins by light and electron microscopy. Results Between tumor-children and healthy control-children we observed significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DNA repair. Only 1 out of 4 patients with grade-4 normal-tissue toxicities revealed an impaired DSB repair capacity. The defective DNA repair in FA patient was verified in irradiated blood lymphocytes as well as in non-irradiated mucosa and skin biopsies leading to an excessive accumulation of heterochromatin-associated DSBs in rapidly cycling cells. Conclusions Analyzing human tissues we show that DSB repair alterations predispose to cancer formation at younger ages and affect the susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. DNA damage foci analysis of blood and tissue samples allows one to detect and characterize DSB repair deficiencies and enables identification of patients at risk for high-grade toxicities. However, not all treatment-associated normal-tissue toxicities can be explained by DSB repair deficiencies. PMID:24637877

  16. Role for Artemis nuclease in the repair of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks by alternative end joining.

    PubMed

    Moscariello, Mario; Wieloch, Radi; Kurosawa, Aya; Li, Fanghua; Adachi, Noritaka; Mladenov, Emil; Iliakis, George

    2015-07-01

    Exposure of cells to ionizing radiation or radiomimetic drugs generates DNA double-strand breaks that are processed either by homologous recombination repair (HRR), or by canonical, DNA-PKcs-dependent non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ). Chemical or genetic inactivation of factors involved in C-NHEJ or HRR, but also their local failure in repair proficient cells, promotes an alternative, error-prone end-joining pathway that serves as backup (A-EJ). There is evidence for the involvement of Artemis endonuclease, a protein deficient in a human radiosensitivity syndrome associated with severe immunodeficiency (RS-SCID), in the processing of subsets of DSBs by HRR or C-NHEJ. It is thought that within HRR or C-NHEJ Artemis processes DNA termini at complex DSBs. Whether Artemis has a role in A-EJ remains unknown. Here, we analyze using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and specialized reporter assays, DSB repair in wild-type pre-B NALM-6 lymphocytes, as well as in their Artemis(-/-), DNA ligase 4(-/-) (LIG4(-/-)), and LIG4(-/-)/Artemis(-/-) double mutant counterparts, under conditions allowing evaluation of A-EJ. Our results substantiate the suggested roles of Artemis in C-NHEJ and HRR, but also demonstrate a role for the protein in A-EJ that is confirmed in Artemis deficient normal human fibroblasts. We conclude that Artemis is a nuclease participating in DSB repair by all major repair pathways.

  17. Xeroderma pigmentosum and related disorders: defects in DNA repair and transcription.

    PubMed

    Berneburg, M; Lehmann, A R

    2001-01-01

    The genetic disorders xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD) are all associated with defects in nucleotide excision repair (NER) of DNA damage. Their clinical features are very different, however, XP being a highly cancer-prone skin disorder, whereas CS and TTD are cancer-free multisystem disorders. All three are genetically complex, with at least eight complementation groups for XP (XP-A to -G and variant), five for CS (CS-A, CS-B, XP-B, XP-D, and XP-G), and three for TTD (XP-B, XP-D, and TTD-A). With the exception of the variant, the products of the XP genes are proteins involved in the different steps of NER, and comprise three damage-recognition proteins, two helicases, and two nucleases. The two helicases, XPB and XPD, are components of the basal transcription factor TFIIH, which has a dual role in NER and initiation of transcription. Different mutations in these genes can affect NER and transcription differentially, and this accounts for the different clinical phenotypes. Mutations resulting in defective repair without affecting transcription result in XP, whereas if transcription is also affected, TTD is the outcome. CS proteins are only involved in transcription-coupled repair, a subpathway of NER in which damage in the transcribed strands of active genes is rapidly and preferentially repaired. Current evidence suggests that they also have an important but not essential role in transcription. The variant form of XP is defective in a novel DNA polymerase, which is able to synthesise DNA past UV-damaged sites. PMID:11037299

  18. A genetic screen identifies FAN1, a Fanconi anemia associated nuclease necessary for DNA interstrand crosslink repair

    PubMed Central

    Smogorzewska, Agata; Desetty, Rohini; Saito, Takamune T.; Schlabach, Michael; Lach, Francis P.; Sowa, Mathew E.; Clark, Alan B.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Harper, J. Wade; Colaiácovo, Monica P.; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway is responsible for interstrand crosslink repair. At the heart of this pathway is the FANCI-FAND2 (ID) complex, which, upon ubiquitination by the FA core complex, travels to sites of damage to coordinate repair that includes nucleolytic modification of the DNA surrounding the lesion and translesion synthesis. How the ID complex regulates these events is unknown. Here we describe a shRNA screen that led to the identification of two nucleases necessary for crosslink repair, FAN1 and EXDL2. FAN1 co-localizes at sites of DNA damage with the ID complex in a manner dependent on FAN1’s ubiquitin binding domain (UBZ), the ID complex, and monoubiquitination of FANCD2. FAN1 possesses intrinsic 5′-3′ exonuclease activity and endonuclease activity that cleaves nicked and branched structures. We propose that FAN1 is a repair nuclease that is recruited to sites of crosslink damage in part through binding the ubiquitinated ID complex through its UBZ domain. PMID:20603073

  19. A matter of life or death: modeling DNA damage and repair in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Karschau, Jens; de Almeida, Camila; Richard, Morgiane C; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian R; Grebogi, Celso; de Moura, Alessandro P S

    2011-02-16

    DNA damage is a hazard all cells must face, and evolution has created a number of mechanisms to repair damaged bases in the chromosome. Paradoxically, many of these repair mechanisms can create double-strand breaks in the DNA molecule which are fatal to the cell. This indicates that the connection between DNA repair and death is far from straightforward, and suggests that the repair mechanisms can be a double-edged sword. In this report, we formulate a mathematical model of the dynamics of DNA damage and repair, and we obtain analytical expressions for the death rate. We predict a counterintuitive relationship between survival and repair. We can discriminate between two phases: below a critical threshold in the number of repair enzymes, the half-life decreases with the number of repair enzymes, but becomes independent of the number of repair enzymes above the threshold. We are able to predict quantitatively the dependence of the death rate on the damage rate and other relevant parameters. We verify our analytical results by simulating the stochastic dynamics of DNA damage and repair. Finally, we also perform an experiment with Escherichia coli cells to test one of the predictions of our model. PMID:21320424

  20. The HhH domain of the human DNA repair protein XPF forms stable homodimers.

    PubMed

    Das, Devashish; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2008-03-01

    The human XPF-ERCC1 protein complex plays an essential role in nucleotide excision repair by catalysing positioned nicking of a DNA strand at the 5' side of the damage. We have recently solved the structure of the heterodimeric complex of the C-terminal domains of XPF and ERCC1 (Tripsianes et al., Structure 2005;13:1849-1858). We found that this complex comprises a pseudo twofold symmetry axis and that the helix-hairpin-helix motif of ERCC1 is required for DNA binding, whereas the corresponding domain of XPF is functioning as a scaffold for complex formation with ERCC1. Despite the functional importance of heterodimerization, the C-terminal domain of XPF can also form homodimers in vitro. We here compare the stabilities of homodimeric and heterodimeric complexes of the C-terminal domains of XPF and ERCC1. The higher stability of the XPF HhH complexes under various experimental conditions, determined using CD and NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, is well explained by the structural differences that exist between the HhH domains of the two complexes. The XPF HhH homodimer has a larger interaction interface, aromatic stacking interactions, and additional hydrogen bond contacts as compared to the XPF/ERCC1 HhH complex, which accounts for its higher stability. PMID:17912758

  1. UV-inducible DNA repair in the cyanobacteria Anabaena spp

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Thiel, T.

    1987-09-01

    Strains of the filamentous cyanobacteria Anabaena spp. were capable of very efficient photoreactivation of UV irradiation-induced damage to DNA. Cells were resistant to several hundred joules of UV irradiation per square meter under conditions that allowed photoreactivation, and they also photoreactivated UV-damaged cyanophage efficiently. Reactivation of UV-irradiated cyanophage (Weigle reactivation) also occurred; UV irradiation of host cells greatly enhanced the plaque-forming ability of irradiated phage under nonphotoreactivating conditions. Postirradiation incubation of the host cells under conditions that allowed photoreactivation abolished the ability of the cells to perform Weigle reactivation of cyanophage N-1. Mitomycin C also induced Weigle reactivation of cyanophage N-1, but nalidixic acid did not. The inducible repair system (defined as the ability to perform Weigle reactivation of cyanophages) was relatively slow and inefficient compared with photoreactivation.

  2. DNA mismatch repair gene mutations in human cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Peltomäki, P

    1997-01-01

    A new pathogenetic mechanism leading to cancer has been delineated in the past 3 years when human homologues of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes have been identified and shown to be involved in various types of cancer. Germline mutations of MMR genes cause susceptibility to a hereditary form of colon cancer, hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC), which represents one of the most common syndromes associated with cancer predisposition in man. Tumors from HNPCC patients are hypermutable and show length variation at short tandem repeat sequences, a phenomenon referred to as microsatellite instability or replication errors. A similar abnormality is found in a proportion of sporadic tumors of the colorectum as well as a variety of other organs; acquired mutations in MMR genes or other endogenous or exogenous causes may underlie these cases. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the functions of normal and mutated MMR genes elucidates mechanisms of cancer development and provides tools for diagnostic applications. PMID:9255561

  3. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Katarzyna A.; Synowiec, Ewelina; Sobierajczyk, Katarzyna; Izdebska, Justyna; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER). Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1) nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease. PMID:25356504

  4. The impact of base excision DNA repair in age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Giovana S; Sykora, Peter; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-06-01

    The aging process and several age-related neurodegenerative disorders have been linked to elevated levels of DNA damage induced by ROS and deficiency in DNA repair mechanisms. DNA damage induced by ROS is a byproduct of cellular respiration and accumulation of damage over time, is a fundamental aspect of a main theory of aging. Mitochondria have a pivotal role in generating cellular oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with several diseases. DNA base excision repair is considered the major pathway for repair of oxidized bases in DNA both in the nuclei and in mitochondria, and in neurons this mechanism is particularly important because non-diving cells have limited back-up DNA repair mechanisms. An association between elevated oxidative stress and a decrease in BER is strongly related to the aging process and has special relevance in age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review the role of DNA repair in aging, focusing on the implications of the DNA base excision repair pathways and how alterations in expression of these DNA repair proteins are related to the aging process and to age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. PARP-1 and Ku compete for repair of DNA double strand breaks by distinct NHEJ pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minli; Wu, Weizhong; Wu, Wenqi; Rosidi, Bustanur; Zhang, Lihua; Wang, Huichen; Iliakis, George

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP-1) recognizes DNA strand interruptions in vivo and triggers its own modification as well as that of other proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose to form polymers. This modification causes a release of PARP-1 from DNA ends and initiates a variety of responses including DNA repair. While PARP-1 has been firmly implicated in base excision and single strand break repair, its role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) remains unclear. Here, we show that PARP-1, probably together with DNA ligase III, operates in an alternative pathway of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) that functions as backup to the classical pathway of NHEJ that utilizes DNA-PKcs, Ku, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4, XLF/Cernunnos and Artemis. PARP-1 binds to DNA ends in direct competition with Ku. However, in irradiated cells the higher affinity of Ku for DSBs and an excessive number of other forms of competing DNA lesions limit its contribution to DSB repair. When essential components of the classical pathway of NHEJ are absent, PARP-1 is recruited for DSB repair, particularly in the absence of Ku and non-DSB lesions. This form of DSB repair is sensitive to PARP-1 inhibitors. The results define the function of PARP-1 in DSB repair and characterize a candidate pathway responsible for joining errors causing genomic instability and cancer. PMID:17088286

  6. The effects of 1-nitropyrene on oxidative DNA damage and expression of DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Dae; Ko, Young-Jun; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Kim, Heon

    2005-05-01

    Nitropyrenes (NPs) present in diesel and gasoline emissions are mutagenic and carcinogenic in experimental animals. Nitro-reduction of 1-NP causes oxidative stress. It is unclear whether 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) is produced from 1-NP and whether it contributes to the carcinogenic activity of 1-NP. In this study, we measured the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured human lung epithelial cells after exposure to 1-NP and the intracellular level of 8-OH-dG and expression level of the 8-OH-dG repair enzymes. As results, 1-NP induced the generation of 8-OH-dG via ROS, but 8-OH-dG repair enzymes prevented an increase of 8-OH-dG formation in cellular DNA of the A549 cell line below 250 microM of 1-NP. These data suggest that 1-NP can induce oxidative DNA damage by generation of ROS, which may play a role in the carcinogenesis induced by 1-NP. These data also suggest that individuals with impaired DNA repair enzymes might be more susceptible to lung cancer induced by 1-NP. PMID:15953848

  7. Involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA and repair in cancer development and aging

    PubMed Central

    Tudek, Barbara; Winczura, Alicja; Janik, Justyna; Siomek, Agnieszka; Foksinski, Marek; Oliński, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage and DNA repair may mediate several cellular processes, like replication and transcription, mutagenesis and apoptosis and thus may be important factors in the development and pathology of an organism, including cancer. DNA is constantly damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) directly and also by products of lipid peroxidation (LPO), which form exocyclic adducts to DNA bases. A wide variety of oxidatively-generated DNA lesions are present in living cells. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoGua) is one of the best known DNA lesions due to its mutagenic properties. Among LPO-derived DNA base modifications the most intensively studied are ethenoadenine and ethenocytosine, highly miscoding DNA lesions considered as markers of oxidative stress and promutagenic DNA damage. Although at present it is impossible to directly answer the question concerning involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA in cancer etiology, it is likely that oxidatively modified DNA bases may serve as a source of mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and are involved in aging (i.e. they may be causal factors responsible for these processes). To counteract the deleterious effect of oxidatively damaged DNA, all organisms have developed several DNA repair mechanisms. The efficiency of oxidatively damaged DNA repair was frequently found to be decreased in cancer patients. The present work reviews the basis for the biological significance of DNA damage, particularly effects of 8-oxoGua and ethenoadduct occurrence in DNA in the aspect of cancer development, drawing attention to the multiplicity of proteins with repair activities. PMID:20589166

  8. Inhibition of DNA replication and repair by anthralin or danthron in cultured human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.M.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1982-07-01

    The comparative effects of the tumor promoter anthralin and its analog, danthron, on semiconservative DNA replication and DNA repair synthesis were studied in cultured human cells. Bromodeoxyuridine was used as density label together with /sup 3/H-thymidine to distinguish replication from repair synthesis in isopycnic CsCl gradients. Anthralin at 1.1 microgram inhibited replication in T98G cells by 50%. In cells treated with 0.4 or 1.3 microM anthralin and additive effect was observed on the inhibition of replication by ultraviolet light (254 nm). In cells irradiated with 20 J/m2, 2.3 microM anthralin was required to inhibit repair synthesis by 50%. Thus there was no selective inhibitory effect of anthralin on repair synthesis. Danthron exhibited no detectable effect on either semiconservative replication or repair synthesis at concentrations below about 5.0 microM. Neither compound stimulated repair synthesis in the absence of ultraviolet irradiation. Thus, anthralin and danthron do not appear to react with DNA to form adducts that are subject to excision repair. Although both compounds appear to intercalate into supercoiled DNA in vitro to a limited extent, the degree of unwinding introduced by the respective drugs does not correlate with their relative effects on DNA synthesis in vivo. Therefore the inhibitory effect of anthralin on DNA replication and repair synthesis in T98G cells does not appear to result from the direct interaction of the drug with DNA.

  9. DNA Ends Alter the Molecular Composition and Localization of Ku Multicomponent Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Adelmant, Guillaume; Calkins, Anne S.; Garg, Brijesh K.; Card, Joseph D.; Askenazi, Manor; Miron, Alex; Sobhian, Bijan; Zhang, Yi; Nakatani, Yoshihiro; Silver, Pamela A.; Iglehart, J. Dirk; Marto, Jarrod A.; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The Ku heterodimer plays an essential role in non-homologous end-joining and other cellular processes including transcription, telomere maintenance and apoptosis. While the function of Ku is regulated through its association with other proteins and nucleic acids, the specific composition of these macromolecular complexes and their dynamic response to endogenous and exogenous cellular stimuli are not well understood. Here we use quantitative proteomics to define the composition of Ku multicomponent complexes and demonstrate that they are dramatically altered in response to UV radiation. Subsequent biochemical assays revealed that the presence of DNA ends leads to the substitution of RNA-binding proteins with DNA and chromatin associated factors to create a macromolecular complex poised for DNA repair. We observed that dynamic remodeling of the Ku complex coincided with exit of Ku and other DNA repair proteins from the nucleolus. Microinjection of sheared DNA into live cells as a mimetic for double strand breaks confirmed these findings in vivo. PMID:22535209

  10. SMCHD1 accumulates at DNA damage sites and facilitates the repair of DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Coker, Heather; Brockdorff, Neil

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT SMCHD1 is a structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) family protein involved in epigenetic gene silencing and chromosome organisation on the female inactive X chromosome and at a limited number of autosomal loci. Here, we demonstrate that SMCHD1 also has a role in DNA repair of double-strand breaks; SMCHD1 is recruited to sites of laser micro-irradiated damage along with other DNA repair factors, including Ku80 (also known as XRCC5 in mammals) and RAD51. Cells deficient in SMCHD1 show evidence of decreased efficiency of repair and cell viability after DNA damage. We suggest that SMCHD1 responds to DNA double-strand breaks in a manner that is likely to involve its ability to alter chromatin states to facilitate DNA repair. PMID:24790221

  11. TAT-mediated delivery of a DNA repair enzyme to skin cells rapidly initiates repair of UV-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jodi L.; Lowell, Brian C.; Ryabinina, Olga P.; Lloyd, R. Stephen; McCullough, Amanda K.

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light causes DNA damage in skin cells, leading to more than one million cases of non-melanoma skin cancer diagnosed annually in the United States. Although human cells possess a mechanism (Nucleotide Excision Repair, NER) to repair UV-induced DNA damage, mutagenesis still occurs when DNA is replicated prior to repair of these photoproducts. While human cells have all the enzymes necessary to complete an alternate repair pathway, Base Excision Repair (BER), they lack a DNA glycosylase that can initiate BER of dipyrimidine photoproducts. Certain prokaryotes and viruses produce pyrimidine dimer-specific DNA glycosylases (pdgs) that initiate BER of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), the predominant UV-induced lesions. Such a pdg was identified in the Chlorella virus PBCV-1 and termed Cv-pdg. The Cv-pdg protein was engineered to contain a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and a membrane permeabilization peptide (TAT). Here, we demonstrate that the Cv-pdg-NLS-TAT protein was delivered to repair-proficient keratinocytes and fibroblasts, and to a human skin model, where it rapidly initiated removal of CPDs. These data suggest a potential strategy for prevention of human skin cancer. PMID:20927123

  12. The comet assay, DNA damage, DNA repair and cytotoxicity: hedgehogs are not always dead.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Yolanda; Costa, Solange; Collins, Andrew R; Azqueta, Amaya

    2013-07-01

    DNA damage is commonly measured at the level of individual cells using the so-called comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis). As the frequency of DNA breaks increases, so does the fraction of the DNA extending towards the anode, forming the comet tail. Comets with almost all DNA in the tail are often referred to as 'hedgehog' comets and are widely assumed to represent apoptotic cells. We review the literature and present theoretical and empirical arguments against this interpretation. The level of DNA damage in these comets is far less than the massive fragmentation that occurs in apoptosis. 'Hedgehog' comets are formed after moderate exposure of cells to, for example, H2O2, but if the cells are incubated for a short period, 'hedgehogs' are no longer seen. We confirm that this is not because DNA has degraded further and been lost from the gel, but because the DNA is repaired. The comet assay may detect the earliest stages of apoptosis, but as it proceeds, comets disappear in a smear of unattached DNA. It is clear that 'hedgehogs' can correspond to one level on a continuum of genotoxic damage, are not diagnostic of apoptosis and should not be regarded as an indicator of cytotoxicity. PMID:23630247

  13. DNA repair in bacterial cultures and plasmid DNA exposed to infrared laser for treatment of pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Marciano, R. S.; Guimarães, O. R.; Polignano, G. A. C.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2013-06-01

    Biostimulation of tissues by low intensity lasers has been described on a photobiological basis and clinical protocols are recommended for treatment of various diseases, but their effects on DNA are controversial. The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of low intensity infrared laser exposure on survival and bacterial filamentation in Escherichia coli cultures, and induction of DNA lesions in bacterial plasmids. In E. coli cultures and plasmids exposed to an infrared laser at fluences used to treat pain, bacterial survival and filamentation and DNA lesions in plasmids were evaluated by electrophoretic profile. Data indicate that the infrared laser (i) increases survival of E. coli wild type in 24 h of stationary growth phase, (ii) induces bacterial filamentation, (iii) does not alter topological forms of plasmids and (iv) does not alter the electrophoretic profile of plasmids incubated with exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. A low intensity infrared laser at the therapeutic fluences used to treat pain can alter survival of E. coli wild type, induce filamentation in bacterial cells, depending on physiologic conditions and DNA repair, and induce DNA lesions other than single or double DNA strand breaks or alkali-labile sites, which are not targeted by exonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase.

  14. Chromatin Modifications during Repair of Environmental Exposure-Induced DNA Damage: A Potential Mechanism for Stable Epigenetic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    O’Hagan, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    Exposures to environmental toxicants and toxins cause epigenetic changes that likely play a role in the development of diseases associated with exposure. The mechanism behind these exposure-induced epigenetic changes is currently unknown. One commonality between most environmental exposures is that they cause DNA damage either directly or through causing an increase in reactive oxygen species, which can damage DNA. Like transcription, DNA damage repair must occur in the context of chromatin requiring both histone modifications and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling. These chromatin changes aid in DNA damage accessibility and signaling. Several proteins and complexes involved in epigenetic silencing during both development and cancer have been found to be localized to sites of DNA damage. The chromatin-based response to DNA damage is considered a transient event, with chromatin being restored to normal as DNA damage repair is completed. However, in individuals chronically exposed to environmental toxicants or with chronic inflammatory disease, repeated DNA damage-induced chromatin rearrangement may ultimately lead to permanent epigenetic alterations. Understanding the mechanism behind exposure-induced epigenetic changes will allow us to develop strategies to prevent or reverse these changes. This review focuses on epigenetic changes and DNA damage induced by environmental exposures, the chromatin changes that occur around sites of DNA damage, and how these transient chromatin changes may lead to heritable epigenetic alterations at sites of chronic exposure. PMID:24259318

  15. TDP1 promotes assembly of non-homologous end joining protein complexes on DNA

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jinho; Li, Jing; Summerlin, Matthew; Hays, Annette; Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J.; Nitiss, Karin C.; Nitiss, John L.; Hanakahi, Leslyn A.

    2015-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is central to the maintenance of genomic integrity. In tumor cells, the ability to repair DSBs predicts response to radiation and many cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs. DSB repair pathways include homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). NHEJ is a template-independent mechanism, yet many NHEJ repair products carry limited genetic changes, which suggests that NHEJ includes mechanisms to minimize error. Proteins required for mammalian NHEJ include Ku70/80, the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), XLF/Cernunnos and the XRCC4:DNA ligase IV complex. NHEJ also utilizes accessory proteins that include DNA polymerases, nucleases, and other end-processing factors. In yeast, mutations of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP1) reduced NHEJ fidelity. TDP1 plays an important role in repair of topoisomerase-mediated DNA damage and 3′-blocking DNA lesions, and mutation of the human TDP1 gene results in an inherited human neuropathy termed SCAN1. We found that human TDP1 stimulated DNA binding by XLF and physically interacted with XLF to form TDP1:XLF:DNA complexes. TDP1:XLF interactions preferentially stimulated TDP1 activity on dsDNA as compared to ssDNA. TDP1 also promoted DNA binding by Ku70/80 and stimulated DNA-PK activity. Because Ku70/80 and XLF are the first factors recruited to the DSB at the onset of NHEJ, our data suggest a role for TDP1 during the early stages of mammalian NHEJ. PMID:25841101

  16. Excision repair of UV radiation-induced DNA damage in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, P.S.; Hevelone, J.; Dwarakanath, V.; Mitchell, D.L. )

    1989-06-01

    Radioimmunoassays were used to monitor the removal of antibody-binding sites associated with the two major UV radiation-induced DNA photoproducts (cyclobutane dimers and (6-4) photoproducts). Unlike with cultured human cells, where (6-4) photoproducts are removed more rapidly than cyclobutane dimers, the kinetics of repair were similar for both lesions. Repair capacity in wild type diminished throughout development. The radioimmunoassays were also employed to confirm the absence of photoreactivation in C. elegans. In addition, three radiation-sensitive mutants (rad-1, rad-2, rad-7) displayed normal repair capacities. An excision defect was much more pronounced in larvae than embryos in the fourth mutant tested (rad-3). This correlates with the hypersensitivity pattern of this mutant and suggests that DNA repair may be developmentally regulated in C. elegans. The mechanism of DNA repair in C. elegans as well as the relationship between the repair of specific photoproducts and UV radiation sensitivity during development are discussed.

  17. Different repair kinetics for short and long DNA double-strand gaps in Saccharomyces cervisiae.

    PubMed

    Glasunov, A V; Frankenberg-Schwager, M; Frankenberg, D

    1995-10-01

    The kinetics of recombinational repair of plasmid DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) and gaps (dsg) of different sizes and ends were studied. For this purpose we used the mutant rad54-3 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is temperature dependent with respect to genetic recombination and rejoining of dsb/dsg, allowing us to stop these processes by shifting cells to the restrictive temperature. We found that the kinetics of repair of cohesive-ended dsb and small gaps (up to 400 bp) are similar and characterized by two phases separated by a plateau. In contrast, large gap (1.4 kbp) repair proceeds with different kinetics exhibiting only the second phase. We also investigated the repair kinetics of 400 bp gaps introduced into plasmid DNA with and without homology to chromosomal DNA allowing recombinational repair and non-recombinational repair (ligation), respectively. We found that gaps introduced in plasmid sequences homologous to chromosomal DNA are rapidly repaired by recombination. In contrast, recircularization of the gapped plasmid by ligation is as slow and inefficient as ligation of a cohesive-ended dsb. The kinetics of repair of gapped plasmids may be explained by assuming a constitutive level of enzymes responsible for the first phase of recombinational repair, while inducible enzymes, which become available at the end of the plateau, carry out the second phase of repair. PMID:7594968

  18. Epigenetic regulation of DNA repair machinery in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana Carvalho; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima

    2015-08-14

    Although thousands of DNA damaging events occur in each cell every day, efficient DNA repair pathways have evolved to counteract them. The DNA repair machinery plays a key role in maintaining genomic stability by avoiding the maintenance of mutations. The DNA repair enzymes continuously monitor the chromosomes to correct any damage that is caused by exogenous and endogenous mutagens. If DNA damage in proliferating cells is not repaired because of an inadequate expression of DNA repair genes, it might increase the risk of cancer. In addition to mutations, which can be either inherited or somatically acquired, epigenetic silencing of DNA repair genes has been associated with carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer represents the second highest cause of cancer mortality worldwide. The disease develops from the accumulation of several genetic and epigenetic changes during the lifetime. Among the risk factors, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is considered the main driving factor to gastric cancer development. Thus, in this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role of H. pylori infection on the epigenetic regulation of DNA repair machinery in gastric carcinogenesis.

  19. Epigenetic regulation of DNA repair machinery in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Juliana Carvalho; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima

    2015-01-01

    Although thousands of DNA damaging events occur in each cell every day, efficient DNA repair pathways have evolved to counteract them. The DNA repair machinery plays a key role in maintaining genomic stability by avoiding the maintenance of mutations. The DNA repair enzymes continuously monitor the chromosomes to correct any damage that is caused by exogenous and endogenous mutagens. If DNA damage in proliferating cells is not repaired because of an inadequate expression of DNA repair genes, it might increase the risk of cancer. In addition to mutations, which can be either inherited or somatically acquired, epigenetic silencing of DNA repair genes has been associated with carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer represents the second highest cause of cancer mortality worldwide. The disease develops from the accumulation of several genetic and epigenetic changes during the lifetime. Among the risk factors, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is considered the main driving factor to gastric cancer development. Thus, in this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role of H. pylori infection on the epigenetic regulation of DNA repair machinery in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26290630

  20. Temporal activation of XRCC1-mediated DNA repair is essential for muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalaf, Mohammad H; Blake, Leanne E; Larsen, Brian D; Bell, Ryan A; Brunette, Steve; Parks, Robin J; Rudnicki, Michael A; McKinnon, Peter J; Jeffrey Dilworth, F; Megeney, Lynn A

    2016-01-01

    Transient DNA strand break formation has been identified as an effective means to enhance gene expression in living cells. In the muscle lineage, cell differentiation is contingent upon the induction of caspase-mediated DNA strand breaks, which act to establish the terminal gene expression program. This coordinated DNA nicking is rapidly resolved, suggesting that myoblasts may deploy DNA repair machinery to stabilize the genome and entrench the differentiated phenotype. Here, we identify the base excision repair pathway component XRCC1 as an indispensable mediator of muscle differentiation. Caspase-triggered XRCC1 repair foci form rapidly within differentiating myonuclei, and then dissipate as the maturation program proceeds. Skeletal myoblast deletion of Xrcc1 does not have an impact on cell growth, yet leads to perinatal lethality, with sustained DNA damage and impaired myofiber development. Together, these results demonstrate that XRCC1 manages a temporally responsive DNA repair process to advance the muscle differentiation program. PMID:27462438

  1. Understanding DNA Repair in Hyperthermophilic Archaea: Persistent Gaps and Other Reasons to Focus on the Fork.

    PubMed

    Grogan, Dennis W

    2015-01-01

    Although hyperthermophilic archaea arguably have a great need for efficient DNA repair, they lack members of several DNA repair protein families broadly conserved among bacteria and eukaryotes. Conversely, the putative DNA repair genes that do occur in these archaea often do not generate the expected phenotype when deleted. The prospect that hyperthermophilic archaea have some unique strategies for coping with DNA damage and replication errors has intellectual and technological appeal, but resolving this question will require alternative coping mechanisms to be proposed and tested experimentally. This review evaluates a combination of four enigmatic properties that distinguishes the hyperthermophilic archaea from all other organisms: DNA polymerase stalling at dU, apparent lack of conventional NER, lack of MutSL homologs, and apparent essentiality of homologous recombination proteins. Hypothetical damage-coping strategies that could explain this set of properties may provide new starting points for efforts to define how archaea differ from conventional models of DNA repair and replication fidelity.

  2. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  3. The Apollo 5' exonuclease functions together with TRF2 to protect telomeres from DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Lenain, Christelle; Bauwens, Serge; Amiard, Simon; Brunori, Michele; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Gilson, Eric

    2006-07-11

    A major issue in telomere research is to understand how the integrity of chromosome ends is preserved . The human telomeric protein TRF2 coordinates several pathways that prevent checkpoint activation and chromosome fusions. In this work, we identified hSNM1B, here named Apollo, as a novel TRF2-interacting factor. Interestingly, the N-terminal domain of Apollo is closely related to that of Artemis, a factor involved in V(D)J recombination and DNA repair. Both proteins belong to the beta-CASP metallo-beta-lactamase family of DNA caretaker proteins. Apollo appears preferentially localized at telomeres in a TRF2-dependent manner. Reduced levels of Apollo exacerbate the sensitivity of cells to TRF2 inhibition, resulting in severe growth defects and an increased number of telomere-induced DNA-damage foci and telomere fusions. Purified Apollo protein exhibits a 5'-to-3' DNA exonuclease activity. We conclude that Apollo is a novel component of the human telomeric complex and works together with TRF2 to protect chromosome termini from being recognized and processed as DNA damage. These findings unveil a previously undescribed telomere-protection mechanism involving a DNA 5'-to-3' exonuclease.

  4. DNA damage in Fabry patients: An investigation of oxidative damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Manini, Paula Regina; Faverzani, Jéssica Lamberty; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Deon, Marion; Giugliani, Roberto; Saffi, Jenifer; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with loss of activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. In addition to accumulation of α-galactosidase A substrates, other mechanisms may be involved in FD pathophysiology, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Higher levels of oxidative damage to proteins and lipids in Fabry patients were previously reported. However, DNA damage by oxidative species in FD has not yet been studied. We investigated basal DNA damage, oxidative DNA damage, DNA repair capacity, and reactive species generation in Fabry patients and controls. To measure oxidative damage to purines and pyrimidines, the alkaline version of the comet assay was used with two endonucleases, formamidopyrimidine DNA-glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (EndoIII). To evaluate DNA repair, a challenge assay with hydrogen peroxide was performed. Patients presented significantly higher levels of basal DNA damage and oxidative damage to purines. Oxidative DNA damage was induced in both DNA bases by H2O2 in patients. Fabry patients presented efficient DNA repair in both assays (with and without endonucleases) as well as significantly higher levels of oxidative species (measured by dichlorofluorescein content). Even if DNA repair be induced in Fabry patients (as a consequence of continuous exposure to oxidative species), the repair is not sufficient to reduce DNA damage to control levels. PMID:26046974

  5. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a convenient model system for the study of DNA repair in photoautotrophic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Vlcek, Daniel; Sevcovicová, Andrea; Sviezená, Barbara; Gálová, Eliska; Miadoková, Eva

    2008-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a convenient model organism for the study of basic biological processes, including DNA repair investigations. This review is focused on the studies of DNA repair pathways in C. reinhardtii. Emphasis is given to the connection of DNA repair with other cellular functions, namely the regulation of the cell cycle. Comparison with the results of repair investigations that are already available revealed the presence of all basic repair pathways in C. reinhardtii as well as special features characteristic of this alga. Among others, the involvement of UVSE1 gene in recombinational repair and uniparental inheritance of chloroplast genome, the specific role of TRXH1 gene in strand break repair, the requirement of PHR1 gene for full activity of PHR2 gene, or encoding of two excision repair proteins by the single REX1 gene. Contrary to yeast, mammals and higher plants, C. reinhardtii does not appear to contain the ortholog of RAD6 gene, which plays an important role in DNA translesion synthesis and mutagenesis. Completed genome sequences will be a basis for molecular analyses allowing to explain the differences that have been observed in DNA repair of this alga in comparison with other model organisms.

  6. Bacillus subtilis SbcC protein plays an important role in DNA inter-strand cross-link repair

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Judita; Sanchez, Humberto; Tadesse, Serkalem; Kidane, Dawit; Krisnamurthy, Mahalakshmi; Alonso, Juan C; Graumann, Peter L

    2006-01-01

    Background Several distinct pathways for the repair of damaged DNA exist in all cells. DNA modifications are repaired by base excision or nucleotide excision repair, while DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired through direct joining of broken ends (non homologous end joining, NHEJ) or through recombination with the non broken sister chromosome (homologous recombination, HR). Rad50 protein plays an important role in repair of DNA damage in eukaryotic cells, and forms a complex with the Mre11 nuclease. The prokaryotic ortholog of Rad50, SbcC, also forms a complex with a nuclease, SbcD, in Escherichia coli, and has been implicated in the removal of hairpin structures that can arise during DNA replication. Ku protein is a component of the NHEJ pathway in pro- and eukaryotic cells. Results A deletion of the sbcC gene rendered Bacillus subtilis cells sensitive to DNA damage caused by Mitomycin C (MMC) or by gamma irradiation. The deletion of the sbcC gene in a recN mutant background increased the sensitivity of the single recN mutant strain. SbcC was also non-epistatic with AddAB (analog of Escherichia coli RecBCD), but epistatic with RecA. A deletion of the ykoV gene encoding the B. subtilis Ku protein in a sbcC mutant strain did not resulted in an increase in sensitivity towards MMC and gamma irradiation, but exacerbated the phenotype of a recN or a recA mutant strain. In exponentially growing cells, SbcC-GFP was present throughout the cells, or as a central focus in rare cases. Upon induction of DNA damage, SbcC formed 1, rarely 2, foci on the nucleoids. Different to RecN protein, which forms repair centers at any location on the nucleoids, SbcC foci mostly co-localized with the DNA polymerase complex. In contrast to this, AddA-GFP or AddB-GFP did not form detectable foci upon addition of MMC. Conclusion Our experiments show that SbcC plays an important role in the repair of DNA inter-strand cross-links (induced by MMC), most likely through HR, and suggest

  7. Statistical mechanics of topologically constrained DNA and nucleoprotein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovan, Stefan Michael

    A complex connection exists between the 3 dimensional topological state of DNA in living organisms and biological processes including gene expression, DNA replication, recombination and repair. A significant limitation in developing a detailed, quantitative understanding of this connection is due to a lack of rigorous methods to calculate statistical mechanical properties of DNA molecules with complex topologies, including supercoiling, looping and knotting. This dissertation's main focus is on developing such methods and applying them to realistic DNA and nucleoprotein models. In chapter 2, a method is presented to calculate free energies and J factors of protein mediated DNA loops by normal mode analysis (NMA). This method is similar to calculations performed previously but with several significant advances. We apply the method to the specific case of DNA looping mediated by Cre recombinase protein. J factors calculated by our method are compared to experimental measurements to extract geometric and elastic properties of the Cre-DNA synaptic complex. In particular, the results suggest the existence of a synaptic complex that is more flexible than previously expected and may be explained by a stable intermediate in the reaction pathway that deviates significantly from the planar crystal structure. Calculating free energies of DNA looping is difficult in general, especially when considering intermediate length scales such as plasmid sized DNA which may readily adopt multiple topological states. In chapter 3, a novel method is presented to obtain free energies of semiflexible biopolymers with fixed topologies and arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. High accuracy is demonstrated by calculating free energies of specific DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex

  8. Interaction of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.C.; Simpson, W.A.; Raghow, R.; Hasty, K.

    1986-03-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is a large multidomain glycoprotein found in the basement membrane, on cell surface and in plasma. The interactions of Fn with DNA may be significant in glomerular deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The authors examined the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn by a solid phase assay in which Fn was coated to microtiter plates and reacted with (/sup 3/H)DNA or DNA complexes with a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody. The optimal interaction of DNA with Fn occurs at <0.1M NaCl suggesting that the binding is charge dependent; the specificity of this binding was shown by competitive inhibition and locking experiments using anti-Fn. The binding was maximum at pH 6.5 and in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. The addition of Clq enhanced the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn, whereas heparan sulfate inhibited such binding. The monomeric or aggregated IgC did not bind Fn but aggregated IgG bound to Fn in the presence of Clq. Furthermore, DNA-anti-DNA complexes in sera from active SLE patients bound Fn which was enhanced in the presence of Clq; DNase abolished this binding indicating that the interaction of these complexes was mediated by DNA. These observations may partially explain the molecular mechanism(s) of the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in basement membrane.

  9. Mismatch repair of heteroduplex DNA intermediates of extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, W P; Nickoloff, J A

    1994-01-01

    Previous work indicated that extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells could be explained by the single-strand annealing (SSA) model. This model predicts that extrachromosomal recombination leads to nonconservative crossover products and that heteroduplex DNA (hDNA) is formed by annealing of complementary single strands. Mismatched bases in hDNA may subsequently be repaired to wild-type or mutant sequences, or they may remain unrepaired and segregate following DNA replication. We describe a system to examine the formation and mismatch repair of hDNA in recombination intermediates. Our results are consistent with extrachromosomal recombination occurring via SSA and producing crossover recombinant products. As predicted by the SSA model, hDNA was present in double-strand break-induced recombination intermediates. By placing either silent or frameshift mutations in the predicted hDNA region, we have shown that mismatches are efficiently repaired prior to DNA replication. Images PMID:8264607

  10. Formaldehyde catabolism is essential in cells deficient for the Fanconi anemia DNA-repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Ivan V; Langevin, Frédéric; Crossan, Gerry P; Takata, Minoru; Patel, Ketan J

    2011-11-13

    Metabolism is predicted to generate formaldehyde, a toxic, simple, reactive aldehyde that can damage DNA. Here we report a synthetic lethal interaction in avian cells between ADH5, encoding the main formaldehyde-detoxifying enzyme, and the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA-repair pathway. These results define a fundamental role for the combined action of formaldehyde catabolism and DNA cross-link repair in vertebrate cell survival.

  11. Impeded repair of abasic site damaged lesions in DNA adsorbed over functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rina; Mondal, Titash; Bhowmick, Anil K; Das, Prolay

    2016-06-01

    The processing of abasic site DNA damage lesions in extracellular DNA in the presence of engineered carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) is demonstrated. The efficacy of the apurinic-apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) in the cleavage of abasic site lesions in the presence of carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-COOH) and graphene oxide (GO) are compared. The CNMs were found to perturb the incision activity of APE1. The reason for such perturbation process was anticipated to take place either by the non-specific adsorption of APE1 over the free surface of the CNMs or steric hindrance offered by the CNM-DNA complex. Accordingly, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was selectively utilized to block the free surface of the CNM-DNA hybrid material. Further treatment of the CNM-DNA-BSA complex with APE1 resulted in a marginal increase in APE1 efficiency. This indicates that APE1 in solution is unable to process the abasic sites on DNA adsorbed over the CNMs. However, the cleavage activity of APE1 was restored in the presence of non-ionic surfactant (Tween 20) that inhibits adsorption of the DNA on the surface of the CNMs. The conformational deformation of the DNA, along with steric hindrance induced by the CNMs resulted in the inhibition of abasic site DNA repair by APE1. Moreover, appreciable changes in the secondary structure of APE1 adsorbed over the CNMs were observed that contribute further to the repair refractivity of the abasic sites. From a toxicological viewpoint, these findings can be extended to the study of the effect of engineered nanoparticles in the intracellular DNA repair process. PMID:27265379

  12. 1999 Gordon Research Conference on Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-12

    This Conference will examine DNA repair as the key component in genomic surveillance that is so crucial to the overall integrity and function of mammalian cells. Recent discoveries have catapulted the field of DNA repair into a pivotal position for fundamental investigations into oncology, aging, environmental health, and developmental biology. We hope to highlight the most promising and exciting avenues of research in robust discussions at this conference. This Mammalian DNA Repair Gordon Conference differs from the past conferences in this series, in which the programs were broader in scope, with respect to topics and biological systems covered. A conference sponsored by the Genetics Society in April 1998 emphasized recombinational mechanisms for double-strand break repair and the role of mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancer. These topics will therefore receive somewhat less emphasis in the upcoming Conference. In view of the recent mechanistic advances in mammalian DNA repair, an upcoming comprehensive DNA repair meeting next autumn at Hilton Head; and the limited enrollment for Gordon Conferences we have decided to focus session-by-session on particular areas of controversy and/or new developments specifically in mammalian systems. Thus, the principal presentations will draw upon results from other cellular systems only to the extent that they impact our understanding of mammalian DNA repair.

  13. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer.

  14. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer. PMID:27183258

  15. RNF4 regulates DNA double-strand break repair in a cell cycle-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ching-Ying; Li, Xu; Stark, Jeremy M.; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Ann, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both RNF4 and KAP1 play critical roles in the response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but the functional interplay of RNF4 and KAP1 in regulating DNA damage response remains unclear. We have previously demonstrated the recruitment and degradation of KAP1 by RNF4 require the phosphorylation of Ser824 (pS824) and SUMOylation of KAP1. In this report, we show the retention of DSB-induced pS824-KAP1 foci and RNF4 abundance are inversely correlated as cell cycle progresses. Following irradiation, pS824-KAP1 foci predominantly appear in the cyclin A (-) cells, whereas RNF4 level is suppressed in the G0-/G1-phases and then accumulates during S-/G2-phases. Notably, 53BP1 foci, but not BRCA1 foci, co-exist with pS824-KAP1 foci. Depletion of KAP1 yields opposite effect on the dynamics of 53BP1 and BRCA1 loading, favoring homologous recombination repair. In addition, we identify p97 is present in the RNF4-KAP1 interacting complex and the inhibition of p97 renders MCF7 breast cancer cells relatively more sensitive to DNA damage. Collectively, these findings suggest that combined effect of dynamic recruitment of RNF4 to KAP1 regulates the relative occupancy of 53BP1 and BRCA1 at DSB sites to direct DSB repair in a cell cycle-dependent manner. PMID:26766492

  16. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase IV: possible involvement in double strand break DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Leem, S H; Ropp, P A; Sugino, A

    1994-08-11

    We identified and purified a new DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase IV), which is similar to mammalian DNA polymerase beta, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggested that it is encoded by YCR14C (POLX) on chromosome III. Here, we provided a direct evidence that the purified DNA polymerase IV is indeed encoded by POLX. Strains harboring a pol4 deletion mutation exhibit neither mitotic growth defect nor a meiosis defect, suggesting that DNA polymerase IV participates in nonessential functions in DNA metabolism. The deletion strains did not exhibit UV-sensitivity. However, they did show weak sensitivity to MMS-treatment and exhibited a hyper-recombination phenotype when intragenic recombination was measured during meiosis. Furthermore, MAT alpha pol4 delta segregants had a higher frequency of illegitimate mating with a MAT alpha tester strain than that of wild-type cells. These results suggest that DNA polymerase IV participates in a double-strand break repair pathway. A 3.2kb of the POL4 transcript was weakly expressed in mitotically growing cells. During meiosis, a 2.2 kb POL4 transcript was greatly induced, while the 3.2 kb transcript stayed at constant levels. This induction was delayed in a swi4 delta strain during meiosis, while no effect was observed in a swi6 delta strain.

  17. Repair of DNA double strand breaks: in vivo biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Neal; Haber, James E

    2006-01-01

    Double strand breaks (DSBs) can cause damage to the genomic integrity of a cell as well as initiate genetic recombination processes. The HO and I-SceI endonucleases from budding yeast have provided a way to study these events by inducing a unique DSB in vivo under the control of a galactose-inducible promoter. The GAL::HO construct has been used extensively to study processes such as nonhomologous end joining, intra- and interchromosomal gene conversion, single strand annealing and break-induced recombination. Synchronously induced DSBs have also been important in the study of the DNA damage checkpoint, adaptation, and recovery pathways of yeast. This chapter describes methods of using GAL::HO to physically monitor the progression of events following a DSB, specifically the events leading to the switching of mating type by gene conversion of MAT using the silent donors at HML and HMR. Southern blot analysis can be used to follow the overall events in this process such as the formation of the DSB and product. Denaturing alkaline gels and slot blot techniques can be employed to follow the 5' to 3' resection of DNA starting at the DSB. After resection, the 3' tail initiates a homology search and then strand invades its homologous sequence at the donor cassette. Polymerase chain reaction is an important means to assay strand invasion and the priming of new DNA synthesis as well as the completion of gene conversion. Methods such as chromatin immunoprecipitation have provided a means to study many proteins that associate with a DSB, including not only recombination proteins, but also proteins involved in nonhomologous end joining, cell cycle arrest, chromatin remodeling, cohesin function, and mismatch repair.

  18. Water extracts of tree Hypericum sps. protect DNA from oxidative and alkylating damage and enhance DNA repair in colon cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alice A; Marques, Filipe; Fernandes-Ferreira, Manuel; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Diet may induce colon carcinogenesis through oxidative or alkylating DNA damage. However, diet may also contain anticarcinogenic compounds that contribute to cancer prevention. DNA damage prevention and/or induction of repair are two important mechanisms involved in cancer chemoprevention by dietary compounds. Hypericum sps. are widely used in traditional medicine to prepare infusions due to their beneficial digestive and neurologic effects. In this study, we investigated the potential of water extracts from three Hypericum sps. and some of their main phenolic compounds to prevent and repair oxidative and alkylating DNA damage in colon cells. The results showed that water extracts of Hypericum perforatum, Hypericum androsaemum, Hypericum undulatum, quercetin and rutin have protective effect against oxidative DNA damage in HT29 cells. Protective effect was also observed against alkylating DNA damage induced by methyl-methanesulfonate, except for H. androsaemum. With regard to alkylating damage repair H. perforatum, H. androsaemum and chlorogenic acid increased repair of alkylating DNA damage by base excision repair pathway. No effect was observed on nucleotide excision repair pathway. Antigenotoxic effects of Hypericum sps. may contribute to colon cancer prevention and the high amount of phenolic compounds present in Hypericum sps. play an important role in DNA protective effects.

  19. A potential impact of DNA repair on ageing and lifespan in the ageing model organism Podospora anserina: decrease in mitochondrial DNA repair activity during ageing.

    PubMed

    Soerensen, Mette; Gredilla, Ricardo; Müller-Ohldach, Mathis; Werner, Alexandra; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Osiewacz, Heinz D; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2009-08-01

    The free radical theory of ageing states that ROS play a key role in age-related decrease in mitochondrial function via the damage of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), proteins and lipids. In the sexually reproducing ascomycete Podospora anserina ageing is, as in other eukaryotes, associated with mtDNA instability and mitochondrial dysfunction. Part of the mtDNA instabilities may arise due to accumulation of ROS induced mtDNA lesions, which, as previously suggested for mammals, may be caused by an age-related decrease in base excision repair (BER). Alignments of known BER protein sequences with the P. anserina genome revealed high homology. We report for the first time the presence of BER activities in P. anserina mitochondrial extracts. DNA glycosylase activities decrease with age, suggesting that the increased mtDNA instability with age may be caused by decreased ability to repair mtDNA damage and hence contribute to ageing and lifespan control in this ageing model. Additionally, we find low DNA glycosylase activities in the long-lived mutants grisea and DeltaPaCox17::ble, which are characterized by low mitochondrial ROS generation. Overall, our data identify a potential role of mtDNA repair in controlling ageing and life span in P. anserina, a mechanism possibly regulated in response to ROS levels.

  20. Isolation of XAB2 complex involved in pre-mRNA splicing, transcription, and transcription-coupled repair.

    PubMed

    Kuraoka, Isao; Ito, Shinsuke; Wada, Tadashi; Hayashida, Mika; Lee, Lily; Saijo, Masafumi; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Matsumoto, Megumi; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Handa, Hiroshi; Qin, Jun; Nakatani, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2008-01-11

    Nucleotide excision repair is a versatile repair pathway that counteracts the deleterious effects of various DNA lesions. In nucleotide excision repair, there is a transcription-coupled repair (TCR) pathway that focuses on DNA damage that blocks RNA polymerase IIo in transcription elongation. XAB2 (XPA-binding protein 2), containing tetratricopeptide repeats, has been isolated by virtue of its ability to interact with xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA). Moreover, XAB2 has been shown to interact with Cockayne syndrome group A and B proteins (CSA and CSB) and RNA polymerase II, as well as XPA, and is involved in TCR and transcription. Here we purified XAB2 as a multimeric protein complex consisting of hAquarius, XAB2, hPRP19, CCDC16, hISY1, and PPIE, which are involved in pre-mRNA splicing. Knockdown of XAB2 with small interfering RNA in HeLa cells resulted in a hypersensitivity to killing by UV light and a decreased recovery of RNA synthesis after UV irradiation and regular RNA synthesis. Enhanced interaction of XAB2 with RNA polymerase IIo or XPA was observed in cells treated with DNA-damaging agents, indicating DNA damage-responsive activity of the XAB2 complex. These results indicated that the XAB2 complex is a multifunctional factor involved in pre-mRNA splicing, transcription, and TCR. PMID:17981804