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Sample records for complex exciton-phonon coupling

  1. Optical properties of MgZnO alloys: Excitons and exciton-phonon complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, M. D.; Cobet, C.; Esser, N.; Laumer, B.; Wassner, T. A.; Eickhoff, M.; Feneberg, M.; Goldhahn, R.

    2011-07-01

    The characteristics of the excitonic absorption and emission around the fundamental bandgap of wurtzite Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy with Mg contents between x = 0 and x = 0.23 are studied using spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The ellipsometric data were analyzed using a multilayer model yielding the dielectric function (DF). The imaginary part of the DF for the alloys exhibits a pronounced feature which is attributed to exciton-phonon coupling (EPC) similar to the previously reported results for ZnO. Thus, in order to determine reliable transition energies, the spectral dependence is analyzed by a model which includes free excitonic lines, the exciton continuum, and the enhanced absorption due to EPC. A line shape analysis of the temperature-dependent PL spectra yielded in particular the emission-related free excitonic transition energies, which are compared to the results from the DF line-shape analysis. The PL linewidth is discussed within the framework of an alloy disorder model.

  2. Band-edge optical transitions in a nonpolar-plane GaN substrate: exciton-phonon coupling and temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M. Z.; Xu, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the band-edge optical transitions involving the interacting exciton-phonon system, especially first-order longitudinal optical (LO) phonon-assisted luminescence of bound and free excitons in m- and c-plane GaN substrates in a low temperature range from 4 K to 40 K. The main luminescence features of all of the three kinds of excitons can be well described by the theoretical models that take exciton-LO-phonon coupling into account. The effective Bohr radii of the excitons play a key role in determining the Huang-Rhys factor characterizing the exciton-LO-phonon coupling strength in GaN. An interesting oscillatory structure is found to appear in the low-temperature luminescence spectra of the nonpolar-plane GaN substrate, which needs to be clarified by further investigations.

  3. Surface strain engineering through Tb doping to study the pressure dependence of exciton-phonon coupling in ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.; Dhar, S. Singh, B. P.; Nayak, C.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Jha, S. N.

    2013-12-07

    A compressive hydrostatic strain has been found to develop in the ZnO lattice as a result of accumulation of Tb ions on the surface of the nanoparticles for Tb mole-fraction less than 0.04. This hydrostatic strain can be controlled up to ≈14 GPa by varying the Tb mole-fraction. Here, we have utilized this novel technique of surface strain engineering through Tb doping for introducing hydrostatic compressive strain in the lattice to study the pressure dependent electronic and vibrational properties of ZnO nanoparticles. Our study reveals that when subjected to pressure, nanoparticles of ZnO behave quite differently than bulk in many aspects. Unlike bulk ZnO, which is reported to go through a wurtzite to rock-salt structural phase transition at ≈8 GPa, ZnO nanoparticles do not show such transition and remain in wurtzite phase even at 14 GPa of pressure. Furthermore, the Grüneisen parameters for the optical phonon modes are found to be order of magnitude smaller in ZnO nanoparticles as compared to bulk. Our study also suggests an increase of the dielectric constant with pressure, which is opposite to what has been reported for bulk ZnO. Interestingly, it has also been found that the exciton-phonon interaction depends strongly upon pressure in this system. The exciton-phonon coupling has been found to decrease as pressure increases. A variational technique has been adopted to theoretically calculate the exciton-LO phonon coupling coefficient in ZnO nanoparticles as a function of pressure, which shows a good agreement with the experimental results. These findings imply that surface engineering of ZnO nanoparticles with Tb could indeed be an efficient tool to enhance and control the optical performance of this material.

  4. Symmetry-dependent exciton-phonon coupling in 2D and bulk MoS2 observed by resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Bruno R; Malard, Leandro M; Alves, Juliana M; Fantini, Cristiano; Pimenta, Marcos A

    2015-04-01

    This work describes a resonance Raman study performed on samples with one, two, and three layers (1L, 2L, 3L), and bulk MoS2, using more than 30 different laser excitation lines covering the visible range, and focusing on the intensity of the two most pronounced features of the Raman scattering spectrum of MoS2 (E2g(1) and A1g bands). The Raman excitation profiles of these bands were obtained experimentally, and it is found that the A1g feature is enhanced when the excitation laser is in resonance with A and B excitons of MoS2, while the E2g1 feature is shown to be enhanced when the excitation laser is close to 2.7 eV. We show from the symmetry analysis of the exciton-phonon interaction that the mode responsible for the E2g(1) resonance is identified as the high energy C exciton recently predicted [D. Y. Qiu, F. H. da Jornada, and S. G. Louie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 216805 (2013)].

  5. Low Exciton-Phonon Coupling, High Charge Carrier Mobilities, and Multiexciton Properties in Two-Dimensional Lead, Silver, Cadmium, and Copper Chalcogenide Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuchen; Singh, Vivek; Goodman, Samuel M; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-12-18

    The development of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials has revealed novel physical properties, like high carrier mobilities and the tunable coupling of charge carriers with phonons, which can enable wide-ranging applications in optoelectronic and thermoelectric devices. While mechanical exfoliation of graphene and some transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g., MoS2, WSe2) has enabled their fabrication as 2D semiconductors and integration into devices, lack of similar syntheses for other 2D semiconductor materials has hindered further progress. Here, we report measurements of fundamental charge carrier interactions and optoelectronic properties of 2D nanomaterials made from two-monolayers-thick PbX, CdX, Cu2X, and Ag2X (X = S, Se) using colloidal syntheses. Extremely low coupling of charge carriers with phonons (2-6-fold lower than bulk and other low-dimensional semiconductors), high carrier mobilities (0.2-1.2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), without dielectric screening), observation of infrared surface plasmons in ultrathin 2D semiconductor nanostructures, strong quantum-confinement, and other multiexcitonic properties (different phonon coupling and photon-to-charge collection efficiencies for band-edge and higher-energy excitons) can pave the way for efficient solution-processed devices made from these 2D nanostructured semiconductors. PMID:26273976

  6. Atypical Exciton-Phonon Interactions in WS2 and WSe2 Monolayers Revealed by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Del Corro, E; Botello-Méndez, A; Gillet, Y; Elias, A L; Terrones, H; Feng, S; Fantini, C; Rhodes, Daniel; Pradhan, N; Balicas, L; Gonze, X; Charlier, J-C; Terrones, M; Pimenta, M A

    2016-04-13

    Resonant Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for providing information about excitons and exciton-phonon coupling in two-dimensional materials. We present here resonant Raman experiments of single-layered WS2 and WSe2 using more than 25 laser lines. The Raman excitation profiles of both materials show unexpected differences. All Raman features of WS2 monolayers are enhanced by the first-optical excitations (with an asymmetric response for the spin-orbit related XA and XB excitons), whereas Raman bands of WSe2 are not enhanced at XA/B energies. Such an intriguing phenomenon is addressed by DFT calculations and by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation. These two materials are very similar. They prefer the same crystal arrangement, and their electronic structure is akin, with comparable spin-orbit coupling. However, we reveal that WS2 and WSe2 exhibit quite different exciton-phonon interactions. In this sense, we demonstrate that the interaction between XC and XA excitons with phonons explains the different Raman responses of WS2 and WSe2, and the absence of Raman enhancement for the WSe2 modes at XA/B energies. These results reveal unusual exciton-phonon interactions and open new avenues for understanding the two-dimensional materials physics, where weak interactions play a key role coupling different degrees of freedom (spin, optic, and electronic). PMID:26998817

  7. Exciton-phonon interaction in Al0.4Ga0.6N/Al0.53Ga0.47N multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya-Li; Jin, Peng; Liu, Gui-Peng; Wang, Wei-Ying; Qi, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Chang-Qing; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2016-08-01

    The exciton-phonon interaction in Al0.4Ga0.6N/Al0.53Ga0.47N multiple quantum wells (MQWs) is studied by deep-ultraviolet time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). Up to four longitudinal-optical (LO) phonon replicas of exciton recombination are observed, indicating the strong coupling of excitons with LO phonons in the MQWs. Moreover, the exciton-phonon coupling strength in the MQWs is quantified by the Huang-Rhys factor, and it keeps almost constant in a temperature range from 10 K to 120 K. This result can be explained in terms of effects of fluctuations in the well thickness in the MQWs and the temperature on the exciton-phonon interaction. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB619306), the Beijing Science and Technology Project, China (Grant No. Z151100003315024), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61404132).

  8. Exciton-phonon system on a star graph: A perturbative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalouz, Saad; Pouthier, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Based on the operatorial formulation of the perturbation theory, the properties of an exciton coupled with optical phonons on a star graph are investigated. Within this method, the dynamics is governed by an effective Hamiltonian, which accounts for exciton-phonon entanglement. The exciton is dressed by a virtual phonon cloud whereas the phonons are clothed by virtual excitonic transitions. In spite of the coupling with the phonons, it is shown that the energy spectrum of the dressed exciton resembles that of a bare exciton. The only differences originate in a polaronic mechanism that favors an energy shift and a decay of the exciton hopping constant. By contrast, the motion of the exciton allows the phonons to propagate over the graph so that the dressed normal modes drastically differ from the localized modes associated to bare phonons. They define extended vibrations whose properties depend on the state occupied by the exciton that accompanies the phonons. It is shown that the phonon frequencies, either red shifted or blue shifted, are very sensitive to the model parameter in general, and to the size of the graph in particular.

  9. Theory of femtosecond coherent double-pump single-molecule spectroscopy: Application to light harvesting complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lipeng; Zhao, Yang; Gelin, Maxim F.; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2015-04-28

    We develop a first principles theoretical description of femtosecond double-pump single-molecule signals of molecular aggregates. We incorporate all singly excited electronic states and vibrational modes with significant exciton-phonon coupling into a system Hamiltonian and treat the ensuing system dynamics within the Davydov D{sub 1} Ansatz. The remaining intra- and inter-molecular vibrational modes are treated as a heat bath and their effect is accounted for through lineshape functions. We apply our theory to simulate single-molecule signals of the light harvesting complex II. The calculated signals exhibit pronounced oscillations of mixed electron-vibrational (vibronic) origin. Their periods decrease with decreasing exciton-phonon coupling.

  10. Theory of femtosecond coherent double-pump single-molecule spectroscopy: Application to light harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lipeng; Gelin, Maxim F; Domcke, Wolfgang; Zhao, Yang

    2015-04-28

    We develop a first principles theoretical description of femtosecond double-pump single-molecule signals of molecular aggregates. We incorporate all singly excited electronic states and vibrational modes with significant exciton-phonon coupling into a system Hamiltonian and treat the ensuing system dynamics within the Davydov D1 Ansatz. The remaining intra- and inter-molecular vibrational modes are treated as a heat bath and their effect is accounted for through lineshape functions. We apply our theory to simulate single-molecule signals of the light harvesting complex II. The calculated signals exhibit pronounced oscillations of mixed electron-vibrational (vibronic) origin. Their periods decrease with decreasing exciton-phonon coupling. PMID:25933751

  11. Energetic pulses in exciton-phonon molecular chains and conservative numerical methods for quasilinear Hamiltonian systems.

    PubMed

    Lemesurier, Brenton

    2013-09-01

    The phenomenon of coherent energetic pulse propagation in exciton-phonon molecular chains such as α-helix protein is studied using an ODE system model of Davydov-Scott type, both with numerical studies using a new unconditionally stable fourth-order accurate energy-momentum conserving time discretization and with analytical explanation of the main numerical observations. Impulsive initial data associated with initial excitation of a single amide-I vibration by the energy released by ATP hydrolysis are used as well as the best current estimates of physical parameter values. In contrast to previous studies based on a proposed long-wave approximation by the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation and focusing on initial data resembling the soliton solutions of that equation, the results here instead lead to approximation by the third derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation, giving a far better fit to observed behavior. A good part of the behavior is indeed explained well by the linear part of that equation, the Airy PDE, while other significant features do not fit any PDE approximation but are instead explained well by a linearized analysis of the ODE system. A convenient method is described for construction of the highly stable, accurate conservative time discretizations used, with proof of its desirable properties for a large class of Hamiltonian systems, including a variety of molecular models.

  12. Excitons and exciton-phonon interactions in 2D MoS2 , WS2 and WSe2 studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, Marcos; Del Corro, Elena; Carvalho, Bruno; Malard, Leandro; Alves, Juliana; Fantini, Cristiano; Terrones, Humberto; Elias, Ana Laura; Terrones, Mauricio

    The 2D materials exhibit a very strong exciton binding energy, and the exciton-phonon coupling plays an important role in their optical properties. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) is a very useful tool to provide information about excitons and their couplings with phonons. We will present in this work a RRS study of different samples of 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (MoS2, WS2 and WSe2) with one, two and three layers (1L, 2L, 3L) and bulk samples, using more than 30 different laser excitation lines covering the visible range. We have observed that all Raman features are enhanced by resonances with excitonic transitions. From the laser energy dependence of the Raman excitation profile (REP) we obtained the energies of the excitonic states and their dependence with the number of atomic layers.. In the case of MoS2, we observed that the electron-phonon coupling is symmetry dependent, and our results provide experimental evidence of the C exciton recently predicted theoretically. The RRS results WSe2 show that the Raman modes are enhanced by the excited excitonic states and we will present the dependence of the excited states energies on the number of layers.

  13. Spatial confinement, self-polarization and exciton-phonon interaction effect on the location of exciton line in lead iodide nanofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, V. M.; Pugantseva, O. V.; Derevyanchuk, A. V.

    2014-08-01

    Theoretical investigation of the spatial confinement, self-polarization and exciton-phonon interaction influence on the exciton state in plane double nanoheterostructure (nanofilm)-lead iodide in polymeric matrix is performed within the effective mass approximation for the electron and dielectric continuum for the phonons in the framework of infinitely deep single quantum well. It is shown that spatial confinement is the dominating feature determining the energy of the bottom of exciton ground band and its binding energy. The relationship of two others depends on nanofilm thickness: in ultrathin films the influence of self-polarization effect is essentially bigger than the role of exciton-phonon interaction.

  14. Role of exciton-phonon interactions and disordering processes in the formation of the absorption edge in Cu6P(S1- x Sex)5Br crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenyak, I. P.; Kranjcec, M.; Suslikov, L. M.; Kovacs, D. Sh.; Pan'ko, V. V.

    2002-04-01

    The absorption edge in Cu6P(S1- x Sex)5Br crystals has been studied for strong absorption in the temperature range of 77 330 K. The parameters of the Urbach absorption edge and exciton-phonon interactions in Cu6P(S1- x Sex)5Br crystals are determined and their effect on the composition disorder is studied.

  15. Transport of quantum excitations coupled to spatially extended nonlinear many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iubini, Stefano; Boada, Octavi; Omar, Yasser; Piazza, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    The role of noise in the transport properties of quantum excitations is a topic of great importance in many fields, from organic semiconductors for technological applications to light-harvesting complexes in photosynthesis. In this paper we study a semi-classical model where a tight-binding Hamiltonian is fully coupled to an underlying spatially extended nonlinear chain of atoms. We show that the transport properties of a quantum excitation are subtly modulated by (i) the specific type (local versus non-local) of exciton-phonon coupling and by (ii) nonlinear effects of the underlying lattice. We report a non-monotonic dependence of the exciton diffusion coefficient on temperature, in agreement with earlier predictions, as a direct consequence of the lattice-induced fluctuations in the hopping rates due to long-wavelength vibrational modes. A standard measure of transport efficiency confirms that both nonlinearity in the underlying lattice and off-diagonal exciton-phonon coupling promote transport efficiency at high temperatures, preventing the Zeno-like quench observed in other models lacking an explicit noise-providing dynamical system.

  16. Probing ultrafast excitation energy transfer of the chlorosome with exciton-phonon variational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Somoza Márquez, Alejandro; Chen, Lipeng; Sun, Kewei; Zhao, Yang

    2016-07-27

    The chlorosome antenna complex is a fascinating structure which due to its immense scale, accurate simulation of excitation energy transfer (EET) dynamics supposes a genuine computational challenge. Resonant vibronic modes have been recently identified in 2D spectra of the chlorosome which motivates our present endeavour of modelling electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom on an equal footing. Following the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational principle, we exploit a general theory of polaron dynamics in two-dimensional lattices based on the Holstein molecular crystal model and investigate a single rod model of pigment aggregates. Unlike reduced formalisms, explicit integration of the degrees of freedom of both the system and the bath requires extensive computational resources. We exploit the architecture of graphic processor units (GPUs) by implementing our simulations on this platform. The simulation of dynamic properties of hundreds or even thousands of pigments is thus achievable in just a few hours. The potential investigation and design of natural or engineered two-dimensional pigment networks can thus be accommodated. Due to the lack of consensus regarding the precise arrangement of chromophores in the chlorosome, helicity and dimerization are investigated independently, extracting their contributions to both optical and EET properties. The presence of dimerization is found to slow down the delocalization process. Exciton delocalization is completed in 100 fs in a single rod aggregate whose dimensions (20 nm) fairly exceed the estimated extent of a coherent domain. Ultrafast energy relaxation in the exciton manifold occurs in 50 fs and the duration of super-diffusive transport is found to last for about 80 fs. PMID:26792106

  17. Coupled adaptive complex networks.

    PubMed

    Shai, S; Dobson, S

    2013-04-01

    Adaptive networks, which combine topological evolution of the network with dynamics on the network, are ubiquitous across disciplines. Examples include technical distribution networks such as road networks and the internet, natural and biological networks, and social science networks. These networks often interact with or depend upon other networks, resulting in coupled adaptive networks. In this paper we study susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic dynamics on coupled adaptive networks, where susceptible nodes are able to avoid contact with infected nodes by rewiring their intranetwork connections. However, infected nodes can pass the disease through internetwork connections, which do not change with time: The dependencies between the coupled networks remain constant. We develop an analytical formalism for these systems and validate it using extensive numerical simulation. We find that stability is increased by increasing the number of internetwork links, in the sense that the range of parameters over which both endemic and healthy states coexist (both states are reachable depending on the initial conditions) becomes smaller. Finally, we find a new stable state that does not appear in the case of a single adaptive network but only in the case of weakly coupled networks, in which the infection is endemic in one network but neither becomes endemic nor dies out in the other. Instead, it persists only at the nodes that are coupled to nodes in the other network through internetwork links. We speculate on the implications of these findings. PMID:23679478

  18. Coupled adaptive complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shai, S.; Dobson, S.

    2013-04-01

    Adaptive networks, which combine topological evolution of the network with dynamics on the network, are ubiquitous across disciplines. Examples include technical distribution networks such as road networks and the internet, natural and biological networks, and social science networks. These networks often interact with or depend upon other networks, resulting in coupled adaptive networks. In this paper we study susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic dynamics on coupled adaptive networks, where susceptible nodes are able to avoid contact with infected nodes by rewiring their intranetwork connections. However, infected nodes can pass the disease through internetwork connections, which do not change with time: The dependencies between the coupled networks remain constant. We develop an analytical formalism for these systems and validate it using extensive numerical simulation. We find that stability is increased by increasing the number of internetwork links, in the sense that the range of parameters over which both endemic and healthy states coexist (both states are reachable depending on the initial conditions) becomes smaller. Finally, we find a new stable state that does not appear in the case of a single adaptive network but only in the case of weakly coupled networks, in which the infection is endemic in one network but neither becomes endemic nor dies out in the other. Instead, it persists only at the nodes that are coupled to nodes in the other network through internetwork links. We speculate on the implications of these findings.

  19. In-situ optical transmission electron microscope study of exciton phonon replicas in ZnO nanowires by cathodoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shize; Tian, Xuezeng; Wang, Lifen; Wei, Jiake; Qi, Kuo; Li, Xiaomin; Xu, Zhi E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn Wang, Wenlong; Zhao, Jimin; Bai, Xuedong E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn; Wang, Enge E-mail: xdbai@iphy.ac.cn

    2014-08-18

    The cathodoluminescence spectrum of single zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires is measured by in-situ optical Transmission Electron Microscope. The coupling between exciton and longitudinal optical phonon is studied. The band edge emission varies for different excitation spots. This effect is attributed to the exciton propagation along the c axis of the nanowire. Contrary to free exciton emission, the phonon replicas are well confined in ZnO nanowire. They travel along the c axis and emit at the end surface. Bending strain increases the relative intensity of second order phonon replicas when excitons travel along the c-axis.

  20. Unified analysis of ensemble and single-complex optical spectral data from light-harvesting complex-2 chromoproteins for gaining deeper insight into bacterial photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajusalu, Mihkel; Kunz, Ralf; Rätsep, Margus; Timpmann, Kõu; Köhler, Jürgen; Freiberg, Arvi

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes are very efficient at converting photons into excitons and transferring them to reaction centers, where the energy is stored in a chemical form. Optical properties of the complexes are known to change significantly in time and also vary from one complex to another; therefore, a detailed understanding of the variations on the level of single complexes and how they accumulate into effects that can be seen on the macroscopic scale is required. While experimental and theoretical methods exist to study the spectral properties of light-harvesting complexes on both individual complex and bulk ensemble levels, they have been developed largely independently of each other. To fill this gap, we simultaneously analyze experimental low-temperature single-complex and bulk ensemble optical spectra of the light-harvesting complex-2 (LH2) chromoproteins from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila in order to find a unique theoretical model consistent with both experimental situations. The model, which satisfies most of the observations, combines strong exciton-phonon coupling with significant disorder, characteristic of the proteins. We establish a detailed disorder model that, in addition to containing a C2-symmetrical modulation of the site energies, distinguishes between static intercomplex and slow conformational intracomplex disorders. The model evaluations also verify that, despite best efforts, the single-LH2-complex measurements performed so far may be biased toward complexes with higher Huang-Rhys factors.

  1. Complex mode dynamics of coupled wave oscillators.

    PubMed

    Alexander, T J; Yan, D; Kevrekidis, P G

    2013-12-01

    We explore how nonlinear coherent waves localized in a few wells of a periodic potential can act analogously to a chain of coupled oscillators. We identify the small-amplitude oscillation modes of these "coupled wave oscillators" and find that they can be extended into the large amplitude regime, where some "ring" for long times. We also reveal the appearance of complex behavior such as the breakdown of Josephson-like oscillations, the destabilization of fundamental oscillation modes, and the emergence of chaotic oscillations for large amplitude excitations. We show that the dynamics may be accurately described by a discrete model with nearest-neighbor coupling, in which the lattice oscillators bear an effective mass.

  2. Same-Sex Couples: Legal Complexities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, Ramona Faith; Kuvalanka, Katherine A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a typology for organizing our current knowledge regarding same-sex couples in the United States who have and have not established legal ties between partners. This framework is complemented by a discussion of key rulings that define what is legally possible as well as the introduction of "legal consciousness,"…

  3. Complex coupled-mode theory for tapered optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Mu, Jianwei; Huang, Wei-Ping

    2011-03-15

    A coupled-mode formulation based on complex local modes is developed for tapered and longitudinally varying optical waveguides. Different from the conventional coupled-mode theory that requires integration over the entire spectrum of radiation modes, the new formulation treats the radiation fields via discrete complex modes similarly to the guided modes. Accuracy, convergence, and scope of validity for the solutions of the complex coupled-mode equations are investigated in detail for a typical single-mode waveguide taper. It is demonstrated that the complex coupled-mode theory has overcome the difficulties of the conventional theory in simulation of radiation field effects while preserving the simplicity and intuitiveness of this popular method.

  4. Exciton coupling of surface complexes on a nanocrystal surface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangxing; Ji, Jianwei; Wang, Guan; You, Xiaozeng

    2014-08-25

    Exciton coupling may arise when chromophores are brought into close spatial proximity. Herein the intra-nanocrystal exciton coupling of the surface complexes formed by coordination of 8-hydroxyquinoline to ZnS nanocrystals (NCs) is reported. It is studied by absorption, photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation (PLE), and PL lifetime measurements. The exciton coupling of the surface complexes tunes the PL color and broadens the absorption and PLE windows of the NCs, and thus is a potential strategy for improving the light-harvesting efficiency of NC solar cells and photocatalysts.

  5. Mode-coupling instability of monolayer complex (dusty) plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Sergey; Ivlev, Alexei; Morfill, Gregor

    2010-05-01

    Strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasmas give us a unique opportunity to go beyond the limits of continuous media and study various generic processes occurring in liquids or solids, in regimes ranging from the onset of cooperative phenomena to large strongly coupled systems at the most detailed kinetic (atomistic) level. On the other hand, there is certain peculiarity of the interparticle interactions in complex plasmas. This can be easily understood if we divide the complete set of elementary charges in complex plasmas into two distinct categories - a subsystem of charges bound to the microparticles, and a subsystem of free plasma charges in the surrounding wakes. Plasma wakes play the role of a "third body" in the mutual particle-particle interaction and, hence, make the pair interaction nonreciprocal. We carried out rigorous theoretical investigation of the DL wave mode coupling occurring in 2D complex plasmas due to particle-wake interactions. The analysis of the mode coupling shows that if the strength of the vertical confinement is below a certain critical value, then resonance coupling between the longitudinal in-plane mode and out-of-plane mode sets in. This results in the emergence of a hybrid mode and drives the mode-coupling instability. The universal dependence of the critical confinement frequency on plasma parameters is calculated, which allows us to specify the conditions when stable 2D highly ordered complex plasma can be formed in experiments.

  6. Complex network synchronization of chaotic systems with delay coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Theesar, S. Jeeva Sathya Ratnavelu, K.

    2014-03-05

    The study of complex networks enables us to understand the collective behavior of the interconnected elements and provides vast real time applications from biology to laser dynamics. In this paper, synchronization of complex network of chaotic systems has been studied. Every identical node in the complex network is assumed to be in Lur’e system form. In particular, delayed coupling has been assumed along with identical sector bounded nonlinear systems which are interconnected over network topology.

  7. Complex coupled-mode theory for optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Ping; Mu, Jianwei

    2009-10-12

    A coupled-mode formulation is described in which the radiation fields are represented in terms of discrete complex modes. The complex modes are obtained from a waveguide model facilitated by the combination of perfectly matched boundary (PML) and perfectly reflecting boundary (PRB) condition. By proper choice of the PML parameters, the guided modes of the structure remain unchanged, whereas the continuous radiation modes are discretized into orthogonal and normalizable complex quasi-leaky and PML modes. The complex coupled-mode formulation is identical to that for waveguides with loss and/or gain and can be solved by similar analytical and numerical techniques. By identifying the phase-matching conditions between the complex modes, the coupled mode formulation may be further simplified to yield analytical solutions. The complex coupled-mode theory is applied to Bragg grating in slab waveguides and validated by rigorous mode-matching method. It is for the first time that we can treat guided and radiation field in a unified and straightforward fashion without having to resort to cumbersome radiation modes. Highly accurate and insightful results are obtained with consideration of only the nearly phase-matched modes.

  8. Generalized synchronization in mutually coupled oscillators and complex networks.

    PubMed

    Moskalenko, Olga I; Koronovskii, Alexey A; Hramov, Alexander E; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2012-09-01

    We introduce a concept of generalized synchronization, able to encompass the setting of collective synchronized behavior for mutually coupled systems and networking systems featuring complex topologies in their connections. The onset of the synchronous regime is confirmed by the dependence of the system's Lyapunov exponents on the coupling parameter. The presence of a generalized synchronization regime is verified by means of the nearest neighbor method.

  9. Ideal gas behavior of a strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasma.

    PubMed

    Oxtoby, Neil P; Griffith, Elias J; Durniak, Céline; Ralph, Jason F; Samsonov, Dmitry

    2013-07-01

    In a laboratory, a two-dimensional complex (dusty) plasma consists of a low-density ionized gas containing a confined suspension of Yukawa-coupled plastic microspheres. For an initial crystal-like form, we report ideal gas behavior in this strongly coupled system during shock-wave experiments. This evidence supports the use of the ideal gas law as the equation of state for soft crystals such as those formed by dusty plasmas. PMID:23863006

  10. Ideal Gas Behavior of a Strongly Coupled Complex (Dusty) Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxtoby, Neil P.; Griffith, Elias J.; Durniak, Céline; Ralph, Jason F.; Samsonov, Dmitry

    2013-07-01

    In a laboratory, a two-dimensional complex (dusty) plasma consists of a low-density ionized gas containing a confined suspension of Yukawa-coupled plastic microspheres. For an initial crystal-like form, we report ideal gas behavior in this strongly coupled system during shock-wave experiments. This evidence supports the use of the ideal gas law as the equation of state for soft crystals such as those formed by dusty plasmas.

  11. Facilitated synchronization of complex networks through a discontinuous coupling strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Qiu, C.; Huang, H. B.; Qi, G. X.; Wang, H. J.

    2010-08-01

    Synchronization stability in complex networks is a topic of theoretical interest and practical importance. Increasing effort has been devoted to the enhancement of synchronizability of networks, or more specifically, the design of synchronizable networks. However, most previous attempts turn the coupling weight/gradient or change the topological interactions, which sometimes is not manageable. In this paper, by adopting a simple kind of discontinuous coupling strategy: the uniform on-off coupling scheme, with on-off period being comparable to the timescale of node dynamics, the problem is solved within the framework of the master stability function. The results show that, this strategy can greatly increase the stable region of synchronization, which means the size of synchronizable networks can be much larger than the traditional case, without any changes of their connections. Furthermore, the synchronization speed can be accelerated considerably, which is even higher than the previous optimal case. The mechanism of the facilitation is revealed and shows that the continuous coupling in fact is one of the worst choices for synchronization in the view of discontinuous coupling strategy. The coupling cost required for synchronization is also examined, which is approximately the same as the continuous coupling.

  12. Coupled dipole plasmonics of nanoantennas in discontinuous, complex dielectric environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forcherio, Gregory T.; Blake, Phillip; Seeram, Manoj; DeJarnette, Drew; Roper, D. Keith

    2015-11-01

    Two-dimensional metamaterials support both plasmonic and coupled lattice (Fano) resonant modes that together could enhance optoelectronics. Descriptions for plasmon excitation in Fano resonant lattices in non-vacuum environments typically use idealized, homogeneous matrices due to computational expense and limitations of common approaches. This work described both localized and coupled resonance activity of two-dimensional, square lattices of gold (Au) nanospheres (NS) in discontinuous, complex dielectric media using compact synthesis of discrete and coupled dipole approximations. This multi-scale approach supported attribution of experimentally observed spectral resonance energy and bandwidth to interactions between metal and dielectric substrate(s) supporting the lattices. Effective polarizabilities of single AuNS, either in vacuo or supported by glass and/or indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates, were obtained with discrete dipole approximation (DDA). This showed plasmon energy transport varied with type of substrate: glass increased scattering, while ITO increased absorption and energy confinement. Far-field lattice interactions between AuNS with/without substrates were computed by coupled dipole approximation (CDA) using effective polarizabilities. This showed glass enhanced diffractive features (e.g., coupled lattice resonance), while ITO supported plasmon modes. This compact, multiscale approach to describe metasurfaces in complex environments could accelerate their development and application.

  13. Handling Magnetic Coupling in Trinuclear Cu(II) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Reta Mañeru, Daniel; Costa, Ramon; Guix Márquez, Meritxell; Moreira, Ibério de P R; Illas, Francesc

    2015-08-11

    The problem of deriving three different two-body magnetic couplings in three electrons/three centers in a general geometric arrangement is investigated using the trinuclear Cu(II) HAKKEJ complex as a real case example. In these systems, one quartet and two doublet low lying electronic states exist, which define the magnetic spectra. However, the two possible linearly independent energy differences do not provide enough information to extract the three magnetic coupling constants. Here, we show how to obtain these parameters without making any assumption on the symmetry of the system from a combination of density functional- and wave function-based calculations. The density functional calculations explore various broken symmetry solutions and relate the corresponding energy to the expectation value of the Heisenberg Hamiltonian. This allows one to obtain all magnetic couplings, although their magnitude strongly depends on the exchange-correlation functional. Interestingly, a constant ratio between the magnetic coupling constants along a series of investigated functionals is found. This provides an additional equation to be used when relying on energy differences between spin states, which in turn allow solving the Heisenberg spectrum. The magnetic couplings thus obtained are compared to the experiment. Implications for the appropriate interpretation of the experiment and for the study of more complex systems are discussed. PMID:26574448

  14. From globally coupled maps to complex-systems biology.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2015-09-01

    Studies of globally coupled maps, introduced as a network of chaotic dynamics, are briefly reviewed with an emphasis on novel concepts therein, which are universal in high-dimensional dynamical systems. They include clustering of synchronized oscillations, hierarchical clustering, chimera of synchronization and desynchronization, partition complexity, prevalence of Milnor attractors, chaotic itinerancy, and collective chaos. The degrees of freedom necessary for high dimensionality are proposed to equal the number in which the combinatorial exceeds the exponential. Future analysis of high-dimensional dynamical systems with regard to complex-systems biology is briefly discussed.

  15. From globally coupled maps to complex-systems biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2015-09-01

    Studies of globally coupled maps, introduced as a network of chaotic dynamics, are briefly reviewed with an emphasis on novel concepts therein, which are universal in high-dimensional dynamical systems. They include clustering of synchronized oscillations, hierarchical clustering, chimera of synchronization and desynchronization, partition complexity, prevalence of Milnor attractors, chaotic itinerancy, and collective chaos. The degrees of freedom necessary for high dimensionality are proposed to equal the number in which the combinatorial exceeds the exponential. Future analysis of high-dimensional dynamical systems with regard to complex-systems biology is briefly discussed.

  16. From globally coupled maps to complex-systems biology

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2015-09-15

    Studies of globally coupled maps, introduced as a network of chaotic dynamics, are briefly reviewed with an emphasis on novel concepts therein, which are universal in high-dimensional dynamical systems. They include clustering of synchronized oscillations, hierarchical clustering, chimera of synchronization and desynchronization, partition complexity, prevalence of Milnor attractors, chaotic itinerancy, and collective chaos. The degrees of freedom necessary for high dimensionality are proposed to equal the number in which the combinatorial exceeds the exponential. Future analysis of high-dimensional dynamical systems with regard to complex-systems biology is briefly discussed.

  17. Coupled disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Andrews, Michael A.; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Wang, Lin; Bauch, Chris T.

    2015-12-01

    It is increasingly recognized that a key component of successful infection control efforts is understanding the complex, two-way interaction between disease dynamics and human behavioral and social dynamics. Human behavior such as contact precautions and social distancing clearly influence disease prevalence, but disease prevalence can in turn alter human behavior, forming a coupled, nonlinear system. Moreover, in many cases, the spatial structure of the population cannot be ignored, such that social and behavioral processes and/or transmission of infection must be represented with complex networks. Research on studying coupled disease-behavior dynamics in complex networks in particular is growing rapidly, and frequently makes use of analysis methods and concepts from statistical physics. Here, we review some of the growing literature in this area. We contrast network-based approaches to homogeneous-mixing approaches, point out how their predictions differ, and describe the rich and often surprising behavior of disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks, and compare them to processes in statistical physics. We discuss how these models can capture the dynamics that characterize many real-world scenarios, thereby suggesting ways that policy makers can better design effective prevention strategies. We also describe the growing sources of digital data that are facilitating research in this area. Finally, we suggest pitfalls which might be faced by researchers in the field, and we suggest several ways in which the field could move forward in the coming years.

  18. Coupled disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks: A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Andrews, Michael A; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Wang, Lin; Bauch, Chris T

    2015-12-01

    It is increasingly recognized that a key component of successful infection control efforts is understanding the complex, two-way interaction between disease dynamics and human behavioral and social dynamics. Human behavior such as contact precautions and social distancing clearly influence disease prevalence, but disease prevalence can in turn alter human behavior, forming a coupled, nonlinear system. Moreover, in many cases, the spatial structure of the population cannot be ignored, such that social and behavioral processes and/or transmission of infection must be represented with complex networks. Research on studying coupled disease-behavior dynamics in complex networks in particular is growing rapidly, and frequently makes use of analysis methods and concepts from statistical physics. Here, we review some of the growing literature in this area. We contrast network-based approaches to homogeneous-mixing approaches, point out how their predictions differ, and describe the rich and often surprising behavior of disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks, and compare them to processes in statistical physics. We discuss how these models can capture the dynamics that characterize many real-world scenarios, thereby suggesting ways that policy makers can better design effective prevention strategies. We also describe the growing sources of digital data that are facilitating research in this area. Finally, we suggest pitfalls which might be faced by researchers in the field, and we suggest several ways in which the field could move forward in the coming years.

  19. Phase clustering in complex networks of delay-coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Toni; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Arenas, Alex

    2011-06-01

    We study the clusterization of phase oscillators coupled with delay in complex networks. For the case of diffusive oscillators, we formulate the equations relating the topology of the network and the phases and frequencies of the oscillators (functional response). We solve them exactly in directed networks for the case of perfect synchronization. We also compare the reliability of the solution of the linear system for non-linear couplings. Taking advantage of the form of the solution, we propose a frequency adaptation rule to achieve perfect synchronization. We also propose a mean-field theory for uncorrelated random networks that proves to be pretty accurate to predict phase synchronization in real topologies, as for example, the Caenorhabditis elegans or the autonomous systems connectivity.

  20. Coupling Through Tortuous Path Narrow Slot Apertures into Complex Cavitivies

    SciTech Connect

    Jedlicka, Russell P.; Castillo, Steven P.; Warne, Larry K.

    1999-07-26

    A hybrid FEM/MoM model has been implemented to compute the coupling of fields into a cavity through narrow slot apertures having depth. The model utilizes the slot model of Warne and Chen [23]-[29] which takes into account the depth of the slot, wall losses, and inhomogeneous dielectrics in the slot region. The cavity interior is modeled with the mixed-order, covariant-projection hexahedral elements of Crowley [32]. Results are given showing the accuracy and generality of the method for modeling geometrically complex slot-cavity combinations.

  1. Entropy-complexity analysis in some globally-coupled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrisment, Antoine M.; Firpo, Marie-Christine

    2016-10-01

    Globally-coupled N-body systems are well known to possess an intricate dynamics. When N is large, collective effects may drastically lower the effective dimension of the dynamics breaking the conditions on ergodicity necessary for the applicability of statistical mechanics. These problems are here illustrated and discussed through an entropy-complexity analysis of the repulsive Hamiltonian mean-field model. Using a Poincaré section of the mean-field time series provides a natural sampling time in the entropy-complexity treatment. This approach is shown to single-out the out-of-equilibrium dynamical features and to uncover a transition of the system dynamics from low-energy non-Boltzmann quasi-stationary states to high-energy stochastic-like behavior.

  2. Complex Plasmonic Nanostructures: Symmetry Breaking and Coupled Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassiter, J. Britt

    Metallic nanostructures support resonant oscillations of their conduction band electrons called localized surface plasmon resonances. Plasmons couple efficiently to light and have enabled a new class of technology for the manipulation of light at the nanoscale. Nanostructures that support plasmon resonances have the potential for a wide range of applications such as enhanced optical spectroscopy techniques for chemical- and bio-sensing, cancer diagnosis and therapy, metamaterials, and energy harvesting. As the field of plasmonics has progressed, these applications have become more sophisticated, requiring increasingly complex nanostructures. For example, coupled nanostructures of two or more nanoparticles are used extensively in plasmon-enhanced spectroscopy techniques because they exhibit extremely large optical field enhancements. Asymmetric nanostructures, such as nanocups (metallic semishells), have been shown to support magnetic modes that could be used in metamaterials applications. This class of complex plasmonic nanostructures holds great potential for both the observation of new physical phenomena and practical applications. This thesis will focus on the fabrication and characterization of several examples of these complex nanostructures using darkfield spectroscopy. The plasmon modes of a dimer consisting of two nanoshells are investigated in both the separated and conductively overlapping regimes and are interpreted using the plasmon hybridization model. Next, coupled nanoclusters of seven particles arranged in a hexagonal pattern are studied. It is found that these nanoclusters support Fano resonances due to the coupling and interference of degenerate subradiant and superradiant plasmon modes. These structures are found to have an extremely high sensitivity to the local dielectric environment, making them attractive for biosensing applications. Variations on the nanocluster geometry are then explored, and it is observed that by adding more particles and

  3. Delay-induced synchrony in complex networks with conjugate coupling.

    PubMed

    Shrii, M Manju; Senthilkumar, D V; Kurths, J

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate stable synchronous chaos in a delay coupled network of time continuous dynamical system using the framework of master stability formalism (MSF). It is further shown that conjugate coupling, i.e., coupling using dissimilar variables, can substitute delay coupling of similar variables in retrieving delay-induced phenomena. By exploiting the MSF, we show that delayed conjugate coupling in an arbitrary network is capable of both inducing synchronization where there is no synchronization at all and enhancing synchronization to a large parameter space, which even the conjugate coupling without delay is incapable of. The above results are demonstrated using the paradigmatic Rössler system and Hindmarsh-Rose neuron. PMID:23004910

  4. Complex magnetic couplings in Co3TeO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chin-Wei; Lee, Chi-Hung; Li, Chi-Yen; Wu, Chun-Ming; Li, Wen-Hsien; Chou, Chih-Chieh; Yang, Hung-Duen; Lynn, Jeffrey W.; Huang, Qingzhen; Harris, A. Brooks; Berger, Helmuth

    2013-11-01

    We report powder and single-crystal neutron diffraction measurements, combined with x-ray powder diffraction data, to unravel the complex magnetic phase diagram and exchange coupling in Co3TeO6. The magnetic structures of the various phases differ markedly from those proposed by Ivanov [Mater. Res. Bull.MRBUAC0025-540810.1016/j.materresbull.2011.10.003 47, 63 (2012)] on the basis of only powder diffraction data. The dominant exchange interactions are identified by considering the geometrical arrangement of severely distorted CoO6 octahedra and CoO4 tetrahedra, which naturally divide into two different types of layers, one of which consists of zigzag chains. These zigzag chains are the first to develop magnetic order at TM1 = 26 K, which is incommensurate in nature. The other separate layer of Co spins develops antiferromagnetic order of Γ4 symmetry at zero wave vector at TM2 = 19.5 K. Our results are consistent with the previous findings of a spontaneous polarization below TM3 = 18 K. Our neutron powder diffraction data indicate that the increase in the single-crystal (600) Bragg peak is due to a relief of extinction rather than to magnetic effects associated with the observed anomalous variation in the incommensurate wave vector at TM4 = 16 K. The commensurate order parameter is shown to have a small dependence on the applied electric field, whereas no such effect is found for the incommensurate ordering. Below TM3, the thermal expansion is negative, and it also exhibits anomalies at TM2 and TM4. A symmetry analysis and comprehensive phase diagram are given.

  5. Coupled Dust-Lattice Modes in Magnetized Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Farokhi, B.; Shahmansouri, M.

    2008-09-07

    Dust lattice wave modes in a one dimensional plasma crystal (formed by paramagnetic dust particles) suspended in the plasma sheath are studied. The ion flow in the sheath introduces 'ion wakes' below the crystal particles. The wave dispersion relations are found under the influence of inhomogeneous magnetic field, wake charge effect and equilibrium charge gradient. The expression for the wave dispersion relations clearly show that three branches exist as a result of the coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes due to the Lorenz forces, charge gradient and wake charge effect. We observe a new coupling between the dust lattice modes, which have not reported so far.

  6. Coupling protein complex analysis to peptide based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Madian, Ashraf G; Liu, Xiuping; Adamec, Jiri; Regnier, Fred E

    2010-12-01

    Proteolysis is a central component of most proteomics methods. Unfortunately much of the information relating to the structural diversity of proteins is lost during digestion. This paper describes a method in which the native proteome of yeast was subjected to preliminary fractionation by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) prior to trypsin digestion of SEC fractions and reversed phase chromatography-mass spectral analysis to identify tryptic peptides thus generated. Through this approach proteins associated with other proteins in high molecular mass complexes were recognized and identified. A focus of this work was on the identification of Hub proteins that associate with multiple interaction partners. A critical component of this strategy is to choose methods and conditions that maximize retention of native structure during the various stages of analysis prior to proteolysis, especially during cell lysis. Maximum survival of protein complexes during lysis was obtained with the French press and bead-beater methods of cell disruption at approximately pH 8 with 200 mM NaCl in the lysis buffer. Structure retention was favored by higher ionic strength, suggesting that hydrophobic effects are important in maintaining the structure of protein complexes. Recovery of protein complexes declined substantially with storage at any temperature, but storage at -20°C was best when low temperature storage was necessary. Slightly lower recovery was obtained with storage at -80°C while lowest recovery was achieved at 4°C. It was concluded that initial fractionation of native proteins in cell lysates by SEC prior to RPC-MS/MS of tryptic digests can be used to recognize and identify proteins in complexes along with their interaction partners in known protein complexes.

  7. Wind-Wave Coupling in a Complex Coastal Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, B. K.; Laxague, N.; Ortiz-Suslow, D. G.; Graber, H. C.; Romeiser, R.

    2014-12-01

    The University of Miami's air-sea interaction research team has acquired, tested and successfully deployed polarimetric cameras on a variety of shipboard platforms. This has opened up a wide range of studies of processes at the air-sea interface that are critical for interpretation of remote sensing imagery in coastal regions. We can now resolve short wave spectra in the field fast enough to capture the wave growth and relaxation as the local wind gusts and wanes, the phase dependence short waves on longer waves and the effects of rain, wave breaking and surfactants on the ocean surface. Here we will present results from shipboard experiments in the Columbia River mouth and corresponding laboratory observations in the University of Miami's new Surge-Structure ATmosphere INteraction (SUSTAIN) laboratory that demonstrate the effects of topography and currents on surface waves and the corresponding air-sea coupling as observed in SAR imagery.

  8. Symmetrized complex amplitudes for He double photoionization from the time-dependent close coupling and exterior complex scaling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, D.A.; Colgan, J.; Martin, F.; McCurdy, C.W.; Pindzola, M.S.; Rescigno, T.N.

    2004-06-01

    Symmetrized complex amplitudes for the double photoionization of helium are computed by the time-dependent close-coupling and exterior complex scaling methods, and it is demonstrated that both methods are capable of the direct calculation of these amplitudes. The results are found to be in excellent agreement with each other and in very good agreement with results of other ab initio methods and experiment.

  9. Towards quantification of vibronic coupling in photosynthetic antenna complexes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, V. P.; Westberg, M.; Wang, C.; Dahlberg, P. D.; Gellen, T.; Gardiner, A. T.; Cogdell, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic antenna complexes harvest sunlight and efficiently transport energy to the reaction center where charge separation powers biochemical energy storage. The discovery of existence of long lived quantum coherence during energy transfer has sparked the discussion on the role of quantum coherence on the energy transfer efficiency. Early works assigned observed coherences to electronic states, and theoretical studies showed that electronic coherences could affect energy transfer efficiency—by either enhancing or suppressing transfer. However, the nature of coherences has been fiercely debated as coherences only report the energy gap between the states that generate coherence signals. Recent works have suggested that either the coherences observed in photosynthetic antenna complexes arise from vibrational wave packets on the ground state or, alternatively, coherences arise from mixed electronic and vibrational states. Understanding origin of coherences is important for designing molecules for efficient light harvesting. Here, we give a direct experimental observation from a mutant of LH2, which does not have B800 chromophores, to distinguish between electronic, vibrational, and vibronic coherence. We also present a minimal theoretical model to characterize the coherences both in the two limiting cases of purely vibrational and purely electronic coherence as well as in the intermediate, vibronic regime. PMID:26049466

  10. Towards quantification of vibronic coupling in photosynthetic antenna complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, V. P.; Westberg, M.; Wang, C.; Gellen, T.; Engel, G. S.; Dahlberg, P. D.; Gardiner, A. T.; Cogdell, R. J.

    2015-06-07

    Photosynthetic antenna complexes harvest sunlight and efficiently transport energy to the reaction center where charge separation powers biochemical energy storage. The discovery of existence of long lived quantum coherence during energy transfer has sparked the discussion on the role of quantum coherence on the energy transfer efficiency. Early works assigned observed coherences to electronic states, and theoretical studies showed that electronic coherences could affect energy transfer efficiency—by either enhancing or suppressing transfer. However, the nature of coherences has been fiercely debated as coherences only report the energy gap between the states that generate coherence signals. Recent works have suggested that either the coherences observed in photosynthetic antenna complexes arise from vibrational wave packets on the ground state or, alternatively, coherences arise from mixed electronic and vibrational states. Understanding origin of coherences is important for designing molecules for efficient light harvesting. Here, we give a direct experimental observation from a mutant of LH2, which does not have B800 chromophores, to distinguish between electronic, vibrational, and vibronic coherence. We also present a minimal theoretical model to characterize the coherences both in the two limiting cases of purely vibrational and purely electronic coherence as well as in the intermediate, vibronic regime.

  11. Towards quantification of vibronic coupling in photosynthetic antenna complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V. P.; Westberg, M.; Wang, C.; Dahlberg, P. D.; Gellen, T.; Gardiner, A. T.; Cogdell, R. J.; Engel, G. S.

    2015-06-01

    Photosynthetic antenna complexes harvest sunlight and efficiently transport energy to the reaction center where charge separation powers biochemical energy storage. The discovery of existence of long lived quantum coherence during energy transfer has sparked the discussion on the role of quantum coherence on the energy transfer efficiency. Early works assigned observed coherences to electronic states, and theoretical studies showed that electronic coherences could affect energy transfer efficiency—by either enhancing or suppressing transfer. However, the nature of coherences has been fiercely debated as coherences only report the energy gap between the states that generate coherence signals. Recent works have suggested that either the coherences observed in photosynthetic antenna complexes arise from vibrational wave packets on the ground state or, alternatively, coherences arise from mixed electronic and vibrational states. Understanding origin of coherences is important for designing molecules for efficient light harvesting. Here, we give a direct experimental observation from a mutant of LH2, which does not have B800 chromophores, to distinguish between electronic, vibrational, and vibronic coherence. We also present a minimal theoretical model to characterize the coherences both in the two limiting cases of purely vibrational and purely electronic coherence as well as in the intermediate, vibronic regime.

  12. Handling Qualities of Model Reference Adaptive Controllers with Varying Complexity for Pitch-Roll Coupled Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Jacob; Hanson, Curt; Johnson, Marcus A.; Nguyen, Nhan

    2011-01-01

    Three model reference adaptive controllers (MRAC) with varying levels of complexity were evaluated on a high performance jet aircraft and compared along with a baseline nonlinear dynamic inversion controller. The handling qualities and performance of the controllers were examined during failure conditions that induce coupling between the pitch and roll axes. Results from flight tests showed with a roll to pitch input coupling failure, the handling qualities went from Level 2 with the baseline controller to Level 1 with the most complex MRAC tested. A failure scenario with the left stabilator frozen also showed improvement with the MRAC. Improvement in performance and handling qualities was generally seen as complexity was incrementally added; however, added complexity usually corresponds to increased verification and validation effort required for certification. The tradeoff between complexity and performance is thus important to a controls system designer when implementing an adaptive controller on an aircraft. This paper investigates this relation through flight testing of several controllers of vary complexity.

  13. Proton-coupled electron transfer and multielectron oxidations in complexes of ruthenium and osmium

    SciTech Connect

    Dovletoglou, A.

    1992-01-01

    This doctoral research concerns the mechanism of proton-coupled electron transfer over an extended pH range. These processes between ruthenium and osmium complexes and hydroquinones have been studied using spectrophotometric methods and cyclic voltammetry. Elucidation of the mechanistic details has been attempted by using isotopic labelling, kinetic analysis, and numerical simulation of complex kinetic schemes. The coordination and redox chemistry of polypyridyl-acetylacetonato and -oxalato complexes of ruthenium and the role of ancillary ligands in defining the properties of Ru[sup IV]O complexes were explored. These studies represent the first attempt to probe possible 2e[sup [minus

  14. Synthesis and discharge of the coupling factor.adenosine diphosphate complex in spinach chloroplast lamellae.

    PubMed

    Roy, H; Moudrianakis, E N

    1971-11-01

    The formation of a coupling factor.ADP complex is shown to be dependent on photoinduced electron transport, AMP, and P(i), and sensitive to arsenate and sulfate. The stability of the complex is unaffected by subsequent addition of arsenate, but is quite markedly sensitive to the addition of ADP. The data are discussed in relation to possible models of photophosphorylation, and in particular, to one in which coupling factor-bound, photosynthetically generated, ADP serves as a phosphoryl donor to substrate ADP. PMID:16591953

  15. Comment on the relation between the nonadiabatic coupling and the complex intersection of potential energy curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Simple relations are discussed that provide a correspondence between the complex intersection of two potential surfaces and the nonadiabatic coupling matrix element between those surfaces. These are key quantities in semiclassical and quantum mechanical theories of collision induced electronic transitions. Within the two state approximation, the complex intersection is shown to be directly related to the location and magnitude of the peak in the nonadiabatic coupling. Two cases are considered: the avoided crossing between two potential surfaces; and the spin orbit interaction due to a P-2 halogen atom. Comparisons are made between the results of the two-state model and the results of ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

  16. J(Si,H) Coupling Constants in Nonclassical Transition-Metal Silane Complexes.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Wolfgang; Meixner, Petra; Batke, Kilian; Barquera-Lozada, José E; Ruhland, Klaus; Fischer, Andreas; Eickerling, Georg; Eichele, Klaus

    2016-09-12

    We will outline that the sign and magnitude of J(Si,H) coupling constants provide a highly sensitive tool to measure the extent of Si-H bond activation in nonclassical silane complexes. Up to now, this structure-property relationship was obscured by erroneous J(Si,H) sign determinations in the literature. These new findings also help to identify the salient control parameters of the Si-H bond activation process in nonclassical silane complexes. PMID:27503583

  17. A Tightly Coupled Particle-Fluid Model for DNA-Laden Flows in Complex Microscale Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Trebotich, D; Miller, G H; Colella, P; Graves, D T; Martin, D F; Schwartz, P O

    2004-11-18

    We present a stable and convergent method for the computation of flows of DNA-laden fluids in microchannels with complex geometry. The numerical strategy combines a ball-rod model representation for polymers tightly coupled with a projection method for incompressible viscous flow. We use Cartesian grid embedded boundary methods to discretize the fluid equations in the presence of complex domain boundaries. A sample calculation is presented showing flow through a packed array microchannel in 2D.

  18. J(Si,H) Coupling Constants in Nonclassical Transition-Metal Silane Complexes.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Wolfgang; Meixner, Petra; Batke, Kilian; Barquera-Lozada, José E; Ruhland, Klaus; Fischer, Andreas; Eickerling, Georg; Eichele, Klaus

    2016-09-12

    We will outline that the sign and magnitude of J(Si,H) coupling constants provide a highly sensitive tool to measure the extent of Si-H bond activation in nonclassical silane complexes. Up to now, this structure-property relationship was obscured by erroneous J(Si,H) sign determinations in the literature. These new findings also help to identify the salient control parameters of the Si-H bond activation process in nonclassical silane complexes.

  19. A coupled multi-block solution procedure for spray combustion in complex geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Kuo-Huey; Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent spray-combusting flow in complex geometries is presently treated by a coupled implicit procedure that employs finite-rate chemistry and real gas properties for combustion, as well as the stochastic separated model for spray and a multiblock treatment for complex geometries. Illustrative numerical tests conducted encompass a steady-state nonreacting backward-facing step flow, a premixed single-phase combustion flow, and spray combustion flow in a gas turbine combustor.

  20. Exploring Regioselective Bond Cleavage and Cross-Coupling Reactions using a Low-Valent Nickel Complex.

    PubMed

    Desnoyer, Addison N; Friese, Florian W; Chiu, Weiling; Drover, Marcus W; Patrick, Brian O; Love, Jennifer A

    2016-03-14

    Recently, esters have received much attention as transmetalation partners for cross-coupling reactions. Herein, we report a systematic study of the reactivity of a series of esters and thioesters with [{(dtbpe)Ni}2(μ-η(2):η(2)-C6H6)] (dtbpe=1,2-bis(di-tert-butyl)phosphinoethane), which is a source of (dtbpe)nickel(0). Trifluoromethylthioesters were found to form η(2)-carbonyl complexes. In contrast, acetylthioesters underwent rapid Cacyl-S bond cleavage followed by decarbonylation to generate methylnickel complexes. This decarbonylation could be pushed backwards by the addition of CO, allowing for regeneration of the thioester. Most of the thioester complexes were found to undergo stoichiometric cross-coupling with phenylboronic acid to yield sulfides. While ethyl trifluoroacetate was also found to form an η(2)-carbonyl complex, phenyl esters were found to predominantly undergo Caryl-O bond cleavage to yield arylnickel complexes. These could also undergo transmetalation to yield biaryls. Attempts to render the reactions catalytic were hindered by ligand scrambling to yield nickel bis(acetate) complexes, the formation of which was supported by independent syntheses. Finally, 2-naphthyl acetate was also found to undergo clean Caryl-O bond cleavage, and although stoichiometric cross-coupling with phenylboronic acid proceeded with good yield, catalytic turnover has so far proven elusive.

  1. Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence of Chlorophylls in Light-Harvesting Complexes Coupled to Silver Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Dorota; Krajnik, Bartosz; Olejnik, Maria; Czechowski, Nikodem; Mackowski, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    We investigate metal-enhanced fluorescence of peridinin-chlorophyll protein coupled to silver nanowires using optical microscopy combined with spectrally and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. In particular we study two different sample geometries: first, in which the light-harvesting complexes are deposited onto silver nanowires, and second, where solution of both nanostructures are mixed prior deposition on a substrate. The results indicate that for the peridinin-chlorophyll complexes placed in the vicinity of the silver nanowires we observe higher intensities of fluorescence emission as compared to the reference sample, where no nanowires are present. Enhancement factors estimated for the sample where the light-harvesting complexes are mixed together with the silver nanowires prior deposition on a substrate are generally larger in comparison to the other geometry of a hybrid nanostructure. While fluorescence spectra are identical both in terms of overall shape and maximum wavelength for peridinin-chlorophyll-protein complexes both isolated and coupled to metallic nanostructures, we conclude that interaction with plasmon excitations in the latter remains neutral to the functionality of the biological system. Fluorescence transients measured for the PCP complexes coupled to the silver nanowires indicate shortening of the fluorescence lifetime pointing towards modifications of radiative rate due to plasmonic interactions. Our results can be applied for developing ways to plasmonically control the light-harvesting capability of photosynthetic complexes. PMID:23533354

  2. Metal-enhanced fluorescence of chlorophylls in light-harvesting complexes coupled to silver nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Dorota; Krajnik, Bartosz; Olejnik, Maria; Twardowska, Magdalena; Czechowski, Nikodem; Hofmann, Eckhard; Mackowski, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    We investigate metal-enhanced fluorescence of peridinin-chlorophyll protein coupled to silver nanowires using optical microscopy combined with spectrally and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. In particular we study two different sample geometries: first, in which the light-harvesting complexes are deposited onto silver nanowires, and second, where solution of both nanostructures are mixed prior deposition on a substrate. The results indicate that for the peridinin-chlorophyll complexes placed in the vicinity of the silver nanowires we observe higher intensities of fluorescence emission as compared to the reference sample, where no nanowires are present. Enhancement factors estimated for the sample where the light-harvesting complexes are mixed together with the silver nanowires prior deposition on a substrate are generally larger in comparison to the other geometry of a hybrid nanostructure. While fluorescence spectra are identical both in terms of overall shape and maximum wavelength for peridinin-chlorophyll-protein complexes both isolated and coupled to metallic nanostructures, we conclude that interaction with plasmon excitations in the latter remains neutral to the functionality of the biological system. Fluorescence transients measured for the PCP complexes coupled to the silver nanowires indicate shortening of the fluorescence lifetime pointing towards modifications of radiative rate due to plasmonic interactions. Our results can be applied for developing ways to plasmonically control the light-harvesting capability of photosynthetic complexes.

  3. Exploring Regioselective Bond Cleavage and Cross-Coupling Reactions using a Low-Valent Nickel Complex.

    PubMed

    Desnoyer, Addison N; Friese, Florian W; Chiu, Weiling; Drover, Marcus W; Patrick, Brian O; Love, Jennifer A

    2016-03-14

    Recently, esters have received much attention as transmetalation partners for cross-coupling reactions. Herein, we report a systematic study of the reactivity of a series of esters and thioesters with [{(dtbpe)Ni}2(μ-η(2):η(2)-C6H6)] (dtbpe=1,2-bis(di-tert-butyl)phosphinoethane), which is a source of (dtbpe)nickel(0). Trifluoromethylthioesters were found to form η(2)-carbonyl complexes. In contrast, acetylthioesters underwent rapid Cacyl-S bond cleavage followed by decarbonylation to generate methylnickel complexes. This decarbonylation could be pushed backwards by the addition of CO, allowing for regeneration of the thioester. Most of the thioester complexes were found to undergo stoichiometric cross-coupling with phenylboronic acid to yield sulfides. While ethyl trifluoroacetate was also found to form an η(2)-carbonyl complex, phenyl esters were found to predominantly undergo Caryl-O bond cleavage to yield arylnickel complexes. These could also undergo transmetalation to yield biaryls. Attempts to render the reactions catalytic were hindered by ligand scrambling to yield nickel bis(acetate) complexes, the formation of which was supported by independent syntheses. Finally, 2-naphthyl acetate was also found to undergo clean Caryl-O bond cleavage, and although stoichiometric cross-coupling with phenylboronic acid proceeded with good yield, catalytic turnover has so far proven elusive. PMID:26879766

  4. The mechanism of coupling between electron transfer and proton translocation in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sazanov, Leonid A

    2014-08-01

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the first and largest enzyme in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and many bacteria. It couples the transfer of two electrons between NADH and ubiquinone to the translocation of four protons across the membrane. Complex I is an L-shaped assembly formed by the hydrophilic (peripheral) arm, containing all the redox centres performing electron transfer and the membrane arm, containing proton-translocating machinery. Mitochondrial complex I consists of 44 subunits of about 1 MDa in total, whilst the prokaryotic enzyme is simpler and generally consists of 14 conserved "core" subunits. Recently we have determined the first atomic structure of the entire complex I, using the enzyme from Thermus thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 Fe-S clusters, 64 TM helices). Structure suggests a unique coupling mechanism, with redox energy of electron transfer driving proton translocation via long-range (up to ~200 Å) conformational changes. It resembles a steam engine, with coupling elements (akin to coupling rods) linking parts of this molecular machine. PMID:24943718

  5. The mechanism of coupling between electron transfer and proton translocation in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sazanov, Leonid A

    2014-08-01

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the first and largest enzyme in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and many bacteria. It couples the transfer of two electrons between NADH and ubiquinone to the translocation of four protons across the membrane. Complex I is an L-shaped assembly formed by the hydrophilic (peripheral) arm, containing all the redox centres performing electron transfer and the membrane arm, containing proton-translocating machinery. Mitochondrial complex I consists of 44 subunits of about 1 MDa in total, whilst the prokaryotic enzyme is simpler and generally consists of 14 conserved "core" subunits. Recently we have determined the first atomic structure of the entire complex I, using the enzyme from Thermus thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 Fe-S clusters, 64 TM helices). Structure suggests a unique coupling mechanism, with redox energy of electron transfer driving proton translocation via long-range (up to ~200 Å) conformational changes. It resembles a steam engine, with coupling elements (akin to coupling rods) linking parts of this molecular machine.

  6. Magnetic Exchange Couplings in Heterodinuclear Complexes Based on Differential Local Spin Rotations.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajendra P; Phillips, Jordan J; Peralta, Juan E

    2016-04-12

    We analyze the performance of a new method for the calculation of magnetic exchange coupling parameters for the particular case of heterodinuclear transition metals complexes of Cu, Ni, and V. This method is based on a generalized perturbative approach which uses differential local spin rotations via formal Lagrange multipiers (Phillips, J. J.; Peralta, J. E. J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 174115). The reliability of the calculated couplings has been assessed by comparing with results from traditional energy differences with different density functional approximations and with experimental values. Our results show that this method to calculate magnetic exchange couplings can be reliably used for heteronuclear transition metal complexes, and at the same time, that it is independent from the different mapping schemes used in energy difference methods. PMID:26953521

  7. Spin Adapted versus Broken Symmetry Approaches in the Description of Magnetic Coupling in Heterodinuclear Complexes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ramon; Valero, Rosendo; Reta Mañeru, Daniel; Moreira, Ibério de P R; Illas, Francesc

    2015-03-10

    The performance of a series of wave function and density functional theory based methods in predicting the magnetic coupling constant of a family of heterodinuclear magnetic complexes has been studied. For the former, the accuracy is similar to other simple cases involving homodinuclear complexes, the main limitation being a sufficient inclusion of dynamical correlation effects. Nevertheless, these series of calculations provide an appropriate benchmark for density functional theory based methods. Here, the usual broken symmetry approach provides a convenient framework to predict the magnetic coupling constants but requires deriving the appropriate mapping. At variance with simple dinuclear complexes, spin projection based techniques cannot recover the corresponding (approximate) spin adapted solution. Present results also show that current implementation of spin flip techniques leads to unphysical results. PMID:26579753

  8. Characterizing and Modeling the Noise and Complex Impedance of Feedhorn-Coupled TES Polarimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, J. W.; Beall, J. A.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Parker, L. P.; Staggs, S. T.; Visnjic, C.; Zhao, Y.; Austermann, J. E.; Halverson, N. W.; Henning, J. W.; Simon, S. M.; Becker, D.; Britton, J.; Cho, H. M.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Niemack, M. D.; Yoon, K. W.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.

    2009-12-16

    We present results from modeling the electrothermal performance of feedhorn-coupled transition edge sensor (TES) polarimeters under development for use in cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments. Each polarimeter couples radiation from a corrugated feedhorn through a planar orthomode transducer, which transmits power from orthogonal polarization modes to two TES bolometers. We model our TES with two- and three-block thermal architectures. We fit the complex impedance data at multiple points in the TES transition. From the fits, we predict the noise spectra. We present comparisons of these predictions to the data for two TESes on a prototype polarimeter.

  9. Heterobimetallic lantern complexes that couple antiferromagnetically through noncovalent Pt···Pt interactions.

    PubMed

    Baddour, Frederick G; Fiedler, Stephanie R; Shores, Matthew P; Golen, James A; Rheingold, Arnold L; Doerrer, Linda H

    2013-05-01

    A series of Pt-based heterobimetallic lantern complexes of the form [PtM(SAc)4(OH2)] (M = Co, 1; Ni, 2; Zn, 3) were prepared using a facile, single-step procedure. These hydrated species were reacted with 3-nitropyridine (3-NO2py) to prepare three additional lantern complexes, [PtM(SAc)4(3-NO2py)] (M = Co, 4; Ni, 5; Zn, 6), or alternatively dried in vacuo to the dehydrated species [PtM(SAc)4] (M = Co, 7; Ni, 8; Zn, 9). The Co- and Ni-containing species exhibit Pt-M bonding in solution and the solid state. In the structurally characterized compounds 1-6, the lantern units form dimers in the solid state via a short Pt···Pt metallophilic interaction. Antiferromagnetic coupling between 3d metal ions in the solid state through noncovalent metallophilic interactions was observed for all the paramagnetic lantern complexes prepared, with J-coupling values of -12.7 cm(-1) (1), -50.8 cm(-1) (2), -6.0 cm(-1) (4), and -12.6 cm(-1) (5). The Zn complexes 3 and 6 also form solid-state dimers, indicating that the formation of short Pt···Pt interactions in these complexes is not predicated on the presence of a paramagnetic 3d metal ion. These contacts and the resultant antiferromagnetic coupling are also not unique to heterobimetallic lantern complexes with axially coordinated H2O or the previously reported thiobenzoate supporting ligand.

  10. anQCD: Fortran programs for couplings at complex momenta in various analytic QCD models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, César; Cvetič, Gorazd

    2016-02-01

    We provide three Fortran programs which evaluate the QCD analytic (holomorphic) couplings Aν(Q2) for complex or real squared momenta Q2. These couplings are holomorphic analogs of the powers a(Q2)ν of the underlying perturbative QCD (pQCD) coupling a(Q2) ≡αs(Q2) / π, in three analytic QCD models (anQCD): Fractional Analytic Perturbation Theory (FAPT), Two-delta analytic QCD (2 δanQCD), and Massive Perturbation Theory (MPT). The index ν can be noninteger. The provided programs do basically the same job as the Mathematica package anQCD.m published by us previously (Ayala and Cvetič, 2015), but are now written in Fortran.

  11. Efficient oxidative coupling of 2,6-disubstituted phenol catalyzed by a dicopper(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Liao, Bei-Sih; Liu, Yi-Hung; Peng, Shei-Ming; Liu, Shiuh-Tzung

    2012-01-28

    Complexation of a rigid multi-pyridine ligand bis(2-pyridyl)-1,8-naphthyridine (bpnp) with [Cu(2)(TFA)(4)] (TFA = trifluoroacetate) resulted in the formation of a dinuclear copper(II) complex, namely [Cu(2)(bpnp)(μ-OH)(TFA)(3)] (1). This complex has been characterized by X-ray crystallographic, spectroscopic and elemental analyses. Complex 1 is an efficient catalyst for the oxidative coupling of various 2,6-disubstituted phenols with molecular oxygen. Yields and selectivity depend on the reaction conditions employed, the best results being obtained in isopropanol or dioxane at 90 °C with yields of >99%. Mechanistic pathway of the catalysis is discussed. PMID:22116574

  12. Experimental Verification of Coupled Stiffness Matrix in Multilayer Composite Structure with Complex Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jun Hwan; Kim, Jae Hoon

    The paper presents an experimental verification for calculating coupled stiffness matrix in complex curvature composite structure. The results of the analytical procedure using Variational Asymptotic Beam Sectional Analysis also indicate that the calculation of 2-D, beam, cross-sectional properties can then be incorporated into and 1-D beam analysis expressed coupled stiffness matrix. This paper presents the 2-D cross-sectional analysis of active anisotropic beams. Comparison between the analytical and experimental results shows that the proposed analytical procedure can provide an accurate and efficient prediction of the both deflection and flexural stiffness of multilayer composite slender structure. Verified comparison results can be used to efficiently design accurate complex slender structure properties for preliminary design and optimization.

  13. Comment on the relation between the nonadiabatic coupling and the complex intersection of potential energy curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Simple relations are discussed that provide a correspondence between the complex intersection of two potential surfaces and the nonadiabatic coupling matrix element between those surfaces. These are key quantities in semiclassical and quantum-mechanical theories of collision-induced electronic transitions. Within the two-state approximation, the complex intersection is shown to be directly related to the location and magnitude of the peak in the nonadiabatic coupling. Two cases have been considered: (1) the avoided crossing between two potential surfaces, and (2) the spin-orbit interaction due to a 2P halogen atom. Comparisons are made between the results of the two-state model and the results of ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

  14. Soliton dynamics to the multi-component complex coupled integrable dispersionless equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zong-Wei; Yu, Guo-Fu; Zhu, Zuo-Nong

    2016-11-01

    The generalized coupled integrable dispersionless (CID) equation describes the current-fed string in a certain external magnetic field. In this paper, we propose a multi-component complex CID equation. The integrability of the multi-component complex equation is confirmed by constructing Lax pairs. One-soliton and two-soliton solutions are investigated to exhibit rich evolution properties. Especially, similar as the multi-component short pulse equation and the first negative AKNS equation, periodic interaction, parallel solitons, elastic and inelastic interaction, energy re-distribution happen between two solitons. Multi-soliton solutions are given in terms of Pfaffian expression by virtue of Hirota's bilinear method.

  15. Assessing spatial coupling in complex population dynamics using mutual prediction and continuity statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.M.; Moniz, L.; Nichols, J.D.; Pecora, L.M.; Cooch, E.

    2005-01-01

    A number of important questions in ecology involve the possibility of interactions or ?coupling? among potential components of ecological systems. The basic question of whether two components are coupled (exhibit dynamical interdependence) is relevant to investigations of movement of animals over space, population regulation, food webs and trophic interactions, and is also useful in the design of monitoring programs. For example, in spatially extended systems, coupling among populations in different locations implies the existence of redundant information in the system and the possibility of exploiting this redundancy in the development of spatial sampling designs. One approach to the identification of coupling involves study of the purported mechanisms linking system components. Another approach is based on time series of two potential components of the same system and, in previous ecological work, has relied on linear cross-correlation analysis. Here we present two different attractor-based approaches, continuity and mutual prediction, for determining the degree to which two population time series (e.g., at different spatial locations) are coupled. Both approaches are demonstrated on a one-dimensional predator?prey model system exhibiting complex dynamics. Of particular interest is the spatial asymmetry introduced into the model as linearly declining resource for the prey over the domain of the spatial coordinate. Results from these approaches are then compared to the more standard cross-correlation analysis. In contrast to cross-correlation, both continuity and mutual prediction are clearly able to discern the asymmetry in the flow of information through this system.

  16. Flexible simulation framework to couple processes in complex 3D models for subsurface utilization assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; Nakaten, Benjamin; De Lucia, Marco; Nakaten, Natalie; Otto, Christopher; Pohl, Maik; Tillner, Elena; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of the geological subsurface for production and storage of hydrocarbons, chemical energy and heat as well as for waste disposal requires the quantification and mitigation of environmental impacts as well as the improvement of georesources utilization in terms of efficiency and sustainability. The development of tools for coupled process simulations is essential to tackle these challenges, since reliable assessments are only feasible by integrative numerical computations. Coupled processes at reservoir to regional scale determine the behaviour of reservoirs, faults and caprocks, generally demanding for complex 3D geological models to be considered besides available monitoring and experimenting data in coupled numerical simulations. We have been developing a flexible numerical simulation framework that provides efficient workflows for integrating the required data and software packages to carry out coupled process simulations considering, e.g., multiphase fluid flow, geomechanics, geochemistry and heat. Simulation results are stored in structured data formats to allow for an integrated 3D visualization and result interpretation as well as data archiving and its provision to collaborators. The main benefits in using the flexible simulation framework are the integration of data geological and grid data from any third party software package as well as data export to generic 3D visualization tools and archiving formats. The coupling of the required process simulators in time and space is feasible, while different spatial dimensions in the coupled simulations can be integrated, e.g., 0D batch with 3D dynamic simulations. User interaction is established via high-level programming languages, while computational efficiency is achieved by using low-level programming languages. We present three case studies on the assessment of geological subsurface utilization based on different process coupling approaches and numerical simulations.

  17. Robust synchronization of complex networks with uncertain couplings and incomplete information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Liang, Jinling; Wang, Zidong; Alsaadi, Fuad E.

    2016-07-01

    The mean square exponential (MSE) synchronization problem is investigated in this paper for complex networks with simultaneous presence of uncertain couplings and incomplete information, which comprise both the randomly occurring delay and the randomly occurring non-linearities. The network considered is uncertain with time-varying stochastic couplings. The randomly occurring delay and non-linearities are modelled by two Bernoulli-distributed white sequences with known probabilities to better describe realistic complex networks. By utilizing the coordinate transformation, the addressed complex network can be exponentially synchronized in the mean square if the MSE stability of a transformed subsystem can be assured. The stability problem is studied firstly for the transformed subsystem based on the Lyapunov functional method. Then, an easy-to-verify sufficient criterion is established by further decomposing the transformed system, which embodies the joint impacts of the single-node dynamics, the network topology and the statistical quantities of the uncertainties on the synchronization of the complex network. Numerical examples are exploited to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  18. EAMCD: an efficient algorithm based on minimum coupling distance for community identification in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, GuoDong; Wu, Yan; Ren, YuanFang; Zhu, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Community structure is an important feature in many real-world networks, which can help us understand structure and function in complex networks better. In recent years, there have been many algorithms proposed to detect community structure in complex networks. In this paper, we try to detect potential community beams whose link strengths are greater than surrounding links and propose the minimum coupling distance (MCD) between community beams. Based on MCD, we put forward an optimization heuristic algorithm (EAMCD) for modularity density function to welded these community beams into community frames which are seen as a core part of community. Using the principle of random walk, we regard the remaining nodes into the community frame to form a community. At last, we merge several small community frame fragments using local greedy strategy for the modularity density general function. Real-world and synthetic networks are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm in detecting communities in complex networks.

  19. Numerical simulation and analysis of complex patterns in a two-layer coupled reaction diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Zheng; Bai, Zhan-Guo; Li, Yan; He, Ya-Feng; Zhao, Kun

    2015-04-01

    The resonance interaction between two modes is investigated using a two-layer coupled Brusselator model. When two different wavelength modes satisfy resonance conditions, new modes will appear, and a variety of superlattice patterns can be obtained in a short wavelength mode subsystem. We find that even though the wavenumbers of two Turing modes are fixed, the parameter changes have influences on wave intensity and pattern selection. When a hexagon pattern occurs in the short wavelength mode layer and a stripe pattern appears in the long wavelength mode layer, the Hopf instability may happen in a nonlinearly coupled model, and twinkling-eye hexagon and travelling hexagon patterns will be obtained. The symmetries of patterns resulting from the coupled modes may be different from those of their parents, such as the cluster hexagon pattern and square pattern. With the increase of perturbation and coupling intensity, the nonlinear system will convert between a static pattern and a dynamic pattern when the Turing instability and Hopf instability happen in the nonlinear system. Besides the wavenumber ratio and intensity ratio of the two different wavelength Turing modes, perturbation and coupling intensity play an important role in the pattern formation and selection. According to the simulation results, we find that two modes with different symmetries can also be in the spatial resonance under certain conditions, and complex patterns appear in the two-layer coupled reaction diffusion systems. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11247242), the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51201057), and the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. A2014208171).

  20. Complex dynamics analysis of impulsively coupled Duffing oscillators with ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Li-Ping; Yu, Jian-Jiang

    2015-02-01

    Impulsively coupled systems are high-dimensional non-smooth systems that can exhibit rich and complex dynamics. This paper studies the complex dynamics of a non-smooth system which is unidirectionally impulsively coupled by three Duffing oscillators in a ring structure. By constructing a proper Poincaré map of the non-smooth system, an analytical expression of the Jacobian matrix of Poincaré map is given. Two-parameter Hopf bifurcation sets are obtained by combining the shooting method and the Runge-Kutta method. When the period is fixed and the coupling strength changes, the system undergoes stable, periodic, quasi-periodic, and hyper-chaotic solutions, etc. Floquet theory is used to study the stability of the periodic solutions of the system and their bifurcations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11402224, 11202180, 61273106, and 11171290), the Qing Lan Project of the Jiangsu Higher Educational Institutions of China, and the Jiangsu Overseas Research and Training Program for University Prominent Young and Middle-aged Teachers and Presidents.

  1. Control of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic couplings in a galvinoxyl triplet chrysene encounter complex through solvent polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Akio; Watanabe, Yasuyuki; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2003-04-01

    Energy difference, J, between the quartet and doublet spin states of a galvinoxyl radical-triplet chrysene pair as an encounter complex in solution was investigated by measuring chemically induced dynamic electron polarization (CIDEP) of galvinoxyl with a time-resolved ESR (TR-ESR) method. All the TR-ESR spectra of galvinoxyl show net type CIDEP signals due to doublet-triplet magnetic interactions. The CIDEP phase switches from absorption in non-polar solvent to emission in polar solvent. The signals were analyzed on the basis of the radical-triplet pair mechanism (RTPM) for CIDEP creation, the results of which indicate that galvinoxyl-triplet chrysene pairs show ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic couplings in non-polar and polar solvents, respectively. This solvent polarity-controlled switching of magnetic coupling in the galvinoxyl-triplet chrysene pair was interpreted by introducing the effect of intermolecular charge transfer interaction on the J value.

  2. Subharmonic phase clusters in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with nonlinear global coupling.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Vladimir; Orlov, Alexander; Krischer, Katharina

    2010-12-01

    A wide variety of subharmonic n -phase cluster patterns was observed in experiments with spatially extended chemical and electrochemical oscillators. These patterns cannot be captured with a phase model. We demonstrate that the introduction of a nonlinear global coupling (NGC) in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation has subharmonic cluster pattern solutions in wide parameter ranges. The NGC introduces a conservation law for the oscillatory state of the homogeneous mode, which describes the strong oscillations of the mean field in the experiments. We show that the NGC causes a pronounced 2:1 self-resonance on any spatial inhomogeneity, leading to two-phase subharmonic clustering, as well as additional higher resonances. Nonequilibrium Ising-Bloch transitions occur as the coupling strength is varied.

  3. Substrate-Na{sup +} complex formation: Coupling mechanism for {gamma}-aminobutyrate symporters

    SciTech Connect

    Pallo, Anna; Simon, Agnes; Bencsura, Akos; Heja, Laszlo; Kardos, Julianna

    2009-07-24

    Crystal structures of transmembrane transport proteins belonging to the important families of neurotransmitter-sodium symporters reveal how they transport neurotransmitters across membranes. Substrate-induced structural conformations of gated neurotransmitter-sodium symporters have been in the focus of research, however, a key question concerning the mechanism of Na{sup +} ion coupling remained unanswered. Homology models of human glial transporter subtypes of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid were built. In accordance with selectivity data for subtype 2 vs. 3, docking and molecular dynamics calculations suggest similar orthosteric substrate (inhibitor) conformations and binding crevices but distinguishable allosteric Zn{sup 2+} ion binding motifs. Considering the occluded conformational states of glial human {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transporter subtypes, we found major semi-extended and minor ring-like conformations of zwitterionic {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion. The existence of the minor ring-like conformation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion may be attributed to the strengthening of the intramolecular H-bond by the electrostatic effect of Na{sup +} ion. Coupling substrate uptake into cells with the thermodynamically favorable Na{sup +} ion movement through substrate-Na{sup +} ion complex formation may be a mechanistic principle featuring transmembrane neurotransmitter-sodium symporter proteins.

  4. Proton coupled electron transfer from the excited state of a ruthenium(II) pyridylimidazole complex.

    PubMed

    Pannwitz, Andrea; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-04-28

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) from the excited state of [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; pyimH = 2-(2'-pyridyl)imidazole) to N-methyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (monoquat, MQ(+)) was studied. While this complex has been investigated previously, our study is the first to show that the formal bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of the imidazole-N-H bond decreases from (91 ± 1) kcal mol(-1) in the electronic ground state to (43 ± 5) kcal mol(-1) in the lowest-energetic (3)MLCT excited state. This makes the [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) complex a very strong (formal) hydrogen atom donor even when compared to metal hydride complexes, and this is interesting for light-driven (formal) hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions with a variety of different substrates. Mechanistically, formal HAT between (3)MLCT excited [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) and monoquat in buffered 1 : 1 (v : v) CH3CN/H2O was found to occur via a sequence of reaction steps involving electron transfer from Ru(ii) to MQ(+) coupled to release of the N-H proton to buffer base, followed by protonation of reduced MQ(+) by buffer acid. Our study is relevant in the larger contexts of photoredox catalysis and light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:27094541

  5. G protein activation by G protein coupled receptors: ternary complex formation or catalyzed reaction?

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Waelbroeck, Magali

    2004-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors catalyze the GDP/GTP exchange on G proteins, thereby activating them. The ternary complex model, designed to describe agonist binding in the absence of GTP, is often extended to G protein activation. This is logically unsatisfactory as the ternary complex does not accumulate when G proteins are activated by GTP. Extended models taking into account nucleotide binding exist, but fail to explain catalytic G protein activation. This review puts forward an enzymatic model of G protein activation and compares its predictions with the ternary complex model and with observed receptor phenomenon. This alternative model does not merely provide a new set of formulae but leads to a new philosophical outlook and more readily accommodates experimental observations. The ternary complex model implies that, HRG being responsible for efficient G protein activation, it should be as stable as possible. In contrast, the enzyme model suggests that although a limited stabilization of HRG facilitates GDP release, HRG should not be "too stable" as this might trap the G protein in an inactive state and actually hinder G protein activation. The two models also differ completely in the definition of the receptor "active state": the ternary complex model implies that the active state corresponds to a single active receptor conformation (HRG); in contrast, the catalytic model predicts that the active receptor state is mobile, switching smoothly through various conformations with high and low affinities for agonists (HR, HRG, HRGGDP, HRGGTP, etc.).

  6. Topology identification of uncertain nonlinearly coupled complex networks with delays based on anticipatory synchronization.

    PubMed

    Che, Yanqiu; Li, Ruixue; Han, Chunxiao; Cui, Shigang; Wang, Jiang; Wei, Xile; Deng, Bin

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an adaptive anticipatory synchronization based method for simultaneous identification of topology and parameters of uncertain nonlinearly coupled complex dynamical networks with time delays. An adaptive controller is proposed, based on Lyapunov stability theorem and Barbǎlat's Lemma, to guarantee the stability of the anticipatory synchronization manifold between drive and response networks. Meanwhile, not only the identification criteria of network topology and system parameters are obtained but also the anticipatory time is identified. Numerical simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:23556964

  7. Coexistence of regular and irregular dynamics in complex networks of pulse-coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Timme, Marc; Wolf, Fred; Geisel, Theo

    2002-12-16

    For general networks of pulse-coupled oscillators, including regular, random, and more complex networks, we develop an exact stability analysis of synchronous states. As opposed to conventional stability analysis, here stability is determined by a multitude of linear operators. We treat this multioperator problem exactly and show that for inhibitory interactions the synchronous state is stable, independent of the parameters and the network connectivity. In randomly connected networks with strong interactions this synchronous state, displaying regular dynamics, coexists with a balanced state exhibiting irregular dynamics. External signals may switch the network between qualitatively distinct states.

  8. Multistability and complex dynamics in coupled semiconductor lasers with time-delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakin, M.; Kochkurov, L.; Melnikov, L.; Astakhov, V.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate complex dynamics of two coupled nonidentical Land-Kobayashi oscillators. It is shown that at low values of feedback rate variation of delay only leads to alternation of periodic and stationary regimes. The analysis of characteristic regimes of the system in a wide range of parameters is provided. We demonstrate that the system under study is multistable. With the variation of control parameters sole fixed point repeatedly undergoes supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcations, which leads to an increase in the number of limit cycles co-existing in the phase space. It is shown that multistable states are formed by different combinations of the periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic regimes.

  9. Complex transitions between spike, burst or chaos synchronization states in coupled neurons with coexisting bursting patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hua-Guang; Chen, Sheng-Gen; Li, Yu-Ye

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the synchronization dynamics of a coupled neuronal system composed of two identical Chay model neurons. The Chay model showed coexisting period-1 and period-2 bursting patterns as a parameter and initial values are varied. We simulated multiple periodic and chaotic bursting patterns with non-(NS), burst phase (BS), spike phase (SS), complete (CS), and lag synchronization states. When the coexisting behavior is near period-2 bursting, the transitions of synchronization states of the coupled system follows very complex transitions that begins with transitions between BS and SS, moves to transitions between CS and SS, and to CS. Most initial values lead to the CS state of period-2 bursting while only a few lead to the CS state of period-1 bursting. When the coexisting behavior is near period-1 bursting, the transitions begin with NS, move to transitions between SS and BS, to transitions between SS and CS, and then to CS. Most initial values lead to the CS state of period-1 bursting but a few lead to the CS state of period-2 bursting. The BS was identified as chaos synchronization. The patterns for NS and transitions between BS and SS are insensitive to initial values. The patterns for transitions between CS and SS and the CS state are sensitive to them. The number of spikes per burst of non-CS bursting increases with increasing coupling strength. These results not only reveal the initial value- and parameter-dependent synchronization transitions of coupled systems with coexisting behaviors, but also facilitate interpretation of various bursting patterns and synchronization transitions generated in the nervous system with weak coupling strength. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11372224 and 11402039) and the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities designated to Tongji University (Grant No. 1330219127).

  10. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    PubMed

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1.

  11. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  12. Impaired Astrocytic Gap Junction Coupling and Potassium Buffering in a Mouse Model of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Zeng, Ling-Hui; Wong, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in astrocytes occur in the brains of patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) and may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurological dysfunction in this disease. Here, we report that knock-out mice with Tsc1 gene inactivation in glia (Tsc1GFAPCKO mice) exhibit decreased expression of the astrocytic connexin protein, Cx43, and an associated impairment in gap junction coupling between astrocytes. Correspondingly, hippocampal slices from Tsc1GFAPCKO mice have increased extracellular potassium concentration in response to stimulation. This impaired potassium buffering can be attributed to abnormal gap junction coupling, as a gap junction inhibitor elicits an additional increase in potassium concentration in control, but not Tsc1GFAPCKO slices. Furthermore, treatment with a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor reverses the deficient Cx43 expression and impaired potassium buffering. These findings suggest that Tsc1 inactivation in astrocytes causes defects in astrocytic gap junction coupling and potassium clearance, which may contribute to epilepsy in Tsc1GFAPCKO mice. PMID:19385061

  13. Characterization of carrageenan hydrogel electrode coatings with immobilized cationic metal complex redox couples

    SciTech Connect

    Crumbliss, A.L.; Perine, S.C.; Edwards, A.K.; Rillema, D.P.

    1992-02-06

    The redox behavior of cationic metal complexes immobilized in a {kappa}-carrageenan hydrogel matrix, which acts as a cation-exchange polymeric electrode coating, is described. Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}, Ru(en){sub 3}{sup 3+}, Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+}, and Co(bpy){sub 3}{sup 3+} (bpy = 2,2{prime}-bipyridine; en = ethylenediamine) were immobilized singly and in pairs (Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} and Co (bpy){sub 3}{sup 3+}) on the surface of a Pt electrode and were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. The redox couples were selected on the basis of their structural similarity and wide range of electron self-exchange rate constants (10{sup 1}-10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). The surface-modified carrageenan hydrogel electrode was found to exhibit superior electrolyte diffusion properties when compared with more commonly used cation-exchange immobilization matrices such as Nafion, and to be stable with respect to leakage of cations into the solution. The carrageenan hydrogel film was also found to be permeable to anionic redox couples such as Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-/4-}. All immobilized redox couples exhibited quasi-reversible electrochemical behavior. Evidence supporting a dual-mode mechanism involving physical diffusion and electron hopping for charge propagation through the carrageenan hydrogel is presented. 45 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Visualization of coupled protein folding and binding in bacteria and purification of the heterodimeric complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyong; Chong, Shaorong

    2003-01-01

    During overexpression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli, misfolded proteins often aggregate and form inclusion bodies. If an aggregation-prone recombinant protein is fused upstream (as an N-terminal fusion) to GFP, aggregation of the recombinant protein domain also leads to misfolding of the downstream GFP domain, resulting in a decrease or loss of fluorescence. We investigated whether the GFP domain could fold correctly if aggregation of the upstream protein domain was prevented in vivo by a coupled protein folding and binding interaction. Such interaction has been previously shown to occur between the E. coli integration host factors and , and between the domains of the general transcriptional coactivator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein and the activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptors. In this study, fusion of integration host factor or the CREB-binding protein domain upstream to GFP resulted in aggregation of the fusion protein. Coexpression of their respective partners, on the other hand, allowed soluble expression of the fusion protein and a dramatic increase in fluorescence. The study demonstrated that coupled protein folding and binding could be correlated to GFP fluorescence. A modified miniintein containing an affinity tag was inserted between the upstream protein domain and GFP to allow rapid purification and identification of the heterodimeric complex. The GFP coexpression fusion system may be used to identify novel protein-protein interactions that involve coupled folding and binding or protein partners that can solubilize aggregation-prone recombinant proteins.

  15. Chromate adsorption on selected soil minerals: Surface complexation modeling coupled with spectroscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Veselská, Veronika; Fajgar, Radek; Číhalová, Sylva; Bolanz, Ralph M; Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph; Siddique, Jamal A; Komárek, Michael

    2016-11-15

    This study investigates the mechanisms of Cr(VI) adsorption on natural clay (illite and kaolinite) and synthetic (birnessite and ferrihydrite) minerals, including its speciation changes, and combining quantitative thermodynamically based mechanistic surface complexation models (SCMs) with spectroscopic measurements. Series of adsorption experiments have been performed at different pH values (3-10), ionic strengths (0.001-0.1M KNO3), sorbate concentrations (10(-4), 10(-5), and 10(-6)M Cr(VI)), and sorbate/sorbent ratios (50-500). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the surface complexes, including surface reactions. Adsorption of Cr(VI) is strongly ionic strength dependent. For ferrihydrite at pH <7, a simple diffuse-layer model provides a reasonable prediction of adsorption. For birnessite, bidentate inner-sphere complexes of chromate and dichromate resulted in a better diffuse-layer model fit. For kaolinite, outer-sphere complexation prevails mainly at lower Cr(VI) loadings. Dissolution of solid phases needs to be considered for better SCMs fits. The coupled SCM and spectroscopic approach is thus useful for investigating individual minerals responsible for Cr(VI) retention in soils, and improving the handling and remediation processes.

  16. Coupling of downstream RNA polymerase-promoter interactions with formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Borukhov, Sergei; Mustaev, Arkady; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) makes extensive contacts with duplex DNA downstream of the transcription bubble in initiation and elongation complexes. We investigated the role of downstream interactions in formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex by measuring initiation activity of stable RNAP complexes with model promoter DNA fragments whose downstream ends extend from +3 to +21 relative to the transcription start site at +1. We found that DNA downstream of position +6 does not play a significant role in transcription initiation when RNAP-promoter interactions upstream of the transcription start site are strong and promoter melting region is AT-rich. Further shortening of downstream DNA dramatically reduces efficiency of transcription initiation. The boundary of minimal downstream DNA duplex needed for efficient transcription initiation shifted further away from the catalytic center upon increasing the GC content of promoter melting region or in the presence of bacterial stringent response regulators DksA and ppGpp. These results indicate that the strength of RNAP-downstream DNA interactions has to reach a certain threshold to retain the catalytically competent conformation of the initiation complex and that establishment of contacts between RNAP and downstream DNA can be coupled with promoter melting. The data further suggest that RNAP interactions with DNA immediately downstream of the transcription bubble are particularly important for initiation of transcription. We hypothesize that these active center-proximal contacts stabilize the DNA template strand in the active center cleft and/or position the RNAP clamp domain to allow RNA synthesis. PMID:25311862

  17. Chromate adsorption on selected soil minerals: Surface complexation modeling coupled with spectroscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Veselská, Veronika; Fajgar, Radek; Číhalová, Sylva; Bolanz, Ralph M; Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph; Siddique, Jamal A; Komárek, Michael

    2016-11-15

    This study investigates the mechanisms of Cr(VI) adsorption on natural clay (illite and kaolinite) and synthetic (birnessite and ferrihydrite) minerals, including its speciation changes, and combining quantitative thermodynamically based mechanistic surface complexation models (SCMs) with spectroscopic measurements. Series of adsorption experiments have been performed at different pH values (3-10), ionic strengths (0.001-0.1M KNO3), sorbate concentrations (10(-4), 10(-5), and 10(-6)M Cr(VI)), and sorbate/sorbent ratios (50-500). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the surface complexes, including surface reactions. Adsorption of Cr(VI) is strongly ionic strength dependent. For ferrihydrite at pH <7, a simple diffuse-layer model provides a reasonable prediction of adsorption. For birnessite, bidentate inner-sphere complexes of chromate and dichromate resulted in a better diffuse-layer model fit. For kaolinite, outer-sphere complexation prevails mainly at lower Cr(VI) loadings. Dissolution of solid phases needs to be considered for better SCMs fits. The coupled SCM and spectroscopic approach is thus useful for investigating individual minerals responsible for Cr(VI) retention in soils, and improving the handling and remediation processes. PMID:27450335

  18. Numerical Simulations of Low Pressure Inductively Coupled Plasmas in Geometrically Complex Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ben; Wu, Hanming; Krishnan, Anantha

    1996-10-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model has been developed for simulation of low pressure inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactors. The model obtains solutions for the plasma density, electron temperature, and electric field for the given operating conditions. The physical phenomena and processes such as ambipolar diffusion, thermal diffusion, quasi-neutrality, ionization, inductive Joule heating, and excitations are considered in the model. A significant feature of the model is its capability of handling complex geometries that are often encountered in industrial reactors. Complex reactor geometries are modeled by a body-fitted-coordinate (BFC) formulation. A series of numerical experiments have been conducted using the model to study effects of various parameters such as chamber pressure, size of the wafer, position of the inductive coil, and the power input into the plasma. Different reactor geometries such as the GEC ICP reference cell and the belljar reactor have been simulated. The results of the parametric experiments are presented to show certain systematic trends in performance parameters such as uniformity and processing rates. The ICP model has been coupled to a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (capable of 3D simulations) that obtains the flow and pressure distribution inside the chamber. The ICP model will use pressure predictions (from the CFD model) to compute the local ionization rates. Chemical source/sink terms from the plasma dissociation model will be used by the CFD code to account for local reactant depletion effects.

  19. Mechanism of Coupled Folding and Binding in the siRNA-PAZ Complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Feng

    2008-08-01

    The PAZ domain plays a key role in gene silencing pathway. The PAZ domain binds with siRNAs to form the multimeric RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). RISC identifies mRNAs homologous to the siRNAs and promotes their degradation. It was found that binding with siRNA significantly enhances apo-PAZ folding. However, the mechanism by which folding is coupled to binding is poorly understood. Thus, the coupling relationship between binding and folding is very important for understanding the function of gene silencing. We have performed molecular dynamics (MD) of both bound and apo-PAZ to study the coupling mechanism between binding and folding in the siRNA-PAZ complex. Room-temperature MD simulations suggest that both PAZ and siRNA become more rigid and stable upon siRNA binding. Kinetic analysis of high-temperature MD simulations shows that both bound and apo-PAZ unfold via a two-state process. The unfolding pathways are different between bound and apo-PAZ: the order of helix III and helices I & II unfolding is switched. Furthermore, transition probability was used to determine the transition state ensemble for both bound and apo-PAZ. It was found that the transition state of bound PAZ is more compact than that of apo-PAZ. The predicted Φ-values suggest that the Φ-values of helix III and sheets of β3-β7 for bound PAZ are more native-like than those of apo-PAZ upon the binding of siRNA. The results can help us to understand the mechanism of gene silencing.

  20. Coupling Charge Reduction Mass Spectrometry to Liquid Chromatography for Complex Mixture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stutzman, John R; Crowe, Matthew C; Alexander, James N; Bell, Bruce M; Dunkle, Melissa N

    2016-04-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) of solution mixtures often generates complex mass spectra, even following liquid chromatography (LC), due to analyte multiple charging. Multiple charge state distributions can lead to isobaric interferences, mass spectral congestion, and ambiguous ion identification. As a consequence, data interpretation increases in complexity. Several charge reduction mass spectrometry (MS) approaches have been previously developed to reduce the average charge state of gaseous ions; however, all of these techniques have been restricted to direct infusion MS. In this study, synthetic polyols and surfactants separated by liquid chromatography and ionized by positive mode ESI have been subjected to polonium-210 α-particle radiation to reduce the average charge state to singly charged cations prior to mass analysis. LC/MS analysis of 5000 molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG5000) generated an average charge state of 5.88+; whereupon, liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/charge reduction/mass spectrometry (LC/CR/MS) analysis of PEG 5000 generated an average charge state of 1.00+. The PEG5000 results demonstrated a decrease in spectral complexity and enabled facile interpretation. Other complex solution mixtures representing specific MS challenges (i.e., competitive ionization and isobaric ion overlap) were explored and analyzed with LC/CR/MS to demonstrate the benefits of coupling LC to CR/MS. For example, polyol information related to initiator, identity/relative amount of monomer, and estimated molecular weight was characterized in random and triblock ethylene oxide/propylene oxide polyols using LC/CR/MS. LC/CR/MS is a new analytical technique for the analysis of complex mixtures. PMID:26971559

  1. Single-molecule resolution of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) complexes.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Kim C; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C

    2016-01-01

    The organization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) into dimers and higher-order oligomers has provided a potential mechanistic system in defining complex GPCR responses. Despite being studied for nearly 20 years it has, and still is, been an area of controversy. Although technology has developed to quantitatively measure these associations in real time, identify the structural interfaces and even systems to understand the physiological significance of di/oligomerization, key questions remain outstanding including the role of each individual complex from the monomer to the higher-order oligomer, in their native system. Recently, single-molecule microscopy approaches have provided the tools to directly visualize individual GPCRs in dimers and oligomers, though as with any technological development each have their advantages and limitations. This chapter will describe these recent developments in single-molecule fluorescent microscopy, focusing on our recent application of super-resolution imaging of the GPCR for the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin to quantify GPCR monomers and formation of protomers in to dimers and distinct oligomeric forms. We present our approach, considerations, strategy, and challenges to visualize this receptor beyond the light diffraction limit via photoactivated localization microscopy with photoactivatable dyes. The addition of super-resolution approaches to the GPCR "nano-tool kit" will pave the way for novel avenues to answer outstanding questions regarding the existence and significance of these complexes to GPCR signaling. PMID:26928539

  2. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin-orbit coupling effects.

    PubMed

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2, where M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se, Te) while including spin-orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed.

  3. Single-molecule resolution of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) complexes.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Kim C; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C

    2016-01-01

    The organization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) into dimers and higher-order oligomers has provided a potential mechanistic system in defining complex GPCR responses. Despite being studied for nearly 20 years it has, and still is, been an area of controversy. Although technology has developed to quantitatively measure these associations in real time, identify the structural interfaces and even systems to understand the physiological significance of di/oligomerization, key questions remain outstanding including the role of each individual complex from the monomer to the higher-order oligomer, in their native system. Recently, single-molecule microscopy approaches have provided the tools to directly visualize individual GPCRs in dimers and oligomers, though as with any technological development each have their advantages and limitations. This chapter will describe these recent developments in single-molecule fluorescent microscopy, focusing on our recent application of super-resolution imaging of the GPCR for the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin to quantify GPCR monomers and formation of protomers in to dimers and distinct oligomeric forms. We present our approach, considerations, strategy, and challenges to visualize this receptor beyond the light diffraction limit via photoactivated localization microscopy with photoactivatable dyes. The addition of super-resolution approaches to the GPCR "nano-tool kit" will pave the way for novel avenues to answer outstanding questions regarding the existence and significance of these complexes to GPCR signaling.

  4. Vortex-soliton complexes in coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with unequal dispersion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampidis, E. G.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Malomed, B. A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a two-component, two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger system with unequal dispersion coefficients and self-defocusing nonlinearities, chiefly with equal strengths of the self- and cross-interactions. In this setting, a natural waveform with a nonvanishing background in one component is a vortex, which induces an effective potential well in the second component, via the nonlinear coupling of the two components. We show that the potential well may support not only the fundamental bound state, but also multiring excited radial state complexes for suitable ranges of values of the dispersion coefficient of the second component. We systematically explore the existence, stability, and nonlinear dynamics of these states. The complexes involving the excited radial states are weakly unstable, with a growth rate depending on the dispersion of the second component. Their evolution leads to transformation of the multiring complexes into stable vortex-bright solitons ones with the fundamental state in the second component. The excited states may be stabilized by a harmonic-oscillator trapping potential, as well as by unequal strengths of the self- and cross-repulsive nonlinearities.

  5. Vortex-soliton complexes in coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with unequal dispersion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Charalampidis, E G; Kevrekidis, P G; Frantzeskakis, D J; Malomed, B A

    2016-08-01

    We consider a two-component, two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger system with unequal dispersion coefficients and self-defocusing nonlinearities, chiefly with equal strengths of the self- and cross-interactions. In this setting, a natural waveform with a nonvanishing background in one component is a vortex, which induces an effective potential well in the second component, via the nonlinear coupling of the two components. We show that the potential well may support not only the fundamental bound state, but also multiring excited radial state complexes for suitable ranges of values of the dispersion coefficient of the second component. We systematically explore the existence, stability, and nonlinear dynamics of these states. The complexes involving the excited radial states are weakly unstable, with a growth rate depending on the dispersion of the second component. Their evolution leads to transformation of the multiring complexes into stable vortex-bright solitons ones with the fundamental state in the second component. The excited states may be stabilized by a harmonic-oscillator trapping potential, as well as by unequal strengths of the self- and cross-repulsive nonlinearities. PMID:27627298

  6. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin-orbit coupling effects.

    PubMed

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2, where M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se, Te) while including spin-orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed. PMID:27367475

  7. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin-orbit coupling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2, where M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se, Te) while including spin-orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed.

  8. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin–orbit coupling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2, where M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se, Te) while including spin–orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed.

  9. Magnetic Field Induced Shear Flow in a Strongly Coupled Complex Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P.; Konopka, U.; Jiang, K.; Morfill, G.

    2011-11-01

    We address an experimental observation of shear flow of micron sized dust particles in a strongly coupled complex plasma in presence of a homogeneous magnetic field. Two concentric Aluminum rings of different size are placed on the lower electrode of a radio frequency (rf) parallel plate discharge. The modified local sheath electric field is pointing outward/inward close to the inner/outher ring, respectively. The microparticles, confined by the rings and subject to an ion wind that driven by the local sheath electric field and deflected by an externally applied magnetic field, start flowing in azimuthal direction. Depending upon the rf amplitudes on the electrodes, the dust layers show rotation in opposite direction at the edges of the ring-shaped cloud resulting a strong shear in its center. MD simulations shows a good agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Coupled ice shelf-ocean modeling and complex grounding line retreat from a seabed ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rydt, J.; Gudmundsson, G. H.

    2016-05-01

    Recent observations and modeling work have shown a complex mechanical coupling between Antarctica's floating ice shelves and the adjacent grounded ice sheet. A prime example is Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica, which has a strong negative mass balance caused by a recent increase in ocean-induced melting of its ice shelf. The mass loss coincides with the retreat of the grounding line from a seabed ridge, on which it was at least partly grounded until the 1970s. At present, it is unclear what has caused the onset of this retreat and how feedback mechanisms between the ocean and ice shelf geometry have influenced the ice dynamics. To address these questions, we present the first results from an offline coupling between a state-of-the-art shallow-ice flow model with grounding line resolving capabilities and a three-dimensional ocean general circulation model with a static implementation of the ice shelf. A series of idealized experiments simulate the retreat from a seabed ridge in response to changes in the ocean forcing, and we show that the retreat becomes irreversible after 20 years of warm ocean conditions. A comparison to experiments with a simple depth-dependent melt rate parameterization demonstrates that such parameterizations are unable to capture the details of the retreat process, and they overestimate mass loss by more than 40% over a 50 year timescale.

  11. Impact of asymptomatic infection on coupled disease-behavior dynamics in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Xie, Jia-Rong; Chen, Han-Shuang; Liu, Can; Small, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Studies on how to model the interplay between diseases and behavioral responses (so-called coupled disease-behavior interaction) have attracted increasing attention. Owing to the lack of obvious clinical evidence of diseases, or the incomplete information related to the disease, the risks of infection cannot be perceived and may lead to inappropriate behavioral responses. Therefore, how to quantitatively analyze the impacts of asymptomatic infection on the interplay between diseases and behavioral responses is of particular importance. In this letter, under the complex network framework, we study the coupled disease-behavior interaction model by dividing infectious individuals into two states: U-state (without evident clinical symptoms, labelled as U) and I-state (with evident clinical symptoms, labelled as I). A susceptible individual can be infected by U- or I-nodes, however, since the U-nodes cannot be easily observed, susceptible individuals take behavioral responses only when they contact I-nodes. The mechanism is considered in the improved Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) model and the improved Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model, respectively. Then, one of the most concerned problems in spreading dynamics: the epidemic thresholds for the two models are given by two methods. The analytic results quantitatively describe the influence of different factors, such as asymptomatic infection, the awareness rate, the network structure, and so forth, on the epidemic thresholds. Moreover, because of the irreversible process of the SIR model, the suppression effect of the improved SIR model is weaker than the improved SIS model.

  12. A Tractable Method for Describing Complex Couplings between Neurons and Population Rate

    PubMed Central

    Marre, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neurons within a population are strongly correlated, but how to simply capture these correlations is still a matter of debate. Recent studies have shown that the activity of each cell is influenced by the population rate, defined as the summed activity of all neurons in the population. However, an explicit, tractable model for these interactions is still lacking. Here we build a probabilistic model of population activity that reproduces the firing rate of each cell, the distribution of the population rate, and the linear coupling between them. This model is tractable, meaning that its parameters can be learned in a few seconds on a standard computer even for large population recordings. We inferred our model for a population of 160 neurons in the salamander retina. In this population, single-cell firing rates depended in unexpected ways on the population rate. In particular, some cells had a preferred population rate at which they were most likely to fire. These complex dependencies could not be explained by a linear coupling between the cell and the population rate. We designed a more general, still tractable model that could fully account for these nonlinear dependencies. We thus provide a simple and computationally tractable way to learn models that reproduce the dependence of each neuron on the population rate. PMID:27570827

  13. A Tractable Method for Describing Complex Couplings between Neurons and Population Rate.

    PubMed

    Gardella, Christophe; Marre, Olivier; Mora, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Neurons within a population are strongly correlated, but how to simply capture these correlations is still a matter of debate. Recent studies have shown that the activity of each cell is influenced by the population rate, defined as the summed activity of all neurons in the population. However, an explicit, tractable model for these interactions is still lacking. Here we build a probabilistic model of population activity that reproduces the firing rate of each cell, the distribution of the population rate, and the linear coupling between them. This model is tractable, meaning that its parameters can be learned in a few seconds on a standard computer even for large population recordings. We inferred our model for a population of 160 neurons in the salamander retina. In this population, single-cell firing rates depended in unexpected ways on the population rate. In particular, some cells had a preferred population rate at which they were most likely to fire. These complex dependencies could not be explained by a linear coupling between the cell and the population rate. We designed a more general, still tractable model that could fully account for these nonlinear dependencies. We thus provide a simple and computationally tractable way to learn models that reproduce the dependence of each neuron on the population rate. PMID:27570827

  14. Coupled ice shelf-ocean modeling and complex grounding line retreat for Pine Island Glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rydt, Jan; Gudmundsson, Hilmar

    2016-04-01

    Recent observations and modeling work have shown a complex mechanical coupling between Antarctica's floating ice shelves and the adjacent grounded ice sheet. A prime example is Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica, which has a strong negative mass balance caused by a recent increase in ocean-induced melting of its ice shelf. The mass loss coincides with the retreat of the grounding line from a seabed ridge, on which it was at least partly grounded until the 1970s. At present, it is unclear what has caused the onset of this retreat, and how feedback mechanisms between the ocean and iceshelf geometry have influenced the ice dynamics. To address these questions, we present results from an offline coupling between a state-of-the-art shallow-ice flow model with grounding line resolving capabilities, and a three-dimensional ocean general circulation model with a static implementation of the ice shelf. A series of idealized experiments simulate the retreat from a seabed ridge in response to changes in the ocean forcing, and we show that the retreat becomes irreversible after 20 years of warm ocean conditions. A comparison to experiments with a simple depth-dependent meltrate parameterisation demonstrates that such parameterizations are unable to capture the details of the retreat process, and they overestimate mass loss by more than 40% over a 50-year timescale.

  15. Slug-flow microextraction coupled with paper spray mass spectrometry for rapid analysis of complex samples.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiewei; Wang, Wenwen; Yang, Yunyun; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Baowei; Yao, Zhong-Ping; Luan, Tiangang

    2016-10-12

    Analysis of trace compounds in small-volume complex samples is of importance for forensic, clinical, pharmaceutical, environmental, and life science investigation. In this study, we reported the coupling of slug-flow microextraction with paper spray mass spectrometry for rapid analysis of trace analytes in small volume of complicated biological samples such as whole blood, milk, and body fluid, etc. The method is performed by applying a disposable glass capillary for rapid extraction of a small amount of complex samples using a small amount of organic solvent; the loaded organic solvent was then spotted onto a paper triangle and dried out; subsequently, a high voltage and some spray solvent were applied onto the paper triangle for mass spectrometric analysis. By using the proposed method, high sensitivity and satisfactory precision for quantitative analysis of trace macrolide antibiotics in whole bloods and milks as well as perfluorinated compounds in individual small organisms have been successfully achieved. In addition, investigation of bioaccumulation of perfluorinated compounds in individual small organisms has been reached.

  16. Slug-flow microextraction coupled with paper spray mass spectrometry for rapid analysis of complex samples.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jiewei; Wang, Wenwen; Yang, Yunyun; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Baowei; Yao, Zhong-Ping; Luan, Tiangang

    2016-10-12

    Analysis of trace compounds in small-volume complex samples is of importance for forensic, clinical, pharmaceutical, environmental, and life science investigation. In this study, we reported the coupling of slug-flow microextraction with paper spray mass spectrometry for rapid analysis of trace analytes in small volume of complicated biological samples such as whole blood, milk, and body fluid, etc. The method is performed by applying a disposable glass capillary for rapid extraction of a small amount of complex samples using a small amount of organic solvent; the loaded organic solvent was then spotted onto a paper triangle and dried out; subsequently, a high voltage and some spray solvent were applied onto the paper triangle for mass spectrometric analysis. By using the proposed method, high sensitivity and satisfactory precision for quantitative analysis of trace macrolide antibiotics in whole bloods and milks as well as perfluorinated compounds in individual small organisms have been successfully achieved. In addition, investigation of bioaccumulation of perfluorinated compounds in individual small organisms has been reached. PMID:27662769

  17. Modular Approaches to Diversified Soft Lewis Basic Complexants through Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling of Bromoheteroarenes with Organotrifluoroborates.

    PubMed

    Chin, Ai Lin; Carrick, Jesse D

    2016-02-01

    Remediation or transmutation of spent nuclear fuel obtained as a function of energy production and legacy waste remains a significant environmental concern. Substantive efforts over the last three decades have focused on the potential of soft-Lewis basic complexants for the chemoselective separation of trivalent actinides from lanthanides in biphasic solvent systems. Recent efforts in this laboratory have focused on the concept of modularity to rapidly prepare complexants and complexant scaffolds not easily accessible via traditional linear methods in a convergent manner to better understand solubility and complexation structure/activity function in process-relevant solvents. The current work describes an efficient method for the construction of diversified complexants through multi-Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of bromoheteroarenes with organotrifluoroborates affording efficient access to 22 novel materials in 43-99% yield over two, three, or four cross-couplings on the same scaffold. Optimization of the catalyst/ligand system, application, and limitations are reported herein. PMID:26751755

  18. Ab initio density matrix renormalization group study of magnetic coupling in dinuclear iron and chromium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Travis V.; Morokuma, Keiji; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi

    2014-02-07

    The applicability of ab initio multireference wavefunction-based methods to the study of magnetic complexes has been restricted by the quickly rising active-space requirements of oligonuclear systems and dinuclear complexes with S > 1 spin centers. Ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) methods built upon an efficient parameterization of the correlation network enable the use of much larger active spaces, and therefore may offer a way forward. Here, we apply DMRG-CASSCF to the dinuclear complexes [Fe{sub 2}OCl{sub 6}]{sup 2−} and [Cr{sub 2}O(NH{sub 3}){sub 10}]{sup 4+}. After developing the methodology through systematic basis set and DMRG M testing, we explore the effects of extended active spaces that are beyond the limit of conventional methods. We find that DMRG-CASSCF with active spaces including the metal d orbitals, occupied bridging-ligand orbitals, and their virtual double shells already capture a major portion of the dynamic correlation effects, accurately reproducing the experimental magnetic coupling constant (J) of [Fe{sub 2}OCl{sub 6}]{sup 2−} with (16e,26o), and considerably improving the smaller active space results for [Cr{sub 2}O(NH{sub 3}){sub 10}]{sup 4+} with (12e,32o). For comparison, we perform conventional MRCI+Q calculations and find the J values to be consistent with those from DMRG-CASSCF. In contrast to previous studies, the higher spin states of the two systems show similar deviations from the Heisenberg spectrum, regardless of the computational method.

  19. Dynamic coupling of complex brain networks and dual-task behavior.

    PubMed

    Alavash, Mohsen; Thiel, Christiane M; Gießing, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    Multi-tasking is a familiar situation where behavioral performance is often challenged. To date, fMRI studies investigating the neural underpinning of dual-task interference have mostly relied on local brain activation maps or static brain connectivity networks. Here, based on task fMRI we explored how fluctuations in behavior during concurrent performance of a visuospatial and a speech task relate to alternations in the topology of dynamic brain connectivity networks. We combined a time-resolved functional connectivity and complex network analysis with a sliding window approach applied to the trial by trial behavioral responses to investigate the coupling between dynamic brain networks and dual-task behavior at close temporal proximity. Participants showed fluctuations in their dual-task behavior over time, with the accuracy in the component tasks being statistically independent from one another. On the global level of brain networks we found that dynamic changes of network topology were differentially coupled with the behavior in each component task during the course of dual-tasking. While momentary decrease in the global efficiency of dynamic brain networks correlated with subsequent increase in visuospatial accuracy, better speech performance was preceded by higher global network efficiency and was followed by an increase in between-module connectivity over time. Additionally, dynamic alternations in the modular organization of brain networks at the posterior cingulate cortex were differentially predictive for the visuospatial as compared to the speech accuracy over time. Our results provide the first evidence that, during the course of dual-tasking, each component task is supported by a distinct topological configuration of brain connectivity networks. This finding suggests that the failure of functional brain connectivity networks to adapt to an optimal topology supporting the performance in both component tasks at the same time contributes to the moment to

  20. The complex G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) interactome unveils new physiopathological targets

    PubMed Central

    Penela, Petronila; Murga, Cristina; Ribas, Catalina; Lafarga, Vanesa; Mayor, Federico

    2010-01-01

    GRK2 is a ubiquitous member of the G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK) family that appears to play a central, integrative role in signal transduction cascades. GRKs participate together with arrestins in the regulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), a family of hundreds of membrane proteins of key physiological and pharmacological importance, by triggering receptor desensitization from G proteins and GPCR internalization, and also by helping assemble macromolecular signalosomes in the receptor environment acting as agonist-regulated adaptor scaffolds, thus contributing to signal propagation. In addition, emerging evidence indicates that GRK2 can phosphorylate a growing number of non-GPCR substrates and associate with a variety of proteins related to signal transduction, thus suggesting that this kinase could also have diverse ‘effector’ functions. We discuss herein the increasing complexity of such GRK2 ‘interactome’, with emphasis on the recently reported roles of this kinase in cell migration and cell cycle progression and on the functional impact of the altered GRK2 levels observed in several relevant cardiovascular, inflammatory or tumour pathologies. Deciphering how the different networks of potential GRK2 functional interactions are orchestrated in a stimulus, cell type or context-specific way is critical to unveil the contribution of GRK2 to basic cellular processes, to understand how alterations in GRK2 levels or functionality may participate in the onset or development of several cardiovascular, tumour or inflammatory diseases, and to assess the feasibility of new therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of the activity, levels or specific interactions of GRK2. PMID:20590581

  1. Study of the influence of the bridge on the magnetic coupling in cobalt(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Fabelo, Oscar; Cañadillas-Delgado, Laura; Pasán, Jorge; Delgado, Fernando S; Lloret, Francesc; Cano, Joan; Julve, Miguel; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina

    2009-12-01

    Two new cobalt(II) complexes of formula [Co(2)(bta)(H(2)O)(6)](n) x 2nH(2)O (1) and [Co(phda)(H(2)O)](n) x nH(2)O (2) [H(4)bta = 1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, H(2)phda = 1,4-phenylenediacetic acid] have been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 is a one-dimensional compound where the bta(4-) ligand acts as 2-fold connector between the cobalt(II) ions through two carboxylate groups in para-conformation. Triply bridged dicobalt(II) units occur within each chain, a water molecule, a carboxylate group in the syn-syn conformation, and an oxo-carboxylate with the mu(2)O(1);kappa(2)O(1),O(2) coordination mode acting as bridges. Compound 2 is a three-dimensional compound, where the phda(2-) group acts as a bridge through its two carboxylate groups, one of them adopting the mu-O,O' coordination mode in the syn-syn conformation and the other exhibiting the single mu(2)-O'' bridging mode. As in 1, chains of cobalt(II) ions occur in 2 with a water molecule, a syn-syn carboxylate group, and an oxo-carboxylate constitute the triply intrachain bridging skeleton. Each chain is linked to other four ones through the phda(2-) ligand, giving rise to the three-dimensional structure. The values of the intrachain cobalt-cobalt separation are 3.1691(4) (1) and 3.11499(2) A (2) whereas those across the phenyl ring of the extended bta(4-) (1) and phda(2-) (2) groups are 10.1120(6) and 11.4805(69 A, respectively. The magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have been investigated in the temperature range 1.9-300 K, and their analysis has revealed the occurrence of moderate intrachain ferromagnetic couplings [J = +5.4 (1) and +2.16 cm(-1) (2), J being the isotropic magnetic coupling parameter], the magnetic coupling through the extended bta(4-) and phda(2-) with cobalt-cobalt separations larger than 10 A being negligible. The nature and magnitude of the magnetic interactions between the high-spin cobalt(II) ions in 1 and 2 are compared to those of related systems and

  2. Accurate gradient approximation for complex interface problems in 3D by an improved coupling interface method

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Yu-Chen; Chern, I-Liang; Chang, Chien C.

    2014-10-15

    Most elliptic interface solvers become complicated for complex interface problems at those “exceptional points” where there are not enough neighboring interior points for high order interpolation. Such complication increases especially in three dimensions. Usually, the solvers are thus reduced to low order accuracy. In this paper, we classify these exceptional points and propose two recipes to maintain order of accuracy there, aiming at improving the previous coupling interface method [26]. Yet the idea is also applicable to other interface solvers. The main idea is to have at least first order approximations for second order derivatives at those exceptional points. Recipe 1 is to use the finite difference approximation for the second order derivatives at a nearby interior grid point, whenever this is possible. Recipe 2 is to flip domain signatures and introduce a ghost state so that a second-order method can be applied. This ghost state is a smooth extension of the solution at the exceptional point from the other side of the interface. The original state is recovered by a post-processing using nearby states and jump conditions. The choice of recipes is determined by a classification scheme of the exceptional points. The method renders the solution and its gradient uniformly second-order accurate in the entire computed domain. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the second order accuracy of the presently proposed method in approximating the gradients of the original states for some complex interfaces which we had tested previous in two and three dimensions, and a real molecule ( (1D63)) which is double-helix shape and composed of hundreds of atoms.

  3. Simplifying the complexity of a coupled carbon turnover and pesticide degradation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschmann, Gianna; Erhardt, André H.; Pagel, Holger; Kügler, Philipp; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    The mechanistic one-dimensional model PECCAD (PEsticide degradation Coupled to CArbon turnover in the Detritusphere; Pagel et al. 2014, Biogeochemistry 117, 185-204) has been developed as a tool to elucidate regulation mechanisms of pesticide degradation in soil. A feature of this model is that it integrates functional traits of microorganisms, identifiable by molecular tools, and physicochemical processes such as transport and sorption that control substrate availability. Predicting the behavior of microbially active interfaces demands a fundamental understanding of factors controlling their dynamics. Concepts from dynamical systems theory allow us to study general properties of the model such as its qualitative behavior, intrinsic timescales and dynamic stability: Using a Latin hypercube method we sampled the parameter space for physically realistic steady states of the PECCAD ODE system and set up a numerical continuation and bifurcation problem with the open-source toolbox MatCont in order to obtain a complete classification of the dynamical system's behaviour. Bifurcation analysis reveals an equilibrium state of the system entirely controlled by fungal kinetic parameters. The equilibrium is generally unstable in response to small perturbations except for a small band in parameter space where the pesticide pool is stable. Time scale separation is a phenomenon that occurs in almost every complex open physical system. Motivated by the notion of "initial-stage" and "late-stage" decomposers and the concept of r-, K- or L-selected microbial life strategies, we test the applicability of geometric singular perturbation theory to identify fast and slow time scales of PECCAD. Revealing a generic fast-slow structure would greatly simplify the analysis of complex models of organic matter turnover by reducing the number of unknowns and parameters and providing a systematic mathematical framework for studying their properties.

  4. Antibody fragments for stabilization and crystallization of G protein-coupled receptors and their signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Arun K; Gupta, Charu; Srivastava, Ashish; Jaiman, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the key players in extracellular signal recognition and their subsequent communications with cellular signaling machinery. Crystallization and high-resolution structure determination of GPCRs has been one of the major advances in the area of GPCR biology over the last 7-8 years. There have primarily been three approaches to GPCR crystallization till date. These are fusion protein strategy, thermostabilization, and antibody fragment-mediated crystallization. Of these, antibody fragment-mediated crystallization has not only provided the first breakthrough in structure determination of a non-rhodopsin GPCR but it has also assisted in obtaining structures of fully active conformations of GPCRs. Antibody fragment approach has also been crucial in obtaining structural information on GPCR signaling complexes. Here, we highlight the specific examples of GPCR crystal structures that have utilized antibody fragments for promoting crystallogenesis and structure solution. We also discuss emerging powerful technologies such as the nanobody technology and the synthetic phage display libraries in the context of GPCR crystallization and underline how these tools are likely to propel key GPCR structural studies in future.

  5. Strongly coupled binuclear uranium-oxo complexes from uranyl oxo rearrangement and reductive silylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Polly L.; Jones, Guy M.; Odoh, Samuel O.; Schreckenbach, Georg; Magnani, Nicola; Love, Jason B.

    2012-03-01

    The most common motif in uranium chemistry is the d0f0 uranyl ion [UO2]2+ in which the oxo groups are rigorously linear and inert. Alternative geometries, such as the cis-uranyl, have been identified theoretically and implicated in oxo-atom transfer reactions that are relevant to environmental speciation and nuclear waste remediation. Single electron reduction is now known to impart greater oxo-group reactivity, but with retention of the linear OUO motif, and reactions of the oxo groups to form new covalent bonds remain rare. Here, we describe the synthesis, structure, reactivity and magnetic properties of a binuclear uranium-oxo complex. Formed through a combination of reduction and oxo-silylation and migration from a trans to a cis position, the new butterfly-shaped Si-OUO2UO-Si molecule shows remarkably strong UV-UV coupling and chemical inertness, suggesting that this rearranged uranium oxo motif might exist for other actinide species in the environment, and have relevance to the aggregation of actinide oxide clusters.

  6. A tetradentate Ni(II) complex cation as a single redox couple for non-aqueous flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-seung; Yoon, Taeho; Jang, Jihyun; Mun, Junyoung; Park, Hosang; Ryu, Ji Heon; Oh, Seung M.

    2015-06-01

    Nickel(II)-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane is examined as a possible single redox couple for non-aqueous flow batteries. The nickel complex cation is reduced at -1.81 V (vs. Fc/Fc+) and oxidized at 0.74 V, showing that this tetradentate Ni(II) complex cation can be used as a single redox couple that offers a cell voltage of 2.55 V. The maximum solubility is 0.4 M in 1.0 M tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate dissolved in a mixed solvent of ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate. When tested in a non-flowing cell, this single redox couple exhibits a very stable cycle performance.

  7. Sequential coupling approach to the synthesis of nickel(II) complexes with N-aryl-2-amino phenolates.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Shinichiro; Tago, Hiroaki; Maitani, Masato M; Wada, Yuji; Takahashi, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    A sequential multicomponent coupling approach is a powerful method for the construction of combinatorial libraries because structurally complex and diverse molecules can be synthesized from simple materials in short steps. In this paper, an efficient synthesis of nickel(II) complexes with N-aryl-2-amino phenols via a sequential three-step coupling approach is described, for potential use in nonlinear optical materials, bioinspired catalytic systems, and near-infrared absorbing filters. Seventeen N-aryl-2-amino phenolates were successfully synthesized in high yields based on the coupling of 3,5-di-tert-butylbenzene-1,2-diol with a pivotal aromatic scaffold, 4-bromo-2-iodo-aniline, followed by sequential Suzuki-Miyaura coupling with aryl boronates. A total of 16 analytically pure nickel(II) complexes with N-aryl-2-amino phenolates were obtained from 17 complexation trials. The procedure allowed us to assemble 4 components in high yields without protection, deprotection, oxidation or reduction steps. Various building blocks that included electron-donating, electron-withdrawing, and basic were used, and readily available, nontoxic and environmentally benign substrates and reagents were employed with no generation of toxic compounds. No strict anhydrous or degassed conditions were required. Absorption spectroscopic measurement of the synthesized nickel(II) complexes revealed that the ortho-substituent Ar(1) exerted more influence on the absorption wavelength of the complexes than the para-substituent Ar(2). On the other hand, both substituents Ar(1) and Ar(2) influenced the molar absorptivity values. These observations should be useful for the design of new and useful nickel(II) complexes as near-infrared chromophores.

  8. A peroxynitrite complex of copper: formation from a copper-nitrosyl complex, transformation to nitrite and exogenous phenol oxidative coupling or nitration.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Young; Deepalatha, Subramanian; Puiu, Simona C; Lee, Dong-Heon; Mondal, Biplab; Narducci Sarjeant, Amy A; del Rio, Diego; Pau, Monita Y M; Solomon, Edward I; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2009-11-01

    Reaction of nitrogen monoxide with a copper(I) complex possessing a tridentate alkylamine ligand gives a Cu(I)-(*NO) adduct, which when exposed to dioxygen generates a peroxynitrite (O=NOO(-))-Cu(II) species. This undergoes thermal transformation to produce a copper(II) nitrito (NO(2) (-)) complex and 0.5 mol equiv O(2). In the presence of a substituted phenol, the peroxynitrite complex effects oxidative coupling, whereas addition of chloride ion to dissociate the peroxynitrite moiety instead leads to phenol ortho nitration. Discussions include the structures (including electronic description) of the copper-nitrosyl and copper-peroxynitrite complexes and the formation of the latter, based on density functional theory calculations and accompanying spectroscopic data. PMID:19662443

  9. Routes to complex dynamics in a ring of unidirectionally coupled systems.

    PubMed

    Perlikowski, P; Yanchuk, S; Wolfrum, M; Stefanski, A; Mosiolek, P; Kapitaniak, T

    2010-03-01

    We study the dynamics of a ring of unidirectionally coupled autonomous Duffing oscillators. Starting from a situation where the individual oscillator without coupling has only trivial equilibrium dynamics, the coupling induces complicated transitions to periodic, quasiperiodic, chaotic, and hyperchaotic behavior. We study these transitions in detail for small and large numbers of oscillators. Particular attention is paid to the role of unstable periodic solutions for the appearance of chaotic rotating waves, spatiotemporal structures, and the Eckhaus effect for a large number of oscillators. Our analytical and numerical results are confirmed by a simple experiment based on the electronic implementation of coupled Duffing oscillators. PMID:20370266

  10. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Strongly Coupled Photosystem II-Inspired Chromophore-Imidazole-Phenol Complex: Stepwise Oxidation and Concerted Reduction.

    PubMed

    Manbeck, Gerald F; Fujita, Etsuko; Concepcion, Javier J

    2016-09-14

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions were studied in acetonitrile for a Photosystem II (PSII)-inspired [Ru(bpy)2(phen-imidazole-Ph(OH)((t)Bu)2)](2+), in which Ru(III) generated by a flash-quench sequence oxidizes the appended phenol and the proton is transferred to the hydrogen-bonded imidazole base. In contrast to related systems, the donor and acceptor are strongly coupled, as indicated by the shift in the Ru(III/II) couple upon phenol oxidation, and intramolecular oxidation of the phenol by Ru(III) is energetically favorable by both stepwise and concerted pathways. The phenol oxidation occurs via a stepwise ET-PT mechanism with kET = 2.7 × 10(7) s(-1) and a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 0.99 ± 0.03. The electron transfer reaction was characterized as adiabatic with λDA = 1.16 eV and 280 < HDA < 540 cm(-1) consistent with strong electronic coupling and slow solvent dynamics. Reduction of the phenoxyl radical by the quencher radical was examined as the analogue of the redox reaction between the PSII tyrosyl radical and the oxygen-evolving complex. In our PSII-inspired complex, the recombination reaction activation energy is <2 kcal mol(-1). The reaction is nonadiabatic (VPCET ≈ 22 cm(-1) (H) and 49 cm(-1) (D)) and concerted, and it exhibits an unexpected inverse KIE = 0.55 that is attributed to greater overlap of the reactant vibronic ground state with the OD vibronic states of the proton acceptor due to the smaller quantum spacing of the deuterium vibrational levels.

  11. Complex eigensolutions of coupled flexural and longitudinal modes in a beam with inclined elastic supports with non-proportional damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Scott; Dreyer, Jason; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-02-01

    Structure borne vibration and noise in an automobile are often explained by representing the full vehicle as a system of elastically coupled beam structures representing the body, engine cradle and body subframe where the engine is often connected to the chassis via inclined viscoelastic supports. To understand more clearly the interactions between a beam structure and isolators, this article examines the flexural and longitudinal motions in an elastic beam with intentionally inclined mounts (viscoelastic end supports). A new analytical solution is derived for the boundary coupled Euler beam and wave equations resulting in complex eigensolutions. This system is demonstrated to be self-adjoint when the support stiffness matrices are symmetric; thus, the modal analysis is used to decouple the equations of motion and solve for the steady state, damped harmonic response. Experimental validation and computational verifications confirm the validity of the proposed formulation. New and interesting phenomena are presented including coupled rigid motions, modal properties for ideal angled roller boundaries, and relationships between coupling and system modal loss factors. The ideal roller boundary conditions when inclined are seen as a limiting case of coupled longitudinal and flexural motions. In particular, the coupled rigid body motions illustrate the influence of support stiffness coupling on the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. The relative modal strain energy concept is used to distinguish the contribution of longitudinal and flexural deformation modes. Since the beam is assumed to be undamped, the system damping is derived from the viscoelastic supports. The support damping (for a given loss factor) is shown to be redistributed between the system modes due to the inclined coupling mechanisms. Finally, this article provides valuable insight by highlighting some technical issues a real-life designer faces when balancing modeling assumptions such as rigid or elastic

  12. Assessment of the CCSD and CCSD(T) Coupled-Cluster Methods in Calculating Heats of Formation for Zn Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Michael N.; Yang, Yue; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2009-08-01

    Heats of formation were calculated using coupled-cluster methods for a series of zinc complexes. The calculated values were evaluated against previously conducted computational studies using density functional methods as well as experimental values. Heats of formation for nine neutral ZnXn complexes [X = -Zn, -H, -O, -F2, -S, -Cl, -Cl2, -CH3, (-CH3)2] were determined at the CCSD and CCSD(T) levels using the 6-31G** and TZVP basis sets as well as the LANL2DZ-6-31G** (LACVP**) and LANL2DZ-TZVP hybrid basis sets. The CCSD(T)/6-31G** level of theory was found to predict the heat of formation for the nonalkyl Zn complexes most accurately. The alkyl Zn species were problematic in that none of the methods that were tested accurately predicted the heat of formation for these complexes. In instances where experimental geometric parameters were available, these were most accurately predicted by the CCSD/6-31G** level of theory; going to CCSD(T) did not improve agreement with the experimental values. Coupled-cluster methods did not offer a systemic improvement over DFT calculations for a given functional/basis set combination. With the exceptions of ZnH and ZnF2, there are multiple density functionals that outperform coupled-cluster calculations with the 6-31G** basis set.

  13. Mode coupling and resonance instabilities in quasi-two-dimensional dust clusters in complex plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ke; Kong, Jie; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2014-09-01

    Small quasi-two-dimensional dust clusters consisting of three to eleven particles are formed in an argon plasma under varying rf power. Their normal modes are investigated through their mode spectra obtained from tracking the particles' thermal motion. Detailed coupling patterns between their horizontal and vertical modes are detected for particle numbers up to 7 and discrete instabilities are found for dust clusters with particle number ⩾9, as predicted in previous theory on ion-flow induced mode coupling in small clusters. The instabilities are proven to be induced by resonance between coupled horizontal and vertical normal modes.

  14. Long-lived excited states of zwitterionic copper(I) complexes for photoinduced cross-dehydrogenative coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Shelar, Deepak Prakash; Han, Xian-Zhu; Li, Ting-Ting; Guan, Xiangguo; Lu, Wei; Liu, Kun; Chen, Yong; Fu, Wen-Fu; Che, Chi-Ming

    2015-01-12

    Four heteroleptic copper(I) complexes containing phenanthroline and monoanionic nido-carborane-diphosphine ligands have been prepared and structurally characterized by various spectroscopic techniques and X-ray diffraction. These complexes exhibit intense absorptions in the visible range and excited-state lifetimes on the microsecond scale. Their application in visible-light-induced cross-dehydrogenative coupling reactions was investigated. Preliminary studies showed that one of the four copper(I) complexes is an efficient catalyst for photoinduced oxidative C-H functionalization using oxygen as oxidant. Furthermore, α-functionalized tertiary amines were obtained in good-to-excellent yields by light irradiation (λ>420 nm) of a mixture of our Cu(I) complex, tertiary amines, and a variety of nucleophiles (nitroalkane, acetone, or indoles) under aerobic conditions. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements provided evidence for the formation of superoxide radical anions (O2(-⋅)) rather than singlet oxygen ((1)O2) during these photocatalytic reactions. PMID:25413572

  15. Complexation Effect on Redox Potential of Iron(III)-Iron(II) Couple: A Simple Potentiometric Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Syed, Raashid Maqsood; Khan, Badruddin

    2011-01-01

    A titration curve with multiple inflection points results when a mixture of two or more reducing agents with sufficiently different reduction potentials are titrated. In this experiment iron(II) complexes are combined into a mixture of reducing agents and are oxidized to the corresponding iron(III) complexes. As all of the complexes involve the…

  16. Effective DNA binding and cleaving tendencies of malonic acid coupled transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravin, Narayanaperumal; Utthra, Ponnukalai Ponya; Kumaravel, Ganesan; Raman, Natarajan

    2016-11-01

    Eight transition metal complexes were designed to achieve maximum biological efficacy. They were characterized by elemental analysis and various other spectroscopic techniques. The monomeric complexes were found to espouse octahedral geometry and non-electrolytic nature. The DNA interaction propensity of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), studied at physiological pH by spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, cyclic voltammetry, and viscometric techniques revealed intercalation as the possible binding mode. Fascinatingly, the complexes were found to exhibit greater binding strength than that of the free ligands. A strong hypochromism and a slight red shift were exhibited by complex 5 among the other complexes. The intrinsic binding constant values of all the complexes compared to cisplatin reveal that they are excellent metallonucleases than that of cisplatin. The complexes were also shown to reveal displacement of the ethidium bromide, a strong intercalator using fluorescence titrations. Gel electrophoresis was used to divulge the competence of the complexes in cleaving the supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA. From the results, it is concluded that the complexes, especially 5, are excellent chemical nucleases in the presence of H2O2. Furthermore, the in vitro antimicrobial screening of the complexes exposes that these complexes are excellent antimicrobial agents. Overall the effect of coligands is evident from the results of all the investigations.

  17. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer methods to study G protein-coupled receptor-receptor tyrosine kinase heteroreceptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Flajolet, Marc; Agnati, Luigi F; Greengard, Paul; Fuxe, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can form heteroreceptor complexes. In these complexes, the signaling from each interacting protomer is modulated to produce an integrated and therefore novel response upon agonist(s) activation. In the GPCR-RTK heteroreceptor complexes, GPCRs can activate RTK in the absence of added growth factor through the use of RTK signaling molecules. This integrative phenomenon is reciprocal and can place also RTK signaling downstream of GPCR. Formation of either stable or transient complexes by these two important classes of membrane receptors is involved in regulating all aspects of receptor function, from ligand binding to signal transduction, trafficking, desensitization, and downregulation among others. Functional phenomena can be modulated with conformation-specific inhibitors that stabilize defined GPCR states to abrogate both GPCR agonist- and growth factor-stimulated cell responses or by means of small interfering heteroreceptor complex interface peptides. The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technology has emerged as a powerful method to study the structure of heteroreceptor complexes closely associated with the study of receptor-receptor interactions in such complexes. In this chapter, we provide an overview of different BRET(2) assays that can be used to study the structure of GPCR-RTK heteroreceptor complexes and their functions. Various experimental designs for optimization of these experiments are also described.

  18. BIOLUMINISCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER (BRET) METHODS TO STUDY G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR - RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASE HETERORECEPTOR COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Flajolet, Marc; Agnati, Luigi F.; Greengard, Paul; Fuxe, Kjell

    2014-01-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can form heteroreceptor complexes. In these complexes, the signalling from each interacting protomer is modulated to produce an integrated and therefore novel response upon agonist(s) activation. In the GPCR-RTK heteroreceptor complexes, GPCRs can activate RTK in the absence of added growth factor through the use of RTK signalling molecules. This integrative phenomenon is reciprocal, and can place also RTK signalling downstream of GPCR. Formation of either stable or transient complexes by these two important classes of membrane receptors is involved in regulating all aspects of receptor function, from ligand binding to signal transduction, trafficking, desensitization and down regulation among others. Functional phenomena can be modulated with conformation-specific inhibitors that stabilize defined GPCR states to abrogate both GPCR agonist- and growth factor-stimulated cell responses or by means of small interfering heteroreceptor complex interface peptides. The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technology has emerged as a powerful method to study the structure of heteroreceptor complexes closely associated with the study of receptor-receptor interactions in such complexes. In this work we provide an overview of different BRET2 assays that can be used to study the structure of GPCR-RTK heteroreceptor complexes and their functions. Various experimental designs for optimization of these experiments are also described. PMID:24143976

  19. Complexes of an argon atom with the linear anions HCC - and HC 4-: results of coupled cluster calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botschwina, P.; Oswald, R.

    2003-08-01

    Large-scale coupled cluster calculations have been carried out for the complexes of an argon atom with the linear anions HCC - and HC 4-. In both cases, almost T-shaped structures are energetically favoured. Their equilibrium dissociation energies ( De) are predicted to be 501(5) and 507(5) cm -1, respectively. In contrast to the isoelectronic neutral systems Ar + HCN and Ar + HC 3N, no energy minima are found for the 'hydrogen-bonded' configurations. While the complex Ar ⋯ HCC - is rather flexible, Ar ⋯ HC 4- appears to be fairly rigid, quite similar to isoelectronic Ar ⋯ HC 3N or Ar ⋯ HC 4H.

  20. Self-time-delay synchronization of time-delay coupled complex chaotic system and its applications to communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fangfang; Liu, Shutang

    2014-10-01

    Considering the time lag produced by the transmission in chaos-communication, we present self-time-delay synchronization (STDS) of complex chaotic systems. STDS implies that the synchronization between the time-delay system (the receiver) and the original system (the transmitter) while maintaining the structure and parameters of systems unchanged, thus these various problems produced by time-delay in practice are avoided. It is more suitable to simulate real communication situation. Aimed to time-delay coupled complex chaotic systems, the control law is derived by active control technique. Based on STDS, a novel communication scheme is further designed according to chaotic masking. In simulation, we take time-delay coupled complex Lorenz system transmitting actual speech signal (analog signal) and binary signal as examples. The speech signal contains two components, which are transmitted by the real part and imaginary part of one complex state variable. Two sequences of binary bits are converted into analog signals by 2M-ary and zero-order holder, then added into the real part and imaginary part of one complex state variable. Therefore, the STDS controller is realized by one critical state variable. It is simple in principle and easy to implement in engineering. Moreover, the communication system is robust to noise. It is possible to adopt cheap circuits with time-delay, which is economical and practical for communication.

  1. Endoglucanase Peripheral Loops Facilitate Complexation of Glucan Chains on Cellulose via Adaptive Coupling to the Emergent Substrate Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuchun; Beckham, Gregg T.; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.; Chu, Jhih-wei

    2013-09-19

    We examine how the catalytic domain of a glycoside hydrolase family 7 endoglucanase catalytic domain (Cel7B CD) facilitates complexation of cellulose chains from a crystal surface. With direct relevance to the science of biofuel production, this problem also represents a model system of biopolymer processing by proteins in Nature. Interactions of Cel7B CD with a cellulose microfibril along different paths of complexation are characterized by mapping the atomistic fluctuations recorded in free-energy simulations onto the parameters of a coarse-grain model. The resulting patterns of protein-biopolymer couplings also uncover the sequence signatures of the enzyme in peeling off glucan chains from the microfibril substrate. We show that the semiopen active site of Cel7B CD exhibits similar barriers and free energies of complexation over two distinct routes; namely, scooping of a chain into the active-site cleft and threading from the chain end into the channel. On the other hand, the complexation energetics strongly depends on the surface packing of the targeted chain and the resulting interaction sites with the enzyme. A revealed principle is that Cel7B CD facilitates cellulose deconstruction via adaptive coupling to the emergent substrate. The flexible, peripheral segments of the protein outside of the active-site cleft are able to accommodate the varying features of cellulose along the simulated paths of complexation. The general strategy of linking physics-based molecular interactions to protein sequence could also be helpful in elucidating how other protein machines process biopolymers.

  2. Complexation studies with lanthanides and humic acid analyzed by ultrafiltration and capillary electrophoresis-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kautenburger, Ralf; Beck, Horst Philipp

    2007-08-01

    For the long-term storage of radioactive waste, detailed information about geo-chemical behavior of radioactive and toxic metal ions under environmental conditions is necessary. Humic acid (HA) can play an important role in the immobilisation or mobilisation of metal ions due to complexation and colloid formation. Therefore, we investigate the complexation behavior of HA and its influence on the migration or retardation of selected lanthanides (europium and gadolinium as homologues of the actinides americium and curium). Two independent speciation techniques, ultrafiltration and capillary electrophoresis coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CE-ICP-MS) have been compared for the study of Eu and Gd interaction with (purified Aldrich) HA. The degree of complexation of Eu and Gd in 25 mg l(-1) Aldrich HA solutions was determined with a broad range of metal loading (Eu and Gd total concentration between 10(-6) and 10(-4) mol l(-1)), ionic strength of 10 mM (NaClO4) and different pH-values. From the CE-ICP-MS electropherograms, additional information on the charge of the Eu species was obtained by the use of 1-bromopropane as neutral marker. To detect HA in the ICP-MS and separate between HA complexed and non complexed metal ions in the CE-ICP-MS, we have halogenated the HA with iodine as ICP-MS marker. PMID:17459403

  3. Investigating vibrational anharmonic couplings in cyanide-bridged transition metal mixed valence complexes using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slenkamp, Karla M.; Lynch, Michael S.; Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Brookes, Jennifer F.; Bannan, Caitlin C.; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Khalil, Munira

    2014-02-01

    Using polarization-selective two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we measure anharmonic couplings and angles between the transition dipole moments of the four cyanide stretching (νCN) vibrations found in [(NH3)5RuIIINCFeII(CN)5]- (FeRu) dissolved in D2O and formamide and [(NC)5FeIICNPtIV(NH3)4NCFeII(CN)5]4- (FePtFe) dissolved in D2O. These cyanide-bridged transition metal complexes serve as model systems for studying the role of high frequency vibrational modes in ultrafast photoinduced charge transfer reactions. Here, we focus on the spectroscopy of the νCN modes in the electronic ground state. The FTIR spectra of the νCN modes of the bimetallic and trimetallic systems are strikingly different in terms of frequencies, amplitudes, and lineshapes. The experimental 2D IR spectra of FeRu and FePtFe and their fits reveal a set of weakly coupled anharmonic νCN modes. The vibrational mode anharmonicities of the individual νCN modes range from 14 to 28 cm-1. The mixed-mode anharmonicities range from 2 to 14 cm-1. In general, the bridging νCN mode is most weakly coupled to the radial νCN mode, which involves the terminal CN ligands. Measurement of the relative transition dipole moments of the four νCN modes reveal that the FeRu molecule is almost linear in solution when dissolved in formamide, but it assumes a bent geometry when dissolved in D2O. The νCN modes are modelled as bilinearly coupled anharmonic oscillators with an average coupling constant of 6 cm-1. This study elucidates the role of the solvent in modulating the molecular geometry and the anharmonic vibrational couplings between the νCN modes in cyanide-bridged transition metal mixed valence complexes.

  4. Preparation of benzyne complexes of group 10 metals by intramolecular suzuki coupling of ortho-metalated phenylboronic esters: molecular structure of the first benzyne-palladium(0) complex.

    PubMed

    Retbøll, Mikael; Edwards, Alison J; Rae, A David; Willis, Anthony C; Bennett, Martin A; Wenger, Eric

    2002-07-17

    A series of nickel(II) and palladium(II) aryl complexes substituted in the ortho position of the aromatic ring by a (pinacolato)boronic ester group, [MBr[o-C(6)H(4)B(pin)]L(2)] (M = Ni, L(2) = 2PPh(3) (2a), 2PCy(3) (2b), 2PEt(3) (2c), dcpe (2d), dppe (2e), and dppb (2f); M = Pd, L(2) = 2PPh(3) (3a), 2PCy(3) (3b), and dcpe (3d)), has been prepared. Many of these complexes react readily with KO(t)Bu to form the corresponding benzyne complexes [M(eta(2)-C(6)H(4))L(2)] (M = Ni, L(2) = 2PPh(3) (4a), 2PCy(3) (4b), 2PEt(3) (4c), dcpe (4d); M = Pd, L(2) = 2PCy(3) (5b)). This reaction can be regarded as an intramolecular version of a Suzuki cross-coupling reaction, the driving force for which may be the steric interaction between the boronic ester group and the phosphine ligands present in the precursors 2 and 3. Complex 3d also reacts with KO(t)Bu, but in this case disproportionation of the initially formed eta(2)-C(6)H(4) complex (5d) leads to a 1:1 mixture of a novel dinuclear palladium(I) complex, [(dcpe)Pd(mu(2)-C(6)H(4))Pd(dcpe)] (6), and a 2,2'-biphenyldiyl complex, [Pd(2,2'-C(6)H(4)C(6)H(4))(dcpe)] (7d). Complexes 2a, 3b, 3d, 4b, 5b, 6, and 7d have been structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction; complex 5b is the first example of an isolated benzyne-palladium(0) species.

  5. Efficient Energy Transfer and Metal Coupling in Cyanide-Bridged Heterodinuclear Complexes Based on (Bipyridine)(terpyridine)ruthenium(II) and (Phenylpyridine)iridium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Barthelmes, Kevin; Jäger, Michael; Kübel, Joachim; Friebe, Christian; Winter, Andreas; Wächtler, Maria; Dietzek, Benjamin; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2016-06-01

    We report a series of cyanide-bridged, heterodinuclear iridium(III)-ruthenium(II) complexes with the generalized formula [Ir((R2)2-ppy)2(CN)(μ-CN)Ru(bpy)(tpy-R1)]PF6 (ppy = 2-phenylpyridine, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, and tpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine). The structural, spectroscopic, and electrochemical properties were analyzed in the context of variation of the electron-withdrawing (e.g., -F, -Br, -CHO) and -donating (e.g., -Me) and extended π-conjugated groups at several positions. In total, ten dinuclear complexes and the appropriate model complexes have been prepared. The iridium(III)-based emission is almost fully quenched in these complexes, and only the ruthenium(II)-based emission is observed, which indicates an efficient energy transfer toward the Ru center. Upon oxidation of the Ru center, the fluorinated complexes 2 exhibit a broad intervalence charge-transfer transition in the near-infrared region. The complexes are assigned to a weakly coupled class II system according to the Robin-Day classification. The electronic structure was evaluated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations to corroborate the experimental data. PMID:27214264

  6. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  7. Fluorescence enhancement of light-harvesting complex 2 from purple bacteria coupled to spherical gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bujak, Ł.; Czechowski, N.; Piatkowski, D.; Litvin, R.; Mackowski, S.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.; Pichler, S.; Cogdell, R. J.; Heiss, W.

    2011-10-24

    The influence of plasmon excitations in spherical gold nanoparticles on the optical properties of a light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the purple bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris has been studied. Systematic analysis is facilitated by controlling the thickness of a silica layer between Au nanoparticles and LH2 complexes. Fluorescence of LH2 complexes features substantial increase when these complexes are separated by 12 nm from the gold nanoparticles. At shorter distances, non-radiative quenching leads to a decrease of fluorescence emission. The enhancement of fluorescence originates predominantly from an increase of absorption of pigments comprising the LH2 complex.

  8. Coordination Complexes of Decamethylytterbocene with4,4'-Disubstituted Bipyridines: An Experimental Study of Spin Coupling inLanthanide Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Marc D.; Berg, David J.; Andersen, Richard A.

    2005-12-08

    The paramagnetic 1:1 coordination complexes of (C5Me5)2Ybwith a series of 4,4'-disubstituted bipyridines, bipy-X, where X is Me,tert-Bu, OMe, Ph, CO2Me, and CO2Et have been prepared. All of thecomplexes are paramagnetic and the values of the magnetic susceptibilityas a function of temperature show that these values are less thanexpected for the cation, [(C5Me5)2Yb(III)(bipy-X)]+, which have beenisolated as the cation-anion ion-pairs[(C5Me5)2Yb(III)(bipy-X)]+[(C5Me5)2YbI2]f fnfn where X is CO2Et, OMe andMe. The 1H NMR chemical shifts (293 K) for the methine resonances locatedat the 6,6' site in the bipy-X ring show a linear relationship with thevalues of chiT (300 K) for the neutral complexes which illustrates thatthe molecular behavior does not depend upon the phase with one exception,viz., (C5Me5)2Yb(bipy-Me). Single crystals of the 4,4'-dimethylbipyridinecomplex undergo an irreversible, abrupt first order phase change at 228 Kthat shatters the single crystals. The magnetic susceptibility,represented in a delta vs. T plot, on this complex, in polycrystallineform undergoes reversible abrupt changes in the temperature regime 205 -212 K, which is suggested to be due to the way the individual molec ularunits pack in the unit cell. A qualitative model is proposed thataccounts for the sub-normal magnetic moments in theseytterbocene-bipyridine complexes.

  9. Cooperation of the Dam1 and Ndc80 kinetochore complexes enhances microtubule coupling and is regulated by aurora B

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Jerry F.; Umbreit, Neil T.; Gestaut, Daniel R.; Franck, Andrew D.; Cooper, Jeremy; Wordeman, Linda; Gonen, Tamir; Asbury, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    The coupling of kinetochores to dynamic spindle microtubules is crucial for chromosome positioning and segregation, error correction, and cell cycle progression. How these fundamental attachments are made and persist under tensile forces from the spindle remain important questions. As microtubule-binding elements, the budding yeast Ndc80 and Dam1 kinetochore complexes are essential and not redundant, but their distinct contributions are unknown. In this study, we show that the Dam1 complex is a processivity factor for the Ndc80 complex, enhancing the ability of the Ndc80 complex to form load-bearing attachments to and track with dynamic microtubule tips in vitro. Moreover, the interaction between the Ndc80 and Dam1 complexes is abolished when the Dam1 complex is phosphorylated by the yeast aurora B kinase Ipl1. This provides evidence for a mechanism by which aurora B resets aberrant kinetochore–microtubule attachments. We propose that the action of the Dam1 complex as a processivity factor in kinetochore–microtubule attachment is regulated by conserved signals for error correction. PMID:20479468

  10. Tuning spin-spin coupling in quinonoid-bridged dicopper(II) complexes through rational bridge variation.

    PubMed

    Schweinfurth, David; Khusniyarov, Marat M; Bubrin, Denis; Hohloch, Stephan; Su, Cheng-Yong; Sarkar, Biprajit

    2013-09-16

    Bridged metal complexes [{Cu(tmpa)}2(μ-L(1)-2H)](ClO4)2 (1), [{Cu(tmpa)}2(μ-L(2)-2H)](ClO4)2 (2), [{Cu(tmpa)}2(μ-L(3)-2H)](BPh4)2 (3), and [{Cu(tmpa)}2(μ-L(4)-2H)](ClO4)2 (4) (tmpa = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine, L(1) = chloranilic acid, L(2) = 2,5-dihydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone, L(3) = (2,5-di-[2-(methoxy)-anilino]-1,4-benzoquinone, L(4) = azophenine) were synthesized from copper(II) salts, tmpa, and the bridging quinonoid ligands in the presence of a base. X-ray structural characterization of the complexes showed a distorted octahedral environment around the copper(II) centers for the complexes 1-3, the donors being the nitrogen atoms of tmpa, and the nitrogen or oxygen donors of the bridging quinones. In contrast, the copper(II) centers in 4 display a distorted square-pyramidal coordination, where one of the pyridine arms of each tmpa remains uncoordinated. Bond-length analyses within the bridging ligand exhibit localization of the double bonds inside the bridge for 1-3. In contrast, complete delocalization of double bonds within the bridging ligand is observed for 4. Temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements on the complexes reveal an antiferromagnetic coupling between the copper(II) ions. The strength of antiferromagnetic coupling was observed to depend on the energy of the HOMO of the bridging quinone ligands, with exchange coupling constants J in the range between -23.2 and -0.6 cm(-1) and the strength of antiferromagnetic coupling of 4 > 3 > 2 > 1. Broken-symmetry density functional theory calculations (DFT) revealed that the orientation of magnetic orbitals in 1 and 2 is different than that in 3 and 4, and this results in two different exchange pathways. These results demonstrate how bridge-mediated spin-spin coupling in quinone-bridged metal complexes can be strongly tuned by a rational design of the bridging ligand employing the [O] for [NR] isoelectronic analogy.

  11. Dynamics of compressional Mach cones in a strongly coupled complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, P. Dey, R.; Sen, Abhijit; Kadyan, Sangeeta

    2014-10-15

    Using a Generalised-Hydrodynamic (GH) fluid model, we study the influence of strong coupling induced modification of the fluid compressibility on the dynamics of compressional Mach cones in a dusty plasma medium. A significant structural change of lateral wakes for a given Mach number and Epstein drag force is found in the strongly coupled regime. With the increase of fluid compressibility, the peak amplitude of the normalised perturbed dust density first increases and then decreases monotonically after reaching its maximum value. It is also noticed that the opening angle of the cone structure decreases with the increase of the compressibility of the medium and the arm of the Mach cone breaks up into small structures in the velocity vector profile when the coupling between the dust particles increases.

  12. Morphological communication: exploiting coupled dynamics in a complex mechanical structure to achieve locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Rieffel, John A.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.; Lipson, Hod

    2010-01-01

    Traditional engineering approaches strive to avoid, or actively suppress, nonlinear dynamic coupling among components. Biological systems, in contrast, are often rife with these dynamics. Could there be, in some cases, a benefit to high degrees of dynamical coupling? Here we present a distributed robotic control scheme inspired by the biological phenomenon of tensegrity-based mechanotransduction. This emergence of morphology-as-information-conduit or ‘morphological communication’, enabled by time-sensitive spiking neural networks, presents a new paradigm for the decentralized control of large, coupled, modular systems. These results significantly bolster, both in magnitude and in form, the idea of morphological computation in robotic control. Furthermore, they lend further credence to ideas of embodied anatomical computation in biological systems, on scales ranging from cellular structures up to the tendinous networks of the human hand. PMID:19776146

  13. TMEDA in iron-catalyzed Kumada coupling: amine adduct versus homoleptic "ate" complex formation.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Robin B; Brenner, Peter B; Carter, Emma; Cogswell, Paul M; Haddow, Mairi F; Harvey, Jeremy N; Murphy, Damien M; Nunn, Joshua; Woodall, Christopher H

    2014-02-10

    The reactions of iron chlorides with mesityl Grignard reagents and tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) under catalytically relevant conditions tend to yield the homoleptic "ate" complex [Fe(mes)3 ](-) (mes=mesityl) rather than adducts of the diamine, and it is this ate complex that accounts for the catalytic activity. Both [Fe(mes)3 ](-) and the related complex [Fe(Bn)3 ](-) (Bn=benzyl) react faster with representative electrophiles than the equivalent neutral [FeR2 (TMEDA)] complexes. Fe(I) species are observed under catalytically relevant conditions with both benzyl and smaller aryl Grignard reagents. The X-ray structures of [Fe(Bn)3 ](-) and [Fe(Bn)4 ](-) were determined; [Fe(Bn)4 ](-) is the first homoleptic σ-hydrocarbyl Fe(III) complex that has been structurally characterized. PMID:24505000

  14. Complex Allylation by the Direct Cross-Coupling of Imines with Unactivated Allylic Alcohols**

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Masayuki; McLaughlin, Martin; Micalizio, Glenn C.

    2010-01-01

    We report a reaction for the convergent coupling of allylic alcohols with imines that delivers stereodefined homoallylic amines. The process proceeds with net allylic transposition, without the intermediacy of allylic organometallic reagents, and forges two stereodefined centers and a geometrically defined di- or trisubstituted alkene with very high levels of selectivity. PMID:19360820

  15. The Copper-nicotinamide complex: sustainable applications in coupling and cycloaddition reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Crystalline copper (II)-nicotinamide complex, synthesized via simple mixing of copper chloride and nicotinamide solution at room temperature, catalyzes the C-S, C-N bond forming and cycloaddition reactions under a variety of sustainable reaction conditions.

  16. Communication: Relativistic Fock-space coupled cluster study of small building blocks of larger uranium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tecmer, Paweł Visscher, Lucas; Severo Pereira Gomes, André; Knecht, Stefan

    2014-07-28

    We present a study of the electronic structure of the [UO{sub 2}]{sup +}, [UO{sub 2}]{sup 2} {sup +}, [UO{sub 2}]{sup 3} {sup +}, NUO, [NUO]{sup +}, [NUO]{sup 2} {sup +}, [NUN]{sup −}, NUN, and [NUN]{sup +} molecules with the intermediate Hamiltonian Fock-space coupled cluster method. The accuracy of mean-field approaches based on the eXact-2-Component Hamiltonian to incorporate spin–orbit coupling and Gaunt interactions are compared to results obtained with the Dirac–Coulomb Hamiltonian. Furthermore, we assess the reliability of calculations employing approximate density functionals in describing electronic spectra and quantities useful in rationalizing Uranium (VI) species reactivity (hardness, electronegativity, and electrophilicity)

  17. Strong Exchange Coupling in a Trimetallic Radical-Bridged Cobalt(II)-Hexaazatrinaphthylene Complex.

    PubMed

    Moilanen, Jani O; Chilton, Nicholas F; Day, Benjamin M; Pugh, Thomas; Layfield, Richard A

    2016-04-25

    Reducing hexaazatrinaphthylene (HAN) with potassium in the presence of 18-c-6 produces [{K(18-c-6)}HAN], which contains the S=1/2 radical [HAN](.-) . The [HAN](.-) radical can be transferred to the cobalt(II) amide [Co{N(SiMe3 )2 }2 ], forming [K(18-c-6)][(HAN){Co(N'')2 }3 ]; magnetic measurements on this compound reveal an S=4 spin system with strong cobalt-ligand antiferromagnetic exchange and J≈-290 cm(-1) (-2 J formalism). In contrast, the Co(II) centres in the unreduced analogue [(HAN){Co(N'')2 }3 ] are weakly coupled (J≈-4.4 cm(-1) ). The finding that [HAN](.-) can be synthesized as a stable salt and transferred to cobalt introduces potential new routes to magnetic materials based on strongly coupled, triangular HAN building blocks. PMID:26997130

  18. FLS-Based Adaptive Synchronization Control of Complex Dynamical Networks With Nonlinear Couplings and State-Dependent Uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jian; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of synchronization control of complex dynamical networks (CDN) subject to nonlinear couplings and uncertainties. An fuzzy logical system-based adaptive distributed controller is designed to achieve the synchronization. The asymptotic convergence of synchronization errors is analyzed by combining algebraic graph theory and Lyapunov theory. In contrast to the existing results, the proposed synchronization control method is applicable for the CDN with system uncertainties and unknown topology. Especially, the considered uncertainties are allowed to occur in the node local dynamics as well as in the interconnections of different nodes. In addition, it is shown that a unified controller design framework is derived for the CDN with or without coupling delays. Finally, simulations on a Chua's circuit network are provided to validate the effectiveness of the theoretical results. PMID:25720020

  19. Asymmetric mixed-valence complexes that consist of cyclometalated ruthenium and ferrocene: synthesis, characterization, and electronic-coupling studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Si-Hai; Shen, Jun-Jian; Yao, Jiannian; Zhong, Yu-Wu

    2013-01-01

    Three bis-tridentate ferrocene-containing cyclometalated ruthenium complexes, [(Fcdpb)Ru(tpy)](+) (1(+)), [(Fctpy)Ru(dpb)](+) (2(+)), and [(Fcdpb)Ru(Fctpy)](+) (3(+)), have been prepared and characterized, where Fcdpb is the 2-deprotonated form of 1,3-di(2-pyridyl)-5-ferrocenylbenzene, tpy is 2,2':6',2"-terpyridine, dpb is the 2-deprotonated form of 1,3-di(2-pyridyl)benzene, and Fctpy is 4'-ferrocenyl-2,2':6',2"-terpyridine. Single crystals of compounds 2(+) and 3(+) have been studied by X-ray analysis. Complexes 1(+) and 2(+) displayed two anodic redox waves, whilst three well-separated redox couples were observed for compound 3(+). A combined experimental and computational study suggested that the ferrocene unit on the Fcdpb moiety in compounds 1(+) and 3(+) was oxidized first. In contrast, the order of the oxidation of ruthenium and ferrocene in complex 2(+) was reversed. Metal-to-metal-charge-transfer transitions (MM'CT) have been observed for the singly oxidized states 1(2+), 2(2+), and 3(2+) in the near-infrared region. Hush analysis showed that the metal-metal electronic couplings in compounds 1(2+) and 3(2+) were much stronger than those in compound 2(2+).

  20. Red-shifted cyanide stretching frequencies in cyanide-bridged transition metal donor-acceptor complexes. Support for vibronic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Watzky, M.A.; Endicott, J.F.; Song, X.

    1996-06-05

    Patterns in the cyanide stretching frequencies have been examined in several series of monometal- and CN{sup {minus}} bridged transition metal complexes. Metal-to-cyanide back-bonding can be identified as a major factor contributing to red shifts of v{sub CN} in monometal complexes. This effect is complicated in cyanide-bridged complexes in two ways: (a) when both metals can back-bond to cyanide, the net interaction is repulsive and results in a blue shift of v{sub CN}: and (b) when a donor and acceptor are bridged, V{sub CN} undergoes a substantial red shift (sometimes more than 60 cm{sup {minus}1} lower in energy than the parent monometal complex). These effects can be described by simple perturbational models for the electronic interactions. Monometal cyanide complexes and CN{sup {minus}}-bridged backbonding metals can be treated in terms of their perturbations of the CN{sup {minus}} {pi} and {pi}* orbitals by using a simple, Hueckel-like, three-center perturbational treatment of electronic interactions. However, bridged donor-acceptor pairs are best described by a vibronic model in which it is assumed that the extent of electronic delocalization is in equilibrium with variations of some nuclear coordinates. Consistent with this approach, it is found that (a) the oscillator strength of the donor-acceptor charge transfer (DACT) absorption is roughly proportional to the red shift of v{sub CN} and (b) there are strong symmetry constraints on the coupling.

  1. Investigating vibrational anharmonic couplings in cyanide-bridged transition metal mixed valence complexes using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Slenkamp, Karla M.; Lynch, Michael S.; Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Brookes, Jennifer F.; Bannan, Caitlin C.; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Khalil, Munira

    2014-02-28

    Using polarization-selective two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we measure anharmonic couplings and angles between the transition dipole moments of the four cyanide stretching (ν{sub CN}) vibrations found in [(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}Ru{sup III}NCFe{sup II}(CN){sub 5}]{sup −} (FeRu) dissolved in D{sub 2}O and formamide and [(NC){sub 5}Fe{sup II}CNPt{sup IV}(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}NCFe{sup II}(CN){sub 5}]{sup 4−} (FePtFe) dissolved in D{sub 2}O. These cyanide-bridged transition metal complexes serve as model systems for studying the role of high frequency vibrational modes in ultrafast photoinduced charge transfer reactions. Here, we focus on the spectroscopy of the ν{sub CN} modes in the electronic ground state. The FTIR spectra of the ν{sub CN} modes of the bimetallic and trimetallic systems are strikingly different in terms of frequencies, amplitudes, and lineshapes. The experimental 2D IR spectra of FeRu and FePtFe and their fits reveal a set of weakly coupled anharmonic ν{sub CN} modes. The vibrational mode anharmonicities of the individual ν{sub CN} modes range from 14 to 28 cm{sup −1}. The mixed-mode anharmonicities range from 2 to 14 cm{sup −1}. In general, the bridging ν{sub CN} mode is most weakly coupled to the radial ν{sub CN} mode, which involves the terminal CN ligands. Measurement of the relative transition dipole moments of the four ν{sub CN} modes reveal that the FeRu molecule is almost linear in solution when dissolved in formamide, but it assumes a bent geometry when dissolved in D{sub 2}O. The ν{sub CN} modes are modelled as bilinearly coupled anharmonic oscillators with an average coupling constant of 6 cm{sup −1}. This study elucidates the role of the solvent in modulating the molecular geometry and the anharmonic vibrational couplings between the ν{sub CN} modes in cyanide-bridged transition metal mixed valence complexes.

  2. Dynamical complexity of multipoint geospace observations related to magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Donner, Reik; Runge, Jakob

    2016-07-01

    We explore, evaluate and compare the applicability, effectiveness and interdisciplinary character of a variety of modern and sophisticated methods, from complex systems sciences, for the investigation of dynamical complexity of the near-Earth electromagnetic environment. We identify and inter-compare complementary analysis concepts, allowing for a systematic study of geospace magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms and regime shifts between normal and abnormal states of the Earth's magnetic field, based on observational data from both ground and space. We expect these concepts to allow identifying previously unrecognized precursory structures in the dynamical complexity and, thus, contribute to a better understanding of dynamical processes manifested in observable magnetic field fluctuations prior to possible space weather-related hazards.

  3. Oxidative Reactivity and Cytotoxic Properties of a Platinum(II) Complex Prepared by Outer-Sphere Amide Bond Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Justin J.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Benzyl amine was coupled to the dangling carboxylic acid groups of the platinum(II) complex [Pt(edda)Cl2], where edda = ethylenediamine-N,N’-diacetic acid, to give the diamidetethered complex [Pt(L)Cl2] (1), where L = ethylenediamine-N,N’-bis(N-benzylacetamide). Complex 1 was oxidized with both PhICl2 and Br2. Oxidation with PhICl2 cleanly afforded the tetrachloride complex, [Pt(L)Cl4] (2), whereas oxidation with Br2 gave rise to several mixed halide complexes of the general formula, [Pt(L)ClxBr4-x], where x = 1, 2, or 3. Complexes 1 and 2 were fully characterized by 1H, 13C, and 195Pt NMR spectroscopy, as well as by ESI-MS. These compounds exist as a mixture of diastereomers that arise from the chirality of the two coordinated nitrogen atoms. Crystal structures of 1, 2, and [Pt(L)ClxBry] (3) are reported. Although refined as the tetrabromide complex [Pt(L)Br4], the crystal structure of 3 is a mixture of species with site-occupancy disorder of chloride and bromide ligands. DFT calculations indicate that the two sets of diastereomers of 1 and 2 are effectively thermoneutral, a conclusion that is also supported by the observation of both members of each pair by NMR spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of 1 and 2 was measured by the MTT assay in HeLa cells and compared to that of cisplatin. Both exhibit IC50 values close to 50 μM and are therefore substantially less toxic than cisplatin, for which the IC50 is 1 μM. PMID:24489429

  4. Coordination of 1,4-Diazabutadiene Ligands to Decamethylytterbocene: Additional Examples of Spin Coupling in Ytterbocene Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Richard; Walter, Marc D.; Berg, David J.; Andersen, Richard A.

    2006-11-04

    The paramagnetic 1:1 coordination complexes of (C5Me5)2Yb with a series of diazabutadiene ligands, RN=C(R')C(R')=NR, where R= CMe3, CHMe2, adamantyl, p-tolyl, p-anisyl, and mesityl when R'=H, and R= p-anisyl when R'= Me, have been prepared. The complexes are paramagnetic, but their magnetic moments are less than expected for the two uncoupled spin carriers, (C5Me5)2Yb(III, 4f13) and the diazabutadiene radical anions (S=1/2), which implies exchange coupling between the spins. The variable temperature 1H NMR spectra show that rotation about the R-N bond is hindered and these barriers are estimated. The barriers are largely determined by steric effects but electronic effects are not unimportant.

  5. Structural and functional coupling of Hsp90- and Sgt1-centred multi-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minghao; Botër, Marta; Li, Kuoyu; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Panaretou, Barry; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Shirasu, Ken; Pearl, Laurence H

    2008-10-22

    Sgt1 is an adaptor protein implicated in a variety of processes, including formation of the kinetochore complex in yeast, and regulation of innate immunity systems in plants and animals. Sgt1 has been found to associate with SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases, the CBF3 kinetochore complex, plant R proteins and related animal Nod-like receptors, and with the Hsp90 molecular chaperone. We have determined the crystal structure of the core Hsp90-Sgt1 complex, revealing a distinct site of interaction on the Hsp90 N-terminal domain. Using the structure, we developed mutations in Sgt1 interfacial residues, which specifically abrogate interaction with Hsp90, and disrupt Sgt1-dependent functions in vivo, in plants and yeast. We show that Sgt1 bridges the Hsp90 molecular chaperone system to the substrate-specific arm of SCF ubiquitin ligase complexes, suggesting a role in SCF assembly and regulation, and providing multiple complementary routes for ubiquitination of Hsp90 client proteins. PMID:18818696

  6. Visual detection of formaldehyde by highly selective fluorophore labeling via gold(III) complex-mediated three-component coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kong-Fan; Deng, Jie-Ren; Wei, Xiao-Qun; Shao, Shi-Ping; Xiang, Da-Peng; Wong, Man-Kin

    2015-07-21

    A novel method for visual detection of formaldehyde with excellent selectivity via a gold(iii) complex-mediated three-component coupling reaction of resin-linked sterically bulky amines and fluorescent alkynes has been developed.

  7. Self-assembly of peptide-porphyrin complexes leads to pH-dependent excitonic coupling.

    PubMed

    Kuciauskas, Darius; Caputo, Gregory A

    2009-10-29

    Using absorbance, fluorescence, resonance light scattering, and circular dichroism spectroscopy, we studied the self-assembly of the anionic meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphine (TPPS(4)(2-/4-)) and a cationic 22-residue polypeptide. We found that three TPPS(4)(2-/4-) molecules bind to the peptide, which contains nine lysine residues in the primary sequence. In acidic solutions, when the peptide is in the random-coil conformation, TPPS(4)(2-) bound to the peptide forms excitonically coupled J-aggregates. In pH 7.6 solutions, when the peptide secondary structure is partially alpha-helical, the porphyrin-to-peptide binding constants are approximately the same as in acidic solutions (approximately 3 x 10(6) M(-1)), but excitonic interactions between the porphyrins are insignificant. The binding of TPPS(4)(2-/4-) to lysine-containing peptides is cooperative and can be described by the Hill model. Our results show that porphyrin binding can be used to change the secondary structure of peptide-based biomaterials. In addition, binding to peptides could be used to optimize porphyrin intermolecular electronic interactions (exciton coupling), which is relevant for the design of light-harvesting antennas for artificial photosynthesis.

  8. Strong Exchange Coupling in a Trimetallic Radical‐Bridged Cobalt(II)‐Hexaazatrinaphthylene Complex

    PubMed Central

    Moilanen, Jani O.; Chilton, Nicholas F.; Day, Benjamin M.; Pugh, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reducing hexaazatrinaphthylene (HAN) with potassium in the presence of 18‐c‐6 produces [{K(18‐c‐6)}HAN], which contains the S=1/2 radical [HAN].−. The [HAN].− radical can be transferred to the cobalt(II) amide [Co{N(SiMe3)2}2], forming [K(18‐c‐6)][(HAN){Co(N′′)2}3]; magnetic measurements on this compound reveal an S=4 spin system with strong cobalt–ligand antiferromagnetic exchange and J≈−290 cm−1 (−2 J formalism). In contrast, the CoII centres in the unreduced analogue [(HAN){Co(N′′)2}3] are weakly coupled (J≈−4.4 cm−1). The finding that [HAN].− can be synthesized as a stable salt and transferred to cobalt introduces potential new routes to magnetic materials based on strongly coupled, triangular HAN building blocks. PMID:26997130

  9. The coupling of carbon dioxide and epoxides by phenanthroline derivatives containing different Cu(II) complexes as catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Ahmet; Palali, Ahmet Arif; Durgun, Mustafa; Tasci, Zeynep; Ulusoy, Mahmut

    2013-09-01

    A series of the mononuclear Cu(II) metal complexes containing the ligand Bdppz [(9a,13a-dihydro-4,5,9,14-tetraaza-benzo[b]triphenylene-11-yl)-phenyl-methanone] (L1) and Aqphen [(12,17-dihydronaphthol[2,3-h]dipyrido[3,2-a:2‧,3‧-c]-phenazine-12,17-dione)] (L2) were synthesized and used as catalyst for the coupling of carbon dioxide (CO2) and liquid epoxide which served as both reactant and solvent. Dimethylamino pyridine (DMAP) was used as co-catalyst. The yields of epoxides to corresponding cyclic carbonates were determined by comparing the ratio of product to substrate in the 1H NMR spectrum of an aliquot of the reaction mixture. The mononuclear Cu(II) complexes of these ligands were synthesized by treating an ethanol solvent of the appropriate ligand with a different molar amount of CuCl2·2H2O. The Cu(II) complexes were characterized by FT-IR, UV-Vis, elemental analysis, melting point analysis, mass spectra, molar conductivity measurements and magnetic susceptibility techniques. The reaction of the Bdppz and Aqphen ligands in a 1:1, 1:2 or 1:3 mole ratio with CuCl2·2H2O afforded ionic Cu(II) complexes in the presence of Et3N.

  10. Coupled lagged ensemble weather- and river runoff prediction in complex Alpine terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiatek, Gerhard; Kunstmann, Harald; Werhahn, Johannes

    2013-04-01

    It is still a challenge to predict fast reacting streamflow precipitation response in Alpine terrain. Civil protection measures require flood prediction in 24 - 48 lead time. This holds particularly true for the Ammer River region which was affected by century floods in 1999, 2003 and 2005. Since 2005 a coupled NWP/Hydrology model system is operated in simulating and predicting the Ammer River discharges. The Ammer River catchment is located in the Bavarian Ammergau Alps and alpine forelands, Germany. With elevations reaching 2185 m and annual mean precipitation between 1100 and 2000 mm it represents very demanding test ground for a river runoff prediction system. The one way coupled system utilizes a lagged ensemble prediction system (EPS) taking into account combination of recent and previous NWP forecasts. The major components of the system are the MM5 NWP model run at 3.5 km resolution and initialized twice a day, the hydrology model WaSiM-ETH run at 100 m resolution and Perl object environment (POE) implementing the networking and the system operation. Results obtained in the years 2005-2012 reveal that river runoff simulations depict already high correlation (NSC in range 0.53 and 0.95) with observed runoff in retrospective runs with monitored meteorology data, but suffer from errors in quantitative precipitation forecast (QPF) from the employed numerical weather prediction model. We evaluate the NWP model accuracy, especially the precipitation intensity, frequency and location and put a focus on the performance gain of bias adjustment procedures. We show how this enhanced QFP data help to reduce the uncertainty in the discharge prediction. In addition to the HND (Hochwassernachrichtendienst, Bayern) observations TERENO Longterm Observatory hydrometeorological observation data are available since 2011. They are used to evaluate the NWP performance and setup of a bias correction procedure based on ensemble postprocessing applying Bayesian (BMA) model averaging

  11. Investigation of organic magnetoresistance dependence on spin-orbit coupling using 8-hydroxyquinolinate rare-earth based complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, R. S.; Costa, D. G.; Ávila, H. C.; Paolini, T. B.; Brito, H. F.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Cremona, M.

    2016-05-01

    The recently discovered organic magnetoresistance effect (OMAR) reveals the spin-dependent behavior of the charge transport in organic semiconductors. So far, it is known that hyperfine interactions play an important role in this phenomenon and also that spin-orbit coupling is negligible for light-atom based compounds. However, in the presence of heavy atoms, spin-orbit interactions should play an important role in OMAR. It is known that these interactions are responsible for singlet and triplet states mixing via intersystem crossing and the change of spin-charge relaxation time in the charge mobility process. In this work, we report a dramatic change in the OMAR effect caused by the presence of strong intramolecular spin-orbit coupling in a series of rare-earth quinolate organic complex-based devices. Our data show a different OMAR lineshape compared with the OMAR lineshape of tris(8-hydroxyquinolinate) aluminum-based devices, which are well described in the literature. In addition, electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory help to establish the connection between this results and the presence of heavy central ions in the different complexes.

  12. Boson stars in a theory of complex scalar fields coupled to the U(1) gauge field and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kulshreshtha, Usha; Shankar Kulshreshtha, Daya

    2014-08-01

    We study boson shells and boson stars in a theory of a complex scalar field coupled to the U(1) gauge field {{A}_{\\mu }} and Einstein gravity with the potential V(|\\Phi |)\\;:=\\frac{1}{2}{{m}^{2}}{{\\left( |\\Phi |+a \\right)}^{2}}. This could be considered either as a theory of a massive complex scalar field coupled to an electromagnetic field and gravity in a conical potential, or as a theory in the presence of a potential that is an overlap of a parabolic and conical potential. Our theory has a positive cosmological constant (\\Lambda :=4\\pi G{{m}^{2}}{{a}^{2}}). Boson stars are found to come in two types, having either ball-like or shell-like charge density. We studied the properties of these solutions and also determined their domains of existence for some specific values of the parameters of the theory. Similar solutions have also been obtained by Kleihaus, Kunz, Laemmerzahl and List, in a V-shaped scalar potential.

  13. Proton-Coupled Reduction of an Iron Cyanide Complex to Methane and Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Rittle, Jonathan; Peters, Jonas C

    2016-09-26

    Nitrogenase enzymes mediate the six-electron reductive cleavage of cyanide to CH4 and NH3 . Herein we demonstrate for the first time the liberation of CH4 and NH3 from a well-defined iron cyanide coordination complex, [SiP(iPr) 3 ]Fe(CN) (where [SiP(iPr) 3 ] represents a tris(phosphine)silyl ligand), on exposure to proton and electron equivalents. [SiP(iPr) 3 ]Fe(CN) additionally serves as a useful entry point to rare examples of terminally-bound Fe(CNH) and Fe(CNH2 ) species that, in accord with preliminary mechanistic studies, are plausible intermediates of the cyanide reductive protonation to generate CH4 and NH3 . Comparative studies with a related [SiP(iPr) 3 ]Fe(CNMe2 ) complex suggests the possibility of multiple, competing mechanisms for cyanide activation and reduction. PMID:27607732

  14. Non-double-couple earthquake mechanisms at the Hengill-Grensdalur volcanic complex, southwest Iceland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Miller, A.D.; Foulger, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Hengill-Grensdalur area in Iceland generates frequent small non-double-couple earthquakes with explosive volumetric components. We collected high quality three-component digital recordings of 4,000 earthquakes on a purpose-designed, 32-station network in 1991, and determined focal mechanisms for 100 of the best-recorded earthquakes by inverting amplitude ratios. Many of the mechanisms are consistent, within the errors, with simultaneous shear and tensile faulting, with tensile faults parallel to the local spreading ridge, and shear faulting similar to that in the South Iceland transform-fault zone. Some events cannot be explained by this model, however, and require other processes, such as crack closing and partial compensation of tensile cracks by fluid flow.

  15. Complex interactions between dispersal and dynamics: Lessons from coupled logistic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, A. )

    1993-07-01

    A study of one of the simplest systems incorporating both dispersal and local dynamics, coupling two discrete time logistic equations, demonstrates several surprising features. Passive dispersal can cause chaotic dynamics to be replaced by simple periodic dynamics. Thus passive movement can be stabilizing, even in a deterministic model without underlying spatial variation in the dynamics. The boundary between initial conditions leading to qualitatively different dynamics can be a fractal, so it is essentially impossible to specify the asymptotic behavior in terms of the initial conditions. In accord with several recent studies of arthropods and earlier theoretical work, density dependence may only be detectable at a small enough spatial scale, so efforts to uncover density dependence must include investigations of movement. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in the Reduction of Carbonyls by Samarium Diiodide-Water Complexes.

    PubMed

    Chciuk, Tesia V; Anderson, William R; Flowers, Robert A

    2016-07-20

    Reduction of carbonyls by SmI2 is significantly impacted by the presence of water, but the fundamental step(s) of initial transfer of a formal hydrogen atom from the SmI2-water reagent system to produce an intermediate radical is not fully understood. In this work, we provide evidence consistent with the reduction of carbonyls by SmI2-water proceeding through proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). Combined rate and computational studies show that a model aldehyde and ketone are likely reduced through an asynchronous PCET, whereas reduction of a representative lactone occurs through a concerted PCET. In the latter case, concerted PCET is likely a consequence of significantly endergonic initial electron transfer. PMID:27367158

  17. Complex analysis of scattering 1p-shell nuclei in the framework of coupled channel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassurlla, M.; Burtebayev, N.; Duisebayev, A.; Burtebayeva, J.; Spitaleri, C.; Urkinbayev, A.; Rusek, K.; Piasecki, E.; Kliczewski, S.; Trzcinska, A.; Sakuta, S. B.; Boztosun, I.; Artemov, S. V.; Galanina, L. I.

    2016-04-01

    The scattering process on 1p-shell nuclei, having the cluster structure, can be seen in the anomaly increasing of cross sections for large angles. Most often, this increasing of cross sections is connected with mechanism of transfer of clusters or nucleons. The study of the α-cluster transfer mechanism in the elastic scattering of 20Ne ions on 16O nuclei is important for investigation burning process in evolution of the Universe immediately after the Big-Bang. Therefore new experiment on the heavy ion accelerator (Warsaw University) was carried out with a significant expansion of the range of angles up to 1700 in center mass system at E Lab =50.0 MeV. Data analysis of angular distribution was performed in framework of the optical model and coupled channel method. The optimal parameters of the optical potential were obtained and the spectroscopic factor was obtained 1 for 20Ne as α +16O.

  18. Sensitivity analysis of complex coupled systems extended to second and higher order derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1989-01-01

    In design of engineering systems, the what if questions often arise such as: what will be the change of the aircraft payload, if the wing aspect ratio is incremented by 10 percent. Answers to such questions are commonly sought by incrementing the pertinent variable, and reevaluating the major disciplinary analyses involved. These analyses are contributed by engineering disciplines that are, usually, coupled, as are the aerodynamics, structures, and performance in the context of the question above. The what if questions can be answered precisely by computation of the derivatives. A method for calculation of the first derivatives has been developed previously. An algorithm is presented for calculation of the second and higher order derivatives.

  19. Exchange coupling transformations in Cu (II) heterospin complexes of “breathing crystals” under structural phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Vitaly A.; Petrova, Marina V.; Lukzen, Nikita N.

    2015-08-15

    Family of “breathing crystals” is the polymer-chain complexes of Cu(hfac){sub 2} with nitroxides. The polymer chains consist of one-, two- or three-spin clusters. The “breathing crystals” experience simultaneous magnetic and Jahn-Teller type structural phase transitions with change of total cluster spin and drastic change of bond lengths (ca. 10-12%). For the first time the intra-cluster magnetic couplings in ”breathing crystals” have been calculated both by band structure methods GGA + U and hybrid DFT (B3LYP and PBE0) for the isolated exchange clusters. The temperature dependence of the magnetic coupling constant was calculated for two polymer-chain compounds of the “breathing crystal” family - C{sub 21}H{sub 19}CuF{sub 12}N{sub 4}O{sub 6} with the chains containing two-spin clusters and C{sub 22}H{sub 21}CuF{sub 12}N{sub 4}O{sub 6} with the chains of alternating three-spin clusters and one-spin sites. It was found that adding a Hubbard-like parameter not only to the copper 3d electrons but also to the oxygen 2p electrons (GGA + U{sub d} + U{sub p} approach) results in an improved description of exchange coupling in the “breathing crystal” compounds. At the same time treatment of the isolated clusters by a large basis hybrid DFT with high computational cost provides a similar quality fit of the experimental magneto-chemical data as that for the GGA + U{sub d} + U{sub p} band structure calculation scheme. Our calculations also showed that in spite of the abrupt transformation of the magnetic coupling constant under the phase transition, the band gap in the “breathing crystals” remains about the same value with temperature decrease.

  20. Prion Protein—Antibody Complexes Characterized by Chromatography-Coupled Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lester; Kim, Seung Joong; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Stöhr, Jan; Poncet-Montange, Guillaume; Weiss, Thomas M.; Tsuruta, Hiro; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Sali, Andrej

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant self-assembly, induced by structural misfolding of the prion proteins, leads to a number of neurodegenerative disorders. In particular, misfolding of the mostly α-helical cellular prion protein (PrPC) into a β-sheet-rich disease-causing isoform (PrPSc) is the key molecular event in the formation of PrPSc aggregates. The molecular mechanisms underlying the PrPC-to-PrPSc conversion and subsequent aggregation remain to be elucidated. However, in persistently prion-infected cell-culture models, it was shown that treatment with monoclonal antibodies against defined regions of the prion protein (PrP) led to the clearing of PrPSc in cultured cells. To gain more insight into this process, we characterized PrP-antibody complexes in solution using a fast protein liquid chromatography coupled with small-angle x-ray scattering (FPLC-SAXS) procedure. High-quality SAXS data were collected for full-length recombinant mouse PrP [denoted recPrP(23–230)] and N-terminally truncated recPrP(89–230), as well as their complexes with each of two Fab fragments (HuM-P and HuM-R1), which recognize N- and C-terminal epitopes of PrP, respectively. In-line measurements by fast protein liquid chromatography coupled with SAXS minimized data artifacts caused by a non-monodispersed sample, allowing structural analysis of PrP alone and in complex with Fab antibodies. The resulting structural models suggest two mechanisms for how these Fabs may prevent the conversion of PrPC into PrPSc. PMID:26287631

  1. The NatA Acetyltransferase Couples Sup35 Prion Complexes to the [PSI+] Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Pezza, John A.; Langseth, Sara X.; Raupp Yamamoto, Rochele; Doris, Stephen M.; Ulin, Samuel P.; Salomon, Arthur R.

    2009-01-01

    Protein-only (prion) epigenetic elements confer unique phenotypes by adopting alternate conformations that specify new traits. Given the conformational flexibility of prion proteins, protein-only inheritance requires efficient self-replication of the underlying conformation. To explore the cellular regulation of conformational self-replication and its phenotypic effects, we analyzed genetic interactions between [PSI+], a prion form of the S. cerevisiae Sup35 protein (Sup35[PSI+]), and the three Nα-acetyltransferases, NatA, NatB, and NatC, which collectively modify ∼50% of yeast proteins. Although prion propagation proceeds normally in the absence of NatB or NatC, the [PSI+] phenotype is reversed in strains lacking NatA. Despite this change in phenotype, [PSI+] NatA mutants continue to propagate heritable Sup35[PSI+]. This uncoupling of protein state and phenotype does not arise through a decrease in the number or activity of prion templates (propagons) or through an increase in soluble Sup35. Rather, NatA null strains are specifically impaired in establishing the translation termination defect that normally accompanies Sup35 incorporation into prion complexes. The NatA effect cannot be explained by the modification of known components of the [PSI+] prion cycle including Sup35; thus, novel acetylated cellular factors must act to establish and maintain the tight link between Sup35[PSI+] complexes and their phenotypic effects. PMID:19073888

  2. An alternative to fully coupled reactive transport simulations for long-term prediction of chemical reactions in complex geological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kempka, Thomas; Kühn, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Fully-coupled reactive transport simulations involving multiphase hydrodynamics and chemical reactions in heterogeneous settings are extremely challenging from a computational point of view. This often leads to oversimplification of the investigated system: coarse spatial discretization, to keep the number of elements in the order of few thousands; simplified chemistry, disregarding many potentially important reactions. A novel approach for coupling non-reactive hydrodynamic simulations with the outcome of single batch geochemical simulations was therefore introduced to assess the potential long-term mineral trapping at the Ketzin pilot site for underground CO2 storage in Germany [1],[2]. The advantage of the coupling is the ability to use multi-million grid non-reactive hydrodynamics simulations on one side and few batch 0D geochemical simulations on the other, so that the complexity of both systems does not need to be reduced. This contribution shows the approach which was taken to validate this simplified coupling scheme. The procedure involved batch simulations of the reference geochemical model, then performing both non-reactive and fully coupled 1D and 3D reactive transport simulations and finally applying the simplified coupling scheme based on the non-reactive and geochemical batch model. The TOUGHREACT/ECO2N [3] simulator was adopted for the validation. The degree of refinement of the spatial grid and the complexity and velocity of the mineral reactions, along with a cut-off value for the minimum concentration of dissolved CO2 allowed to originate precipitates in the simplified approach were found out to be the governing parameters for the convergence of the two schemes. Systematic discrepancies between the approaches are not reducible, simply because there is no feedback between chemistry and hydrodynamics, and can reach 20 % - 30 % in unfavourable cases. However, even such discrepancy is completely acceptable, in our opinion, given the amount of

  3. Copper(I) complexes with trispyrazolylmethane ligands: synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Haldón, Estela; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Nicasio, M Carmen; Pérez, Pedro J

    2012-08-01

    Three novel Cu(I) complexes bearing tris(pyrazolyl)methane ligands, Tpm(x), have been prepared from reactions of equimolar amounts of CuI and the ligands Tpm, (HC(pz)(3)), Tpm*, (HC(3,5-Me(2)-pz)(3)), and Tpm(Ms), (HC(3-Ms-pz)(3)). X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the Tpm and Tpm(Ms) derivatives exhibit a 2:1 Cu:ligand ratio, whereas the Tpm* complex is a mononuclear species in nature. The latter has been employed as a precatalyst in the arylation of amides and aromatic thiols with good activity. The synthesis of a Tpm*Cu(I)-phthalimidate, a feasible intermediate in this catalytic process, has also been performed. Low temperature (1)H NMR studies in CDCl(3) have indicated that this complex exists in solution as a mixture of two, neutral and ionic forms. Conductivity measurements have reinforced this proposal, the ionic form predominating in a very polar solvent such as DMSO. The reaction of Tpm*Cu(I)-phthalimidate with iodobenzene afforded the expected C-N coupling product in 76% yield accounting for its role as an intermediate in this transformation.

  4. Isolation of XAB2 complex involved in pre-mRNA splicing, transcription, and transcription-coupled repair.

    PubMed

    Kuraoka, Isao; Ito, Shinsuke; Wada, Tadashi; Hayashida, Mika; Lee, Lily; Saijo, Masafumi; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Matsumoto, Megumi; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Handa, Hiroshi; Qin, Jun; Nakatani, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2008-01-11

    Nucleotide excision repair is a versatile repair pathway that counteracts the deleterious effects of various DNA lesions. In nucleotide excision repair, there is a transcription-coupled repair (TCR) pathway that focuses on DNA damage that blocks RNA polymerase IIo in transcription elongation. XAB2 (XPA-binding protein 2), containing tetratricopeptide repeats, has been isolated by virtue of its ability to interact with xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA). Moreover, XAB2 has been shown to interact with Cockayne syndrome group A and B proteins (CSA and CSB) and RNA polymerase II, as well as XPA, and is involved in TCR and transcription. Here we purified XAB2 as a multimeric protein complex consisting of hAquarius, XAB2, hPRP19, CCDC16, hISY1, and PPIE, which are involved in pre-mRNA splicing. Knockdown of XAB2 with small interfering RNA in HeLa cells resulted in a hypersensitivity to killing by UV light and a decreased recovery of RNA synthesis after UV irradiation and regular RNA synthesis. Enhanced interaction of XAB2 with RNA polymerase IIo or XPA was observed in cells treated with DNA-damaging agents, indicating DNA damage-responsive activity of the XAB2 complex. These results indicated that the XAB2 complex is a multifunctional factor involved in pre-mRNA splicing, transcription, and TCR. PMID:17981804

  5. Ab Initio Computation of Spin Orbit Coupling Effects on Magnetic Properties of Iron-Containing Complexes and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, Fredy; Rodriguez, Jorge H.

    2007-03-01

    Zero-Field Splittings (ZFS) in metalloproteins and other metal complexes arise from the combined action of crystalline fields acting on the metal valence electrons and spin-orbit coupling (SOC), a relativistic effect. The ab-initio calculation of ZFS parameters of metal-containing (bio)molecules is a challenging computational problem of practical relevance to metalloenzyme biochemistry, inorganic chemistry, and molecular-based bio- nanotechnology. We have implemented a methodology which treats the nonrelativistic electronic structure of magnetic (bio) molecules within the framework of spin density functional theory (SDFT) and adds the relativistic effects of SOC via perturbation theory (PT). This combined SDFT-PT approach allowed us to compute the ZFS parameters of iron-containing complexes and non-heme iron proteins with a good degree of accuracy. We also developed a semiquantitative approach to elucidate the physico-chemical origin of the magnitudes of ZFS parameters. We present results for biochemically relevant iron complexes and for nitric oxide-containing non-heme iron proteins, such as isopenicillin N synthase, which have unusually large ZFS. The computed ZFS parameters are in good agreement with experiment. Supported by NSF CAREER Award CHE- 0349189 (JHR).

  6. Intermolecular Photocatalyzed Heck-like Coupling of Unactivated Alkyl Bromides by a Dinuclear Gold Complex.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jin; Li, Jian; Weingand, Vanessa; Rudolph, Matthias; Hashmi, A Stephen K

    2016-08-26

    A practical protocol for a photocatalyzed alkyl-Heck-like reaction of unactivated alkyl bromides and different alkenes promoted by dinuclear gold photoredox catalysis in the presence of an inorganic base is reported. Primary, secondary, and tertiary unactivated alkyl bromides with β-hydrogen can be applied. Esters, aldehydes, ketones, nitriles, alcohols, heterocycles, alkynes, alkenes, ethers, and halogen moieties are all well tolerated. In addition to 1,1-diarylalkenes, silylenolethers and enamides can also be applied, which further increases the synthetic potential of the reaction. The mild reaction conditions, broad substrate scope, and an excellent functional-group tolerance deliver an ideal tool for synthetic chemists that can even be used for challenging late-stage modifications of complex natural products.

  7. Trajectory Generation and Coupled Numerical Simulation for Thermal Spraying Applications on Complex Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candel, A.; Gadow, R.

    2009-12-01

    For high process reproducibility and optimized coating quality in thermal spray applications on complex geometries, atmospheric plasma spraying and high-velocity oxygen fuel torches are guided by advanced robot systems. The trajectory of the torch, the spray angle, and the relative speed between torch and component are crucial factors which affect the coating microstructure, properties, and, especially, the residual stress distribution. Thus, the requirement of high-performance thermally sprayed coatings with narrow dimensional tolerances leads to challenges in the field of robot-assisted handling, and software tools for efficient trajectory generation and robot programming are demanded. By appropriate data exchange, the automatically generated torch trajectory and speed profile can be integrated in finite element method models to analyze their influence on the heat and mass transfer during deposition. Coating experiments assisted by online diagnostics were performed to validate the developed software tools.

  8. Identification of Signaling Protein Complexes by Parallel Affinity Precipitation Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Heng; Lin, Qishan; Zhao, Jihe

    2014-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions play a pivotal role in both inter- and intra-cellular signaling. Identification of signaling protein complexes can thus shed important new insights into cell communications. We developed a parallel affinity precipitation protocol to overcome the disadvantages of the tandem affinity purification procedure, such as the potential disruption of target protein conformation, subcellular localization or function by epitope tags, the potential need of large amounts of cell culture or generation of stable cell lines, and relatively long duration the two-step precipitation takes. This new simplified assay of protein interaction is quick, economic and specific. This paper describes the details in the design and method of the assay. PMID:24839392

  9. NADP+ reduction with reduced ferredoxin and NADP+ reduction with NADH are coupled via an electron-bifurcating enzyme complex in Clostridium kluyveri.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Moll, Johanna; Thauer, Rudolf K

    2010-10-01

    It was recently found that the cytoplasmic butyryl-coenzyme A (butyryl-CoA) dehydrogenase-EtfAB complex from Clostridium kluyveri couples the exergonic reduction of crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA with NADH and the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin with NADH via flavin-based electron bifurcation. We report here on a second cytoplasmic enzyme complex in C. kluyveri capable of energetic coupling via this novel mechanism. It was found that the purified iron-sulfur flavoprotein complex NfnAB couples the exergonic reduction of NADP+ with reduced ferredoxin (Fdred) and the endergonic reduction of NADP+ with NADH in a reversible reaction: Fdred2-+NADH+2 NADP++H+=Fdox+NAD++2 NADPH. The role of this energy-converting enzyme complex in the ethanol-acetate fermentation of C. kluyveri is discussed.

  10. Multiplex Detection of Bacteria in Complex Clinical and Environmental Samples using Oligonucleotide-coupled Fluorescent Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Dumonceaux, Tim J.; Town, Jennifer R.; Hill, Janet E.; Chaban, Bonnie L.; Hemmingsen, Sean M.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a recurring polymicrobial syndrome that is characterized by a change in the "normal" microbiota from Lactobacillus-dominated to a microbiota dominated by a number of bacterial species, including Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, and others1-3. This condition is associated with a range of negative health outcomes, including HIV acquisition4, and it can be difficult to manage clinically5. Furthermore, diagnosis of BV has relied on the use of Gram stains of vaginal swab smears that are scored on various numerical criteria6,7. While this diagnostic is simple, inexpensive, and well suited to resource-limited settings, it can suffer from problems related to subjective interpretations and it does not give a detailed profile of the composition of the vaginal microbiota8. Recent deep sequencing efforts have revealed a rich, diverse vaginal microbiota with clear differences between samples taken from individuals that are diagnosed with BV compared to those individuals that are considered normal9,10, which has resulted in the identification of a number of potential targets for molecular diagnosis of BV11,12. These studies have provided a wealth of useful information, but deep sequencing is not yet practical as a diagnostic method in a clinical setting. We have recently described a method for rapidly profiling the vaginal microbiota in a multiplex format using oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent beads with detection on a Luminex platform13. This method, like current Gram stain-based methods, is rapid and simple but adds the additional advantage of exploiting molecular knowledge arising from sequencing studies in probe design. This method therefore provides a way to profile the major microorganisms that are present in a vaginal swab that can be used to diagnose BV with high specificity and sensitivity compared to Gram stain while providing additional information on species presence and abundance in a semi-quantitative and rapid manner. This

  11. Dynamics of Complex Systems Built as Coupled Physical, Communication and Decision Layers.

    PubMed

    Kühnlenz, Florian; Nardelli, Pedro H J

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a simple model to capture the complexity of multilayer systems where their constituent layers affect, and are affected by, each other. The physical layer is a circuit composed by a power source and resistors in parallel. Every individual agent aims at maximizing its own delivered power by adding, removing or keeping the resistors it has; the delivered power is in turn a non-linear function that depends on the other agents' behavior, its own internal state, its global state perception, the information received from its neighbors via the communication network and a randomized selfishness. We develop an agent-based simulation to analyze the effects of number of agents (system size), communication network topology, communication errors and the minimum power gain that triggers a behavioral change on the system dynamic. Our results show that a wave-like behavior at macro-level (caused by individual changes in the decision layer) can only emerge for a specific system size. The ratio between cooperators and defectors depends on the minimum gain assumed-lower minimal gains lead to less cooperation, and vice-versa. Different communication network topologies imply different levels of power utilization and fairness at the physical layer, and a certain level of error in the communication layer induces more cooperation. PMID:26730590

  12. Dynamics of Complex Systems Built as Coupled Physical, Communication and Decision Layers.

    PubMed

    Kühnlenz, Florian; Nardelli, Pedro H J

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a simple model to capture the complexity of multilayer systems where their constituent layers affect, and are affected by, each other. The physical layer is a circuit composed by a power source and resistors in parallel. Every individual agent aims at maximizing its own delivered power by adding, removing or keeping the resistors it has; the delivered power is in turn a non-linear function that depends on the other agents' behavior, its own internal state, its global state perception, the information received from its neighbors via the communication network and a randomized selfishness. We develop an agent-based simulation to analyze the effects of number of agents (system size), communication network topology, communication errors and the minimum power gain that triggers a behavioral change on the system dynamic. Our results show that a wave-like behavior at macro-level (caused by individual changes in the decision layer) can only emerge for a specific system size. The ratio between cooperators and defectors depends on the minimum gain assumed-lower minimal gains lead to less cooperation, and vice-versa. Different communication network topologies imply different levels of power utilization and fairness at the physical layer, and a certain level of error in the communication layer induces more cooperation.

  13. Dynamics of Complex Systems Built as Coupled Physical, Communication and Decision Layers

    PubMed Central

    Kühnlenz, Florian; Nardelli, Pedro H. J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a simple model to capture the complexity of multilayer systems where their constituent layers affect, and are affected by, each other. The physical layer is a circuit composed by a power source and resistors in parallel. Every individual agent aims at maximizing its own delivered power by adding, removing or keeping the resistors it has; the delivered power is in turn a non-linear function that depends on the other agents’ behavior, its own internal state, its global state perception, the information received from its neighbors via the communication network and a randomized selfishness. We develop an agent-based simulation to analyze the effects of number of agents (system size), communication network topology, communication errors and the minimum power gain that triggers a behavioral change on the system dynamic. Our results show that a wave-like behavior at macro-level (caused by individual changes in the decision layer) can only emerge for a specific system size. The ratio between cooperators and defectors depends on the minimum gain assumed—lower minimal gains lead to less cooperation, and vice-versa. Different communication network topologies imply different levels of power utilization and fairness at the physical layer, and a certain level of error in the communication layer induces more cooperation. PMID:26730590

  14. Modified function projective synchronization between two different complex networks with delayed couplings and delayed nodes of different dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Min; Zhang, Yamei; Zhang, Meng

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, to deal with the problem of modified function projective synchronization (MFPS) between two different networks with delayed couplings and delayed nodes of different dimensions, a hybrid control scheme combining adaptive control and nonlinear control is proposed. First, a more realistic drive-response complex network model is constructed by introducing double delays. Then, we design hybrid feedback controllers to synchronize up the drive and response networks of different dimensions to a scaling function matrix. Based on Lyapunov stability theory and the linear matrix inequality (LMI), we rigorously prove that the MFPS between the proposed drive-response networks can be achieved and meanwhile some sufficient conditions are derived by adopting an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii energy function. Noteably, many existing synchronization settings can be regarded as special cases of the present synchronization framework. Numerical simulation experiments are employed to verify the correctness and the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Divergent Coupling of Alcohols and Amines Catalyzed by Isoelectronic Hydride Mn(I) and Fe(II) PNP Pincer Complexes.

    PubMed

    Mastalir, Matthias; Glatz, Mathias; Gorgas, Nikolaus; Stöger, Berthold; Pittenauer, Ernst; Allmaier, Günter; Veiros, Luis F; Kirchner, Karl

    2016-08-22

    Herein, we describe an efficient coupling of alcohols and amines catalyzed by well-defined isoelectronic hydride Mn(I) and Fe(II) complexes, which are stabilized by a PNP ligand based on the 2,6-diaminopyridine scaffold. This reaction is an environmentally benign process implementing inexpensive, earth-abundant non-precious metal catalysts, and is based on the acceptorless alcohol dehydrogenation concept. A range of alcohols and amines including both aromatic and aliphatic substrates were efficiently converted in good to excellent isolated yields. Although in the case of Mn selectively imines were obtained, with Fe-exclusively monoalkylated amines were formed. These reactions proceed under base-free conditions and required the addition of molecular sieves. PMID:27377955

  16. Unexpected carbon-carbon coupling between organic cyanides and isopropyl {beta}-carbon in a hafnium ene diamide complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bol, J.E.; Hessen, B.; Teuben, J.H.; Smeets, W.J.J.; Spek, A.L.

    1992-06-01

    Reaction of the ene diamide complex Cp*Hf({sigma}{sup 2},{pi}-iPr-DAB)Cl (1; Cp* = {eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}, iPr-DAB = 1,4-diisopropyl-1,4-diaza-1,3-butadiene) with organic cyanides was investigated. The crystal structure of the product, Cp*Hf[iPrNCH{double_bond}CHNC(Me){double_bond}CHC(tBu){double_bond}NH]Cl, is reported. The reaction is thought to proceed by two hydrogen transfers and a C-C coupling on the {beta}-carbon of an isopropyl group. NMR was used to identify reaction intermediates in the hydrogen transfer scheme.

  17. Crystal Structure of a Group I Energy Coupling Factor Vitamin Transporter S Component in Complex with Its Cognate Substrate.

    PubMed

    Josts, Inokentijs; Almeida Hernandez, Yasser; Andreeva, Antonina; Tidow, Henning

    2016-07-21

    Energy coupling factor (ECF) transporters are responsible for the uptake of essential scarce nutrients in prokaryotes. This ATP-binding cassette transporter family comprises two subgroups that share a common architecture forming a tripartite membrane protein complex consisting of a translocation component and ATP hydrolyzing module and a substrate-capture (S) component. Here, we present the crystal structure of YkoE from Bacillus subtilis, the S component of the previously uncharacterized group I ECF transporter YkoEDC. Structural and biochemical analyses revealed the constituent residues of the thiamine-binding pocket as well as an unexpected mode of vitamin recognition. In addition, our experimental and bioinformatics data demonstrate major differences between YkoE and group II ECF transporters and indicate how group I vitamin transporter S components have diverged from other group I and group II ECF transporters. PMID:27447050

  18. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Fleming, Graham R.; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-08-14

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the “site-probe response.” By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  19. Coupling nutrient sensing to metabolic homoeostasis: the role of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway.

    PubMed

    André, Caroline; Cota, Daniela

    2012-11-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway is known to couple different environmental cues to the regulation of several energy-demanding functions within the cell, spanning from protein translation to mitochondrial activity. As a result, at the organism level, mTORC1 activity affects energy balance and general metabolic homoeostasis by modulating both the activity of neuronal populations that play key roles in the control of food intake and body weight, as well as by determining storage and use of fuel substrates in peripheral tissues. This review focuses on recent advances made in understanding the role of the mTORC1 pathway in the regulation of energy balance. More particularly, it aims at providing an overview of the status of knowledge regarding the mechanisms underlying the ability of certain amino acids, glucose and fatty acids, to affect mTORC1 activity and in turn illustrates how the mTORC1 pathway couples nutrient sensing to the hypothalamic regulation of the organisms' energy homoeostasis and to the control of intracellular metabolic processes, such as glucose uptake, protein and lipid biosynthesis. The evidence reviewed pinpoints the mTORC1 pathway as an integrator of the actions of nutrients on metabolic health and provides insight into the relevance of this intracellular pathway as a potential target for the therapy of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type-2 diabetes.

  20. Complexation of europium and uranium by humic acids analyzed by capillary electrophoresis-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Möser, Christina; Kautenburger, Ralf; Philipp Beck, Horst

    2012-05-01

    Investigations of the mobility of radioactive and nonradioactive substances in the environment are important tasks for the development of a future disposal in deep geological formations. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can play an important role in the mobilization of metal ions due to complexation. In this study, we investigate the complexation behavior of humic acid (HA) as a model substance for DOM and its influence on the migration of europium as homologue for the actinide americium and uranium as the principal component of nuclear fuel. As speciation technique, capillary electrophoresis (CE) was hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). For the study, 0.5 mg·L⁻¹ of the metals and 25 mg·L⁻¹ of (purified Aldrich) HA and an aqueous solution sodium-perchlorate with an ionic strength of 10 mM at pH 5 were used. CE-ICP-MS clearly shows the different speciation of the triple positively charged europium and the double positively charged uranyl cation with HA. PMID:22648819

  1. Determination of local optical response functions of nanostructures with increasing complexity by using single and coupled Lorentzian oscillator models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschlimann, Martin; Brixner, Tobias; Fischer, Alexander; Hensen, Matthias; Huber, Bernhard; Kilbane, Deirdre; Kramer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Walter; Piecuch, Martin; Thielen, Philip

    2016-07-01

    We reconstruct the optical response of nanostructures of increasing complexity by fitting interferometric time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) data from an ultrashort (21 fs) laser excitation source with different harmonic oscillator-based models. Due to its high spatial resolution of ~40 nm, PEEM is a true near-field imaging system and enables in normal incidence mode a mapping of plasmon polaritons and an intuitive interpretation of the plasmonic behaviour. Using an actively stabilized Mach-Zehnder interferometer, we record two-pulse correlation signals with 50 as time resolution that contain information about the temporal plasmon polariton evolution. Spectral amplitude and phase of excited plasmon polaritons are extracted from the recorded phase-resolved interferometric two-pulse correlation traces. We show that the optical response of a plasmon polariton generated at a gold nanoparticle can be reconstructed from the interferometric two-pulse correlation signal using a single harmonic oscillator model. In contrast, for a corrugated silver surface, a system with increased plasmonic complexity, in general an unambiguous reconstruction of the local optical response based on coupled and uncoupled harmonic oscillators, fails. Whereas for certain local responses different models can be discriminated, this is impossible for other positions. Multidimensional spectroscopy offers a possibility to overcome this limitation.

  2. Coupled snow dynamics, soil moisture, and soil temperatures in complex terrain of a semi-arid mountainous watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryden, S.; Link, T. E.; Seyfried, M. S.; McNamara, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Mid-elevation regions characterized by transient or relatively brief seasonal snow covers are likely to experience large hydrologic impacts from warming trends as these regions transition from snow to rain-dominated precipitation in winter. These regions in the western United States are often comprised of complex terrain, including a range of slopes, aspects, elevation, vegetation, geology, and soils over multiple scales. How snow dynamics (e.g. distribution and timing) are coupled with soil moisture and soil temperature in complex terrain is a topic that needs to be explored in order to better understand how climate variations and trends will alter the hydrologic states and fluxes in these mid-elevation transition zones. To address this question, automated hydrometeorological stations were installed in Johnston Draw, a subbasin of the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in southwestern Idaho. In addition to long-term precipitation records for the area, individual meteorological stations were installed on opposing north and south-facing slopes in the drainage at 50 meter elevation intervals, from 1550 to 1750 m amsl. Each station provides air temperature and vapor pressure, wind speed and direction, snow depth, and a profile of soil moisture and temperature at 5cm, 20cm, 35cm, and 50 cm depths, with some profiles extending to approximately 2 m where soils are deepest. Prior to a major mid-winter melt event in January 2011 snow depths averaged 45 cm on north-facing slopes and only 3 cm on south-facing slopes. Soil moisture was depleted near the surface and soil temperatures were just above freezing at all elevations and aspects. In mid-January, air temperatures rapidly increased from below freezing to daily averages from 3-6 °C for six consecutive days, coupled with very high wind speeds, and followed by a pulse of increased streamflow. This event completely ablated the snowpack on south-facing slopes and reduced the snowpack depth on north-facing slopes by 24 cm

  3. Electron Transfer Reactivity of the Aqueous Iron(IV)-Oxo Complex. Outer-Sphere vs Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2016-07-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of organic and inorganic reductants by aqueous iron(IV) ions, Fe(IV)(H2O)5O(2+) (hereafter Fe(IV)aqO(2+)), are reported. The substrates examined include several water-soluble ferrocenes, hexachloroiridate(III), polypyridyl complexes M(NN)3(2+) (M = Os, Fe and Ru; NN = phenanthroline, bipyridine and derivatives), HABTS(-)/ABTS(2-), phenothiazines, Co(II)(dmgBF2)2, macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes, and aqueous cerium(III). Most of the reductants were oxidized cleanly to the corresponding one-electron oxidation products, with the exception of phenothiazines which produced the corresponding oxides in a single-step reaction, and polypyridyl complexes of Fe(II) and Ru(II) that generated ligand-modified products. Fe(IV)aqO(2+) oxidizes even Ce(III) (E(0) in 1 M HClO4 = 1.7 V) with a rate constant greater than 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). In 0.10 M aqueous HClO4 at 25 °C, the reactions of Os(phen)3(2+) (k = 2.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)), IrCl6(3-) (1.6 × 10(6)), ABTS(2-) (4.7 × 10(7)), and Fe(cp)(C5H4CH2OH) (6.4 × 10(7)) appear to take place by outer sphere electron transfer (OSET). The rate constants for the oxidation of Os(phen)3(2+) and of ferrocenes remained unchanged in the acidity range 0.05 < [H(+)] < 0.10 M, ruling out prior protonation of Fe(IV)aqO(2+) and further supporting the OSET assignment. A fit to Marcus cross-relation yielded a composite parameter (log k22 + E(0)Fe/0.059) = 17.2 ± 0.8, where k22 and E(0)Fe are the self-exchange rate constant and reduction potential, respectively, for the Fe(IV)aqO(2+)/Fe(III)aqO(+) couple. Comparison with literature work suggests k22 < 10(-5) M(-1) s(-1) and thus E(0)(Fe(IV)aqO(2+)/Fe(III)aqO(+)) > 1.3 V. For proton-coupled electron transfer, the reduction potential is estimated at E(0) (Fe(IV)aqO(2+), H(+)/Fe(III)aqOH(2+)) ≥ 1.95 V. PMID:27320290

  4. A coupled remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA) to estimate actual evapotranspiration under complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z. Q.; Liu, C. S.; Gao, W.; Chang, N. B.

    2010-07-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be used as an ecological indicator to address the ecosystem complexity. The accurate measurement of ET is of great significance for studying environmental sustainability, global climate changes, and biodiversity. Remote sensing technologies are capable of monitoring both energy and water fluxes on the surface of the Earth. With this advancement, existing models, such as SEBAL, S_SEBI and SEBS, enable us to estimate the regional ET with limited temporal and spatial scales. This paper extends the existing modeling efforts with the inclusion of new components for ET estimation at varying temporal and spatial scales under complex terrain. Following a coupled remote sensing and surface energy balance approach, this study emphasizes the structure and function of the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA). With the aid of the elevation and landscape information, such as slope and aspect parameters derived from the digital elevation model (DEM), and the vegetation cover derived from satellite images, the SEBTA can fully account for the dynamic impacts of complex terrain and changing land cover in concert with some varying kinetic parameters (i.e., roughness and zero-plane displacement) over time. Besides, the dry and wet pixels can be recognized automatically and dynamically in image processing thereby making the SEBTA more sensitive to derive the sensible heat flux for ET estimation. To prove the application potential, the SEBTA was carried out to present the robust estimates of 24 h solar radiation over time, which leads to the smooth simulation of the ET over seasons in northern China where the regional climate and vegetation cover in different seasons compound the ET calculations. The SEBTA was validated by the measured data at the ground level. During validation, it shows that the consistency index reached 0.92 and the correlation coefficient was 0.87.

  5. Crystal Structure of G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 5 in Complex with a Rationally Designed Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Homan, Kristoff T; Waldschmidt, Helen V; Glukhova, Alisa; Cannavo, Alessandro; Song, Jianliang; Cheung, Joseph Y; Koch, Walter J; Larsen, Scott D; Tesmer, John J G

    2015-08-21

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) regulate cell signaling by initiating the desensitization of active G protein-coupled receptors. The two most widely expressed GRKs (GRK2 and GRK5) play a role in cardiovascular disease and thus represent important targets for the development of novel therapeutic drugs. In the course of a GRK2 structure-based drug design campaign, one inhibitor (CCG215022) exhibited nanomolar IC50 values against both GRK2 and GRK5 and good selectivity against other closely related kinases such as GRK1 and PKA. Treatment of murine cardiomyocytes with CCG215022 resulted in significantly increased contractility at 20-fold lower concentrations than paroxetine, an inhibitor with more modest selectivity for GRK2. A 2.4 Å crystal structure of the GRK5·CCG215022 complex was determined and revealed that the inhibitor binds in the active site similarly to its parent compound GSK180736A. As designed, its 2-pyridylmethyl amide side chain occupies the hydrophobic subsite of the active site where it forms three additional hydrogen bonds, including one with the catalytic lysine. The overall conformation of the GRK5 kinase domain is similar to that of a previously determined structure of GRK6 in what is proposed to be its active state, but the C-terminal region of the enzyme adopts a distinct conformation. The kinetic properties of site-directed mutants in this region are consistent with the hypothesis that this novel C-terminal structure is representative of the membrane-bound conformation of the enzyme.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Provide Insights into Epitopes Coupled to the Soluble and Membrane-Bound MHC-II Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Martiniano; Correa-Basurto, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Epitope recognition by major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II) is essential for the activation of immunological responses to infectious diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that this molecular event takes place in the MHC-II peptide-binding groove constituted by the α and β light chains of the heterodimer. This MHC-II peptide-binding groove has several pockets (P1-P11) involved in peptide recognition and complex stabilization that have been probed through crystallographic experiments and in silico calculations. However, most of these theoretical calculations have been performed without taking into consideration the heavy chains, which could generate misleading information about conformational mobility both in water and in the membrane environment. Therefore, in absence of structural information about the difference in the conformational changes between the peptide-free and peptide-bound states (pMHC-II) when the system is soluble in an aqueous environment or non-covalently bound to a cell membrane, as the physiological environment for MHC-II is. In this study, we explored the mechanistic basis of these MHC-II components using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in which MHC-II was previously co-crystallized with a small epitope (P7) or coupled by docking procedures to a large (P22) epitope. These MD simulations were performed at 310 K over 100 ns for the water-soluble (MHC-IIw, MHC-II-P7w, and MHC-II-P22w) and 150 ns for the membrane-bound species (MHC-IIm, MHC-II-P7m, and MHC-II-P22m). Our results reveal that despite the different epitope sizes and MD simulation environments, both peptides are stabilized primarily by residues lining P1, P4, and P6-7, and similar noncovalent intermolecular energies were observed for the soluble and membrane-bound complexes. However, there were remarkably differences in the conformational mobility and intramolecular energies upon complex formation, causing some differences with respect to how the two peptides are

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations to provide insights into epitopes coupled to the soluble and membrane-bound MHC-II complexes.

    PubMed

    Bello, Martiniano; Correa-Basurto, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Epitope recognition by major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II) is essential for the activation of immunological responses to infectious diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that this molecular event takes place in the MHC-II peptide-binding groove constituted by the α and β light chains of the heterodimer. This MHC-II peptide-binding groove has several pockets (P1-P11) involved in peptide recognition and complex stabilization that have been probed through crystallographic experiments and in silico calculations. However, most of these theoretical calculations have been performed without taking into consideration the heavy chains, which could generate misleading information about conformational mobility both in water and in the membrane environment. Therefore, in absence of structural information about the difference in the conformational changes between the peptide-free and peptide-bound states (pMHC-II) when the system is soluble in an aqueous environment or non-covalently bound to a cell membrane, as the physiological environment for MHC-II is. In this study, we explored the mechanistic basis of these MHC-II components using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in which MHC-II was previously co-crystallized with a small epitope (P7) or coupled by docking procedures to a large (P22) epitope. These MD simulations were performed at 310 K over 100 ns for the water-soluble (MHC-IIw, MHC-II-P(7w), and MHC-II-P(22w)) and 150 ns for the membrane-bound species (MHC-IIm, MHC-II-P(7m), and MHC-II-P(22m)). Our results reveal that despite the different epitope sizes and MD simulation environments, both peptides are stabilized primarily by residues lining P1, P4, and P6-7, and similar noncovalent intermolecular energies were observed for the soluble and membrane-bound complexes. However, there were remarkably differences in the conformational mobility and intramolecular energies upon complex formation, causing some differences with respect to how the two peptides

  8. Efficient cross-coupling of aryl Grignard reagents with alkyl halides by recyclable ionic iron(III) complexes bearing a bis(phenol)-functionalized benzimidazolium cation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chong-Liang; Xie, Cun-Fei; Wu, Yu-Feng; Sun, Hong-Mei; Shen, Qi; Zhang, Yong

    2013-12-14

    A novel bis(phenol)-functionalized benzimidazolium salt, 1,3-bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzyl)benzimidazolium chloride (H3LCl, 1), was designed and used to prepare ionic iron(III) complexes of the type [H3L][FeX4] (X = Cl, 2; X = Br, 3). Both 2 and 3 were characterized by elemental analysis, Raman spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. The catalytic performances of 2 and 3 in cross-coupling reactions using aryl Grignard reagents with primary and secondary alkyl halides bearing β-hydrogens were studied. This analysis shows that complex 2 has good potential for alkyl chloride-mediated coupling. In comparison, complex 3 showed slightly lower catalytic activity. After decanting the product contained in the ethereal layer, complex 2 could be recycled at least eight times without significant loss of catalytic activity.

  9. Efficient cross-coupling of aryl Grignard reagents with alkyl halides by recyclable ionic iron(III) complexes bearing a bis(phenol)-functionalized benzimidazolium cation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chong-Liang; Xie, Cun-Fei; Wu, Yu-Feng; Sun, Hong-Mei; Shen, Qi; Zhang, Yong

    2013-12-14

    A novel bis(phenol)-functionalized benzimidazolium salt, 1,3-bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzyl)benzimidazolium chloride (H3LCl, 1), was designed and used to prepare ionic iron(III) complexes of the type [H3L][FeX4] (X = Cl, 2; X = Br, 3). Both 2 and 3 were characterized by elemental analysis, Raman spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. The catalytic performances of 2 and 3 in cross-coupling reactions using aryl Grignard reagents with primary and secondary alkyl halides bearing β-hydrogens were studied. This analysis shows that complex 2 has good potential for alkyl chloride-mediated coupling. In comparison, complex 3 showed slightly lower catalytic activity. After decanting the product contained in the ethereal layer, complex 2 could be recycled at least eight times without significant loss of catalytic activity. PMID:24145602

  10. Phospholamban Modulates the Functional Coupling between Nucleotide Domains in Ca-ATPase Oligomeric Complexes in Cardiac Sarcoplasmic Reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Yao, Qing; Soares, Thereza A.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2009-03-24

    Oligomeric interactions between Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains and their modulation by phospholamban (PLB) were measured in native cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) microsomes. Progressive modification of Lys514 with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC), which physically blocks access to the nucleotide binding site by ATP, demonstrates that Ca-ATPase active sites function independently of one another prior to the phosphorylation of PLB. However, upon PKA-dependent phosphorylation of PLB, a second-order dependence between enzyme activity and the fraction of active sites is observed, consistent with a dimeric functional complex. Complementary distance measurements were made using FITC or 5-iodoacetamido-fluorescein (IAF) bound to Cys674 within the N- or P-domains respectively, to detect structural coupling within oligomeric complexes. Accompanying the phosphorylation of PLB, neighboring Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains exhibit a 4 ± 2 Å decrease in the proximity between FITC sites within the N-domain and a 9 ± 3 Å increase in the proximity between IAF sites within P-domains. Thus, the phosphorylation of PLB induces spatial rearrangements between the N- and P-domain elements of proximal Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains which restore functional interactions between neighboring polypeptide chains and, in turn, result in increased rates of catalytic turnover. These results are interpreted in terms of a structural model, calculated through optimization of shape complementarity, desolvation, and electrostatic energies, which suggests a dimeric arrangement of Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains through the proximal association of N-domains. We suggest that the phosphorylation of PLB acts to release constraints involving interdomain subunit interactions that enhance catalytically important N-domain motions.

  11. Phospholamban Modulates the Functional Coupling between Nucleotide Domains in Ca-ATPase Oligomeric Complexes in Cardiac Sarcoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Linda T.L.; Yao, Qing; Soares, Thereza A.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2009-01-01

    Oligomeric interactions between Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains and their modulation by phospholamban (PLB) were measured in native cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) microsomes. Progressive modification of Lys514 with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC), which physically blocks access to the nucleotide binding site by ATP, demonstrates that Ca-ATPase active sites function independently of one another prior to the phosphorylation of PLB. However, upon PKA-dependent phosphorylation of PLB, a second-order dependence between residual enzyme activity and the fraction of active sites is observed, consistent with a dimeric functional complex. Complementary distance measurements were made using FITC or 5-iodoacetamido-fluorescein (IAF) bound to Cys674 within the N- or P-domains respectively, to detect structural coupling within oligomeric complexes. Accompanying the phosphorylation of PLB, neighboring Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains exhibit a 4 ± 2 Å decrease in the proximity between FITC sites within the N-domain and a 9 ± 3 Å increase in the proximity between IAF sites within P-domains. Thus, the phosphorylation of PLB induces spatial rearrangements between the N- and P-domain elements of proximal Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains which restore functional interactions between neighboring polypeptide chains and, in turn, result in increased rates of catalytic turnover. These results are interpreted in terms of a structural model, calculated through optimization of shape complementarity, desolvation, and electrostatic energies, which suggests a dimeric arrangement of Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains through the proximal association of N-domains that accommodates interaction with PLB. We suggest that the phosphorylation of PLB acts to release constraints involving interdomain subunit interactions that enhance catalytically important N-domain motions. PMID:19191503

  12. Mode-coupling theory and polynomial fitting functions: a complex-plane representation of dielectric data on polymers.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, H

    2001-07-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the higher-order A3 and A4 scenarios of the mode-coupling theory (MCT) are in many cases capable of providing a good description of the complicated dielectric spectra often encountered in polymeric systems. In this paper, more data from dielectric measurements on poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(vinylidene fluoride), Nylon-66, poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene) (PCTFE), and the polymer gel system poly(acrylonitrile)-ethylene carbonate-propylene carbonate are evaluated within the A4 scenario of the MCT. For all these systems, very good agreement is found between the theoretical and experimental spectra. The data analysis is demonstrated to be facilitated considerably by plotting the data in the complex plane whereby the elliptic functions derived from the theory for the frequency-dependent dielectric function can be replaced by polynomials. For PCTFE, the scaling behavior predicted by the MCT could be verified and the temperature dependences of the extracted scaling parameters were found to be consistent with theory.

  13. Screening of xanthine oxidase inhibitors in complex mixtures using online HPLC coupled with postcolumn fluorescence-based biochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Deqiang; Li, Shaoping; Zhao, Jing

    2014-02-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) catalyzes the metabolism of hypoxanthine and xanthine to uric acid, the overproduction and/or underexcretion of which could cause the incidence of hyperuricemia such as gout. Herein, the inhibition of XO is recognized as one of the therapeutic approaches to treat gout. In the present study, an off-line fluorescence-based microplate method was first developed for an XO assay in which the enzyme converted pterin to its fluorescent metabolite isoxanthopterin. Then, a postcolumn continuous XO assay as a means of bioactivity assessment was coupled to HPLC separation to establish the online HPLC with diode array detection, biochemical detection, and MS/MS system for the screening of XO inhibitors. The availability of the online system was first tested with a positive drug, allopurinol, a well-known XO inhibitor, and subsequent analysis of Scutellaria baicalensis extract showed that two main bioactive compounds with XO inhibitory activities were observed, indicating that the developed online system was applicable to complex mixtures.

  14. Developing a high-resolution wind map for a complex terrain with a coupled MM5/CALMET system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Steve H. L.; Fung, Jimmy C. H.; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Kot, S. C.

    2007-03-01

    This study investigates the wind energy potential in Hong Kong, a region with a complex terrain, by coupling the prognostic MM5 mesoscale model with the CALMET diagnostic model to produce high-resolution wind fields. Hourly wind fields were simulated for the entire year of 2004. The MM5 simulations were performed on a nested grid from 40.5 km down to 1.5 km horizontal resolution. The CALMET meteorological model was used in a domain that includes the entire Hong Kong region with a high horizontal resolution of 100 m. The MM5 model wind field (1.5 km horizontal resolution) output was input into the CALMET diagnostic meteorological model every hour along with an objective analysis procedure using all available observations. Verification was achieved through two steps. In the first step, the data from three meteorological surface stations that were not assimilated into the CALMET model were compared horizontally with the simulated wind fields. In the second step, the simulated wind fields were compared vertically with the vertical wind profile collected from two upper air sounding stations. The results of this study identified the locations of the highest wind energy potential in HK down to 100 m resolution.

  15. Comparison of two complex land surface schemes coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peylin, Philippe; Polcher, Jan; Bonan, Gordon; Williamson, David L.; Laval, Katia

    1997-08-01

    Two climate simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research general circulation model (version CCM2) coupled either to the Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) or to Sechiba land surface scheme are compared. Both parameterizations of surface-atmosphere exchanges may be considered as complex but represent the soil hydrology and the role of vegetation in very different ways. The global impact of the change in land surface scheme on the simulated climate appears to be small. Changes are smaller than those obtained when comparing either one of these schemes to the fixed hydrology used in the standard CCM2. Nevertheless, at the regional scale, changing the land-surface scheme can have a large impact on the local climate. As one example, wre detail how circulation patterns are modified above the Tibetan plateau during the monsoon season. Elsewhere, mainly over land, changes can also be important. In the tropics, during the dry season, Sechiba produces warmer surface temperatures than does BATS. This warming arises from differences in the soil hydrology, both storage capacity and the dynamics of soil water transport. Over the Tundra biotype, the formulation of the transpiration induces significant differences in the energy balance.

  16. Assessing coupling between lakes and layered aquifers in a complex Pleistocene landscape based on water level dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischeid, Gunnar; Natkhin, Marco; Steidl, Jörg; Dietrich, Ottfried; Dannowski, Ralf; Merz, Christoph

    2010-11-01

    The biosphere reserve Schorfheide-Chorin is a scenic region with many lakes. Hydraulic coupling between lakes and groundwater is difficult to assess due to the very heterogeneous Pleistocene deposits with a complex layering of different aquifers, part of them being confined. Thus, a principal component analysis of time series of groundwater and lake water levels was performed. The first two principal components provided a quantitative measure of damping of the input signal, i.e., the extent to which time series of groundwater pressure heads or lake water levels are smoothed and delayed with respect to the input signal, i.e., groundwater recharge or precipitation minus evapotranspiration, respectively. The lakes differed substantially with respect to damping behaviour, indicating different impacts of deep groundwater contribution. For most of the groundwater wells, damping increased linearly with mean depth to water table. In contrast, some wells exhibited nearly identical behaviour independent of depth. High-pass filtered data of water table level from these wells were strongly and inversely correlated with those of barometric pressure fluctuations, pointing to a confined aquifer which was evidently not connected to the adjacent lake.

  17. Rapid Isolation and Determination of Flavones in Biological Samples Using Zinc Complexation Coupled with High-Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chenghe; Wang, Hecheng; Wang, Yingping; Xiao, Shengyuan

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophyll-type contaminants are commonly encountered in the isolation and determination of flavones of plant aerial plant parts. Heme is also a difficult background substance in whole blood analysis. Both chlorophyll and heme are porphyrin type compounds. In this study, a rapid method for isolating flavones with 5-hydroxyl or ortho-hydroxyl groups from biological samples was developed based on the different solubilities of porphyrin-metal and flavone-metal complexes. It is important that other background substances, e.g., proteins and lipids, are also removed from flavones without an additional processing. The recoveries of scutellarin, baicalin, baicalein, wogonoside and wogonin, which are the primary constituents of Scutellaria baicalensis (skullcaps) were 99.65% ± 1.02%, 98.98% ± 0.73%, 99.65% ± 0.03%, 97.59% ± 0.09% and 95.19% ± 0.47%, respectively. As a sample pretreatment procedure, this method was coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with good separation, sensitivity and linearity and was applied to determine the flavone content in different aerial parts of S. baicalensis and in dried blood spot samples. PMID:27537870

  18. Critical coupling and coherent perfect absorption for ranges of energies due to a complex gain and loss symmetric system

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Mohammad; Ghatak, Ananya; Mandal, Bhabani Prasad

    2014-05-15

    We consider a non-Hermitian medium with a gain and loss symmetric, exponentially damped potential distribution to demonstrate different scattering features analytically. The condition for critical coupling (CC) for unidirectional wave and coherent perfect absorption (CPA) for bidirectional waves are obtained analytically for this system. The energy points at which total absorption occurs are shown to be the spectral singular points for the time reversed system. The possible energies at which CC occurs for left and right incidence are different. We further obtain periodic intervals with increasing periodicity of energy for CC and CPA to occur in this system. -- Highlights: •Energy ranges for CC and CPA are obtained explicitly for complex WS potential. •Analytical conditions for CC and CPA for PT symmetric WS potential are obtained. •Conditions for left and right CC are shown to be different. •Conditions for CC and CPA are shown to be that of SS for the time reversed system. •Our model shows the great flexibility of frequencies for CC and CPA.

  19. Electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer of an osmium aquo complex: theoretical analysis of asymmetric tafel plots and transfer coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Michelle K; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-02-01

    Electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer of an osmium aquo complex attached to a self-assembled monolayer on a gold electrode is studied with a recently developed theoretical formulation. The calculated hydrogen/deuterium kinetic isotope effect for the standard rate constant, the cathodic transfer coefficient at zero overpotential, and the Tafel plot are in excellent agreement with experimental data. The input quantities to the heterogeneous rate constant expressions were calculated with density functional theory in conjunction with dielectric continuum models, and no parameters were fit to experimental data. The theoretical calculations indicate that the asymmetry of the Tafel plot and the deviation of the transfer coefficient at zero overpotential from the standard value of one-half arise from the change in the equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance upon electron transfer. The direction of the asymmetry and deviation from one-half is determined by the sign of this distance change, and the magnitude of these effects is determined by the magnitude of this distance change, as well as the reorganization energy and the distance dependence of the overlap between the initial and final proton vibrational wave functions. This theory provides experimentally testable predictions for the impact of specific system properties on the qualitative behavior of the Tafel plots. PMID:20067257

  20. Quasilongitudinal soliton in a two-dimensional strongly coupled complex dusty plasma in the presence of an external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Samiran

    2014-09-01

    The propagation of a nonlinear low-frequency mode in two-dimensional (2D) monolayer hexagonal dusty plasma crystal in presence of external magnetic field and dust-neutral collision is investigated. The standard perturbative approach leads to a 2D Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) soliton for the well-known dust-lattice mode. However, the Coriolis force due to crystal rotation and Lorentz force due to magnetic field on dust particles introduce a linear forcing term, whereas dust-neutral drag introduce the usual damping term in the 2D KdV equation. This new nonlinear equation is solved both analytically and numerically to show the competition between the linear forcing and damping in the formation of quasilongitudinal soliton in a 2D strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasma. Numerical simulation on the basis of the typical experimental plasma parameters and the analytical solution reveal that the neutral drag force is responsible for the usual exponential decay of the soliton, whereas Coriolis and/or Lorentz force is responsible for the algebraic decay as well as the oscillating tail formation of the soliton. The results are discussed in the context of the plasma crystal experiment. PMID:25314548

  1. Unraveling the molecular architecture of a G protein-coupled receptor/β-arrestin/Erk module complex

    PubMed Central

    Bourquard, Thomas; Landomiel, Flavie; Reiter, Eric; Crépieux, Pascale; Ritchie, David W.; Azé, Jérôme; Poupon, Anne

    2015-01-01

    β-arrestins serve as signaling scaffolds downstream of G protein-coupled receptors, and thus play a crucial role in a plethora of cellular processes. Although it is largely accepted that the ability of β-arrestins to interact simultaneously with many protein partners is key in G protein-independent signaling of GPCRs, only the precise knowledge of these multimeric arrangements will allow a full understanding of the dynamics of these interactions and their functional consequences. However, current experimental procedures for the determination of the three-dimensional structures of protein-protein complexes are not well adapted to analyze these short-lived, multi-component assemblies. We propose a model of the receptor/β-arrestin/Erk1 signaling module, which is consistent with most of the available experimental data. Moreover, for the β-arrestin/Raf1 and the β-arrestin/ERK interactions, we have used the model to design interfering peptides and shown that they compete with both partners, hereby demonstrating the validity of the predicted interaction regions. PMID:26030356

  2. Inversion of the direction of stereoinduction in the coupling of chiral gamma,delta-unsaturated Fischer carbene complexes with o-ethynylbenzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Binay K; Menon, Suneetha; Johnson, Dennis Lee; Herndon, James W

    2002-06-27

    [reaction: see text] A variety of gamma,delta-unsaturated carbene complexes that feature a stereogenic center at the beta-carbon couple with 2-ethynylbenzaldehyde to afford hydrophenanthrene derivatives with a high degree of stereoinduction. The direction of stereoinduction is opposite for examples where the stereogenic center is acyclic vs examples where it is within a ring.

  3. [Interdependence between milk productivity of cattle and a complex of loci of a coupled block of caseins and beta-lactoglobulin].

    PubMed

    Marinchuk, G E

    1992-01-01

    The complex lactoprotein markers, connected with the different level of milking capacity and fat percentage are found in cattle on the basis of experimental data. The high correlation is stated between selection of beta-lactoglobulin alleles and alleles of the coupled gene casein blocks on the levels of microevolution herds and macroevolution breeds.

  4. The impact of ice shelf - iceberg coupling on the North Atlantic Ocean in a global climate model of intermediate complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugelmayer, M.; Roche, D. M.; Renssen, H.

    2012-04-01

    The influence of icebergs on the climate system is well known. On the one hand they act as a source of fresh water and on the other hand icebergs are a sink of latent heat. As a consequence icebergs clearly affect the ocean stratification and the formation of sea ice. The influence of icebergs on the climate system is especially important during so - called Heinrich events, which were periods with huge armadas of icebergs during the glacial climate. So far, icebergs have mostly been parameterized in global climate models as freshwater and heat fluxes. More recently, an iceberg module was used to generate bergs at specific locations. In this study a version of the Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity, LOVECLIM, that includes a 3D dynamic - thermodynamic iceberg module (Jongma et al, 2008) is coupled to the Grenoble model for ice shelves and land ice (GRISLI, Ritz et al, 1997; 2001). Therefore, the icebergs are generated according to the amount of mass loss at the calving sites of GRISLI. The ice shelf model itself depends on the precipitation and temperature that is calculated by LOVECLIM. The calving rate of GRISLI is given back to the dynamic iceberg module in the form of an ice volume flux. The volume flux is taken to generate icebergs according to the size and mass distribution of Bigg et al. (1997). These bergs are then released at the same locations as the calving took place. In the present study we analyse the effect of moving icebergs on sea surface temperature, salinity and convection in comparison to an experiment where the ice volume that is lost by calving is given to the ocean directly as a freshwater flux at the calving site. Moreover, the influence of the start position of the icebergs on their tracks and on the ocean is investigated as we examine the differences between a model run using prescribed locations and the model run with the coupled ice shelf - iceberg model. All the experiments are done under preindustrial forcing.

  5. Air-Stable Triazine-Based Ni(II) PNP Pincer Complexes As Catalysts for the Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling.

    PubMed

    Mastalir, Matthias; Stöger, Berthold; Pittenauer, Ernst; Allmaier, Günter; Kirchner, Karl

    2016-07-01

    Air-stable, thermally robust, and well-defined cationic Ni(II) PNP pincer complexes based on the 2,4-diaminotriazine scaffold are described. These complexes are active catalysts for the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of a wide range of aryl, heteroaryl (including benzoxazole, thiazole, pyridine, pyrimidine, thiazole), primary and secondary alkyl halides, and pseudohalides with different organoboronate reagents giving excellent to good isolated yields. Neutral deprotonated complexes seem to play a key role in the catalytic process. PMID:27281438

  6. A thiocyanato-bridged copper(I) cubane complex and its application in palladium-catalyzed Sonogashira coupling of aryl halides.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Manoj; Singh, Gurmeet; Kumar, Abhinav; Rath, Nigam P

    2013-09-28

    Reaction of copper(I) thiocyanate with 1,1'-bis(di-tert-butylphosphino) ferrocene (dtbpf) in a 2:1 molar ratio in DCM-MeOH (50:50 V/V) afforded a tetranuclear copper(I) complex [Cu4(μ3-SCN)4(κ(1)-P,P-dtbpf)2] (1) with a cubane-like structure. Complex 1 was shown to be an efficient catalyst in comparison to CuI in the Sonogashira reaction. The coupling products were obtained in high yields by using Pd loadings of 0.2 mol% as well as complex-1 of 0.1 mol%. PMID:23903662

  7. Manipulating Nonlinear Emission and Cooperative Effect of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots by Coupling to a Silver Nanorod Complex Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Fan; Cheng, Zi-Qiang; Wang, Ya-Lan; Zhang, Qing; Zhou, Li; Yang, Zhong-Jian; Zhong, Yu-Ting; Liang, Shan; Xiong, Qihua; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2014-05-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots have three-dimensional confined excitons with large optical oscillator strength and gain. The surface plasmons of metallic nanostructures offer an efficient tool to enhance exciton-exciton coupling and excitation energy transfer at appropriate geometric arrangement. Here, we report plasmon-mediated cooperative emissions of approximately one monolayer of ensemble CdSe/ZnS quantum dots coupled with silver nanorod complex cavities at room temperature. Power-dependent spectral shifting, narrowing, modulation, and amplification are demonstrated by adjusting longitudinal surface plasmon resonance of silver nanorods, reflectivity and phase shift of silver nanostructured film, and mode spacing of the complex cavity. The underlying physical mechanism of the nonlinear excitation energy transfer and nonlinear emissions are further investigated and discussed by using time-resolved photoluminescence and finite-difference time-domain numerical simulations. Our results suggest effective strategies to design active plasmonic complex cavities for cooperative emission nanodevices based on semiconductor quantum dots.

  8. Manipulating Nonlinear Emission and Cooperative Effect of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots by Coupling to a Silver Nanorod Complex Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Fan; Cheng, Zi-Qiang; Wang, Ya-Lan; Zhang, Qing; Zhou, Li; Yang, Zhong-Jian; Zhong, Yu-Ting; Liang, Shan; Xiong, Qihua; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots have three-dimensional confined excitons with large optical oscillator strength and gain. The surface plasmons of metallic nanostructures offer an efficient tool to enhance exciton-exciton coupling and excitation energy transfer at appropriate geometric arrangement. Here, we report plasmon-mediated cooperative emissions of approximately one monolayer of ensemble CdSe/ZnS quantum dots coupled with silver nanorod complex cavities at room temperature. Power-dependent spectral shifting, narrowing, modulation, and amplification are demonstrated by adjusting longitudinal surface plasmon resonance of silver nanorods, reflectivity and phase shift of silver nanostructured film, and mode spacing of the complex cavity. The underlying physical mechanism of the nonlinear excitation energy transfer and nonlinear emissions are further investigated and discussed by using time-resolved photoluminescence and finite-difference time-domain numerical simulations. Our results suggest effective strategies to design active plasmonic complex cavities for cooperative emission nanodevices based on semiconductor quantum dots. PMID:24787617

  9. Organo-palladium(II) complexes bearing unsymmetrical N,N,N-pincer ligands: synthesis, structures and oxidatively induced coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Wright, Luka A; Hope, Eric G; Solan, Gregory A; Cross, Warren B; Singh, Kuldip

    2015-04-28

    The 2-(2′-aniline)-6-imine-pyridines, 2-(C6H4-2′-NH2)-6-(CMe=NAr)C5H3N (Ar = 4-i-PrC6H4 (HL1a), 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3 (HL1b)), have been synthesised via sequential Stille cross-coupling, deprotection and condensation steps from 6-tributylstannyl-2-(2-methyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-yl)pyridine and 2-bromonitrobenzene. The palladium(II) acetate N,N,N-pincer complexes, [{2-(C6H4-2′-NH)-6-(CMe=NAr)C5H3N}Pd(OAc)] (Ar = 4-i-PrC6H4 (1a), 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3 (1b)), can be prepared by reacting HL1 with Pd(OAc)2 or, in the case of 1a, more conveniently by the template reaction of ketone 2-(C6H4-2′-NH2)-6-(CMe=O)C5H3N, Pd(OAc)2 and 4-isopropylaniline; ready conversion of 1 to their chloride analogues, [{2-(C6H4-2′-NH)-6-(CMe=NAr)C5H3N}PdCl] (Ar = 4-i-PrC6H4 (2a), 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3 (2b)), has been demonstrated. The phenyl-containing complexes, [{2-(C6H4-2′-NH)-6-(CMe=NAr)C5H3N}PdPh] (Ar = 4-i-PrC6H4 (3a), 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3 (3b)), can be obtained by treating HL1 with (PPh3)2PdPh(Br) in the presence of NaH or with regard to 3a, by the salt elimination reaction of 2a with phenyllithium. Reaction of 2a with silver tetrafluoroborate or triflate in the presence of acetonitrile allows access to cationic [{2-(C6H4-2′-NH)-6-(CMe=N(4-i-PrC6H4)C5H3N}Pd(NCMe)][X] (X = BF4 (4), X = O3SCF3 (5)), respectively; the pyridine analogue of 5, [{2-(C6H4-2′-NH)-6-(CMe=N(4-i-PrC6H4)C5H3N}Pd(NC5H5)][O3SCF3] (5′), is also reported. Oxidation of phenyl-containing 3a with one equivalent of 1-chloromethyl-4-fluoro-1,4-diazoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octane bis(tetrafluoroborate) (Selectfluor™) in acetonitrile at low temperature leads to a new palladium species that slowly decomposes to give 4 and biphenyl; biphenyl formation is also observed upon reaction of 3a with XeF2. However, no such oxidatively induced coupling occurs when using 3b. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies have been performed on HL1b, 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b and 5′. PMID:25789841

  10. Rapid and sensitive hormonal profiling of complex plant samples by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plant hormones play a pivotal role in several physiological processes during a plant's life cycle, from germination to senescence, and the determination of endogenous concentrations of hormones is essential to elucidate the role of a particular hormone in any physiological process. Availability of a sensitive and rapid method to quantify multiple classes of hormones simultaneously will greatly facilitate the investigation of signaling networks in controlling specific developmental pathways and physiological responses. Due to the presence of hormones at very low concentrations in plant tissues (10-9 M to 10-6 M) and their different chemistries, the development of a high-throughput and comprehensive method for the determination of hormones is challenging. Results The present work reports a rapid, specific and sensitive method using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-MS/MS) to analyze quantitatively the major hormones found in plant tissues within six minutes, including auxins, cytokinins, gibberellins, abscisic acid, 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxyic acid (the ethylene precursor), jasmonic acid and salicylic acid. Sample preparation, extraction procedures and UPLC-MS/MS conditions were optimized for the determination of all plant hormones and are summarized in a schematic extraction diagram for the analysis of small amounts of plant material without time-consuming additional steps such as purification, sample drying or re-suspension. Conclusions This new method is applicable to the analysis of dynamic changes in endogenous concentrations of hormones to study plant developmental processes or plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses in complex tissues. An example is shown in which a hormone profiling is obtained from leaves of plants exposed to salt stress in the aromatic plant, Rosmarinus officinalis. PMID:22098763

  11. Catalytic Activity of Cationic and Neutral Silver(I)-XPhos Complexes with Nitrogen Ligands or Tolylsulfonate for Mannich and Aza-Diels-Alder Coupling Reactions.

    PubMed

    Grirrane, Abdessamad; Álvarez, Eleuterio; García, Hermenegildo; Corma, Avelino

    2016-01-01

    Cationic and neutral silver(I)-L complexes (L=Buchwald-type biaryl phosphanes) with nitrogen co-ligands or organosulfonate counter ions have been synthesised and characterised through their structural and spectroscopic properties. At room temperature, both cationic and neutral silver(I)-L complexes are extremely active catalysts in the promotion of the single and double A(3) coupling of terminal (di)alkynes, pyrrolidine and formaldehyde. In addition, the aza-Diels-Alder two- and three-component coupling reactions of Danishefsky's diene with an imine or amine and aldehyde are efficiently catalysed by these cationic or neutral silver(I)-L complexes. The solvent influences the catalytic performance due to limited complex solubility or solvent decomposition and reactivity. The isolation of new silver(I)-L complexes with reagents as ligands lends support to mechanistic proposals for such catalytic processes. The activity, stability and metal-distal arene interaction of these silver(I)-L catalysts have been compared with those of analogous cationic gold(I) and copper(I) complexes. PMID:26598792

  12. Complex polyfluoride additives in Fmoc-amino acid fluoride coupling processes. Enhanced reactivity and avoidance of stereomutation.

    PubMed

    Carpino, Louis A; Ionescu, Dumitru; El-Faham, Ayman; Beyermann, Michael; Henklein, Peter; Hanay, Christiane; Wenschuh, Holger; Bienert, Michael

    2003-04-01

    [reaction: see text] Isolated Fmoc amino acid fluorides have previously been shown to be among the most efficient reagents for peptide bond formation. Now, it has been found that anionic, polyhydrogen fluoride additives are capable of diverting many of the classical peptide coupling processes to acid fluoride couplings. Examples include the use of N-HBTU or N-HATU and the carbodiimide technique. As HF-containing species, these additives provide a more suitable medium for the coupling of systems that are sensitive to loss of configuration at the reactive carboxyl function.

  13. Reconstitution of photosynthetic energy conservation. II. Photophosphorylation in liposomes containing photosystem-I reaction center and chloroplast coupling-factor complex.

    PubMed

    Hauska, G; Samoray, D; Orlich, G; Nelson, N

    1980-10-01

    Photophosphorylation has been reconstituted in a liposomal system containing reaction centers of photosystem I and coupling-factor complex, both highly purified from spinach chloroplasts. This energy-converting model system was put together by diluting the preparation of the coupling-factor complex with an aqueous suspension of proteolipid vesicles, preformed from photosystem-I reaction centers and soybean phospholipids by sonication. In the presence of reduced N-methyl-phenazonium methosulfate the system catalyzed photophosphorylation with rates up to 50 mumol ATP formed x mg chlorophyll-1 x h-1, which was sensitive to uncouplers and to N,N'-dicyclohexyl-carbodiimide. The properties of the system in comparison to chloroplasts is discussed. PMID:6450680

  14. Intramolecular transfer of {open_quotes}CO{close_quotes} from ({eta}{sup 6}-arene)Cr(CO){sub 3} complexes in stille-type palladium-catalyzed cross coupling reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Caldirola, P.; Chowdhury, R.; Johansson, A.M.; Hacksell, U.

    1995-12-31

    The reaction between [{eta}{sup 6}-(trialkylstannyl)benzene]Cr(CO){sub 3} complexes and different electrophiles such as iodobenzene and aryltriflate and the coupling between (tributylphenyl)stannane and the Cr(CO){sub 3} complex of chlorobenzene have been studied. Products from two different types of reactions were observed: (1) benzophenone along with the alkylarylketone, resulting from a carbonylative coupling, and (2) biphenyl, arising from a direct coupling.

  15. Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling reaction of 1-aryltriazenes with arylboronic acids catalyzed by a recyclable polymer-supported N-heterocyclic carbene–palladium complex catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Guangming; Ren, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling reaction of 1-aryltriazenes with arylboronic acids catalyzed by a recyclable polymer-supported Pd–NHC complex catalyst has been realized for the first time. The polymer-supported catalyst can be re-used several times still retaining high activity for this transformation. Various aryltriazenes were investigated as electrophilic substrates at room temperature to give biaryls in good to excellent yields and showed good chemoselectivity over aryl halides in the reactions. PMID:20703375

  16. Cross-coupling reaction of alkyl halides with grignard reagents catalyzed by Ni, Pd, or Cu complexes with pi-carbon ligand(s).

    PubMed

    Terao, Jun; Kambe, Nobuaki

    2008-11-18

    Transition metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of organic halides and pseudo-halides containing a C-X bond (X = I, Br, Cl, OTf, OTs, etc.) with organometallic reagents are among the most important transformations for carbon-carbon bond formation between a variety of sp, sp(2), and sp(3)-hybridized carbon atoms. In particular, researchers have widely employed Ni- and Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling to synthesize complex organic structures from readily available components. The catalytic cycle of this process comprises oxidative addition, transmetalation, and reductive elimination steps. In these reactions, various organometallic reagents could bear a variety of R groups (alkyl, vinyl, aryl, or allyl), but the coupling partner has been primarily limited to sp and sp(2) carbon compounds: alkynes, alkenes, and arenes. With alkyl coupling partners, these reactions typically run into two problems within the catalytic cycle. First, oxidative addition of alkyl halides to a metal catalyst is generally less efficient than that of aryl or alkenyl compounds. Second, the alkylmetal intermediates formed tend to undergo intramolecular beta-hydrogen elimination. In this Account, we describe our efforts to overcome these problems for Ni and Pd chemistry. We have developed new catalytic systems that do not involve M(0) species but proceed via an anionic complex as the key intermediate. For example, we developed a unique cross-coupling reaction of alkyl halides with organomagnesium or organozinc reagents catalyzed by using a 1,3-butadiene as the additive. This reaction follows a new catalytic pathway: the Ni or Pd catalyst reacts first with R-MgX to form an anionic complex, which then reacts with alkyl halides. Bis-dienes were also effective additives for the Ni-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of organozinc reagents with alkyl halides. This catalytic system tolerates a wide variety of functional groups, including nitriles, ketones, amides, and esters. In addition, we have extended

  17. Absorption Spectroscopy, Emissive Properties, and Ultrafast Intersystem Crossing Processes in Transition Metal Complexes: TD-DFT and Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Absorption spectroscopy, emissive properties, and ultrafast intersystem crossing processes in transition metal complexes are discussed in the light of recent developments in time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT), spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects, and non-adiabatic excited states dynamics. Methodological highlights focus on spin-orbit and vibronic couplings and on the recent strategies available for simulating ultra-fast intersystem crossings (ISC).The role of SOC in the absorption spectroscopy of third-row transition metal complexes is illustrated by two cases studies, namely Ir(III) phenyl pyridine and Re(I) carbonyl bipyridine complexes.The problem of luminescence decay in third-row transition metal complexes handled by TD-DFT linear and quadratic response theories including SOC is exemplified by three studies: (1) the phosphorescence of Ir(III) complexes from the lowest triplet state; (2) the emissive properties of square planar Pt(II) complexes with bidentate and terdentate ligands characterized by low-lying metal-to-ligand-charge-transfer (MLCT) and metal-centered (MC) states; and (3) the ultra-fast luminescence decay of Re(I) carbonyl bipyridine halides via low-lying singlet and triplet charge transfer states delocalized over the bipyridine and the halide ligands.Ultrafast ISC occurring in spin crossover [Fe (bpy)3]2+, in [Ru (bpy)3]2+, and [Re (Br)(CO)3(bpy] complexes are deciphered thanks to recent developments based on various approaches, namely non-radiative rate theory within the Condon approximation, non-adiabatic surface hopping molecular dynamics, and quantum wave packet dynamics propagation.

  18. Spatial modulation of light transmission through a single microcavity by coupling of photosynthetic complex excitations to surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Itai; Cohen, Moshik; Heifler, Omri; Lilach, Yigal; Zalevsky, Zeev; Mujica, Vladimiro; Richter, Shachar

    2015-06-01

    Molecule-plasmon interactions have been shown to have a definite role in light propagation through optical microcavities due to strong coupling between molecular excitations and surface plasmons. This coupling can lead to macroscopic extended coherent states exhibiting increment in temporal and spatial coherency and a large Rabi splitting. Here, we demonstrate spatial modulation of light transmission through a single microcavity patterned on a free-standing Au film, strongly coupled to one of the most efficient energy transfer photosynthetic proteins in nature, photosystem I. Here we observe a clear correlation between the appearance of spatial modulation of light and molecular photon absorption, accompanied by a 13-fold enhancement in light transmission and the emergence of a distinct electromagnetic standing wave pattern in the cavity. This study provides the path for engineering various types of bio-photonic devices based on the vast diversity of biological molecules in nature.

  19. Palladium-phosphinous acid complexes catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling reaction of heteroaryl bromides with phenylboronic acid in water/alcoholic solvents.

    PubMed

    Li, Ben; Wang, Cuiping; Chen, Guang; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2013-06-01

    Highly active, air-stable and water-soluble palladium-phosphinous acid complexes have been applied to Suzuki cross-coupling reaction of heteroaryl bromides under mild conditions in water/alcoholic solvents. Suzuki cross-coupling reaction of heteroaryl bromides with phenylboronic acid occurred efficiently using palladium phosphinous acid complexes (POPd) and phase transfer catalyst (tetrabutylammonium bromide and polyethylene glycol) in water/ethanol mixture, water/propanol mixture and neat water respectively, the corresponding yields of cross-coupling heteroaryl-aryls were satisfied. The tert-butyl substituted ligand di-tert-butylphosphino in combination with POPd was found to be more active than the same family derived catalysts dipalladium complexes POPd1 and POPd2, and other two kinds of Pd-catalysts Pd(PPh3)4 and Pd2(dba)3. The mechanism of Suzuki cross-coupling reaction between heteroaryl bromides and phenylboronic acid in water was proposed with respect to the key role of phase transfer catalyst on the transmetallation step. Compared with other solid phase transfer catalysts, TBAB was tested as the ideal one. The alkalinity of base and the molar proportion between POPd and TBAB were investigated in water and alcoholic solvents. Notably, in the presence of TBAB adding alcoholic solvents into water enhanced the yields of target products. However in terms of the liquid phase transfer catalyst of PEGs, mixing water into PEGs could slightly decrease the yields with respect to the water free PEGs bulk phase, which was probably due to the homogenous liquid conditions in pure PEGs and weak interactions between PEGs and heteroaryl bromide molecules in water depending on their molecular chain lengths.

  20. Ionic iron(III) complexes of bis(phenol)-functionalized imidazolium cations: synthesis, structures and catalysis for aryl Grignard cross-coupling of alkyl halides.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hai-ning; Xing, Ya-lin; Xia, Cong-liang; Sun, Hong-mei; Shen, Qi; Zhang, Yong

    2012-10-14

    A series of bis(phenol)-functionalized imidazolium salts, 1,3-bis(4,6-di-R(1)-2-hydroxybenzyl)-2-R(2)-4,5-di-R(3)-imidazolium chlorides H(3)L(n)Cl (R(1) = (t)Bu, R(2) = R(3) = H, H(3)L(1)Cl, 1; R(1) = CH(3), R(2) = R(3) = H, H(3)L(2)Cl, 2; R(1) = (t)Bu, R(2) = H, R(3) = Cl, H(3)L(3)Cl, 3; R(1) = (t)Bu, R(2) = CH(3), R(3) = H, H(3)L(4)Cl, 4), were used to produce a novel series of ionic iron(III) complexes [H(3)L(n)][FeX(4)] (n = 1, X = Cl, 5; n = 2, X = Cl, 6; n = 3, X = Cl, 7; n = 4, X = Cl, 8; n = 1, X = Br, 9; n = 3, X = Br, 10). All of the complexes were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Elemental analysis and X-ray crystallography were also used. All of the complexes were non-hygroscopic and air-stable, with five of them existing as solids (5, 7-10) and one as an oil (6) at room temperature. A preliminary catalytic study on the cross-coupling reactions of aryl Grignard reagents with primary and secondary alkyl halides bearing β-hydrogens, revealed that all of the ionic iron(III) complexes exhibited good to excellent catalytic activity. Complexes 5, 6 and 8 exhibited optimal activity, whereas 7, 9 and 10 showed only moderate activity. Furthermore, by simply decanting the cross-coupling product in the ether layer, complexes 5 and 6 could be reused in at least seven successive runs without significant loss in catalytic activity.

  1. Distance-Independent Charge Recombination Kinetics in Cytochrome c - Cytochrome c Peroxidase Complexes: Compensating Changes in the Electronic Coupling and Reorganization Energies

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Kuznetsov, Aleksey; Nocek, Judith M.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Crane, Brian R.; Hu, Xiangqian; Beratan, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Charge recombination rate constants vary no more than three-fold for inter-protein ET in the Zn-substituted wild type (WT) cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP):cytochrome c (Cc) complex and in complexes with four mutants of the Cc protein (i.e., F82S, F82W, F82Y and F82I), despite large differences in the ET distance. Theoretical analysis indicates that charge recombination for all complexes involves a combination of tunneling and hopping via Trp191. For three of the five structures (WT and F82S(W)), the protein favors hopping more than that in the other two structures that have longer heme→ZnP distances (F82Y(I)). Experimentally observed biexponential ET kinetics is explained by the complex locking in alternative coupling pathways, where the acceptor hole state is either primarily localized on ZnP (slow phase) or on Trp191 (fast phase). The large conformational differences between the CcP:Cc interface for the F82Y(I) mutants compared to the WT and F82S(W) complexes are predicted to change the reorganization energies for the CcP:Cc ET reactions because of changes in solvent exposure and inter-protein ET distances. Since the recombination reaction is likely to occur in the inverted Marcus regime, an increased reorganization energy compensates the decreased role for hopping recombination (and the longer transfer distance) in the F82Y(I) mutants. Taken together, coupling pathway and reorganization energy effects for the five protein complexes explains the observed insensitivity of recombination kinetics to donor-acceptor distance and docking pose and also reveals how hopping through aromatic residues can accelerate long-range ET. PMID:23895339

  2. Inventory of metal complexes circulating in plant fluids: a reliable method based on HPLC coupled with dual elemental and high-resolution molecular mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Flis, Paulina; Ouerdane, Laurent; Grillet, Louis; Curie, Catherine; Mari, Stéphane; Lobinski, Ryszard

    2016-08-01

    Description of metal species in plant fluids such as xylem, phloem or related saps remains a complex challenge usually addressed either by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, X-ray analysis or computational prediction. To date, none of these techniques has achieved a complete and true picture of metal-containing species in plant fluids, especially for the least concentrated complexes. Here, we present a generic analytical methodology for a large-scale (> 10 metals, > 50 metal complexes) detection, identification and semiquantitative determination of metal complexes in the xylem and embryo sac liquid of the green pea, Pisum sativum. The procedure is based on direct injection using hydrophilic interaction chromatography with dual detection by elemental (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) and molecular (high-resolution electrospray mass spectrometry) mass spectrometric detection. Numerous and novel complexes of iron(II), iron(III), copper(II), zinc, manganese, cobalt(II), cobalt(III), magnesium, calcium, nickel and molybdenum(IV) with several ligands including nicotianamine, citrate, malate, histidine, glutamine, aspartic acid, asparagine, phenylalanine and others are observed in pea fluids and discussed. This methodology provides a large inventory of various types of metal complexes, which is a significant asset for future biochemical and genetic studies into metal transport/homeostasis.

  3. Inventory of metal complexes circulating in plant fluids: a reliable method based on HPLC coupled with dual elemental and high-resolution molecular mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Flis, Paulina; Ouerdane, Laurent; Grillet, Louis; Curie, Catherine; Mari, Stéphane; Lobinski, Ryszard

    2016-08-01

    Description of metal species in plant fluids such as xylem, phloem or related saps remains a complex challenge usually addressed either by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, X-ray analysis or computational prediction. To date, none of these techniques has achieved a complete and true picture of metal-containing species in plant fluids, especially for the least concentrated complexes. Here, we present a generic analytical methodology for a large-scale (> 10 metals, > 50 metal complexes) detection, identification and semiquantitative determination of metal complexes in the xylem and embryo sac liquid of the green pea, Pisum sativum. The procedure is based on direct injection using hydrophilic interaction chromatography with dual detection by elemental (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) and molecular (high-resolution electrospray mass spectrometry) mass spectrometric detection. Numerous and novel complexes of iron(II), iron(III), copper(II), zinc, manganese, cobalt(II), cobalt(III), magnesium, calcium, nickel and molybdenum(IV) with several ligands including nicotianamine, citrate, malate, histidine, glutamine, aspartic acid, asparagine, phenylalanine and others are observed in pea fluids and discussed. This methodology provides a large inventory of various types of metal complexes, which is a significant asset for future biochemical and genetic studies into metal transport/homeostasis. PMID:27111838

  4. Public health impact of disease-behavior dynamics. Comment on "Coupled disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks: A review" by Z. Wang et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Chad R.; Galvani, Alison P.

    2015-12-01

    In a loop of dynamic feedback, behavior such as the decision to vaccinate, hand washing, or avoidance influences the progression of the epidemic, yet behavior is driven by the individual's and population's perceived risk of infection during an outbreak. In what we believe will become a seminal paper that stimulates future research as well as an informative teaching aid, Wang et. al. comprehensively review methodological advances that have been used to incorporate human behavior into epidemiological models on the effects of coupling disease transmission and behavior on complex social networks [1]. As illustrated by the recent outbreaks of measles and Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), here we highlight the importance of coupling behavior and disease transmission that Wang et al. address.

  5. Ethanol production from cellulose by coupled saccharification/fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and cellulase complex from Sclerotium rolfsii UV-8 mutant.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, M V

    1992-09-01

    Using cellulase/hemicellulase complex of Sclerotium rolfsii UV-8 mutant and Saccharomyces cerevisiae for fermentation, the coupled saccharification/fermentation (CSF) of 15% AT-rice straw was carried out at 40 degrees C, pH 4.5 for the first 24 h and further incubation was performed at 30 degrees C for 72 h. Increasing the amount of cellulase activity from 3-12 IU FPA/g of substrate resulted in increased yields of ethanol from 1.5-3.6% in 96 h. It has been observed that the coupled system was advantageous over the two stage (separate hydrolysis/fermentation) system as it produced higher amounts of ethanol from cellulose (3.6% as compared to 2.3% ethanol from rice straw). PMID:1288411

  6. Modelling real disease dynamics with behaviourally adaptive complex networks. Comment on "Coupled disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks: A review" by Z. Wang et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Mean field compartmental models of disease transmission have been successfully applied to a host of different scenarios, and the Kermack-McKendrick equations are now a staple of mathematical biology text books. In Susceptible-Infected-Removed format these equations provide three coupled first order ordinary differential equations with a very mild nonlinearity and they are very well understood. However, underpinning these equations are two important assumptions: that the population is (a) homogeneous, and (b) well-mixed. These assumptions become closest to being true for diseases infecting a large portion of the population for which inevitable individual effects can be averaged away. Emerging infectious disease (such as, in recent times, SARS, avian influenza, swine flu and ebola) typically does not conform to this scenario. Individual contacts and peculiarities of the transmission network play a vital role in understanding the dynamics of such relatively rare infections - particularly during the early stages of an outbreak.

  7. Computation of indirect nuclear spin-spin couplings with reduced complexity in pure and hybrid density functional approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luenser, Arne; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2016-09-01

    We present a (sub)linear-scaling algorithm to determine indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants at the Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham density functional levels of theory. Employing efficient integral algorithms and sparse algebra routines, an overall (sub)linear scaling behavior can be obtained for systems with a non-vanishing HOMO-LUMO gap. Calculations on systems with over 1000 atoms and 20 000 basis functions illustrate the performance and accuracy of our reference implementation. Specifically, we demonstrate that linear algebra dominates the runtime of conventional algorithms for 10 000 basis functions and above. Attainable speedups of our method exceed 6 × in total runtime and 10 × in the linear algebra steps for the tested systems. Furthermore, a convergence study of spin-spin couplings of an aminopyrazole peptide upon inclusion of the water environment is presented: using the new method it is shown that large solvent spheres are necessary to converge spin-spin coupling values.

  8. Electromagnetic coupling and array packing induce exchange of dominance on complex modes in 3D periodic arrays of spheres with large permittivity

    DOE PAGES

    Campione, Salvatore; Capolino, Filippo

    2016-01-25

    In this study, we investigate the effect on wave propagation of array packing and electromagnetic coupling between spheres in a three-dimensional (3D) lattice of microspheres with large permittivity that exhibit strong magnetic polarizability. We report on the complex wavenumber of Bloch waves in the lattice when each sphere is assumed to possess both electric and magnetic dipoles and full electromagnetic coupling is accounted for. While for small material-filling fractions we always determine one dominant mode with low attenuation constant, the same does not happen for large filling fractions, when electromagnetic coupling is included. In the latter case we peculiarly observemore » two dominant modes with low attenuation constant, dominant in different frequency ranges. The filling fraction threshold for which two dominant modes appear varies for different metamaterial constituents, as proven by considering spheres made by either titanium dioxide or lead telluride. As further confirmation of our findings, we retrieve the complex propagation constant of the dominant mode(s) via a field fitting procedure employing two sets of waves (direct and reflected) pertaining to two distinct modes, strengthening the presence of the two distinct dominant modes for increasing filling fractions. However, given that one mode only, with transverse polarization, at any given frequency, is dominant and able to propagate inside the lattice, we are able to accurately treat the metamaterial that is known to exhibit artificial magnetism as a homogeneous material with effective parameters, such as the refractive index. Results clearly show that the account of both electric and magnetic scattering processes in evaluating all electromagnetic intersphere couplings is essential for a proper description of the electromagnetic propagation in lattices.« less

  9. Structure and Function of Cross-class Complexes of G Protein-coupled Secretin and Angiotensin 1a Receptors.

    PubMed

    Harikumar, Kaleeckal G; Augustine, Mary Lou; Lee, Leo T O; Chow, Billy K C; Miller, Laurence J

    2016-08-12

    Complexes of secretin (SecR) and angiotensin 1a (Atr1a) receptors have been proposed to be functionally important in osmoregulation, providing an explanation for overlapping and interdependent functions of hormones that bind and activate different classes of GPCRs. However, the nature of these cross-class complexes has not been well characterized and their signaling properties have not been systematically explored. We now use competitive inhibition of receptor bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence complementation to establish the dominant functionally important state as a symmetrical homodimeric form of SecR decorated by monomeric Atr1a, interacting through lipid-exposed faces of Atr1a TM1 and TM4. Conditions increasing prevalence of this complex exhibited negative allosteric modulatory impact on secretin-stimulated cAMP responses at SecR. In contrast, activating Atr1a with full agonist in such a complex exhibited a positive allosteric modulatory impact on the same signaling event. This modulation was functionally biased, with secretin-stimulated calcium responses unaffected, whereas angiotensin-stimulated calcium responses through the complex were reduced or absent. Further supporting this interpretation, Atr1a with mutations of lipid-exposed faces of TM1 and TM4 that did not affect its ability to bind or signal, could be expressed in the same cell as SecR, yet not exhibit either the negative or positive allosteric impact on cAMP observed with the inactive or activated states of wild type Atr1a on function, and not interfere with angiotensin-stimulated calcium responses like complexes with Atr1a. This may provide a more selective means of exploring the physiologic functional impact of this cross-class receptor complex without interfering with the function of either component receptor. PMID:27330080

  10. Evaluation of nitrogen nuclear hyperfine and quadrupole coupling parameters for the proximal imidazole in myoglobin-azide, -cyanide, and -mercaptoethanol complexes by electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Magliozzo, R S; Peisach, J

    1993-08-24

    Electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy and computer simulation of spectra has been used to evaluate the nitrogen nuclear hyperfine and quadrupole coupling parameters for the proximal imidazole nitrogen directly coordinated to iron in three low-spin heme complexes, myoglobin-azide, -cyanide, and -mercaptoethanol (MbN3, MbCN, and MbRS). The variability in the weak electron-nuclear coupling parameters reveals the electronic flexibility within the heme group that depends on properties of the exogenous ligands. For example, the isotropic component of the nitrogen nuclear hyperfine coupling ranges from 4.4 MHz for MbN3 to 2.2 MHz for both MbCN and MbRS. The weaker coupling in MbCN and MbRS is taken as evidence for delocalization of unpaired electron spin from iron into the exogenous anionic ligands. The value of e2Qq, the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant for the axial imidazole nitrogen in MbCN and MbRS, was 2.5 MHz but was significantly larger, 3.2 MHz, in MbN3. This large value is considered evidence for a weakened sigma bond between the proximal imidazole and ferric iron in this form, and for a feature contributing to the origin of the high spin-low spin equilibrium exhibited by MbN3 [Beetlestone, J., & George, P. (1964) Biochemistry 5, 707-714]. The ESEEM results have allowed a correlation to be made between the orientation of the g tensor axes, the orientation of the p-pi orbital of the proximal imidazole nitrogen, and sigma- and pi-bonding features of the axial ligands. Furthermore, the proximal imidazole is suggested to act as a pi-acceptor in low-spin heme complexes in order to support strong sigma electron donation from the lone pair orbital to iron. An evaluation of the nitrogen nuclear hyperfine coupling parameters for the porphyrin pyrrole sites in MbRS reveals a large inequivalence in isotropic components consistent with an orientation of rhombic axes (and g tensor axes) that eclipses the Fe-Npyrrole vector directions. PMID:8395204

  11. Deriving the New Traveling Wave Solutions for the Nonlinear Dispersive Equation, KdV-ZK Equation and Complex Coupled KdV System Using Extended Simplest Equation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, K. Elboree

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the traveling wave solutions for the nonlinear dispersive equation, Korteweg-de Vries Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation and complex coupled KdV system by using extended simplest equation method, and then derive the hyperbolic function solutions include soliton solutions, trigonometric function solutions include periodic solutions with special values for double parameters and rational solutions. The properties of such solutions are shown by figures. The results show that this method is an effective and a powerful tool for handling the solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations (NLEEs) in mathematical physics.

  12. Spectral Diffusion and Electron-Phonon Coupling of the B800 BChl a Molecules in LH2 Complexes from Three Different Species of Purple Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Baier, J.; Gabrielsen, M.; Oellerich, S.; Michel, H.; van Heel, M.; Cogdell, R.J.; Köhler, J.

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the spectral diffusion and the electron-phonon coupling of B800 bacteriochlorophyll a molecules in the peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 for three different species of purple bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodospirillum molischianum, and Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. We come to the conclusion that B800 binding pockets for Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are rather similar with respect to the polarity of the protein environment but that the packaging of the αβ-polypeptides seems to be less tight in Rb. sphaeroides with respect to the other two species. PMID:19883604

  13. Selenium-ligated palladium(II) complexes as highly active catalysts for carbon-carbon coupling reactions: the Heck reaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Zheng, Chong

    2004-08-19

    Three selenium-ligated Pd(II) complexes were readily synthesized and shown to be extremely active catalysts for the Heck reaction of various aryl bromides, including deactivated and heterocyclic ones. The catalytic activity of the selenide-based Pd(II) complexes not only rivals but vastly outperforms that of the corresponding phosphorus and sulfur analogues. Practical advantages of the selenium-based catalysts include their straightforward synthesis and high activity in the absence of any additives as well as the enhanced stability of the selenide ligands toward air oxidation. PMID:15330667

  14. Selenium-ligated palladium(II) complexes as highly active catalysts for carbon-carbon coupling reactions: the Heck reaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Zheng, Chong

    2004-08-19

    Three selenium-ligated Pd(II) complexes were readily synthesized and shown to be extremely active catalysts for the Heck reaction of various aryl bromides, including deactivated and heterocyclic ones. The catalytic activity of the selenide-based Pd(II) complexes not only rivals but vastly outperforms that of the corresponding phosphorus and sulfur analogues. Practical advantages of the selenium-based catalysts include their straightforward synthesis and high activity in the absence of any additives as well as the enhanced stability of the selenide ligands toward air oxidation.

  15. A time convolution less density matrix approach to the nonlinear optical response of a coupled system-bath complex

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Marten Knorr, Andreas

    2010-04-15

    Time convolution less density matrix theory (TCL) is a powerful and well established tool to investigate strong system-bath coupling for linear optical spectra. We show that TCL equations can be generalised to the nonlinear optical response up to a chosen order in the optical field. This goal is achieved via an time convolution less perturbation scheme for the reduced density matrices of the electronic system. In our approach, the most important results are the inclusion of a electron-phonon coupling non-diagonal in the electronic states and memory effects of the bath: First, the considered model system is introduced. Second, the time evolution of the statistical operator is expanded with respect to the external optical field. This expansion is the starting point to explain how a TCL theory can treat the response up to in a certain order in the external field. Third, new TCL equations, including bath memory effects, are derived and the problem of information loss in the reduced density matrix is analysed. For this purpose, new dimensions are added to the reduced statistical operator to compensate lack of information in comparison with the full statistical operator. The theory is benchmarked with a two level system and applied to a three level system including non-diagonal phonon coupling. In our analysis of pump-probe experiments, the bath memory is influenced by the system state occupied between pump and probe pulse. In particular, the memory of the bath influences the dephasing process of electronic coherences developing during the time interval between pump and probe pulses.

  16. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with post-column dual-bioactivity assay for simultaneous screening of xanthine oxidase inhibitors and free radical scavengers from complex mixture.

    PubMed

    Li, D Q; Zhao, J; Li, S P

    2014-06-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) can catalyze hypoxanthine and xanthine to generate uric acid and reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide anion radical (O₂(•-)) and hydrogen peroxide. XO inhibitors and free radical scavengers are beneficial to the treatment of gout and many related diseases. In the present study, an on-line high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with post-column dual-bioactivity assay was established and successfully applied to simultaneously screening of XO inhibitors and free radical scavengers from a complex mixture, Oroxylum indicum extract. The integrated system of HPLC separation, bioactivity screening and mass spectrometry identification was proved to be simple and effective for rapid and sensitive screening of individual bioactive compounds in complex mixtures.

  17. Evaluation of Multi-tRNA Synthetase Complex by Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Size Exclusion Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Seok; Lee, Cheolju

    2015-01-01

    Eight aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (M, K, Q, D, R, I, EP and LARS) and three auxiliary proteins (AIMP1, 2 and 3) are known to form a multi-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC) in mammalian cells. We combined size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with reversed-phase liquid chromatography multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (RPLC-MRM-MS) to characterize MSC components and free ARS proteins in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293T) cells. Crude cell extract and affinity-purified proteins were fractionated by SEC in non-denaturing state and ARSs were monitored in each fraction by MRM-MS. The eleven MSC components appeared mostly in earlier SEC fractions demonstrating their participation in complex formation. TARSL2 and AIMP2-DX2, despite their low abundance, were co-purified with KARS and detected in the SEC fractions, where MSC appeared. Moreover, other large complex-forming ARS proteins, such as VARS and FARS, were detected in earlier fractions. The MRM-MS results were further confirmed by western blot analysis. Our study demonstrates usefulness of combined SEC-MRM analysis for the characterization of protein complexes and in understanding the behavior of minor isoforms or variant proteins. PMID:26544075

  18. Isotope coded protein labeling coupled immunoprecipitation (ICPL-IP): a novel approach for quantitative protein complex analysis from native tissue.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Andreas; Fuerholzner, Bettina; Kinkl, Norbert; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius

    2013-05-01

    High confidence definition of protein interactions is an important objective toward the understanding of biological systems. Isotope labeling in combination with affinity-based isolation of protein complexes has increased in accuracy and reproducibility, yet, larger organisms--including humans--are hardly accessible to metabolic labeling and thus, a major limitation has been its restriction to small animals, cell lines, and yeast. As composition as well as the stoichiometry of protein complexes can significantly differ in primary tissues, there is a great demand for methods capable to combine the selectivity of affinity-based isolation as well as the accuracy and reproducibility of isotope-based labeling with its application toward analysis of protein interactions from intact tissue. Toward this goal, we combined isotope coded protein labeling (ICPL)(1) with immunoprecipitation (IP) and quantitative mass spectrometry (MS). ICPL-IP allows sensitive and accurate analysis of protein interactions from primary tissue. We applied ICPL-IP to immuno-isolate protein complexes from bovine retinal tissue. Protein complexes of immunoprecipitated β-tubulin, a highly abundant protein with known interactors as well as the lowly expressed small GTPase RhoA were analyzed. The results of both analyses demonstrate sensitive and selective identification of known as well as new protein interactions by our method.

  19. Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Powell, B J

    2015-01-01

    There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated d(6) (t(2g)(6)) transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and Ir(ppy)3, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, T1, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of T1 and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-reversal parity and total angular momentum modulo two. We show that the broad parameter regime consistent with the experimental data implies significant localization of the excited state. PMID:26123864

  20. Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Powell, B J

    2015-06-30

    There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated d(6) (t(2g)(6)) transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and Ir(ppy)3, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, T1, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of T1 and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-reversal parity and total angular momentum modulo two. We show that the broad parameter regime consistent with the experimental data implies significant localization of the excited state.

  1. Kinetically coupled folding of a single HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 complex in viral membrane fusion and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Junyi; Rebane, Aleksander A.; Ma, Lu; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 (gp41) mediates viral entry into host cells by coupling its folding energy to membrane fusion. Gp41 folding is blocked by fusion inhibitors, including the commercial drug T20, to treat HIV/AIDS. However, gp41 folding intermediates, energy, and kinetics are poorly understood. Here, we identified the folding intermediates of a single gp41 trimer-of-hairpins and measured their associated energy and kinetics using high-resolution optical tweezers. We found that folding of gp41 hairpins was energetically independent but kinetically coupled: Each hairpin contributed a folding energy of ∼−23 kBT, but folding of one hairpin successively accelerated the folding rate of the next one by ∼20-fold. Membrane-mimicking micelles slowed down gp41 folding and reduced the stability of the six-helix bundle. However, the stability was restored by cooperative folding of the membrane-proximal external region. Surprisingly, T20 strongly inhibited gp41 folding by actively displacing the C-terminal hairpin strand in a force-dependent manner. The inhibition was abolished by a T20-resistant gp41 mutation. The energetics and kinetics of gp41 folding established by us provides a basis to understand viral membrane fusion, infection, and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26038562

  2. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy of the Ne-D2O van der Waals complex: Strong Coriolis and angular-radial coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Song; Zheng, Rui; Zhu, Yu; Duan, Chuanxi

    2011-10-01

    Four internal-rotation/vibration bands of the Ne-D2O complex have been measured in the v2 bend region of D2O using a tunable infrared diode laser spectrometer to probe a slit supersonic expansion. Three ortho bands are excited from the ground state Σ(000) to the Σ and Π(111, υ2 = 1) internal rotor states and the n = 1, Σ(000, υ2 = 1) stretching-internal rotor combination state. Strong perturbations between the excited vibrational states are evident. The observed spectra are analyzed separately with a three-state J-dependent Coriolis plus J-independent angular-radial coupling model [M. J. Weida and D. J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 3078 (1997), 10.1063/1.473051] and a three-state Coriolis coupling model [R. C. Cohen and R. J. Saykally, J. Chem. Phys. 95, 7891 (1991), 10.1063/1.461318]. The former model works more successfully than the latter. Molecular constants for the ground and excited vibrational states of ortho 20Ne-D2O isotopomer as well as the Coriolis and angular-radial coupling constants are determined accurately. The van der Waals stretching frequency is estimated to be νs = 24.85 cm-1 in the ground state and decreases to about 20.8 cm-1 upon vibrational excitation of the D2O bend.

  3. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy of the Ne-D2O van der Waals complex: strong Coriolis and angular-radial coupling.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Zheng, Rui; Zhu, Yu; Duan, Chuanxi

    2011-10-01

    Four internal-rotation/vibration bands of the Ne-D(2)O complex have been measured in the v(2) bend region of D(2)O using a tunable infrared diode laser spectrometer to probe a slit supersonic expansion. Three ortho bands are excited from the ground state Σ(0(00)) to the Σ and Π(1(11), υ(2) = 1) internal rotor states and the n = 1, Σ(0(00), υ(2) = 1) stretching-internal rotor combination state. Strong perturbations between the excited vibrational states are evident. The observed spectra are analyzed separately with a three-state J-dependent Coriolis plus J-independent angular-radial coupling model [M. J. Weida and D. J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 3078 (1997)] and a three-state Coriolis coupling model [R. C. Cohen and R. J. Saykally, J. Chem. Phys. 95, 7891 (1991)]. The former model works more successfully than the latter. Molecular constants for the ground and excited vibrational states of ortho (20)Ne-D(2)O isotopomer as well as the Coriolis and angular-radial coupling constants are determined accurately. The van der Waals stretching frequency is estimated to be ν(s) = 24.85 cm(-1) in the ground state and decreases to about 20.8 cm(-1) upon vibrational excitation of the D(2)O bend.

  4. Online coupling of high-resolution chromatography with extreme UV photon activation tandem mass spectrometry: Application to the structural investigation of complex glycans by dissociative photoionization.

    PubMed

    Ropartz, David; Giuliani, Alexandre; Fanuel, Mathieu; Hervé, Cécile; Czjzek, Mirjam; Rogniaux, Hélène

    2016-08-24

    The activation of ions by extreme-energy photons (XUV) produced by a synchrotron radiation beamline is a powerful method for characterizing complex glycans using tandem mass spectrometry (MS). As previously described, this activation method leads to rich fragmentation spectra with many structurally valuable cross-ring cleavages while maintaining labile modifications on the glycan structures. However, until now, the tandem MS event was too long to be compatible with liquid chromatography elution times. In this work, the duty cycle of the activation and detection of fragments was shortened, and the background signal on the spectra was drastically reduced. Both improvements allowed, for the first time, the successful coupling of a UHPLC system to XUV-activated tandem MS. The approach was used to characterize a complex mixture of oligo-porphyrans, which are a class of highly sulfated oligosaccharides, in a fully automated way. Due to an enhanced dynamic range and an increased sensitivity, some hypothetical structures of low abundance have been unequivocally confirmed in this study and others have been revised. Some previously undescribed species of oligo-porphyrans that exhibit lateral branching have been fully resolved. This work contributes to the scarce knowledge of the structure of porphyrans in red algae and pushes the current capacities of XUV-activation tandem MS by demonstrating the possibility of a direct coupling with UHPLC. This study will considerably broaden the applicability and practicality of this method in many fields of analytical biology. PMID:27496992

  5. Enzyme-coupled nanoparticles-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for searching for low-mass inhibitors of enzymes in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Salwiński, Aleksander; Da Silva, David; Delépée, Raphaël; Maunit, Benoît

    2014-04-01

    In this report, enzyme-coupled magnetic nanoparticles (EMPs) were shown to be an effective affinity-based tool for finding specific interactions between enzymatic targets and the low-mass molecules in complex mixtures using classic MALDI-TOF apparatus. EMPs used in this work act as nonorganic matrix enabling ionization of small molecules without any interference in the low-mass range (enzyme-coupled nanoparticles-assisted laser desorption ionization MS, ENALDI MS) and simultaneously carry the superficial specific binding sites to capture inhibitors present in a studied mixture. We evaluated ENALDI approach in two complementary variations: 'ion fading' (IF-ENALDI), based on superficial adsorption of inhibitors and 'ion hunting' (IH-ENALDI), based on selective pre-concentration of inhibitors. IF-ENALDI was applied for two sets of enzyme-inhibitor pairs: tyrosinase-glabridin and trypsin-leupeptin and for the real plant sample: Sparrmannia discolor leaf and stem methanol extract. The efficacy of IH-ENALDI was shown for the pair of trypsin-leupeptin. Both ENALDI approaches pose an alternative for bioassay-guided fractionation, the common method for finding inhibitors in the complex mixtures.

  6. Enzyme-Coupled Nanoparticles-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Searching for Low-Mass Inhibitors of Enzymes in Complex Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salwiński, Aleksander; Da Silva, David; Delépée, Raphaël; Maunit, Benoît

    2014-04-01

    In this report, enzyme-coupled magnetic nanoparticles (EMPs) were shown to be an effective affinity-based tool for finding specific interactions between enzymatic targets and the low-mass molecules in complex mixtures using classic MALDI-TOF apparatus. EMPs used in this work act as nonorganic matrix enabling ionization of small molecules without any interference in the low-mass range (enzyme-coupled nanoparticles-assisted laser desorption ionization MS, ENALDI MS) and simultaneously carry the superficial specific binding sites to capture inhibitors present in a studied mixture. We evaluated ENALDI approach in two complementary variations: `ion fading' (IF-ENALDI), based on superficial adsorption of inhibitors and `ion hunting' (IH-ENALDI), based on selective pre-concentration of inhibitors. IF-ENALDI was applied for two sets of enzyme-inhibitor pairs: tyrosinase-glabridin and trypsin-leupeptin and for the real plant sample: Sparrmannia discolor leaf and stem methanol extract. The efficacy of IH-ENALDI was shown for the pair of trypsin-leupeptin. Both ENALDI approaches pose an alternative for bioassay-guided fractionation, the common method for finding inhibitors in the complex mixtures.

  7. αT-Catenin Is a Constitutive Actin-binding α-Catenin That Directly Couples the Cadherin·Catenin Complex to Actin Filaments*

    PubMed Central

    Wickline, Emily D.; Dale, Ian W.; Merkel, Chelsea D.; Heier, Jonathon A.; Stolz, Donna B.

    2016-01-01

    α-Catenin is the primary link between the cadherin·catenin complex and the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian αE-catenin is allosterically regulated: the monomer binds the β-catenin·cadherin complex, whereas the homodimer does not bind β-catenin but interacts with F-actin. As part of the cadherin·catenin complex, αE-catenin requires force to bind F-actin strongly. It is not known whether these properties are conserved across the mammalian α-catenin family. Here we show that αT (testes)-catenin, a protein unique to amniotes that is expressed predominantly in the heart, is a constitutive actin-binding α-catenin. We demonstrate that αT-catenin is primarily a monomer in solution and that αT-catenin monomer binds F-actin in cosedimentation assays as strongly as αE-catenin homodimer. The β-catenin·αT-catenin heterocomplex also binds F-actin with high affinity unlike the β-catenin·αE-catenin complex, indicating that αT-catenin can directly link the cadherin·catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton. Finally, we show that a mutation in αT-catenin linked to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, V94D, promotes homodimerization, blocks β-catenin binding, and in cardiomyocytes disrupts localization at cell-cell contacts. Together, our data demonstrate that αT-catenin is a constitutively active actin-binding protein that can physically couple the cadherin·catenin complex to F-actin in the absence of tension. We speculate that these properties are optimized to meet the demands of cardiomyocyte adhesion. PMID:27231342

  8. Coupling of histone methylation and RNA processing by the nuclear mRNA cap-binding complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Zicong; Jiang, Danhua; Fu, Xing; Luo, Xiao; Liu, Renyi; He, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, genes are transcribed into pre-mRNAs that are subsequently processed into mature mRNAs by adding a 5'-cap and a 3'-polyA tail and splicing introns. Pre-mRNA processing involves their binding proteins and processing factors, whereas gene transcription often involves chromatin modifiers. It has been unclear how the factors involved in chromatin modifications and RNA processing function in concert to control mRNA production. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, the evolutionarily conserved nuclear mRNA cap-binding complex (CBC) forms multi-protein complexes with a conserved histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase complex called COMPASS-like and a histone 3 lysine 36 (H3K36) methyltransferase to integrate active histone methylations with co-transcriptional mRNA processing and cap preservation, leading to a high level of mature mRNA production. We further show that CBC is required for H3K4 and H3K36 trimethylation, and the histone methyltransferases are required for CBC-mediated mRNA cap preservation and efficient pre-mRNA splicing at their target loci, suggesting that these factors are functionally interdependent. Our study reveals novel roles for histone methyltransferases in RNA-processing-related events and provides mechanistic insights into how the 'downstream' RNA CBC controls eukaryotic gene transcription. PMID:27249350

  9. Steric and Electronic Influence on Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Reactivity of a Mononuclear Mn(III)-Hydroxo Complex.

    PubMed

    Rice, Derek B; Wijeratne, Gayan B; Burr, Andrew D; Parham, Joshua D; Day, Victor W; Jackson, Timothy A

    2016-08-15

    A mononuclear hydroxomanganese(III) complex was synthesized utilizing the N5 amide-containing ligand 2-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)]amino-N-2-methyl-quinolin-8-yl-acetamidate (dpaq(2Me) ). This complex is similar to previously reported [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+) [Inorg. Chem. 2014, 53, 7622-7634] but contains a methyl group adjacent to the hydroxo moiety. This α-methylquinoline group in [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) gives rise to a 0.1 Å elongation in the Mn-N(quinoline) distance relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). Similar bond elongation is observed in the corresponding Mn(II) complex. In MeCN, [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) reacts rapidly with 2,2',6,6'-tetramethylpiperidine-1-ol (TEMPOH) at -35 °C by a concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism (second-order rate constant k2 of 3.9(3) M(-1) s(-1)). Using enthalpies and entropies of activation from variable-temperature studies of TEMPOH oxidation by [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) (ΔH(‡) = 5.7(3) kcal(-1) M(-1); ΔS(‡) = -41(1) cal M(-1) K(-1)), it was determined that [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) oxidizes TEMPOH ∼240 times faster than [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). The [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) complex is also capable of oxidizing the stronger O-H and C-H bonds of 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenol and xanthene, respectively. However, for these reactions [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) displays, at best, modest rate enhancement relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). A combination of density function theory (DFT) and cyclic voltammetry studies establish an increase in the Mn(III)/Mn(II) reduction potential of [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+), which gives rise to a larger driving force for CPET for the former complex. Thus, more favorable thermodynamics for [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) can account for the dramatic increase in rate with TEMPOH. For the more sterically encumbered substrates, DFT computations suggest that this effect is mitigated by unfavorable steric interactions between the

  10. Steric and Electronic Influence on Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Reactivity of a Mononuclear Mn(III)-Hydroxo Complex.

    PubMed

    Rice, Derek B; Wijeratne, Gayan B; Burr, Andrew D; Parham, Joshua D; Day, Victor W; Jackson, Timothy A

    2016-08-15

    A mononuclear hydroxomanganese(III) complex was synthesized utilizing the N5 amide-containing ligand 2-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)]amino-N-2-methyl-quinolin-8-yl-acetamidate (dpaq(2Me) ). This complex is similar to previously reported [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+) [Inorg. Chem. 2014, 53, 7622-7634] but contains a methyl group adjacent to the hydroxo moiety. This α-methylquinoline group in [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) gives rise to a 0.1 Å elongation in the Mn-N(quinoline) distance relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). Similar bond elongation is observed in the corresponding Mn(II) complex. In MeCN, [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) reacts rapidly with 2,2',6,6'-tetramethylpiperidine-1-ol (TEMPOH) at -35 °C by a concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism (second-order rate constant k2 of 3.9(3) M(-1) s(-1)). Using enthalpies and entropies of activation from variable-temperature studies of TEMPOH oxidation by [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) (ΔH(‡) = 5.7(3) kcal(-1) M(-1); ΔS(‡) = -41(1) cal M(-1) K(-1)), it was determined that [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) oxidizes TEMPOH ∼240 times faster than [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). The [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) complex is also capable of oxidizing the stronger O-H and C-H bonds of 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenol and xanthene, respectively. However, for these reactions [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) displays, at best, modest rate enhancement relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). A combination of density function theory (DFT) and cyclic voltammetry studies establish an increase in the Mn(III)/Mn(II) reduction potential of [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+), which gives rise to a larger driving force for CPET for the former complex. Thus, more favorable thermodynamics for [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) can account for the dramatic increase in rate with TEMPOH. For the more sterically encumbered substrates, DFT computations suggest that this effect is mitigated by unfavorable steric interactions between the

  11. How to identify the most effective control measures based on disease-behavior coupled mechanisms?. Comment on "Coupled disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks: A review" by Z. Wang et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gui-Quan; Jin, Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Modelling infectious diseases on complex networks is a significant tool to understand the transmission of epidemics in human society, and consequently it has commanded increasing attention in the community of mathematicians, physicists, epidemiologists, public health policy-makers and so on [1-4]. Human behavior responses are associated with the emergence of infectious disease, for instance, wearing masks [5], staying away from a thick crowd [6], cutting contacts with infected individuals [7] and receiving a vaccination [8]. However, infectious diseases and human behavior were often modeled as independent systems in the literature, despite the fact that in the real world they are often mutually influential on each other, and hence their coupling exerts significant impacts on disease spread [9,10].

  12. Cyclometalated iridium complexes of bis(aryl) phosphine ligands: catalytic C-H/C-D exchanges and C-C coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Campos, Jesús; Espada, María F; López-Serrano, Joaquín; Carmona, Ernesto

    2013-06-01

    This work details the synthesis and structural identification of a series of complexes of the (η(5)-C5Me5)Ir(III) unit coordinated to cyclometalated bis(aryl)phosphine ligands, PR'(Ar)2, for R' = Me and Ar = 2,4,6-Me3C6H2, 1b; 2,6-Me2-4-OMe-C6H2, 1c; 2,6-Me2-4-F-C6H2, 1d; R' = Et, Ar = 2,6-Me2C6H3, 1e. Both chloride- and hydride-containing compounds, 2b-2e and 3b-3e, respectively, are described. Reactions of chlorides 2 with NaBArF (BArF = B(3,5-C6H3(CF3)2)4) in the presence of CO form cationic carbonyl complexes, 4(+), with ν(CO) values in the narrow interval 2030-2040 cm(-1), indicating similar π-basicity of the Ir(III) center of these complexes. In the absence of CO, NaBArF forces κ(4)-P,C,C',C″ coordination of the metalated arm (studied for the selected complexes 5b, 5d, and 5e), a binding mode so far encountered only when the phosphine contains two benzylic groups. A base-catalyzed intramolecular, dehydrogenative, C-C coupling reaction converts the κ(4) species 5d and 5e into the corresponding hydrido phosphepine complexes 6d and 6e. Using CD3OD as the source of deuterium, the chlorides 2 undergo deuteration of their 11 benzylic positions whereas hydrides 3 experience only D incorporation into the Ir-H and Ir-CH2 sites. Mechanistic schemes that explain this diversity have come to light thanks to experimental and theoretical DFT studies that are also reported. PMID:23675910

  13. Insights into dehydrogenative coupling of alcohols and amines catalyzed by a (PNN)-Ru(II) hydride complex: unusual metal-ligand cooperation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guixiang; Li, Shuhua

    2011-11-01

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to elucidate the mechanism of dehydrogenative coupling of primary alcohols and amines mediated by a PNN-Ru(II) hydride complex (PNN = (2-(di-tert-butylphosphinomethyl)-6-(diethylaminomethyl)pyridine)). A plausible reaction pathway was proposed which contains three stages: (1) The alcohol dehydrogenation reaction to generate the aldehyde and H(2); (2) The aldehyde-amine condensation reaction to form the hemiaminal intermediate; (3) The dehydrogenation process of the hemiaminal intermediate to yield the final amide product with the liberation of H(2). The first and third stages occur via a similar pathway: (a) Proton transfer from the substrate to the PNN ligand; (b) Intramolecular rearrangement of the deprotonated substrate to form an anagostic complex; (c) Hydride transfer from the deprotonated substrate to the Ru center to yield the trans-dihydride intermediate and the aldehyde (or amide); (d) Benzylic proton migration from the PNN ligand to the metal center forming a dihydrogen complex and subsequent H(2) liberation to regenerate the catalyst. In all these steps, the metal-ligand cooperation plays an essential role. In proton transfer steps (a) and (d), the metal-ligand cooperation is achieved through the aromatization/dearomatization processes of the PNN ligand. While in steps (b) and (c), their collaboration are demonstrated by the formation of an anagostic interaction between Ru and the C-H bond and two ionic hydrogen bonds supported by the PNN ligand. PMID:21942421

  14. Advances in ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for sensitive detection of several food allergens in complex and processed foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Planque, M; Arnould, T; Dieu, M; Delahaut, P; Renard, P; Gillard, N

    2016-09-16

    Sensitive detection of food allergens is affected by food processing and foodstuff complexity. It is therefore a challenge to detect cross-contamination in food production that could endanger an allergic customer's life. Here we used ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for simultaneous detection of traces of milk (casein, whey protein), egg (yolk, white), soybean, and peanut allergens in different complex and/or heat-processed foodstuffs. The method is based on a single protocol (extraction, trypsin digestion, and purification) applicable to the different tested foodstuffs: chocolate, ice cream, tomato sauce, and processed cookies. The determined limits of quantitation, expressed in total milk, egg, peanut, or soy proteins (and not soluble proteins) per kilogram of food, are: 0.5mg/kg for milk (detection of caseins), 5mg/kg for milk (detection of whey), 2.5mg/kg for peanut, 5mg/kg for soy, 3.4mg/kg for egg (detection of egg white), and 30.8mg/kg for egg (detection of egg yolk). The main advantage is the ability of the method to detect four major food allergens simultaneously in processed and complex matrices with very high sensitivity and specificity.

  15. Advances in ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for sensitive detection of several food allergens in complex and processed foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Planque, M; Arnould, T; Dieu, M; Delahaut, P; Renard, P; Gillard, N

    2016-09-16

    Sensitive detection of food allergens is affected by food processing and foodstuff complexity. It is therefore a challenge to detect cross-contamination in food production that could endanger an allergic customer's life. Here we used ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for simultaneous detection of traces of milk (casein, whey protein), egg (yolk, white), soybean, and peanut allergens in different complex and/or heat-processed foodstuffs. The method is based on a single protocol (extraction, trypsin digestion, and purification) applicable to the different tested foodstuffs: chocolate, ice cream, tomato sauce, and processed cookies. The determined limits of quantitation, expressed in total milk, egg, peanut, or soy proteins (and not soluble proteins) per kilogram of food, are: 0.5mg/kg for milk (detection of caseins), 5mg/kg for milk (detection of whey), 2.5mg/kg for peanut, 5mg/kg for soy, 3.4mg/kg for egg (detection of egg white), and 30.8mg/kg for egg (detection of egg yolk). The main advantage is the ability of the method to detect four major food allergens simultaneously in processed and complex matrices with very high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27554027

  16. Speciation analysis of inorganic tin by on-column complexation ion chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Yang, Die; Guo, Xiangquan; Chen, Zuliang

    2014-11-14

    Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) were used as complementary methods to identify Sn-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) complex formation. ESI-MS was used to initially confirm the formation of [Sn(DTPA)](3-) and [Sn(DTPA)](1-) and their MS spectra suggest these tin complexes were stable in solution. On-column complexation of tin with DTPA and the separation of [Sn(DTPA)](3-) and [Sn(DTPA)](1-) was performed on anion-exchange chromatography with an mobile phase containing 20mM NH4NO3 and 3mM DTPA at pH 6.0, and the subsequent detection of [Sn(DTPA)](3-) and [Sn(DTPA)](1-) was achieved by ICP-MS. Linear plots were obtained in a concentration range of 1.0-1000 μg L(-1) with detection limits ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 μg L(-1). The developed procedure allows the simultaneous determination of [Sn(DTPA)](3-) and [Sn(DTPA)](1-) in less than 5 min with a RSD between 2.1 and 2.7%. The recoveries of [Sn(DTPA)](3-) and [Sn(DTPA)](1-) were found to be 96.8 and 99.4%, respectively, when the sample was spiked with 20 μg L(-1) standard. Finally, the proposed procedure was used for the determination of tin species in contaminated water.

  17. From bis(silylene) and bis(germylene) pincer-type nickel(II) complexes to isolable intermediates of the nickel-catalyzed Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Daniel; Brück, Andreas; Irran, Elisabeth; Meier, Florian; Kaupp, Martin; Driess, Matthias; Hartwig, John F

    2013-10-16

    The first [ECE]Ni(II) pincer complexes with E = Si(II) and E = Ge(II) metallylene donor arms were synthesized via C-X (X = H, Br) oxidative addition, starting from the corresponding [EC(X)E] ligands. These novel complexes were fully characterized (NMR, MS, and XRD) and used as catalyst for Ni-catalyzed Sonogashira reactions. These catalysts allowed detailed information on the elementary steps of this catalytic reaction (transmetalation → oxidative addition → reductive elimination), resulting in the isolation and characterization of an unexpected intermediate in the transmetalation step. This complex, {[ECE]Ni acetylide → CuBr} contains both nickel and copper, with the copper bound to the alkyne π-system. Consistent with these unusual structural features, DFT calculations of the {[ECE]Ni acetylide → CuBr} intermediates revealed an unusual E-Cu-Ni three-center-two-electron bonding scheme. The results reveal a general reaction mechanism for the Ni-based Sonogashira coupling and broaden the application of metallylenes as strong σ-donor ligands for catalytic transformations. PMID:24053603

  18. Tunable molecular distortion in a nickel complex coupled to a reversible phase transition in the crystalline state

    SciTech Connect

    Falvello, L.R.; Hitchman, M.A.; Palacio, F.; Pascual, I.; Schultz, A.J.; Stratemeier, H.; Tomas, M.; Urriolabeitia, E.P.; Young, D.M.

    1999-03-31

    The six-coordinate coordination complex trans-[Ni(cyan-{kappa}N){sub 2}(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}] has been characterized in the solid state by X-ray and neutron diffraction at temperatures ranging from 11 to 298 K, by electronic spectroscopy over the temperature range 14--297 K, and by magnetic susceptibility measurements from 1.8 to 300 K. At room temperature the observed space group if Fmmm, although there is reason to believe that at a finer level of distinction it is really Cmcm approximating Fmmm. The nickel center lies on a site of apparent point symmetry mmm. At lower temperatures, the space group is unambiguously Cmcm without appreciable change in the unit cell parameters, and the molecule lies at a site of m2m symmetry. The shape of the molecule changes smoothly with temperature variations from room temperature down to about 140 K, in a behavior characteristic of second-order phase transformations. The molecular shape varies, but by lesser amounts, below 140 K. Possible causes of this phenomenon are discussed. The increase in intensity on cooling of some of the bands observed in the polarized crystal spectrum of the complex is consistent with the change in the molecular structure. Bonding parameters derived from the transition energies indicate that the cyanurate produces a very weak ligand field, which is consistent with the long metal-ligand bond to this ligand. The magnetic properties of the solid display Curie-Weiss behavior through the temperature range of the most pronounced molecular shape changes, but antiferromagnetic interactions become significant below 50 K, with antiferromagnetic ordering at 2.61 K. The propagation pathways for the magnetic interactions are inferred.

  19. Coupling Gd-DTPA with a bispecific, recombinant protein anti-EGFR-iRGD complex improves tumor targeting in MRI

    PubMed Central

    XIN, XIAOYAN; SHA, HUIZI; SHEN, JINGTAO; ZHANG, BING; ZHU, BIN; LIU, BAORUI

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant anti-epidermal growth factor receptor-internalizing arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (anti-EGFR single-domain antibody fused with iRGD peptide) protein efficiently targets the EGFR extracellular domain and integrin αvβ/β5, and shows a high penetration into cells. Thus, this protein may improve penetration of conjugated drugs into the deep zone of gastric cancer multicellular 3D spheroids. In the present study, a novel tumor-targeting contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was developed, by coupling gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) with the bispecific recombinant anti-EGFR-iRGD protein. The anti-EGFR-iRGD protein was extracted from Escherichia coli and Gd was loaded onto the recombinant protein by chelation using DTPA anhydride. Single-targeting agent anti-EGFR-DTPA-Gd, which served as the control, was also prepared. The results of the present study showed that anti-EGFR-iRGD-DTPA-Gd exhibited no significant cyto toxicity to human gastric carcinoma cells (BGC-823) under the experimental conditions used. Compared with a conventional contrast agent (Magnevist), anti-EGFR-iRGD-DTPA-Gd showed higher T1 relaxivity (10.157/mM/sec at 3T) and better tumor-targeting ability. In addition, the signal intensity and the area under curve for the enhanced signal time in tumor, in vivo, were stronger than Gd-DTPA alone or the anti-EGFR-Gd control. Thus, Gd-labelled anti-EGFR-iRGD has potential as a tumor-targeting contrast agent for improved MRI. PMID:27035336

  20. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of the coupled C, N, P and Si retention in complex of water reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Bartoszek, Lilianna; Koszelnik, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The Solina-Myczkowce complex of reservoirs (SMCR) accounts about 15 % of the water storage in Poland. On the base of historical (2004-2006 years) data, the mass balance of nitrogen, phosphorus, total organic carbon and dissolved silicon were calculated. Large, natural affluents were the main source of the biogenic compounds in the studied ecosystem, delivering 90 % of TOC, 87 % of TN and 81 % of TP and DSi load. Moreover, results show that SMCR is an important sink for all the analysed biogenic elements. About 15-30 % of external loads were retained in the reservoir mainly in upper Solina. Due to the intensive processes of primary production, inorganic forms of nitrogen and phosphorus were mainly retained. Internal production of organic matter lead to an amount of the organic matter deposited in the sediments greater than was anticipated on the basis of the mass balance calculations. A constant load of dissolved silicon originating only from natural sources did not contribute to supplement deficits of Si present in the body of water in the reservoirs, promoting disturbances in N:C:P:Si ratios and another growth condition for other types of algae. PMID:27504255

  1. The complex PrPc-Fyn couples human oligomeric Aβ with pathological tau changes in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Megan; Sherman, Mathew A.; Amar, Fatou; Nuvolone, Mario; Schneider, Julie A.; Bennett, David A.; Aguzzi, Adriano; Lesné, Sylvain E.

    2013-01-01

    Amidst controversy, the cellular form of the prion protein PrPc has been proposed to mediate oligomeric Aβ-induced deficits. In contrast, there is consistent evidence that the Src kinase Fyn is activated by Aβ oligomers and leads to synaptic and cognitive impairment in transgenic animals. However, the molecular mechanism by which soluble Aβ activates Fyn remains unknown. Combining the use of human and transgenic mouse brain tissue as well as primary cortical neurons, we demonstrate that soluble Aβ binds to PrPc at neuronal dendritic spines in vivo and in vitro where it forms a complex with Fyn, resulting in the activation of the kinase. Using the antibody 6D11 to prevent oligomeric Aβ from binding to PrPc, we abolished Fyn activation and Fyn-dependent tau hyperphosphorylation induced by endogenous oligomeric Aβ in vitro. Finally we showed that gene dosage of Prnp regulates Aβ-induced Fyn/tau alterations. Altogether, our findings identify a complete signaling cascade linking one specific endogenous Aβ oligomer, Fyn alteration and tau hyperphosphorylation in cellular and animal models modeling aspects of the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23175838

  2. Replication-Coupled PCNA Unloading by the Elg1 Complex Occurs Genome-wide and Requires Okazaki Fragment Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Takashi; Katou, Yuki; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Donaldson, Anne D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The sliding clamp PCNA is a crucial component of the DNA replication machinery. Timely PCNA loading and unloading are central for genome integrity and must be strictly coordinated with other DNA processing steps during replication. Here, we show that the S. cerevisiae Elg1 replication factor C-like complex (Elg1-RLC) unloads PCNA genome-wide following Okazaki fragment ligation. In the absence of Elg1, PCNA is retained on chromosomes in the wake of replication forks, rather than at specific sites. Degradation of the Okazaki fragment ligase Cdc9 leads to PCNA accumulation on chromatin, similar to the accumulation caused by lack of Elg1. We demonstrate that Okazaki fragment ligation is the critical prerequisite for PCNA unloading, since Chlorella virus DNA ligase can substitute for Cdc9 in yeast and simultaneously promotes PCNA unloading. Our results suggest that Elg1-RLC acts as a general PCNA unloader and is dependent upon DNA ligation during chromosome replication. PMID:26212319

  3. Quantification of biopharmaceuticals and biomarkers in complex biological matrices: a comparison of liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry and ligand binding assays.

    PubMed

    Bults, Peter; van de Merbel, Nico C; Bischoff, Rainer

    2015-08-01

    The quantification of proteins (biopharmaceuticals or biomarkers) in complex biological samples such as blood plasma requires exquisite sensitivity and selectivity, as all biological matrices contain myriads of proteins that are all made of the same 20 proteinogenic amino acids, notwithstanding post-translational modifications. This review describes and compares the two main approaches, namely, ligand binding assays (LBAs) and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. While LBAs remain the most widely used approach, SRM assays are gaining interest due to their generally better analytical performance (precision and accuracy) and their capacity for multiplex analyses. This article focuses on the possible reasons for the discrepancies between results obtained by LBAs and SRM assays.

  4. Complex absorbing potential based equation-of-motion coupled cluster method for the potential energy curve of CO{sub 2}{sup −} anion

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Aryya; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2014-10-28

    The equation-of-motion coupled cluster method employing the complex absorbing potential has been used to investigate the low energy electron scattering by CO{sub 2}. We have studied the potential energy curve for the {sup 2}Π{sub u} resonance states of CO{sub 2}{sup −} upon bending as well as symmetric and asymmetric stretching of the molecule. Specifically, we have stretched the C−O bond length from 1.1 Å to 1.5 Å and the bending angles are changed between 180° and 132°. Upon bending, the low energy {sup 2}Π{sub u} resonance state is split into two components, i.e., {sup 2}A{sub 1}, {sup 2}B{sub 1} due to the Renner-Teller effect, which behave differently as the molecule is bent.

  5. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Iron(II) and Iron(I) Complexes Bearing Bisphosphine Ligands of Relevance to Iron-Catalyzed C–C Cross-Coupling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chelating phosphines are effective additives and supporting ligands for a wide array of iron-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. While recent studies have begun to unravel the nature of the in situ-formed iron species in several of these reactions, including the identification of the active iron species, insight into the origin of the differential effectiveness of bisphosphine ligands in catalysis as a function of their backbone and peripheral steric structures remains elusive. Herein, we report a spectroscopic and computational investigation of well-defined FeCl2(bisphosphine) complexes (bisphosphine = SciOPP, dpbz, tBudppe, or Xantphos) and known iron(I) variants to systematically discern the relative effects of bisphosphine backbone character and steric substitution on the overall electronic structure and bonding within their iron complexes across oxidation states implicated to be relevant in catalysis. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and density functional theory (DFT) studies demonstrate that common o-phenylene and saturated ethyl backbone motifs result in small but non-negligible perturbations to 10Dq(Td) and iron–bisphosphine bonding character at the iron(II) level within isostructural tetrahedra as well as in five-coordinate iron(I) complexes FeCl(dpbz)2 and FeCl(dppe)2. Notably, coordination of Xantphos to FeCl2 results in a ligand field significantly reduced relative to those of its iron(II) partners, where a large bite angle and consequent reduced iron–phosphorus Mayer bond orders (MBOs) could play a role in fostering the unique ability of Xantphos to be an effective additive in Kumada and Suzuki–Miyaura alkyl–alkyl cross-couplings. Furthermore, it has been found that the peripheral steric bulk of the SciOPP ligand does little to perturb the electronic structure of FeCl2(SciOPP) relative to that of the analogous FeCl2(dpbz) complex, potentially suggesting that differences in the steric properties of these ligands might be more important in

  6. Efficient Epoxidation of Styrene Derivatives by a Nonheme Iron(IV)-Oxo Complex via Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer with Triflic Acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyun; Lee, Yong-Min; Ohkubo, Kei; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-06-15

    Styrene derivatives are not oxidized by [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) (N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine) in acetonitrile at 298 K, whereas epoxidation of styrene derivatives by the iron(IV)-oxo complex occurs efficiently in the presence of triflic acid (HOTf) via proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) from styrene derivatives to the diprotonated species of [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) with HOTf. Logarithms of the first-order rate constants of HOTf-promoted expoxidation of styrene derivatives with [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) and PCET from electron donors to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) in the precursor complexes exhibit a remarkably unified correlation with the driving force of PCET in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer when the differences in the formation constants of precursor complexes are taken into account. The same PCET driving force dependence is obtained for the first-order rate constants of HOTf-promoted oxygen atom transfer from thioanisols to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) and HOTf-promoted hydrogen atom transfer from toluene derivatives to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) in the precursor complexes. Thus, HOTf-promoted epoxidation of styrene derivatives by [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) proceeds via the rate-determining electron transfer from styrene derivatives to the diprotonated species of [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+), as shown in the reactions of HOTf-promoted oxygen atom transfer from thioanisols to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) and HOTf-promoted hydrogen atom transfer from toluene derivatives to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+).

  7. High affinity neurexin binding to cell adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor CIRL1/latrophilin-1 produces an intercellular adhesion complex.

    PubMed

    Boucard, Antony A; Ko, Jaewon; Südhof, Thomas C

    2012-03-16

    The G-protein-coupled receptor CIRL1/latrophilin-1 (CL1) and the type-1 membrane proteins neurexins represent distinct neuronal cell adhesion molecules that exhibit no similarities except for one common function: both proteins are receptors for α-latrotoxin, a component of black widow spider venom that induces massive neurotransmitter release at synapses. Unexpectedly, we have now identified a direct binding interaction between the extracellular domains of CL1 and neurexins that is regulated by alternative splicing of neurexins at splice site 4 (SS4). Using saturation binding assays, we showed that neurexins lacking an insert at SS4 bind to CL1 with nanomolar affinity, whereas neurexins containing an insert at SS4 are unable to bind. CL1 competed for neurexin binding with neuroligin-1, a well characterized neurexin ligand. The extracellular sequences of CL1 contain five domains (lectin, olfactomedin-like, serine/threonine-rich, hormone-binding, and G-protein-coupled receptor autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domains). Of these domains, the olfactomedin-like domain mediates neurexin binding as shown by deletion mapping. Cell adhesion assays using cells expressing neurexins and CL1 revealed that their interaction produces a stable intercellular adhesion complex, indicating that their interaction can be trans-cellular. Thus, our data suggest that CL1 constitutes a novel ligand for neurexins that may be localized postsynaptically based on its well characterized interaction with intracellular SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeats adaptor proteins (SHANK) and could form a trans-synaptic complex with presynaptic neurexins.

  8. Thiocyanate-Ligated Heterobimetallic {PtM} Lantern Complexes Including a Ferromagnetically Coupled 1D Coordination Polymer.

    PubMed

    Guillet, Jesse L; Bhowmick, Indrani; Shores, Matthew P; Daley, Christopher J A; Gembicky, Milan; Golen, James A; Rheingold, Arnold L; Doerrer, Linda H

    2016-08-15

    A series of heterobimetallic lantern complexes with the central unit {PtM(SAc)4(NCS)} have been prepared and thoroughly characterized. The {Na(15C5)}[PtM(SAc)4(NCS)] series, 1 (Co), 2 (Ni), 3 (Zn), are discrete compounds in the solid state, whereas the {Na(12C4)2)}[PtM(SAc)4(NCS)] series, 4 (Co), 5 (Ni), 6 (Zn), and 7 (Mn), are ion-separated species. Compound 7 is the first {PtMn} lantern of any bridging ligand (carboxylate, amide, etc.). Monomeric 1-7 have M(2+), necessitating counter cations that have been prepared as {(15C5)Na}(+) and {(12C4)2Na}(+) variants, none of which form extended structures. In contrast, neutral [PtCr(tba)4(NCS)]∞ 8 forms a coordination polymer of {PtCr}(+) units linked by (NCS)(-) in a zigzag chain. All eight compounds have been thoroughly characterized and analyzed in comparison to a previously reported family of compounds. Crystal structures are presented for compounds 1-6 and 8, and solution magnetic susceptibility measurements are presented for compounds 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7. Further structural analysis of dimerized {PtM} units reinforces the empirical observation that greater charge density along the Pt-M vector leads to more Pt···Pt interactions in the solid state. Four structural classes, one new, of {MPt}···{PtM} units are presented. Solid state magnetic characterization of 8 reveals a ferromagnetic interaction in the {PtCr(NCS)} chain between the Cr centers of J/kB = 1.7(4) K.

  9. Thiocyanate-Ligated Heterobimetallic {PtM} Lantern Complexes Including a Ferromagnetically Coupled 1D Coordination Polymer.

    PubMed

    Guillet, Jesse L; Bhowmick, Indrani; Shores, Matthew P; Daley, Christopher J A; Gembicky, Milan; Golen, James A; Rheingold, Arnold L; Doerrer, Linda H

    2016-08-15

    A series of heterobimetallic lantern complexes with the central unit {PtM(SAc)4(NCS)} have been prepared and thoroughly characterized. The {Na(15C5)}[PtM(SAc)4(NCS)] series, 1 (Co), 2 (Ni), 3 (Zn), are discrete compounds in the solid state, whereas the {Na(12C4)2)}[PtM(SAc)4(NCS)] series, 4 (Co), 5 (Ni), 6 (Zn), and 7 (Mn), are ion-separated species. Compound 7 is the first {PtMn} lantern of any bridging ligand (carboxylate, amide, etc.). Monomeric 1-7 have M(2+), necessitating counter cations that have been prepared as {(15C5)Na}(+) and {(12C4)2Na}(+) variants, none of which form extended structures. In contrast, neutral [PtCr(tba)4(NCS)]∞ 8 forms a coordination polymer of {PtCr}(+) units linked by (NCS)(-) in a zigzag chain. All eight compounds have been thoroughly characterized and analyzed in comparison to a previously reported family of compounds. Crystal structures are presented for compounds 1-6 and 8, and solution magnetic susceptibility measurements are presented for compounds 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7. Further structural analysis of dimerized {PtM} units reinforces the empirical observation that greater charge density along the Pt-M vector leads to more Pt···Pt interactions in the solid state. Four structural classes, one new, of {MPt}···{PtM} units are presented. Solid state magnetic characterization of 8 reveals a ferromagnetic interaction in the {PtCr(NCS)} chain between the Cr centers of J/kB = 1.7(4) K. PMID:27486841

  10. Coupling fast all-season soil strength land surface model with weather research and forecasting model to assess low-level icing in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sines, Taleena R.

    Icing poses as a severe hazard to aircraft safety with financial resources and even human lives hanging in the balance when the decision to ground a flight must be made. When analyzing the effects of ice on aviation, a chief cause for danger is the disruption of smooth airflow, which increases the drag force on the aircraft therefore decreasing its ability to create lift. The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model Advanced Research WRF (WRF-ARW) is a collaboratively created, flexible model designed to run on distributed computing systems for a variety of applications including forecasting research, parameterization research, and real-time numerical weather prediction. Land-surface models, one of the physics options available in the WRF-ARW, output surface heat and moisture flux given radiation, precipitation, and surface properties such as soil type. The Fast All-Season Soil STrength (FASST) land-surface model was developed by the U.S. Army ERDC-CRREL in Hanover, New Hampshire. Designed to use both meteorological and terrain data, the model calculates heat and moisture within the surface layer as well as the exchange of these parameters between the soil, surface elements (such as snow and vegetation), and atmosphere. Focusing on the Presidential Mountain Range of New Hampshire under the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) Icing Assessments in Cold and Alpine Environments project, one of the main goals is to create a customized, high resolution model to predict and assess ice accretion in complex terrain. The purpose of this research is to couple the FASST land-surface model with the WRF to improve icing forecasts in complex terrain. Coupling FASST with the WRF-ARW may improve icing forecasts because of its sophisticated approach to handling processes such as meltwater, freezing, thawing, and others that would affect the water and energy budget and in turn affect icing forecasts. Several transformations had to take place in order

  11. Enhanced fluorescence sensitivity by coupling yttrium-analyte complexes and three-way fast high-performance liquid chromatography data modeling.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, Mirta R; Culzoni, María J; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a sensitive chromatographic method for the analysis of seven fluoroquinolones (FQs) in environmental water samples, by coupling yttrium-analyte complex and three-way chromatographic data modeling. This method based on the use of HPLC-FSFD does not require complex or tedious sample treatments or enrichment processes before the analysis, due to the significant fluorescence increments of the analytes reached by the presence of Y(3+). Enhancement achieved for the FQs signals obtained after Y(3+) addition reaches 103- to 1743-fold. Prediction results corresponding to the application of MCR-ALS to the validation set showed relative error of prediction (REP%) values below 10% in all cases. A recovery study that includes the simultaneous determination of the seven FQs in three different environmental aqueous matrices was conducted. The recovery studies assert the efficiency and the accuracy of the proposed method. The LOD values calculated are in the order of part per trillion (below 0.5 ng mL(-1) for all the FQs, except for enoxacin). It is noteworthy to mention that the method herein proposed, which does not include pre-concentration steps, allows reaching LOD values in the same order of magnitude than those achieved by more sophisticated methods based on SPE and UHPLC-MS/MS.

  12. The Cockayne syndrome B protein, involved in transcription-coupled DNA repair, resides in an RNA polymerase II-containing complex.

    PubMed

    van Gool, A J; Citterio, E; Rademakers, S; van Os, R; Vermeulen, W; Constantinou, A; Egly, J M; Bootsma, D; Hoeijmakers, J H

    1997-10-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR), a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) defective in Cockayne syndrome A and B (CSA and CSB), is responsible for the preferential removal of DNA lesions from the transcribed strand of active genes, permitting rapid resumption of blocked transcription. Here we demonstrate by microinjection of antibodies against CSB and CSA gene products into living primary fibroblasts, that both proteins are required for TCR and for recovery of RNA synthesis after UV damage in vivo but not for basal transcription itself. Furthermore, immunodepletion showed that CSB is not required for in vitro NER or transcription. Its central role in TCR suggests that CSB interacts with other repair and transcription proteins. Gel filtration of repair- and transcription-competent whole cell extracts provided evidence that CSB and CSA are part of large complexes of different sizes. Unexpectedly, there was no detectable association of CSB with several candidate NER and transcription proteins. However, a minor but significant portion (10-15%) of RNA polymerase II was found to be tightly associated with CSB. We conclude that within cell-free extracts, CSB is not stably associated with the majority of core NER or transcription components, but is part of a distinct complex involving RNA polymerase II. These findings suggest that CSB is implicated in, but not essential for, transcription, and support the idea that Cockayne syndrome is due to a combined repair and transcription deficiency. PMID:9312053

  13. Phonon-Assisted Anti-Stokes Lasing in ZnTe Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Liu, Xinfeng; Utama, M Iqbal Bakti; Xing, Guichuan; Sum, Tze Chien; Xiong, Qihua

    2016-01-13

    Phonon-assisted anti-Stokes emission and its stimulated emission in polar semiconductor ZnTe are demonstrated via the annihilation of phonons as a result of strong exciton-phonon coupling. The findings are not only important for developing high-power radiation-balanced lasers, but are also promising for manufacturing ultraefficient solid-state laser coolers. PMID:26573758

  14. Electron transfer reactivity of the aqueous iron(IV)–oxo complex. Outer-sphere vs proton-coupled electron transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2016-06-18

    Here, the kinetics of oxidation of organic and inorganic reductants by aqueous iron(IV) ions, FeIV(H2O)5O2+ (hereafter FeIVaqO2+), are reported. The substrates examined include several water-soluble ferrocenes, hexachloroiridate(III), polypyridyl complexes M(NN)32+ (M = Os, Fe and Ru; NN = phenanthroline, bipyridine and derivatives), HABTS–/ABTS2–, phenothiazines, CoII(dmgBF2)2, macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes, and aqueous cerium(III). Most of the reductants were oxidized cleanly to the corresponding one-electron oxidation products, with the exception of phenothiazines which produced the corresponding oxides in a single-step reaction, and polypyridyl complexes of Fe(II) and Ru(II) that generated ligand-modified products. FeIVaqO2+ oxidizes even Ce(III) (E0 in 1 M HClO4 = 1.7more » V) with a rate constant greater than 104 M–1 s–1. In 0.10 M aqueous HClO4 at 25 °C, the reactions of Os(phen)32+ (k = 2.5 × 105 M–1 s–1), IrCl63– (1.6 × 106), ABTS2– (4.7 × 107), and Fe(cp)(C5H4CH2OH) (6.4 × 107) appear to take place by outer sphere electron transfer (OSET). The rate constants for the oxidation of Os(phen)32+ and of ferrocenes remained unchanged in the acidity range 0.05 < [H+] < 0.10 M, ruling out prior protonation of FeIVaqO2+ and further supporting the OSET assignment. A fit to Marcus cross-relation yielded a composite parameter (log k22 + E0Fe/0.059) = 17.2 ± 0.8, where k22 and E0Fe are the self-exchange rate constant and reduction potential, respectively, for the FeIVaqO2+/FeIIIaqO+ couple. Comparison with literature work suggests k22 < 10–5 M–1 s–1 and thus E0(FeIVaqO2+/FeIIIaqO+) > 1.3 V. For proton-coupled electron transfer, the reduction potential is estimated at E0 (FeIVaqO2+, H+/FeIIIaqOH2+) ≥ 1.95 V.« less

  15. Removal of high-salinity matrices through polymer-complexation-ultrafiltration for the detection of trace levels of REEs using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hualing; Lin, Jijun; Gong, Zhenbin; Huang, Jiahua; Yang, Shifeng

    2015-10-01

    The polymer-complexation-ultrafiltration (PCUF) technique was applied to separate trace levels of rare earth elements (REEs), including scandium, yttrium and the lanthanides, from high-salinity matrices prior to their determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The REEs were converted into REE-polymer complexes using the water-soluble polymer polyacrylic acid (PAA) at a specified pH, retained on the ultrafiltration membrane of centrifugal filter units, and finally eluted using diluted nitric acid to achieve separation from matrices with relatively high levels of various inorganic ions, such as sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and chlorine ions. Numerous factors affecting the PCUF efficiency were optimized. The optimal conditions included the addition of 30 mg L(-1) of PAA, a pH of 7.5, a reaction time of 40 min at room temperature, and 5.0 mL of 3% nitric acid (v/v) eluent. Under these conditions, the analytes were quantitatively separated and recovered, with a resulting relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 4.0% (0.05 µg L(-1), n=5) and standard addition recoveries between 89.2% (La) and 95.8% (Sm) for matrices of various salinities. The blank samples for the method ranged from 0.0003 µg L(-1) (Dy) to 0.0031 µg L(-1) (Sc), and the limits of quantification (LOQs, 10σ) were between 0.0006 µg L(-1) (Dy) and 0.0026 µg L(-1) (Sc). Furthermore, the salinity of the sample exhibited no effect on the REE-polymer complex formation process. Finally, the method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of dissolved Sc, Y, and lanthanides in coastal and estuarine seawater samples. PMID:26078161

  16. Determination of aminopolycarboxylic acids at ultra-trace levels by means of online coupling ion exchange chromatography and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry with indirect detection via their Pd²⁺-complexes.

    PubMed

    Nette, David; Seubert, Andreas

    2015-07-16

    A new indirect IC-ICP-MS method for the determination of aminopolycarboxylic acids in water samples is described. It is based on the addition of an excess of Pd(II) to water samples. The analytes are forced into very strong and negatively charged palladium complexes, separated by ion exchange chromatography and detected by their palladium content, utilizing an on-line coupled ICP-MS. This method is suitable to determine the concentration of 8 aminopolycarboxylic acids (nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), (2-carboxyethyl) iminodiacetic acid (β-ADA), methylglycinediacetic acid (MGDA), 2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediamine triacetic acid (HEDTA), diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethylendiamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), 1,3-diaminopropane tetraacetic acid (1,3-PDTA) and 1,2-diaminopropane tetraacetic acid (1,2-PDTA) at the ng kg(-1) level. The method is faster and easier than the established gas chromatography (GC)-method ISO 16588:2002 and up to two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the ion pair chromatography based method of DIN 38413-8. Analytic performance is superior to ISO 16588:2002 and the comparability is good. PMID:26073818

  17. A combined high-field EPR and quantum chemical study on a weakly ferromagnetically coupled dinuclear Mn(III) complex. A complete analysis of the EPR spectrum beyond the strong coupling limit.

    PubMed

    Retegan, Marius; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle; Neese, Frank; Duboc, Carole

    2013-01-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of polynuclear complexes, in particular the magnetic anisotropy (zero field splitting, ZFS), the leading term of the spin Hamiltonian (SH), are commonly analyzed in a global manner and no attempt is usually made to understand the various contributions to the anisotropy at the atomic scale. This is especially true in weakly magnetically coupled systems. The present study addresses this problem and investigates the local SH parameters using a methodology based on experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. This work focuses on the challenging mono μ-oxo bis μ-acetato dinuclear Mn(III) complex: [Mn(2)(III)(μ-O)(μ-OAc)(2)L(2)](PF(6))(2) (with L = trispyrrolidine-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) (1), which is particularly difficult for EPR spectroscopy because of its large magnetic anisotropy and the weak ferromagnetic interaction between the two Mn(III) ions. High field (up to 12 T) and high frequency (190-345 GHz) EPR experiments have been recorded for 1 between 5 and 50 K. These data have been analyzed by employing a complex Hamiltonian, which encompasses terms describing the local and inter-site interactions. Density functional theory and multireference correlated ab initio calculations have been used to estimate the ZFS of the Mn(III) ions (D(Mn) = +4.29 cm(-1), E(Mn)/D(Mn) = 0.19) and the Euler angles reflecting the relative orientation of the ZFS tensor for each Mn(III) (α = -52°, β = 28°, γ = 3°). This analysis allowed the accurate determination of the local parameters: D(Mn) = +4.50 cm(-1), E(Mn)/D(Mn) = 0.07, α = -35°, β = 23°, γ = 2°. The spin ladder approach has also been applied, but only the parameters of the ground spin state of 1 have been accurately determined (D(4) = +1.540 cm(-1), E(4)/D(4) = 0.107). This is not sufficient to allow for the determination of the local parameters. The validity and practical performance of both approaches have been discussed. PMID:23160651

  18. Effects of a nearby Mn delta layer on the optical properties of an InGaAs/GaAs quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Balanta, M. A. G. Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Iikawa, F.; Brum, J. A.; Mendes, Udson C.; Danilov, Yu. A.; Dorokhin, M. V.; Vikhrova, Olga V.; Zvonkov, Boris N.

    2014-11-28

    We investigated the effects of nearby Mn ions on the confined states of a InGaAs/GaAs quantum well through circularly polarized and magneto-optical measurements. The addition of a Mn delta-doping layer at the barrier close to the well gives rise to surprisingly narrow absorption peaks in the photoluminescence excitation spectra. The peaks become increasingly stronger for decreasing spacer-layer thicknesses between the quantum well and the Mn layer. Most of the peaks were identified based on self-consistent calculations; however, we observed additional peaks that cannot be identified with quantum well transitions, which origin we attribute to an enhanced exciton-phonon coupling. Finally, we discuss possible effects related to the exciton magneto-polaron complex in the reinforcement of the photoluminescence excitation peaks.

  19. Prediction Models of Retention Indices for Increased Confidence in Structural Elucidation during Complex Matrix Analysis: Application to Gas Chromatography Coupled with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dossin, Eric; Martin, Elyette; Diana, Pierrick; Castellon, Antonio; Monge, Aurelien; Pospisil, Pavel; Bentley, Mark; Guy, Philippe A

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring of volatile and semivolatile compounds was performed using gas chromatography (GC) coupled to high-resolution electron ionization mass spectrometry, using both headspace and liquid injection modes. A total of 560 reference compounds, including 8 odd n-alkanes, were analyzed and experimental linear retention indices (LRI) were determined. These reference compounds were randomly split into training (n = 401) and test (n = 151) sets. LRI for all 552 reference compounds were also calculated based upon computational Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) models, using two independent approaches RapidMiner (coupled to Dragon) and ACD/ChromGenius software. Correlation coefficients for experimental versus predicted LRI values calculated for both training and test set compounds were calculated at 0.966 and 0.949 for RapidMiner and at 0.977 and 0.976 for ACD/ChromGenius, respectively. In addition, the cross-validation correlation was calculated at 0.96 from RapidMiner and the residual standard error value obtained from ACD/ChromGenius was 53.635. These models were then used to predict LRI values for several thousand compounds reported present in tobacco and tobacco-related fractions, plus a range of specific flavor compounds. It was demonstrated that using the mean of the LRI values predicted by RapidMiner and ACD/ChromGenius, in combination with accurate mass data, could enhance the confidence level for compound identification from the analysis of complex matrixes, particularly when the two predicted LRI values for a compound were in close agreement. Application of this LRI modeling approach to matrixes with unknown composition has already enabled the confirmation of 23 postulated compounds, demonstrating its ability to facilitate compound identification in an analytical workflow. The goal is to reduce the list of putative candidates to a reasonable relevant number that can be obtained and measured for confirmation. PMID:27403731

  20. Electron Transport in a Dioxygenase-Ferredoxin Complex: Long Range Charge Coupling between the Rieske and Non-Heme Iron Center

    PubMed Central

    Jono, Ryota; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Dioxygenase (dOx) utilizes stereospecific oxidation on aromatic molecules; consequently, dOx has potential applications in bioremediation and stereospecific oxidation synthesis. The reactive components of dOx comprise a Rieske structure Cys2[2Fe-2S]His2 and a non-heme reactive oxygen center (ROC). Between the Rieske structure and the ROC, a universally conserved Asp residue appears to bridge the two structures forming a Rieske-Asp-ROC triad, where the Asp is known to be essential for electron transfer processes. The Rieske and ROC share hydrogen bonds with Asp through their His ligands; suggesting an ideal network for electron transfer via the carboxyl side chain of Asp. Associated with the dOx is an itinerant charge carrying protein Ferredoxin (Fdx). Depending on the specific cognate, Fdx may also possess either the Rieske structure or a related structure known as 4-Cys-[2Fe-2S] (4-Cys). In this study, we extensively explore, at different levels of theory, the behavior of the individual components (Rieske and ROC) and their interaction together via the Asp using a variety of density function methods, basis sets, and a method known as Generalized Ionic Fragment Approach (GIFA) that permits setting up spin configurations manually. We also report results on the 4-Cys structure for comparison. The individual optimized structures are compared with observed spectroscopic data from the Rieske, 4-Cys and ROC structures (where information is available). The separate pieces are then combined together into a large Rieske-Asp-ROC (donor/bridge/acceptor) complex to estimate the overall coupling between individual components, based on changes to the partial charges. The results suggest that the partial charges are significantly altered when Asp bridges the Rieske and the ROC; hence, long range coupling through hydrogen bonding effects via the intercalated Asp bridge can drastically affect the partial charge distributions compared to the individual isolated structures. The

  1. Development of a 3D Coupled Physical-Biogeochemical Model for the Marseille Coastal Area (NW Mediterranean Sea): What Complexity Is Required in the Coastal Zone?

    PubMed Central

    Fraysse, Marion; Pinazo, Christel; Faure, Vincent Martin; Fuchs, Rosalie; Lazzari, Paolo; Raimbault, Patrick; Pairaud, Ivane

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial inputs (natural and anthropogenic) from rivers, the atmosphere and physical processes strongly impact the functioning of coastal pelagic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to develop a tool for the examination of these impacts on the Marseille coastal area, which experiences inputs from the Rhone River and high rates of atmospheric deposition. Therefore, a new 3D coupled physical/biogeochemical model was developed. Two versions of the biogeochemical model were tested, one model considering only the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles and a second model that also considers the phosphorus (P) cycle. Realistic simulations were performed for a period of 5 years (2007–2011). The model accuracy assessment showed that both versions of the model were able of capturing the seasonal changes and spatial characteristics of the ecosystem. The model also reproduced upwelling events and the intrusion of Rhone River water into the Bay of Marseille well. Those processes appeared to greatly impact this coastal oligotrophic area because they induced strong increases in chlorophyll-a concentrations in the surface layer. The model with the C, N and P cycles better reproduced the chlorophyll-a concentrations at the surface than did the model without the P cycle, especially for the Rhone River water. Nevertheless, the chlorophyll-a concentrations at depth were better represented by the model without the P cycle. Therefore, the complexity of the biogeochemical model introduced errors into the model results, but it also improved model results during specific events. Finally, this study suggested that in coastal oligotrophic areas, improvements in the description and quantification of the hydrodynamics and the terrestrial inputs should be preferred over increasing the complexity of the biogeochemical model. PMID:24324589

  2. DFT 2H quadrupolar coupling constants of ruthenium complexes: a good probe of the coordination of hydrides in conjuction with experiments.

    PubMed

    del Rosal, Iker; Gutmann, Torsten; Maron, Laurent; Jolibois, Franck; Chaudret, Bruno; Walaszek, Bernadeta; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Poteau, Romuald; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2009-07-21

    Transition metal (TM) hydrides are of great interest in chemistry because of their reactivity and their potential as catalysts for hydrogenation reactions. 2H solid-state NMR can be used in order to get information about the local environment of hydrogen atoms, and more particularly the coordination mode of hydrides in such complexes. In this work we will show that it is possible to establish at the level of density functional theory (DFT) a viable methodological strategy that allows the determination of 2H NMR parameters, namely the quadrupolar coupling constant (C(Q)) respectively the quadrupolar splitting (deltanuQ) and the asymmetry parameter (etaQ). The reliability of the method (B3PW91-DFT) and basis set effects have been first evaluated for simple organic compounds (benzene and fluorene). A good correlation between experimental and theoretical values is systematically obtained if the large basis set cc-pVTZ is used for the computations. 2H NMR properties of five mononuclear ruthenium complexes (namely Cp*RuD3(PPh3), Tp*RuD(THT)2, Tp*RuD(D2)(THT) and Tp*RuD(D2)2 and RuD2(D2)2(PCy3)2) which exhibit different ligands and hydrides involved in different coordination modes (terminal-H or eta2-H2), have been calculated and compared to previous experimental data. The results obtained are in excellent agreement with experiments. Although 2H NMR spectra are not always easy to analyze, assistance by quantum chemistry calculations allows unambiguous assignment of the signals of such spectra. As far as experiments can be achieved at very low temperatures in order to avoid dynamic effects, this hybrid theoretical/experimental tool may give useful insights in the context of the characterization of ruthenium surfaces or nanoparticles with solid-state NMR. PMID:19842483

  3. Development of a 3D coupled physical-biogeochemical model for the Marseille coastal area (NW Mediterranean Sea): what complexity is required in the coastal zone?

    PubMed

    Fraysse, Marion; Pinazo, Christel; Faure, Vincent Martin; Fuchs, Rosalie; Lazzari, Paolo; Raimbault, Patrick; Pairaud, Ivane

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial inputs (natural and anthropogenic) from rivers, the atmosphere and physical processes strongly impact the functioning of coastal pelagic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to develop a tool for the examination of these impacts on the Marseille coastal area, which experiences inputs from the Rhone River and high rates of atmospheric deposition. Therefore, a new 3D coupled physical/biogeochemical model was developed. Two versions of the biogeochemical model were tested, one model considering only the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles and a second model that also considers the phosphorus (P) cycle. Realistic simulations were performed for a period of 5 years (2007-2011). The model accuracy assessment showed that both versions of the model were able of capturing the seasonal changes and spatial characteristics of the ecosystem. The model also reproduced upwelling events and the intrusion of Rhone River water into the Bay of Marseille well. Those processes appeared to greatly impact this coastal oligotrophic area because they induced strong increases in chlorophyll-a concentrations in the surface layer. The model with the C, N and P cycles better reproduced the chlorophyll-a concentrations at the surface than did the model without the P cycle, especially for the Rhone River water. Nevertheless, the chlorophyll-a concentrations at depth were better represented by the model without the P cycle. Therefore, the complexity of the biogeochemical model introduced errors into the model results, but it also improved model results during specific events. Finally, this study suggested that in coastal oligotrophic areas, improvements in the description and quantification of the hydrodynamics and the terrestrial inputs should be preferred over increasing the complexity of the biogeochemical model. PMID:24324589

  4. Development of a 3D coupled physical-biogeochemical model for the Marseille coastal area (NW Mediterranean Sea): what complexity is required in the coastal zone?

    PubMed

    Fraysse, Marion; Pinazo, Christel; Faure, Vincent Martin; Fuchs, Rosalie; Lazzari, Paolo; Raimbault, Patrick; Pairaud, Ivane

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial inputs (natural and anthropogenic) from rivers, the atmosphere and physical processes strongly impact the functioning of coastal pelagic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to develop a tool for the examination of these impacts on the Marseille coastal area, which experiences inputs from the Rhone River and high rates of atmospheric deposition. Therefore, a new 3D coupled physical/biogeochemical model was developed. Two versions of the biogeochemical model were tested, one model considering only the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles and a second model that also considers the phosphorus (P) cycle. Realistic simulations were performed for a period of 5 years (2007-2011). The model accuracy assessment showed that both versions of the model were able of capturing the seasonal changes and spatial characteristics of the ecosystem. The model also reproduced upwelling events and the intrusion of Rhone River water into the Bay of Marseille well. Those processes appeared to greatly impact this coastal oligotrophic area because they induced strong increases in chlorophyll-a concentrations in the surface layer. The model with the C, N and P cycles better reproduced the chlorophyll-a concentrations at the surface than did the model without the P cycle, especially for the Rhone River water. Nevertheless, the chlorophyll-a concentrations at depth were better represented by the model without the P cycle. Therefore, the complexity of the biogeochemical model introduced errors into the model results, but it also improved model results during specific events. Finally, this study suggested that in coastal oligotrophic areas, improvements in the description and quantification of the hydrodynamics and the terrestrial inputs should be preferred over increasing the complexity of the biogeochemical model.

  5. A study of Cu turnover in proteins of the visceral complex of Littorina littorea by stable isotopic analysis using coupled HPLC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Mason, A Z; Borja, M R

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional HPLC system, tandemly coupled to an ICP-MS, has been used to study copper accumulation and turnover in the visceral complex cytosol of the gastropod, Littorina littorea. Animals were exposed for 8 weeks to NTA-buffered seawater containing stable isotopic 65Cu and then transferred to media containing stable isotopic 63Cu. The free ion activity of each isotope was maintained at 10(-11) M. Size exclusion (SE) HPLC showed Cu associated with haemocyanin (HC) and metallothionein-like (MT) proteins in two ligand pools with apparent molecular weights of >300 kDa and approximately 17 kDa, respectively. The MT pool was inducible by Cu, could assimilate the metal from both intrinsic and extrinsic sources and showed a higher rate of Cu accumulation and turnover than the HC pool. The induction of this pool also caused the sequestration and cytosolic redistribution of Zn, Cd, Pb, Mn and Co. Further fractionation of the MT pool by ion-exchange (IE) HPLC revealed that the Cu was associated with a single, major isoform of the protein that was Cu inducible and also bound trace quantities of Zn and Pb. A number of additional metal containing proteins were also resolved by IE. the most prominent of which also bound Pb, Mn and minor quantities of Zn. The significance of these findings in metal homeostasis and detoxification is discussed. PMID:12408587

  6. The spatial-functional coupling of box C/D and C'/D' RNPs is an evolutionarily conserved feature of the eukaryotic box C/D snoRNP nucleotide modification complex.

    PubMed

    Qu, Guosheng; van Nues, Rob W; Watkins, Nicholas J; Maxwell, E Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Box C/D ribonucleoprotein particles guide the 2'-O-ribose methylation of target nucleotides in both archaeal and eukaryotic RNAs. These complexes contain two functional centers, assembled around the C/D and C'/D' motifs in the box C/D RNA. The C/D and C'/D' RNPs of the archaeal snoRNA-like RNP (sRNP) are spatially and functionally coupled. Here, we show that similar coupling also occurs in eukaryotic box C/D snoRNPs. The C/D RNP guided 2'-O-methylation when the C'/D' motif was either mutated or ablated. In contrast, the C'/D' RNP was inactive as an independent complex. Additional experiments demonstrated that the internal C'/D' RNP is spatially coupled to the terminal box C/D complex. Pulldown experiments also indicated that all four core proteins are independently recruited to the box C/D and C'/D' motifs. Therefore, the spatial-functional coupling of box C/D and C'/D' RNPs is an evolutionarily conserved feature of both archaeal and eukaryotic box C/D RNP complexes.

  7. Polynuclear platinum phosphanido/phosphinito complexes: formation of P-O and P-O-P bonds through reductive coupling processes.

    PubMed

    Ara, Irene; Forniés, Juan; Ibáñez, Susana; Mastrorilli, Piero; Todisco, Stefano; Gallo, Vito

    2016-02-01

    A mixture of the asymmetric complexes of formula [(RF)2Pt(μ-Ph2PO)(μ-PPh2)Pt(μ-PPh2)2Pt(solv)(solv')] [(1-(solv)(solv')] (solv, solv' = acetone, H2O, CH3CN) has been prepared by reaction of [(RF)2Pt(II)(μ-PPh2)2Pt(II)(μ-PPh2)2Pt(II)(NCCH3)2] with AgClO4 in CH3CN/acetone. The lability of the Pt-solvent bonds allows the displacement of the coordinated solvent molecules by dppm or Cl(-) and the isolation of the tri- or hexanuclear phosphanido/phosphinito Pt(ii) complexes [(C6F5)2Pt(μ-PPh2)(μ-PPh2O)Pt(μ-PPh2)2Pt(dppm)] (2) or [NBu4]2[(C6F5)2Pt(μ-PPh2)(μ-PPh2O)Pt(μ-PPh2)2Pt(μ-Cl)2Pt(μ-PPh2)2Pt(μ-PPh2)(μ-PPh2O)Pt(C6F5)2] (as a mixture of the two possible isomers 4a and 4b). Complex 2 reacts with AgClO4 to form the tetranuclear derivative [(C6F5)2Pt(μ-PPh2)(μ-PPh2O)Pt(μ-PPh2)2Pt(dppm)Ag(OClO3)] (3), which displays two Pt-Ag donor-acceptor bonds. The mixture of the hexanuclear isomers 4a-4b reacts with Tl(acac) producing the acetylacetonato complex [NBu4][(C6F5)2Pt(μ-PPh2)(μ-PPh2O)Pt(μ-PPh2)2Pt(acac)] (5) which, upon reaction with HCl, yields back the mixture of 4a-4b. The reaction of 4a-4b with PPh3 produces [NBu4][(C6F5)2Pt(μ-PPh2)(μ-PPh2O)Pt(μ-PPh2)2Pt(Cl)(PPh3)] (6) as a mixture of isomers with the chloro ligand located syn (6a) or anti (6b) to the PPh2O(-) group. Either the reaction of 6 with AgClO4 or the treatment of 5 with HPPh3ClO4 results in the formation of the species [(C6F5)2Pt(II)(μ-PPh2)2Pt(I)(μ-PPh2OPPh2)Pt(I)(PPh3)] (7) (44 VEC), which can be explained as the consequence of a PPh2O/PPh2 reductive coupling and a rearrangement of ligands in the molecule generating a Pt(ii),Pt(i),Pt(i) compound. All complexes were characterised in the solid state by XRD (only one of the isomers, in the cases of 4 and 6) and in solution by NMR spectroscopy.

  8. Magnetic Interactions in the Copper Complex (L-Aspartato)(1,10-phenanthroline)copper(II) Hydrate. An Exchange-Coupled Extended System with Two Dissimilar Copper Ions.

    PubMed

    Brondino, Carlos D.; Calvo, Rafael; Atria, Ana María; Spodine, Evgenia; Nascimento, Otaciro R.; Peña, Octavio

    1997-07-01

    We report EPR measurements in single-crystal samples at the microwave frequencies 9.8 and 34.3 GHz and magnetic susceptibility measurements in polycrystalline samples for the ternary complex of copper with aspartic acid and phenanthroline, (L-aspartato)(1,10-phenanthroline)copper(II) hydrate. The crystal lattice of this compound is composed of two dissimilar copper ions identified as Cu(A) and Cu(B), which are in two types of copper chains called A and B, respectively, running parallel to the b crystal axis. The copper ions in the A chains are connected by the aspartic acid molecule, and those in the B chains by a chemical path that involves a carboxylate bridge and a hydrogen bond. Both chains are held together by a complex network of hydrogen bonds and by hydrophobic interactions between aromatic amines. Magnetic susceptibility data indicate a Curie-Weiss behavior in the studied temperature range (2-300 K). The EPR spectra at 9.8 GHz display a single exchange collapsed resonance for any magnetic field orientation, in the so-called strong exchange regime. Those at 34.3 GHz are within the so-called weak exchange regime and display two resonances which belong to each type of copper ion chain. The decoupling of the spectra at 34.3 GHz using a theory based on Anderson's model for the case of two weakly exchange coupled spins S = (1)/(2) allows one to obtain the angular variation of the squares of the g-factor and the peak-to-peak line width of each resonance. This model also allows one to evaluate the exchange parameter |J(AB)/k| = 2.7(6) mK associated with the chemical path connecting dissimilar copper ions. The line width data obtained for each component of the spectra at 34.3 GHz are analyzed in terms of a model based on Kubo and Tomita's theory, to obtain the exchange parameters |J(A)/k| = 0.77(2) K and |J(B)/k| = 1.44(2) K associated with the chemical paths connecting the similar copper ions of types A and B, respectively.

  9. Three-dimensional seismic structure and moment tensors of non-double-couple earthquakes at the Hengill-Grensdalur volcanic complex, Iceland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, A.D.; Julian, B.R.; Foulger, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    The volcanic and geothermal areas of Iceland are rich sources of non-double-couple (non-DC) earthquakes. A state-of-the-art digital seismometer network deployed at the Hengill-Grensdalur volcanic complex in 1991 recorded 4000 small earthquakes. We used the best recorded of these to determine 3-D VP and VP/VS structure tomographically and accurate earthquake moment tensors. The VP field is dominated by high seismic wave speed bodies interpreted as solidified intrusions. A widespread negative (-4 per cent) VP/VS anomaly in the upper 4 km correlates with the geothermal field, but is too strong to be caused solely by the effect of temperature upon liquid water or the presence of vapour, and requires in addition mineralogical or lithological differences between the geothermal reservoir and its surroundings. These may be caused by geothermal alteration. Well-constrained moment tensors were obtained for 70 of the best-recorded events by applying linear programming methods to P- and S-wave polarities and amplitude ratios. About 25 per cent of the mechanisms are, within observational error, consistent with DC mechanisms consistent with shear faulting. The other 75 per cent have significantly non-DC mechanisms. Many have substantial explosive components, one has a substantial implosive component, and the deviatoric component of many is strongly non-DC. Many of the non-DC mechanisms are consistent, within observational error, with simultaneous tensile and shear faulting. However, the mechanisms occupy a continuum in source-type parameter space and probably at least one additional source process is occurring. This may be fluid flow into newly formed cracks, causing partial compensation of the volumetric component. Studying non-shear earthquakes such as these has great potential for improving our understanding of geothermal processes and earthquake source processes in general.

  10. Raptor ablation in skeletal muscle decreases Cav1.1 expression and affects the function of the excitation-contraction coupling supramolecular complex.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rubén J; Mosca, Barbara; Treves, Susan; Maj, Marcin; Bergamelli, Leda; Calderon, Juan C; Bentzinger, C Florian; Romanino, Klaas; Hall, Michael N; Rüegg, Markus A; Delbono, Osvaldo; Caputo, Carlo; Zorzato, Francesco

    2015-02-15

    The protein mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase regulating a number of biochemical pathways controlling cell growth. mTOR exists in two complexes termed mTORC1 and mTORC2. Regulatory associated protein of mTOR (raptor) is associated with mTORC1 and is essential for its function. Ablation of raptor in skeletal muscle results in several phenotypic changes including decreased life expectancy, increased glycogen deposits and alterations of the twitch kinetics of slow fibres. In the present paper, we show that in muscle-specific raptor knockout (RamKO), the bulk of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is mainly associated in its cAMP-non-stimulated form with sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes. In addition, 3[H]-ryanodine and 3[H]-PN200-110 equilibrium binding show a ryanodine to dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) ratio of 0.79 and 1.35 for wild-type (WT) and raptor KO skeletal muscle membranes respectively. Peak amplitude and time to peak of the global calcium transients evoked by supramaximal field stimulation were not different between WT and raptor KO. However, the increase in the voltage sensor-uncoupled RyRs leads to an increase of both frequency and mass of elementary calcium release events (ECRE) induced by hyper-osmotic shock in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibres from raptor KO. The present study shows that the protein composition and function of the molecular machinery involved in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling is affected by mTORC1 signalling.

  11. The Very Large G-Protein-Coupled Receptor VLGR1: A Component of the Ankle Link Complex Required for the Normal Development of Auditory Hair Bundles

    PubMed Central

    McGee, JoAnn; Goodyear, Richard J.; McMillan, D. Randy; Stauffer, Eric A.; Holt, Jeffrey R.; Locke, Kirsten G.; Birch, David G.; Legan, P. Kevin; White, Perrin C.; Walsh, Edward J.; Richardson, Guy P.

    2009-01-01

    Sensory hair bundles in the inner ear are composed of stereocilia that can be interconnected by a variety of different link types, including tip links, horizontal top connectors, shaft connectors, and ankle links. The ankle link antigen is an epitope specifically associated with ankle links and the calycal processes of photoreceptors in chicks. Mass spectrometry and immunoblotting were used to identify this antigen as the avian ortholog of the very large G-protein-coupled receptor VLGR1, the product of the Usher syndrome USH2C (Mass1) locus. Like ankle links, Vlgr1 is expressed transiently around the base of developing hair bundles in mice. Ankle links fail to form in the cochleae of mice carrying a targeted mutation in Vlgr1 (Vlgr1/del7TM), and the bundles become disorganized just after birth. FM1-43 [N-(3-triethylammonium)propyl)-4-(4-(dibutylamino)styryl) pyridinium dibromide] dye loading and whole-cell recordings indicate mechanotransduction is impaired in cochlear, but not vestibular, hair cells of early postnatal Vlgr1/del7TM mutant mice. Auditory brainstem recordings and distortion product measurements indicate that these mice are severely deaf by the third week of life. Hair cells from the basal half of the cochlea are lost in 2-month-old Vlgr1/del7TM mice, and retinal function is mildly abnormal in aged mutants. Our results indicate that Vlgr1 is required for formation of the ankle link complex and the normal development of cochlear hair bundles. PMID:16775142

  12. Raptor ablation in skeletal muscle decreases Cav1.1 expression and affects the function of the excitation–contraction coupling supramolecular complex

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Rubén J.; Mosca, Barbara; Treves, Susan; Maj, Marcin; Bergamelli, Leda; Calderon, Juan C.; Bentzinger, C. Florian; Romanino, Klaas; Hall, Michael N.; Rüegg, Markus A.; Delbono, Osvaldo; Caputo, Carlo; Zorzato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The protein mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase regulating a number of biochemical pathways controlling cell growth. mTOR exists in two complexes termed mTORC1 and mTORC2. Regulatory associated protein of mTOR (raptor) is associated with mTORC1 and is essential for its function. Ablation of raptor in skeletal muscle results in several phenotypic changes including decreased life expectancy, increased glycogen deposits and alterations of the twitch kinetics of slow fibres. In the present paper, we show that in muscle-specific raptor knockout (RamKO), the bulk of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is mainly associated in its cAMP-non-stimulated form with sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes. In addition, 3[H]–ryanodine and 3[H]–PN200-110 equilibrium binding show a ryanodine to dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) ratio of 0.79 and 1.35 for wild-type (WT) and raptor KO skeletal muscle membranes respectively. Peak amplitude and time to peak of the global calcium transients evoked by supramaximal field stimulation were not different between WT and raptor KO. However, the increase in the voltage sensor-uncoupled RyRs leads to an increase of both frequency and mass of elementary calcium release events (ECRE) induced by hyper-osmotic shock in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibres from raptor KO. The present study shows that the protein composition and function of the molecular machinery involved in skeletal muscle excitation–contraction (E–C) coupling is affected by mTORC1 signalling. PMID:25431931

  13. Pure Optical Dephasing Dynamics in Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Matt; Fleming, Graham; Ma, Yingzhong; Green, Alexander A.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2011-01-01

    We report a detailed study of ultrafast exciton dephasing processes in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) employing a sample highly enriched in a single tube species, the (6,5) tube. Systematic measurements of femtosecond pump-probe, two-pulse photon echo and three-pulse photon echo peak shift over a broad range of excitation intensities and lattice temperature (from 4.4 to 292 K) enable us to quantify the timescales of pure optical dephasing (T 2 ), along with exciton-exciton and exciton-phonon scattering, environmental effects as well as spectral diffusion. While the exciton dephasing time (T2 ) increases from 205 fs at room temperature to 320 fs at 70 K, we found that further decrease of the lattice temperature leads to a shortening of the T2 times. This complex temperature dependence was found to arise from an enhanced relaxation of exciton population at lattice temperatures below 80 K. By quantitatively accounting the contribution from the population relaxation, the corresponding pure optical dephasing times increase monotonically from 225 fs at room temperature to 508 fs at 4.4 K. We further found that below 180 K, the inverse of the pure dephasing time (1/T 2 ) scales linearly with temperature with a slope of 6.7 0.6 eV/K, which suggests dephasing arising from one-phonon scattering (i.e. acoustic phonons). In view ofthe large dynamic disorder of the surrounding environment, the origin of the long room temperature pure dephasing time is proposed to result from reduced strength of exciton-phonon coupling by motional narrowing over nuclear fluctuations. This consideration further suggests the occurrence of remarkable initial exciton delocalization, and makes nanotubes ideal to study many-body effects in spatially confined systems.

  14. 1,5-Diamido-9,10-anthraquinone, a Centrosymmetric Redox-Active Bridge with Two Coupled β-Ketiminato Chelate Functions: Symmetric and Asymmetric Diruthenium Complexes.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mohd Asif; Mandal, Abhishek; Paretzki, Alexa; Beyer, Katharina; Fiedler, Jan; Kaim, Wolfgang; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The dinuclear complexes {(μ-H2L)[Ru(bpy)2]2}(ClO4)2 ([3](ClO4)2), {(μ-H2L)[Ru(pap)2]2}(ClO4)2 ([4](ClO4)2), and the asymmetric [(bpy)2Ru(μ-H2L)Ru(pap)2](ClO4)2 ([5](ClO4)2) were synthesized via the mononuclear species [Ru(H3L)(bpy)2]ClO4 ([1]ClO4) and [Ru(H3L)(pap)2]ClO4 ([2]ClO4), where H4L is the centrosymmetric 1,5-diamino-9,10-anthraquinone, bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, and pap is 2-phenylazopyridine. Electrochemistry of the structurally characterized [1]ClO4, [2]ClO4, [3](ClO4)2, [4](ClO4)2, and [5](ClO4)2 reveals multistep oxidation and reduction processes, which were analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of paramagnetic intermediates and by UV-vis-NIR spectro-electrochemistry. With support by time-dependent density functional theory (DFT) calculations the redox processes could be assigned. Significant results include the dimetal/bridging ligand mixed spin distribution in 3(3+) versus largely bridge-centered spin in 4(3+)-a result of the presence of Ru(II)-stabilizig pap coligands. In addition to the metal/ligand alternative for electron transfer and spin location, the dinuclear systems allow for the observation of ligand/ligand and metal/metal site differentiation within the multistep redox series. DFT-supported EPR and NIR absorption spectroscopy of the latter case revealed class II mixed-valence behavior of the oxidized asymmetric system 5(3+) with about equal contributions from a radical bridge formulation. In comparison to the analogues with the deprotonated 1,4-diaminoanthraquinone isomer the centrosymmetric H2L(2-) bridge shows anodically shifted redox potentials and weaker electronic coupling between the chelate sites. PMID:27171539

  15. 1,5-Diamido-9,10-anthraquinone, a Centrosymmetric Redox-Active Bridge with Two Coupled β-Ketiminato Chelate Functions: Symmetric and Asymmetric Diruthenium Complexes.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mohd Asif; Mandal, Abhishek; Paretzki, Alexa; Beyer, Katharina; Fiedler, Jan; Kaim, Wolfgang; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The dinuclear complexes {(μ-H2L)[Ru(bpy)2]2}(ClO4)2 ([3](ClO4)2), {(μ-H2L)[Ru(pap)2]2}(ClO4)2 ([4](ClO4)2), and the asymmetric [(bpy)2Ru(μ-H2L)Ru(pap)2](ClO4)2 ([5](ClO4)2) were synthesized via the mononuclear species [Ru(H3L)(bpy)2]ClO4 ([1]ClO4) and [Ru(H3L)(pap)2]ClO4 ([2]ClO4), where H4L is the centrosymmetric 1,5-diamino-9,10-anthraquinone, bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, and pap is 2-phenylazopyridine. Electrochemistry of the structurally characterized [1]ClO4, [2]ClO4, [3](ClO4)2, [4](ClO4)2, and [5](ClO4)2 reveals multistep oxidation and reduction processes, which were analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of paramagnetic intermediates and by UV-vis-NIR spectro-electrochemistry. With support by time-dependent density functional theory (DFT) calculations the redox processes could be assigned. Significant results include the dimetal/bridging ligand mixed spin distribution in 3(3+) versus largely bridge-centered spin in 4(3+)-a result of the presence of Ru(II)-stabilizig pap coligands. In addition to the metal/ligand alternative for electron transfer and spin location, the dinuclear systems allow for the observation of ligand/ligand and metal/metal site differentiation within the multistep redox series. DFT-supported EPR and NIR absorption spectroscopy of the latter case revealed class II mixed-valence behavior of the oxidized asymmetric system 5(3+) with about equal contributions from a radical bridge formulation. In comparison to the analogues with the deprotonated 1,4-diaminoanthraquinone isomer the centrosymmetric H2L(2-) bridge shows anodically shifted redox potentials and weaker electronic coupling between the chelate sites.

  16. Improving the WRF model's (version 3.6.1) simulation over sea ice surface through coupling with a complex thermodynamic sea ice model (HIGHTSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Huang, Jianbin; Luo, Yong; Zhao, Zongci

    2016-06-01

    Sea ice plays an important role in the air-ice-ocean interaction, but it is often represented simply in many regional atmospheric models. The Noah sea ice scheme, which is the only option in the current Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model (version 3.6.1), has a problem of energy imbalance due to its simplification in snow processes and lack of ablation and accretion processes in ice. Validated against the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) in situ observations, Noah underestimates the sea ice temperature which can reach -10 °C in winter. Sensitivity tests show that this bias is mainly attributed to the simulation within the ice when a time-dependent ice thickness is specified. Compared with the Noah sea ice model, the high-resolution thermodynamic snow and ice model (HIGHTSI) uses more realistic thermodynamics for snow and ice. Most importantly, HIGHTSI includes the ablation and accretion processes of sea ice and uses an interpolation method which can ensure the heat conservation during its integration. These allow the HIGHTSI to better resolve the energy balance in the sea ice, and the bias in sea ice temperature is reduced considerably. When HIGHTSI is coupled with the WRF model, the simulation of sea ice temperature by the original Polar WRF is greatly improved. Considering the bias with reference to SHEBA observations, WRF-HIGHTSI improves the simulation of surface temperature, 2 m air temperature and surface upward long-wave radiation flux in winter by 6, 5 °C and 20 W m-2, respectively. A discussion on the impact of specifying sea ice thickness in the WRF model is presented. Consistent with previous research, prescribing the sea ice thickness with observational information results in the best simulation among the available methods. If no observational information is available, we present a new method in which the sea ice thickness is initialized from empirical estimation and its further change is predicted by a complex thermodynamic

  17. Coupled Effects of a Perturbation in a Complex Structure Observed with SDO/AIA, SDO/HMI and ROSA/HARDcam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadavid, A. C.; Lawrence, J. K.; Christian, D. J.; Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.

    2012-12-01

    We study properties of intensity fluctuations in NOAA Active Region 11250 observed on 13 July 2011 starting at UT 13:32. Included are data obtained in the EUV bands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA) as well as nearly simultaneous observations of the chromosphere made, at much higher spatial and temporal resolution, with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) and Hydrogen-Alpha Rapid Dynamics camera (HARDcam) systems at the Dunn Solar Telescope. A complex structure seen in both the ROSA/HARDcam and SDO data sets comprises a system of loops extending outward from near the boundary of the leading sunspot umbra. It is visible in the ROSA Ca II K and HARDcam Hα images, as well as the SDO 304 Å, 171 Å and 193 Å channels, and it thus couples the chromosphere, transition region and corona. In the ground-based images the loop structure is 4.1 Mm long. Some 17.5 Mm, can be traced in the SDO/AIA data. The chromospheric emissions observed by ROSA and HARDcam appear to occupy the inner, and apparently cooler and lower, quarter of the loop. We compare the intensity fluctuations of two points within the structure. From alignment with SDO/HMI images we identify a point "A" near the loop structure, which sits directly above a bipolar magnetic feature in the photosphere. Point "B" is characteristic of locations within the loops that are visible in both the ROSA/HARDcam and the SDO/AIA data. The intensity traces for point A are quiet during the first part of the data string. At time ~ 19 min they suddenly begin a series of impulsive brightenings. In the 171 Å and 193 Å coronal lines the brightenings are localized impulses in time, but in the transition region line at 304 Å they are more extended in time. The intensity traces in the 304 Å line for point B shows a quasi-periodic signal that changes properties at about 19 min. The wavelet power spectra are characterized by two periodicities. A 6.7 min period

  18. Metal ion effect on the switch of mechanism from direct oxygen transfer to metal ion-coupled electron transfer in the sulfoxidation of thioanisoles by a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyun; Morimoto, Yuma; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2011-04-13

    The mechanism of sulfoxidation of thioaniosoles by a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex is switched from direct oxygen transfer to metal ion-coupled electron transfer by the presence of Sc(3+). The switch in the sulfoxidation mechanism is dependent on the one-electron oxidation potentials of thioanisoles. The rate of sulfoxidation is accelerated as much as 10(2)-fold by the addition of Sc(3+).

  19. Spin-lattice relaxation of ligand nuclei in slowly reorienting paramagnetic complexes in the electronic doublet spin state ( S = {1}/{2}). A theoretical approach for strongly coupled two-spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetis, Nikolas P.

    In this paper a general theory for treating the spin-lattice relaxation of a ligand nucleus (denoted by I) is derived for a metal complex in a doublet electron spin state ( S = {1}/{2}). The dipole-dipole SI interaction is treated for the case where the electron spin is also strongly coupled to the metal nucleus K. The SK interaction considered here is the hyperfine coupling, both scalar (SC) and dipolar (DD). The present theory is valid for slowly reorienting complexes in solution and can, furthermore, incorporate relaxation effects of the electron spin S, and the metal nucleus K due to processes which are faster than, and independent of, reorientation, i.e., for processes that fulfil the strong narrowing conditions. The effects of chemical exchange of the ligands and of anisotropic reorientation of the complex are also studied. Together with our previous studies of paramagnetic complexes with electron spin S ≧ 1, that have been recently reviewed by J. Kowalewski, L. Nordenskiöld, N. Benetis, and P. O. Westlund, ( Prog. NMR Spectrosc.17, 141 (1985)), the present work completes the elementary relaxation features of ligand nuclei of metal complexes in the slow motional regime. The present theory is shown to be more general than the theory of Bertini and co-workers ( J. Magn. Reson.59 , 213 (1984)), which can be obtained as a limit of the present approach by decoupling the reorientation from the motions of the S-K two spin system. The treatment of a strongly coupled two-spin system is emphasized since it provides a necessary step to the treatment of the relaxation of paramagnetic doublets.

  20. Synthesis and reactivity of silyl ruthenium complexes: the importance of trans effects in C-H activation, Si-C bond formation, and dehydrogenative coupling of silanes.

    PubMed

    Dioumaev, Vladimir K; Procopio, Leo J; Carroll, Patrick J; Berry, Donald H

    2003-07-01

    A series of octahedral ruthenium silyl hydride complexes, cis-(PMe(3))(4)Ru(SiR(3))H (SiR(3) = SiMe(3), 1a; SiMe(2)CH(2)SiMe(3), 1b; SiEt(3), 1c; SiMe(2)H, 1d), has been synthesized by the reaction of hydrosilanes with (PMe(3))(3)Ru(eta(2)-CH(2)PMe(2))H (5), cis-(PMe(3))(4)RuMe(2) (6), or (PMe(3))(4)RuH(2) (9). Reaction with 6 proceeds via an intermediate product, cis-(PMe(3))(4)Ru(SiR(3))Me (SiR(3) = SiMe(3), 7a; SiMe(2)CH(2)SiMe(3), 7b). Alternatively, 1 and 7 have been synthesized via a fast hydrosilane exchange with another cis-(PMe(3))(4)Ru(SiR(3))H or cis-(PMe(3))(4)Ru(SiR(3))Me, which occurs at a rate approaching the NMR time scale. Compounds 1a, 1b, 1d, and 7a adopt octahedral geometries in solution and the solid state with mutually cis silyl and hydride (or silyl and methyl) ligands. The longest Ru-P distance within a complex is always trans to Si, reflecting the strong trans influence of silicon. The aptitude of phosphine dissociation in these complexes has been probed in reactions of 1a, 1c, and 7a with PMe(3)-d(9) and CO. The dissociation is regioselective in the position trans to a silyl ligand (trans effect of Si), and the rate approaches the NMR time scale. A slower secondary process introduces PMe(3)-d(9) and CO in the other octahedral positions, most likely via nondissociative isomerization. The trans effect and trans influence in 7a are so strong that an equilibrium concentration of dissociated phosphine is detectable (approximately 5%) in solution of pure 7a. Compounds 1a-c also react with dihydrogen via regioselective dissociation of phosphine from the site trans to Si, but the final product, fac-(PMe(3))(3)Ru(SiR(3))H(3) (SiR(3) = SiMe(3), 4a; SiMe(2)CH(2)SiMe(3), 4b; SiEt(3), 4c), features hydrides cis to Si. Alternatively, 4a-c have been synthesized by photolysis of (PMe(3))(4)RuH(2) in the presence of a hydrosilane or by exchange of fac-(PMe(3))(3)Ru(SiR(3))H(3) with another HSiR(3). The reverse manifold - HH elimination from 4a and trapping

  1. Homogeneous and heterogenized Au(III) Schiff base-complexes as selective and general catalysts for self-coupling of aryl boronic acids.

    PubMed

    González-Arellano, C; Corma, A; Iglesias, M; Sánchez, F

    2005-04-21

    A series of homogeneous and heterogenized gold metal complexes show high activity and selectivity for the homocoupling of a large variety of aryl boronic acids, being of general utility for the synthesis of C2-symmetric biaryls.

  2. Spectroscopic and magnetic studies of erbium(III)-TEMPO complex as a potential single-molecule magnet: Interplay of the crystal-field and exchange coupling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbowiak, Mirosław; Rudowicz, Czesław; Nakamura, Takeshi; Murakami, Rina; Ishida, Takayuki

    2016-10-01

    Crystallographic, spectroscopic, and magnetic studies of three-center systems: lanthanoid-Ln3+ ions doubly-coordinated by TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl) radicals [Ln-TEMPO2] are reported. The temperature dependence of alternating-current magnetic susceptibility indicates the single-molecule-magnet behavior of Er-TEMPO2, exhibiting relatively slow magnetization relaxation. Well-resolved absorption spectra were obtained only for Er-TEMPO2. Other samples yielded spectra not amenable for meaningful interpretation. The crystal-field parameters (CFPs) determined from the measured Er3+-energy levels served as starting CFPs for fitting the direct-current magnetic susceptibility result. Compatibility of the so-determined and fine-tuned CFPs, and interplay between crystal-field-related effects and exchange-coupling effects are considered. Exchange couplings in Ln-TEMPO2 appear antiferromagnetic and unexpectedly large.

  3. Carbon-carbon cross-coupling reactions catalyzed by a two-coordinate nickel(II)-bis(amido) complex via observable Ni(I) , Ni(II) , and Ni(III) intermediates.

    PubMed

    Lipschutz, Michael I; Tilley, T Don

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the development of more sustainable catalytic systems based on abundant first-row metals, especially nickel, for cross-coupling reactions has attracted significant interest. One of the key intermediates invoked in these reactions is a Ni(III) -alkyl species, but no such species that is part of a competent catalytic cycle has yet been isolated. Herein, we report a carbon-carbon cross-coupling system based on a two-coordinate Ni(II) -bis(amido) complex in which a Ni(III) -alkyl species can be isolated and fully characterized. This study details compelling experimental evidence of the role played by this Ni(III) -alkyl species as well as those of other key Ni(I) and Ni(II) intermediates. The catalytic cycle described herein is also one of the first examples of a two-coordinate complex that competently catalyzes an organic transformation, potentially leading to a new class of catalysts based on the unique ability of first-row transition metals to accommodate two-coordinate complexes.

  4. Mono- and binuclear cyclometallated palladium(II) complexes containing bridging (N,O-) and terminal (N-) imidate ligands: air stable, thermally robust and recyclable catalysts for cross-coupling processes.

    PubMed

    Fairlamb, Ian J S; Kapdi, Anant R; Lee, Adam F; Sánchez, Gregorio; López, Gregorio; Serrano, José Luis; García, Luis; Pérez, José; Pérez, Eduardo

    2004-12-01

    Novel dinuclear cyclometallated palladium complexes [{Pd(mu-NCO)(C circumflex accent N)}(2)], containing asymmetric imidato -NCO- bridging units have been synthesised [C circumflex accent N = 7,8-benzoquinolyl; -NCO- = succinimidate (1c), phthalimidate (1a-3a) or maleimidate (3c)]. The reaction of these complexes, and the previously reported analogous imidate precursors containing a phenylazophenyl (1a-3a) or 2-pyridylphenyl (1b-3b) backbone, with tertiary phosphines provides novel mononuclear N-bonded imidate derivatives of the general formula [Pd(C circumflex accent N)(imidate)(L)][L = PPh(3), P(4-F-C(6)H(4))(3) or P(4-MeO-C(6)H(4))(3)]. The single crystal structures of [Pd(azb)(phthalimidate)(P(4-MeO-C(6)H(4))(3))](9a) and [Pd(bzq)(phthalimidate)(PPh(3))](7c) have been established. Dinuclear complexes (1a-3a, 1b-3b, 1c-3c) demonstrate outstanding thermal stability in the solid-state, as shown by thermoanalytical techniques. A marked influence of bridging imidate groups on the initial decomposition temperature is observed. The dinuclear and mononuclear derivatives are shown to be active catalysts/precatalysts for the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions of aryl bromides with aryl boronic acids, and the Sonogashira reactions of aryl halides with phenyl acetylene (in the presence and absence of Cu(I) salts). The conversions appear to be dependent, to some extent, on the type of imidate ligand, suggesting a role for these pseudohalides in the catalytic cycle in both cross-coupling processes. Lower catalyst loadings in 'copper-free' Sonogashira cross-couplings favour higher turnover frequencies. We have further determined that these catalysts may be recycled using a poly(ethylene oxide)(PEO)/methanol solvent medium in Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling. Once the reaction is complete, product extraction into a hexane/diethyl ether mixture (1 : 1, v/v) gives cross-coupled products in good yields (with purity > 95%). The polar phase can then be re-used several times

  5. Metal complexes stability constant determination by hyphenation of capillary electrophoresis with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: the case of 1:1 metal-to-ligand stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Petit, Jeremy; Geertsen, Valérie; Beaucaire, Catherine; Stambouli, Moncef

    2009-05-01

    Nuclear energy development has raised new issues like radionuclides biogeochemistry. The modelling of their biochemical properties involves the accurate determination of thermodynamical data, like stability constants. This can be achieved by using hyphenated capillary electrophoresis (CE)-ICPMS and the method was applied successfully on 1:1 lanthanum-oxalate and uranyl-oxalate complexes. Several significant steps are discussed: choice of analytical conditions, electrophoretic mobility calculation, mathematical treatment of experimental data by using linear regressions, ligand concentration and ionic strength corrections. The following values were obtained with a good precision for lanthanum-oxalate and uranyl-oxalate complexes: log(K degrees (LaOxa(+)))=6.10+/-0.10 and log(K degrees (UO(2)Oxa))=6.40+/-0.30, respectively, at infinite dilution. These values are consistent with the literature data, showing CE-ICPMS potential for metal complexes stability constants determination. PMID:19303078

  6. Convenient route leading to neutral fac-M(CO)3(NNO) complexes (M = Re, 99mTc) coupled to amine pharmacophores.

    PubMed

    Chiotellis, Aris; Tsoukalas, Charalambos; Pelecanou, Maria; Raptopoulou, Catherine; Terzis, Aris; Papadopoulos, Minas; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zetta; Pirmettis, Ioannis

    2008-04-01

    The synthesis and characterization of three neutral tricarbonyl fac-M(CO)3(NNO) (M = Re, (99m)Tc) complexes based on the picolylamine N,N-diacetic acid (PADA) ligand is reported. One of the two carboxylate groups of the PADA ligand is efficiently and conveniently derivatized with an amine nucleophile through the use of the PADA anhydride. In this work, aniline, benzylamine and pyrrolidine were used as model amine nucleophiles. The rhenium complexes were synthesized using the [NEt4]2[Re(CO)3Br3] precursor and fully characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic methods, and X-ray crystallography. The analogous technetium-99m complexes were also prepared quantitatively using the [(99m)Tc(CO)3(H2O)3](+) precursor. The reaction scheme presented for the synthesis of the fac-M(CO)3(NNO) (M = Re, (99m)Tc) complexes can be applied to the development of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals because, in principle, any bioactive pharmacophore bearing an amine group can be used in the place of the model amine nucleophiles. PMID:18293919

  7. Actin Filaments Are Involved in the Coupling of V0-V1 Domains of Vacuolar H+-ATPase at the Golgi Complex.

    PubMed

    Serra-Peinado, Carla; Sicart, Adrià; Llopis, Juan; Egea, Gustavo

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that actin-depolymerizing agents promote the alkalization of the Golgi stack and thetrans-Golgi network. The main determinant of acidic pH at the Golgi is the vacuolar-type H(+)-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase), whose V1domain subunitsBandCbind actin. We have generated a GFP-tagged subunitB2construct (GFP-B2) that is incorporated into the V1domain, which in turn is coupled to the V0sector. GFP-B2 subunit is enriched at distal Golgi compartments in HeLa cells. Subcellular fractionation, immunoprecipitation, and inversal FRAP experiments show that the actin depolymerization promotes the dissociation of V1-V0domains, which entails subunitB2translocation from Golgi membranes to the cytosol. Moreover, molecular interaction between subunitsB2andC1and actin were detected. In addition, Golgi membrane lipid order disruption byd-ceramide-C6 causes Golgi pH alkalization. We conclude that actin regulates the Golgi pH homeostasis maintaining the coupling of V1-V0domains of V-ATPase through the binding of microfilaments to subunitsBandCand preserving the integrity of detergent-resistant membrane organization. These results establish the Golgi-associated V-ATPase activity as the molecular link between actin and the Golgi pH. PMID:26872971

  8. Actin Filaments Are Involved in the Coupling of V0-V1 Domains of Vacuolar H+-ATPase at the Golgi Complex.

    PubMed

    Serra-Peinado, Carla; Sicart, Adrià; Llopis, Juan; Egea, Gustavo

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that actin-depolymerizing agents promote the alkalization of the Golgi stack and thetrans-Golgi network. The main determinant of acidic pH at the Golgi is the vacuolar-type H(+)-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase), whose V1domain subunitsBandCbind actin. We have generated a GFP-tagged subunitB2construct (GFP-B2) that is incorporated into the V1domain, which in turn is coupled to the V0sector. GFP-B2 subunit is enriched at distal Golgi compartments in HeLa cells. Subcellular fractionation, immunoprecipitation, and inversal FRAP experiments show that the actin depolymerization promotes the dissociation of V1-V0domains, which entails subunitB2translocation from Golgi membranes to the cytosol. Moreover, molecular interaction between subunitsB2andC1and actin were detected. In addition, Golgi membrane lipid order disruption byd-ceramide-C6 causes Golgi pH alkalization. We conclude that actin regulates the Golgi pH homeostasis maintaining the coupling of V1-V0domains of V-ATPase through the binding of microfilaments to subunitsBandCand preserving the integrity of detergent-resistant membrane organization. These results establish the Golgi-associated V-ATPase activity as the molecular link between actin and the Golgi pH.

  9. Cost effective, robust, and reliable coupled separation techniques for the identification and quantification of phospholipids in complex biological matrices: application to insects.

    PubMed

    Zahradníčková, Helena; Tomčala, Aleš; Berková, Petra; Schneedorferová, Ivana; Okrouhlík, Jan; Simek, Petr; Hodková, Magdalena

    2014-08-01

    The quantification of phospholipid classes and the determination of their molecular structures are crucial in physiological and medical studies. This paper's target analytes are cell membrane phospholipids, which play an important role in the seasonal acclimation processes of poikilothermic organisms. We introduce a set of simple and cost-effective analytical methods that enable efficient characterization and quantification of particular phospholipid classes and the identification and relative distribution of the individual phospholipid species. The analytical approach involves solid-phase extraction and high-performance thin-layer chromatography, which facilitate the separation of particular lipid classes. The obtained fractions are further transesterified to fatty acid methyl esters and subjected to gas chromatography coupled to flame ionization detection, which enables the determination of the position of double bonds. Phospholipid species separation is achieved by high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, which gives information about the headgroup moiety and attached fatty acids. The total content of each phospholipids class is assessed by phosphorus determination by UV spectrophotometry. The simultaneous analysis of phosphorus, fatty acid residues, and phospholipid species provides detailed information about phospholipid composition. Evaluation of these coupled methods was achieved by application to an insect model, Pyrrhocoris apterus. High correlation was observed between fatty acid compositions as determined by gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. PMID:24799084

  10. Is it important to characterize complex patterns of riverbed hydraulic conductivities for assessing river-aquifer exchange fluxes? An evaluation with an integrated fully coupled hydrological model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qi; Kurtz, Wolfgang; Schilling, Oliver; Brunner, Philip; Vereecken, Harry; Hendricks Franssen, Harrie-Jan

    2016-04-01

    Riverbed hydraulic conductivity is a critical parameter for the prediction of exchange fluxes between groundwater and surface water bodies. It was found in previous studies that it is important to characterize heterogeneity of riverbed hydraulic conductivity. In this context, we also investigated in the past whether the heterogeneity pattern of riverbed hydraulic conductivities (i.e., multiGaussian, different types of non-multiGaussian patterns) plays an important role. It was found that the heterogeneity pattern does not matter so much. However, these past studies were conducted with the subsurface hydrological model SPRING which only considers one way coupling and only vertical fluxes through the river-aquifer interface. In this study, the role of patterns was further explored using the fully coupled hydrological model HydroGeoSphere. A synthetic 3-D river-aquifer model was set up with a heterogeneous riverbed showing non-multiGaussian patterns in the form of meandering channels as the reference field. Data assimilation experiments were carried out with help of the Ensemble Kalman Filter to characterize the heterogeneous riverbed. The data assimilation experiments were conducted for four types of riverbed hydraulic conductivity (K) fields: (i) spatially homogeneous, (ii) heterogeneous with multiGaussian distribution, (iii) heterogeneous with non-multiGaussian distribution (channelized structures) and (iv) heterogeneous with non-multiGaussian distribution (elliptic structures). For all the data assimilation scenarios, state variables and riverbed K were updated by assimilating piezometric heads. The experiments were repeated for ten reference fields. Results show that for all prior geostatistical models data assimilation was able to reduce the difference between simulated and measured hydraulic heads, and to improve the characterization of riverbed hydraulic conductivities and river-aquifer exchange fluxes. Results were slightly better for non-multiGaussian fields

  11. Simple deterministic models and applications. Comment on "Coupled disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks: A review" by Z. Wang et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyun Mo

    2015-12-01

    Currently, discrete modellings are largely accepted due to the access to computers with huge storage capacity and high performance processors and easy implementation of algorithms, allowing to develop and simulate increasingly sophisticated models. Wang et al. [7] present a review of dynamics in complex networks, focusing on the interaction between disease dynamics and human behavioral and social dynamics. By doing an extensive review regarding to the human behavior responding to disease dynamics, the authors briefly describe the complex dynamics found in the literature: well-mixed populations networks, where spatial structure can be neglected, and other networks considering heterogeneity on spatially distributed populations. As controlling mechanisms are implemented, such as social distancing due 'social contagion', quarantine, non-pharmaceutical interventions and vaccination, adaptive behavior can occur in human population, which can be easily taken into account in the dynamics formulated by networked populations.

  12. Enzyme-mediated site-specific bioconjugation of metal complexes to proteins: sortase-mediated coupling of copper-64 to a single-chain antibody.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Brett M; Alt, Karen; Jeffery, Charmaine M; Price, Roger I; Jagdale, Shweta; Rigby, Sheena; Williams, Charlotte C; Peter, Karlheinz; Hagemeyer, Christoph E; Donnelly, Paul S

    2014-06-10

    The enzyme-mediated site-specific bioconjugation of a radioactive metal complex to a single-chain antibody using the transpeptidase sortase A is reported. Cage amine sarcophagine ligands that were designed to function as substrates for the sortase A mediated bioconjugation to antibodies were synthesized and enzymatically conjugated to a single-chain variable fragment. The antibody fragment scFv(anti-LIBS) targets ligand-induced binding sites (LIBS) on the glycoprotein receptor GPIIb/IIIa, which is present on activated platelets. The immunoconjugates were radiolabeled with the positron-emitting isotope (64)Cu. The new radiolabeled conjugates were shown to bind selectively to activated platelets. The diagnostic potential of the most promising conjugate was demonstrated in an in vivo model of carotid artery thrombosis using positron emission tomography. This approach gives homogeneous products through site-specific enzyme-mediated conjugation and should be broadly applicable to other metal complexes and proteins. PMID:24777818

  13. A Field-Scale Reactive Transport Model for U(VI) Migration Influenced by Coupled Multirate Mass Transfer and Surface Complexation Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Prommer, Henning; Greskowiak, Janek; Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; Rockhold, Mark L.

    2010-05-06

    A field-scale reactive transport model was developed that incorporates laboratory-characterized U(VI) surface complexation reactions (SCR) and multi-rate mass transfer processes, and field-measured hydrogeochemical conditions at Department of Energy, Hanford 300A site, Washington, where an Integrated Field Research Challenge project is ongoing. The model was used to assess the importance of multi-rate mass transfer processes on sorption-retarded U(VI) reactive transport at the 300A site and to evaluate the effect of variable geochemical conditions on U(VI) plume migration caused by dynamic river stage fluctuations at the east side of the site. Model simulations revealed a complex spatio-temporal variations of groundwater geochemistry that affects U(VI) speciation, adsorption, and plume migration. In general, the river water intrusion enhances uranium adsorption and lowers groundwater aqueous uranium concentration as a result of river water dilution that decreases aqueous carbonate concentration, which subsequently weakens aqueous U(VI)-carbonate complexation and enhances U(VI)-surface complexation. The simulations also found that SCR-retarded U migration becomes more dynamic and more in sync with the groundwater flow field when multi-rate mass transfer processes are involved. Strong U(VI) adsorption was simulated at the 300A site based on the field-measured hydrogeochemical conditions, suggesting a slow dissipation of U(VI) plume, a phenomenon consistent with the observation at the site. Uranium breakthrough curves at selected observation points and the mass changes over time in the simulation indicate that uranium adsorption/desorption never attains steady state as a result of both the highly dynamic flow field and the chemistry variations caused by river water intrusion. Thus, the multi-rate SCM model appears to be a crucial feature for future reactive transport simulations of uranium at the 300A site.

  14. High-Order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) Method for Wave Propagation Simulation in Complex Geophysical Media - Elastic, Acoustic and Hydro-Acoustic - an Unifying Framework to Couple Continuous Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sébastien, T.; Vilotte, J. P.; Guillot, L.; Mariotti, C.

    2014-12-01

    Today seismological observation systems combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna that provide complementary observations of source-radiated waves in heterogeneous and complex geophysical media. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-physics - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasonic - wave simulation methods. A popular approach is the Spectral Element Method (SEM) (Chaljub et al, 2006) which is high-order accurate (low dispersion error), very flexible to parallelization and computationally attractive due to efficient sum factorization technique and diagonal mass matrix. However SEMs suffer from lack of flexibility in handling complex geometry and multi-physics wave propagation. High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods (DGMs), i.e. Dumbser et al (2006), Etienne et al. (2010), Wilcox et al (2010), are recent alternatives that can handle complex geometry, space-and-time adaptativity, and allow efficient multi-physics wave coupling at interfaces. However, DGMs are more memory demanding and less computationally attractive than SEMs, especially when explicit time stepping is used. We propose a new class of higher-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Elements (HDGSEM) methods for spatial discretization of wave equations, following the unifying framework for hybridization of Cockburn et al (2009) and Nguyen et al (2011), which allows for a single implementation of conforming and non-conforming SEMs. When used with energy conserving explicit time integration schemes, HDGSEM is flexible to handle complex geometry, computationally attractive and has significantly less degrees of freedom than classical DGMs, i.e., the only coupled unknowns are the single-valued numerical traces of the velocity field on the element's faces. The formulation can be extended to model fractional energy loss at interfaces between elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic media. Accuracy and performance of the HDGSEM are illustrated and

  15. The CD4 and CD8 antigens are coupled to a protein-tyrosine kinase (p56lck) that phosphorylates the CD3 complex.

    PubMed Central

    Barber, E K; Dasgupta, J D; Schlossman, S F; Trevillyan, J M; Rudd, C E

    1989-01-01

    Many mammalian receptors have been found to regulate cell growth by virtue of a protein-tyrosine kinase domain in their cytoplasmic tail. We recently described an association of the CD4 antigen with a T-cell-specific protein-tyrosine kinase (p56lck; formerly termed pp58lck; EC 2.7.1.112). This interaction represents a potential mechanism by which T-cell growth may be regulated and offers a model by which other members of the src family (products of c-src, c-yes, c-fgr, etc.) may interact with mammalian growth factor receptors. As in the case of the CD4 antigen, the CD8 antigen appears to serve as a receptor for nonpolymorphic regions of products of the major histocompatibility complex and has been implicated in the regulation of T-cell growth. In this study, we reveal that the human CD8 antigen is also associated with the T-cell-specific protein-tyrosine kinase (p56lck). The associated p56lck kinase was detected by use of both in vitro and in vivo labeling regimes using an antiserum to the C terminus of p56lck. Two-dimensional nonequilibrium pH-gradient gel electrophoresis and sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated the similarity of p56lck to the protein-tyrosine kinase associated with the CD4 antigen. The catalytic activity of p56lck was revealed by the autophosphorylation of the 55- to 60-kDa kinase and the occasional labeling of a 35-kDa protein. Last, we demonstrate directly that members of the CD3 complex, including the gamma, delta, and epsilon chains, as well as a putative zeta subunit, can be phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by the CD4/CD8.p56lck complex. Images PMID:2470098

  16. Using coupled micropillar compression and micro-Laue diffraction to investigate deformation mechanisms in a complex metallic alloy Al13Co4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Ayan; Dolbnya, Igor P.; Britton, T. Ben; Jones, Nicholas G.; Sernicola, Giorgio; Walter, Claudia; Gille, Peter; Dye, David; Clegg, William J.; Giuliani, Finn

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have used in-situ micro-Laue diffraction combined with micropillar compression of focused ion beam milled Al13Co4 complex metallic alloy to investigate the evolution of deformation in Al13Co4. Streaking of the Laue spots shows that the onset of plastic flow occurs at stresses as low as 0.8 GPa, although macroscopic yield only becomes apparent at 2 GPa. The measured misorientations, obtained from peak splitting, enable the geometrically necessary dislocation density to be estimated as 1.1 × 1013 m-2.

  17. Adenosine A1 receptors heterodimerize with β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors creating novel receptor complexes with altered G protein coupling and signaling.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekera, P Charukeshi; Wan, Tina C; Gizewski, Elizabeth T; Auchampach, John A; Lasley, Robert D

    2013-04-01

    G protein coupled receptors play crucial roles in mediating cellular responses to external stimuli, and increasing evidence suggests that they function as multiple units comprising homo/heterodimers and hetero-oligomers. Adenosine and β-adrenergic receptors are co-expressed in numerous tissues and mediate important cellular responses to the autocoid adenosine and sympathetic stimulation, respectively. The present study was undertaken to examine whether adenosine A1ARs heterodimerize with β1- and/or β2-adrenergic receptors (β1R and β2R), and whether such interactions lead to functional consequences. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies with differentially epitope-tagged A1, β1, and β2 receptors transiently co-expressed in HEK-293 cells indicate that A1AR forms constitutive heterodimers with both β1R and β2R. This heterodimerization significantly influenced orthosteric ligand binding affinity of both β1R and β2R without altering ligand binding properties of A1AR. Receptor-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation significantly increased in cells expressing A1AR/β1R and A1AR/β2R heteromers. β-Receptor-mediated cAMP production was not altered in A1AR/β1R expressing cells, but was significantly reduced in the A1AR/β2R cells. The inhibitory effect of the A1AR on cAMP production was abrogated in both A1AR/β1R and A1AR/β2R expressing cells in response to the A1AR agonist CCPA. Co-immunoprecipitation studies conducted with human heart tissue lysates indicate that endogenous A1AR, β1R, and β2R also form heterodimers. Taken together, our data suggest that heterodimerization between A1 and β receptors leads to altered receptor pharmacology, functional coupling, and intracellular signaling pathways. Unique and differential receptor cross-talk between these two important receptor families may offer the opportunity to fine-tune crucial signaling responses and development of more specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:23291003

  18. Lattice-Modulated Phase Transition Coupled with Redox-Isomeric Interconversion of o-Semiquinone-Catecholato into Bis(o-semiquinonato) Cobalt Complexes.

    PubMed

    Bubnov, Michael P; Skorodumova, Nina A; Arapova, Alla V; Smirnova, Natalia N; Samsonov, Maxim A; Fukin, Georgy K; Cherkasov, Vladimir K; Abakumov, Gleb A

    2015-08-17

    Two redox-isomeric (valence tautomeric) complexes (2,2'-bpy)Co(3,6-DBSQ)2 (1) and (1,10-phen)Co(3,6-DBSQ)2 (2) (where 2,2'-bpy = 2,2'-dipyridine; 1,10-phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; 3,6-DBSQ = 3,6-di-tert-butyl-benzosemiquinone-1,2) reveal phase transitions that accompany redox-isomeric interconversions of semiquinone-catecholato isomer into a bis-(semiquinonato) one. Phase transitions differ one from another by thermodynamic parameters (transition temperature and interval, enthalpy, and entropy). Complexes 1 and 2 have the same crystal system and space group, and they form solid solutions with any molar ratio. The number of solid solutions with the molar ratios of 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, 1:4, 1:8, and 1:16 of 1 per 2, respectively, were obtained. Product with 1:1 ratio was studied by precise calorimetry, by variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility, and by X-ray structural analysis. All solid solutions were investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry. Each solid solution possesses phase transition whose parameters depend on its composition. Transition temperature and enthalpy gradually grow with increasing of molar fraction of 1. The diagram "enthalpy-composition" is linear, whereas phase diagram "transition temperature-composition" is the bent-up arc.

  19. A cyclometalated resting state for a reactive molybdenum amide: Favorable consequences of {beta}-hydrogen elimination including reductive cleavage, coupling, and complexation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Y.C.; Johnson, M.J.A.; Mindiola, D.J.; Cummins, C.C.; Klooster, W.T.; Koetzle, T.F.

    1999-11-10

    Dimethylamide ligation of molybdenum(III) supports Mo{triple{underscore}bond}Mo triple bond formation, and N-tert-butylanilide ligation engenders reactive yet isolable monomeric three-coordination derivatives, it is now shown that ligation of Mo(III) by N-isopropylanilide gives rise to the cyclometalated{sup 4} ({beta}-H eliminated) species Mo(H)({eta}{sup 2}-Me{sub 3}C{double{underscore}bond}NAr)(N[{sup i}Pr]Ar){sub 2} (1, Ar = 3,5-C{sub 6}H{sub 3}Me{sub 2}), which can be thought of alternatively as an imine complex or as a metallaziridine derivative. {beta}-H elimination for complexes of organoamide ligands is a rarely documented phenomenon. Compound 1, which is freely soluble in hydrocarbon and ethereal solvents, was obtained as a brown solid in 70% yield from the reaction of Li(N[{sup i}Pr]Ar)(OEt{sub 2}) with MoCl{sub 3}(THF){sub 3}.

  20. Lattice-Modulated Phase Transition Coupled with Redox-Isomeric Interconversion of o-Semiquinone-Catecholato into Bis(o-semiquinonato) Cobalt Complexes.

    PubMed

    Bubnov, Michael P; Skorodumova, Nina A; Arapova, Alla V; Smirnova, Natalia N; Samsonov, Maxim A; Fukin, Georgy K; Cherkasov, Vladimir K; Abakumov, Gleb A

    2015-08-17

    Two redox-isomeric (valence tautomeric) complexes (2,2'-bpy)Co(3,6-DBSQ)2 (1) and (1,10-phen)Co(3,6-DBSQ)2 (2) (where 2,2'-bpy = 2,2'-dipyridine; 1,10-phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; 3,6-DBSQ = 3,6-di-tert-butyl-benzosemiquinone-1,2) reveal phase transitions that accompany redox-isomeric interconversions of semiquinone-catecholato isomer into a bis-(semiquinonato) one. Phase transitions differ one from another by thermodynamic parameters (transition temperature and interval, enthalpy, and entropy). Complexes 1 and 2 have the same crystal system and space group, and they form solid solutions with any molar ratio. The number of solid solutions with the molar ratios of 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, 1:4, 1:8, and 1:16 of 1 per 2, respectively, were obtained. Product with 1:1 ratio was studied by precise calorimetry, by variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility, and by X-ray structural analysis. All solid solutions were investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry. Each solid solution possesses phase transition whose parameters depend on its composition. Transition temperature and enthalpy gradually grow with increasing of molar fraction of 1. The diagram "enthalpy-composition" is linear, whereas phase diagram "transition temperature-composition" is the bent-up arc. PMID:26230912

  1. Successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication spectrophotometric method for determination of hydroquinone in complex mixture with its degradation products, tretinoin and methyl paraben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elghobashy, Mohamed R.; Bebawy, Lories I.; Shokry, Rafeek F.; Abbas, Samah S.

    2016-03-01

    A sensitive and selective stability-indicating successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication (SRS-CM) spectrophotometric method was studied and developed for the spectrum resolution of five component mixture without prior separation. The components were hydroquinone in combination with tretinoin, the polymer formed from hydroquinone alkali degradation, 1,4 benzoquinone and the preservative methyl paraben. The proposed method was used for their determination in their pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The zero order absorption spectra of hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben were determined at 293, 357.5, 245 and 255.2 nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges of 4.00-46.00, 1.00-7.00, 0.60-5.20, and 1.00-7.00 μg mL- 1 for hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben, respectively. The pharmaceutical formulation was subjected to mild alkali condition and measured by this method resulting in the polymerization of hydroquinone and the formation of toxic 1,4 benzoquinone. The proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the reported method.

  2. Online Extraction Coupled to Liquid Chromatography Analysis (OLE-LC): Eliminating Traditional Sample Preparation Steps in the Investigation of Solid Complex Matrices.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Vinícius G; Leme, Gabriel M; Cavalheiro, Alberto J; Funari, Cristiano S

    2016-09-01

    Current methods employed for the analysis of the chemical composition of solid matrices (such as plant, animal, or human tissues; soil; etc.) often require many sample treatment steps, including an extraction step with exclusively dedicated solvents. This work describes an optimized analytical setup in which the extraction of a solid sample is directly coupled to its analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. This approach avoids (i) the use of pumps and valves other than those comprising the HPLC instrument, (ii) the use of solvents other than those of the mobile phase, and (iii) the need to stop the mobile phase flow at any time during the full analytical procedure. The compatibility of this approach with the direct analysis of fresh tissues (leaves, stems, and seeds of four plant species with dissimilar chemical compositions) was successfully demonstrated, leading to the elimination of sample preparation steps such as drying, grinding, concentration, dilution, and filtration, among others. This work describes a new, simple, and efficient green approach to minimize or eliminate sample treatment procedures. It could be easily applied for quality control of plant materials and their derived products through chromatographic fingerprints and for untargeted metabolomic investigations of solid matrices, among other applications. PMID:27494768

  3. Doubly TEMPO-coordinated gadolinium(III), lanthanum(III), and yttrium(III) complexes. Strong superexchange coupling across rare earth ions.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Rina; Nakamura, Takeshi; Ishida, Takayuki

    2014-04-21

    We prepared crystalline [RE(III)(hfac)3(TEMPO)2] (RE = Gd, La, Y), where TEMPO and hfac stand for 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl and 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoropentane-2,4-dionate, respectively. The X-ray crystal structure of TEMPO-coordinated RE compounds was determined for the first time. The Gd and Y analogues are isomorphous, and the La derivative has a similar molecular skeleton. The Gd-O(TEMPO) bond lengths were 2.322(3) and 2.354(3) Å with the O-Gd-O angle of 140.36(11)°. The magnetic study clarified that [Gd(hfac)3(TEMPO)2] behaved as a ground Stotal = 7/2 species. The La and Y analogues showed the superexchange interactions across the diamagnetic ions with 2JTEMPO1-TEMPO2/kB = -14.9(1) and -49.8(2) K, respectively. Assuming the presence of a similar interaction like the Y derivative, the Gd-TEMPO exchange couplings are estimated with 2JGd-TEMPO/kB = -12.9(5) and +8.0(6) K.

  4. Membrane-bound MinDE complex acts as a toggle switch that drives Min oscillation coupled to cytoplasmic depletion of MinD.

    PubMed

    Vecchiarelli, Anthony G; Li, Min; Mizuuchi, Michiyo; Hwang, Ling Chin; Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi

    2016-03-15

    The Escherichia coli Min system self-organizes into a cell-pole to cell-pole oscillator on the membrane to prevent divisions at the cell poles. Reconstituting the Min system on a lipid bilayer has contributed to elucidating the oscillatory mechanism. However, previous in vitro patterns were attained with protein densities on the bilayer far in excess of those in vivo and failed to recapitulate the standing wave oscillations observed in vivo. Here we studied Min protein patterning at limiting MinD concentrations reflecting the in vivo conditions. We identified "burst" patterns--radially expanding and imploding binding zones of MinD, accompanied by a peripheral ring of MinE. Bursts share several features with the in vivo dynamics of the Min system including standing wave oscillations. Our data support a patterning mechanism whereby the MinD-to-MinE ratio on the membrane acts as a toggle switch: recruiting and stabilizing MinD on the membrane when the ratio is high and releasing MinD from the membrane when the ratio is low. Coupling this toggle switch behavior with MinD depletion from the cytoplasm drives a self-organized standing wave oscillator.

  5. Successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication spectrophotometric method for determination of hydroquinone in complex mixture with its degradation products, tretinoin and methyl paraben.

    PubMed

    Elghobashy, Mohamed R; Bebawy, Lories I; Shokry, Rafeek F; Abbas, Samah S

    2016-03-15

    A sensitive and selective stability-indicating successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication (SRS-CM) spectrophotometric method was studied and developed for the spectrum resolution of five component mixture without prior separation. The components were hydroquinone in combination with tretinoin, the polymer formed from hydroquinone alkali degradation, 1,4 benzoquinone and the preservative methyl paraben. The proposed method was used for their determination in their pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The zero order absorption spectra of hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben were determined at 293, 357.5, 245 and 255.2 nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges of 4.00-46.00, 1.00-7.00, 0.60-5.20, and 1.00-7.00 μg mL(-1) for hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben, respectively. The pharmaceutical formulation was subjected to mild alkali condition and measured by this method resulting in the polymerization of hydroquinone and the formation of toxic 1,4 benzoquinone. The proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the reported method. PMID:26745510

  6. A characterization of the coupled evolution of grain fabric and pore space using complex networks: Pore connectivity and optimized flows in the presence of shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Scott; Walker, David M.; Tordesillas, Antoinette

    2016-03-01

    A framework for the multiscale characterization of the coupled evolution of the solid grain fabric and its associated pore space in dense granular media is developed. In this framework, a pseudo-dual graph transformation of the grain contact network produces a graph of pores which can be readily interpreted as a pore space network. Survivability, a new metric succinctly summarizing the connectivity of the solid grain and pore space networks, measures material robustness. The size distribution and the connectivity of pores can be characterized quantitatively through various network properties. Assortativity characterizes the pore space with respect to the parity of the number of particles enclosing the pore. Multiscale clusters of odd parity versus even parity contact cycles alternate spatially along the shear band: these represent, respectively, local jamming and unjamming regions that continually switch positions in time throughout the failure regime. Optimal paths, established using network shortest paths in favor of large pores, provide clues on preferential paths for interstitial matter transport. In systems with higher rolling resistance at contacts, less tortuous shortest paths thread through larger pores in shear bands. Notably the structural patterns uncovered in the pore space suggest that more robust models of interstitial pore flow through deforming granular systems require a proper consideration of the evolution of in situ shear band and fracture patterns - not just globally, but also inside these localized failure zones.

  7. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1989-04-25

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  8. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1982-03-17

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the U sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  9. Coupling of the 99mtechnetium-nitrido group to monoclonal antibody and use of the complexes for the detection of tumors in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kanellos, J.; Pietersz, G.A.; McKenzie, I.F.; Bonnyman, J.; Baldas, J.

    1986-08-01

    The in vivo detection of tumors by immunoscintigraphy using /sup 99m/Tc labelled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) was explored in this study. A simple method for the labelling of microgram quantities of MoAb with /sup 99m/Tc based on the substitution reaction of MoAb and /sup 99m/TcNCl/sub 4//sup -/ is described. The selective activity of the /sup 99m/technetium-nitrido-MoAb (/sup 99m/TcN-MoAb) complexes was proved in vitro by a binding assay with different target cells. The /sup 99m/TcN-MoAb complexes were shown to bind reactive cells up to 20 times more avidly than nonreactive cells. The specificity of the /sup 99m/TcN-MoAb complexes was shown in vivo. (C57BL/6 X BALB/c)F1 mice bearing palpable tumors (0.3-1.5 cm in diameter) were given an iv injection of 1 of 2 MoAb (one reactive and the other nonreactive) identically labeled with /sup 99m/TcNCl/sub 4//sup -/ and then scanned with a gamma camera, and/or the tissues were removed and the localization of /sup 99m/Tc-nitrido group-labeled MoAb was measured. Tumor localization of the reactive MoAb (1.8-2.2% of the injected dose) was four times greater than that of the nonreactive /sup 99m/TcN-MoAb (0.3-0.4% of the injected dose). The localization of specific /sup 99m/TcN-MoAb to a murine thymoma was observed in the gamma camera image at just 2 hours after injection. At 27 hours, tumors could readily be detected by /sup 99m/TcN-MoAb without the need for background subtraction. Nonreactive /sup 99m/TcN-MoAb did not image the tumors. The use of /sup 99m/TcN-MoAb offers substantial improvement over radioiodinated (/sup 125/I or /sup 131/I) MoAb for the detection of tumors. The use of /sup 99m/TcNCl/sub 4//sup -/ as a labeling agent results in /sup 99m/Tc-labeled MoAb with high specific activity and specificity when compared with the specific activity and specificity of the /sup 99m/Tc-MoAb prepared by using the conventional SnCl/sub 2/ reduction of pertechnetate.

  10. Development of new portable miniaturize solid phase microextraction of silver-APDC complex using micropipette tip in-syringe system couple with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi; Samoon, Muhammad Kashif

    2016-02-01

    An innovative and simple miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPME) method, was developed for preconcentration and determination of silver(I) in the fresh and waste water samples. For M-SPME, a micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth (ACC) as sorbent, in a syringe system. The size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC before and after adsorption of analyte have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), was drawn into the syringe filled with ACC and dispensed manually for 2 to 10 aspirating/dispensing cycle. Then the Ag- complex sorbed on the ACC in micropipette was quantitatively eluted by drawing and dispensing of different concentrations of acids for 2 to 5 aspirating/dispensing cycles. The extracted Ag ions with modifier were injected directly into the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency, including the concentration of ligand, pH, sample volume, eluent type, concentration and volume was investigated. Validity and accuracy of the developed method was checked by the standard addition method. Reliability of the proposed methodology was checked by the relative standard deviation (%RSD), which was found to be < 5%. Under the optimized experimental variables, the limits of detection (LOD) and enhancement factors (EF), were obtained to be 0.86 ng L- 1 and 120, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver ions in fresh and waste water samples.

  11. Development of new portable miniaturize solid phase microextraction of silver-APDC complex using micropipette tip in-syringe system couple with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi; Samoon, Muhammad Kashif

    2016-02-01

    An innovative and simple miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPME) method, was developed for preconcentration and determination of silver(I) in the fresh and waste water samples. For M-SPME, a micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth (ACC) as sorbent, in a syringe system. The size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC before and after adsorption of analyte have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), was drawn into the syringe filled with ACC and dispensed manually for 2 to 10 aspirating/dispensing cycle. Then the Ag- complex sorbed on the ACC in micropipette was quantitatively eluted by drawing and dispensing of different concentrations of acids for 2 to 5 aspirating/dispensing cycles. The extracted Ag ions with modifier were injected directly into the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency, including the concentration of ligand, pH, sample volume, eluent type, concentration and volume was investigated. Validity and accuracy of the developed method was checked by the standard addition method. Reliability of the proposed methodology was checked by the relative standard deviation (%RSD), which was found to be <5%. Under the optimized experimental variables, the limits of detection (LOD) and enhancement factors (EF), were obtained to be 0.86 ng L(-1) and 120, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver ions in fresh and waste water samples.

  12. Development of new portable miniaturize solid phase microextraction of silver-APDC complex using micropipette tip in-syringe system couple with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shah, Faheem; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Arain, Mariam Shahzadi; Samoon, Muhammad Kashif

    2016-02-01

    An innovative and simple miniaturized solid phase microextraction (M-SPME) method, was developed for preconcentration and determination of silver(I) in the fresh and waste water samples. For M-SPME, a micropipette tip packed with activated carbon cloth (ACC) as sorbent, in a syringe system. The size, morphology and elemental composition of ACC before and after adsorption of analyte have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The sample solution treated with a complexing reagent, ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), was drawn into the syringe filled with ACC and dispensed manually for 2 to 10 aspirating/dispensing cycle. Then the Ag- complex sorbed on the ACC in micropipette was quantitatively eluted by drawing and dispensing of different concentrations of acids for 2 to 5 aspirating/dispensing cycles. The extracted Ag ions with modifier were injected directly into the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis. The influence of different variables on the extraction efficiency, including the concentration of ligand, pH, sample volume, eluent type, concentration and volume was investigated. Validity and accuracy of the developed method was checked by the standard addition method. Reliability of the proposed methodology was checked by the relative standard deviation (%RSD), which was found to be <5%. Under the optimized experimental variables, the limits of detection (LOD) and enhancement factors (EF), were obtained to be 0.86 ng L(-1) and 120, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace levels of silver ions in fresh and waste water samples. PMID:26520476

  13. [Main Cellular Redox Couples].

    PubMed

    Bilan, D S; Shokhina, A G; Lukyanov, S A; Belousov, V V

    2015-01-01

    Most of the living cells maintain the continuous flow of electrons, which provides them by energy. Many of the compounds are presented in a cell at the same time in the oxidized and reduced states, forming the active redox couples. Some of the redox couples, such as NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH, oxidized/reduced glutathione (GSSG/GSH), are universal, as they participate in adjusting of many cellular reactions. Ratios of the oxidized and reduced forms of these compounds are important cellular redox parameters. Modern research approaches allow setting the new functions of the main redox couples in the complex organization of cellular processes. The following information is about the main cellular redox couples and their participation in various biological processes.

  14. Promoting C–C Bond Coupling of Benzyne and Methyl Ligands in Electron-Deficient (triphos)Pt–CH3+ Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In situ generated benzyne reacts at room temperature with (triphos)Pt–CH3+ to form a five-coordinate π-complex (2) that is isolable and stable in solution. Thermolysis of 2 at 60 °C generates (triphos)Pt(o-tolyl)+ (3), which is the product of formal migratory insertion of CH3– onto the coordinated benzyne. The reaction of 2 with the acid Ph2NH2+ yields toluene at room temperature over the course of 8 h, while the same reaction with 3 only proceeds to 40% conversion over 2 days. These data indicate that the protonolysis of 2 does not proceed by CH3 migration onto benzyne to form 3 followed by protodemetalation. Instead, the data suggest either that protonation of 2 is first and is followed by H migration to yield a PtIVPh(Me) dication or that this latter species is generated by direct protonolysis of coordinated benzyne prior to reductive elimination of toluene. PMID:26146438

  15. Precursor complex structure of pseudouridine synthase TruB suggests coupling of active site perturbations to an RNA-sequestering peripheral protein domain.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Charmaine; Hamilton, Christopher S; Mueller, Eugene G; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2005-08-01

    The pseudouridine synthase TruB is responsible for the universally conserved post-transcriptional modification of residue 55 of elongator tRNAs. In addition to the active site, the "thumb", a peripheral domain unique to the TruB family of enzymes, makes extensive interactions with the substrate. To coordinate RNA binding and release with catalysis, the thumb may be able to sense progress of the reaction in the active site. To establish whether there is a structural correlate of communication between the active site and the RNA-sequestering thumb, we have solved the structure of a catalytically inactive point mutant of TruB in complex with a substrate RNA, and compared it to the previously determined structure of an active TruB bound to a reaction product. Superposition of the two structures shows that they are extremely similar, except in the active site and, intriguingly, in the relative position of the thumb. Because the two structures were solved using isomorphous crystals, and because the thumb is very well ordered in both structures, the displacement of the thumb we observe likely reflects preferential propagation of active site perturbations to this RNA-binding domain. One of the interactions between the active site and the thumb involves an active site residue whose hydrogen-bonding status changes during the reaction. This may allow the peripheral RNA-binding domain to monitor progress of the pseudouridylation reaction.

  16. Ferromagnetic coupling in the three-dimensional malonato-bridged gadoliniumIII complex [Gd2(mal)3(H2O)6] (H2mal = malonic acid).

    PubMed

    Hernández-Molina, María; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina; López, Trinidad; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2003-09-01

    The novel gadolinium(III) complex of formula [Gd(2)(mal)(3)(H(2)O)(6)] (1) (H(2)mal = 1,3-propanedioic acid) has been prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystal data for 1: monoclinic, space group I2/a, a = 11.1064(10) A, b = 12.2524(10) A, c =13.6098(2) A, beta = 92.925(10) degrees, U = 1849.5(3) A(3), Z = 4. Compound 1 is a three-dimensional network made up of malonate-bridged gadolinium(III) ions where the malonate exhibits two bridging modes, eta(5)-bidentate + unidentate and eta(3):eta(3) + bis(unidentate). The gadolinium atom is nine-coordinate with three water molecules and six malonate oxygen atoms from three malonate ligands forming a distorted monocapped square antiprism. The shortest metal-metal separations are 4.2763(3) A [through the oxo-carboxylate bridge] and 6.541(3) A [through the carboxylate in the anti-syn coordination mode]. The value of the angle at the oxo-carboxylate atom is 116.8(2) degrees. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal the occurrence of a significant ferromagnetic interaction through the oxo-carboxylate pathway (J = +0.048(1) cm(-1), H = -JS(Gd(1)) x S(Gd(1a))).

  17. High-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method for wave propagation simulation in complex geophysical media (elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic); an unifying framework to couple continuous Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrana, Sebastien; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Guillot, Laurent; Mariotti, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Today seismological observation systems combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna that provide complementary observations of source-radiated waves in heterogeneous and complex geophysical media. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-physics - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasonic - wave simulation methods. A popular approach is the Spectral Element Method (SEM) (Chaljub et al, 2006) which is high-order accurate (low dispersion error), very flexible to parallelization and computationally attractive due to efficient sum factorization technique and diagonal mass matrix. However SEMs suffer from lack of flexibility in handling complex geometry and multi-physics wave propagation. High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods (DGMs), i.e. Dumbser et al (2006), Etienne et al. (2010), Wilcox et al (2010), are recent alternatives that can handle complex geometry, space-and-time adaptativity, and allow efficient multi-physics wave coupling at interfaces. However, DGMs are more memory demanding and less computationally attractive than SEMs, especially when explicit time stepping is used. We propose a new class of higher-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Elements (HDGSEM) methods for spatial discretization of wave equations, following the unifying framework for hybridization of Cockburn et al (2009) and Nguyen et al (2011), which allows for a single implementation of conforming and non-conforming SEMs. When used with energy conserving explicit time integration schemes, HDGSEM is flexible to handle complex geometry, computationally attractive and has significantly less degrees of freedom than classical DGMs, i.e., the only coupled unknowns are the single-valued numerical traces of the velocity field on the element's faces. The formulation can be extended to model fractional energy loss at interfaces between elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic media. Accuracy and performance of the HDGSEM are illustrated and

  18. Palladium complexes of abnormal N-heterocyclic carbenes as precatalysts for the much preferred Cu-free and amine-free Sonogashira coupling in air in a mixed-aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    John, Alex; Shaikh, Mobin M; Ghosh, Prasenjit

    2009-12-21

    A series of new PEPPSI (Pyridine Enhanced Precatalyst Preparation Stabilization and Initiation) themed precatalysts of abnormal N-heterocyclic carbenes for the highly desirable Cu-free and amine-free Sonogashira coupling in air in a mixed-aqueous medium is reported. Specifically, the PEPPSI themed (NHC)PdI2(pyridine) type precatalysts, 1b-4b, efficiently carried out the highly convenient Cu-free and amine-free Sonogashira coupling of aryl bromides and iodides with terminal acetylenes in air in a mixed aqueous medium. Complexes, 1b-4b, were synthesized by the direct reaction of the corresponding imidazo[1,2-a]pyridinium iodide salts, 1a-4a, with PdCl2 in pyridine in the presence of K2CO3 as a base while the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridinium iodide salts, 1a-4a, were in turn synthesized by the alkylation reactions of the respective imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine derivatives with alkyl iodides. The density functional theory (DFT) studies revealed that these imidazol-3-ylidene[1,2-a]pyridine derived abnormal carbenes are strongly sigma-donating and consequently significantly weaken the catalytically important labile trans pyridine ligand in 1b-4b.

  19. Coupling geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological approaches to assess the health of contaminated soil around the Almalyk mining and smelter complex, Uzbekistan.

    PubMed

    Shukurov, Nosir; Kodirov, Obidjon; Peitzsch, Mirko; Kersten, Michael; Pen-Mouratov, Stanislav; Steinberger, Yosef

    2014-04-01

    This study describes the impact of airborne pollution resulting from mining and smelting activities on the soils of the Almalyk mining and industrial area (NE Uzbekistan). Samples were collected along a transect downwind of the industrial area. Enriched contents of some metals were found in the upper soil layers near the metallurgical complex (Zn≤3010 mg kg(-1), Pb≤630 mg kg(-1), Cd≤30 mg kg(-1)) which suggests that these metals were derived from local stack emissions. The morphology and internal microstructure of metal-bearing spherical particles found in the heavy mineral fraction suggest that these particles were probably a result of inefficient flue gas cleaning technique of the smelter. The highest metal concentrations were found also in soil solutions and exchangeable solid fractions from the first three locations, and decreased with increasing distance from the pollution source along transect. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations suggest that the mobile metal pool in the contaminated soil is mainly controlled by dissolution of metal carbonates formed as weathering product of the metalliferous particles. The health of the microbiological soil ecosystem was assessed by measurements of basal respiration, nematode abundance, biomass-related C and N content, and microbial metabolic quotient qCO2. Significant correlations were found between the dissolved metal content and the microbiological health parameters, a negative one for Cmic/Corg ratio, and a positive one for qCO2. A negative correlation was found between the amount of nematodes and the metal contents suggesting that the contaminated soil has significant impact on the functioning of the microbiological community. A better understanding of the spatial variations in the whole ecosystem functioning due to airborne impact could be very useful for establishing suitable land use and best management practices for the polluted areas.

  20. Quantifying mineral abundances of complex mixtures by coupling spectral deconvolution of SWIR spectra (2.1-2.4 μm) and regression tree analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulder, V.L.; Plotze, Michael; de Bruin, Sytze; Schaepman, Michael E.; Mavris, C.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Egli, Markus

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for assessing mineral abundances of mixtures having more than two constituents using absorption features in the 2.1-2.4 μm wavelength region. In the first step, the absorption behaviour of mineral mixtures is parameterised by exponential Gaussian optimisation. Next, mineral abundances are predicted by regression tree analysis using these parameters as inputs. The approach is demonstrated on a range of prepared samples with known abundances of kaolinite, dioctahedral mica, smectite, calcite and quartz and on a set of field samples from Morocco. The latter contained varying quantities of other minerals, some of which did not have diagnostic absorption features in the 2.1-2.4 μm region. Cross validation showed that the prepared samples of kaolinite, dioctahedral mica, smectite and calcite were predicted with a root mean square error (RMSE) less than 9 wt.%. For the field samples, the RMSE was less than 8 wt.% for calcite, dioctahedral mica and kaolinite abundances. Smectite could not be well predicted, which was attributed to spectral variation of the cations within the dioctahedral layered smectites. Substitution of part of the quartz by chlorite at the prediction phase hardly affected the accuracy of the predicted mineral content; this suggests that the method is robust in handling the omission of minerals during the training phase. The degree of expression of absorption components was different between the field sample and the laboratory mixtures. This demonstrates that the method should be calibrated and trained on local samples. Our method allows the simultaneous quantification of more than two minerals within a complex mixture and thereby enhances the perspectives of spectral analysis for mineral abundances.

  1. Insight into unresolved complex mixtures of aromatic hydrocarbons in heavy oil via two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Weng, Na; Wan, Shan; Wang, Huitong; Zhang, Shuichang; Zhu, Guangyou; Liu, Jingfu; Cai, Di; Yang, Yunxu

    2015-06-12

    The aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of five crude oils representing a natural sequence of increasing degree of biodegradation from the Liaohe Basin, NE, China, were analyzed using conventional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC). Because of the limited peak capability and low resolution, compounds in the aromatic fraction of a heavily biodegraded crude oil that were analyzed by GC-MS appeared as unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) or GC "humps". They could be separated based on their polarity by GC×GC. UCMs are composed mainly of aromatic biomarkers and aromatic hydrocarbons with branched alkanes or cycloalkanes substituents. The quantitative results achieved by GC×GC-FID were shown that monoaromatic hydrocarbons account for the largest number and mass of UCMs in the aromatic hydrocarbon fraction of heavily biodegraded crude oil, at 45% by mass. The number and mass of diaromatic hydrocarbons ranks second at 33% by mass, followed by the aromatic biomarker compounds, triaromatic, tetraaromatic, and pentaaromatic hydrocarbons, that account for 10%, 6%, 1.5%, and 0.01% of all aromatic compounds by mass, respectively. In the heavily biodegraded oil, compounds with monocyclic cycloalkane substituents account for the largest proportion of mono- and diaromatic hydrocarbons, respectively. The C4-substituted compounds account for the largest proportion of naphthalenes and the C3-substituted compounds account for the largest proportion of phenanthrenes, which is very different from non-biodegraded, slightly biodegraded, and moderately biodegraded crude oil. It is inferred that compounds of monoaromatic, diaromatic and triaromatic hydrocarbons are affected by biodegradation, that compounds with C1-, C2-substituents are affected by the increase in degree of biodegradation, and that their relative content decreased, whereas compounds with C3-substituents or more were affected slightly or unaffected, and their

  2. p -State Luminescence in CdSe Nanoplatelets: Role of Lateral Confinement and a Longitudinal Optical Phonon Bottleneck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtstein, Alexander W.; Scott, Riccardo; Kickhöfel, Sebastian; Jagsch, Stefan T.; Christodoulou, Sotirios; Bertrand, Guillaume H. V.; Prudnikau, Anatol V.; Antanovich, Artsiom; Artemyev, Mikhail; Moreels, Iwan; Schliwa, Andrei; Woggon, Ulrike

    2016-03-01

    We evidence excited state emission from p states well below ground state saturation in CdSe nanoplatelets. Size-dependent exciton ground and excited state energies and population dynamics are determined by four independent methods: time-resolved PL, time-integrated PL, rate equation modeling, and Hartree renormalized k .p calculations—all in very good agreement. The ground state-excited state energy spacing strongly increases with the lateral platelet quantization. Depending on its detuning to the LO phonon energy, the PL decay of CdSe platelets is governed by a size tunable LO phonon bottleneck, related to the low exciton-phonon coupling, very large oscillator strength, and energy spacing of both states. This is, for instance, ideal to tune lasing properties. CdSe platelets are perfectly suited to control the exciton-phonon interaction by changing their lateral size while the optical transition energy is determined by their thickness.

  3. High resolution seismic data coupled to Multibeam bathymetry of Stromboli island collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment: implications with the marine geophysics and volcanology of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex (Sicily, Southern Tyrrhenian sea, Italy).

    PubMed

    Aiello, Gemma; Di Fiore, Vincenzo; Marsella, Ennio; Passaro, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    New high resolution seismic data (Subbottom Chirp) coupled to high resolution Multibeam bathymetry collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment aimed at recording active seismic data and tomography of the Stromboli Island are here presented. The Stromboli geophysical experiment has been already carried out based on onshore and offshore data acquisition in order to investigate the deep structure and the location of the magma chambers of the Stromboli volcano. A new detailed swath bathymetry of Stromboli Island is here shown and discussed to reconstruct an up-to-date morpho-bathymetry and marine geology of the area compared to the volcanologic setting of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex. Due to its high resolution the new Digital Terrain Model of the Stromboli Island gives interesting information about the submerged structure of the volcano, particularly about the volcano-tectonic and gravitational processes involving the submarine flanks of the edifice. Several seismic units have been identified based on the geologic interpretation of Subbottom Chirp profiles recorded around the volcanic edifice and interpreted as volcanic acoustic basement pertaining to the volcano and overlying slide chaotic bodies emplaced during its complex volcano-tectonic evolution. They are related to the eruptive activity of Stromboli, mainly poliphasic and to regional geological processes involving the intriguing geology of the Aeolian Arc, a volcanic area still in activity and needing improved research interest. PMID:24860717

  4. High resolution seismic data coupled to Multibeam bathymetry of Stromboli island collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment: implications with the marine geophysics and volcanology of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex (Sicily, Southern Tyrrhenian sea, Italy).

    PubMed

    Aiello, Gemma; Di Fiore, Vincenzo; Marsella, Ennio; Passaro, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    New high resolution seismic data (Subbottom Chirp) coupled to high resolution Multibeam bathymetry collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment aimed at recording active seismic data and tomography of the Stromboli Island are here presented. The Stromboli geophysical experiment has been already carried out based on onshore and offshore data acquisition in order to investigate the deep structure and the location of the magma chambers of the Stromboli volcano. A new detailed swath bathymetry of Stromboli Island is here shown and discussed to reconstruct an up-to-date morpho-bathymetry and marine geology of the area compared to the volcanologic setting of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex. Due to its high resolution the new Digital Terrain Model of the Stromboli Island gives interesting information about the submerged structure of the volcano, particularly about the volcano-tectonic and gravitational processes involving the submarine flanks of the edifice. Several seismic units have been identified based on the geologic interpretation of Subbottom Chirp profiles recorded around the volcanic edifice and interpreted as volcanic acoustic basement pertaining to the volcano and overlying slide chaotic bodies emplaced during its complex volcano-tectonic evolution. They are related to the eruptive activity of Stromboli, mainly poliphasic and to regional geological processes involving the intriguing geology of the Aeolian Arc, a volcanic area still in activity and needing improved research interest.

  5. Nonadiabatic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryachko, Eugene S.

    The general features of the nonadiabatic coupling and its relation to molecular properties are surveyed. Some consequences of the [`]equation of motion', formally expressing a [`]smoothness' of a given molecular property within the diabatic basis, are demonstrated. A particular emphasis is made on the relation between a [`]smoothness' of the electronic dipole moment and the generalized Mulliken-Hush formula for the diabatic electronic coupling.

  6. V(IV)O versus V(IV) complex formation by tridentate (O, N(arom), O) ligands: prediction of geometry, EPR 51V hyperfine coupling constants, and UV-Vis spectra.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Luisa; Várnagy, Katalin; Timári, Sarolta; Hegetschweiler, Kaspar; Micera, Giovanni; Garribba, Eugenio

    2013-05-01

    Systems formed using the V(IV)O(2+) ion with tridentate ligands containing a (O, N(arom), O) donor set were described. Examined ligands were 3,5-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1-phenyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole (H2hyph(Ph)), 4-[3,5-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]benzoic acid (H3hyph(C)), 4-[3,5-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]benzenesulfonic acid (H3hyph(S)), and 2,6-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)pyridine (H2bhpp), with H3hyph(C) being an orally active iron chelator that is commercially available under the name Exjade (Novartis) for treatment of chronic iron overload arising from blood transfusions. The systems were studied using EPR, UV-Vis, and IR spectroscopies, pH potentiometry, and DFT methods. The ligands bind vanadium with the two terminal deprotonated phenol groups and the central aromatic nitrogen to give six-membered chelate rings. In aqueous solution the main species were the mono- and bis-chelated V(IV)O complexes, whereas in the solid state neutral non-oxido V(IV) compounds were formed. [V(hyph(Ph))2] and [V(bhpp)2] are hexacoordinated, with a geometry close to the octahedral and a meridional arrangement of the ligands. DFT calculations allow distinguishing V(IV)O and V(IV) species and predicting their structure, the (51)V hyperfine coupling constant tensor A, and the electronic absorption spectra. Finally, EPR spectra of several non-oxido V(IV) species were compared using relevant geometrical parameters to demonstrate that in the case of tridentate ligands the (51)V hyperfine coupling constant is related to the geometric isomerism (meridional or facial) rather than the twist angle Φ, which measures the distortion of the hexacoordinated structure toward a trigonal prism. PMID:23581472

  7. FLEXIBLE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Babelay, E.F.

    1962-02-13

    A flexible shaft coupling for operation at speeds in excess of 14,000 rpm is designed which requires no lubrication. A driving sleeve member and a driven sleeve member are placed in concentric spaced relationship. A torque force is transmitted to the driven member from the driving member through a plurality of nylon balls symmetrically disposed between the spaced sleeves. The balls extend into races and recesses within the respective sleeve members. The sleeve members have a suitable clearance therebetween and the balls have a suitable radial clearance during operation of the coupling to provide a relatively loose coupling. These clearances accommodate for both parallel and/or angular misalignments and avoid metal-tometal contact between the sleeve members during operation. Thus, no lubrication is needed, and a minimum of vibrations is transmitted between the sleeve members. (AEC)

  8. Prosthesis coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reswick, J. B.; Mooney, V.; Bright, C. W.; Owens, L. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A coupling for use in an apparatus for connecting a prosthesis to the bone of a stump of an amputated limb is described which permits a bio-compatible carbon sleeve forming a part of the prosthesis connector to float so as to prevent disturbing the skin seal around the carbon sleeve. The coupling includes a flexible member interposed between a socket that is inserted within an intermedullary cavity of the bone and the sleeve. A lock pin is carried by the prosthesis and has a stem portion which is adapted to be coaxially disposed and slideably within the tubular female socket for securing the prosthesis to the stump. The skin around the percutaneous carbon sleeve is able to move as a result of the flexing coupling so as to reduce stresses caused by changes in the stump shape and/or movement between the bone and the flesh portion of the stump.

  9. New high-order, semi-implicit Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin - Spectral Element Method (HDG-SEM) for simulation of complex wave propagation involving coupling between seismic, hydro-acoustic and infrasonic waves: numerical analysis and case studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrana, S.; Vilotte, J. P.; Guillot, L.

    2015-12-01

    New seismological monitoring networks combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna, providing complementary observation of source-radiated waves. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-media - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasound - wave simulation methods, in order to improve our physical understanding of energy exchanges at material interfaces.We present here a new development of a high-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method, for the simulation of coupled seismic and acoustic wave propagation, within a unified framework ([1],[2]) allowing for continuous and discontinuous Spectral Element Methods (SEM) to be used in the same simulation, with conforming and non-conforming meshes. The HDG-SEM approximation leads to differential - algebraic equations, which can be solved implicitly using energy-preserving time-schemes.The proposed HDG-SEM is computationally attractive, when compared with classical Discontinuous Galerkin methods, involving only the approximation of the single-valued traces of the velocity field along the element interfaces as globally coupled unknowns. The formulation is based on a variational approximation of the physical fluxes, which are shown to be the explicit solution of an exact Riemann problem at each element boundaries. This leads to a highly parallel and efficient unstructured and high-order accurate method, which can be space-and-time adaptive.A numerical study of the accuracy and convergence of the HDG-SEM is performed through a number of case studies involving elastic-acoustic (infrasound) coupling with geometries of increasing complexity. Finally, the performance of the method is illustrated through realistic case studies involving ground wave propagation associated to topography effects.In conclusion, we outline some on-going extensions of the method.References:[1] Cockburn, B., Gopalakrishnan, J., Lazarov, R., Unified hybridization of discontinuous Galerkin, mixed and

  10. Dichotomous Hydrogen Atom Transfer vs. Proton Coupled Electron Transfer During Activation of X-H Bonds (X = C, N, O) by Nonheme Iron-Oxo Complexes of Variable Basicity

    PubMed Central

    Usharani, Dandamudi; Lacy, David C.; Borovik, A. S.; Shaik, Sason

    2013-01-01

    We describe herein the hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT)/ proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactivity for FeIV-oxo and FeIII-oxo complexes (1–4) that activate C-H, N-H, and O-H bonds in 9,10 dihydroanthracene (S1), dimethylformamide (S2), 1,2 diphenylhydrazine (S3), p-methoxyphenol (S4), and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (S5). In 1–3, the iron is pentacoordinated by tris[N'-tert-butylureaylato)-N-ethylene]aminato ([H3buea]3−) or its derivatives. These complexes are basic, in the order 3 >> 1 > 2. Oxidant 4, [FeIVN4Py(O)]2+ (N4Py: N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-bis(2-pyridyl) methylamine), is the least basic oxidant. The DFT results match experimental trends and exhibit a mechanistic spectrum ranging from concerted HAT and PCET reactions to concerted-asynchronous proton transfer (PT) / electron transfer (ET) mechanisms, all the way to PT. The singly occupied orbital along the O---H---X (X= C, N, O) moiety in the TS shows clearly that in the PCET cases, the electron is transferred separately from the proton. The Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle does not account for the observed reactivity pattern, as evidenced by the scatter in the plot of calculated barrier vs. reactions driving forces. However, a plot of the deformation energy in the TS vs. the respective barrier provides a clear signature of the HAT/PCET dichotomy. Thus, in all C-H bond activations, the barrier derives from the deformation energy required to create the TS, whereas in N-H/O-H bond activations, the deformation energy is much larger than the corresponding barrier, indicating the presence of stabilizing interaction between the TS fragments. A valence bond model is used to link the observed results with the basicity/acidity of the reactants. PMID:24124906

  11. Molecularly imprinted polymer coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and injector port silylation: a novel approach for the determination of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid in complex biological samples using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Chauhan, Abhishek; Jain, Rajeev; Dhuriya, Yogesh Kumar; Saxena, Prem Narain; Khanna, Vinay Kumar

    2014-01-15

    A novel analytical approach based on molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), and injector port silylation (IPS) has been developed for the selective preconcentration, derivatization and analysis of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) in complex biological samples such as rat blood and liver. Factors affecting the synthesis of MIP were evaluated and the best monomer and cross-linker were selected based on binding affinity studies. Various parameters of MISPE, DLLME and IPS were optimized for the selective preconcentration and derivatization of 3-PBA. The developed method offers a good linearity over the calibration range of 0.02-2.5ngmg(-1) and 7.5-2000ngmL(-1) for liver and blood respectively. Under optimized conditions, the recovery of 3-PBA in liver and blood samples were found to be in the range of 83-91%. The detection limit was found to be 0.0045ngmg(-1) and 1.82ngmL(-1) in liver and blood respectively. SRM transition of 271→227 and 271→197 has been selected as quantifier and qualifier transition for 3-PBA derivative. Intra and inter-day precision for five replicates in a day and for five, successive days was found to be less than 8%. The method developed was successfully applied to real samples, i.e. rat blood and tissue for quantitative evaluation of 3-PBA. The analytical approach developed is rapid, economic, simple, eco-friendly and possess immense utility for the analysis of analytes with polar functional groups in complex biological samples by GC-MS/MS.

  12. Dopant-Assisted Positive Photoionization Ion Mobility Spectrometry Coupled with Time-Resolved Thermal Desorption for On-Site Detection of Triacetone Triperoxide and Hexamethylene Trioxide Diamine in Complex Matrices.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dandan; Peng, Liying; Wen, Meng; Zhou, Qinghua; Chen, Chuang; Wang, Xin; Chen, Wendong; Li, Haiyang

    2016-04-19

    Peroxide explosives, such as triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylene trioxide diamine (HMTD), were often used in the terrorist attacks due to their easy synthesis from readily starting materials. Therefore, an on-site detection method for TATP and HMTD is urgently needed. Herein, we developed a stand-alone dopant-assisted positive photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (DAPP-IMS) coupled with time-resolved thermal desorption introduction for rapid and sensitive detection of TATP and HMTD in complex matrices, such as white solids, soft drinks, and cosmetics. Acetone was chosen as the optimal dopant for better separation between reactant ion peaks and product ion peaks as well as higher sensitivity, and the limits of detection (LODs) of TATP and HMTD standard samples were 23.3 and 0.2 ng, respectively. Explosives on the sampling swab were thermally desorbed and carried into the ionization region dynamically within 10 s, and the maximum released concentration of TATP or HMTD could be time-resolved from the matrix interference owing to the different volatility. Furthermore, with the combination of the fast response thermal desorber (within 0.8 s) and the quick data acquisition software to DAPP-IMS, two-dimensional data related to drift time (TATP: 6.98 ms, K0 = 2.05 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1); HMTD: 9.36 ms, K0 = 1.53 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) and desorption time was obtained for TATP and HMTD, which is beneficial for their identification in complex matrices. PMID:27031877

  13. GMAP210 AND IFT88 ARE PRESENT IN THE SPERMATID GOLGI APPARATUS AND PARTICIPATE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ACROSOME-ACROPLAXOME COMPLEX, HEAD-TAIL COUPLING APPARATUS AND TAIL

    PubMed Central

    Kierszenbaum, Abraham L.; Rivkin, Eugene; Tres, Laura L.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Haycraft, Courtney J.; Bornens, Michel; Rios, Rosa M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the localization of the golgin GMAP210 and the intraflagellar protein IFT88 in the Golgi of spermatids and the participation of these two proteins in the development of the acrosome-acroplaxome complex, the head-tail coupling apparatus (HTCA) and the spermatid tail. Immunocytochemical experiments show that GMAP210 predominates in the cis-Golgi whereas IFT88 prevails in the trans-Golgi network. Both proteins co-localize in proacrosomal vesicles, along acrosome membranes, the HTCA and the developing tail. IFT88 persists in the acrosome-acroplaxome region of the sperm head whereas GMAP210 is not longer seen there. Spermatids of the Ift88 mouse mutant display abnormal head shaping and are tail-less. GMAP210 is visualized in the Ift88 mutant during acrosome-acroplaxome biogenesis. However, GMAP210–stained vesicles, mitochondria and outer dense fiber material build up in the manchette region and fail to reach the abortive tail stump in the mutant. In vitro disruption of the spermatid Golgi and microtubules with Brefeldin-A and nocodazole blocks the progression of GMAP210- and IFT88-stained proacrosomal vesicles to the acrosome-acroplaxome complex but F-actin distribution in the acroplaxome is not affected. We provide the first evidence that IFT88 is present in the Golgi of spermatids, that the microtubule-associated golgin GMAP210 and IFT88 participate in acrosome, HTCA and tail biogenesis, and that defective intramanchette transport of cargos disrupts spermatid tail development. PMID:21337470

  14. Holomorphic Yukawa couplings in heterotic string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesneag, Stefan; Buchbinder, Evgeny I.; Candelas, Philip; Lukas, Andre

    2016-01-01

    We develop techniques, based on differential geometry, to compute holomorphic Yukawa couplings for heterotic line bundle models on Calabi-Yau manifolds defined as complete intersections in projective spaces. It is shown explicitly how these techniques relate to algebraic methods for computing holomorphic Yukawa couplings. We apply our methods to various examples and evaluate the holomorphic Yukawa couplings explicitly as functions of the complex structure moduli. It is shown that the rank of the Yukawa matrix can decrease at specific loci in complex structure moduli space. In particular, we compute the up Yukawa coupling and the singlet-Higgs-lepton trilinear coupling in the heterotic standard model described in ref. [32].

  15. High performance solid-phase extraction cleanup method coupled with gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for analysis of polychlorinated naphthalenes and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls in complex samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Jin, Jing; Tan, Dongqin; Xu, Jiazhi; Dhanjai; Ni, Yuwen; Zhang, Haijun; Chen, Jiping

    2016-05-27

    A solid-phase extraction (SPE) cleanup method was developed to purify the sample extracts for the analysis of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs). Monodisperse magnesium oxide (MgO) microspheres and basic alumina were used as SPE adsorbents. Important parameters of the SPE procedure were optimized, including the amount of basic alumina and the type and volume of the washing and elution solvents. The optimized SPE cleanup method exhibited excellent purification performance for the removal of organochlorinated compounds, lipid compounds, sulfur, and pigments. Additionally, it was found that the retention activities of congeners differed with the number and position of the chlorine substituents in PCNs. In this study, an analytical method based on a combination of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) coupled with SPE cleanup and gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) is proposed for the analysis of PCNs and dl-PCBs in complex samples (sediment, pine needle, and scallop samples). The analytical method demonstrates good linearity, acceptable recovery (63-148%) and precision (relative standard deviations less than 26%). The limits of detection (LODs) of PCN and dl-PCB congeners were in the range of 0.6-19.1pgg(-1) and 0.4-8.6pgg(-1), respectively. The PCNs and dl-PCBs levels in these samples ranged from 0.16 to 3.07ngg(-1) dry weight (dw) and from undetectable to 0.07ngg(-1) dw, respectively. PMID:27130583

  16. Application of capillary electrophoresis-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to comparative studying of the reactivity of antitumor ruthenium(III) complexes differing in the nature of counter-ion toward human serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Połeć-Pawlak, Kasia; Abramski, Jan K; Ferenc, Julia; Foteeva, Lidia S; Timerbaev, Andrei R; Keppler, Bernhard K; Jarosz, Maciej

    2008-05-30

    Varying the counter-ion is a highly supportive practice in tackling the problem of poor water-solubility of metal complexes of pharmaceutical importance. As a matter of fact, the relevant structural modification may alter the metabolic pathways and possibly the mode of action of a drug. To prove that this does not take place for one of the lead anticancer metal-based developmental compounds, indazolium trans-[RuCl(4)(1H-indazole)(2)] (KP1019), its reactivity toward human serum proteins was assessed under simulated physiological conditions and compared to that of a much more soluble analogue, sodium trans-[RuCl(4)(1H-indazole)(2)] (KP1339). For such kinetic assaying, capillary electrophoresis (CE) interfaced online with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to specifically monitor changes in the metal speciation following the formation of ruthenium-protein adducts was applied. The rate constants of interaction with albumin and transferrin were determined at pharmacologically fitting drug-to-protein ratios as on average 0.0319+/-0.0021 min(-1) and 0.0931+/-0.0019 min(-1) (KP1019) and 0.0316+/-0.0018 min(-1) and 0.0935+/-0.0053 min(-1) (KP1339), respectively. The results of this brief study showed that changing from organic to inorganic counter-ion at the stage of formulation could commonly be recommended for improving ruthenium-based drug solubility and bioavailability.

  17. Negative coupling and coupling phase dispersion in a silicon quadrupole micro-racetrack resonator.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Daniel; Tsay, Alan; Van, Vien

    2015-07-27

    We report the first experimental study of the effects of coupling phase dispersion on the spectral response of a two-dimensionally coupled quadrupole micro-racetrack resonator. Negative coupling in the system is observed to manifest itself in the sharp stop band transition and deep extinction in the pseudo-elliptic filter response of the quadrupole. The results demonstrate the feasibility of realizing advanced silicon microring devices based on the 2D coupling topology with general complex coupling coefficients.

  18. Overdamping by weakly coupled environments

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Haake, Fritz

    2005-12-15

    A quantum system weakly interacting with a fast environment usually undergoes a relaxation with complex frequencies whose imaginary parts are damping rates quadratic in the coupling to the environment in accord with Fermi's 'golden rule'. We show for various models (spin damped by harmonic-oscillator or random-matrix baths, quantum diffusion, and quantum Brownian motion) that upon increasing the coupling up to a critical value still small enough to allow for weak-coupling Markovian master equations, a different relaxation regime can occur. In that regime, complex frequencies lose their real parts such that the process becomes overdamped. Our results call into question the standard belief that overdamping is exclusively a strong coupling feature.

  19. Magnetoelectric coupling at metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, Lukas; Yamada, T.K.; Balashov, T.; Takacs, A. F.; Wesselink, R.J.H.; Daene, Markus W; Fechner, M.; Ostanin, S.; Ernst, Arthur; Mertig, I.; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2010-10-01

    Magnetoelectric coupling allows the magnetic state of a material to be changed by an applied electric field. To date, this phenomenon has mainly been observed in insulating materials such as complex multiferroic oxides. Bulk metallic systems do not exhibit magnetoelectric coupling, because applied electric fields are screened by conduction electrons. We demonstrate strong magnetoelectric coupling at the surface of thin iron films using the electric field from a scanning tunnelling microscope, and are able to write, store and read information to areas with sides of a few nanometres. Our work demonstrates that high-density, non-volatile information storage is possible in metals.

  20. Coupling Dynamics in Aircraft: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    Coupling dynamics can produce either adverse or beneficial stability and controllability, depending on the characteristics of the aircraft. This report presents archival anecdotes and analyses of coupling problems experienced by the X-series, Century series, and Space Shuttle aircraft. The three catastrophic sequential coupling modes of the X-2 airplane and the two simultaneous unstable modes of the X-15 and Space Shuttle aircraft are discussed. In addition, the most complex of the coupling interactions, inertia roll coupling, is discussed for the X-2, X-3, F-100A, and YF-102 aircraft. The mechanics of gyroscopics, centrifugal effect, and resonance in coupling dynamics are described. The coupling modes discussed are interacting multiple degrees of freedom of inertial and aerodynamic forces and moments. The aircraft are assumed to be rigid bodies. Structural couplings are not addressed. Various solutions for coupling instabilities are discussed.

  1. Evidence for direct coupling of primary agonist-receptor interaction to the exposure of functional IIb-IIIa complexes in human blood platelets. Results from studies with the antiplatelet compound ajoene.

    PubMed

    Apitz-Castro, R; Jain, M K; Bartoli, F; Ledezma, E; Ruiz, M C; Salas, R

    1991-09-24

    Ajoene, (E,Z)-4,5,9-trithiadodeca-1,6,11-triene 9-oxide, is a potent antiplatelet compound isolated from alcoholic extracts of garlic. In vitro, ajoene reversibly inhibits platelet aggregation as well as the release reaction induced by all known agonists. In this paper we show that ajoene has a unique locus of action, that is not shared by any other known antiplatelet compound. For example, ajoene inhibits agonist-induced exposure of fibrinogen receptors, as well as intracellular responses such as activation of protein kinase C and the increase in cytoplasmic free calcium induced by receptor-dependent agonists (collagen, ADP, PAF, low-dose thrombin). On the other hand, with agonists that can by-pass (at least partially) the receptor-transductor-effector sequence, such as high-dose thrombin, PMA, NaF, only the exposure of fibrinogen receptors is blocked by ajoene. Binding of fibrinogen to chymotrypsin-treated platelets is only slightly inhibited by ajoene. The results reported here also show that: (a) ajoene does not act as a calcium chelator, does not impair the initial agonist-receptor interaction and does not influence the basal levels of intracellular inhibitors of platelet activation such as cyclic GMP; (b) the locus of action of ajoene is a yet unknown molecular step that links, in the case of physiological agonists, specific agonist-receptor complexes to the sequence of the signal transduction system on the plasma membrane of platelets. In the case of non-physiological, receptor-independent agonists (PMA, NaF), we can only speculate on the hypothesis that they somehow mimic the effect of the agonist-receptor complexes on the signal transduction system; and (c) the exposure of fibrinogen receptors is not a direct consequence of other intracellular processes. These observations clearly show, for the first time, that the exposure of fibrinogen receptors is a membrane event proximally and obligatorily coupled to the occupancy of other membrane receptors by their

  2. Hydrogen Interaction with Metal Halides: the Nuclear Quadrupole Coupling Constant of Gold in the {p}{-H}_2{-AuCl} Complex and Trends in the Other Hydrogen-Coinage Metal Halide Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenchain, Daniel A.; Grubbs, G. S. Grubbs, Ii; Pickett, Herbert M.; Novick, Stewart E.

    2013-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of p-H_2-AuCl has been measured using a laser ablation equipped FTMW cavity spectrometer. The predicted structure, using a 60 electron core potential and an aug-cc-pVQZ at the MP2 level of theory, shows that H_2 has an r_e = 0.91Å. A predicted value for the eQq(χ_{aa}) of gold required a semi-empirical method using the results of previous AuCl complexes in the gas phase. Transitions have been measured across multiple J levels, and have been used to determine the rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants of multiple isotopologues. The o-H_2-AuCl has also been observed. While the monomer value of the eQq of ^{197}Au was determined to be 9.63112(13) MHz in ^{197}Au^{35}Cl, we observed a significant change in the eQq of ^{197}Au in p-H_2-^{197}Au^{35}Cl to a value of -817.9983(36) MHz [0.02728556(12) cm^{-1}], giving rise to a Au hyperfine component splittings of approximately 220 MHz [0.007 cm^{-1}] and suggesting a change in electronic structure with the interaction of H_2. We will present a summary of the hydrogen-coinage metal halide talks given at this conference, including trends in eQq and hydrogen metal halide dissociation energies. D. Figgen, G. Rauhut, M. Dolh, H. Stoll J. Chem. Phys. 311(2005) 227. K. A. Peterson, C. Puzzarini, Theor. Chem. Acc. 114 (2005) 283. C. J. Evans, C. L. Gerry J. Mol. Spectrosc. 203 (2000) 105.

  3. Detachable strong cation exchange monolith, integrated with capillary zone electrophoresis and coupled with pH gradient elution, produces improved sensitivity and numbers of peptide identifications during bottom-up analysis of complex proteomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenbin; Yan, Xiaojing; Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-04-21

    A detachable sulfonate-silica hybrid strong cation-exchange monolith was synthesized in a fused silica capillary, and used for solid phase extraction with online pH gradient elution during capillary zone electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry (CZE-MS/MS) proteomic analysis. Tryptic digests were prepared in 50 mM formic acid and loaded onto the strong cation-exchange monolith. Fractions were eluted using a series of buffers with lower concentration but higher pH values than the 50 mM formic acid background electrolyte. This combination of elution and background electrolytes results in both sample stacking and formation of a dynamic pH junction and allows use of relatively large elution buffer volumes while maintaining reasonable peak efficiency and resolution. A series of five pH bumps were applied to elute E. coli tryptic peptides from the monolith, followed by analysis using CZE coupled to an LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer; 799 protein groups and 3381 peptides were identified from 50 ng of the digest in a 2.5 h analysis, which approaches the identification rate for this organism that was obtained with an Orbitrap Fusion. We attribute the improved numbers of peptide and protein identifications to the efficient fractionation by the online pH gradient elution, which decreased the complexity of the sample in each elution step and improved the signal intensity of low abundance peptides. We also performed a comparative analysis using a nanoACQUITY UltraPerformance LCH system. Similar numbers of protein and peptide identifications were produced by the two methods. Protein identifications showed significant overlap between the two methods, whereas peptide identifications were complementary.

  4. A detachable strong cation exchange monolith, integrated with capillary zone electrophoresis and coupled with pH gradient elution, produces improved sensitivity and numbers of peptide identifications during bottom-up analysis of complex proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenbin; Yan, Xiaojing; Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2015-01-01

    A detachable sulfonate-silica hybrid strong cation-exchange monolith was synthesized in a fused silica capillary, and used for solid phase extraction with on-line pH gradient elution during capillary zone electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry (CZE-MS/MS) proteomic analysis. Tryptic digests were prepared in 50 mM formic acid and loaded onto the strong cation-exchange monolith. Fractions were eluted using a series of buffers with lower concentration but higher pH values than the 50 mM formic acid background electrolyte. This combination of elution and background electrolytes results in both sample stacking and formation of a dynamic pH junction, and allows use of relatively large elution buffer volumes while maintaining reasonable peak efficiency and resolution. A series of five pH bumps were applied to elute E. coli tryptic peptides from the monolith, followed by analysis using CZE coupled to an LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer; 799 protein groups and 3,381 peptides were identified from 50 ng of the digest in a 2.5 hour analysis, which approaches the identification rate for this organism that was obtained with an Orbitrap Fusion. We attribute the improved numbers of peptide and protein identifications to the efficient fractionation by the on-line pH gradient elution, which decreased the complexity of the sample in each elution step and improved the signal intensity of low abundance peptides. We also performed a comparative analysis using a nanoACQUITY UltraPerformance LCH system. Similar numbers of protein and peptide identifications were produced by the two methods. Protein identifications showed significant overlap between the two methods, whereas peptide identifications were complementary. PMID:25822566

  5. Evaluation of the capabilities of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls in complex-matrix food samples.

    PubMed

    Portolés, T; Sales, C; Abalos, M; Sauló, J; Abad, E

    2016-09-21

    The use of the novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography (GC) coupled to triple quadrupole using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and its potential for the simultaneous determination of the 12 dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls (DL-PCBs) in complex food and feed matrices has been evaluated. In first place, ionization and fragmentation behavior of DL-PCBs on the APCI source under charge transfer conditions has been studied followed by their fragmentation in the collision cell. Linearity, repeatability and sensitivity have been studied obtaining instrumental limits of detection and quantification of 0.0025 and 0.005 pg μL(-1) (2.5 and 5 fg on column) respectively for every DL-PCB. Finally, application to real samples has been carried out and DL-PCB congeners (PCB 77, 81, 105, 114, 118, 123, 126, 156, 157, 167, 169, 189) have been detected in the different samples in the range of 0.40-10000 pg g(-1). GC-(APCI)MS/MS has been proved as a suitable alternative to the traditionally accepted confirmation method based on the use of high resolution mass spectrometry and other triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry techniques operating with electron ionization. The development of MS/MS methodologies for the analysis of dioxins and DL-PCBs is nowadays particularly important, since this technique was included as a confirmatory method in the present European Union regulations that establish the requirements for the determination of these compounds in food and feed matrices.

  6. Evaluation of the capabilities of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls in complex-matrix food samples.

    PubMed

    Portolés, T; Sales, C; Abalos, M; Sauló, J; Abad, E

    2016-09-21

    The use of the novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography (GC) coupled to triple quadrupole using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and its potential for the simultaneous determination of the 12 dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls (DL-PCBs) in complex food and feed matrices has been evaluated. In first place, ionization and fragmentation behavior of DL-PCBs on the APCI source under charge transfer conditions has been studied followed by their fragmentation in the collision cell. Linearity, repeatability and sensitivity have been studied obtaining instrumental limits of detection and quantification of 0.0025 and 0.005 pg μL(-1) (2.5 and 5 fg on column) respectively for every DL-PCB. Finally, application to real samples has been carried out and DL-PCB congeners (PCB 77, 81, 105, 114, 118, 123, 126, 156, 157, 167, 169, 189) have been detected in the different samples in the range of 0.40-10000 pg g(-1). GC-(APCI)MS/MS has been proved as a suitable alternative to the traditionally accepted confirmation method based on the use of high resolution mass spectrometry and other triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry techniques operating with electron ionization. The development of MS/MS methodologies for the analysis of dioxins and DL-PCBs is nowadays particularly important, since this technique was included as a confirmatory method in the present European Union regulations that establish the requirements for the determination of these compounds in food and feed matrices. PMID:27590550

  7. How Geometric Distortions Scatter Electronic Excitations in Conjugated Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tian; Li, Hao; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y

    2014-11-20

    Effects of disorder and exciton-phonon interactions are the major factors controlling photoinduced dynamics and energy-transfer processes in conjugated organic semiconductors, thus defining their electronic functionality. All-atom quantum-chemical simulations are potentially capable of describing such phenomena in complex "soft" organic structures, yet they are frequently computationally restrictive. Here we efficiently characterize how electronic excitations in branched conjugated molecules interact with molecular distortions using the exciton scattering (ES) approach as a fundamental principle combined with effective tight-binding models. Molecule geometry deformations are incorporated to the ES view of electronic excitations by identifying the dependence of the Frenkel-type exciton Hamiltonian parameters on the characteristic geometry parameters. We illustrate our methodology using two examples of intermolecular distortions, bond length alternation and single bond rotation, which constitute vibrational degrees of freedom strongly coupled to the electronic system in a variety of conjugated systems. The effect on excited-state electronic structures has been attributed to localized variation of exciton on-site energies and couplings. As a result, modifications of the entire electronic spectra due to geometric distortions can be efficiently and accurately accounted for with negligible numerical cost. The presented approach can be potentially extended to model electronic structures and photoinduced processes in bulk amorphous polymer materials. PMID:26276475

  8. How Geometric Distortions Scatter Electronic Excitations in Conjugated Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tian; Li, Hao; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y

    2014-11-20

    Effects of disorder and exciton-phonon interactions are the major factors controlling photoinduced dynamics and energy-transfer processes in conjugated organic semiconductors, thus defining their electronic functionality. All-atom quantum-chemical simulations are potentially capable of describing such phenomena in complex "soft" organic structures, yet they are frequently computationally restrictive. Here we efficiently characterize how electronic excitations in branched conjugated molecules interact with molecular distortions using the exciton scattering (ES) approach as a fundamental principle combined with effective tight-binding models. Molecule geometry deformations are incorporated to the ES view of electronic excitations by identifying the dependence of the Frenkel-type exciton Hamiltonian parameters on the characteristic geometry parameters. We illustrate our methodology using two examples of intermolecular distortions, bond length alternation and single bond rotation, which constitute vibrational degrees of freedom strongly coupled to the electronic system in a variety of conjugated systems. The effect on excited-state electronic structures has been attributed to localized variation of exciton on-site energies and couplings. As a result, modifications of the entire electronic spectra due to geometric distortions can be efficiently and accurately accounted for with negligible numerical cost. The presented approach can be potentially extended to model electronic structures and photoinduced processes in bulk amorphous polymer materials.

  9. Pulse-coupled BZ oscillators with unequal coupling strengths.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Viktor; Kutner, Daniel J; Chavis, John T; Epstein, Irving R

    2015-02-14

    Coupled chemical oscillators are usually studied with symmetric coupling, either between identical oscillators or between oscillators whose frequencies differ. Asymmetric connectivity is important in neuroscience, where synaptic strength inequality in neural networks commonly occurs. While the properties of the individual oscillators in some coupled chemical systems may be readily changed, enforcing inequality between the connection strengths in a reciprocal coupling is more challenging. We recently demonstrated a novel way of coupling chemical oscillators, which allows for manipulation of individual connection strengths. Here we study two identical, pulse-coupled Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) oscillators with unequal connection strengths. When the pulse perturbations contain KBr (inhibitor), this system exhibits simple out-of-phase and complex oscillations, oscillatory-suppressed states as well as temporally periodic patterns (N : M) in which the two oscillators exhibit different numbers of peaks per cycle. The N : M patterns emerge due to the long-term effect of the inhibitory pulse-perturbations, a feature that has not been considered in earlier works. Time delay was previously shown to have a profound effect on the system's behaviour when pulse coupling was inhibitory and the coupling strengths were equal. When the coupling is asymmetric, however, delay produces no qualitative change in behaviour, though the 1 : 2 temporal pattern becomes more robust. Asymmetry in instantaneous excitatory coupling via AgNO3 injection produces a previously unseen temporal pattern (1 : N patterns starting with a double peak) with time delay and high [AgNO3]. Numerical simulations of the behaviour agree well with theoretical predictions in asymmetrical pulse-coupled systems.

  10. Dark coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Gavela, M.B.; Hernández, D.; Honorez, L. Lopez; Mena, O.; Rigolin, S. E-mail: d.hernandez@uam.es E-mail: omena@ific.uv.es

    2009-07-01

    The two dark sectors of the universe—dark matter and dark energy—may interact with each other. Background and linear density perturbation evolution equations are developed for a generic coupling. We then establish the general conditions necessary to obtain models free from non-adiabatic instabilities. As an application, we consider a viable universe in which the interaction strength is proportional to the dark energy density. The scenario does not exhibit ''phantom crossing'' and is free from instabilities, including early ones. A sizeable interaction strength is compatible with combined WMAP, HST, SN, LSS and H(z) data. Neutrino mass and/or cosmic curvature are allowed to be larger than in non-interacting models. Our analysis sheds light as well on unstable scenarios previously proposed.

  11. Thermoacoustic couple

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-10-04

    An apparatus and method for determining acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor are disclosed. The preferred embodiment of the apparatus, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  12. Protein Complexes in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Caufield, J. Harry; Abreu, Marco; Wimble, Christopher; Uetz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale analyses of protein complexes have recently become available for Escherichia coli and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, yielding 443 and 116 heteromultimeric soluble protein complexes, respectively. We have coupled the results of these mass spectrometry-characterized protein complexes with the 285 “gold standard” protein complexes identified by EcoCyc. A comparison with databases of gene orthology, conservation, and essentiality identified proteins conserved or lost in complexes of other species. For instance, of 285 “gold standard” protein complexes in E. coli, less than 10% are fully conserved among a set of 7 distantly-related bacterial “model” species. Complex conservation follows one of three models: well-conserved complexes, complexes with a conserved core, and complexes with partial conservation but no conserved core. Expanding the comparison to 894 distinct bacterial genomes illustrates fractional conservation and the limits of co-conservation among components of protein complexes: just 14 out of 285 model protein complexes are perfectly conserved across 95% of the genomes used, yet we predict more than 180 may be partially conserved across at least half of the genomes. No clear relationship between gene essentiality and protein complex conservation is observed, as even poorly conserved complexes contain a significant number of essential proteins. Finally, we identify 183 complexes containing well-conserved components and uncharacterized proteins which will be interesting targets for future experimental studies. PMID:25723151

  13. Retrofitting gear couplings with diaphragm couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, J.R. )

    1988-10-01

    Retrofitting a coupling should not be an afterthought when upgrading a system. Couplings are an integral part of a drive train and should be a major consideration. This article discusses guidelines that should be used when replacing gear couplings with diaphragm couplings. Reviewed are the coupling selection process: how and to what extent the desired diaphragm couplings should be matched to the gear coupling. Also discussed are the details of coupling modification that can be made to accommodate system performance. Included are how changes in materials, configuration and design can help tune a diaphragm coupling to meet the characteristics of the previous gear couplings. The article also discusses the retrofit process for a specific syngas train at International Minerals and Chemical Corp., Sterlington, La.

  14. Measuring the uncertainty of coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaojun; Shang, Pengjian

    2015-06-01

    A new information-theoretic measure, called coupling entropy, is proposed here to detect the causal links in complex systems by taking into account the inner composition alignment of temporal structure. It is a permutation-based asymmetric association measure to infer the uncertainty of coupling between two time series. The coupling entropy is found to be effective in the analysis of Hénon maps, where different noises are added to test its accuracy and sensitivity. The coupling entropy is also applied to analyze the relationship between unemployment rate and CPI change in the U.S., where the CPI change turns out to be the driving variable while the unemployment rate is the responding one.

  15. Five types of "couple object-relations" seen in couple therapy: implications for theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Robert

    2014-02-01

    The author suggests that there are five types of couples seen in couple therapy. Based on the object relations of each, these are parasitic, symbiotic, narcissistic, sibling, and oedipal. Furthermore, each of these couple object-relations corresponds to the developmental level of a couple, and the couple's developmental level can be, and often is, of more primitive object relations than the actual developmental level of either member of the couple alone (that is, the couple is often greater than the sum of its parts; Mendelsohn, 2009). In addition, every couple-relationship is infused with projective identification (Mendelsohn, 2009), but each is also characterized by its own complex of character defenses, so that every couple-relationship presents with a particular of kind transference and a corresponding countertransference. Some of the theoretical and treatment implications of these transference and countertransference matrices are discussed.

  16. Designing the Dynamics of Globally Coupled Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosz, G.; Moehlis, J.; Ashwin, P.

    2009-09-01

    A method for designing cluster states with prescribed stability is presented for coupled phase oscillator systems with all-to-all coupling. We determine criteria for the coupling function that ensure the existence and stability of a large variety of clustered configurations. We show that such criteria can be satisfied by choosing Fourier coefficients of the coupling function. We demonstrate that using simple trigonometric and localized coupling functions one can realize arbitrary patterns of stable clusters and that the designed systems are capable of performing finite state computation. The design principles may be relevant when engineering complex dynamical behavior of coupled systems, e.g. the emergent dynamics of artificial neural networks, coupled chemical oscillators and robotic swarms.

  17. Earthquakes with non--double-couple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, C

    1994-05-01

    Seismological observations confirm that the pattern of seismic waves from some earthquakes cannot be produced by slip along a planar fault surface. More than one physical mechanism is required to explain the observed varieties of these non-double-couple earthquakes. The simplest explanation is that some earthquakes are complex, with stress released on two or more suitably oriented, nonparallel fault surfaces. However, some shallow earthquakes in volcanic and geothermal areas require other explanations. Current research focuses on whether fault complexity explains most observed non-double-couple earthquakes and to what extent ordinary earthquakes have non-double-couple components.

  18. The Complex of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor-Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor α Up-Regulates Connexin43 and Intercellular Coupling in Astrocytes via the Janus Tyrosine Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription PathwayD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ozog, Mark A.; Bernier, Suzanne M.; Bates, Dave C.; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Lo, Cecilia W.; Naus, Christian C.G.

    2004-01-01

    Cytokines regulate numerous cell processes, including connexin expression and gap junctional coupling. In this study, we examined the effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on connexin43 (Cx43) expression and intercellular coupling in astrocytes. Murine cortical astrocytes matured in vitro were treated with CNTF (20 ng/ml), soluble ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor α (CNTFRα) (200 ng/ml), or CNTF-CNTFRα. Although CNTF and CNTFRα alone had no effect on Cx43 expression, the heterodimer CNTF-CNTFRα significantly increased both Cx43 mRNA and protein levels. Cx43 immunostaining correlated with increased intercellular coupling as determined by dye transfer analysis. By using the pharmacological inhibitor α-cyano-(3,4-dihydroxy)-N-benzylcinnamide (AG490), the increase in Cx43 was found to be dependent on the Janus tyrosine kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that CNTF-CNTFRα treatment produced nuclear localization of phosphorylated STAT3, whereas CNTF treatment alone did not. Transient transfection of constructs containing various sequences of the Cx43 promoter tagged to a LacZ reporter into ROS 17/2.8 cells confirmed that the promoter region between -838 to -1693 was deemed necessary for CNTF-CNTFRα to induce heightened expression. CNTF-CNTFRα did not alter Cx30 mRNA levels, suggesting selectivity of CNTF-CNTFRα for connexin signaling. Together in the presence of soluble receptor, CNTF activates the JAK/STAT pathway leading to enhanced Cx43 expression and intercellular coupling. PMID:15342787

  19. A combined computational and experimental study of the [Co(bpy)3](2+/3+) complexes as one-electron outer-sphere redox couples in dye-sensitized solar cell electrolyte media.

    PubMed

    Yaghoobi Nia, Narges; Farahani, Pooria; Sabzyan, Hassan; Zendehdel, Mahmoud; Oftadeh, Mohsen

    2014-06-21

    A combined experimental and computational investigation conducted to understand the nature of the interactions between cobalt II/III redox mediators ([Co(bpy)3](2+/3+)) and their impact on the performance of the corresponding dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) is reported. The fully optimized equilibrium structures of cobalt(II/III)-tris-bipyridine complexes in the gas phase and acetonitrile solvent are obtained by the density functional B3LYP method using LanL2DZ and 6-31G(d,p) basis sets. The harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman scattering activities of the complexes are also calculated. The scaled computational vibrational wavenumbers show very good agreement with the experimental values. Calculations of the electronic properties of the complexes are also performed at the TD-B3LYP/6-31G(p,d)[LanL2DZ] level of theory. Detailed interpretations of the infrared and Raman spectra of the complexes in different phases are reported. Detailed atomic orbital coefficients of the frontier molecular orbitals and their major contributions to electronic excitations of the complexes are also reported. These results are in good agreement with the experimental electrochemical values. Marcus diagram is derived for the electron transfer reaction Co(II) + D35(+)→ Co(III) + D35 using the Co-N bond length as a reaction coordinate. PMID:24802678

  20. Four-electron oxidative dehydrogenation induced by proton-coupled electron transfer in ruthenium(III) complex with 2-(1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-2-yl)phenolate.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Ryoji; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Sunatsuki, Yukinari

    2013-09-01

    New ruthenium(II or III) complexes with general formula [Ru(O-N)(bpy)2](n+) (O-N = unsymmetrical bidentate phenolate ligand; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) were synthesized, and their crystal structures and electrochemical properties were characterized. Ru(II) complexes with 2-(2-imidazolinyl)phenolate (Himn(-)) or 2-(1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-2-yl)phenolate (Hthp(-)) could be deprotonated by addition of excess KO(t)Bu, although the deprotonated species were easily reprotonated by exposure to air. Unlike these Ru(II) complexes, their Ru(III) analogs showed interesting ligand oxidation reactions upon addition of bases. With [Ru(III)(Himn)(bpy)2](2+), two-electron oxidation of Himn(-) and reduction of the Ru(III) center resulted in conversion of the 2-imidazolinyl group to a 2-imidazolyl group. On the other hand, the corresponding Hthp(-) complex exhibited four-electron oxidation of the ligand to form 2-(2-pyrimidyl)phenolate (pym(-)). These aromatization reactions of imidazolinyl and 1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidyl groups were also achieved by the electrochemically generated Ru(III) complexes. PMID:23967872

  1. A combined computational and experimental study of the [Co(bpy)3](2+/3+) complexes as one-electron outer-sphere redox couples in dye-sensitized solar cell electrolyte media.

    PubMed

    Yaghoobi Nia, Narges; Farahani, Pooria; Sabzyan, Hassan; Zendehdel, Mahmoud; Oftadeh, Mohsen

    2014-06-21

    A combined experimental and computational investigation conducted to understand the nature of the interactions between cobalt II/III redox mediators ([Co(bpy)3](2+/3+)) and their impact on the performance of the corresponding dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) is reported. The fully optimized equilibrium structures of cobalt(II/III)-tris-bipyridine complexes in the gas phase and acetonitrile solvent are obtained by the density functional B3LYP method using LanL2DZ and 6-31G(d,p) basis sets. The harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman scattering activities of the complexes are also calculated. The scaled computational vibrational wavenumbers show very good agreement with the experimental values. Calculations of the electronic properties of the complexes are also performed at the TD-B3LYP/6-31G(p,d)[LanL2DZ] level of theory. Detailed interpretations of the infrared and Raman spectra of the complexes in different phases are reported. Detailed atomic orbital coefficients of the frontier molecular orbitals and their major contributions to electronic excitations of the complexes are also reported. These results are in good agreement with the experimental electrochemical values. Marcus diagram is derived for the electron transfer reaction Co(II) + D35(+)→ Co(III) + D35 using the Co-N bond length as a reaction coordinate.

  2. Traffic congestion in interconnected complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Fei; Wu, Jiajing; Xia, Yongxiang; Tse, Chi K.

    2014-06-01

    Traffic congestion in isolated complex networks has been investigated extensively over the last decade. Coupled network models have recently been developed to facilitate further understanding of real complex systems. Analysis of traffic congestion in coupled complex networks, however, is still relatively unexplored. In this paper, we try to explore the effect of interconnections on traffic congestion in interconnected Barabási-Albert scale-free networks. We find that assortative coupling can alleviate traffic congestion more readily than disassortative and random coupling when the node processing capacity is allocated based on node usage probability. Furthermore, the optimal coupling probability can be found for assortative coupling. However, three types of coupling preferences achieve similar traffic performance if all nodes share the same processing capacity. We analyze interconnected Internet autonomous-system-level graphs of South Korea and Japan and obtain similar results. Some practical suggestions are presented to optimize such real-world interconnected networks accordingly.

  3. Electrical coupling in multi-array charge coupled devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Parul; Sakarvadiya, Vishal; Dubey, Neeraj; Kirkire, Shweta; Thapa, Nitesh; Banerjee, Arup

    2016-05-01

    Silicon based charge coupled device (CCD) performances have improved immensely over the years. Scientific community across the globe target challenging remote sensing applications with CCD as optical imaging detector. Over the years, both pixel count (from few hundreds to few tens of thousands) and line readout rate (from few kHz to few tens of kHz) have increased considerably. Pixels are readout using a large number of output ports driven up to few tens of MHz Moreover, for multi-spectral applications, same Si die contains multiple arrays sharing input stimuli. This is usually done to optimize package pin count. Si die as well as package level layout of clock and bias lines become critical for closely spaced multi-array devices. The inter-array separation may go down to few hundreds of microns when filter coating is laid on top of the die. Die level layout becomes quite critical for devices with such architecture. The inter-array (consecutive arrays) separation is optimized to reduce optical coupling / stray light in devices integrated multi-band strip filter. Layout constraints along with shared bias/clock lines are known to produce electrical cross-talk or coupling. Effect of this (within one array or between two arrays) cross-talk is more pronounced in systems having low noise floor. Video signal dependent coupling in a multi-port system becomes quite complex and leads to a relatively noisier system (post correction). The paper presents results of simulations and tests (pre and post correction) addressing this type of electrical coupling. The paper presents cause, impact and possible remedial measures to minimize such coupling in a multi-array, multi-port TDI CCD from 1.3% to below 0.06%.

  4. The Work-Centered Couple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Len; Carlson, Jon

    1991-01-01

    Sketches taxonomy of work-centered couple. Briefly describes five couple types: the dual-career couple, the commuting couple, the military couple, the executive couple, and the family business couple. Notes that issues of work and career can greatly impact the lives of these couples. Encourages family psychology to further explore this area of…

  5. Understanding complex chiral plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Yue, Song; Liu, Na

    2015-11-01

    Chiral nanoplasmonics exhibits great potential for novel nanooptical devices due to the generation of a strong chiroptical response within nanoscale metallic structures. Recently, a number of different approaches have been utilized to create chiral nanoplasmonic structures. However, particularly for tailoring nanooptical chiral sensing devices, the understanding of the resulting chiroptical response when coupling chiral and achiral structures together is crucial and has not been completely understood to date. Here, we present a thorough and step-by-step experimental study to understand the intriguing chiral-achiral coupling scheme. We set up a hybrid plasmonic system, which bears resemblance to the 'host-guest' system in supramolecular chemistry to analyze and explain the complex chiral response both at the chiral and achiral plasmonic resonances. We also provide an elegant and simple analytical model, which can describe, predict, and comprehend the chiroptical spectra in detail. Our study will shed light on designing well-controlled chiral-achiral coupling platforms for reliable chiral sensing.

  6. Ferromagnetic vs. antiferromagnetic coupling in bis(mu2-1,1-azido)dinickel(II) complexes with syn- and anti-conformations of the end-on azide bridges.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Phalguni; Wagner, Rita; Khanra, Sumit; Weyhermüller, Thomas

    2006-11-01

    Reaction of a 1 : 1 : 1 molar ratio of NiCl(2), NaN(3) and H(2)L, a tetradentate ligand N-(2-pyridyl)methyl)-N,N-bis(2'-hydroxy-3',5'-dimethylbenzyl)amine in methanol in presence of Et(3)N results in a turquoise precipitate, which affords deep green crystals of [Ni(2)(HL)(2)(N(3))(2)]*1.5CH(2)Cl(2) (1) and [Ni(2)(HL)(2)(N(3))(2)]*H(2)O (2) upon crystallization from CH(2)Cl(2)-MeOH or THF-MeOH, respectively. Both complexes reveal distorted octahedral NiN(4)O(2) coordination environments around the Ni(ii) centers with bis(micro-1,1-azido) bridging ligands. Complex 1 displays an unprecedented small Ni-N-Ni bridge angle of 90.4 degrees , whereas 2 contains the said angle of av. 98.7 degrees lying in the usual range observed for other comparable structures. The variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility together with the variable-field, variable-temperature (VTVH) magnetization measurements discern different ground states of S(t) = 0 for 1 and S(t) = 2 for 2. The magnetic behaviours of these compounds are discussed in the context of the known bis(end-on azido) bridging dinickel(II) complexes.

  7. Cross-coupling reaction with lithium methyltriolborate.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasunori; Ikizakura, Kazuya; Ito, Hajime; Miyaura, Norio

    2012-12-28

    We newly developed lithium methyltriolborate as an air-stable white solid that is convenient to handle. The good performance of this triolborate for metal-catalyzed bond-forming reactions was demonstrated in palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions with haloarenes. Cross-coupling reaction of [MeB(OCH₂)₃CCH₃]Li with aryl halides occurred in the presence of Pd(OAc)₂/RuPhos complex in refluxing MeOH/H₂O and the absence of bases.

  8. Investigating the structural origin of trpzip2 temperature dependent unfolding fluorescence line shape based on a Markov state model simulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Gao, Fang; Cui, Raymond Z; Shuang, Feng; Liang, Wanzhen; Huang, Xuhui; Zhuang, Wei

    2012-10-25

    Vibrationally resolved fluorescence spectra of the β-hairpin trpzip2 peptide at two temperatures as well as during a T-jump unfolding process are simulated on the basis of a combination of Markov state models and quantum chemistry schemes. The broad asymmetric spectral line shape feature is reproduced by considering the exciton-phonon couplings. The temperature dependent red shift observed in the experiment has been attributed to the state population changes of specific chromophores. Through further theoretical study, it is found that both the environment's electric field and the chromophores' geometry distortions are responsible for tryptophan fluorescence shift. PMID:22994891

  9. Synchronization in node of complex networks consist of complex chaotic system

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Qiang; Xie, Cheng-jun; Liu, Hong-jun; Li, Yan-hui

    2014-07-15

    A new synchronization method is investigated for node of complex networks consists of complex chaotic system. When complex networks realize synchronization, different component of complex state variable synchronize up to different scaling complex function by a designed complex feedback controller. This paper change synchronization scaling function from real field to complex field for synchronization in node of complex networks with complex chaotic system. Synchronization in constant delay and time-varying coupling delay complex networks are investigated, respectively. Numerical simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Biorhythm in Couple Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araoz, Daniel L.

    1977-01-01

    Twelve couples in marital counseling were studied during 12 months on the basis of their biorhythms. For each couple a compatibility percentage was obtained. It was found that difficulties in their interaction correlated highly with dissonance in their biorhythms. (Author)

  11. Couples with dementia: Positioning the 'we'.

    PubMed

    Hydén, Lars-Christer; Nilsson, Elin

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate how spouses in couples with dementia position themselves in relation to each other by analysing their use of pronouns, especially the we. The study uses joint interviews with 11 couples. Based on a quantitative analysis of pronoun use, it is argued that the pronoun we is used by all the spouses; however, it is used less frequently by the spouses with dementia in comparison with healthy spouses. A qualitative analysis of the use of the pronoun we shows that the spouses position, experience and consider themselves as a couple and that they position and experience themselves as individuals in relation to the couple. One of the challenges for couples with dementia is to be able to retain a we in face of the progression of the dementia disease. By positioning themselves in various ways, the spouses establish and negotiate quite a complex and emotionally charged web of relationships.

  12. Microwave fidelity studies by varying antenna coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köber, B.; Kuhl, U.; Stöckmann, H.-J.; Gorin, T.; Savin, D. V.; Seligman, T. H.

    2010-09-01

    The fidelity decay in a microwave billiard is considered, where the coupling to an attached antenna is varied. The resulting quantity, coupling fidelity, is experimentally studied for three different terminators of the varied antenna: a hard-wall reflection, an open wall reflection, and a 50Ω load, corresponding to a totally open channel. The model description in terms of an effective Hamiltonian with a complex coupling constant is given. Quantitative agreement is found with the theory obtained from a modified VWZ approach [J. J. M. Verbaarschot , Phys. Rep. 129, 367 (1985)10.1016/0370-1573(85)90070-5].

  13. The Phosphotyrosine Phosphatase SHP-2 Participates in a Multimeric Signaling Complex and Regulates T Cell Receptor (TCR) coupling to the Ras/Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Pathway in Jurkat T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Frearson, Julie A.; Alexander, Denis R.

    1998-01-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domain–containing phosphotyrosine phosphatases (SHPs) are increasingly being shown to play critical roles in protein tyrosine kinase–mediated signaling pathways. The role of SHP-1 as a negative regulator of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling has been established. To further explore the function of the other member of this family, SHP-2, in TCR-mediated events, a catalytically inactive mutant SHP-2 was expressed under an inducible promoter in Jurkat T cells. Expression of the mutant phosphatase significantly inhibited TCR-induced activation of the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)-2 member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, but had no effect on TCR-ζ chain tyrosine phosphorylation or TCR-elicited Ca2+ transients. Inactive SHP-2 was targeted to membranes resulting in the selective increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of three membrane-associated candidate SHP-2 substrates of 110 kD, 55-60 kD, and 36 kD, respectively. Analysis of immunoprecipitates containing inactive SHP-2 also indicated that the 110-kD and 36-kD Grb-2–associated proteins were putative substrates for SHP-2. TCR-stimulation of Jurkat T cells expressing wild-type SHP-2 resulted in the formation of a multimeric cytosolic complex composed of SHP-2, Grb-2, phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3′-kinase, and p110. A significant proportion of this complex was shown to be membrane associated, presumably as a result of translocation from the cytosol. Catalytically inactive SHP-2, rather than the wild-type PTPase, was preferentially localized in complex with Grb-2 and the p85 subunit of PI 3′-kinase, suggesting that the dephosphorylating actions of SHP-2 may regulate the association of these signaling molecules to the p110 complex. Our results show that SHP-2 plays a critical role in linking the TCR to the Ras/MAPK pathway in Jurkat T cells, and also provide some insight into the molecular interactions of SHP-2 that form the basis of this signal transduction process

  14. An osmium(III)/osmium(V) redox couple generating Os(V)(O)(OH) center for cis-1,2-dihydroxylation of alkenes with H2O2: Os complex with a nitrogen-based tetradentate ligand.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hideki; Kitayama, Kazuhiro; Mori, Seiji; Itoh, Shinobu

    2012-11-21

    For the synthesis of the 1,2-diols, cis-1,2-dihydroxylation of alkenes catalyzed by osmium(VIII) tetroxide (OsO(4)) is a powerful method. However, OsO(4) is quite toxic due to its highly volatile and sublimable nature. Thus, the development of alternative catalysts for cis-1,2-dihydroxylation of alkenes is highly challenging. Our approach involves the use of a nitrogen-based tetradentate ligand, tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (tpa), for an osmium center to develop a new osmium catalyst and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as a cheap and environmentally benign oxidant. The new Os-tpa complex acts as a very efficient turnover catalyst for syn-selective dihydroxylation of various alkenes (turnover number ∼1000) in aqueous media, and H(2)O(2) oxidant is formally incorporated into the products quantitatively (100% atom efficiency). The reaction intermediates involved in the catalytic cycle have been isolated and characterized crystallographically as [Os(III)(OH)(H(2)O)(tpa)](2+) and [Os(V)(O)(OH)(tpa)](2+) complexes. The observed syn-selectivity, structural characteristics of the intermediates, and kinetic studies have suggested a concerted [3 + 2]-cycloaddition mechanism between [Os(V)(O)(OH)(tpa)](2+) and alkenes, which is strongly supported by DFT calculations.

  15. Hydromechanical coupling in geologic processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    Earth's porous crust and the fluids within it are intimately linked through their mechanical effects on each other. This paper presents an overview of such "hydromechanical" coupling and examines current understanding of its role in geologic processes. An outline of the theory of hydromechanics and rheological models for geologic deformation is included to place various analytical approaches in proper context and to provide an introduction to this broad topic for nonspecialists. Effects of hydromechanical coupling are ubiquitous in geology, and can be local and short-lived or regional and very long-lived. Phenomena such as deposition and erosion, tectonism, seismicity, earth tides, and barometric loading produce strains that tend to alter fluid pressure. Resulting pressure perturbations can be dramatic, and many so-called "anomalous" pressures appear to have been created in this manner. The effects of fluid pressure on crustal mechanics are also profound. Geologic media deform and fail largely in response to effective stress, or total stress minus fluid pressure. As a result, fluid pressures control compaction, decompaction, and other types of deformation, as well as jointing, shear failure, and shear slippage, including events that generate earthquakes. By controlling deformation and failure, fluid pressures also regulate states of stress in the upper crust. Advances in the last 80 years, including theories of consolidation, transient groundwater flow, and poroelasticity, have been synthesized into a reasonably complete conceptual framework for understanding and describing hydromechanical coupling. Full coupling in two or three dimensions is described using force balance equations for deformation coupled with a mass conservation equation for fluid flow. Fully coupled analyses allow hypothesis testing and conceptual model development. However, rigorous application of full coupling is often difficult because (1) the rheological behavior of geologic media is complex

  16. Selective 4e-/4H+ O2 reduction by an iron(tetraferrocenyl)porphyrin complex: from proton transfer followed by electron transfer in organic solvent to proton coupled electron transfer in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Mittra, Kaustuv; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Samanta, Subhra; Dey, Abhishek

    2013-12-16

    An iron porphyrin catalyst bearing four ferrocenes and a hydrogen bonding distal pocket is found to catalyze 4e(-)/4H(+) oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in organic solvent under homogeneous conditions in the presence of 2-3 equiv of Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid. Absorption spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and resonance Raman data along with H2O2 assay indicate that one out of the four electrons necessary to reduce O2 to H2O is donated by the ferrous porphyrin while three are donated by the distal ferrocene residues. The same catalyst shows 4e(-)/4H(+) reduction of O2 in an aqueous medium, under heterogeneous conditions, over a wide range of pH. Both the selectivity and the rate of ORR are found to be pH independent in an aqueous medium. The ORR proceeds via a proton transfer followed by electron transfer (PET) step in an organic medium and while a 2e(-)/1H(+) proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) step determines the electrochemical potential of ORR in an aqueous medium.

  17. On the mechanisms of degenerate ligand exchange in [M(CH(3))](+)/CH(4) Couples (M=Fe, Co, Ni, Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, Pt) as explored by mass spectrometric and computational studies: oxidative addition/reductive elimination versus sigma-complex-assisted metathesis.

    PubMed

    Armélin, Marc; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    The degenerate ligand exchange in [M(CH(3))](+)/CH(4) couples occurs in the gas phase at room temperature for M=Ni, Ru, Rh, Pd, and Pt, whereas the complexes containing Fe and Co are unreactive. Details of hydrogen-atom scrambling versus direct ligand switch have been uncovered by labeling experiments with CD(4) and (13)CH(4), respectively. The reactivity scale ranges from unreactive (M=Fe, Co) or inefficient (M=Ni, Pd) to moderately (M=Ru) and rather reactive (M=Rh, Pt). Quite extensive, but not complete, H/D exchange between the hydrogen atoms of the incoming and outgoing methyl groups is observed for M=Pt, whereas for M=Ni and Pd a predominantly direct ligand switch prevails. DFT calculations performed at the B3LYP level of theory account well for the thermal nonreactivity of the Fe and Co couples. For [Ni[CH(3))](+)/CH(4), a sigma-complex-assisted metathesis (sigma-CAM) is operative such that, in a two-state reactivity (TSR) scenario, two spin flips between the (3)A ground and (1)A excited states take place at the entrance and exit channels of the encounter complexes. For M=Ru and Rh, only oxidative addition/reductive elimination (OA/RE) is favored energetically, and the reaction is confined to the electronic ground states (3)A and (2)A. In contrast, for the [Pd(CH(3))](+)/CH(4) system, on the (1)A ground-state potential-energy surface both the OA/RE and sigma-CAM variants are energetically comparable, and the small reaction efficiency for the ligand switch is reflected in transition states located energetically close to the reactants. For the [M(CH(3))](+)/CH(4) complexes of the 5d elements, the sigma-CAM mechanism does not play a role. For M=Pt, the energetically most favored path proceeds in a spin-conserving manner on the (1)A potential-energy surface, which accounts for the extensive single and double hydrogen-atom exchange preceding ligand exchange. Although for M=Os and Ir the [M(CH(3))](+) complexes could not be generated experimentally, computational

  18. Complexity Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sandra L.; Anderson, Beth C.

    To determine whether consensus existed among teachers about the complexity of common classroom materials, a survey was administered to 66 pre-service and in-service kindergarten and prekindergarten teachers. Participants were asked to rate 14 common classroom materials as simple, complex, or super-complex. Simple materials have one obvious part,…

  19. Enhancing the magnetic coupling of oxalato-bridged Re(IV)2M(II) (M=Mn, Co, Ni, and Cu) trinuclear complexes via peripheral halide ligand effects.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lillo, José; Mastropietro, Teresa F; De Munno, Giovanni; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel; Faus, Juan

    2011-06-20

    Four heterotrinuclear Re(IV)(2)M(II) compounds of general formula (NBu(4))(2)[{Re(IV)Br(4)(μ-ox)}(2)M(II)(Him)(2)] [NBu(4)(+) = tetra-n-butylammonium cation, ox = oxalate, Him = imidazole; M = Mn (1), Co (2), Ni (3), and Cu (4)] have been synthesized by using the novel mononuclear complex [Re(IV)Br(4)(ox)](2-) as a ligand toward divalent first-row transition metal ions in the presence of imidazole. Compounds 1-4 are isostructural complexes whose structure contains discrete trinuclear [{Re(IV)Br(4)(μ-ox)}(2)M(II)(Him)(2)](2-) anions and bulky NBu(4)(+) cations. The Re and M atoms are six-coordinated: four peripheral bromo and two oxalate-oxygens (at Re), and two cis-coordinated imidazole molecules and four oxygen atoms from two oxalate ligands (at M), build distorted octahedral surroundings. Two peripheral [ReBr(4)(ox)](2-) units act as bidentate ligands through the oxalate group toward the central [M(II)(Him)(2)] fragment affording the trinuclear entities. The values of the intramolecular Re···M separation are 5.62(1) (1), 5.51(1) (2), 5.46(1) (3), and 5.55(1) Å (4). Magnetic susceptibility measurements on polycrystalline samples of 1-4 in the temperature range of 1.9-300 K show the occurrence of intramolecular antiferro- [J = -1.1 cm(-1) (1)] and ferromagnetic interactions [J = +3.9 (2), +19.7 (3), and +14.4 cm(-1) (4)], the Hamiltonian being defined as Ĥ = -J [Ŝ(M)(Ŝ(Re1) + Ŝ(Re2))]. The larger spin delocalization on the oxalato bridge in 1-4 when compared to the trinuclear Re(IV)(2)M(II) complexes with chloro instead of bromo as peripheral ligands (1'-4') accounts for the strengthening of the magnetic interactions in 1-4 [J = -0.35 (1'), +14.2 (3'), and +7.7 cm(-1) (4')]. An incipient frequency dependence of the out-of-phase ac signals of 3 at very low temperatures is reminiscent of a system with slow relaxation of the magnetization, a phenomenon characteristic of single-molecule magnet behavior.

  20. Solid phase microextraction coupled with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for high-resolution metabolite profiling in apples: implementation of structured separations for optimization of sample preparation procedure in complex samples.

    PubMed

    Risticevic, Sanja; DeEll, Jennifer R; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2012-08-17

    Metabolomics currently represents one of the fastest growing high-throughput molecular analysis platforms that refer to the simultaneous and unbiased analysis of metabolite pools constituting a particular biological system under investigation. In response to the ever increasing interest in development of reliable methods competent with obtaining a complete and accurate metabolomic snapshot for subsequent identification, quantification and profiling studies, the purpose of the current investigation is to test the feasibility of solid phase microextraction for advanced fingerprinting of volatile and semivolatile metabolites in complex samples. In particular, the current study is focussed on the development and optimization of solid phase microextraction (SPME) - comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-ToFMS) methodology for metabolite profiling of apples (Malus × domestica Borkh.). For the first time, GC × GC attributes in terms of molecular structure-retention relationships and utilization of two-dimensional separation space on orthogonal GC × GC setup were exploited in the field of SPME method optimization for complex sample analysis. Analytical performance data were assessed in terms of method precision when commercial coatings are employed in spiked metabolite aqueous sample analysis. The optimized method consisted of the implementation of direct immersion SPME (DI-SPME) extraction mode and its application to metabolite profiling of apples, and resulted in a tentative identification of 399 metabolites and the composition of a metabolite database far more comprehensive than those obtainable with classical one-dimensional GC approaches. Considering that specific metabolome constituents were for the first time reported in the current study, a valuable approach for future advanced fingerprinting studies in the field of fruit biology is proposed. The current study also intensifies the understanding of SPME

  1. Coupled Planetary Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    We can look beyond the Earth, to Venus and Mars, to find opportunities to understand interactions among crust, mantle, hydrosphere, and atmosphere reservoirs. There has obviously been coupling among some of these reservoirs on other worlds, and in some cases feedback may have been in play but that is more difficult to demonstrate. The massive CO2 atmosphere of Venus has likely fluctuated significantly over its history due to exchange with other reservoirs, with attendant greenhouse effects strongly modulating surface temperature. Additionally, release of H2O and SO2 from large-scale magmatic events may have led to significant surface temperature increases, ΔT0, and the details depend on the competition between IR radiation warming and planetary albedo increase due to cloud formation. Diffusion of Δ T0 into the shallow crust may be responsible for the rapid global formation of compressional wrinkle ridges following widespread volcanic resurfacing [Solomon et al., 1999]. Diffusion of ΔT0 into the venusian upper mantle could have increased the rate of partial melting. The accompanying increase in volatile release to the atmosphere could set up a positive feedback because of increased greenhouse warming diffusing into the planet's interior [Phillips et al., 2001, Venus]. Another outcome of deep penetration of a greenhouse-induced positive ΔT0 is the lowering of mantle viscosity and an accompanying decrease in convective stress, which could shut down an exisiting lithospheric recycling regime [Lenardic et al., 2008]. Mars offers a rich set of possibilities for coupling between reservoirs [Jakosky and Phillips, 2001]. Magmatism at the massive Tharsis volcanic complex possibly induced episodic climate changes in the latter part of the Noachian era (~3.6-4.2 Ga). This could have led to clement conditions, forming valley networks that follow a regional slope caused partly by the mass load of Tharsis itself [Phillips et al., 2001, Mars]. Earlier in the Noachian

  2. Engineering complex tissues.

    PubMed

    Atala, Anthony; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2012-11-14

    Tissue engineering has emerged at the intersection of numerous disciplines to meet a global clinical need for technologies to promote the regeneration of functional living tissues and organs. The complexity of many tissues and organs, coupled with confounding factors that may be associated with the injury or disease underlying the need for repair, is a challenge to traditional engineering approaches. Biomaterials, cells, and other factors are needed to design these constructs, but not all tissues are created equal. Flat tissues (skin); tubular structures (urethra); hollow, nontubular, viscus organs (vagina); and complex solid organs (liver) all present unique challenges in tissue engineering. This review highlights advances in tissue engineering technologies to enable regeneration of complex tissues and organs and to discuss how such innovative, engineered tissues can affect the clinic.

  3. Assessment of the "6-31+G** + LANL2DZ" Mixed Basis Set Coupled with Density Functional Theory Methods and the Effective Core Potential: Prediction of Heats of Formation and Ionization Potentials for First-Row-Transition-Metal Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Weaver, Michael N.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2009-08-01

    Computational chemists have long demonstrated great interest in finding ways to reliably and accurately predict the molecular properties for transition-metal-containing complexes. This study is a continuation of our validation efforts of density functional theory (DFT) methods when applied to transition-metal-containing systems (Riley, K.E.; Merz, K. M., Jr. J. Phys. Chem. 2007, 111, 6044-6053). In our previous work we examined DFT using all-electron basis sets, but approaches incorporating effective core potentials (ECPs) are effective in reducing computational expense. With this in mind, our efforts were expanded to include evaluation of the performance of the basis set derived to approximate such an approach as well on the same set of density functionals. Indeed, employing an ECP basis such as LANL2DZ (Los Alamos National Laboratory 2 double ζ) for transition metals, while using all-electron basis sets for all other non-transition-metal atoms, has become more and more popular in computations on transition-metal-containing systems. In this study, we assess the performance of 12 different DFT functionals, from the GGA (generalized gradient approximation), hybrid-GGA, meta-GGA, and hybrid-meta-GGA classes, respectively, along with the 6-31+G** + LANL2DZ (on the transition metal) mixed basis set in predicting two important molecular properties, heats of formation and ionization potentials, for 94 and 58 systems containing first-row transition metals from Ti to Zn, which are all in the third row of the periodic table. An interesting note is that the inclusion of the exact exchange term in density functional methods generally increases the accuracy of ionization potential prediction for the hybrid-GGA methods but decreases the reliability of determining the heats of formation for transition-metal-containing complexes for all hybrid density functional methods. The hybrid-GGA functional B3LYP gives the best performance in predicting the ionization potentials, while the

  4. Response reactions: equilibrium coupling.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Eufrozina A; Nagypal, Istvan

    2006-06-01

    It is pointed out and illustrated in the present paper that if a homogeneous multiple equilibrium system containing k components and q species is composed of the reactants actually taken and their reactions contain only k + 1 species, then we have a unique representation with (q - k) stoichiometrically independent reactions (SIRs). We define these as coupling reactions. All the other possible combinations with k + 1 species are the coupled reactions that are in equilibrium when the (q - k) SIRs are in equilibrium. The response of the equilibrium state for perturbation is determined by the coupling and coupled equilibria. Depending on the circumstances and the actual thermodynamic data, the effect of coupled equilibria may overtake the effect of the coupling ones, leading to phenomena that are in apparent contradiction with Le Chatelier's principle. PMID:16722770

  5. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L.C.

    2000-05-23

    A three tooth kinematic coupling is disclosed based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  6. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Layton C.

    2000-01-01

    A three tooth kinematic coupling based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  7. Ordering design tasks based on coupling strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L., Jr.; Bloebaum, Christina L.

    1994-01-01

    The design process associated with large engineering systems requires an initial decomposition of the complex system into modules of design tasks which are coupled through the transference of output data. In analyzing or optimizing such a coupled system, it is essential to be able to determine which interactions figure prominently enough to significantly affect the accuracy of the system solution. Many decomposition approaches assume the capability is available to determine what design tasks and interactions exist and what order of execution will be imposed during the analysis process. Unfortunately, this is often a complex problem and beyond the capabilities of a human design manager. A new feature for DeMAID (Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition) will allow the design manager to use coupling strength information to find a proper sequence for ordering the design tasks. In addition, these coupling strengths aid in deciding if certain tasks or couplings could be removed (or temporarily suspended) from consideration to achieve computational savings without a significant loss of system accuracy. New rules are presented and two small test cases are used to show the effects of using coupling strengths in this manner.

  8. Ordering Design Tasks Based on Coupling Strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L.; Bloebaum, C. L.

    1994-01-01

    The design process associated with large engineering systems requires an initial decomposition of the complex system into modules of design tasks which are coupled through the transference of output data. In analyzing or optimizing such a coupled system, it is essential to be able to determine which interactions figure prominently enough to significantly affect the accuracy of the system solution. Many decomposition approaches assume the capability is available to determine what design tasks and interactions exist and what order of execution will be imposed during the analysis process. Unfortunately, this is often a complex problem and beyond the capabilities of a human design manager. A new feature for DeMAID (Design Manager's Aid for Intelligent Decomposition) will allow the design manager to use coupling strength information to find a proper sequence for ordering the design tasks. In addition, these coupling strengths aid in deciding if certain tasks or couplings could be removed (or temporarily suspended) from consideration to achieve computational savings without a significant loss of system accuracy. New rules are presented and two small test cases are used to show the effects of using coupling strengths in this manner.

  9. Integral dependent spin couplings in CI calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iberle, K.; Davidson, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    Although the number of ways to combine Slater determinants to form spin eigenfunctions increases rapidly with the number of open shells, most of these spin couplings will make only a small contribution to a given state, provided the spin coupling is chosen judiciously. The technique of limiting calculations to the interacting subspace pioneered by Bunge (1970) was employed by Munch and Davidson (1975) to the vanadium atom. The use of an interacting space looses its advantage in more complex cases. However, the problem can always be reduced to only one interacting spin coupling by making the coefficients integral dependent. The present investigation is concerned with the performance of integral dependent interacting couplings, taking into account the results of three test calculations.

  10. Multi-level coupled cluster theory

    SciTech Connect

    Myhre, Rolf H.; Koch, Henrik; Sánchez de Merás, Alfredo M. J.

    2014-12-14

    We present a general formalism where different levels of coupled cluster theory can be applied to different parts of the molecular system. The system is partitioned into subsystems by Cholesky decomposition of the one-electron Hartree-Fock density matrix. In this way the system can be divided across chemical bonds without discontinuities arising. The coupled cluster wave function is defined in terms of cluster operators for each part and these are determined from a set of coupled equations. The total wave function fulfills the Pauli-principle across all borders and levels of electron correlation. We develop the associated response theory for this multi-level coupled cluster theory and present proof of principle applications. The formalism is an essential tool in order to obtain size-intensive complexity in the calculation of local molecular properties.

  11. 40 CFR 721.10045 - Diazotized substituted heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). 721.10045... derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (PMN P-02-737)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10045 - Diazotized substituted heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). 721.10045... derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (PMN P-02-737)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10045 - Diazotized substituted heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). 721.10045... derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (PMN P-02-737)...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10045 - Diazotized substituted heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). 721.10045... derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (PMN P-02-737)...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10045 - Diazotized substituted heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). 721.10045... derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject... heteromonocycle coupled with naphthalene sulfonic acid derivative, nickel complex, alkaline salt (PMN P-02-737)...

  16. Controlling synchronous patterns in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weijie; Fan, Huawei; Wang, Ying; Ying, Heping; Wang, Xingang

    2016-04-01

    Although the set of permutation symmetries of a complex network could be very large, few of them give rise to stable synchronous patterns. Here we present a general framework and develop techniques for controlling synchronization patterns in complex network of coupled chaotic oscillators. Specifically, according to the network permutation symmetry, we design a small-size and weighted network, namely the control network, and use it to control the large-size complex network by means of pinning coupling. We argue mathematically that for any of the network symmetries, there always exists a critical pinning strength beyond which the unstable synchronous pattern associated to this symmetry can be stabilized. The feasibility of the control method is verified by numerical simulations of both artificial and real-world networks and demonstrated experimentally in systems of coupled chaotic circuits. Our studies show the controllability of synchronous patterns in complex networks of coupled chaotic oscillators.

  17. Complex derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; Georg, Co-Pierre; May, Robert; Stiglitz, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    The intrinsic complexity of the financial derivatives market has emerged as both an incentive to engage in it, and a key source of its inherent instability. Regulators now faced with the challenge of taming this beast may find inspiration in the budding science of complex systems.

  18. Designing Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanville, Ranulph

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the nature of complexity and design, as well as relationships between the two, and suggests that design may have much potential as an approach to improving human performance in situations seen as complex. It is developed against two backgrounds. The first is a world view that derives from second order cybernetics and radical…

  19. Improved fluid-structure coupling. [BWR

    SciTech Connect

    McMaster, W.H.; Gong, E.Y.; Landram, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    In the computer code PELE-IC, an incompressible Eulerian hydrodynamic algorithm was coupled to a Lagrangian finite element shell algorithm for the analysis of pressure suppression in boiling water reactors. This effort also required the development of a free surface algorithm capable of handling expanding gas bubbles. These algorithms have been improved to strengthen the coupling and to add the capability for following the more complex free surfaces resulting from steam condensation. These improvements have also permitted more economical 2D calculations and have made it feasible to develop a 3D version. A compressible option using the acoustic approximation has also been added, furthering the usefulness of the code. The coupling improvements were made in three areas which are identified as (1) preferential coupling, (2) merged cell coupling, and (3) free surface-structure coupling, and are described. These algorithms have been additionally implemented in a three dimensional version of the code called PELE3D. This version has a free surface capability to follow expanding and contracting bubbles and is coupled to a curved rigid surface.

  20. Translation-coupling systems

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian; Mendez-Perez, Daniel

    2013-11-05

    Disclosed are systems and methods for coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A version of the invention includes a translation-coupling cassette. The translation-coupling cassette includes a target gene, a response gene, a response-gene translation control element, and a secondary structure-forming sequence that reversibly forms a secondary structure masking the response-gene translation control element. Masking of the response-gene translation control element inhibits translation of the response gene. Full translation of the target gene results in unfolding of the secondary structure and consequent translation of the response gene. Translation of the target gene is determined by detecting presence of the response-gene protein product. The invention further includes RNA transcripts of the translation-coupling cassettes, vectors comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, hosts comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, methods of using the translation-coupling cassettes, and gene products produced with the translation-coupling cassettes.

  1. Translation-coupling systems

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian; Mendez-Perez, Daniel

    2015-05-19

    Disclosed are systems and methods for coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A version of the invention includes a translation-coupling cassette. The translation-coupling cassette includes a target gene, a response gene, a response-gene translation control element, and a secondary structure-forming sequence that reversibly forms a secondary structure masking the response-gene translation control element. Masking of the response-gene translation control element inhibits translation of the response gene. Full translation of the target gene results in unfolding of the secondary structure and consequent translation of the response gene. Translation of the target gene is determined by detecting presence of the response-gene protein product. The invention further includes RNA transcripts of the translation-coupling cassettes, vectors comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, hosts comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, methods of using the translation-coupling cassettes, and gene products produced with the translation-coupling cassettes.

  2. Gear Spline Coupling Program

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yi; Errichello, Robert

    2013-08-29

    An analytical model is developed to evaluate the design of a spline coupling. For a given torque and shaft misalignment, the model calculates the number of teeth in contact, tooth loads, stiffnesses, stresses, and safety factors. The analytic model provides essential spline coupling design and modeling information and could be easily integrated into gearbox design and simulation tools.

  3. Complexity and synchronization in stochastic chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son Dang, Thai; Palit, Sanjay Kumar; Mukherjee, Sayan; Hoang, Thang Manh; Banerjee, Santo

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the complexity of a hyperchaotic dynamical system perturbed by noise and various nonlinear speech and music signals. The complexity is measured by the weighted recurrence entropy of the hyperchaotic and stochastic systems. The synchronization phenomenon between two stochastic systems with complex coupling is also investigated. These criteria are tested on chaotic and perturbed systems by mean conditional recurrence and normalized synchronization error. Numerical results including surface plots, normalized synchronization errors, complexity variations etc show the effectiveness of the proposed analysis.

  4. PREFACE: Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, David; Senatore, Gaetano

    2009-05-01

    , condensed matter and ultra-cold plasmas. One hundred and thirty participants came from twenty countries and four continents to participate in the conference. Those giving presentations were asked to contribute to this special issue to make a representative record of an interesting conference. We thank the International Advisory Board and the Programme Committee for their support and suggestions. We thank the Local Organizing Committee (Stefania De Palo, Vittorio Pellegrini, Andrea Perali and Pierbiagio Pieri) for all their efforts. We highlight for special mention the dedication displayed by Andrea Perali, by Rocco di Marco for computer support, and by our tireless conference secretary Fiorella Paino. The knowledgeable guided tour of the historic centre of Camerino given by Fiorella Paino was appreciated by many participants. It is no exaggeration to say that without the extraordinary efforts put in by these three, the conference could not have been the success that it was. For their sustained interest and support we thank Fulvio Esposito, Rector of the University of Camerino, Fabio Beltram, Director of NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, and Daniel Cox, Co-Director of ICAM, University of California at Davis. We thank the Institute of Complex and Adaptive Matter ICAM-I2CAM, USA for providing a video record of the conference on the web (found at http://sccs2008.df.unicam.it/). Finally we thank the conference sponsors for their very generous support: the University of Camerino, the Institute of Complex and Adaptive Matter ICAM-I2CAM, USA, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics ICTP Trieste, and CNR-INFM DEMOCRITOS Modeling Center for Research in Atomistic Simulation, Trieste. Participants at the International Conference on Strongly Coupled Coulomb Systems (SCCS) (University of Camerino, Italy, 29 July-2 August 2008).

  5. The Coupled Harmonic Oscillator: Not Just for Seniors Anymore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preyer, Norris W.

    1996-01-01

    Presents experiments that use Microcomputer Based Laboratory (MBL) techniques to enable freshmen physics students to investigate complex systems, such as nonlinear oscillators or coupled harmonic oscillators, at a level appropriate for an independent project. (JRH)

  6. Exploring complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strogatz, Steven H.

    2001-03-01

    The study of networks pervades all of science, from neurobiology to statistical physics. The most basic issues are structural: how does one characterize the wiring diagram of a food web or the Internet or the metabolic network of the bacterium Escherichia coli? Are there any unifying principles underlying their topology? From the perspective of nonlinear dynamics, we would also like to understand how an enormous network of interacting dynamical systems - be they neurons, power stations or lasers - will behave collectively, given their individual dynamics and coupling architecture. Researchers are only now beginning to unravel the structure and dynamics of complex networks.

  7. Depression: The Differing Narratives of Couples in Couple Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rautiainen, Eija-Liisa; Aaltonen, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    How does the spouse of a person with depression take part in constructing narratives of depression in couple therapy? In this study we examined couples' ways of co-constructing narratives of depression in couple therapy. Three couple therapy processes were chosen for the study, one spouse in each couple having been referred to an outpatient clinic…

  8. Carney Complex

    MedlinePlus

    ... Screening guidelines may change over time as new technologies are developed and more is learned about Carney complex. It is important to talk with your doctor about appropriate screening tests. Learn more about what to expect when having ...

  9. Coupling in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, N.M.

    1994-12-01

    The performance of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at the commencement of run Ib was far below expectations. After a frustrating period of several months, a low-{beta} quad downstream of the interaction point at B0 was found to be rolled. This rolled quadrupole coupled the horizontal and vertical motion of the Tevatron beams. It also made matching the beam from the Main Ring to the Tevatron impossible, resulting in emittance blow up on injection. The net result of the roll was a significant reduction in the Tevatron luminosity. When the roll in the quadrupole was corrected the performance of the Tevatron improved dramatically. This note will discuss the experimental data indicating the presence of coupling and subsequent calculations which show how coupling an affect the luminosity. It is not intended to exhaust a discussion of coupling, which hopefully will be understood well enough to be discussed in a subsequent note.

  10. Disformally coupled inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Koivisto, Tomi; Longden, Chris

    2016-03-01

    A disformal coupling between two scalar fields is considered in the context of cosmological inflation. The coupling introduces novel derivative interactions mixing the kinetic terms of the fields but without introducing superluminal or unstable propagation of the two scalar fluctuation modes. Though the typical effect of the disformal coupling is to inhibit one of the fields from inflating the universe, the energy density of the other field can drive viable near Sitter -inflation in the presence of nontrivial disformal dynamics, in particular when one assumes exponential instead of power-law form for the couplings. The linear perturbation equations are written for the two-field system, its canonical degrees of freedom are quantised, their spectra are derived and the inflationary predictions are reported for numerically solved exponential models. A generic prediction is low tensor-to-scalar ratio.

  11. Multimode Strong Coupling in Circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Neereja; Liu, Yanbing; Sadri, Darius; Szocs, Laszlo; Underwood, Devin; Malekakhlagh, Moein; Tureci, Hakan; Houck, Andrew

    We present experimental and theoretical studies in the multimode strong coupling (MMSC) regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). In MMSC, a single atom is simultaneously coupled to a large, but discrete, number of cavity harmonics, with atom-mode coupling strengths comparable to the free spectral range (FSR). This regime is readily accessible in circuit QED, by strongly coupling a transmon qubit to a low fundamental frequency microwave cavity. We present some key results from our original experiment (PRX 5, 021035, 2015), in which a transmon qubit, resonant with the 75th harmonic of a 90 MHz cavity, reached qubit-mode coupling strengths exceeding 30MHz. When this system is coherently driven, we observed complex multimode fluorescence, with the notable formation of ultra-narrow linewidths. To better understand these unique features of multimode resonance fluorescence we developed a quantum formalism, which attributes the spectral linewidth narrowing to the correlated spontaneous emission of doubly dressed states. Finally we will share preliminary experimental results from our continuing study of MMSC, this time from a system where qubit-mode coupling strengths approach and even exceed the FSR.

  12. Flux qubit ultrastrongly coupled to two resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baust, A.; Hoffmann, E.; Haeberlein, M.; Schwarz, M. J.; Eder, P.; Goetz, J.; Wulschner, F.; Xie, E.; Zhong, L.; Fedorov, K.; Menzel, E. P.; Deppe, F.; Marx, A.; Gross, R.

    2015-03-01

    Circuit quantum electrodynamics has not only become a versatile toolbox for quantum information processing, but is also a powerful platform for the investigation of light-matter interaction. The coupling strength between microwave resonators and qubits acting as artificial atoms can be tuned over several orders of magnitude and can even reach the regime of ultrastrong coupling.We present spectroscopic data of a flux qubit coupled galvanically to the signal lines of two coplanar stripline resonators. We discuss the complex mode spectrum and show that the coupling strength between the qubit and one resonant mode reaches 15% of the respective mode frequency. Noticably, the high coupling strength is reached solely by the geometric layout of the qubit without utilizing additional coupling elements such as Josephson junctions. Our data exhibit a pronounced Bloch-Siegert shift and therefore represent an experimental evidence for the breakdown of the Jaynes-Cummings model. This work is supported by the DFG via SFB 631, and EU projects CCQED and PROMISCE.

  13. Complex networks: Patterns of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2010-07-01

    The Turing mechanism provides a paradigm for the spontaneous generation of patterns in reaction-diffusion systems. A framework that describes Turing-pattern formation in the context of complex networks should provide a new basis for studying the phenomenon.

  14. Physical nature of interactions in Zn(II) complexes with 2,2'-bipyridyl: quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), interacting quantum atoms (IQA), noncovalent interactions (NCI), and extended transition state coupled with natural orbitals for chemical valence (ETS-NOCV) comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Cukrowski, Ignacy; de Lange, Jurgens H; Mitoraj, Mariusz

    2014-01-23

    In the present account factors determining the stability of ZnL, ZnL2, and ZnL3 complexes (L = bpy, 2,2′-bipyridyl) were characterized on the basis of various techniques: the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), energy decomposition schemes based on interacting quantum atoms (IQA), and extended transition state coupled with natural orbitals for chemical valence (ETS-NOCV). Finally, the noncovalent interactions (NCI) index was also applied. All methods consistently indicated that the strength of the coordination bonds, Zn–O and Zn–N, decreases from ZnL to ZnL3. Importantly, it has been identified that the strength of secondary intramolecular heteropolar hydrogen bonding interactions, CH···O and CH···N, increases when going from ZnL to ZnL3. A similar trend appeared to be valid for the π-bonding as well as electrostatic stabilization. In addition to the above leading bonding contributions, all techniques suggested the existence of very subtle, but non-negligible additional stabilization from the CH···HC electronic exchange channel; these interactions are the weakest among all considered here. From IQA it was found that the local diatomic interaction energy, Eint(H,H), amounts at HF to −2.5, −2.7, and −2.9 kcal mol(–1) for ZnL, ZnL2, and ZnL3, respectively (−2.1 kcal mol(–1) for ZnL at MP2). NOCV-based deformation density channels showed that formation of CH--HC contacts in Zn complexes causes significant polarization of σ(C–H) bonds, which accordingly leads to charge accumulation in the CH···HC bay region. Charge depletion from σ(C–H) bonds was also reflected in the calculated spin–spin (1)J(C–H) coupling constants, which decrease from 177.06 Hz (ZnL) to 173.87 Hz (ZnL3). This last result supports our findings of an increase in the local electronic CH···HC stabilization from ZnL to ZnL3 found from QTAIM, IQA, and ETS-NOCV. Finally, this work unites for the first time the results from four methods that are widely

  15. Complex chimerism

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kimberly K.; Petroff, Margaret G.; Coscia, Lisa A.; Armenti, Vincent T.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of women with organ transplantation have undergone successful pregnancies, however little is known about how the profound immunologic changes associated with pregnancy might influence tolerance or rejection of the allograft. Pregnant women with a solid organ transplant are complex chimeras with multiple foreign cell populations from the donor organ, fetus, and mother of the pregnant woman. We consider the impact of complex chimerism and pregnancy-associated immunologic changes on tolerance of the allograft both during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Mechanisms of allograft tolerance are likely dynamic during pregnancy and affected by the influx of fetal microchimeric cells, HLA relationships (between the fetus, pregnant woman and/or donor), peripheral T cell tolerance to fetal cells, and fetal minor histocompatibility antigens. Further research is necessary to understand the complex immunology during pregnancy and the postpartum period of women with a solid organ transplant. PMID:23974274

  16. Iteration of Complex Functions and Newton's Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Jerry; Barnard, Roger; Cook, David; Corte, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses some common iterations of complex functions. The presentation is such that similar processes can easily be implemented and understood by undergraduate students. The aim is to illustrate some of the beauty of complex dynamics in an informal setting, while providing a couple of results that are not otherwise readily available in…

  17. Averaging of globally coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, James W.; Strogatz, Steven H.; Wiesenfeld, Kurt

    1992-03-01

    We study a specific system of symmetrically coupled oscillators using the method of averaging. The equations describe a series array of Josephson junctions. We concentrate on the dynamics near the splay-phase state (also known as the antiphase state, ponies on a merry-go-round, or rotating wave). We calculate the Floquet exponents of the splay-phase periodic orbit in the weak-coupling limit, and find that all of the Floquet exponents are purely imaginary; in fact, all the Floquet exponents are zero except for a single complex conjugate pair. Thus, nested two-tori of doubly periodic solutions surround the splay-phase state in the linearized averaged equations. We numerically integrate the original system, and find startling agreement with the averaging results on two counts: The observed ratio of frequencies is very close to the prediction, and the solutions of the full equations appear to be either periodic or doubly periodic, as they are in the averaged equations. Such behavior is quite surprising from the point of view of generic dynamical systems theory-one expects higher-dimensional tori and chaotic solutions. We show that the functional form of the equations, and not just their symmetry, is responsible for this nongeneric behavior.

  18. A regioselective double Stille coupling reaction of bicyclic stannolanes.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Akio; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; So, Masahiro; Itaya, Tomoyuki; Matsuda, Kantaro; Kawamoto, Takuji

    2016-09-14

    A regioselective double Stille coupling reaction was explored using bicyclic stannolanes that were easily prepared from the radical cascade reaction of β-amino-α-methylene esters. Various 1-bromo-2-iodoarenes underwent the double coupling reaction to afford benzoisoindole derivatives in a regioselective manner, where the carbon attached to the iodine selectively coupled with the vinylic carbon, and then the carbon attached to bromine coupled with the alkyl carbon. The combination of intra- and intermolecular coupling reactions provided hexahydroindeno[1,2-b]pyrrole derivatives in good yields. The yields were further improved in the presence of excess amounts of CsF. An attempt to identify the reaction intermediate was made wherein the decomposition of the stannolanes with aqueous HCl and HBr afforded trigonal bipyramidal (TBP) pentacoordinated tin complexes, as confirmed by microanalyses and (119)Sn NMR. Using DCl for the decomposition selectively introduced a deuterium to the E-position of the exomethylene unit. The complexes smoothly underwent the intramolecular Stille coupling reaction in the presence of both a palladium catalyst and DABCO, affording hexahydroindeno[1,2-b]pyrroles in good yields. These results suggest that the double coupling reaction progresses through a TBP tin complex, promoting the second intramolecular coupling reaction between the aryl halide and Csp(3)-tin bond. PMID:27506959

  19. A regioselective double Stille coupling reaction of bicyclic stannolanes.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Akio; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; So, Masahiro; Itaya, Tomoyuki; Matsuda, Kantaro; Kawamoto, Takuji

    2016-09-14

    A regioselective double Stille coupling reaction was explored using bicyclic stannolanes that were easily prepared from the radical cascade reaction of β-amino-α-methylene esters. Various 1-bromo-2-iodoarenes underwent the double coupling reaction to afford benzoisoindole derivatives in a regioselective manner, where the carbon attached to the iodine selectively coupled with the vinylic carbon, and then the carbon attached to bromine coupled with the alkyl carbon. The combination of intra- and intermolecular coupling reactions provided hexahydroindeno[1,2-b]pyrrole derivatives in good yields. The yields were further improved in the presence of excess amounts of CsF. An attempt to identify the reaction intermediate was made wherein the decomposition of the stannolanes with aqueous HCl and HBr afforded trigonal bipyramidal (TBP) pentacoordinated tin complexes, as confirmed by microanalyses and (119)Sn NMR. Using DCl for the decomposition selectively introduced a deuterium to the E-position of the exomethylene unit. The complexes smoothly underwent the intramolecular Stille coupling reaction in the presence of both a palladium catalyst and DABCO, affording hexahydroindeno[1,2-b]pyrroles in good yields. These results suggest that the double coupling reaction progresses through a TBP tin complex, promoting the second intramolecular coupling reaction between the aryl halide and Csp(3)-tin bond.

  20. Pinning impulsive directed coupled delayed dynamical network and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chunnan; Wu, Quanjun; Xiang, Lan; Zhou, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the present paper is to further investigate pinning synchronisation of a complex delayed dynamical network with directionally coupling by a single impulsive controller. By developing the analysis procedure of pinning impulsive stability for undirected coupled dynamical network previously, some simple yet general criteria of pinning impulsive synchronisation for such directed coupled network are derived analytically. It is shown that a single impulsive controller can always pin a given directed coupled network to a desired homogenous solution, including an equilibrium point, a periodic orbit, or a chaotic orbit. Subsequently, the theoretical results are illustrated by a directed small-world complex network which is a cellular neural network (CNN) and a directed scale-free complex network with the well-known Hodgkin-Huxley neuron oscillators. Numerical simulations are finally given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control methodology.

  1. Semiclassical theory of coupled lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakir, S.A.; Chow, W.W.

    1985-08-01

    The semiclassical equations of motion for a system of coupled lasers are developed and the frequency locking of the lasers comprising the system is analyzed. It is shown that the frequency-coupling range, in terms of the coupled cavities' mismatch, is proportional to the coupling coefficient. For a system where the cavities are uniformally filled with the active medium, the coupling vanishes regardless of the transmittance of the coupling mirrors. Our theory is valid for all values of coupling and for any number of lasers in the array. It may also be adapted to study different types of coupling arrangements.

  2. Researching Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumara, Dennis J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses what Complexity Theory (presented as a rubric that collects theoretical understandings from a number of domains such as ecology, biology, neurology, and education) suggests about mind, selfhood, intelligence, and practices of reading, and the import of these reconceptualizations to reader-response researchers. Concludes that developing…

  3. Complex interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Régules, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Complexity science - which describes phenomena such as collective and emergent behaviour - is the focus of a new centre where researchers are examining everything from the spread of influenza to what a healthy heartbeat looks like. Sergio de Régules reports.

  4. Amorphic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, G.; Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce amorphic complexity as a new topological invariant that measures the complexity of dynamical systems in the regime of zero entropy. Its main purpose is to detect the very onset of disorder in the asymptotic behaviour. For instance, it gives positive value to Denjoy examples on the circle and Sturmian subshifts, while being zero for all isometries and Morse-Smale systems. After discussing basic properties and examples, we show that amorphic complexity and the underlying asymptotic separation numbers can be used to distinguish almost automorphic minimal systems from equicontinuous ones. For symbolic systems, amorphic complexity equals the box dimension of the associated Besicovitch space. In this context, we concentrate on regular Toeplitz flows and give a detailed description of the relation to the scaling behaviour of the densities of the p-skeletons. Finally, we take a look at strange non-chaotic attractors appearing in so-called pinched skew product systems. Continuous-time systems, more general group actions and the application to cut and project quasicrystals will be treated in subsequent work.

  5. Dynamics of weakly coupled parametrically forced oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado Sánchez, P.; Porter, J.; Tinao, I.; Laverón-Simavilla, A.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of two weakly coupled parametric oscillators are studied in the neighborhood of the primary subharmonic instability. The nature of both primary and secondary instabilities depends in a critical way on the permutation symmetries, if any, that remain after coupling is considered, and this depends on the relative phases of the parametric forcing terms. Detailed bifurcation sets, revealing a complex series of transitions organized in part by Bogdanov-Takens points, are calculated for representative sets of parameters. In the particular case of out-of-phase forcing the predictions of the coupled oscillator model are compared with direct numerical simulations and with recent experiments on modulated cross waves. Both the initial Hopf bifurcation and the subsequent saddle-node heteroclinic bifurcation are confirmed.

  6. Formalization of Embodied Sensorimotor Coupling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kohei

    2008-10-01

    Theoretical conception of an active behavior of the system is one of the most challengeable topics in complex systems research. Recently, especially in the fields of robotics and artificial intelligence, there broadly exists the study to understand the interface between the system and its environment by creating an autonomous agent that carries a sensorimotor coupling. In this paper, an embodied sensorimotor coupling system is discussed. Applying a generative pointer, the system is formalized to contain an intrinsic discrepancy induced by heterarichical duality in a flow construction by using category theory. In the system, the body plays a positive role as a dynamical mediator, or interface, between two conflicting layers, a relational layers and a constituent layers. As a result, it induces a structural change of the system itself. Implementing the construction to a Braitenberg type vehicle, we observed dynamical changes of system parameters and its behavior revealed various motion patterns compared with the conventional sensorimotor coupling system.

  7. Spatial resolution effect of light coupling structures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juntao; Li, Kezheng; Schuster, Christian; Su, Rongbin; Wang, Xuehua; Borges, Ben-Hur V.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Martins, Emiliano R.

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of light between free space and thin film semiconductors is an essential requirement of modern optoelectronic technology. For monochromatic and single mode devices, high performance grating couplers have been developed that are well understood. For broadband and multimode devices, however, more complex structures, here referred to as “coupling surfaces”, are required, which are often difficult to realise technologically. We identify general design rules based on the Fourier properties of the coupling surface and show how they can be used to determine the spatial resolution required for the coupler’s fabrication. To our knowledge, this question has not been previously addressed, but it is important for the understanding of diffractive nanostructures and their technological realisation. We exemplify our insights with solar cells and UV photodetectors, where high-performance nanostructures that can be realised cost-effectively are essential. PMID:26678574

  8. Mode coupling in spin torque oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dong; Heinonen, Olle

    2016-09-01

    A number of recent experimental works have shown that the dynamics of a single spin torque oscillator can exhibit complex behavior that stems from interactions between two or more modes of the oscillator, such as observed mode-hopping or mode coexistence. There has been some initial work indicating how the theory for a single-mode (macro-spin) spin torque oscillator should be generalized to include several modes and the interactions between them. In the present work, we rigorously derive such a theory starting with the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for magnetization dynamics by expanding up to third-order terms in deviation from equilibrium. Our results show how a linear mode coupling, which is necessary for observed mode-hopping to occur, arises through coupling to a magnon bath. The acquired temperature dependence of this coupling implies that the manifold of orbits and fixed points may shift with temperature.

  9. Dynamics of weakly coupled parametrically forced oscillators.

    PubMed

    Salgado Sánchez, P; Porter, J; Tinao, I; Laverón-Simavilla, A

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of two weakly coupled parametric oscillators are studied in the neighborhood of the primary subharmonic instability. The nature of both primary and secondary instabilities depends in a critical way on the permutation symmetries, if any, that remain after coupling is considered, and this depends on the relative phases of the parametric forcing terms. Detailed bifurcation sets, revealing a complex series of transitions organized in part by Bogdanov-Takens points, are calculated for representative sets of parameters. In the particular case of out-of-phase forcing the predictions of the coupled oscillator model are compared with direct numerical simulations and with recent experiments on modulated cross waves. Both the initial Hopf bifurcation and the subsequent saddle-node heteroclinic bifurcation are confirmed.

  10. Wave coupling of atmosphere-ionosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharenko, L. P.

    2011-12-01

    The dynamic coupling of atmosphere-ionosphere system is a complex interdisciplinary problem. Current thinking suggests that the upward propagation of internal atmospheric waves (planetary waves, tides, gravity waves) from the lower atmosphere is an essential source of energy and momentum for the thermosphere and embedded ionosphere. Studies over the last decade presented fascinating experimental and modeling evidence of global coupling from the troposphere to mesosphere, thermosphere and ionosphere. They were enabled by unprecedented availability of satellite data, in particularly from TIMED, MLS, CHAMP, and GRACE, focused experimental campaigns from ground-based instruments, and major advances in global coupling models. This paper will summarize several developments over the past decade, including non-migrating structures in the ionosphere and thermosphere, advances in studies of gravity waves and planetary waves, and their implications for better understanding of ITM. The paper will also identify questions that need to be answered in the future, and outline promising topics of future development.

  11. Diverse coupling of neurons to populations in sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Okun, Michael; Steinmetz, Nicholas; Cossell, Lee; Iacaruso, M. Florencia; Ko, Ho; Barthó, Péter; Moore, Tirin; Hofer, Sonja B.; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    A large population of neurons can in principle produce an astronomical number of distinct firing patterns. In cortex however, these patterns lie in a space of lower dimension1-4, as if individual neurons were “obedient members of a huge orchestra”5. Here we use recordings from the visual cortex of mouse and monkey to investigate the relationship between individual neurons and the population, and to establish the underlying circuit mechanisms. We show that neighbouring neurons can differ in their coupling to the overall firing of the population, ranging from strongly coupled “choristers” to weakly coupled “soloists”. Population coupling is largely independent of sensory preferences, and it is a fixed cellular attribute, invariant to stimulus conditions. Neurons with high population coupling are more strongly affected by non-sensory behavioural variables such as motor intention. Population coupling reflects a causal relationship, predicting a neuron’s response to optogenetically-driven increases in local activity. Moreover, population coupling indicates synaptic connectivity: a neuron’s population coupling, measured in vivo, predicted subsequent in vitro estimates of the number of synapses received from its neighbours. Finally, population coupling provides a compact summary of population activity: knowledge of the population couplings of N neurons predicts a substantial portion of their N2 pairwise correlations. Population coupling therefore represents a novel, simple measure that characterises each neuron’s relationship to a larger population, explaining seemingly complex network firing patterns in terms of basic circuit variables. PMID:25849776

  12. Mathematical and algorithmic issues in multiphysics coupling.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, Xiuli; Stone, Charles Michael; Wheeler, Mary Fanett

    2004-06-01

    The modeling of fluid/structure interaction is of growing importance in both energy and environmental applications. Because of the inherent complexity, these problems must be simulated on parallel machines in order to achieve high resolution. The purpose of this research was to investigate techniques for coupling flow and geomechanics in porous media that are suitable for parallel computation. In particular, our main objective was to develop an iterative technique which can be as accurate as a fully coupled model but which allows for robust and efficient coupling of existing complex models (software). A parallel linear elastic module was developed which was coupled to a three phase three-component black oil model in IPARS (Integrated Parallel Accurate Reservoir Simulator). An iterative de-coupling technique was introduced at each time step. The resulting nonlinear iteration involved solving for displacements and flow sequentially. Rock compressibility was used in the flow model to account for the effect of deformation on the pore volume. Convergence was achieved when the mass balance for each component satisfied a given tolerance. This approach was validated by comparison with a fully coupled approach implemented in the British PetroledAmoco ACRES simulator. Another objective of this work was to develop an efficient parallel solver for the elasticity equations. A preconditioned conjugate gradient solver was implemented to solve the algebraic system arising from tensor product linear Galerkin approximations for the displacements. Three preconditioners were developed: LSOR (line successive over-relaxation), block Jacobi, and agglomeration multi-grid. The latter approach involved coarsening the 3D system to 2D and using LSOR as a smoother that is followed by applying geometric multi-grid with SOR (successive over-relaxation) as a smoother. Preliminary tests on a 64-node Beowulf cluster at CSM indicate that the agglomeration multi-grid approach is robust and efficient.

  13. Coupled wedge waves.

    PubMed

    Abell, Bradley C; Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J

    2013-11-01

    The interface between two wedges can be treated as a displacement discontinuity characterized by elastic stiffnesses. By representing the boundary between the two quarter-spaces as a displacement discontinuity, coupled wedge waves were determined theoretically to be dispersive and to depend on the specific stiffness of the non-welded contact between the two wedges. Laboratory experiments on isotropic and anisotropic aluminum confirmed the theoretical prediction that the velocity of coupled wedge waves, for a non-welded interface, ranged continuously from the single wedge wave velocity at low stress to the Rayleigh velocity as the load applied normal to the interface was increased. Elastic waves propagating along the coupled wedges of two quarter-spaces in non-welded contact are found to exist theoretically even when the material properties of the two quarter-spaces are the same.

  14. Saturation in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Ahmed; Hanna, James

    2015-03-01

    We consider a weakly nonlinear system consisting of a resonantly forced oscillator coupled to an unforced oscillator. It has long been known that, for quadratic nonlinearities and a 2:1 resonance between the oscillators, a perturbative solution of the dynamics exhibits a phenomenon known as saturation. At low forcing, the forced oscillator responds, while the unforced oscillator is quiescent. Above a critical value of the forcing, the forced oscillator's steady-state amplitude reaches a plateau, while that of the unforced oscillator increases without bound. We show that, contrary to established folklore, saturation is not unique to quadratically nonlinear systems. We present conditions on the form of the nonlinear couplings and resonance that lead to saturation. Our results elucidate a mechanism for localization or diversion of energy in systems of coupled oscillators, and suggest new approaches for the control or suppression of vibrations in engineered systems.

  15. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-07-11

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid-base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron-proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ λ. Multiple-Site Electron-Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron-proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron-proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e-/2H+ MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving

  16. Splitting of Interlayer Shear Modes and Photon Energy Dependent Anisotropic Raman Response in N-Layer ReSe₂ and ReS₂.

    PubMed

    Lorchat, Etienne; Froehlicher, Guillaume; Berciaud, Stéphane

    2016-02-23

    We investigate the interlayer phonon modes in N-layer rhenium diselenide (ReSe2) and rhenium disulfide (ReS2) by means of ultralow-frequency micro-Raman spectroscopy. These transition metal dichalcogenides exhibit a stable distorted octahedral (1T') phase with significant in-plane anisotropy, leading to sizable splitting of the (in-plane) layer shear modes. The fan-diagrams associated with the measured frequencies of the interlayer shear modes and the (out-of-plane) interlayer breathing modes are perfectly described by a finite linear chain model and allow the determination of the interlayer force constants. Nearly identical values are found for ReSe2 and ReS2. The latter are appreciably smaller than but on the same order of magnitude as the interlayer force constants reported in graphite and in trigonal prismatic (2Hc) transition metal dichalcogenides (such as MoS2, MoSe2, MoTe2, WS2, WSe2), demonstrating the importance of van der Waals interactions in N-layer ReSe2 and ReS2. In-plane anisotropy results in a complex angular dependence of the intensity of all Raman modes, which can be empirically utilized to determine the crystal orientation. However, we also demonstrate that the angular dependence of the Raman response drastically depends on the incoming photon energy, shedding light on the importance of resonant exciton-phonon coupling in ReSe2 and ReS2. PMID:26820232

  17. [Couples counseling with Latinos].

    PubMed

    Zumaya, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Intimate ties and emotional relationship gain the function to confirm, to stabilize and, afterwards, to structure the coherency's model of the structured self-organization up to that moment. When the couple perceives the bond of the relationship such as a sole and exclusive for a person, they take a leading role to be able to deduce a sense of individuality and uniqueness in the way to feel himself in the world. Based on these considerations, in this paper I propose a brief description of a counselling method, which characterises the work I am carrying out since several years in the counselling and therapy with couples.

  18. Coupled transport protein systems.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    This set of animated lessons provides examples of how transport proteins interact in coupled systems to produce physiologic effects. The gastric pumps animation depicts the secretion of hydrochloric acid into the gastric lumen. The animation called glucose absorption depicts glucose absorption by intestinal epithelial cells. The CFTR animation explains how the cystic fibrosis conductance transmembrane regulator (CFTR) functions as a key component of a coupled system of transport proteins that clears the pulmonary system of mucus and inhaled particulates. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these processes. Courses that might use them include introductory biology, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, pharmacology, and physiology.

  19. Coupled moderator neutronics

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1995-12-01

    Optimizing the neutronic performance of a coupled-moderator system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source is a new and challenging area for the spallation target-system designer. For optimal performance of a neutron source, it is essential to have good communication with instrument scientists to obtain proper design criteria and continued interaction with mechanical, thermal-hydraulic, and materials engineers to attain a practical design. A good comprehension of the basics of coupled-moderator neutronics will aid in the proper design of a target system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source.

  20. Wakefields and coupling impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    1995-02-01

    After a short introduction of the wake potentials and coupling impedances, a few new results in impedance calculations are discussed. The first example is a new analytical method for calculating impedances of axisymmetric structures in the low frequency range, below the cutoff frequency of the vacuum chamber. The second example demonstrates that even very small discontinuities on a smooth waveguide can result in appearance of trapped modes, with frequencies slightly below the waveguide cutoff frequency. The high-frequency (above the cutoff) behavior of the coupling impedance of many small discontinuities is discussed in the third example.

  1. Chimera-type states induced by local coupling.

    PubMed

    Clerc, M G; Coulibaly, S; Ferré, M A; García-Ñustes, M A; Rojas, R G

    2016-05-01

    Coupled oscillators can exhibit complex self-organization behavior such as phase turbulence, spatiotemporal intermittency, and chimera states. The latter corresponds to a coexistence of coherent and incoherent states apparently promoted by nonlocal or global coupling. Here we investigate the existence, stability properties, and bifurcation diagram of chimera-type states in a system with local coupling without different time scales. Based on a model of a chain of nonlinear oscillators coupled to adjacent neighbors, we identify the required attributes to observe these states: local coupling and bistability between a stationary and an oscillatory state close to a homoclinic bifurcation. The local coupling prevents the incoherent state from invading the coherent one, allowing concurrently the existence of a family of chimera states, which are organized by a homoclinic snaking bifurcation diagram.

  2. Chimera-type states induced by local coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, M. G.; Coulibaly, S.; Ferré, M. A.; García-Ñustes, M. A.; Rojas, R. G.

    2016-05-01

    Coupled oscillators can exhibit complex self-organization behavior such as phase turbulence, spatiotemporal intermittency, and chimera states. The latter corresponds to a coexistence of coherent and incoherent states apparently promoted by nonlocal or global coupling. Here we investigate the existence, stability properties, and bifurcation diagram of chimera-type states in a system with local coupling without different time scales. Based on a model of a chain of nonlinear oscillators coupled to adjacent neighbors, we identify the required attributes to observe these states: local coupling and bistability between a stationary and an oscillatory state close to a homoclinic bifurcation. The local coupling prevents the incoherent state from invading the coherent one, allowing concurrently the existence of a family of chimera states, which are organized by a homoclinic snaking bifurcation diagram.

  3. Chimera-type states induced by local coupling.

    PubMed

    Clerc, M G; Coulibaly, S; Ferré, M A; García-Ñustes, M A; Rojas, R G

    2016-05-01

    Coupled oscillators can exhibit complex self-organization behavior such as phase turbulence, spatiotemporal intermittency, and chimera states. The latter corresponds to a coexistence of coherent and incoherent states apparently promoted by nonlocal or global coupling. Here we investigate the existence, stability properties, and bifurcation diagram of chimera-type states in a system with local coupling without different time scales. Based on a model of a chain of nonlinear oscillators coupled to adjacent neighbors, we identify the required attributes to observe these states: local coupling and bistability between a stationary and an oscillatory state close to a homoclinic bifurcation. The local coupling prevents the incoherent state from invading the coherent one, allowing concurrently the existence of a family of chimera states, which are organized by a homoclinic snaking bifurcation diagram. PMID:27300877

  4. Managing Complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  5. Complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen

    2015-07-29

    Complex regional pain syndrome is a chronic pain condition characterized by autonomic and inflammatory features. It occurs acutely in about 7% of patients who have limb fractures, limb surgery, or other injuries. Many cases resolve within the first year, with a smaller subset progressing to the chronic form. This transition is often paralleled by a change from "warm complex regional pain syndrome," with inflammatory characteristics dominant, to "cold complex regional pain syndrome" in which autonomic features dominate. Multiple peripheral and central mechanisms seem to be involved, the relative contributions of which may differ between individuals and over time. Possible contributors include peripheral and central sensitization, autonomic changes and sympatho-afferent coupling, inflammatory and immune alterations, brain changes, and genetic and psychological factors. The syndrome is diagnosed purely on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms. Effective management of the chronic form of the syndrome is often challenging. Few high quality randomized controlled trials are available to support the efficacy of the most commonly used interventions. Reviews of available randomized trials suggest that physical and occupational therapy (including graded motor imagery and mirror therapy), bisphosphonates, calcitonin, subanesthetic intravenous ketamine, free radical scavengers, oral corticosteroids, and spinal cord stimulation may be effective treatments. Multidisciplinary clinical care, which centers around functionally focused therapies is recommended. Other interventions are used to facilitate engagement in functional therapies and to improve quality of life.

  6. Coupling analysis of transient cardiovascular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Müller, Andreas; Riedl, Maik; Penzel, Thomas; Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Kurths, Jürgen; Wessel, Niels

    2013-04-01

    The analysis of effects from coupling in and between systems is important in data-driven investigations as practiced in many scientific fields. It allows deeper insights into the mechanisms of interaction emerging among individual smaller systems when forming complex systems as in the human circulatory system. For systems featuring various regimes, usually only the epochs before and after a transition between different regimes are analyzed, although relevant information might be hidden within these transitions. Transient behavior of cardiovascular variables may emerge, on the one hand, from the recovery of the system after a severe disturbance or, on the other hand, from adaptive behavior throughout changes of states. It contains important information about the processes involved and the relations between state variables such as heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration. Therefore, we apply an ensemble approach to extend the method of symbolic coupling traces to time-variant coupling analysis. These new ensemble symbolic coupling traces are capable of determining coupling direction, strength, and time offset τ from transient dynamics in multivariate cardiovascular data. We use this method to analyze data recorded during an orthostatic test to reveal a transient structure that cannot be detected by classic methods.

  7. Status report on SHARP coupling framework.

    SciTech Connect

    Caceres, A.; Tautges, T. J.; Lottes, J.; Fischer, P.; Rabiti, C.; Smith, M. A.; Siegel, A.; Yang, W. S.; Palmiotti, G.

    2008-05-30

    This report presents the software engineering effort under way at ANL towards a comprehensive integrated computational framework (SHARP) for high fidelity simulations of sodium cooled fast reactors. The primary objective of this framework is to provide accurate and flexible analysis tools to nuclear reactor designers by simulating multiphysics phenomena happening in complex reactor geometries. Ideally, the coupling among different physics modules (such as neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, and structural mechanics) needs to be tight to preserve the accuracy achieved in each module. However, fast reactor cores in steady state mode represent a special case where weak coupling between neutronics and thermal-hydraulics is usually adequate. Our framework design allows for both options. Another requirement for SHARP framework has been to implement various coupling algorithms that are parallel and scalable to large scale since nuclear reactor core simulations are among the most memory and computationally intensive, requiring the use of leadership-class petascale platforms. This report details our progress toward achieving these goals. Specifically, we demonstrate coupling independently developed parallel codes in a manner that does not compromise performance or portability, while minimizing the impact on individual developers. This year, our focus has been on developing a lightweight and loosely coupled framework targeted at UNIC (our neutronics code) and Nek (our thermal hydraulics code). However, the framework design is not limited to just using these two codes.

  8. Electronically-implemented coupled logistic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Her, Alexandre; Amil, Pablo; Rubido, Nicolás; Marti, Arturo C.; Cabeza, Cecilia

    2016-03-01

    The logistic map is a paradigmatic dynamical system originally conceived to model the discrete-time demographic growth of a population, which shockingly, shows that discrete chaos can emerge from trivial low-dimensional non-linear dynamics. In this work, we design and characterize a simple, low-cost, easy-to-handle, electronic implementation of the logistic map. In particular, our implementation allows for straightforward circuit-modifications to behave as different one-dimensional discrete-time systems. Also, we design a coupling block in order to address the behavior of two coupled maps, although, our design is unrestricted to the discrete-time system implementation and it can be generalized to handle coupling between many dynamical systems, as in a complex system. Our findings show that the isolated and coupled maps' behavior has a remarkable agreement between the experiments and the simulations, even when fine-tuning the parameters with a resolution of ~10-3. We support these conclusions by comparing the Lyapunov exponents, periodicity of the orbits, and phase portraits of the numerical and experimental data for a wide range of coupling strengths and map's parameters.

  9. Coupled Oscillators with Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Satoshi; Aizawa, Yoji

    1998-08-01

    A simple coupled oscillator system with chemotaxis is introducedto study morphogenesis of cellular slime molds. The modelsuccessfuly explains the migration of pseudoplasmodium which hasbeen experimentally predicted to be lead by cells with higherintrinsic frequencies. Results obtained predict that its velocityattains its maximum value in the interface region between totallocking and partial locking and also suggest possible rolesplayed by partial synchrony during multicellular development.

  10. Gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Kimm, Kyoungtae; Yoon, J. H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a family of gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole solutions in Einstein-Weinberg-Salam theory. Our result confirms the existence of globally regular gravitating electroweak monopole which changes to the magnetically charged black hole as the Higgs vacuum value approaches to the Planck scale. Moreover, our solutions could provide a more accurate description of the monopole stars and magnetically charged black holes.

  11. Coupling Gammasphere and ORRUBA

    SciTech Connect

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Manning, B.; Pain, S. D.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Matos, M.; Chipps, K. A.; Hardy, S.; Shand, C.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Lister, C. J.; Peters, W. A.; Seweryniak, D.

    2013-04-19

    The coincident detection of particles and gamma rays allows the study of the structure of exotic nuclei via inverse kinematics reactions using radioactive ion beams and thick targets. We report on the status of the project to couple the highresolution charged-particle detector ORRUBA to Gammasphere, a high-efficiency, high-resolution gamma ray detector.

  12. Multifractal signatures of complexity matching.

    PubMed

    Delignières, Didier; Almurad, Zainy M H; Roume, Clément; Marmelat, Vivien

    2016-10-01

    The complexity matching effect supposes that synchronization between complex systems could emerge from multiple interactions across multiple scales and has been hypothesized to underlie a number of daily-life situations. Complexity matching suggests that coupled systems tend to share similar scaling properties, and this phenomenon is revealed by a statistical matching between the scaling exponents that characterize the respective behaviors of both systems. However, some recent papers suggested that this statistical matching could originate from local adjustments or corrections, rather than from a genuine complexity matching between systems. In the present paper, we propose an analysis method based on correlation between multifractal spectra, considering different ranges of time scales. We analyze several datasets collected in various situations (bimanual coordination, interpersonal coordination, and walking in synchrony with a fractal metronome). Our results show that this method is able to distinguish between situations underlain by genuine statistical matching and situations where statistical matching results from local adjustments. PMID:27225255

  13. Synthesis and reactivity of new aminophenolate complexes of nickel.

    PubMed

    Yu, Siqi; Wang, Huan; Sledziewski, Jill E; Madhira, Venkata N; Takahashi, Cyrus G; Leon, Michelle K; Dudkina, Yulia B; Budnikova, Yulia H; Vicic, David A

    2014-01-01

    New well-defined, paramagnetic nickel complexes have been prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The complexes were found to be active for the cross-coupling of alkyl electrophiles (especially ethyl 2-bromobutyrate) with alkyl Grignard reagents. The ligand architecture in these new complexes could potentially be rendered chiral, opening up future possibilities for performing asymmetric cross-coupling reactions. PMID:25185067

  14. Assimilating atmospheric observations into the ocean using strongly coupled ensemble data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluka, Travis C.; Penny, Stephen G.; Kalnay, Eugenia; Miyoshi, Takemasa

    2016-01-01

    The local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) is used to develop a strongly coupled data assimilation (DA) system for an intermediate complexity ocean-atmosphere coupled model. Strongly coupled DA uses the cross-domain error covariance from a coupled-model background ensemble to allow observations in one domain to directly impact the state of the other domain during the analysis update. This method is compared to weakly coupled DA in which the coupled model is used for the background, but the cross-domain error covariance is not utilized. We perform an observing system simulation experiment with atmospheric observations only. Strongly coupled DA reduces the ocean analysis errors compared to weakly coupled DA, and the higher accuracy of the ocean also improves the atmosphere. The LETKF system design presented should allow for easy implementation of strongly coupled DA with other types of coupled models.

  15. [Carney complex].

    PubMed

    Kacerovská, D; Michal, M; Síma, R; Grossmann, P; Kazakov, D V

    2011-10-01

    Carney complex is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease, with at least two genetic loci including the PRKAR1A gene located on chromosome 17 and the CNC2 locus mapped to chromosome 2. Clinically this syndrome is characterized by multiple myxomas occurring in different anatomic sites, mucocutaneous pigmentary lesions, and a variety of non-endocrine and endocrine tumors, often causing endocrine abnormalities, involving various organs. Knowledge of morphological findings in CNC patients with their typical locations is necessary to raise suspicion of this syndrome by pathologists. Confirmation of the diagnosis allows regular clinical check-ups and early treatment of these patients. PMID:22145222

  16. Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldberger, Ary L.

    2006-01-01

    Physiologic systems in health and disease display an extraordinary range of temporal behaviors and structural patterns that defy understanding based on linear constructs, reductionist strategies, and classical homeostasis. Application of concepts and computational tools derived from the contemporary study of complex systems, including nonlinear dynamics, fractals and “chaos theory,” is having an increasing impact on biology and medicine. This presentation provides a brief overview of an emerging area of biomedical research, including recent applications to cardiopulmonary medicine and chronic obstructive lung disease. PMID:16921107

  17. Carney complex.

    PubMed

    Espiard, Stéphanie; Bertherat, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Carney complex is a rare, dominantly inherited multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome, affecting endocrine glands as the adrenal cortex (causing Cushing's syndrome), the pituitary and the thyroid. It is associated with many other nonendocrine tumors, including cardiac myxomas, testicular tumors, melanotic schwannoma, breast myxomatosis, and abnormal pigmentation (lentiginosis) or myxomas of the skin. The gene located on the CNC1 locus was identified 12 years ago as the regulatory subunit 1A (R1A) of the protein kinase A (PRKAR1A) located at 17q22-24. Inactivating heterozygous germline mutations of PRKAR1A are observed in about two thirds of Carney complex patients with some genotype-phenotype correlation useful for follow-up and prognosis. More rarely, mutations of phosphodiesterase genes have been reported in patients presenting mainly with Cushing's syndrome. In vitro and in vivo studies help to understand how R1A inactivation leads to tumorigenesis. PRKAR1A appears to be a relatively weak tumorigenic signal which can cooperate with other signaling pathways and tumor suppressors. PMID:23652670

  18. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with photo-diode array and quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry based chemical profiling approach to evaluate the influence of preparation methods on the holistic quality of Qiong-Yu-Gao, a traditional complex herbal medicine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin-Di; Mao, Qian; Shen, Hong; Zhu, Ling-Ying; Li, Song-Lin; Yan, Ru

    2013-08-23

    Qiong-Yu-Gao (QYG), consisting of Rehmanniae Radix (RR), Poriae (PO) and Ginseng Radix (GR), is a commonly used tonic traditional complex herbal medicine (CHM). So far, three different methods have been documented for preparation of QYG, i.e. method 1 (M1): mixing powders of GR and PO with decoction of RR; method 2 (M2): combining the decoction of RR and PO with the decoction of GR; method 3 (M3): decocting the mixture of RR, GR and PO. In present study, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with photo-diode array and quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-PDA-QTOF-MS/MS) based chemical profiling approach was developed to investigate the influence of the three preparation methods on the holistic quality of QYG. All detected peaks were unambiguously identified by comparing UV spectra, accurate mass data/characteristic mass fragments and retention times with those of reference compounds, and/or tentatively assigned by matching empirical molecular formula with that of known compounds, and/or elucidating quasi-molecular ions and fragment ions referring to information available in literature. A total of 103 components, mainly belonging to ginsenosides, phenethylalcohol glycosides, iridoid glycosides and triterpenoid acids, were identified, of which 5 degraded ginsenosides were putatively determined to be newly generated during preparation procedures of QYG samples. Triterpenoid acids and malonyl-ginsenosides were detected only in M1 samples, while degraded ginsenosides were merely detectable in M2/M3 samples. The possible reasons for the difference among chemical profiles of QYG samples prepared with three methods were also discussed. It could be concluded that preparation method do significantly affect the holistic quality of QYG. The influence of the altered chemical profiles on the bioactivity of QYG needs further investigation. The present study demonstrated that UHPLC-PDA-QTOF-MS/MS based chemical profiling approach is efficient and

  19. New coupled quintessence cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Jesus, J. F.; Santos, R. C.; Lima, J. A. S.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2008-09-15

    A component of dark energy has been recently proposed to explain the current acceleration of the Universe. Unless some unknown symmetry in Nature prevents or suppresses it, such a field may interact with the pressureless component of dark matter, giving rise to the so-called models of coupled quintessence. In this paper we propose a new cosmological scenario where radiation and baryons are conserved, while the dark energy component is decaying into cold dark matter. The dilution of cold dark matter particles, attenuated with respect to the usual a{sup -3} scaling due to the interacting process, is characterized by a positive parameter {epsilon}, whereas the dark energy satisfies the equation of state p{sub x}={omega}{rho}{sub x} ({omega}<0). We carry out a joint statistical analysis involving recent observations from type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillation peak, and cosmic microwave background shift parameter to check the observational viability of the coupled quintessence scenario here proposed.

  20. Anomalous gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Rizzo, T.; Baur, U.

    1997-01-13

    The measurement of anomalous gauge boson self couplings is reviewed for a variety of present and planned accelerators. Sensitivities are compared for these accelerators using models based on the effective Lagrangian approach. The sensitivities described here are for measurement of {open_quotes}generic{close_quotes} parameters {kappa}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub V}, etc., defined in the text. Pre-LHC measurements will not probe these coupling parameters to precision better than O(10{sup -1}). The LHC should be sensitive to better than O(10{sup -2}), while a future NLC should achieve sensitivity of O(10{sup -3}) to O(10{sup -4}) for center of mass energies ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV.