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Sample records for complex formation constants

  1. Investigation of the Composition and Formation Constant of Molecular Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sahai, R.; Loper, G. L.; Lin, S. H.; Eyring, H.

    1974-01-01

    It has been the purpose of the present paper to investigate and explore the conditions under which the linear relation between Δ/CD0 and Δ in the Hanna-Ashbaugh-Foster-Fyfe equation for the evaluation of equilibrium constants holds, (CD0 is initial concentration of a donor and Δ is the observed chemical shift relative to the chemical shift of the acceptor) to obtain the equation representing the exact linear relation between Δ/CD0 and Δ, when the linear relation between Δ/CD0 and Δ holds, and to discuss how to use the Job method in nuclear magnetic resonance measurements to determine the stoichiometry of molecular complexes. We have found that the conventional belief that CD0 should always be chosen to be much greater than CA0 (initial concentration of acceptor) is not necessarily always true and the exact linear relation between Δ/CD0 and Δ is represented by the equation Δ/CD0 = K1Δ0/(1 + K1CA0) - K1Δ/(1 + K1CA0)2, where K1 is the formation constant of the complex. It is shown that in the Job method of nuclear magnetic resonance measurements one has to plot ΔCA0 against the mole fraction, and the mole fraction at the maximum should give us the composition of the complex. Theoretical results have been verified experimentally on the weak interaction between naphthalene and methyl iodide. PMID:16592155

  2. Determination of absorptivity and formation constant of a chalcone association complex.

    PubMed

    Blanco, S E; Ferretti, F H

    1998-04-01

    A UV spectrometric method was developed to determine the molar absorptivity (epsilon(C)) and formation constant (K(c)) of the association complex of unsubstituted chalcone in cyclohexane, in the concentration range from 4.00.10(-4) to 2.00.10(-2) mol dm(-3). The thermodynamic and spectroscopic magnitudes such as K(c) and epsilon(C) contribute to the understanding of the physicochemical behavior of several alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonylic compounds, of low solubility in water, as it is the case of numerous flavonoids of chemical and biological importance. The studied association complex, formed by two chalcone molecules, is characterized by the constants epsilon(C) (300.8 nm)=4.98.10(4) dm(3) mol(-1) cm(-1) and K(c)=5.58.10(3). The method proposed is convenient for the study of solute-solute molecular associations particularly those due to dipole-dipole interactions.

  3. Studies on chalcone derivatives: Complex formation, thermal behavior, stability constant and antioxidant activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Yusif S.; Gaber, M.

    2015-02-01

    The chalcone 3-[4‧-dimethylaminophenyl]-1-(2-pyridyl) prop-2-en-1-one (DMAPP) and 3-(4‧-diethylaminophenyl)-1-(2-pyridinyl) prop-2-en-1-one abbreviated as DEAPP have been synthesized and characterized with IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques as described previously (El-Daly et al., 2008; Gaber et al., 2009; El-Sayed, 2013). By using UV visible spectroscopy method the mole fraction ratio for copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes were determined and it was found to be 1:1. The stability constants of this complex have been determined by Job's method. The stability constant (Kf) of copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes in universal buffer pH = 3.2 was determined to be 9.9 × 104 and 5.2 × 104 respectively. The effect of Cu(II) ion on the emission spectrum of the free chalcone is also assigned. Adherence to Beer's law and Ringbom optimum concentration ranges are determined. The thermal decomposition of the metal complexes is studied by TGA technique. The kinetic parameters like activation energy, pre-exponential factor and entropy of activation are estimated. The structure of complexes was energetically optimized through molecular mechanics applying MM+ force field coupled with molecular dynamics simulation. The bond lengths and bond angles have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes. The mode of interaction of the chalcone to copper nanoparticles was studied. The apparent association constants of the colloidal copper nanoparticles:chalcone complexes in solution were evaluated using the spectral method and compared with the formation constant of the Cu(II) chalcone complexes. Antioxidant activity of these chalcones was evaluated by using 1,1‧-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPHrad) radicals scavenging method, which showed that the antioxidant activity of DMAPP has higher value than the DEAPP. Semi-empirical study results showed that DMAPP have higher dipole moment than DEAPP [1].

  4. Calculation of equilibrium binding constants and cooperativity of Cu(II) mixed solvated complexes formation.

    PubMed

    Kudrev, A G

    2012-11-15

    A new extension of matrix approach is proposed to calculate the equilibrium constants of coordinated solvent substitution in a metal ion first salvation shell in the mixed solvent system. The proposed method allows reducing the number of independent variables, necessary to calculate the fractions of species in solution. The equilibrium model of MeCN substitution with DMF and DMSO in the presence of Cu(II) ion for the assessment of structure of intermediate species is presented and verified. The distribution diagrams of Cu(II) species in mixed organic solvents have been analyzed using the modified matrix method. The intrinsic equilibrium constants K of the first solvent molecule replacement in the Cu(II) coordination shell and the correction for the mutual influence between the solvent molecules as ligands in the successive complex formation (cooperativity parameter w) in acetonitrile solution have been calculated from the fitting procedure. It is shown that anticooperative substitution of MeCN by donor ligands in the first coordination shell of the Cu(II) ion is always governed by the change of coordination number during the stepwise process.

  5. Formation constants of copper(I) complexes with cysteine, penicillamine and glutathione: implications for copper speciation in the human eye.

    PubMed

    Königsberger, Lan-Chi; Königsberger, Erich; Hefter, Glenn; May, Peter M

    2015-12-21

    Protonation constants for the biologically-important thioamino acids cysteine (CSH), penicillamine (PSH) and glutathione (GSH), and the formation constants of their complexes with Cu(I), have been measured at 25 °C and an ionic strength of 1.00 mol dm(-3) (Na)Cl using glass electrode potentiometry. The first successful characterisation of binary Cu(I)-CSH and Cu(I)-GSH species over the whole pH range was achieved in this study by the addition of a second thioamino acid, which prevented the precipitation that normally occurs. Appropriate combinations of binary and ternary (mixed ligand) titration data were used to optimise the speciation models and formation constants for the binary species. The results obtained differ significantly from literature data with respect to the detection and quantification of protonated and polynuclear complexes. The present results are thought to be more reliable because of the exceptionally wide pH and concentration ranges employed, the excellent reproducibility of the data, the close agreement between the calculated and observed formation functions, and the low standard deviations and absence of numerical correlation in the constants. The present formation constants were incorporated into a large Cu speciation model which was used to predict, for the first time, metal-ligand equilibria in the biofluids of the human eye. This simulation provided an explanation for the precipitation of metallic copper in lens and cornea, which is known to occur as a consequence of Wilson's disease.

  6. Determination of the equilibrium formation constants of two U(VI)-peroxide complexes at alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Meca, S; Martínez-Torrents, A; Martí, V; Giménez, J; Casas, I; de Pablo, J

    2011-08-21

    The formation of uranyl-peroxide complexes was studied at alkaline media by using UV-Visible spectrophotometry and the STAR code. Two different complexes were found at a H(2)O(2)/U(VI) ratio lower than 2. A graphical method was used in order to obtain the formation constants of such complexes and the STAR program was used to refine the formation constants values because of its capacity to treat multiwavelength absorbance data and refining equilibrium constants. The values obtained for the two complexes identified were: UO(2)(2+) + H(2)O(2) + 4OH(-) <−> UO(2)(O(2))(OH)(2)(2-) + 2H(2)O: log β°(1,1,4) = 28.1 ± 0.1 (1). UO(2)(2+) + 2H(2)O(2) + 6OH(-) <−> UO(2)(O(2))(2)(OH)(2)(4-) + 4H(2)O: log β°(1,2,6) = 36.8 ± 0.2 (2). At hydrogen peroxide concentrations higher than 10(-5) mol dm(-3), and in the absence of carbonate, the UO(2)(O(2))(2)(OH)(2)(4-) complex is predominant in solution, indicating the significant peroxide affinity of peroxide ions for uranium and the strong complexes of uranium(VI) with peroxide.

  7. Stability constants for the formation of rare earth-inorganic complexes as a function of ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millero, Frank J.

    1992-08-01

    Recent studies have been made on the distribution of the rare earths (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) in natural waters relative to their concentration in shales. These metals have also been used as models for the behavior of the trivalent actinides. The speciation of the rare earths in natural waters is modelled by using ionic interaction models which require reliable stability constants. In this paper the stability constants for the formation of lanthanide complexes ( k mx∗) with Cl -, NO 3-, SO 42-, OH -, HCO 3-, H 2PO 4-, HPO 42-, and CO 32- determined in NaClO 44 at various ionic strengths have been extrapolated to infinite dilution using the Pitzer interaction model. The activity coefficients for free ions ( γM, γx) needed for this extrapolation have been estimated from the Pitzer equations. The thermodynamic stability constants ( KMX) and activity coefficients of the various ion pairs ( γMX) were determined from In ( solK MX∗/γ Mγ x) = In K mx+ In (γ MX). The activity coefficients of the ion pairs have been used to determine Pitzer parameters ( BMX) for the rare earth complexes. The values of BMX were found to be the same for complexes of the same charge. These results make it possible to estimate the stability constants for the formation of rare earth complexes over a wide range of ionic strengths. The stability constants have been used to determine the speciation of the lanthanides in seawater and in brines. The carbonate complexes dominate for all natural waters where the carbonate alkalinity is greater than 0.001 eq/L at a pH near 8.

  8. Fundamental and overtone vibrational spectroscopy, enthalpy of hydrogen bond formation and equilibrium constant determination of the methanol-dimethylamine complex.

    PubMed

    Du, Lin; Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2013-07-07

    We have measured gas phase vibrational spectra of the bimolecular complex formed between methanol (MeOH) and dimethylamine (DMA) up to about 9800 cm(-1). In addition to the strong fundamental OH-stretching transition we have also detected the weak second overtone NH-stretching transition. The spectra of the complex are obtained by spectral subtraction of the monomer spectra from spectra recorded for the mixture. For comparison, we also measured the fundamental OH-stretching transition in the bimolecular complex between MeOH and trimethylamine (TMA). The enthalpies of hydrogen bond formation (ΔH) for the MeOH-DMA and MeOH-TMA complexes have been determined by measurements of the fundamental OH-stretching transition in the temperature range from 298 to 358 K. The enthalpy of formation is found to be -35.8 ± 3.9 and -38.2 ± 3.3 kJ mol(-1) for MeOH-DMA and MeOH-TMA, respectively, in the 298 to 358 K region. The equilibrium constant (Kp) for the formation of the MeOH-DMA complex has been determined from the measured and calculated transition intensities of the OH-stretching fundamental transition and the NH-stretching second overtone transition. The transition intensities were calculated using an anharmonic oscillator local mode model with dipole moment and potential energy curves calculated using explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods. The equilibrium constant for formation of the MeOH-DMA complex was determined to be 0.2 ± 0.1 atm(-1), corresponding to a ΔG value of about 4.0 kJ mol(-1).

  9. Determination of equilibrium and rate constants for complex formation by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy supplemented by dynamic light scattering and Taylor dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuzhu; Poniewierski, Andrzej; Jelińska, Aldona; Zagożdżon, Anna; Wisniewska, Agnieszka; Hou, Sen; Hołyst, Robert

    2016-10-04

    The equilibrium and rate constants of molecular complex formation are of great interest both in the field of chemistry and biology. Here, we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), supplemented by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA), to study the complex formation in model systems of dye-micelle interactions. In our case, dyes rhodamine 110 and ATTO-488 interact with three differently charged surfactant micelles: octaethylene glycol monododecyl ether C12E8 (neutral), cetyltrimethylammonium chloride CTAC (positive) and sodium dodecyl sulfate SDS (negative). To determine the rate constants for the dye-micelle complex formation we fit the experimental data obtained by FCS with a new form of the autocorrelation function, derived in the accompanying paper. Our results show that the association rate constants for the model systems are roughly two orders of magnitude smaller than those in the case of the diffusion-controlled limit. Because the complex stability is determined by the dissociation rate constant, a two-step reaction mechanism, including the diffusion-controlled and reaction-controlled rates, is used to explain the dye-micelle interaction. In the limit of fast reaction, we apply FCS to determine the equilibrium constant from the effective diffusion coefficient of the fluorescent components. Depending on the value of the equilibrium constant, we distinguish three types of interaction in the studied systems: weak, intermediate and strong. The values of the equilibrium constant obtained from the FCS and TDA experiments are very close to each other, which supports the theoretical model used to interpret the FCS data.

  10. Spectrophotometric and electrochemical determination of the formation constants of the complexes Curcumin-Fe(III)-water and Curcumin-Fe(II)-water.

    PubMed

    Bernabé-Pineda, Marganta; Ramírez-Silva, Maria Teresa; Romero-Romo, Mario Alberto; González-Vergara, Enrique; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto

    2004-04-01

    The formation of complexes among the Curcumin, Fe(III) and Fe(II) was studied in aqueous media within the 5-11 pH range by means of UV-Vis spectrophotometry and cyclic voltammetry. When the reaction between the Curcumin and the ions present in basic media took place, the resulting spectra of the systems Curcumin-Fe(III) and Curcumin-Fe(II) presented a similar behaviour. The cyclic voltammograms in basic media indicated that a chemical reaction has taken place between the Curcumin and Fe(III) before that of the formation of complexes. Data processing with SQUAD permitted to calculate the formation constants of the complexes Curcumin-Fe(III), corresponding to the species FeCur (lob beta110 = 22.25 +/- 0.03) and FeCur(OH)- (log beta111 = 12.14 +/- 0.03), while for the complexes Curcumin-Fe(II) the corresponding formation constants of the species FeCur- (log beta110 = 9.20 +/- 0.04), FeHCur (log beta111 = 19.76 +/- 0.03), FeH2Cur+ (log beta112 = 28.11 +/- 0.02).

  11. Formation constants of copper(II) complexes with tripeptides containing Glu, Gly, and His: potentiometric measurements and modeling by generalized multiplicative analysis of variance.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Rima Raffoul; Sutton, Gordon J; Ebrahimi, Diako; Hibbert, D Brynn

    2014-02-03

    We report a systematic study of the effects of types and positions of amino acid residues of tripeptides on the formation constants logβ, acid dissociation constants pKa, and the copper coordination modes of the copper(II) complexes with 27 tripeptides formed from the amino acids glutamic acid, glycine, and histidine. logβ values were calculated from pH titrations with l mmol L(-1):1 mmol L(-1) solutions of the metal and ligand and previously reported ligand pKa values. Generalized multiplicative analysis of variance (GEMANOVA) was used to model the logβ values of the saturated, most protonated, monoprotonated, logβ(CuL) - logβ(HL), and pKa of the amide group. The resulting model of the saturated copper species has a two-term model describing an interaction between the central and the C-terminal residues plus a smaller, main effect of the N-terminal residue. The model supports the conclusion that two copper coordination modes exist depending on the absence or presence of His at the central position, giving species in which copper is coordinated via two or three fused chelate rings, respectively. The GEMANOVA model for pKamide, which is the same as that for the saturated complex, showed that Gly-Gly-His has the lowest pKamide values among the 27 tripeptides. Visible spectroscopy indicated the formation of metal-ligand dimers for tripeptides His-His-Gly and His-His-Glu, but not for His-His-His, and the formation of multiple ligand bis compexes CuL2 and Cu(HL)2 for tripeptides (Glu/Gly)-His-(Glu/Gly) and His-(Glu/Gly)-(Glu/Gly), respectively.

  12. How the cosmological constant affects gravastar formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, R.; Silva, M.F.A. da; Rocha, P. E-mail: mfasnic@gmail.com

    2009-12-01

    Here we generalized a previous model of gravastar consisted of an internal de Sitter spacetime, a dynamical infinitely thin shell with an equation of state, but now we consider an external de Sitter-Schwarzschild spacetime. We have shown explicitly that the final output can be a black hole, a ''bounded excursion'' stable gravastar, a stable gravastar, or a de Sitter spacetime, depending on the total mass of the system, the cosmological constants, the equation of state of the thin shell and the initial position of the dynamical shell. We have found that the exterior cosmological constant imposes a limit to the gravastar formation, i.e., the exterior cosmological constant must be smaller than the interior cosmological constant. Besides, we have also shown that, in the particular case where the Schwarzschild mass vanishes, no stable gravastar can be formed, but we still have formation of black hole.

  13. Standard thermodynamic functions and constants of complex formation of Nd3+ and La3+ with L-asparagine in aqueous solutions at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernyavskaya, N. V.; Chernov, A. S.; Litvinenko, V. E.

    2016-12-01

    The enthalpies of complex formation of L-asparagine (HAsn±) with Nd3+ and La3+ ions are determined calorimetrically at 298.15 K and an ionic strength of 0.5 (KNO3). The thermodynamic characteristics of the formation of the NdAsn2+, NdAsn2+, LaAsn2 +, and LaAsn2 + complexes are calculated.

  14. Determination of formation constants of hydroxo and carbonate complexes of Pr(3+) in 2 M NaCl at 303 K.

    PubMed

    López-González, H; Jiménez-Reyes, M; Rojas-Hernández, A; Solache-Ríos, M

    1997-10-01

    The hydrolysis of praseodymium III in 2 M sodium chloride at 303 K was studied. Two methods were used: pH titration followed by a computational refinement and solvent extraction in the presence of a competitive ligand. The hydrolysis constants obtained by pH titration were: logbeta(1,H)=-7.68+/-0.07, logbeta(1,2H)=-15.10+/-0.03, and beta(1,3H)=-23.80+/-0.04. The stability constants of praseodymium carbonate complexes were determined by pH titration as well and were: logbeta(1,CO(2-)(3))=5.94+/-0.08 and logbeta(1,2CO(2-)(3))=11.15+/-0.15. Praseodymium carbonate species were taken into consideration for calculating the first hydrolysis constants by the solvent extraction method and the value obtained was: logbeta(1,H)=-7.69+/-0.27. The values for logbeta(1,H) attained by both methods are the same. The species-distribution diagram was obtained from the stability constants of praseodymium carbonate complexes and hydrolysis products in the conditions of the present work.

  15. Complexity of formation in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Shira; Marrochio, Hugo; Myers, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    It was recently conjectured that the quantum complexity of a holographic boundary state can be computed by evaluating the gravitational action on a bulk region known as the Wheeler-DeWitt patch. We apply this complexity=action duality to evaluate the `complexity of formation' [1, 2], i.e. the additional complexity arising in preparing the entangled thermofield double state with two copies of the boundary CFT compared to preparing the individual vacuum states of the two copies. We find that for boundary dimensions d > 2, the difference in the complexities grows linearly with the thermal entropy at high temperatures. For the special case d = 2, the complexity of formation is a fixed constant, independent of the temperature. We compare these results to those found using the complexity=volume duality.

  16. Bacterial formate hydrogenlyase complex

    PubMed Central

    McDowall, Jennifer S.; Murphy, Bonnie J.; Haumann, Michael; Palmer, Tracy; Armstrong, Fraser A.; Sargent, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, Escherichia coli can carry out a mixed-acid fermentation that ultimately produces molecular hydrogen. The enzyme directly responsible for hydrogen production is the membrane-bound formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex, which links formate oxidation to proton reduction and has evolutionary links to Complex I, the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase. Although the genetics, maturation, and some biochemistry of FHL are understood, the protein complex has never been isolated in an intact form to allow biochemical analysis. In this work, genetic tools are reported that allow the facile isolation of FHL in a single chromatographic step. The core complex is shown to comprise HycE (a [NiFe] hydrogenase component termed Hyd-3), FdhF (the molybdenum-dependent formate dehydrogenase-H), and three iron-sulfur proteins: HycB, HycF, and HycG. A proportion of this core complex remains associated with HycC and HycD, which are polytopic integral membrane proteins believed to anchor the core complex to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. As isolated, the FHL complex retains formate hydrogenlyase activity in vitro. Protein film electrochemistry experiments on Hyd-3 demonstrate that it has a unique ability among [NiFe] hydrogenases to catalyze production of H2 even at high partial pressures of H2. Understanding and harnessing the activity of the FHL complex is critical to advancing future biohydrogen research efforts. PMID:25157147

  17. Thiocyanato Chromium (III) Complexes: Separation by Paper Electrophoresis and Estimate of Stability Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Erik; Eriksen, J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment wherein the student can demonstrate the existence of all the thiocyanato chromium complexes, estimate the stepwise formation constants, demonstrate the robustness of chromium III complexes, and show the principles of paper electrophoresis. (GS)

  18. Predicting Stability Constants for Uranyl Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin P.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-04-02

    The ability to predict the equilibrium constants for the formation of 1:1 uranyl:ligand complexes (log K1 values) provides the essential foundation for the rational design of ligands with enhanced uranyl affinity and selectivity. We also use density functional theory (B3LYP) and the IEFPCM continuum solvation model to compute aqueous stability constants for UO22+ complexes with 18 donor ligands. Theoretical calculations permit reasonably good estimates of relative binding strengths, while the absolute log K1 values are significantly overestimated. Accurate predictions of the absolute log K1 values (root mean square deviation from experiment < 1.0 for log K1 values ranging from 0 to 16.8) can be obtained by fitting the experimental data for two groups of mono and divalent negative oxygen donor ligands. The utility of correlations is demonstrated for amidoxime and imide dioxime ligands, providing a useful means of screening for new ligands with strong chelate capability to uranyl.

  19. Predicting Stability Constants for Uranyl Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    DOE PAGES

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin P.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-04-02

    The ability to predict the equilibrium constants for the formation of 1:1 uranyl:ligand complexes (log K1 values) provides the essential foundation for the rational design of ligands with enhanced uranyl affinity and selectivity. We also use density functional theory (B3LYP) and the IEFPCM continuum solvation model to compute aqueous stability constants for UO22+ complexes with 18 donor ligands. Theoretical calculations permit reasonably good estimates of relative binding strengths, while the absolute log K1 values are significantly overestimated. Accurate predictions of the absolute log K1 values (root mean square deviation from experiment < 1.0 for log K1 values ranging from 0more » to 16.8) can be obtained by fitting the experimental data for two groups of mono and divalent negative oxygen donor ligands. The utility of correlations is demonstrated for amidoxime and imide dioxime ligands, providing a useful means of screening for new ligands with strong chelate capability to uranyl.« less

  20. Variation of stability constants of thorium citrate complexes and of thorium hydrolysis constants with ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Choppin, G.R.; Erten, H.N.; Xia, Y.X.

    1995-09-01

    Citrate is among the organic anions that are expected to be present in the wastes planned for deposition in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository. In this study, a solvent extraction method has been used to measure the stability constants of Thorium(IV)[Th(IV)] with citrate anions in aqueous solutions with (a) NaClO{sub 4} and (b) NaCl as the background electrolytes. The ionic strengths were varied up to 5 m (NaCl) and 14 m (NaClO{sub 4}). The data from the NaClO{sub 4} solutions at varying pH values were used to calculate the hydrolysis constants for formation of Th(OH){sup 3+} at the different ionic strengths.

  1. Spectrophotometric Determination of Iron(III)-Glycine Formation Constant in Aqueous Medium Using Competitive Ligand Binding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, Rajendra; Prasad, Surendra

    2009-01-01

    The formation constant of iron(III) complex with glycine (Gly) ligand in aqueous acidic medium (0.2 M HNO[subscript 3], I = 0.2 M at 28 plus or minus 1 degree C) was determined spectrophotometrically in which a competing color reaction between Fe(III) and SCN[superscript -] was used as an indicator reaction. Under the specified conditions Fe(III)…

  2. Constant-complexity stochastic simulation algorithm with optimal binning

    SciTech Connect

    Sanft, Kevin R.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2015-08-21

    At the molecular level, biochemical processes are governed by random interactions between reactant molecules, and the dynamics of such systems are inherently stochastic. When the copy numbers of reactants are large, a deterministic description is adequate, but when they are small, such systems are often modeled as continuous-time Markov jump processes that can be described by the chemical master equation. Gillespie’s Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA) generates exact trajectories of these systems, but the amount of computational work required for each step of the original SSA is proportional to the number of reaction channels, leading to computational complexity that scales linearly with the problem size. The original SSA is therefore inefficient for large problems, which has prompted the development of several alternative formulations with improved scaling properties. We describe an exact SSA that uses a table data structure with event time binning to achieve constant computational complexity with respect to the number of reaction channels for weakly coupled reaction networks. We present a novel adaptive binning strategy and discuss optimal algorithm parameters. We compare the computational efficiency of the algorithm to existing methods and demonstrate excellent scaling for large problems. This method is well suited for generating exact trajectories of large weakly coupled models, including those that can be described by the reaction-diffusion master equation that arises from spatially discretized reaction-diffusion processes.

  3. Constant-complexity stochastic simulation algorithm with optimal binning.

    PubMed

    Sanft, Kevin R; Othmer, Hans G

    2015-08-21

    At the molecular level, biochemical processes are governed by random interactions between reactant molecules, and the dynamics of such systems are inherently stochastic. When the copy numbers of reactants are large, a deterministic description is adequate, but when they are small, such systems are often modeled as continuous-time Markov jump processes that can be described by the chemical master equation. Gillespie's Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA) generates exact trajectories of these systems, but the amount of computational work required for each step of the original SSA is proportional to the number of reaction channels, leading to computational complexity that scales linearly with the problem size. The original SSA is therefore inefficient for large problems, which has prompted the development of several alternative formulations with improved scaling properties. We describe an exact SSA that uses a table data structure with event time binning to achieve constant computational complexity with respect to the number of reaction channels for weakly coupled reaction networks. We present a novel adaptive binning strategy and discuss optimal algorithm parameters. We compare the computational efficiency of the algorithm to existing methods and demonstrate excellent scaling for large problems. This method is well suited for generating exact trajectories of large weakly coupled models, including those that can be described by the reaction-diffusion master equation that arises from spatially discretized reaction-diffusion processes.

  4. Theoretical prediction of coordination environments and stability constants of lanthanum lactate complexes in solution

    DOE PAGES

    Roy, Lindsay E.; Martin, Leigh R.

    2016-09-12

    Using Density Functional Theory calculations in combination with explicit solvent and a continuum solvent model, this work sets out to understand the coordination environment and relevant thermodynamics of La(III)-lactate complexes. Calculations focus on the coordination modes for the complexes and changes in Gibbs free energy for complexation in solution. These results confirm that the α-hydroxyl group should be protonated, or at least hydrogen bonded to a water molecule, upon successive addition of the lactate ligand to the La(III) center using Bader's Atoms-in Molecules (AIM) approach. In addition, we present a straightforward method for predicting stability constants at the semi-quantitative levelmore » for La(III)-lactate complexes in solution. Furthermore, the proposed method could be particularly useful for prediction of lanthanide complex formation in various biochemical, environmental, and nuclear separations processes.« less

  5. Theoretical prediction of coordination environments and stability constants of lanthanum lactate complexes in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Lindsay E.; Martin, Leigh R.

    2016-09-12

    Using Density Functional Theory calculations in combination with explicit solvent and a continuum solvent model, this work sets out to understand the coordination environment and relevant thermodynamics of La(III)-lactate complexes. Calculations focus on the coordination modes for the complexes and changes in Gibbs free energy for complexation in solution. These results confirm that the α-hydroxyl group should be protonated, or at least hydrogen bonded to a water molecule, upon successive addition of the lactate ligand to the La(III) center using Bader's Atoms-in Molecules (AIM) approach. In addition, we present a straightforward method for predicting stability constants at the semi-quantitative level for La(III)-lactate complexes in solution. Furthermore, the proposed method could be particularly useful for prediction of lanthanide complex formation in various biochemical, environmental, and nuclear separations processes.

  6. Stoichiometry and Formation Constant Determination by Linear Sweep Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Franklin A.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper an experiment is described in which the equilibrium constants necessary for determining the composition and distribution of lead (II)-oxalate species may be measured by linear sweep voltammetry. (Author/BB)

  7. Laboratory measurement of the complex dielectric constant of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiebe, M. L.

    1971-01-01

    The dielectric constant of a material is an extremely important parameter when considering passive radiometric remote sensing applications. This is because the emitted energy measured by a microwave radiometer is dependent on the dielectric constant of the surface being scanned. Two techniques of measuring dielectric constants are described. The first method involves a dielectric located in air. The second method uses basically the same theoretical approach, but the dielectric under consideration is located inside a section of waveguide.

  8. Pattern Formation and Complexity Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2001-03-01

    Success of nonlinear modelling of pattern formation and self-organization encourages speculations on informational and number theoretical foundations of complexity emergence. Pythagorean "unreasonable effectiveness of integers" in natural processes is perhaps extrapolatable even to universal emergence "out-of-nothing" (Leibniz, Wheeler). Because rational numbers (R = M/N) are everywhere dense on real axis, any digital string (hence any "book" from "Library of Babel" of J.L.Borges) is "recorded" infinitely many times in arbitrary many rationals. Furthermore, within any arbitrary small interval there are infinitely many Rs for which (either or both) integers (Ms and Ns) "carry" any given string of any given length. Because any iterational process (such as generation of fractal features of Mandelbrot Set) is arbitrary closely approximatable with rational numbers, the infinite pattern of integers expresses itself in generation of complexity of the world, as well as in emergence of the world itself. This "tunnelling" from Platonic World ("Platonia" of J.Barbour) to a real (physical) world is modern recast of Leibniz's motto ("for deriving all from nothing there suffices a single principle").

  9. Thermodynamics and kinetics of aqueous ferric phosphate complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmy, R.B.; Patel, R.C.; Matijevic, E.

    1985-09-25

    The equilibria and kinetics of complexation of iron(III) with phosphoric acid (at pH < 2) were studied at 25 and 50/sup 0/C at ionic strength ..mu.. = 2.5 M by using spectrophotometric and stopped-flow techniques. The results are consistent with the formation of two complexes, FeH/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup 2 +/ and Fe(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2//sup +/. The second species could only be detected by the analysis of kinetic data. The equilibrium constants, extinction coefficients, rate constants, and activation parameters for the formation of these complexes are given. A mechanism is proposed to account for the observed hydrogen ion dependency of the apparent forward rate constants. 35 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  10. Calculation of equilibrium constants by matrix method for complexes of gold(III).

    PubMed

    Kudrev, A G

    2008-04-15

    A new matrix approach is proposed to calculate the equilibrium constants of ligands substitution in a metal ion inner coordination sphere with fixed binding sites positions. The proposed method allows to reduce the number of independent variables, necessary for the titration curves fitting without deterioration in the description accuracy. The square planar complexes [MY(4-n)X(n)] n=0-4 formation in solution model includes three independent variables K , omega(cis) and omega(trans) (K -equilibrium constant of replacement of first ligand, omega(cis), omega(trans)-parameters of mutual influence) as an alternative to four stepwise equilibrium constants and two microconstants. In the present investigation experimental spectrophotometric data published in the literature for system {Au(3+)-Cl(-)-Br(-)} were analysed. With the help of the proposed method the equilibrium constants of chloride by bromide ion substitution in internal coordination sphere of Au(III) are calculated K =50; omega(cis)=1.3; omega(trans)=0.7.

  11. Charge-transfer complex formation between o-chloranil and a series of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Biswanath; Mukherjee, Asok K.; Seal, Bejoy K.

    2001-02-01

    The equilibrium constants, enthalpies and entropies of formation of molecular electron donor-acceptor (EDA) complexes of o-chloranil with a series of aromatic hydrocarbons have been determined spectrophotometrically. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic aspects of these complexes have been analysed.

  12. On the Temperature Dependence of the Formation Constant of Thiocyanatopentaaquochromium (III) in Acidic Solution.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    constants for metal ion complexes Bflandamer’s method Chromium (III) complexes Heat capacity of activation Equilibrium and kinetics of reactions in solution...20 ABSTRACT (Continue on reveree aide if neceetary and Identify by block number) The equilibrium constants for the ionization of carboxylic acids in...water pass through a maximum as temperature changes. If the equilibrium constant repre- sents a one-step process, then the attendant thermodynamic

  13. Competitive counterion complexation allows the true host : guest binding constants from a single titration by ionic receptors.

    PubMed

    Pessêgo, Márcia; Basílio, Nuno; Muñiz, M Carmen; García-Río, Luis

    2016-07-06

    Counterion competitive complexation is a background process currently ignored by using ionic hosts. Consequently, guest binding constants are strongly affected by the design of the titration experiments in such a way that the results are dependent on the guest concentration and on the presence of added salts, usually buffers. In the present manuscript we show that these experimental difficulties can be overcome by just considering the counterion competitive complexation. Moreover a single titration allows us to obtain not only the true binding constants but also the stoichiometry of the complex showing the formation of 1 : 1 : 1 (host : guest : counterion) complexes. The detection of high stoichiometry complexes is not restricted to a single titration experiment but also to a displacement assay where both competitive and competitive-cooperative complexation models are taken into consideration.

  14. Determination of association constant of host-guest supramolecular complex (molecular recognition of carbamazepine, antiseizure drug, with calix(4)arene).

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, C; Jayabal, P; Ramakrishnan, V

    2015-12-05

    The thermodynamic property of the host-guest, inclusion complex formed between p-t-butyl calix(4)arene which is a supramolecule, and the antiseizure drug, carbamazepine was studied. p-t-Butyl calix(4)arene has been used as a host molecule and carbamazepine as a guest molecule. Optical absorption spectral studies were carried out to investigate the molecular recognition properties of p-t-butyl calix(4)arene with carbamazepine. The stochiometry of the host-guest complexes formed and the association constant were determined. An interesting 1:2 stochiometric host-guest complex was formed. Job's continuous method of variation and Benesi-Hildebrand expression were used for the determination of binding constant and the stochiometry of the host-guest complex formed. Molecular dimension of the host molecule plays a vital role in the formation of the host-guest stochiometric complexes.

  15. Spray formation with complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustig, S.; Rosen, M.

    2011-05-01

    Droplet formation through Faraday excitation has been tested in the low driving frequency limit. Kerosene was used to model liquid fuel with the addition of PIB in different proportions. All fluids were characterized in detail. The mechanisms of ejection were investigated to identify the relative influence of viscosity and surface tension. It was also possible to characterize the type of instability leading to the emission drop process.

  16. Complexation of DTPA and EDTA with Cd(2+): stability constants and thermodynamic parameters at the soil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Karak, Tanmoy; Paul, Ranjit Kumar; Das, Dilip Kumar; Boruah, Romesh Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Two alkaline soils collected from the surface horizon (0-15 cm) of two agricultural fields Lakshmikantapur (LKP; 22° 06' 03″ N and 88° 18' 19″ E) and Diamond Harbour (DHB; 22° 11' N and 88° 14' E) of West Bengal, India were studied to observe the stability of cadmium (Cd) chelate complexes with diethylenetriaminepentaacetatic acid (DTPA) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), removing organic matter (OM). The objective of the present study is "determination of the stability constants and the thermodynamic parameters of Cd-DTPA and Cd-EDTA complexes at different pH and temperatures at the soil-water interface". Complex formation of soil Cd with DTPA and EDTA at the soil-water interface was studied under different ligand-to-metal ratios, pHs and temperatures. Apparent conditional stability constants (log k´) were calculated from the concentrations of Cd chelates and free Cd(2+), estimated by solid phase extraction with an ion exchanger. Standard Gibbs energy (ΔG°), standard enthalpy (ΔH°) and standard entropy (ΔS°) of formation were calculated at three different temperatures. The higher stability constants of Cd-DTPA than Cd-EDTA indicated longer persistence of Cd-DTPA at the soil solution interface than Cd-EDTA complex. Increase of ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° with progress of temperature revealed that Cd-complex formation was facilitated by temperature. Highly negative ΔG° and positive ΔH° for Cd-complex formation indicated the reaction spontaneous and exothermic. In general, both ligands complexed high percentages of cadmium signalling their role in enhancing remobilization of Cd present in soil and preventing exchange of contaminated Cd from external source with soil mineral matrix; these phenomena may greatly reduce hazard for environment and human health. The result of this study support that DTPA increases solubility and more persistence of Cd in acidic soils within the range of temperature and mole fraction (MF = moles of Cd(2+)

  17. Correlation between stabilities of uranyl ion complexes with various monocarboxylic acids and Hammett-Taft substituent constants

    SciTech Connect

    Poluektov, N.S.; Perfil'ev, V.A.; Meshkova, S.B.; Mishchenko, V.T.

    1987-01-01

    A correlation has been observed between the stabilities of uranyl ion complexes (1:1 composition) and the substituent inductive constants in formic and acetic acid derivatives. For substituents which are not directly involved in couples formation the parameters of the Hammett-Taft equation log K/sub 1/ = A + B have the following values: A = 1.311, B = -2.360. For substituents which form a coordination bond with the uranyl ion, A = 7.0077 and B = - 17.321. In the case of complexes formed between the uranyl ion and salicylic acid and its derivatives, there is a correlation between complex stability and sigma/sub m/ and sigma/sub p/ substituent constants for the meta- and para-positions, respectively (A = 12.72, B = -4.41).

  18. Complex dielectric constant of various biomolecules as a function of wavelength using surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Ayushi; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2014-07-01

    Present study focuses on determination of complex dielectric constant of biomolecules as function of frequency by means of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique without losing their biofunctionality. Surface plasmon modes have been excited in Kretschmann configuration at interface of ZnO-Au thin films. Various biomolecules (glucose oxidase, cholesterol oxidase, urease, and uricase) have been immobilized successfully on surface of ZnO thin film by electrostatic interaction. SPR reflectance curves for all biomolecules were recorded separately at different wavelengths (407-635 nm). Complex dielectric constant was determined by fitting the experimental SPR data with Fresnel's equations. Dielectric constant of all biomolecules shows frequency dispersion and attributed to ionic polarization.

  19. A Simple Method for the Consecutive Determination of Protonation Constants through Evaluation of Formation Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurek, Jozef; Nackiewicz, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    A simple method is presented for the consecutive determination of protonation constants of polyprotic acids based on their formation curves. The procedure is based on generally known equations that describe dissociation equilibria. It has been demonstrated through simulation that the values obtained through the proposed method are sufficiently…

  20. STAR FORMATION ACROSS THE W3 COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Ybarra, Jason E.; Tapia, Mauricio; Megías, Guillermo D.; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Alves, Joáo F.

    2015-09-15

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the history of star formation in the W3 complex. Using deep, near-infrared ground-based images combined with images obtained with Spitzer and Chandra observatories, we identified and classified young embedded sources. We identified the principal clusters in the complex and determined their structure and extension. We constructed extinction-limited samples for five principal clusters and constructed K-band luminosity functions that we compare with those of artificial clusters with varying ages. This analysis provided mean ages and possible age spreads for the clusters. We found that IC 1795, the centermost cluster of the complex, still hosts a large fraction of young sources with circumstellar disks. This indicates that star formation was active in IC 1795 as recently as 2 Myr ago, simultaneous to the star-forming activity in the flanking embedded clusters, W3-Main and W3(OH). A comparison with carbon monoxide emission maps indicates strong velocity gradients in the gas clumps hosting W3-Main and W3(OH) and shows small receding clumps of gas at IC 1795, suggestive of rapid gas removal (faster than the T Tauri timescale) in the cluster-forming regions. We discuss one possible scenario for the progression of cluster formation in the W3 complex. We propose that early processes of gas collapse in the main structure of the complex could have defined the progression of cluster formation across the complex with relatively small age differences from one group to another. However, triggering effects could act as catalysts for enhanced efficiency of formation at a local level, in agreement with previous studies.

  1. Star Formation Across the W3 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Ybarra, Jason E.; Megías, Guillermo D.; Tapia, Mauricio; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Alves, Joáo F.

    2015-09-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the history of star formation in the W3 complex. Using deep, near-infrared ground-based images combined with images obtained with Spitzer and Chandra observatories, we identified and classified young embedded sources. We identified the principal clusters in the complex and determined their structure and extension. We constructed extinction-limited samples for five principal clusters and constructed K-band luminosity functions that we compare with those of artificial clusters with varying ages. This analysis provided mean ages and possible age spreads for the clusters. We found that IC 1795, the centermost cluster of the complex, still hosts a large fraction of young sources with circumstellar disks. This indicates that star formation was active in IC 1795 as recently as 2 Myr ago, simultaneous to the star-forming activity in the flanking embedded clusters, W3-Main and W3(OH). A comparison with carbon monoxide emission maps indicates strong velocity gradients in the gas clumps hosting W3-Main and W3(OH) and shows small receding clumps of gas at IC 1795, suggestive of rapid gas removal (faster than the T Tauri timescale) in the cluster-forming regions. We discuss one possible scenario for the progression of cluster formation in the W3 complex. We propose that early processes of gas collapse in the main structure of the complex could have defined the progression of cluster formation across the complex with relatively small age differences from one group to another. However, triggering effects could act as catalysts for enhanced efficiency of formation at a local level, in agreement with previous studies.

  2. STABILITY CONSTANTS OF NP(V) COMPLEXES WITH FLOURIDE AND SULFATE AT VARIABLE TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Xia; J.I. Friese; D.A. Moore; L. Rao

    2005-07-11

    A solvent extraction method was used to determine the stability constants of Np(V) complexes with fluoride and sulfate in 1.0 M NaClO{sub 4} from 25 C to 60 C. The distribution ratio of Np(V) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentrations of fluoride and sulfate were increased. Stability constants of the 1:1 Np(V)-fluoride complexes and the 1:1 Np(V)-sulfate and 1:2 Np(V)-sulfate complexes, dominant in the aqueous phase under the experimental conditions, were calculated from the effect of [F{sup -}] and [SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}] on the distribution ratio. The enthalpy and entropy of complexation were calculated from the stability constants at different temperatures by using the Van't Hoff equation.

  3. Complex organic molecules and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacmann, A.; Faure, A.

    2014-12-01

    Star forming regions are characterised by the presence of a wealth of chemical species. For the past two to three decades, ever more complex organic species have been detected in the hot cores of protostars. The evolution of these molecules in the course of the star forming process is still uncertain, but it is likely that they are partially incorporated into protoplanetary disks and then into planetesimals and the small bodies of planetary systems. The complex organic molecules seen in star forming regions are particularly interesting since they probably make up building blocks for prebiotic chemistry. Recently we showed that these species were also present in the cold gas in prestellar cores, which represent the very first stages of star formation. These detections question the models which were until now accepted to account for the presence of complex organic molecules in star forming regions. In this article, we shortly review our current understanding of complex organic molecule formation in the early stages of star formation, in hot and cold cores alike and present new results on the formation of their likely precursor radicals.

  4. Antioxidant study of quercetin and their metal complex and determination of stability constant by spectrophotometry method.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, R; Rajendran, M; Devapiriam, D

    2014-03-01

    Quercetin found chelate cadmium ions, scavenge free radicals produced by cadmium. Hence new complex, quercetin with cadmium was synthesised, and the synthesised complex structures were determined by UV-vis spectrophotometry, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis techniques (UV-vis, IR, TGA and DTA). The equilibrium stability constants of quercetin-cadmium complex were determined by Job's method. The determined stability constant value of quercetin-cadminum complex at pH 4.4 is 2.27×10(6) and at pH 7.4 is 7.80×10(6). It was found that the quercetin and cadmium ion form 1:1 complex in both pH 4.4 and pH 7.4. The structure of the compounds was elucidated on the basis of obtained results. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of the free quercetin and quercetin-cadmium complexes were determined by DPPH and ABTS assays.

  5. Equilibrium constant for carbamate formation from monoethanolamine and its relationship with temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Aroua, M.K.; Benamor, A.; Haji-Sulaiman, M.Z.

    1999-09-01

    Removal of acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S using aqueous solutions of alkanolamines is an industrially important process. The equilibrium constant for the formation of carbamate from monoethanolamine was evaluated at various temperatures of 298, 308, 318, and 328 K and ionic strengths up to 1.7 M. From the plot of log{sub 10} K versus I{sup 0.5}, the variation of the thermodynamical constant with temperature follows the relationship log{sub 10} K{sub 1} = {minus}0.934 + (0.671 {times} 10{sup 3})K/T.

  6. Binding constant determination of uranyl-citrate complex by ACE using a multi-injection method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiding; Li, Linnan; Huang, Hexiang; Xu, Linnan; Li, Ze; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-04-01

    The binding constant determination of uranyl with small-molecule ligands such as citric acid could provide fundamental knowledge for a better understanding of the study of uranyl complexation, which is of considerable importance for multiple purposes. In this work, the binding constant of uranyl-citrate complex was determined by ACE. Besides the common single-injection method, a multi-injection method to measure the electrophoretic mobility was also applied. The BGEs used contained HClO4 and NaClO4 , with a pH of 1.98 ± 0.02 and ionic strength of 0.050 mol/L, then citric acid was added to reach different concentrations. The electrophoretic mobilities of the uranyl-citrate complex measured by both of the two methods were consistent, and then the binding constant was calculated by nonlinear fitting assuming that the reaction had a 1:1 stoichiometry and the complex was [(UO2 )(Cit)](-) . The binding constant obtained by the multi-injection method was log K = 9.68 ± 0.07, and that obtained by the single-injection method was log K = 9.73 ± 0.02. The results provided additional knowledge of the uranyl-citrate system, and they demonstrated that compared with other methods, ACE using the multi-injection method could be an efficient, fast, and simple way to determine electrophoretic mobilities and to calculate binding constants.

  7. The Proline Enamine Formation Pathway Revisited in Dimethyl Sulfoxide: Rate Constants Determined via NMR.

    PubMed

    Haindl, Michael H; Hioe, Johnny; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2015-10-14

    Enamine catalysis is a fundamental activation mode in organocatalysis and can be successfully combined with other catalytic methods, e.g., photocatalysis. Recently, the elusive enamine intermediates were detected, and their stabilization modes were revealed. However, the formation pathway of this central organocatalytic intermediate is still a matter of dispute, and several mechanisms involving iminium and/or oxazolidinone are proposed. Here, the first experimentally determined rate constants and rates of enamine formation are presented using 1D selective exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) buildup curves and initial rate approximation. The trends of the enamine formation rates from exo-oxazolidinones and endo-oxazolidinones upon variation of the proline and water concentrations as well as the nucelophilic/basic properties of additives are investigated together with isomerization rates of the oxazolidinones. These first kinetic data of enamine formations in combination with theoretical calculations reveal the deprotonation of iminium intermediates as the dominant pathway in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The dominant enamine formation pathway varies according to the experimental conditions, e.g., the presence and strength of basic additives. The enamine formation is zero-order in proline and oxazolidinones, which excludes the direct deprotonation of oxazolidinones via E2 mechanism. The nucleophilicity of the additives influences only the isomerization rates of the oxazolidinones and not the enamine formation rates, which excludes a nucleophile-assisted anti elimination of oxazolidinones as a major enamine formation pathway.

  8. Determination of equilibrium association constants of ligand-DNA complexes by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gabelica, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometry can be used to detect ligand-DNA noncovalent complexes formed in solution. This chapter describes how to determine equilibrium association constants of the complexes. Particular attention is devoted to describing how to tune an electrospray mass spectrometer using a 12-mer oligodeoxynucleotides duplex in order to perform these experiments. This protocol can then be applied to any nucleic acid structure that can be ionized with electrospray mass spectrometry.

  9. Thermodynamics for complex formation between palladium(ii) and oxalate.

    PubMed

    Pilný, Radomír; Lubal, Přemysl; Elding, Lars I

    2014-08-28

    Complex formation between [Pd(H2O)4](2+) and oxalate (ox = C2O4(2-)) has been studied spectrophoto-metrically in aqueous solution at variable temperature, ionic strength and pH. Thermodynamic parameters at 298.2 K and 1.00 mol dm(-3) HClO4 ionic medium for the complex formation [Pd(H2O)4](2+) + H2ox ⇄ [Pd(H2O)2(ox)] + 2H3O(+) with equilibrium constant K1,H (in mol dm(-3)) are log10K1,H = 3.38 ± 0.08, ΔH = -33 ± 3 kJ mol(-1), and ΔS = -48 ± 11 J K(-1) mol(-1), as determined from spectrophotometric equilibrium titrations at 15.0, 20.0, 25.0 and 31.0 °C. Thermodynamic overall stability constants β (in (mol dm(-3))(-n), n = 1,2) for [Pd(H2O)2(ox)] and [Pd(ox)2](2-) at zero ionic strength and 298.2 K, defined as the equilibrium constants for the reaction Pd(2+) + nox(2-) ⇄ [Pd(ox)n](2-2n) (water molecules omitted) are log10β = 9.04 ± 0.06 and log10β = 13.1 ± 0.3, respectively, calculated by use of Specific Ion Interaction Theory from spectrophotometric titrations with initial hydrogen ion concentrations of 1.00, 0.100 and 0.0100 mol dm(-3) and ionic strengths of 1.00, 2.00 or 3.00 mol dm(-3). The values derived together with literature data give estimated overall stability constants for Pd(ii) compounds such as [Pd(en)(ox)] and cis-[Pd(NH3)2Cl2], some of them analogs to Pt(ii) complexes used in cancer treatment. The palladium oxalato complexes are significantly more stable than palladium(ii) complexes with monodentate O-bonding ligands. A comparison between several different palladium complexes shows that different parameters contribute to the stability variations observed. These are discussed together with the so-called chelate effect.

  10. DISSOCIATION OF ARSENITE-PEPTIDE COMPLEXES: TRIPHASIC NATURE, RATE CONSTANTS, HALF LIVES AND BIOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We determined the number and the dissociation rate constants of different complexes formed from arsenite and two peptides containing either one (RV AVGNDYASGYHYGV for peptide 20) or three cysteines (LE AWQGK VEGTEHLYSMK K for peptide 10) via radioactive 73As labeled arsenite and ...

  11. Determination of Equilibrium Constants of Metal Complexes from Spectrophotometric Measurements. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibañez, Gabriela A.; Olivieri, Alejandro C.; Escandar*, Graciela M.

    1999-09-01

    We describe an undergraduate laboratory practice involving the determination of complex equilibrium constants by spectrophotometric techniques. The results are obtained through model fitting using a computer program. As an example of these determinations, salicylic acid was selected and evaluated in the presence of copper(II) ion. The experimental conditions, general procedures, and computational strategem are discussed.

  12. Determining conditional stability constants for Pb complexation by carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CMCD).

    PubMed

    Skold, Magnus E; Thyne, Geoffrey D; Drexler, John W; McCray, John E

    2007-08-15

    Carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CMCD) has been proposed for remediation of metal-contaminated sediments. This research presents stability constants for CMCD-lead complexes, and demonstrates a rigorous methodology for estimating stability constants for metal-complexing agents. The conditional stability constant for the lead-CMCD aqueous complex was determined to be 10(5.18) with the 95% confidence interval ranging from 10(5.14) to 10(5.22). The best fit for experimental data was made by assuming a reaction between divalent CMCD(2-) and Pb(2+) and using the WATEQ activity coefficient formulation. The optimized value was derived from experimental data with the geochemical model PHREEQC coupled to UCODE_2005, a parameter optimization program. Like FITEQL, UCODE has a built-in option to optimize parameter values by minimizing the weighted sum of squared residuals (WSSR). However, our approach not only allows rapid, automatic optimization of the stability constant, but also allows determination of uncertainties in estimated parameter values and statistical analysis to assess the appropriateness of the conceptual model. The automation of the process allows testing of multiple conceptual models and the final values produced are internally consistent with the PHREEQC database. In this case five different conceptual models to describe the metal complexation and protonation reactions of CMCD were considered.

  13. Determination of complex permittivity from propagation constant measurement with planar transmission lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new two-standard calibration procedure is outlined for determining the complex permittivity of materials from the propagation constant measured with planar transmission lines. Once calibrated, a closed-form expression for the material permittivity is obtained. The effects of radiation and conducto...

  14. Stability constants important to the understanding of plutonium in environmental waters, hydroxy and carbonate complexation of PuO{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D A

    1990-04-20

    The formation constants for the reactions PuO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}O = PuO{sub 2}(OH) + H{sup +} and PuO{sub 2}{sup +} + CO{sub 3}{sup 2} = PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sup {minus}} were determined in aqueous sodium perchlorate solutions by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy. The molar absorptivity of the PuO{sub 2}{sup +} band at 569 nm decreased with increasing hydroxide concentration. Similarly, spectral changes occurred between 540 and 580 nm as the carbonate concentration was increased. The absorption data were analyzed by the non-linear least-squares program SQUAD to yield complexation constants. Using the specific ion interaction theory, both complexation constants were extrapolated to zero ionic strength. These thermodynamic complexation constants were combined with the oxidation-reduction potentials of Pu to obtain Eh versus pH diagrams. 120 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. Direct rate constant measurement of radical disulphide anion formation for cysteine and cysteamine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezyk, Stephen P.

    1995-03-01

    The techniques of pulse radiolysis, laser photolysis and absorption spectroscopy have been used to directly determine rate constants for radical disulphide anion formation for cysteine and cysteamine in aqueous solution. The measured values for cysteine, over the pH range 7-12, allowed calculation of individual rate constants for the constituent reactions RS . + RSH → RSSR -. + H + and RS . + RS - → RSSR -. as (3.39 ± 0.31) × 10 8 and (1.21 ± 0.04) × 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1, respectively. Analogous values for cysteamine were also determined by this technique as (3.06 ± 0.16) × 10 8 and (3.65 ± 0.07) × 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1.

  16. Testing anthropic reasoning for the cosmological constant with a realistic galaxy formation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudoh, Takahiro; Totani, Tomonori; Makiya, Ryu; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    The anthropic principle is one of the possible explanations for the cosmological constant (Λ) problem. In previous studies, a dark halo mass threshold comparable with our Galaxy must be assumed in galaxy formation to get a reasonably large probability of finding the observed small value, P(<Λobs), though stars are found in much smaller galaxies as well. Here we examine the anthropic argument by using a semi-analytic model of cosmological galaxy formation, which can reproduce many observations such as galaxy luminosity functions. We calculate the probability distribution of Λ by running the model code for a wide range of Λ, while other cosmological parameters and model parameters for baryonic processes of galaxy formation are kept constant. Assuming that the prior probability distribution is flat per unit Λ, and that the number of observers is proportional to stellar mass, we find P(<Λobs) = 6.7 per cent without introducing any galaxy mass threshold. We also investigate the effect of metallicity; we find P(<Λobs) = 9.0 per cent if observers exist only in galaxies whose metallicity is higher than the solar abundance. If the number of observers is proportional to metallicity, we find P(<Λobs) = 9.7 per cent. Since these probabilities are not extremely small, we conclude that the anthropic argument is a viable explanation, if the value of Λ observed in our Universe is determined by a probability distribution.

  17. Quasi-optical measurement of complex dielectric constant at 300 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöckel, Bernd

    1993-10-01

    A two beam interferometer in the Martin-Puplett configuration is used to determine the complex dielectric constant at 300 GHz of teflon, TPX-plastics, SPECTRALON and paraffin waxes with melting temperatures of 48° C and 72° C, respectively. The design of the quasi-optical system leads to a constant beam diameter at the power detector independent of path delay and frequency. The power detector signal is recorded not only along one period but over about 50 periods. A spectrum estimation routine allows to determine more exactly amplitude and phase angle of the signal. A basic problem is noticed: imperfect detector and source match cause harmonic distortion of the power detector signal. The effects on processing the loss tangent and the invalidation are shown. Finally loss tangent and dielectric constant are determined indirectly by optimizing an equivalent microwave circuit using a commercial available microwave design system to take multiple reflections and losses in consideration.

  18. Association constants and heats of formation of heteroassociates of anions of sulphophthaleine dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapovalov, S. A.

    2010-11-01

    The tendency of anions of sulphophthaleine dyes to heteroassociation was studied in aqueous solutions of phenol red, bromophenol blue, bromocresol green, bromocresol purple, and bromothymol blue. It was spectrophotometrically determined that single-(Han-) and double-charged anions (An2-) of sul-phophthaleines can form stable heteroassociates of composition Ct+ · HAn- and (Ct+)2 · An2- with cations (Ct+) of polymethine dyes, pinacyanol, and quinaldine red. The values of enthalpy formation of ions of dyes and heteroassociates were calculated using semi-empirical methods, then correlated with experimentally determined values of equilibrium association constants.

  19. Association constants and enthalpies of formation of heteroassociates of anions of cresol red and thymol blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapovalov, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    The tendency of anions of sulfophthaleine dyes to heteroassociation was studied in aqueous solutions of phenol red, cresol red, thymol blue, and non-substituted phenol red. It was spectrophotometrically determined that single (HAn-) and doubly charged anions (An2-) of sulfophthaleines can form stable heteroassociates of the composition Ct+ · HAn- and (Ct+)2 · An2- with cations (Ct+) of polymethine dyes, pinacyanol, and quinaldine red. The values of enthalpy formation of ions of dyes and heteroassociates were calculated semi-empirically and compared with experimentally determined values of the equilibrium association constants.

  20. Measurement of Magnitude and Sign of Heteronuclear Coupling Constants in Transition Metal Complexes.

    PubMed

    Otting; Soler; Messerle

    1999-04-01

    Sets of specifically tailored E.COSY-type correlation experiments and double-quantum/zero-quantum (DQ/ZQ) experiments are presented which enable the determination of sign and size of small heteronuclear coupling constants across the metal center of transition metal complexes. For the octahedrally coordinated complexes, [Ru(TPM)(H)(CO)(PPh3)]+[BF4]- (1) and [Ir(TPM)(H)(CO)(CO2CH3)]+[BF4]- (2), 14 of 15 and 15 of 15 possible two-bond scalar coupling constants across the metal center were measured, respectively, using 15N and 15N/13C enriched samples (TPM = tris(1-pyrazolyl)methane)). The reduced coupling constants 2KX-M-Y = 4pi2 2J/(hgammaXgammaY) were found to be positive when the coupled nuclei X and Y were trans with respect to the metal center, and negative when the coupled nuclei were in cis position. The validity of this sign rule was verified for JCC, JNN, JPN, JPC, JCN, JHP, JHC, and JHN couplings. Idiosyncracies associated with 2D NMR spectra for the sign determination of coupling constants with 15N which lead to corrections for the signs of JHN, JPN, and JCN couplings reported previously are discussed. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  1. Stability Constants of Technetium (IV) Oxalate Complexes as a Function of Ionic Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yuanxian; Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2006-03-01

    Solvent extraction methods were used to determine the stability constants of Tc(IV) with oxalate anions in NaCl solutions ranging in concentration from 0.5 M to 2.0 M. All experiments were conducted in an atmosphere-controlled chamber under Ar atmosphere (< 1.0ppm O2). A reducing agent (hydrazine) was used during extractions to maintain technetium in the tetravalent oxidation state. Independent tests confirmed that the oxidation state of technetium did not change during extractions. The distribution ratio of Tc(IV) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentration of oxalic acid increased. At the oxalic acid concentrations used in these experiments, the complexes TcO(Ox) and TcO(Ox)22- were found to be the dominant aqueous species. Based on these data, the thermodynamic stability constants of Tc(IV) with oxalate complexes were calculated by the Specific Ion Interaction Theory (SIT).

  2. Interactive formation control in complex environments.

    PubMed

    Henry, Joseph; Shum, Hubert P H; Komura, Taku

    2014-02-01

    The degrees of freedom of a crowd is much higher than that provided by a standard user input device. Typically, crowd-control systems require multiple passes to design crowd movements by specifying waypoints, and then defining character trajectories and crowd formation. Such multi-pass control would spoil the responsiveness and excitement of real-time control systems. In this paper, we propose a single-pass algorithm to control a crowd in complex environments. We observe that low-level details in crowd movement are related to interactions between characters and the environment, such as diverging/merging at cross points, or climbing over obstacles. Therefore, we simplify the problem by representing the crowd with a deformable mesh, and allow the user, via multitouch input, to specify high-level movements and formations that are important for context delivery. To help prevent congestion, our system dynamically reassigns characters in the formation by employing a mass transport solver to minimize their overall movement. The solver uses a cost function to evaluate the impact from the environment, including obstacles and areas affecting movement speed. Experimental results show realistic crowd movement created with minimal high-level user inputs. Our algorithm is particularly useful for real-time applications including strategy games and interactive animation creation.

  3. Interactive Formation Control in Complex Environments.

    PubMed

    Henry, Joseph; Shum, Hubert P H; Komura, Taku

    2013-08-13

    The degrees of freedom of a crowd is much higher than that provided by a standard user input device. Typically, crowd control systems require multiple passes to design crowd movements by specifying waypoints, and then defining character trajectories and crowd formation. Such multi-pass control would spoil the responsiveness and excitement of real-time control systems. In this paper, we propose a single-pass algorithm to control a crowd in complex environments. We observe that low level details in crowd movement are related to interactions between characters and the environment, such as diverging/merging at cross points, or climbing over obstacles. Therefore, we simplify the problem by representing the crowd with a deformable mesh, and allow the user, via multi-touch input, to specify high level movements and formations that are important for context delivery. To help prevent congestion, our system dynamically reassigns characters in the formation by employing a mass transport solver to minimise their overall movement. The solver uses a cost function to evaluate the impact from the environment, including obstacles and areas affecting movement speed. Experimental results show realistic crowd movement created with minimal high-level user inputs. Our algorithm is particularly useful for real-time applications including strategy games and interactive animation creation.

  4. Negative ion formation by Rydberg electron transfer: Isotope-dependent rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, H.S. Jr.; Klots, C.E.; Compton, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    The formation of negative ions during collisions of rubidium atoms in selected ns and nd Rydberg states with carbon disulfide molecules has been studied for a range of effective principal quantum numbers (10 {le} n* {le} 25). For a narrow range of n* near n* = 17, rate constants for CS{sub 2}{sup {minus}} formation are found to depend upon the isotopic composition of the molecule, producing a negative ion isotope ratio (mass 78 to mass 76, amu) up to 10.5 times larger than the natural abundance ratio of CS{sub 2} isotopes in the reagent. The isotope ratio is found to depend strongly upon the initial quantum state of the Rydberg atom and perhaps upon the collision energy and CS{sub 2} temperature. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Equilibrium star formation in a constant Q disc: model optimization and initial tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Thilker, David A.; Zwaan, Martin A.

    2013-10-01

    We develop a model for the distribution of the interstellar medium (ISM) and star formation in galaxies based on recent studies that indicate that galactic discs stabilize to a constant stability parameter, which we combine with prescriptions of how the phases of the ISM are determined and for the star formation law (SFL). The model predicts the gas surface mass density and star formation intensity of a galaxy given its rotation curve, stellar surface mass density and the gas velocity dispersion. This model is tested on radial profiles of neutral and molecular ISM surface mass density and star formation intensity of 12 galaxies selected from the H I Nearby Galaxy Survey sample. Our tests focus on intermediate radii (0.3 to 1 times the optical radius) because there are insufficient data to test the outer discs and the fits are less accurate in detail in the centre. Nevertheless, the model produces reasonable agreement with the ISM mass and star formation rate integrated over the central region in all but one case. To optimize the model, we evaluate four recipes for the stability parameter, three recipes for apportioning the ISM into molecular and neutral components, and eight versions of the SFL. We find no clear-cut best prescription for the two-fluid (gas and stars) stability parameter Q2f and therefore for simplicity, we use the Wang and Silk approximation (QWS). We found that an empirical scaling between the molecular-to-neutral ISM ratio (Rmol) and the stellar surface mass density proposed by Leroy et al. works marginally better than the other two prescriptions for this ratio in predicting the ISM profiles, and noticeably better in predicting the star formation intensity from the ISM profiles produced by our model with the SFLs we tested. Thus, in the context of our modelled ISM profiles, the linear molecular SFL and the two-component SFL work better than the other prescriptions we tested. We incorporate these relations into our `constant Q disc' model.

  6. Estimating the acidity of transition metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes by adding ligand acidity constants.

    PubMed

    Morris, Robert H

    2014-02-05

    A simple equation (pKa(THF) = ∑AL + Ccharge + Cnd + Cd6) can be used to obtain an estimate of the pKa of diamagnetic transition metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes in tetrahydrofuran, and, by use of conversion equations, in other solvents. It involves adding acidity constants AL for each of the ligands in the 5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-coordinate conjugate base complex of the hydride or dihydrogen complex along with a correction for the charge (Ccharge = -15, 0 or 30 for x = +1, 0 or -1 charge, respectively) and the periodic row of the transition metal (Cnd = 0 for 3d or 4d metal, 2 for 5d metal) as well as a correction for d(6) octahedral acids (Cd6 = 6 for d(6) metal ion in the acid, 0 for others) that are not dihydrogen complexes. Constants AL are provided for 13 commonly occurring ligand types; of these, nine neutral ligands are correlated with Lever's electrochemical ligand parameters EL. This method gives good estimates of the over 170 literature pKa values that range from less than zero to 50 with a standard deviation of 3 pKa units for complexes of the metals chromium to nickel, molybdenum, ruthenium to palladium, and tungsten to platinum in the periodic table. This approach allows a quick assessment of the acidity of hydride complexes found in nature (e.g., hydrogenases) and in industry (e.g., catalysis and hydrogen energy applications). The pKa values calculated for acids that have bulky or large bite angle chelating ligands deviate the most from this correlation. The method also provides an estimate of the base strength of the deprotonated form of the complex.

  7. Experimental study of the complex resistivity and dielectric constant of chrome-contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haorui; Yang, Heli; Yi, Fengyan

    2016-08-01

    Heavy metals such as arsenic and chromium often contaminate soils near industrialized areas. Soil samples, made with different water content and chromate pollutant concentrations, are often needed to test soil quality. Because complex resistivity and complex dielectric characteristics of these samples need to be measured, the relationship between these measurement results and chromium concentration as well as water content was studied. Based on soil sample observations, the amplitude of the sample complex resistivity decreased with an increase of contamination concentration and water content. The phase of complex resistivity takes on a tendency of initially decrease, and then increase with the increasing of contamination concentration and water content. For a soil sample with the same resistivity, the higher the amplitude of complex resistivity, the lower the water content and the higher the contamination concentration. The real and imaginary parts of the complex dielectric constant increase with an increase in contamination concentration and water content. Note that resistivity and complex resistivity methods are necessary to adequately evaluate pollution at various sites.

  8. Structural correspondence between uranyl chloride complexes in solution and their stability constants.

    PubMed

    Soderholm, L; Skanthakumar, S; Wilson, Richard E

    2011-05-19

    Pair-distribution functions (PDF)s were obtained from high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS) data on a series of uranyl solutions as a function of chloride ion concentration. Analyses reveal that chloride forms only inner-sphere complexes with the uranyl, replacing inner-sphere waters such that the total uranyl coordination number decreases from 4.7 waters at [Cl(-)] = 0 m to 4.4 (1.7 water and 2.7 Cl(-)) at [Cl(-)] = 6.8 m. Some of the second-coordination sphere waters reorient upon uranyl inner-sphere chloride complexation in order to hydrogen bond with the bound anion. Similar data obtained on a series of solutions maintained at constant ionic strength are used to confirm structural assignments through determining stability constants for the addition of chloride to uranyl and comparison with published values. The stability constants, β(1) = 1.5(10) m(-1), β(2) = 0.8(4) m(-2), and β(3) = 0.4(1) m(-3), obtained in a series of solutions with constant ionic strength of 5.3 m, are in reasonable agreement with previously published results determined by solvent extraction. The agreement of stability constants supports our peak assignments for the PDF and thus our structural model for uranyl chloride complexes in solution. Using coordination numbers and speciation determined here as a function of chloride ion concentration, the monochloro species is found to have four coordinating waters in the uranyl equatorial plane, the dichoro species is found to be an equilibrium of three and two coordinating waters, and the trichloro species has only a single water in the equatorial plane. These values correspond to total average coordination numbers of 5, 4.3, and 4 for the mono-, di-, and trichlorouranyl complexes. From the equilibrium value of the dichloro species, it can be further estimated that ΔG = -0.5 kcal/mol for the conversion of five to four coordinate species. Overall, the HEXS data support the assertion that uranyl chloride correlations do exist and the results are

  9. Constant Electric and Magnetic Fields Effect on the Structuring and Thermomechanical and Thermophysical Properties of Nanocomposites Formed from Pectin-Cu2+-Polyethyleneimine Interpolyelectrolyte-Metal Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demchenko, V.; Shtompel', V.; Riabov, S.; Lysenkov, E.

    2015-12-01

    Applying wide-angle X-ray scattering method, thermomechanical analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry, the structural organization and properties of nanocomposites formed by chemical reduction of Cu2+ cations in the interpolyelectrolyte-metal complex (pectin-Cu2+-polyethyleneimine) under the influence of a constant magnetic and electric fields have been studied. It has been found that the chemical reduction of Cu2+ cations in the interpolyelectrolyte-metal complex bulk under constant electric and magnetic fields leads to formation of nanocomposite consisting of interpolyelectrolyte complex, including pectin-polyethyleneimine and nanoparticles of the metal Cu phase, whereas nanocomposite with Cu/Cu2O nanoparticles is formed in original state (without any field). It was observed that, under constant field, nanocomposites obtained have higher structural glass-transition temperatures and thermal stability.

  10. A theoretical study on the electronic structures and equilibrium constants evaluation of Deferasirox iron complexes.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Samie; Saljooghi, Amir Shokooh; Izadyar, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Elemental iron is essential for cellular growth and homeostasis but it is potentially toxic to the cells and tissues. Excess iron can contribute in tumor initiation and tumor growth. Obviously, in iron overload issues using an iron chelator in order to reduce iron concentration seems to be vital. This study presents the density functional theory calculations of the electronic structure and equilibrium constant for iron-deferasirox (Fe-DFX) complexes in the gas phase, water and DMSO. A comprehensive study was performed to investigate the Deferasirox-iron complexes in chelation therapy. Calculation was performed in CAMB3LYP/6-31G(d,p) to get the optimized structures for iron complexes in high and low spin states. Natural bond orbital and quantum theory of atoms in molecules analyses was carried out with B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) to understand the nature of complex bond character and electronic transition in complexes. Electrostatic potential effects on the complexes were evaluated using the CHelpG calculations. The results indicated that higher affinity for Fe(III) is not strictly a function of bond length but also the degree of Fe-X (X=O,N) covalent bonding. Based on the quantum reactivity parameters which have been investigated here, it is possible reasonable design of the new chelators to improve the chelator abilities.

  11. Cyclodextrins in pharmaceutical formulations II: solubilization, binding constant, and complexation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jambhekar, Sunil S; Breen, Philip

    2016-02-01

    Cyclodextrins are cyclic oligosaccharides that have been recognized as pharmaceutical adjuvants for the past 20 years. The molecular structure of these glucose derivatives, which approximates a truncated cone, bucket, or torus, generates a hydrophilic exterior surface and a nonpolar interior cavity. Cyclodextrins can interact with appropriately sized drug molecules to yield an inclusion complex. These noncovalent inclusion complexes offer a variety of advantages over noncomplexed forms of a drug. Cyclodextrins are carbohydrates that are primarily used to enhance the aqueous solubility, physical chemical stability, and bioavailability of drugs. Their other applications include preventing drug-drug interactions, converting liquid drugs into microcrystalline powders, minimizing gastrointestinal and ocular irritation, and reducing or eliminating unpleasant taste and smell. Here, we focus on the solubilization of drugs by complexation, and discuss the determination and significance of binding constants for cyclodextrin complexes, and the determination of complexation efficiency and factors that influence it. We also make some general observations on cyclodextrin complexation and the use of cyclodextrins in solid, as well as parenteral, dosage forms.

  12. The potentiometric determination of stability constants for zinc acetate complexes in aqueous solutions to 295°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glordano, Thomas H.; Drummond, S. E.

    1991-09-01

    A potentiometric method was used to determine the formation quotients of zinc acetate complexes in aqueous solutions from 50 to 295°C at ionic strengths of 0.03,0.3, and 1.0 m. The potentiometric titrations were carried out in an externally heated, Teflon-lined concentration cell fitted with hydrogen electrodes. Formal sodium acetate concentrations of the experimental solutions ranged from 0.001 to 0. 1 m with acetic acid to sodium acetate ratios ranging from 30 to 300. Sodium trifluoromethanesulfonate (F3CSO3Na) was used as a supporting electrolyte. Stoichiometries and formation quotients for the complexes ZnCH3COO+, Zn(CH3COO)2, and Zn(CH3COO)-3 were derived from the titration data by regression analysis. Stability constants at infinite dilution (Kn) and other relevant thermodynamic quantities were calculated for these three complexes. Logarithms for the formation constants of the general reaction Zn2+ + nCH3COO- = Zn(CH3COO)n2-n are n = 1-(1.9 ± 0.2, 50°C), (2.3 ± 0.1, 100°C), (2.8 ± 0.1, 150°C), (3.5 ± 0.1, 200°C), (4.3 ± 0.2, 250°C), (5.3 ± 0.3, 300°C); n = 2-(3.4 ± 0.1, 50°C), (4.0 ± 0.1, 100°C), (4.83 ± 0.09, 150°C), (5.9 ± 0.1, 200°C), (7.1 ± 0.1, 250°C), (8.7 ± 0.2, 300°C); n = 3-(4.1 ± 0.3, 50°C), (4.7 ± 0.3, 100°C), (5.5 ± 0.3, 150°C), (6.6 ± 0.3, 200°C), (7.9 ± 0.3, 250°C), (9.4 ± 0.3, 300°C). Calculations of zinc speciation in acetate-chloride solutions show that zinc acetate complexes should have an importance similar to zinc chloride complexes in high acetate waters where chloride to acetate molal ratios are less than about 10.

  13. Stability Constants of Mixed Ligand Complexes of Nickel(II) with Adenine and Some Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Türkel, Naciye

    2015-01-01

    Nickel is one of the essential trace elements found in biological systems. It is mostly found in nickel-based enzymes as an essential cofactor. It forms coordination complexes with amino acids within enzymes. Nickel is also present in nucleic acids, though its function in DNA or RNA is still not clearly understood. In this study, complex formation tendencies of Ni(II) with adenine and certain L-amino acids such as aspartic acid, glutamic acid, asparagine, leucine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan were investigated in an aqueous medium. Potentiometric equilibrium measurements showed that both binary and ternary complexes of Ni(II) form with adenine and the above-mentioned L-amino acids. Ternary complexes of Ni(II)-adenine-L-amino acids are formed by stepwise mechanisms. Relative stabilities of the ternary complexes are compared with those of the corresponding binary complexes in terms of Δlog10⁡K, log10⁡X, and % RS values. It was shown that the most stable ternary complex is Ni(II):Ade:L-Asn while the weakest one is Ni(II):Ade:L-Phe in aqueous solution used in this research. In addition, results of this research clearly show that various binary and ternary type Ni(II) complexes are formed in different concentrations as a function of pH in aqueous solution. PMID:26843852

  14. Efficient Algorithm Using a Broadband Approach to Determine the Complex Constants of Piezoelectric Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiochi, F.; Kiyono, C. Y.; Peréz, N.; Adamowski, J. C.; Silva, E. C. N.

    A new systematic and efficient algorithm to obtain the ten complex constants of piezoelectric materials belonging to the 6 mm symmetry class was developed. A finite element method routine was implemented in Matlab using eight-node axisymmetric elements. The algorithm raises the electrical conductance and resistance curves and calculates the quadratic difference between the experimental and numerical curves. Finally, to minimize the difference, an optimization algorithm based on the "Method of Moving Asymptotes" (MMA) is used. The algorithm is able to adjust the curves over a wide frequency range obtaining the real and imaginary parts of the material properties simultaneously.

  15. Models for ionic contribution to the complex dielectric constant of nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Alexe-Ionescu, A L; Barbero, G; Lelidis, I

    2009-12-01

    We analyze the models that account the ionic contribution to the complex dielectric constant of a nematic liquid crystal. We compare the predictions of the model of [Sawada, Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. Sci. Technol., Sect. A 318, 225 (1998)] based on the assumption that the electric field in the liquid coincides with the applied one, with the model of Macdonald where the electric field in the sample is determined in self-consistent manner by solving the equation of Poisson. We show that the model of Sawada , widely used to determine the bulk density of ions and their diffusion coefficient in liquid crystal cells, predicts a thickness dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant different from that predicted by the model of Macdonald. On the contrary, the predictions of the two models coincide for what concerns the frequency dependencies of the two components of the dielectric constant. By considering a typical case, we show that the numerical values of the ionic properties derived by means of the model of Sawada may differ even more than 1 order of magnitude by those predicted by the model of Macdonald. A rescaling procedure allowing to evaluate the bulk density of ions and the ionic diffusion coefficient determined by means of the model of Sawada in agreement with the one of Macdonald is proposed.

  16. Microcalorimetric determination of the thermodynamics of formation of the mono- and bi-sulfato complexes of lanthanum in aqueous solutions between 25 and 55 degrees C

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, C.; Matijevic, E.

    1987-05-01

    Using a differential microcalorimeter, the formation constants and enthalpies of formation of the mono- and bi-sulfato complexes of lanthanum ion have been evaluated for aqueous acidic solutions over a temperature range of 25 to 55/sup 0/C.

  17. The evolution of galaxies at constant number density: a less biased view of star formation, quenching, and structural formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ownsworth, Jamie R.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Mundy, Carl J.; Mortlock, Alice; Hartley, William G.; Duncan, Kenneth; Almaini, Omar

    2016-09-01

    Due to significant galaxy contamination and impurity in stellar mass selected samples (up to 95 per cent from z = 0-3), we examine the star formation history, quenching time-scales, and structural evolution of galaxies using a constant number density selection with data from the United Kingdom Infra-Red Deep Sky Survey Ultra-Deep Survey field. Using this methodology, we investigate the evolution of galaxies at a variety of number densities from z = 0-3. We find that samples chosen at number densities ranging from 3 × 10-4 to 10-5 galaxies Mpc-3 (corresponding to z ˜ 0.5 stellar masses of M* = 1010.95-11.6 M0) have a star-forming blue fraction of ˜50 per cent at z ˜ 2.5, which evolves to a nearly 100 per cent quenched red and dead population by z ˜ 1. We also see evidence for number density downsizing, such that the galaxies selected at the lowest densities (highest masses) become a homogeneous red population before those at higher number densities. Examining the evolution of the colours for these systems furthermore shows that the formation redshift of galaxies selected at these number densities is zform > 3. The structural evolution through size and Sérsic index fits reveal that while there remains evolution in terms of galaxies becoming larger and more concentrated in stellar mass at lower redshifts, the magnitude of the change is significantly smaller than for a mass-selected sample. We also find that changes in size and structure continues at z < 1, and is coupled strongly to passivity evolution. We conclude that galaxy structure is driving the quenching of galaxies, such that galaxies become concentrated before they become passive.

  18. Determination of stability constants for thallium(III) cyanide complexes in aqueous solution by means of sup 13 C and sup 205 Ti NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Blixt, J.; Gyori, B.; Glaser, J. )

    1989-11-27

    In contrast to what is usually assumed, we have found and proved that thallium(III) forms very strong cyanide complexes in aqueous solution. The authors have investigated this system using {sup 205}Tl, {sup 13}C, and {sup 14}N NMR and potentiometry and established the existence of four thallium(III)-cyanide complexes of the composition Tl(CN){sub n}{sup 3-n}, n = 1-4. We have measured their chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants and determined their formation constants at 25{degree}C in dilute (0.05 M) aqueous solution in the ionic medium ((Na{sup +}) = 1 M, (Li{sup +}) + (H{sup +}) = 3 M, (ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) = 4 M). We have also determined the stability constant for HCN in the same ionic medium, log K{sub a} = 10.11 (5).

  19. Computer-controlled apparatus for measuring complex elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants of polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, T.; Date, M.; Ishida, K.; Ikeda, Y.

    1986-02-01

    Principles and design details are described for a fully automatic system measuring frequency and temperature spectra of the complex elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants of polymer films. A microcomputer is used to control all processes including wave generation, sampling, and calculations. A sinusoidal excitation wave is written onto a RAM, readout by an external clock, and applied to a sample via a D/A converter. The resulting signals related to force, deformation, charge, and voltage are simultaneously sampled using the same clock and are determined as complex quantities through Fourier transformation. Their ratios give corresponding complex response functions. A multifrequency signal consisting of eight sinusoidal waves with frequencies of common ratio 2 is used to obtain frequency spectra over two decades at a time. This system operates over a frequency range from 0.01 to 100 Hz for elastic and piezoelectric measurements and from 0.01 Hz to 10 kHz for dielectric measurements at temperatures from -160 to 250 °C with an accuracy of 0.1% in tan δ.

  20. Polarographic determination of lead hydroxide formation constants at low ionic strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lind, Carol J.

    1978-01-01

    Values of formation constants for lead hydroxide at 25 ??C were calculated from normal pulse polarographic measurements of 10-6 M lead in 0.01 M sodium perchlorate. The low concentrations simulate those found in many freshwaters, permitting direct application of the values when considering distributions of lead species. The precise evaluation of species distribution in waters at other ionic strengths requires activity coefficient corrections. As opposed to much of the previously published work done at high ionic strength, the values reported here were obtained at low ionic strength, permitting use of smaller and better defined activity coefficient corrections. These values were further confirmed by differential-pulse polarography and differential-pulse anodic stripping voltammetry data. The logs of the values for ??1??? ??2???, and ??3??? were calculated to be 6.59, 10.80, and 13.63, respectively. When corrected to zero ionic strength these values were calculated to be 6.77, 11.07, and 13.89, respectively.

  1. Complex unconstrained three-dimensional hand movement and constant equi-affine speed.

    PubMed

    Maoz, Uri; Berthoz, Alain; Flash, Tamar

    2009-02-01

    One long-established simplifying principle behind the large repertoire and high versatility of human hand movements is the two-thirds power law-an empirical law stating a relationship between local geometry and kinematics of human hand trajectories during planar curved movements. It was further generalized not only to various types of human movements, but also to motion perception and prediction, although it was unsuccessful in explaining unconstrained three-dimensional (3D) movements. Recently, movement obeying the power law was proved to be equivalent to moving with constant planar equi-affine speed. Generalizing such motion to 3D space-i.e., to movement at constant spatial equi-affine speed-predicts the emergence of a new power law, whose utility for describing spatial scribbling movements we have previously demonstrated. In this empirical investigation of the new power law, subjects repetitively traced six different 3D geometrical shapes with their hand. We show that the 3D power law explains the data consistently better than both the two-thirds power law and an additional power law that was previously suggested for spatial hand movements. We also found small yet systematic modifications of the power-law's exponents across the various shapes, which further scrutiny suggested to be correlated with global geometric factors of the traced shape. Nevertheless, averaging over all subjects and shapes, the power-law exponents are generally in accordance with constant spatial equi-affine speed. Taken together, our findings provide evidence for the potential role of non-Euclidean geometry in motion planning and control. Moreover, these results seem to imply a relationship between geometry and kinematics that is more complex than the simple local one stipulated by the two-thirds power law and similar models.

  2. Complex formation dynamics in a single-molecule electronic device

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Huimin; Li, Wengang; Chen, Jiewei; He, Gen; Li, Longhua; Olson, Mark A.; Sue, Andrew C.-H.; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Guo, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule electronic devices offer unique opportunities to investigate the properties of individual molecules that are not accessible in conventional ensemble experiments. However, these investigations remain challenging because they require (i) highly precise device fabrication to incorporate single molecules and (ii) sufficient time resolution to be able to make fast molecular dynamic measurements. We demonstrate a graphene-molecule single-molecule junction that is capable of probing the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of a host-guest complex. By covalently integrating a conjugated molecular wire with a pendent crown ether into graphene point contacts, we can transduce the physical [2]pseudorotaxane (de)formation processes between the electron-rich crown ether and a dicationic guest into real-time electrical signals. The conductance of the single-molecule junction reveals two-level fluctuations that are highly dependent on temperature and solvent environments, affording a nondestructive means of quantitatively determining the binding and rate constants, as well as the activation energies, for host-guest complexes. The thermodynamic processes reveal the host-guest binding to be enthalpy-driven and are consistent with conventional 1H nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments. This electronic device opens up a new route to developing single-molecule dynamics investigations with microsecond resolution for a broad range of chemical and biochemical applications. PMID:28138528

  3. Novel Characterization Method of Ions in Liquid Crystal Materials by Complex Dielectric Constant Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Atsushi; Tarumi, Kazuaki; Naemura, Shohei

    1999-03-01

    The frequency dependence of the complex dielectric constant of liquid crystal materials doped with tetra-n-butylammonium iodide (TBAI) is investigated in the low-frequency region, and the experimental results are analyzed in terms of space charge polarization. The contribution from an electric double layer is also taken into consideration in the analysis. By means of curve fitting utilizing theoretical expressions of the space charge polarization, five sets of diffusion coefficient and density values are obtained for mobile ions. It is confirmed by experiments on the temperature dependence that five kinds of ions follow Walden's rule, and verified from the viewpoint of ion radii that two of the five kinds of ions are TBA+ and I-. The frequency-dependent dielectric properties, which are characteristic of the behaviors of ions, can be well explained by this study and the analytical method introduced here is considered to be powerful for the evaluation of the attributes of mobile ions.

  4. Complexation of arsenite with dissolved organic matter: conditional distribution coefficients and apparent stability constants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong

    2010-11-01

    The complexation of arsenic (As) with dissolved organic matter (DOM), although playing an important role in regulating As mobility and transformation, is poorly characterized, as evidenced by scarce reporting of fundamental parameters of As-DOM complexes. The complexation of arsenite (AsIII) with Aldrich humic acid (HA) at different pHs was characterized using a recently developed analytical technique to measure both free and DOM-bound As. Conditional distribution coefficient (KD), describing capacity of DOM in binding AsIII from the mass perspective, and apparent stability constant (Ks), describing stability of resulting AsIII-DOM complexes, were calculated to characterize AsIII-DOM complexation. LogKD of AsIII ranged from 3.7 to 2.2 (decreasing with increase of As/DOM ratio) at pH 5.2, from 3.6 to 2.6 at pH 7, and from 4.3 to 3.2 at pH=9.3, respectively. Two-site ligand binding models can capture the heterogeneity of binding sites and be used to calculate Ks by classifying the binding sites into strong (S1) and weak (S2) groups. LogKs for S1 sites are 7.0, 6.5, and 5.9 for pH 5.2, 7, and 9.3, respectively, which are approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than for weak S2 sites. The results suggest that AsIII complexation with DOM increases with pH, as evidenced by significant spikes in concentrations of DOM-bound AsIII and in KD values at pH 9.3. In contrary to KD, logKs decreased with pH, in particular for S1 sites, probably due to the presence of negatively charged H2AsO3- and the involvement of metal-bridged AsIII-DOM complexation at pH 9.3.

  5. On the Formation of "Hypercoordinated" Uranyl Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Schoendorff, George E.; De Jong, Wibe A.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Gibson, John K.; Rios, Daniel; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2011-09-05

    Recent gas phase experimental studies suggest the presence of hypercoordinated uranyl complexes. Coordination of acetone (Ace) to uranyl to form hypercoordinated species is examined using density functional theory (DFT) with a range of functionals and second order perturbation theory (MP2). Complexes with up to eight acetones were studied. It is shown that no more than six acetones can bind directly to uranium and that the observed uranyl complexes are not hypercoordinated.

  6. Tungsten speciation in sulfidic waters: Determination of thiotungstate formation constants and modeling their distribution in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohajerin, T. Jade; Helz, George R.; White, Christopher D.; Johannesson, Karen H.

    2014-11-01

    Using UV/VIS spectrophotometry the equilibrium constants for the formation of monothiotungstate, WO3S2- (WO42-+H2S↔WO3S2-+H2O; log K01 = 3.08 ± 0.11), dithiotungstate, WO2S22- (WO3S2-+H2S↔WO2S22-+H2O; log K12 = 3.22 ± 0.22), trithiotungstate, WOS32- (WO2S22-+H2S↔WO3S2-+H2O; log K23 = 2.76 ± 0.10), and tetrathiotungstate, WS42- (WO3S2-+H2S↔WS42-+H2O; log K34 ∼2.36) were determined. The equilibrium constants describing the formation of thiotungstates are approximately two orders of magnitude less than the equilibrium constants for the formation of the analogous thiomolybdates. These equilibrium constants for thiotungstates were used to model tungstate speciation in sulfidic waters. The model predicts that thiotungstate species are negligible in most natural waters, but are likely to be important in circum-neutral, anoxic waters with ⩾0.1 mM S(-II) concentrations. Natural waters that are conducive to thiotungstate formation include the Black Sea, Tyro and Bannock Basins, and porewaters with high rates of sulfate reduction such as those common in salt marshes. Preliminary field investigations indicate that thiotungstate formation may lead to increased W solubility.

  7. Spectrophotometric determination of the formation constant of triiodide ions in aqueous-organic solvent or polymer mixed media both in absence and presence of a surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naorem, Homendra; Devi, Seram Dushila

    2013-01-01

    The formation constant of triiodide ions from iodine-iodide equilibrium in aqueous-organic solvent or polymer mixed media have been determined spectrophotometrically at three different temperatures 20, 30 and 40 °C. The organic solvents chosen for the study are ethylene glycol, 2-methoxy ethanol, and 2-ethoxy ethanol while the polymers include polyethylene glycol (PEG), hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) or polyethylene oxide (PEO). Effect of a surfactant on the formation of triiodide ions in the mixed media has also been investigated. Though presence of the organic solvents led to an increase in the triiodide formation except for 2-ethoxy ethanol mixed media at low percentage, the increase in presence of PEG or the other polymer mixed media even at very low percentage was much higher as compared to those in ethylene glycol or its homologues. The increase in the formation constant has been discussed in terms of changes in its solvation properties and the hydrophobic character of the mixed media besides the solvent dielectric effects. The sharp increase in triiodide formation in presence of the polymer under study suggests the possibility of iodine being present as triiodide or other higher polyiodides in the inclusion complexes of iodine with other polymers like starch or PVA. The decrease in the triiodide formation in presence of surfactant micelles may, however, be attributed to solubilization of iodine by the micelles. Iodine was found to be better solubilized in TX-100 micelles as compared to SDS micelles.

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of the formation constant of triiodide ions in aqueous-organic solvent or polymer mixed media both in absence and presence of a surfactant.

    PubMed

    Naorem, Homendra; Devi, Seram Dushila

    2013-01-15

    The formation constant of triiodide ions from iodine-iodide equilibrium in aqueous-organic solvent or polymer mixed media have been determined spectrophotometrically at three different temperatures 20, 30 and 40°C. The organic solvents chosen for the study are ethylene glycol, 2-methoxy ethanol, and 2-ethoxy ethanol while the polymers include polyethylene glycol (PEG), hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) or polyethylene oxide (PEO). Effect of a surfactant on the formation of triiodide ions in the mixed media has also been investigated. Though presence of the organic solvents led to an increase in the triiodide formation except for 2-ethoxy ethanol mixed media at low percentage, the increase in presence of PEG or the other polymer mixed media even at very low percentage was much higher as compared to those in ethylene glycol or its homologues. The increase in the formation constant has been discussed in terms of changes in its solvation properties and the hydrophobic character of the mixed media besides the solvent dielectric effects. The sharp increase in triiodide formation in presence of the polymer under study suggests the possibility of iodine being present as triiodide or other higher polyiodides in the inclusion complexes of iodine with other polymers like starch or PVA. The decrease in the triiodide formation in presence of surfactant micelles may, however, be attributed to solubilization of iodine by the micelles. Iodine was found to be better solubilized in TX-100 micelles as compared to SDS micelles.

  9. Determination of stability constants of Cu(I), Cd(II) & Zn(II) complexes with thiols using fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Michael J; Ahner, Beth A

    2013-11-01

    Fluorometric competing-ligand titrations were used to measure stability constants of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Cu(I) complexes of cysteine and glutathione (GSH). Cu(I)-stability constants were also determined for the dipeptides Arg-Cys and Gln-Cys which are produced by a marine alga under copper stress. The fluorescent ion indicators FluoZin-1 and BTC (Invitrogen) were used as competing ligands in titrations involving Zn(II) and Cd(II). Phen Green SK (Invitrogen) was likewise used in Cu(I) titrations. Conditional and cumulative general stability constants were determined using a least squares fit of the titration data to speciation models. The measured stability constants of Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes were consistent with previous work, validating our method and assumptions. Our results also include the first general stability constants for Cu(I)-cysteine complexes and an alternative set for Cu(I)-GSH complexes. While these stability constants indicate that Cu(I) forms strong complexes with thiols, they are not strong enough to effectively buffer Cu(I) in seawater.

  10. Determination of the complexation constants of Pb(II) and Cd(II) with thymol blue using spectrophotometry, SQUAD and the HSAB principle.

    PubMed

    Balderas-Hernández, P; Rojas-Hernández, A; Galván, M; Romo, M Romero; Palomar-Pardavé, M; Ramírez-Silva, M T

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results concerning the determination of the formation constants of the complexes between thymol blue, TB, and the metal ions Pb(II) or Cd(II). The experimental procedure was carried out in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere at 25 degrees C. The spectrophotometry data obtained were processed through the software SQUAD to calculate the complexation constants of the metal-indicator and to establish an adequate base of the models which considered the structure of the indicator, and the actual metal species in the aqueous solutions. For the Pb(II)-TB-H2O system the logK value calculated for the PbTB complex was 5.591+/-0.057 while for the Cd(II)-TB-H2O system, the logK value of the CdTB complex was 5.099+/-0.008. Also, supporting theoretical chemistry results on the chemical hardness of TB molecule were performed to enable establishment of a relative prediction scale of the TB complexation constants ranking in the framework of the Principle of Hard and Soft Acids and Bases or HSAB Principle.

  11. Spectrophotometric quantification of the thermodynamic constants of the complexes formed by dopamine and Cu(II) in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Verastegui-Omaña, B; Palomar-Pardavé, M; Rojas-Hernández, A; Corona Avendaño, S; Romero-Romo, M; Ramírez-Silva, M T

    2015-05-15

    The thermodynamic constants of the complex Cu(II)-dopamine in aqueous solution were evaluated from spectrophotometric data using the software SQUAD. It was found that there exist Cu(II):DA complexes with 1:1 and 1:2 stoichiometries and that their predominance depends on both the solution pH and the [Cu(II)]/[DA] ratio. Moreover, it is shown that the solubility of Cu(OH)2(s) increases drastically when these complexes are thermodynamically stable.

  12. Universal reaction mechanism of boronic acids with diols in aqueous solution: kinetics and the basic concept of a conditional formation constant.

    PubMed

    Furikado, Yuki; Nagahata, Tomomi; Okamoto, Takuya; Sugaya, Tomoaki; Iwatsuki, Satoshi; Inamo, Masahiko; Takagi, Hideo D; Odani, Akira; Ishihara, Koji

    2014-10-06

    To establish a detailed reaction mechanism for the condensation between a boronic acid, RB(OH)2, and a diol, H2L, in aqueous solution, the acid dissociation constants (Ka(BL)) of boronic acid diol esters (HBLs) were determined based on the well-established concept of conditional formation constants of metal complexes. The pKa values of HBLs were 2.30, 2.77, and 2.00 for the reaction systems, 2,4-difluorophenylboronic acid and chromotropic acid, 3-nitrophenylboronic acid and alizarin red S, and phenylboronic acid and alizarin red S, respectively. A general and precise reaction mechanism of RB(OH)2 with H2L in aqueous solution, which can serve as a universal reaction mechanism for RB(OH)2 and H2L, was proposed on the basis of (a) the relative kinetic reactivities of the RB(OH)2 and its conjugate base, that is, the boronate ion, toward H2L, and (b) the determined pKa values of HBLs. The use of the conditional formation constant, K', based on the main reaction: RB(OH)2 + H2L (K1)⇌ RB(L)(OH)(-) + H3O(+) instead of the binding constant has been proposed for the general reaction of uncomplexed boronic acid species (B') with uncomplexed diol species (L') to form boronic acid diol complex species (esters, BL') in aqueous solution at pH 5-11: B' + L' (K')⇌ BL'. The proposed reaction mechanism explains perfectly the formation of boronic acid diol ester in aqueous solution.

  13. Structural determinants for the formation of sulfhemeprotein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Román-Morales, Elddie; Pietri, Ruth; Ramos-Santana, Brenda; Vinogradov, Serge N.; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; López-Garriga, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Several hemoglobins were explored by UV-Vis and resonance Raman spectroscopy to define sulfheme complex formation. Evaluation of these proteins upon the reaction with H2O2 or O2 in the presence of H2S suggest: (a) the formation of the sulfheme derivate requires a HisE7 residue in the heme distal site with an adequate orientation to form an active ternary complex; (b) that the ternary complex intermediate involves the HisE7, the peroxo or ferryl species, and the H2S molecule. This moiety precedes and triggers the sulfheme formation. PMID:20732304

  14. Determination of Equilibrium Constants of Some Novel Antioxidant Compounds and Study on their Complexes with Some Divalent Metal ions in Ethanol-water Mixed.

    PubMed

    Atabey, Hasan; Findik, Esra; Sari, Hayati; Ceylan, Mustafa

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the nature and type of complexes formed in solution, between novel antioxidant compounds [P1(4-(1-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)propyl)benzene-1,2-diol) and P2(4-(1-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)propyl)benzene-1,3-diol)] and the ions Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+ and Co2+. Potentiometric titration technique was used to follow the formation of complexes during the course of coordination. The stability of the complexes formed was controlled through the determination of stability constants in aqueous ethanol solution at 25 ± 0.1 C° and ionic strength of 0.1 M NaCl. Basicity of the ligand was also assessed by the determination of the dissociation constants of the ligand. All the constants were computed by computer refinement of pH-volume data using the SUPERQUAD program. The species distribution diagram of each type of complex has been obtained after computer calculation process.

  15. Estimation of the initial equilibrium constants in the formation of tetragonal lysozyme nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from a study of the equilibria, kinetic rates, and the aggregation pathway which leads from a lysozyme monomer crystal to a tetragonal crystal, using dialyzed and recrystallized commercial hen eggwhite lysozyme. Relative light scattering intensity measurements were used to estimate the initial equilibrium constants for undersaturated lysozyme solutions in the tetragonal regime. The K1 value was estimated to be (1-3) x 10 exp 4 L/mol. Estimates of subsequent equilibrium constants depend on the crystal aggregation model chosen or determined. Experimental data suggest that tetragonal lysozyme crystal grows by addition of aggregates preformed in the bulk solution, rather than by monomer addition.

  16. Direct electronic probing of biological complexes formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchia, Eleonora; Magliulo, Maria; Manoli, Kyriaki; Giordano, Francesco; Palazzo, Gerardo; Torsi, Luisa

    2014-10-01

    Functional bio-interlayer organic field - effect transistors (FBI-OFET), embedding streptavidin, avidin and neutravidin as bio-recognition element, have been studied to probe the electronic properties of protein complexes. The threshold voltage control has been achieved modifying the SiO2 gate diaelectric surface by means of the deposition of an interlayer of bio-recognition elements. A threshold voltage shift with respect to the unmodified dielectric surface toward more negative potential values has been found for the three different proteins, in agreement with their isoelectric points. The relative responses in terms of source - drain current, mobility and threshold voltage upon exposure to biotin of the FBI-OFET devices have been compared for the three bio-recognition elements.

  17. Molecular statics calculations of proton binding to goethite surfaces: A new approach to estimation of stability constants for multisite surface complexation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, James R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    1996-05-01

    A new approach to estimating stability constants for proton binding in multisite surface complexation models is presented. The method is based on molecular statics computation of energies for the formation of proton vacancies and interstitials in ideal periodic slabs representing the (100), (110), (010), (001), and (021) surfaces of goethite. Gas-phase energies of clusters representing the hydrolysis products of ferric iron are calculated using the same potential energy functions used for the surface. These energies are linearly related to the hydrolysis constants for ferric iron in aqueous solution. Stability constants for proton binding at goethite surfaces are estimated by assuming the same log K- Δ E relationship for goethite surface protonation reactions. These stability constants predict a pH of zero charge of 8.9, in adequate agreement with measurements on CO 2-free goethite. The estimated stability constants differ significantly from previous estimations based on Pauling bond strength. We find that nearly all the surface oxide ions are reactive; nineteen of the twenty-six surface sites investigated have log Kint between 7.7 and 9.4. This implies a site density between fifteen and sixteen reactive sites/nm for crystals dominated by (110) and (021) crystal faces.

  18. Positronium formation in solid transition metal losartanates complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, F. C.; Denadai, A. M. L.; Fulgêncio, F.; da Silva, J. G.; Windmöller, D.; Marques-Netto, A.; Machado, J. C.; Magalhães, W. F.

    2013-10-01

    In this Letter, positron annihilation lifetime (PALS) measurements were performed in transition metal losartanates complexes, MT(Los)2, and in potassium losartanate, KLos, in order to built up insights about the positronium formation mechanism in molecular environment. A correlation was obtained between formation probability, I3, and the covalence of complexes, evaluated by molar electrical conductivity in dimethylformamide (DMF). Furthermore, some metallic ion properties, such as reduction potential and pauling electronegativity, were also correlated with I3. These results were analyzed in terms of the spur model and of the recently proposed mechanism, named cybotatic correlated system kinetic mechanism (CCSKM), which involves molecular excited states in positronium formation.

  19. A two force-constant model for complexes B⋯M-X (B is a Lewis base and MX is any diatomic molecule): Intermolecular stretching force constants from centrifugal distortion constants DJ or ΔJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Dror M.; Walker, Nicholas R.; Legon, Anthony C.

    2016-02-01

    A two force-constant model is proposed for complexes of the type B⋯MX, in which B is a simple Lewis base of at least C2v symmetry and MX is any diatomic molecule lying along a Cn axis (n ≥ 2) of B. The model assumes a rigid subunit B and that force constants beyond quadratic are negligible. It leads to expressions that allow, in principle, the determination of three quadratic force constants F11, F12, and F22 associated with the r(B⋯M) = r2 and r(M-X) = r1 internal coordinates from the equilibrium centrifugal distortion constants DJ e or ΔJ e , the equilibrium principal axis coordinates a1 and a2, and equilibrium principal moments of inertia. The model can be applied generally to complexes containing different types of intermolecular bond. For example, the intermolecular bond of B⋯MX can be a hydrogen bond if MX is a hydrogen halide, a halogen-bond if MX is a dihalogen molecule, or a stronger, coinage-metal bond if MX is a coinage metal halide. The equations were tested for BrCN, for which accurate equilibrium spectroscopic constants and a complete force field are available. In practice, equilibrium values of DJ e or ΔJ e for B⋯MX are not available and zero-point quantities must be used instead. The effect of doing so has been tested for BrCN. The zero-point centrifugal distortion constants DJ 0 or ΔJ 0 for all B⋯MX investigated so far are of insufficient accuracy to allow F11 and F22 to be determined simultaneously, even under the assumption F12 = 0 which is shown to be reasonable for BrCN. The calculation of F22 at a series of fixed values of F11 reveals, however, that in cases for which F11 is sufficiently larger than F22, a good approximation to F22 is obtained. Plots of F22 versus F11 have been provided for Kr⋯CuCl, Xe⋯CuCl, OC⋯CuCl, and C2H2⋯AgCl as examples. Even in cases where F22 ˜ F11 (e.g., OC⋯CuCl), such plots will yield either F22 or F11 if the other becomes available.

  20. A two force-constant model for complexes B⋯M-X (B is a Lewis base and MX is any diatomic molecule): Intermolecular stretching force constants from centrifugal distortion constants D(J) or Δ(J).

    PubMed

    Bittner, Dror M; Walker, Nicholas R; Legon, Anthony C

    2016-02-21

    A two force-constant model is proposed for complexes of the type B⋯MX, in which B is a simple Lewis base of at least C2v symmetry and MX is any diatomic molecule lying along a Cn axis (n ≥ 2) of B. The model assumes a rigid subunit B and that force constants beyond quadratic are negligible. It leads to expressions that allow, in principle, the determination of three quadratic force constants F11, F12, and F22 associated with the r(B⋯M) = r2 and r(M-X) = r1 internal coordinates from the equilibrium centrifugal distortion constants DJ (e) or ΔJ (e), the equilibrium principal axis coordinates a1 and a2, and equilibrium principal moments of inertia. The model can be applied generally to complexes containing different types of intermolecular bond. For example, the intermolecular bond of B⋯MX can be a hydrogen bond if MX is a hydrogen halide, a halogen-bond if MX is a dihalogen molecule, or a stronger, coinage-metal bond if MX is a coinage metal halide. The equations were tested for BrCN, for which accurate equilibrium spectroscopic constants and a complete force field are available. In practice, equilibrium values of DJ (e) or ΔJ (e) for B⋯MX are not available and zero-point quantities must be used instead. The effect of doing so has been tested for BrCN. The zero-point centrifugal distortion constants DJ (0) or ΔJ (0) for all B⋯MX investigated so far are of insufficient accuracy to allow F11 and F22 to be determined simultaneously, even under the assumption F12 = 0 which is shown to be reasonable for BrCN. The calculation of F22 at a series of fixed values of F11 reveals, however, that in cases for which F11 is sufficiently larger than F22, a good approximation to F22 is obtained. Plots of F22 versus F11 have been provided for Kr⋯CuCl, Xe⋯CuCl, OC⋯CuCl, and C2H2⋯AgCl as examples. Even in cases where F22 ∼ F11 (e.g., OC⋯CuCl), such plots will yield either F22 or F11 if the other becomes available.

  1. Complex Formation in the Ternary System Tl(III)-CN(-)-Cl(-) in Aqueous Solution. A (205)Tl NMR Study.

    PubMed

    Berg, Katja E.; Blixt, Johan; Glaser, Julius

    1996-11-20

    The existence of mixed complexes of the general formula Tl(CN)(m)()Cl(n)()(3)(-)(m)()(-)(n)() (m + n complexes have been identified, and their compositions, chemical shifts, (205)Tl-(13)C spin-spin coupling constants, and peak integrals were determined and used to calculate the stability constants, beta = [Tl(CN)(m)()Cl(n)()(3)(-)(m)()(-)(n)()]/{[Tl(3+)][CN(-)](m)()[Cl(-)](n)()}. Very good agreement was obtained between the equilibrium constants determined in this work and those estimated by a theoretical formula using the stability constants for the binary complexes and a statistical factor. Specific interaction coefficients have been calculated for the Tl(CN)(m)()(3)(-)(m)() (1 complexes. Some interesting correlations were found for the obtained NMR parameters. The stepwise formation constants for addition of one cyanide ligand, log K(CN), show linear dependence on both the spin-spin coupling constants, (1)J((205)Tl-(13)C), and the chemical shifts, delta(Tl). Also the interatomic distance, d(Tl-C), is linearly correlated to the spin-spin coupling constant. The correlations are discussed in terms of the Ramsey equation, involving bond properties, stereochemistry, and stability of the complexes. Since (1)J((205)Tl-(13)C) also shows linear dependence on the Tl-CN force constant, it is concluded that the above correlations reflect the Tl-CN bond strength. Thus, the most important factor contributing to the thermodynamic stability of the complexes is the enthalpy term, dominated by formation of very strong sigma-bonds between cyanide and thallium. These trends may prove useful for spectral/structural assignments but also for estimation of metal-to-ligand bond distances and stability constants for complexes which exist only in low concentration.

  2. Rate constant for formation of chlorine nitrate by the reaction ClO + NO2 + M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, M. T.; Lin, C. L.; Demore, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    The pseudo-first-order decay of ClO in a large excess of NO2 was monitored in a discharge flow/mass-spectrometer apparatus in order to measure the rate constant of the reaction ClO + NO2 + M yields ClONO2 + M for M = He, Ar, and N2 over the temperature range from 248 to 417 K. Numerical results are given for He at 248, 299, 360, and 417 K (1 to 9 torr); for Ar at 298 K (1 to 4 torr); and for N2 at 299, 360, and 417 K (1 to 6 torr). Systematic errors are estimated, and identification of the reaction product is discussed. The results obtained are shown to be in excellent agreement with other recent measurements of the same rate constant.

  3. Efficient quantum-classical method for computing thermal rate constant of recombination: application to ozone formation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Mikhail V; Babikov, Dmitri

    2012-05-14

    Efficient method is proposed for computing thermal rate constant of recombination reaction that proceeds according to the energy transfer mechanism, when an energized molecule is formed from reactants first, and is stabilized later by collision with quencher. The mixed quantum-classical theory for the collisional energy transfer and the ro-vibrational energy flow [M. Ivanov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144107 (2011)] is employed to treat the dynamics of molecule + quencher collision. Efficiency is achieved by sampling simultaneously (i) the thermal collision energy, (ii) the impact parameter, and (iii) the incident direction of quencher, as well as (iv) the rotational state of energized molecule. This approach is applied to calculate third-order rate constant of the recombination reaction that forms the (16)O(18)O(16)O isotopomer of ozone. Comparison of the predicted rate vs. experimental result is presented.

  4. Complex molecule formation around massive young stellar objects.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Karin I; Fayolle, Edith C; Reiter, John B; Cyganowski, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar complex organic molecules were first identified in the hot inner regions of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), but have more recently been found in many colder sources, indicating that complex molecules can form at a range of temperatures. However, individually these observations provide limited constraints on how complex molecules form, and whether the same formation pathways dominate in cold, warm and hot environments. To address these questions, we use spatially resolved observations from the Submillimeter Array of three MYSOs together with mostly unresolved literature data to explore how molecular ratios depend on environmental parameters, especially temperature. Towards the three MYSOs, we find multiple complex organic emission peaks characterized by different molecular compositions and temperatures. In particular, CH3CCH and CH3CN seem to always trace a lukewarm (T = 60 K) and a hot (T > 100 K) complex chemistry, respectively. These spatial trends are consistent with abundance-temperature correlations of four representative complex organics--CH3CCH, CH3CN, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO--in a large sample of complex molecule hosts mined from the literature. Together, these results indicate a general chemical evolution with temperature, i.e. that new complex molecule formation pathways are activated as a MYSO heats up. This is qualitatively consistent with model predictions. Furthermore, these results suggest that ratios of complex molecules may be developed into a powerful probe of the evolutionary stage of a MYSO, and may provide information about its formation history.

  5. Stability constants of some metal complexes of triethylenetetraminehexa-acetic acid and complexometric titration of rare earths and other metals.

    PubMed

    Soucek, D A; Cheng, K L; Droll, H A

    1968-08-01

    The stability constants of some non-protonated 1:1 metal complexes of triethylenetetraminehexa-acetic acid are reported; log K values are Cd 19.8, Co(II) 20.4, Ni 19.9, Pb 19.5, Sm(III) 24.3, Zn 20.1.

  6. Flexible Acyclic Polyol-Chloride Anion Complexes and Their Characterization by Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Variable Temperature Binding Constant Determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Shokri, Alireza; Wang, Xue B.; Wang, Yangping; O'Doherty, George A.; Kass, Steven R.

    2016-03-17

    Flexible acyclic alcohols with 1–5 hydroxyl groups were bound to chloride anion and these complexes were interrogated by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy and companion density functional theory computations. The resulting vertical detachment energies are reproduced on average to 0.10 eV by M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ predictions and range from 4.45 – 5.96 eV. These values are 0.84 – 2.35 eV larger than the adiabatic detachment energy of Cl– as a result of the larger hydrogen bond networks in the bigger polyols. Adiabatic detachment energies of the alcohol–Cl– clusters are more difficult to determine both experimentally and computationally. This is due to the large geometry changes that occur upon photodetachment and the large bond dissociation energy of H–Cl which enables the resulting chlorine atom to abstract a hydrogen from any of the methylene (CH2) or methine (CH) positions. Both ionic and non-ionic hydrogen bonds (i.e., OH•••Cl– and OH•••OH•••Cl–) form in the larger polyols complexes, and are found to be energetically comparable. Subtle structural differences, consequently can lead to the formation of different types of hydrogen bonds and maximizing the ionic ones is not always preferred. Solution equilibrium binding constants between the alcohols and tetrrabuylammonium chloride (TBACl) in acetonitrile at -24.2, 22.0, and 53.6 °C were also determined. The free energies of association are nearly identical for all of the substrates (i.e., ΔG° = -2.8 ± 0.7 kcal mol–1). Compensating enthalpy and entropy values reveal, contrary to expectation and the intrinsic gas-phase preferences, that the bigger systems with more hydroxyl groups are entropically favored and enthalpically disfavored relative to the smaller species. This suggests that more solvent molecules are released upon binding TBACl to alcohols with more hydroxyl groups and is consistent with the measured negative heat capacities. These quantities increase with

  7. 31P{1H}NMR and carbonyl force constants of unsymmetrical bidentate phosphine complexes of group (VI) metal carbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesu Raj, Joe Gerald; Pathak, Devendra Deo; Kapoor, Pramesh N.

    2015-05-01

    In our present work we report synthesis of an unsymmetrical diphos ligand, 1-diphenylphosphino-2-di-m-tolylphosphinoethane and its coordinate complexes with group (VI) metal carbonyls such as Cr(CO)6 Mo(CO)6 and W(CO)6. The synthesized ligand and its complexes have been completely characterized by elemental analyses, FTIR, 1HNMR, 31P{1H}NMR and FAB mass spectrometry methods. Special emphasis has been given to calculations of carbonyl force constants. Based on the spectroscopic evidences it has been confirmed that these metal carbonyl complexes with the ditertiary phosphine ligand showed cis geometry in their molecular structure.

  8. Determination of Stability Constants of Cadmium-Glycine Complexes by a Unified Treatment for Potentiometric and Polarographic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-min; Shi, Qiu-zhi

    2006-04-01

    The cadmium(II)-glycine system was studied by the two experimental techniques, ion sensitive electrode (ISE) and differential pulse polarography (DPP), and the experimental data obtained were used by a unified mathematical treatment to calculate the complex stability constants. The combination of the two techniques is of many advantages as ISE can be performed at low [LT]:[MT] ratios and significantly higher [MT], whereas DPP could be used well at large [LT]:[MT] ratios and much smaller [MT]. This makes it possible to study a metal-ligand system in a relatively broader range of experimental conditions that, in turn, provides more information about the metal-ligand system of interest. Applying the unified mathematical treatment to the cadmium-glycine system, two new complexes MHL and ML2(OH) as well as three complexes ML, ML2 and ML3, reported in literatures, could be modeled and all their stability constants have been refined.

  9. Equilibrium constants from spectrophotometric data: dimer formation in gaseous Br2.

    PubMed

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2008-07-03

    The equilibrium constant for the dimerization reaction, 2Br 2(g) right arrow over left arrow Br 4(g), is estimated using the classic spectrophotometric method with precise data and a multiwavelength fitting approach. The analysis is very sensitive to small errors in the data, requiring that parameters for the baseline absorption be included at each wavelength. To that end spectra for 18 Br 2 pressures in the range 6-119 Torr are augmented by six baseline scans to facilitate estimation of three baseline constants and two molar absorptivities at each wavelength, yielding K c = 2.5 +/- 0.4 L/mol at 22 degrees C. This value is more than double the only previous estimate, which was based on analysis of PVT data. With adoption of a literature estimate of Delta H degrees = -9.5 kJ/mol, the new K implies Delta S degrees = -51 J mol (-1) K (-1) (ideal gas, 1 bar reference). The spectra for monomer absorption (peak 227 nm) and dimer absorption (205 nm) are obtained with unprecedented precision.

  10. Light dark photon and fermionic dark radiation for the Hubble constant and the structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, P.; Tang, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the tensions in the Hubble constant H0 and the structure growth σ8 between Planck results and other low redshift measurements, we discuss some cosmological effects of a dark sector model in which dark matter (DM) interacts with fermionic dark radiation (DR) through a light gauge boson (dark photon). Such kind of models are very generic in particle physics with a dark sector with dark gauge symmetries. The effective number of neutrinos is increased by δNeff ∼ 0.5 due to light dark photon and fermionic DR, thereby resolving the conflicts in H0. The elastic scattering between DM and DR induces suppression for DM's density perturbation, but without acoustic oscillations. For weakly-interacting DM around 100 GeV, the new gauge coupling should be ∼10-4 to have sizable effect on matter power spectrum in order to relax the tension in σ8.

  11. Thermodynamics of cationic lipid-DNA complex formation as studied by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Pozharski, Edwin; MacDonald, Robert C

    2002-07-01

    The detailed analysis of the cationic lipid-DNA complex formation by means of isothermal titration calorimetry is presented. Most experiments were done using 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EDOPC), but basic titrations were also done using DOTAP, DOTAP:DOPC, and DOTAP:DOPE mixtures. Complex formation was endothermic with less than 1 kcal absorbed per mole of lipid or DNA charge. This enthalpy change was attributed to DNA-DNA mutual repulsion within the lamellar complex. The exception was DOTAP:DOPE-containing lipoplex for which the enthalpy of formation was exothermic, presumably because of DOPE amine group protonation. Experimental conditions, namely, direction and titration increment as well as concentration of titrant, which dictate the structure of resulting lipoplex (whether lamellar complex or DNA-coated vesicle), were found to affect the apparent thermodynamics of complex formation. The structure, in turn, influences the biological properties of the lipoplex. If the titration of lipid into DNA was carried out in large increments, the DeltaH was larger than when the injection increments were smaller, a finding that is consistent with increased vesicle disruption under large increments and which is expected theoretically. Cationic lipid-DNA binding was weak in high ionic strength solutions, however, the effective binding constant is within micromolar range because of macromolecular nature of the interaction.

  12. Thermodynamics of cationic lipid-DNA complex formation as studied by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Pozharski, Edwin; MacDonald, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    The detailed analysis of the cationic lipid-DNA complex formation by means of isothermal titration calorimetry is presented. Most experiments were done using 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EDOPC), but basic titrations were also done using DOTAP, DOTAP:DOPC, and DOTAP:DOPE mixtures. Complex formation was endothermic with less than 1 kcal absorbed per mole of lipid or DNA charge. This enthalpy change was attributed to DNA-DNA mutual repulsion within the lamellar complex. The exception was DOTAP:DOPE-containing lipoplex for which the enthalpy of formation was exothermic, presumably because of DOPE amine group protonation. Experimental conditions, namely, direction and titration increment as well as concentration of titrant, which dictate the structure of resulting lipoplex (whether lamellar complex or DNA-coated vesicle), were found to affect the apparent thermodynamics of complex formation. The structure, in turn, influences the biological properties of the lipoplex. If the titration of lipid into DNA was carried out in large increments, the DeltaH was larger than when the injection increments were smaller, a finding that is consistent with increased vesicle disruption under large increments and which is expected theoretically. Cationic lipid-DNA binding was weak in high ionic strength solutions, however, the effective binding constant is within micromolar range because of macromolecular nature of the interaction. PMID:12080142

  13. New spectroscopic studies of plutonium (IV) nitrate complex formation in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J.M.; Veirs, D.K.; Vaughn, R.B.

    1997-06-01

    Spectrophotometric titrations of Pu(IV) with HNO{sub 3} were conducted in a series of aqueous HClO{sub 4} solutions ranging ionic strength from 2 to 19 mol/kg on the molality scale. The Pu f-f absorption spectra in the visible and near IR range were deconvoluted into spectra of Pu{sup 4+}(aq), Pu(NO{sub 3}){sup 3+} and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+} complexes and their formation constants as functions of ionic strength. When corrected for the incomplete dissociation of nitric acid, these formation constants exhibit smooth increases with ionic strength from 5 to 19 mol/kg.

  14. Estimation of apparent binding constant of complexes of selected acyclic nucleoside phosphonates with β-cyclodextrin by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Šolínová, Veronika; Mikysková, Hana; Kaiser, Martin Maxmilián; Janeba, Zlatko; Holý, Antonín; Kašička, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) has been applied to estimation of apparent binding constant of complexes of (R,S)-enantiomers of selected acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs) with chiral selector β-cyclodextrin (βCD) in aqueous alkaline medium. The noncovalent interactions of five pairs of (R,S)-enantiomers of ANPs-based antiviral drugs and their derivatives with βCD were investigated in the background electrolyte (BGE) composed of 35 or 50 mM sodium tetraborate, pH 10.0, and containing variable concentration (0-25 mM) of βCD. The apparent binding constants of the complexes of (R,S)-enantiomers of ANPs with βCD were estimated from the dependence of effective electrophoretic mobilities of (R,S)-enantiomers of ANPs (measured simultaneously by ACE at constant reference temperature 25°C inside the capillary) on the concentration of βCD in the BGE using different nonlinear and linear calculation methodologies. Nonlinear regression analysis provided more precise and accurate values of the binding constants and a higher correlation coefficient as compared to the regression analysis of the three linearized plots of the effective mobility dependence on βCD concentration in the BGE. The complexes of (R,S)-enantiomers of ANPs with βCD have been found to be relatively weak - their apparent binding constants determined by the nonlinear regression analysis were in the range 13.3-46.4 L/mol whereas the values from the linearized plots spanned the interval 12.3-55.2 L/mol.

  15. Low temperature elastic constants and nonlinear acoustic response in rocks and complex materials

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, T. W.; Ulrich, T. J.; Johnson, P. A.; Tencate, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    The 'P-M Space' model of Guyer and McCall has some success in describing the large nonlinear effects ('slow dynamics') observed by Johnson et al. in rocks. The model uses elements which couple classical nonlinear elasticity with hysteretic components. The actual processes and scales corresponding to the model elements are not yet defined, however it is reasonable to seek energy scales by studying the low-temperature dependence of the elastic constants. We have measured qualitative elastic properties of basalt and Berea sandstone from room temperature down to 4 K using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). A simple elastic solid should show a monotonic increase in the elastic constants as temperature decreases. The basalt samples show this gross behavior but the sandstone shows a very unexpected anomalous regime between 40 K and 200 K where the elastic constants decrease with decreasing temperature. Both rocks show temperature-dependent structure in both the modulus and internal friction, and also significant hysteresis, indicating history and rate-dependent properties. This data provides insight into the time and energy scales of dynamical effects observed in sandstones.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and thermodynamics of complex formation of some new Schiff base ligands with some transition metal ions and the adduct formation of zinc Schiff base complexes with some organotin chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Mozaffar; Asadi, Zahra; Torabi, Susan; Lotfi, Najmeh

    Four new complexes, [M(Salpyr)] where Salpyr = N,N'-bis(Salicylidene)-2,3- and 3,4-diiminopyridine and M = Co, Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn were synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and UV-vis spectrophotometry. UV-vis spectrophotometric study of the adduct formation of the zinc(II) complexes, [Zn(2,3-Salpyr)] and [Zn(3,4-Salpyr)], as donor with R2SnCl2 (R = methyl, phenyl, n-butyl), PhSnCl3 and Bu3SnCl as acceptors has been investigated in methanol, as solvent. The formation constants and the thermodynamic free energies were measured using UV-vis spectrophotometry. Titration of the organotin chlorides with Zn(II) complexes at various temperatures (T = 283-313 K) leads to 1:1 adduct formation. The results show that the formation constants were decreased by increasing the temperature. The trend of the reaction of RnSnCl4-n as acceptors toward given zinc complexes was as follows: PhSnCl3 > Me2SnCl2 > Ph2SnCl2 > Bu2SnCl2 > Bu3SnCl By considering the formation constants and the ΔG° of the complex formation for the Schiff base as donor and the M(II) as acceptor, the following conclusion was drawn: the formation constant for a given Schiff base changes according to the following trend: Ni > Cu > Co > Zn > Mn

  17. Formation and Stability of Manganese-Desferrioxamine B Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, O. W.; Sposito, G.

    2004-12-01

    Recent laboratory and field studies suggest that Mn(III) forms persistent aqueous complexes with high-affinity ligands, particularly those produced by microbes. Aqueous Mn(III) species thus may play a significant, as-yet largely unexplored role in biogeochemical processes. We determined stability constants for both Mn(II) and Mn(III) complexes with the common tri-hydroxamate siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFOB). We found the thermodynamic stability constants of the species, MHDFOBx-2 [M = Mn(II), x = 2; M = Mn(III), x = 3] to be KMn(II) = 106.8 ± 0.1 and KMn(III) = 1029.2 ± 0.2 at 25° C. The Mn(III)HDFOB+ complex is stable for pH in the range 7.0 - 11.3, but at pH < 7.0, Mn(III)HDFOB+ decays by internal electron transfer, yielding oxidized DFOB products and Mn2+. For pH > 11.3, the complex decays by disproportionation, yielding Mn2+ and solid MnO2. The Mn(III)HDFOB+ complex may be formed by either the oxidation of aqueous Mn(II)-HDFOB complexes or the DFOB-promoted dissolution of solid manganese(III) oxides. The DFOB-promoted Mn(II) air-oxidation rate was found to be proportional to the concentration of Mn(II)-DFOB complexes. At pH > 6.5, the dissolution of manganite (γ -MnOOH) in the presence of DFOB is predominantly a non-reductive ligand-promoted reaction whose rate is proportional to the adsorbed surface concentration of DFOB. At pH < 6.5, Mn2+ is the dominant species resulting from manganite dissolution, thus implicating a reductive dissolution pathway. The results of this study have broad implications for the biogeochemical cycling of manganese, redox-active elements, and siderophores in natural waters and soils.

  18. Equilibrium and Formation/Dissociation Kinetics of some Lanthanide(III)-PCTA complexes

    PubMed Central

    Tircsó, Gyula; Kovács, Zoltán; Sherry, A. Dean

    2008-01-01

    The protonation constants (KiH) of 3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo[9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-3,6,9,-triacetic acid (PCTA) and stability constants of complexes formed between this pyridine containing macrocycle and several different metal ions have been determined in 1.0 M KCl, 25°C and compared to previous literature values. The first protonation constant was found to be 0.5-0.6 log units higher than the value reported previously and a total five protonation steps were detected (log KiH = 11.36, 7.35, 3.83, 2.12 and 1.29). The stability constants of complexes formed between PCTA and Mg2+, Ca2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ were also somewhat higher than those previously reported but this difference could be largely attributed to the higher first protonation constant of the ligand. Stability constants of complexes formed between PCTA and the Ln3+ series of ions and Y3+ were determined by using an “out-of-cell” potentiometric method. These values ranged from log K = 18.15 for Ce(PCTA) to log K = 20.63 for Yb(PCTA), increasing along the lanthanide series in proportion to decreasing Ln3+ cation size. The rates of complex formation for Ce(PCTA), Eu(PCTA), Y(PCTA) and Yb(PCTA) were followed by conventional UV-VIS spectroscopy in the pH range pH=3.5 - 4.4. First order rate constants (saturation kinetics) obtained for different ligand / metal ion ratios were consistent with rapid formation of a diprotonated intermediate, Ln(H2PCTA)2+. The stabilities of the intermediates as determined from the kinetic data were 2.81, 3.12, 2.97 and 2.69 log K units for Ce(H2PCTA), Eu(H2PCTA), Y(H2PCTA) and Yb(H2PCTA), respectively. Rearrangement of these intermediates to the fully chelated complexes was the rate determining step and the rate constant (kr) for this process was found to be inversely proportional to the proton concentration. The formation rates (kOH) increased with a decrease in lanthanide ion size (9.68×107 M-1s-1, 1.74×108 M-1s-1, 1.13×108 M-1s-1 and 1.11×109 M-1s-1 for Ce

  19. Equilibrium and formation/dissociation kinetics of some Ln(III)PCTA complexes.

    PubMed

    Tircsó, Gyula; Kovacs, Zoltan; Sherry, A Dean

    2006-11-13

    The protonation constants () of 3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo[9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-3,6,9-triacetic acid (PCTA) and stability constants of complexes formed between this pyridine-containing macrocycle and several different metal ions have been determined in 1.0 M KCl at 25 degrees C and compared to previous literature values. The first protonation constant was found to be 0.5-0.6 log units higher than the value reported previously, and a total of five protonation steps were detected (log = 11.36, 7.35, 3.83, 2.12, and 1.29). The stability constants of complexes formed between PCTA and Mg2+, Ca2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ were also somewhat higher than those previously reported, but this difference could be largely attributed to the higher first protonation constant of the ligand. Stability constants of complexes formed between PCTA and the Ln3+ series of ions and Y3+ were determined by using an "out-of-cell" potentiometric method. These values ranged from log K = 18.15 for Ce(PCTA) to log K = 20.63 for Yb(PCTA), increasing along the Ln series in proportion to decreasing Ln3+ cation size. The rates of complex formation for Ce(PCTA), Eu(PCTA), Y(PCTA), and Yb(PCTA) were followed by conventional UV-vis spectroscopy in the pH range 3.5-4.4. First-order rate constants (saturation kinetics) obtained for different ligand-to-metal ion ratios were consistent with the rapid formation of a diprotonated intermediate, Ln(H(2)PCTA)(2+). The stabilities of the intermediates as determined from the kinetic data were 2.81, 3.12, 2.97, and 2.69 log K units for Ce(H(2)PCTA), Eu(H(2)PCTA), Y(H(2)PCTA), and Yb(H(2)PCTA), respectively. Rearrangement of these intermediates to the fully chelated complexes was the rate-determining step, and the rate constant (k(r)) for this process was found to be inversely proportional to the proton concentration. The formation rates (k(OH)) increased with a decrease in the lanthanide ion size [9.68 x 10(7), 1.74 x 10(8), 1.13 x 10(8), and 1.11 x 10(9) M(-1

  20. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jirsa, M.A.; Miller, J.D.; Morey, G.B.

    2008-01-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a ???1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by ???1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex.

    PubMed

    Jirsa, Mark A; Miller, James D; Morey, G B

    2008-10-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a approximately 1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by approximately 1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact.

  2. Spectrophotometric determination of reaction stoichiometry and equilibrium constants of metallochromic indicators. II. The Ca2+-arsenazo III complexes.

    PubMed

    Dorogi, P L; Neumann, E

    1981-04-01

    The analytical method described in the preceding article was applied to spectrophotometric Ca2+-titrations of the metallochromic indicator arsenazo III (Ar). At various reactant concentrations it was determined that Ar forms 1:1,1:2 and 2 : 1 complexes with calcium. The equilibrium constants and extinction coefficients at 602 nm were determined. Corrected to zero ionic strength at 293 K and pH 7.0, the reactions Ca + Ar = CaAr, CaAr + Ar = CaAr2 and CaAr + Ca = Ca2Ar are associated with dissociation equilibrium constants k(11) = 1.6 x 10(-6)M, K12 = 3.2 x 10(-4)M and K21 = 5.8 x 10(-3)M. respectively. The extinction coefficient of unbound indicator is (602) = 9.6 (+/-0.3) x 10(3) cm(-1) M(-1). Arscnazo III complexes with monovalent ions like Na+ and K+ : at zero ionic strength, the dissociation constant of the Na+-Ar complex is about 0.1 M.

  3. Rapid-reaction kinetic characterization of the pathway of streptokinase-plasmin catalytic complex formation.

    PubMed

    Verhamme, Ingrid M; Bock, Paul E

    2008-09-19

    Binding of the fibrinolytic proteinase plasmin (Pm) to streptokinase (SK) in a tight stoichiometric complex transforms Pm into a potent proteolytic activator of plasminogen. SK binding to the catalytic domain of Pm, with a dissociation constant of 12 pm, is assisted by SK Lys(414) binding to a Pm kringle, which accounts for a 11-20-fold affinity decrease when Pm lysine binding sites are blocked by 6-aminohexanoic acid (6-AHA) or benzamidine. The pathway of SK.Pm catalytic complex formation was characterized by stopped-flow kinetics of SK and the Lys(414) deletion mutant (SKDeltaK414) binding to Pm labeled at the active site with 5-fluorescein ([5F]FFR-Pm) and the reverse reactions by competitive displacement of [5F]FFR-Pm with active site-blocked Pm. The rate constants for the biexponential fluorescence quenching caused by SK and SKDeltaK414 binding to [5F]FFR-Pm were saturable as a function of SK concentration, reporting encounter complex affinities of 62-110 nm in the absence of lysine analogs and 4900-6500 and 1430-2200 nm in the presence of 6-AHA and benzamidine, respectively. The encounter complex with SKDeltaK414 was approximately 10-fold weaker in the absence of lysine analogs but indistinguishable from that of native SK in the presence of 6-AHA and benzamidine. The studies delineate for the first time the sequence of molecular events in the formation of the SK.Pm catalytic complex and its regulation by kringle ligands. Analysis of the forward and reverse reactions supports a binding mechanism in which SK Lys(414) binding to a Pm kringle accompanies near-diffusion-limited encounter complex formation followed by two slower, tightening conformational changes.

  4. Quantum-mechanical calculation of equilibrium geometry and force constants of complex polycyclic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Shatokhin, S.A.; Gribov, L.A.; Perelygin, I.S.

    1986-09-01

    Equilibrium molecular geometries have been calculated for cyclopropane, cyclobutane, cubane, and certain propellanes, using an algorithm for automatic construction of a system of independent optimization coordinates in the approximation of the semiempirical MINDO/3 method. In the vicinity of the energy minimum that was found, for all of these molecules, parameters of the potential function have been determined, assigned in a system of dependent natural coordinates. Calculations procedures are set forth, along with the principles used in selecting the significant potential constants with the presence of interrelationships among the internal geometric characteristics of the molecules.

  5. Hydrolysis, formation and ionization constants at 25/sup 0/C, and at high temperature-high ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.L.; Phillips, C.A.; Skeen, J.

    1985-02-01

    Thermochemical data for nuclear waste disposal are compiled. The resulting computerized database consists of critically evaluated data on Gibbs energy of formation, enthalpy of formation, entropy and heat capacity of selected substances for about 16 elements at 25/sup 0/C and zero ionic strength. Elements covered are Am, As, Br, C, Cl, F, I, Mo, Np, N, O, P, Pu, Si, Sr, S, and U. Values of these thermodynamic properties were used to calculate equilibrium quotients for hydrolysis, complexation and ionization reactions up to 300/sup 0/C and 3 ionic strength, for selected chemical reactions.

  6. Decreased overall basicity of a series of new N,N'-bis(carboxymethyl) macrocylcic ether-bis(lactone) ligands derived from EDTA and the ring size effect on the stability constants of their lanthanide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.A.; Chang, P.H.L.; Qin, S.Y.

    1988-03-09

    In order to examine the effects of positions of the nitrogen donor atoms and the relative coordination sites of the two carboxylate groups on lanthanide complexation in the study of the characteristics of both open-chain and macrocyclic ligands for the preparation of novel metal-ion selective reagents, a series of N, N'-bis(carboxymethyl)macrocyclic ether-bis(lactone)ligands derived from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid have been prepared and characterized. The ligand protonation constants and the lanthanide complex formation constants have been determined and are reported here. 14 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Formation and stability of lanthanide complexes and their encapsulation into polymeric microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Mumper, R.J.; Jay, M.

    1992-10-15

    The complexation of lanthanides (Ln) with dicarbonyl compounds (acetylacetone, acac; ethyl acetoacetate; 3-ethyl-2,4-pentanedione; 2,4-hexanedione; 3-methyl-2,4-pentanedione; and diethyl malonate) was investigated using a potentiometric titration technique. The ability of a dicarbonyl compound to complex with the lanthanide elements was greatly dependent on its pK{sub a} and on the pH of the titrated solution. Selected lanthanide complexes (Ln complexes) were incorporated into spherical poly(L-lactic acid)(PLA) matrices and irradiated in a nuclear reactor with neutrons to produce short-lived high-energy {Beta}-particle-emitting radioisotopes. The lanthanides investigated (Ho, Dy, Sm, and La) were chosen on the basis of their physical and nuclear properties. A transition element (Re) was also studied. The small decrease in the ionic radii of the lanthanides with increasing atomic number led to (a) greater ability to extract and complex from an aqueous solution with complexing agents, (b) larger formation and stability constants for the Ln complexes, (c) increased solubility of the Ln complexes in chloroform, and (d) increase in the maximum percent incorporation of the stable lanthanides in PLA spheres. Ho(aca) was found to be the most promising candidate of the complexes studied on the basis of the above observations and due to the favorable physical properties of {sup 165}Ho and nuclear properties of {sup 166}Ho. 21 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Formation of Complex Molecules via radiative association reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Kinsuk; Herbst, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The detection of increasing numbers of complex organic molecules in the various phases of star formation plays a key role since they follow the same chemical rules of carbon-based chemistry that are observed in our planet Earth. Many of these molecules are believed to be formed on the surfaces of grains, and can then be released to the gas phase when these grains are heated. This is evident when we observe a rich chemistry in hot core regions. However, recently complex organic molecules have also been observed in cold clouds. Therefore, it is necessary to re-examine various pathways for the formation of these molecules in the gas phase. In this presentation, I will discuss role of radiative association reactions in the formation of complex molecules in the gas phase and at low temperature. We will compare abundance of assorted molecules with and without new radiative association reactions and will show that the abundance of a few complex molecules such as HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3 etc. can go up due to introduction of these reactions, which can help to explain their observed abundances.

  9. Positronium formation studies in crystalline molecular complexes: Triphenylphosphine oxide - Acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, F. C.; Denadai, A. M. L.; Guerra, L. D. L.; Fulgêncio, F. H.; Windmöller, D.; Santos, G. C.; Fernandes, N. G.; Yoshida, M. I.; Donnici, C. L.; Magalhães, W. F.; Machado, J. C.

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogen bond formation in the triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO), acetanilide (ACN) supramolecular heterosynton system, named [TPPO0.5·ACN0.5], has been studied by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and supported by several analytical techniques. In toluene solution, Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) presented a 1:1 stoichiometry and indicated that the complexation process is driven by entropy, with low enthalpy contribution. X-ray structure determination showed the existence of a three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds, allowing also the confirmation of the existence of a 1:1 crystalline molecular complex in solid state. The results of thermal analysis (TGA, DTA and DSC) and FTIR spectroscopy showed that the interactions in the complex are relatively weaker than those found in pure precursors, leading to a higher positronium formation probability at [TPPO0.5·ACN0.5]. These weak interactions in the complex enhance the possibility of the n- and π-electrons to interact with positrons and consequently, the probability of positronium formation is higher. Through the present work is shown that PALS is a sensible powerful tool to investigate intermolecular interactions in solid heterosynton supramolecular systems.

  10. Polarographic Determination of Composition and Thermodynamic Stability Constant of a Complex Metal Ion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, Dolores; Mendicuti, Francisco

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment designed to encourage laboratory cooperation among individual undergraduate students or groups. Notes each student contributes results individually and the exchange of data is essential to obtain final results. Uses the polarographic method for determining complex metal ions. (MVL)

  11. Accelerating procelain formation by incorporating a complex additive

    SciTech Connect

    Maslennikova, G.N.; Dubovitskii, S.A.; Moroz, I.K.

    1986-05-01

    The authors studied the influence of a complex additive consisting of oxides of calcium, zinc, and magnesium on the formaton of porcelain. In order to achieve a more uniform distribution of the complex additive in the porcelain body it was incorporated in the form of water soluble salts-nitrates, which ensured comparability of results and excluded the effect of the different types of anions. The study of the main parameters of sintering (porosity, shrinkage, and mechanical strength) for the test bodies showed that they sinter at lower temperatures and attain zero porosity, maximum shrinkage, and mechanical strength. The most typical bodies indentified in this way were investigated by methods of complex differential thermal analysis and x-ray diffraction. Thus, the introduction of complex additives consisting of calcium, zinc, and magnesium oxides contributes to the earlier formation of porcelain. With the reduction of firing temperatures by 100/sup 0/C the authors observe an improvement in the basic properties of porcelain.

  12. Infrared Complex Optical Constants of GB, GF, HD, HN1, and VX

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    a complex function. Traditionally this has been accomplished through the Kramers- Kronig (K-K) relationship (2) The integral in eq 2...data: subtractive Kramers- Kronig (SKK) and MacLaurin Kramers- Kronig (MacLaurin KK). Ohta and Ishida showed that the SKK method appeared to improve...Methods for Kramers- Kronig Transformation. Appl. Spectrosc. 1988, 42, 952–957. 5. Stenzel, O. Das Dunnschichtspektrum; Springer-Verlag: Berlin

  13. Rosette: Understanding Star Formation in Molecular Cloud Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng

    2010-09-01

    We propose Chandra imaging of three embedded clusters in the Rosette Molecular Cloud (RMC) complex. With complementary existing Spitzer and FLAMINGOS infrared surveys, the Chandra observation is critical for us to: (1) create a complete census of the young stars in the cloud; (2) study the spatial distribution of the young stars in different evolutionary stages within the RMC and the disk frequency in the embedded clusters; (3) construct X-ray Luminosity Function (XLF) and Initial Mass Function (IMF) for the clusters to examine XLF/IMF variations; (4) elucidate star formation history in this complex.

  14. Speciation of phytate ion in aqueous solution. Alkali metal complex formation in different ionic media.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Concetta; Milea, Demetrio; Pettignano, Alberto; Sammartano, Silvio

    2003-08-01

    The acid-base properties of phytic acid [ myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis(dihydrogen phosphate)] (H(12)Phy; Phy(12-)=phytate anion) were studied in aqueous solution by potentiometric measurements ([H+]-glass electrode) in lithium and potassium chloride aqueous media at different ionic strengths (0< I mol L(-1)< or =3) and at t=25 degrees C. The protonation of phytate proved strongly dependent on both ionic medium and ionic strength. The protonation constants obtained in alkali metal chlorides are considerably lower than the corresponding ones obtained in a previous paper in tetraethylammonium iodide (Et(4)NI; e.g., at I=0.5 mol L(-1), log K(3)(H)=11.7, 8.0, 9.1, and 9.1 in Et(4)NI, LiCl, NaCl and KCl, respectively; the protonation constants in Et(4)NI and NaCl were already reported), owing to the strong interactions occurring between the phytate and alkaline cations present in the background salt. We explained this in terms of complex formation between phytate and alkali metal ions. Experimental evidence allows us to consider the formation of 13 mixed proton-metal-ligand complexes, M(j)H(i)Phy((12-i-j)-), (M+ =Li+, Na+, K+), with j< or =7 and i< or =6, in the range 2.5< or =pH< or =10 (some measurements, at low ionic strength, were extended to pH=11). In particular, all the species formed are negatively charged: i+j-12=-5, -6. Very high formation percentages of M+-phytate species are observed in all the pH ranges investigated. The stability of alkali metal complexes follows the trend Li+ > or =Na+K+. Some measurements were also performed at constant ionic strength (I=0.5 mol L(-1)), using different mixtures of Et(4)NI and alkali metal chlorides, in order to confirm the formation of hypothesized and calculated metal-proton-ligand complex species and to obtain conditional protonation constants in these multi-component ionic media.

  15. Constant growth of V-groove AlGaAs/GaAs multilayers on submicron gratings for complex optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Chang-Sik; Kim, Tae Geun; Wang, Xue-Lun; Ogura, Mutsuo

    2000-12-01

    We have developed a new way of the constant growth technique to conserve a grating height of vertical-stacked V-groove AlGaAs/GaAs multilayer on submicron gratings up to 1.5 μm thickness by a low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The V-shaped GaAs buffer, grown on thermally deformed submicron gratings, has an important role in overcoming mass transport effects by recovering the deformed grating profile from sinusoidal to V-shaped. The low AlAs mole fraction is favorable to preserve the grating height up to a greater thickness. The constant growth technique is an important step to realize complex optoelectronic devices such as one-step grown distributed feedback lasers and two-dimensional photonic crystals.

  16. Equivalence of Mg2+ and Na+ ions in salt dependence of the equilibrium binding and dissociation rate constants of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase open complex.

    PubMed

    Loziński, Tomasz; Bolewska, Krystyna; Wierzchowski, Kazimierz L

    2009-06-01

    Conflicting experimental data on the influence of Mg(2+) ions on the salt dependence of formation/dissociation of open transcription complex (RPo) of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase led us to carry systematic measurements of the dissociation rate constant (k(d)) and thermodynamic stability of complexes at lambdaP(R) and Pa promoters in a broad range of [NaCl] and [MgCl(2)] at 25, 31 and 37 degrees C, using fluorescence detected abortive transcription assay. Values of k(d) determined in MgCl(2) in the presence of heparin, as a commonly used anionic competitor, were shown to depend on heparin concentration whereas in NaCl this effect was not observed. Kinetics of dissociation was therefore determined in the course of salt-induced down-shift of the binding equilibrium. Salt derivatives of k(d)'s (n(d)) appeared to be similar in NaCl (approximately 8.5) and MgCl(2) (approximately 10) for both complexes. Isotherms of fractional occupancy of promoters by RNAP as a function of ln [salt] were shown to conform to a sigmoid Boltzman function parameterized to include binding constant of RPo and a net change (n(obs)) in the number of electrolyte ions associated with complex components upon its formation/dissociation. The fitted values of n(obs) appeared also similar in NaCl and in MgCl(2): approximately 18 for RPo/lambdaP(R) and approximately 20 for RPo/Pa, respectively. Overall unfavorable vant'Hoff enthalpy (DeltaH(obs)) of RPo proved to be much higher in MgCl(2) than in NaCl by ca. 20 kcal/mol for both complexes, rendering them profoundly less stable in the former salt. In both salts, DeltaH(obs) was higher by approximately 30 kcal/mol for RPo/Pa relative to RPo/lambdaP(R). Similarity of n(obs) and n(d) values for the two salts indicates thermodynamic equivalence of Mg(2+) and Na(+) in [salt]-controlled binding equilibrium of RPo. This finding remains in disagreement with earlier data and suggests that salt effects on open complex stability should be sought in global

  17. Formation and antimicrobial activity of complexes of beta-cyclodextrin and some antimycotic imidazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Van Doorne, H; Bosch, E H; Lerk, C F

    1988-04-22

    Complex formation between beta-cyclodextrin and six antimycotic imidazole derivatives has been studied. The solubility of all drugs was increased in the presence of beta-cyclodextrin. The smallest increase (approx. 5-fold) was observed for miconazol, and the largest increase (approx. 160-fold) was observed for bifonazol. Apparent 1:1-complex constants were measured and found to decrease in the order: bifonazol greater than ketoconazol greater than tioconazol greater than miconazol greater than itraconazol greater than clotrimazol. The complexes appeared to possess a low, if any, antimicrobial activity. Measurement of inhibition zone sizes, with four test organisms was used to study the release of the antimycotic drugs from topical preparations. The antimycotic drugs were more readily released from topical preparations containing beta-cyclodextrin than from the same vehicles without beta-cyclodextrin. The rationale of beta-cyclodextrin addition to antimycotic topical preparations is discussed.

  18. Gel phase formation in dilute triblock copolyelectrolyte complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Samanvaya; Andreev, Marat; Levi, Adam E.; Goldfeld, David J.; Mao, Jun; Heller, William T.; Prabhu, Vivek M.; de Pablo, Juan J.; Tirrell, Matthew V.

    2017-02-01

    Assembly of oppositely charged triblock copolyelectrolytes into phase-separated gels at low polymer concentrations (<1% by mass) has been observed in scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. Here we show that in contrast to uncharged, amphiphilic block copolymers that form discrete micelles at low concentrations and enter a phase of strongly interacting micelles in a gradual manner with increasing concentration, the formation of a dilute phase of individual micelles is prevented in polyelectrolyte complexation-driven assembly of triblock copolyelectrolytes. Gel phases form and phase separate almost instantaneously on solvation of the copolymers. Furthermore, molecular models of self-assembly demonstrate the presence of oligo-chain aggregates in early stages of copolyelectrolyte assembly, at experimentally unobservable polymer concentrations. Our discoveries contribute to the fundamental understanding of the structure and pathways of complexation-driven assemblies, and raise intriguing prospects for gel formation at extraordinarily low concentrations, with applications in tissue engineering, agriculture, water purification and theranostics.

  19. Gel phase formation in dilute triblock copolyelectrolyte complexes

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Samanvaya; Andreev, Marat; Levi, Adam E.; Goldfeld, David J.; Mao, Jun; Heller, William T.; Prabhu, Vivek M.; de Pablo, Juan J.; Tirrell, Matthew V.

    2017-01-01

    Assembly of oppositely charged triblock copolyelectrolytes into phase-separated gels at low polymer concentrations (<1% by mass) has been observed in scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. Here we show that in contrast to uncharged, amphiphilic block copolymers that form discrete micelles at low concentrations and enter a phase of strongly interacting micelles in a gradual manner with increasing concentration, the formation of a dilute phase of individual micelles is prevented in polyelectrolyte complexation-driven assembly of triblock copolyelectrolytes. Gel phases form and phase separate almost instantaneously on solvation of the copolymers. Furthermore, molecular models of self-assembly demonstrate the presence of oligo-chain aggregates in early stages of copolyelectrolyte assembly, at experimentally unobservable polymer concentrations. Our discoveries contribute to the fundamental understanding of the structure and pathways of complexation-driven assemblies, and raise intriguing prospects for gel formation at extraordinarily low concentrations, with applications in tissue engineering, agriculture, water purification and theranostics. PMID:28230046

  20. Complexation of phosphine ligands with peracetylated beta-cyclodextrin in supercritical carbon dioxide: spectroscopic determination of equilibrium constants.

    PubMed

    Galia, Alessandro; Navarre, Edward C; Scialdone, Onofrio; Ferreira, Michel; Filardo, Giuseppe; Tilloy, Sebastien; Monflier, Eric

    2007-03-15

    The interaction between peracetylated beta-cyclodextrin and several triphenyl phosphine derivatives was studied in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) by UV-visible spectroscopy. The equilibrium constant for a 1:1 complexation reaction was obtained from titration spectra and calculated using two established mathematical models. The values of the equilibrium constants are 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than those obtained in aqueous solution with analogous phosphines. This is likely due to the absence in scCO2 of the hydrophobic effect, which is replaced by a corresponding, but weaker, CO2-phobic effect. The largest value of Kf was found for complexes of diphenyl(4-adamantylphenyl)phosphine, which is rationalized on the basis of the excellent fit of the phosphine in the cyclodextrin cavity, leading to enhanced host-guest van der Waals interactions. This study can be considered the first step toward the comprehension of the complexation thermodynamics of modified cyclodextrins soluble in scCO2.

  1. Demixing-stimulated lane formation in binary complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.-R.; Jiang, K.; Suetterlin, K. R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.

    2011-11-29

    Recently lane formation and phase separation have been reported for experiments with binary complex plasmas in the PK3-Plus laboratory onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Positive non-additivity of particle interactions is known to stimulate phase separation (demixing), but its effect on lane formation is unknown. In this work, we used Langevin dynamics (LD) simulation to probe the role of non-additivity interactions on lane formation. The competition between laning and demixing leads to thicker lanes. Analysis based on anisotropic scaling indices reveals a crossover from normal laning mode to a demixing-stimulated laning mode. Extensive numerical simulations enabled us to identify a critical value of the non-additivity parameter {Delta} for the crossover.

  2. The catalytic role of uranyl in formation of polycatechol complexes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    To better understand the association of contaminant uranium with natural organic matter (NOM) and the fate of uranium in ground water, spectroscopic studies of uranium complexation with catechol were conducted. Catechol provides a model for ubiquitous functional groups present in NOM. Liquid samples were analyzed using Raman, FTIR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Catechol was found to polymerize in presence of uranyl ions. Polymerization in presence of uranyl was compared to reactions in the presence of molybdate, another oxyion, and self polymerization of catechol at high pH. The effect of time and dissolved oxygen were also studied. It was found that oxygen was required for self-polymerization at elevated pH. The potential formation of phenoxy radicals as well as quinones was monitored. The benzene ring was found to be intact after polymerization. No evidence for formation of ether bonds was found, suggesting polymerization was due to formation of C-C bonds between catechol ligands. Uranyl was found to form outer sphere complexes with catechol at initial stages but over time (six months) polycatechol complexes were formed and precipitated from solution (forming humic-like material) while uranyl ions remained in solution. Our studies show that uranyl acts as a catalyst in catechol-polymerization. PMID:21396112

  3. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-08-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects.

  4. A Computer Simulation Method for the Calculation of Equilibrium Constants for the Formation of Physical Clusters of Molecules: Application to Small Water Clusters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    areas of chemical physics. First, the values of K 2and K 3are related to the second and third virial coefficients of the substance. Second , the theory of...equilibrium constants for dimer and trimer formation are simply related to the second and third virial coefficients . Here we discuss our choice of the Rn and...containment sphere at low temperatures. The equilibrium constant for dimer formation can be related to the second virial coefficient for the gas under

  5. Heat capacity contributions to the formation of inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Olvera, Angeles; Pérez-Casas, Silvia; Costas, Miguel

    2007-10-04

    An analysis scheme for the formation of the inclusion complexes in water is presented. It is exemplified for the case where the host is alpha-cyclodextrin and the guest is a linear alcohol (1-propanol to 1-octanol) or the isomers of 1-pentanol. Eight transfer isobaric heat capacities, DeltatCp, involving different initial and final states are evaluated at infinite dilution of the guest using both data determined in this work and from the literature. Apart from the usual definition for the inclusion heat capacity change, three inclusion transfers are used. The sign of each DeltatCp indicates if the transfer is an order-formation or an order-destruction process. From the DeltatCp data, the main contributions to the heat capacity of cyclodextrin complexation, namely, those due to dehydration of the hydrophobic section of the guest molecule, H-bond formation, formation of hydrophobic interactions, and release of water molecules from the cyclodextrin cavity, are estimated. The relative weight of each of these contributions to the DeltatCp values is discussed, providing a better characterization of the molecular recognition process involved in the inclusion phenomena.

  6. Dynamics of electrical double layer formation in room-temperature ionic liquids under constant-current charging conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xikai; Huang, Jingsong; Zhao, Hui; Sumpter, Bobby G; Qiao, Rui

    2014-07-16

    We report detailed simulation results on the formation dynamics of an electrical double layer (EDL) inside an electrochemical cell featuring room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) enclosed between two planar electrodes. Under relatively small charging currents, the evolution of cell potential from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations during charging can be suitably predicted by the Landau-Ginzburg-type continuum model proposed recently (Bazant et al 2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 046102). Under very large charging currents, the cell potential from MD simulations shows pronounced oscillation during the initial stage of charging, a feature not captured by the continuum model. Such oscillation originates from the sequential growth of the ionic space charge layers near the electrode surface. This allows the evolution of EDLs in RTILs with time, an atomistic process difficult to visualize experimentally, to be studied by analyzing the cell potential under constant-current charging conditions. While the continuum model cannot predict the potential oscillation under such far-from-equilibrium charging conditions, it can nevertheless qualitatively capture the growth of cell potential during the later stage of charging. Improving the continuum model by introducing frequency-dependent dielectric constant and density-dependent ion diffusion coefficients may help to further extend the applicability of the model. The evolution of ion density profiles is also compared between the MD and the continuum model, showing good agreement.

  7. Dynamics of electrical double layer formation in room-temperature ionic liquids under constant-current charging conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xikai; Huang, Jingsong; Zhao, Hui; Sumpter, Bobby G; Qiao, Rui

    2014-01-01

    We report detailed simulation results on the formation dynamics of an electrical double layer (EDL) inside an electrochemical cell featuring room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) enclosed between two planar electrodes. Under relatively small charging currents, the evolution of cell potential during charging can be suitably predicted by the Landau-Ginzburg-type continuum model proposed recently (M. Z. Bazant, B. D. Storey, and A. A. Kornyshev, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106, 046102, 2011). Under very large charging currents, the cell potential shows pronounced oscillation during the initial stage of charging, a feature not captured by the continuum model. Such oscillation originates from the sequential growth of the ionic space charge layers near the electrode surface, allowing the evolution of EDLs in RTILs with time, an atomistic process difficult to visualize experimentally, to be studied by analyzing the cell potential under constant current charging conditions. While the continuum model cannot predict the potential oscillation under such far-from-equilibrium charging conditions, it can nevertheless qualitatively capture the growth of cell potential during the later stage of charging. Improving the continuum model by introducing frequency-dependent dielectric constant and density-dependent ion diffusion coefficients may help to further extend the applicability of the model. Keywords: ionic

  8. Segrosome Complex Formation during DNA Trafficking in Bacterial Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Oliva, María A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialized partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex.

  9. Nanoparticle-protein complexes mimicking corona formation in ocular environment.

    PubMed

    Jo, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Son, Jin Gyeong; Dan, Ki Soon; Song, Sang Hoon; Lee, Tae Geol; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2016-12-01

    Nanoparticles adsorb biomolecules to form corona upon entering the biological environment. In this study, tissue-specific corona formation is provided as a way of controlling protein interaction with nanoparticles in vivo. In the vitreous, the composition of the corona was determined by the electrostatic and hydrophobic properties of the associated proteins, regardless of the material (gold and silica) or size (20- and 100-nm diameter) of the nanoparticles. To control protein adsorption, we pre-incubate 20-nm gold nanoparticles with 5 selectively enriched proteins from the corona, formed in the vitreous, to produce nanoparticle-protein complexes. Compared to bare nanoparticles, nanoparticle-protein complexes demonstrate improved binding to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the vitreous. Furthermore, nanoparticle-protein complexes retain in vitro anti-angiogenic properties of bare nanoparticles. In particular, priming the nanoparticles (gold and silica) with tissue-specific corona proteins allows nanoparticle-protein complexes to exert better in vivo therapeutic effects by higher binding to VEGF than bare nanoparticles. These results suggest that controlled corona formation that mimics in vivo processes may be useful in the therapeutic use of nanomaterials in local environment.

  10. Modulation of the adsorption properties at air-water interfaces of complexes of egg white ovalbumin with pectin by the dielectric constant.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, Elena V; de Jongh, Harmen H J

    2008-02-15

    The possibility of modulating the mesoscopic properties of food colloidal systems by the dielectric constant is studied by determining the impact of small amounts of ethanol (10%) on the adsorption of egg white ovalbumin onto the air-water interface in the absence and presence of pectin. The adsorption kinetics was monitored using tensiometry. The addition of ethanol resulted in considerably slower adsorption of the protein onto the interface, and this effect was enhanced when the protein was in complex with the pectin. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements demonstrated that in the case of noncomplexed ovalbumin the addition of ethanol resulted in a more condensed protein surface layer where ovalbumin adopted a preferred orientation at the interface. In contrast, the effect of ethanol on the ovalbumin-pectin complex suggested a pronounced multipoint electrostatic interaction between protein and polyelectrolyte and the formation of a more rigid spatial arrangement within the complex, thereby leading to suppressed protein-protein interactions. From this work it is concluded that by the enhanced binding affinity between ovalbumin and pectin a strong effect on the adsorption properties of the protein can be accomplished. This work does therefore illustrate how solvent quality can be exploited effectively to enhance or suppress protein functional behavior in complex applications containing air-water interfaces.

  11. Mercury(II) Penicillamine Complex Formation in Alkaline Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, B.O.; Jalilehvand, F.; Mah, V.

    2009-06-01

    The complex formation between mercury(II) and penicillamine (H{sub 2}Pen = 3,3'-dimethyl cysteine) in alkaline aqueous solutions (pH {approx}2) has been investigated with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and {sup 199}Hg NMR spectroscopy. By varying the penicillamine concentration (C{sub H{sub 2}Pen} = 0.2--1.25 M) in {approx}0.1 M Hg(II) solutions, two coexisting major species [Hg(Pen){sub 2}]{sup 2-} and [Hg(Pen){sub 3}]{sub 4-} were characterized with mean Hg-S bond distances 2.34(2) and 2.44(2) {angstrom}, respectively. The [Hg(Pen){sub 2}]{sup 2-} complex with two deprotonated penicillamine ligands forms an almost linear S-Hg-S entity with two weak chelating Hg-N interactions at the mean Hg-N distance 2.52(2) {angstrom}. The same type of coordination is also found for the corresponding [Hg(Cys){sub 2}]{sup 2-} complex in alkaline aqueous solution with the mean bond distances Hg-S 2.34(2) {angstrom} and Hg-N 2.56(2) {angstrom}. The relative amounts of the [Hg(Pen){sub 2}]{sup 2-} and [Hg(Pen){sub 3}]{sup 4-} complexes were estimated by fitting linear combinations of the EXAFS oscillations to the experimental spectra. Also their {sup 199}Hg NMR chemical shifts were used to evaluate the complex formation, showing that the [Hg(Pen){sub 3}]{sup 4-} complex dominates already at moderate excess of the free ligand ([Pen{sup 2-}] > {approx} 0.1 M).

  12. Constant speed control for complex cross-section welding using robot based on angle self-test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Long; Zou, Yong; Huang, Jiqiang; Huang, Junfen; Tao, Xinghua; Hu, Yanfeng

    2014-03-01

    Expandable profile liner(EPL) is a promising new oil well casing cementing technique, and welding is a major EPLs connection technology. Connection of EPL is still in the stage of manual welding so far, automatic welding technology is a hotspot of EPL which is one of the key technologies to be solved. A robot for automatic welding of "8" type EPL is studied. Four quadrants of mathematical equations of the 8-shaped cross-section track of EPL, consisting of multiple arcs, are established. Mechanism program for complex cross-section welding of EPL based on angle detection is proposed according to characteristics of small size, small valleys, and large forming errors, etc. A welding velocity vector control model is established by linkage control of a welding vehicle, a small driven actuator, and a height tracking mechanism. A constant speed control model based on an angle and symmetrical analysis model of rectangular coordinate system for EPL is built. Constraint conditions of constant speed control between each section are analyzed with 4 sections in first quadrant as an example, and cooperation work mechanism of the welding vehicle and the small tracking actuator is established based on pressure detection. The constant speed control model using angle self-test can be used to avoid the need for a precise mathematical model for tracking control and to adapt manufacture and installation deviation of EPL workpiece. The model is able to solve constant speed and trajectory tracking problems of EPL cross-section welding. EPL seams welded by the studied robot are good in appearance, and non-destructive testing(NDT) shows the seams are good in quality with no welding defects. Bulge tests show that the maximum pressure of welded EPL is 35 MPa, which can fulfill expansion performance requirements.

  13. Monolayer kinetic model of formation of β-cyclodextrin-β-carotene inclusion complex.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Tz; Mircheva, K; Balashev, K; Panaiotov, I; Boury, F

    2015-11-01

    The carotenoids are sensitive molecules and their chemical integrity must be preserved from pro-oxidant elements which could affect and decrease their physiological benefits. The encapsulation based on the inclusion of the carotenoids into cage molecules is a promising approach for preserving over time of the intrinsic properties of the carotenoids. It is well known that cyclic oligosaccharide β-cyclodextrin (CD) as a cage molecule possesses strong inclusion ability to β-carotene (C) and as a result of the hydrophobic interactions forms an inclusion complex. In the present paper a monolayer kinetic model was established with the notion to extract more information about the influence of the molecular structure and organization to the interfacial interactions between the interacting species as well as about the role of the specific areas, which are often underestimated in previously studied dispersed systems. We developed the monolayer kinetic model for the formation of the inclusion CD-C complex by applying an experimental approach for following the kinetics by means of measuring the decrease of the surface area (ΔA) versus time (t) at constant surface pressure (π) and the decrease of surface pressure (π) versus time (t) at constant surface area (A). We also visualized by AFM the state of the monolayers at the initial and end points of the kinetic process. The values for the degree (d) and constant (Ka) of the association were estimated and compared with those from the studies of dispersed systems.

  14. The microwave properties of the jovian clouds: A new model for the complex dielectric constant of aqueous ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Danny; Steffes, Paul G.; Noorizadeh, Sahand

    2014-02-01

    A new model for the complex dielectric constant of aqueous ammonia (NH4OH) under conditions characteristic of the jovian clouds has been developed. The new model is based on laboratory measurements in the frequency range between 2 and 8.5 GHz for ammonia concentrations of 0-8.5% by volume and temperatures between 274 and 297 K. The new model is based on the Meissner and Wentz (Meissner, T., Wentz, F.J. [2004]. IEEE Trans. Geosci. Rem. Sens. 42, 1836-1849) model of the complex dielectric constant of pure water but contains corrections for dissolved ammonia. Assuming Raleigh scattering, these measurements are applied to a cloud attenuation model to calculate the range of opacity of the jovian aqueous ammonia clouds. These measurements will improve our understanding of the data collected by the Juno microwave radiometer (MWR) by better characterizing the absorption properties of the aqueous ammonia present in the jovian atmosphere. The new model has been validated for temperatures up to 313 K, and may be consistently used for the expected conditions for aqueous clouds in all of the outer planets. The model fits 60.26% of all laboratory measurements within 2-sigma uncertainty. Descriptions of the experimental setups, uncertainties associated with the laboratory measurements, the model fitting process, the new model, and its application to approximating jovian cloud opacity are provided.

  15. Formation of a Ternary Complex for Selenocysteine Biosynthesis in Bacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ivan R.; Serrão, Vitor H. B.; Manzine, Livia R.; Faim, Lívia M.; da Silva, Marco T. A.; Makki, Raphaela; Saidemberg, Daniel M.; Cornélio, Marinônio L.; Palma, Mário S.; Thiemann, Otavio H.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of selenocysteine-containing proteins (selenoproteins) involves the interaction of selenocysteine synthase (SelA), tRNA (tRNASec), selenophosphate synthetase (SelD, SPS), a specific elongation factor (SelB), and a specific mRNA sequence known as selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS). Because selenium compounds are highly toxic in the cellular environment, the association of selenium with proteins throughout its metabolism is essential for cell survival. In this study, we demonstrate the interaction of SPS with the SelA-tRNASec complex, resulting in a 1.3-MDa ternary complex of 27.0 ± 0.5 nm in diameter and 4.02 ± 0.05 nm in height. To assemble the ternary complex, SPS undergoes a conformational change. We demonstrated that the glycine-rich N-terminal region of SPS is crucial for the SelA-tRNASec-SPS interaction and selenoprotein biosynthesis, as revealed by functional complementation experiments. Taken together, our results provide new insights into selenoprotein biosynthesis, demonstrating for the first time the formation of the functional ternary SelA-tRNASec-SPS complex. We propose that this complex is necessary for proper selenocysteine synthesis and may be involved in avoiding the cellular toxicity of selenium compounds. PMID:26378233

  16. Formation of polyelectrolyte complexes with diethylaminoethyl dextran: charge ratio and molar mass effect.

    PubMed

    Le Cerf, Didier; Pepin, Anne Sophie; Niang, Pape Momar; Cristea, Mariana; Karakasyan-Dia, Carole; Picton, Luc

    2014-11-26

    The formation of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) between carboxymethyl pullulan and DEAE Dextran, was investigated, in dilute solution, with emphasis on the effect of charge density (molar ratio or pH) and molar masses. Electrophoretic mobility measurements have evidenced that insoluble PECs (neutral electrophoretic mobility) occurs for charge ratio between 0.6 (excess of polycation) and 1 (stoichiometry usual value) according to the pH. This atypical result is explained by the inaccessibility of some permanent cationic charge when screened by pH dependant cationic ones (due to the Hoffman alkylation). Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) indicates an endothermic formation of PEC with a binding constant around 10(5) L mol(-1). Finally asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation coupled on line with static multi angle light scattering (AF4/MALS) evidences soluble PECs with very large average molar masses and size around 100 nm, in agreement with scrambled eggs multi-association between various polyelectrolyte chains.

  17. The ribosome-associated complex antagonizes prion formation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Amor, Alvaro J; Castanzo, Dominic T; Delany, Sean P; Selechnik, Daniel M; van Ooy, Alex; Cameron, Dale M

    2015-01-01

    The number of known fungal proteins capable of switching between alternative stable conformations is steadily increasing, suggesting that a prion-like mechanism may be broadly utilized as a means to propagate altered cellular states. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which cells regulate prion formation and toxicity we examined the role of the yeast ribosome-associated complex (RAC) in modulating both the formation of the [PSI(+)] prion - an alternative conformer of Sup35 protein - and the toxicity of aggregation-prone polypeptides. The Hsp40 RAC chaperone Zuo1 anchors the RAC to ribosomes and stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. We found that cells lacking Zuo1 are sensitive to over-expression of some aggregation-prone proteins, including the Sup35 prion domain, suggesting that co-translational protein misfolding increases in Δzuo1 strains. Consistent with this finding, Δzuo1 cells exhibit higher frequencies of spontaneous and induced prion formation. Cells expressing mutant forms of Zuo1 lacking either a C-terminal charged region required for ribosome association, or the J-domain responsible for Ssb ATPase stimulation, exhibit similarly high frequencies of prion formation. Our findings are consistent with a role for the RAC in chaperoning nascent Sup35 to regulate folding of the N-terminal prion domain as it emerges from the ribosome.

  18. The ribosome-associated complex antagonizes prion formation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Alvaro J; Castanzo, Dominic T; Delany, Sean P; Selechnik, Daniel M; van Ooy, Alex; Cameron, Dale M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The number of known fungal proteins capable of switching between alternative stable conformations is steadily increasing, suggesting that a prion-like mechanism may be broadly utilized as a means to propagate altered cellular states. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which cells regulate prion formation and toxicity we examined the role of the yeast ribosome-associated complex (RAC) in modulating both the formation of the [PSI+] prion – an alternative conformer of Sup35 protein – and the toxicity of aggregation-prone polypeptides. The Hsp40 RAC chaperone Zuo1 anchors the RAC to ribosomes and stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. We found that cells lacking Zuo1 are sensitive to over-expression of some aggregation-prone proteins, including the Sup35 prion domain, suggesting that co-translational protein misfolding increases in Δzuo1 strains. Consistent with this finding, Δzuo1 cells exhibit higher frequencies of spontaneous and induced prion formation. Cells expressing mutant forms of Zuo1 lacking either a C-terminal charged region required for ribosome association, or the J-domain responsible for Ssb ATPase stimulation, exhibit similarly high frequencies of prion formation. Our findings are consistent with a role for the RAC in chaperoning nascent Sup35 to regulate folding of the N-terminal prion domain as it emerges from the ribosome. PMID:25739058

  19. Simulations of photochemical smog formation in complex urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muilwijk, C.; Schrijvers, P. J. C.; Wuerz, S.; Kenjereš, S.

    2016-12-01

    In the present study we numerically investigated the dispersion of photochemical reactive pollutants in complex urban areas by applying an integrated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Reaction Dynamics (CRD) approach. To model chemical reactions involved in smog generation, the Generic Reaction Set (GRS) approach is used. The GRS model was selected since it does not require detailed modeling of a large set of reactive components. Smog formation is modeled first in the case of an intensive traffic emission, subjected to low to moderate wind conditions in an idealized two-dimensional street canyon with a building aspect ratio (height/width) of one. It is found that Reactive Organic Components (ROC) play an important role in the chemistry of smog formation. In contrast to the NOx/O3 photochemical steady state model that predicts a depletion of the (ground level) ozone, the GRS model predicts generation of ozone. Secondly, the effect of direct sunlight and shadow within the street canyon on the chemical reaction dynamics is investigated for three characteristic solar angles (morning, midday and afternoon). Large differences of up to one order of magnitude are found in the ozone production for different solar angles. As a proof of concept for real urban areas, the integrated CFD/CRD approach is applied for a real scale (1 × 1 km2) complex urban area (a district of the city of Rotterdam, The Netherlands) with high traffic emissions. The predicted pollutant concentration levels give realistic values that correspond to moderate to heavy smog. It is concluded that the integrated CFD/CRD method with the GRS model of chemical reactions is both accurate and numerically robust, and can be used for modeling of smog formation in complex urban areas.

  20. Protein-free parallel triple-stranded DNA complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Shchyolkina, A. K.; Timofeev, E. N.; Lysov, Yu. P.; Florentiev, V. L.; Jovin, T. M.; Arndt-Jovin, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    A 14 nt DNA sequence 5′-AGAATGTGGCAAAG-3′ from the zinc finger repeat of the human KRAB zinc finger protein gene ZNF91 bearing the intercalator 2-methoxy,6-chloro,9-amino acridine (Acr) attached to the sugar–phosphate backbone in various positions has been shown to form a specific triple helix (triplex) with a 16 bp hairpin (intramolecular) or a two-stranded (intermolecular) duplex having the identical sequence in the same (parallel) orientation. Intramolecular targets with the identical sequence in the antiparallel orientation and a non-specific target sequence were tested as controls. Apparent binding constants for formation of the triplex were determined by quantitating electrophoretic band shifts. Binding of the single-stranded oligonucleotide probe sequence to the target led to an increase in the fluorescence anisotropy of acridine. The parallel orientation of the two identical sequence segments was confirmed by measurement of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the acridine on the 5′-end of the probe strand as donor and BODIPY-Texas Red on the 3′-amino group of either strand of the target duplex as acceptor. There was full protection from OsO4-bipyridine modification of thymines in the probe strand of the triplex, in accordance with the presumed triplex formation, which excluded displacement of the homologous duplex strand by the probe–intercalator conjugate. The implications of these results for the existence of protein-independent parallel triplexes are discussed. PMID:11160932

  1. [Regularities of formation of chlorophyll-human serum albumin functionally active complexes in the aqueous medium].

    PubMed

    Semichaevskiĭ, V D

    1975-01-01

    In the system with constant content of the chlorophyll a and increasing amounts of human serum albumin, dependence of pigment incorporation into the complex upon interaction of its aqueous associates with protein solutions was studied by applying the gel filtration on Sephadex G-75 and by measuring light scattering and rate of sensitized photoreduction of the methyl red by ascorbic-acid. The curves were obtained after extraction of the chlorophyll by acetone from dry pigment-protein films formed after desiccation of the aqueous systems. Sigmoid character of the above dependences, their linearization in Hill's coordinates and the value of cooperativity coefficient close to 2 testifies in favour of the cooperative character of the complex formation, two pigment molecules reacting with a single protein molecule. Measurement of adsorption isotherms and their treatment with use of the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller theory of polymolecular adsorption make it possible to evaluate the maximum molar ratio of the pigment to the protein in the complex (close to 2). The pigment-pigment interaction suggests that the chlorophyll molecules adsorbed on the protein are in the state of loosely packed dimers. Deaggregation of aqueus pigment associates by the protein in the course of complex formation results in a considerable increase of the protosensitizing chlorophyll activity.

  2. Formation of gold mineralization in ultramafic alkalic magmatic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikov, I. D.; Kogarko, L. N.; Sazonov, A. M.; Kononkova, N. N.

    2016-06-01

    Study of mineral inclusions within alluvial gold particles of the Guli Complex (East Siberia) and findings of lode gold in rocks of the same intrusion have demonstrated that gold mineralization occurs in interstitions of both early high-magnesium rocks (dunite) and later alkalic and carbonatite rocks. In dunite the native gold occurs in association with Fe-Ni sulfides (monosulfide solid solution, pentlandite, and heazlewoodite). Formation of the gold-bearing alloys took place under a low oxygen potential over a broad range of temperatures: from those close to 600°C down to below 400°C.

  3. Factors Leading to the Formation of Arc Cloud Complexes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    I. M2i .16 MICROCnWY O TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU 0F STANDARDS-1963-A ils. ... TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF R AOL mMETEOROLOGY FACTORS LEADING...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT, TASKAFIT STUDENT AT: AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS Texas A&M Univ II. CONTROLLING...to an ACC. /0 FACTORS LEADING TO THE FORMATION OF ARC CLOUD COMPLEXES A Thesis by MARK JOHN WELSHINGER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M

  4. Redox reactions and complex formation of transplutonium elements in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, N.N.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper gives a brief analysis of the kinetics and mechanism of a number of redox processes and the complex formation of transplutonium elements in unusual oxidation states. The composition and strength of complexes of TPE with various addends have been determined. The new experimental data on the oxidation potentials of americium and berkelium ions in solutions are cited in abbreviated form. It follows from the data that in phosphoric acid solutions, when the H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ concentration is increased from 10 to 15 M, the oxidation potential of the couple Am(IV)-Am(III) decreases. The oxidation potentials of the couples Am(VI)-Am(V), Cm(V)-Cm(IV), and Bk(IV)Bk(III) are also presented.

  5. Cu(II) complex formation with xylitol in alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Norkus, Eugenijus; Vaiciūniene, Jūrate; Vuorinen, Tapani; Gaidamauskas, Ernestas; Reklaitis, Jonas; Jääskeläinen, Anna-Stiina; Crans, Debbie C

    2004-02-25

    The formation of four Cu(II)-xylitol complexes was observed in aqueous alkaline solutions (11.0< or =pH< or =14.0, I=1.0, 20 degrees C) by means of direct current polarography and VIS spectrophotometry. Mononuclear hydroxy complexes, CuXyl(OH)- (log beta=17.7 +/- 0.5), CuXyl(OH)2(2-) (log beta=20.2 +/- 0.3) and CuXyl2(OH)2(4-) (log beta=22.4 +/- 0.3), are formed at high ligand-to-metal ratios (L:M> or =10), whereas dinuclear complex Cu2Xyl (log beta=29.2 +/- 0.3) is the predominant species at low ligand-to-metal ratio (L:M=0.5). Diffusion coefficients and molar absorptivities of the complex species were determined. pH variable 13C NMR suggested that pKa values of xylitol are rather similar and equal to 13.8 +/- 0.2, 13.9 +/- 0.1 and 13.9 +/- 0.2 for OH-groups adjacent to (C-1,C-5), (C-3) and (C-2,C-4) carbon atoms, respectively.

  6. Characterization of Hydrogen Complex Formation in III-V Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Michael D

    2006-09-28

    Atomic hydrogen has been found to react with some impurity species in semiconductors. Hydrogenation is a methodology for the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the semiconductor for the express purpose of forming complexes within the material. Efforts to develop hydrogenation as an isolation technique for AlGaAs and Si based devices failed to demonstrate its commercial viability. This was due in large measure to the low activation energies of the formed complexes. Recent studies of dopant passivation in long wavelength (0.98 - 1.55m) materials suggested that for the appropriate choice of dopants much higher activation energies can be obtained. This effort studied the formation of these complexes in InP, This material is extensively used in optoelectronics, i.e., lasers, modulators and detectors. The experimental techniques were general to the extent that the results can be applied to other areas such as sensor technology, photovoltaics and to other material systems. The activation energies for the complexes have been determined and are reported in the scientific literature. The hydrogenation process has been shown by us to have a profound effect on the electronic structure of the materials and was thoroughly investigated. The information obtained will be useful in assessing the long term reliability of device structures fabricated using this phenomenon and in determining new device functionalities.

  7. Spectrophotometric, FTIR and theoretical studies of the charge-transfer complexes between isoniazid (pyridine-4-carboxylic acid hydrazide) and the acceptors (p-chloranil, chloranilic acid and tetracyanoethylene) in acetonitrile, their association constants, thermodynamic properties and other related properties.

    PubMed

    Bagchi Chattaraj, Seema; Sharma, Kakali; Chakrabortty, Ashutosh; Lahiri, Sujit Chandra

    2012-09-01

    Spectrophotometric, FTIR and theoretical studies of the charge-transfer complexes between Isoniazid (pyridine-4-carboxylic acid hydrazide) and the acceptors (p-chloranil, chloranilic acid and tetracyanoethylene) in acetonitrile, their association constants, thermodynamic properties and other related properties were studied. Isoniazid (INH), a widely used anti tubercular agent was found to form beautifully colored charge-transfer complexes with p-chloranil, chloranilic acid and tetracyanoethylene in acetonitrile. The absorption maxima of the complexes were 484, 519 and 479 nm, respectively (isoniazid had no absorption, but the acceptors had absorption in these regions). The composition of the complexes were determined to be 1:1 from Job's method of continuous variations depending on the time period of experiments as the stability of some of the complexes (p-chloranil and tetracyanoethylene complexes) was time dependent. Solid complexes formed between isoniazid and the acceptors were isolated but p-chloranil was found to form two different complexes. FTIR spectra of the complexes and the acceptors were measured. FTIR spectra of the complexes showed considerable shift in absorption peaks, changes in intensities of the peaks and formation of the new band (probably due to hydrogen bonding) on complexation. The thermodynamic association constants and other thermodynamic parameters of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically taking D and A in varying ratios (2:8-8:2) and also in equimolar ratios. The complex formation was found to be spontaneous and associated with negative changes of ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0). The energies hν(CT) of the charge-transfer complexes were compared with the theoretical values of hν(CT) of the complexes obtained from HOMO and LUMO of the donor and the acceptors. Density function theory utilizing different basis sets was used for calculation. hν(CT) (experimental) values of the transition energies of the complexes in acetonitrile

  8. Spectrophotometric, FTIR and theoretical studies of the charge-transfer complexes between isoniazid (pyridine-4-carboxylic acid hydrazide) and the acceptors (p-chloranil, chloranilic acid and tetracyanoethylene) in acetonitrile, their association constants, thermodynamic properties and other related properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi (Chattaraj), Seema; Sharma, Kakali; Chakrabortty, Ashutosh; Lahiri, Sujit Chandra

    Spectrophotometric, FTIR and theoretical studies of the charge-transfer complexes between Isoniazid (pyridine-4-carboxylic acid hydrazide) and the acceptors (p-chloranil, chloranilic acid and tetracyanoethylene) in acetonitrile, their association constants, thermodynamic properties and other related properties were studied. Isoniazid (INH), a widely used anti tubercular agent was found to form beautifully colored charge-transfer complexes with p-chloranil, chloranilic acid and tetracyanoethylene in acetonitrile. The absorption maxima of the complexes were 484, 519 and 479 nm, respectively (isoniazid had no absorption, but the acceptors had absorption in these regions). The composition of the complexes were determined to be 1:1 from Job's method of continuous variations depending on the time period of experiments as the stability of some of the complexes (p-chloranil and tetracyanoethylene complexes) was time dependent. Solid complexes formed between isoniazid and the acceptors were isolated but p-chloranil was found to form two different complexes. FTIR spectra of the complexes and the acceptors were measured. FTIR spectra of the complexes showed considerable shift in absorption peaks, changes in intensities of the peaks and formation of the new band (probably due to hydrogen bonding) on complexation. The thermodynamic association constants and other thermodynamic parameters of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically taking D and A in varying ratios (2:8-8:2) and also in equimolar ratios. The complex formation was found to be spontaneous and associated with negative changes of ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0. The energies hνCT of the charge-transfer complexes were compared with the theoretical values of hνCT of the complexes obtained from HOMO and LUMO of the donor and the acceptors. Density function theory utilizing different basis sets was used for calculation. hνCT (experimental) values of the transition energies of the complexes in acetonitrile differed

  9. Intramolecular exchange energy transfer in a bridged bimetallic transition metal complex: Calculation of rate constants using emission spectral fitting parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Y.Y.; Baba, A.I.; Kim, W.Y.; Schmehl, R.H.; Atherton, S.J.

    1996-11-21

    The photophysical behavior of the transition metal complexes [[(bpy){sub 2}Ru]{sub 2}(bphb)](PF{sub 6}){sub 4}, [[(tpy)(CN)Ru]{sub 2}(bhpb)](PF{sub 6}){sub 2} and [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bhpb)Ru(tpy)(CN)](PF{sub 6}){sub 4} (bpy = 2,2`-bipyridine, typ = 2,2`,6`,2{double_prime}-terpyridine, bphb = 1,4-bis(2,2`-bipyrid-4-yl)benzene) was investigated in acetonitrile solution and low-temperature glasses. Luminescence spectra, excitation spectra, and transient absorption decays of the three complexes serve to show that intermolecular electronic energy transfer from the MLCT excited state of the [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bphb)] chromophore to the MLCT state of the tpy-containing chromophore occurs in the unsymmetric bimetallic complex. Nearly complete energy transfer from the [(bpy){sub 2}Ru(bphb)] chromophore to the tpy-containing chromophore was observed even in 4:1 ethanol: methanol glasses at 20K. A semiclassical exchange energy transfer mechanism was used to treat the available data; the Franck-Condon weighted density of state (FCWD) was obtained using parameters determined from fits of luminescence spectra. Give the FCWD at room temperature and the experimental rate constant, an electronic coupling matrix element of approximately 60 cm{sup -1} was determined for this system. 34 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Ligand(s)-to-metal charge transfer as a factor controlling the equilibrium constants of late first-row transition metal complexes: revealing the Irving-Williams thermodynamical series.

    PubMed

    Varadwaj, Pradeep R; Varadwaj, Arpita; Jin, Bih-Yaw

    2015-01-14

    A unified relationship between the experimental formation constants and the ligand(s)-to-metal charge transfer values of versatile ligand complexes of late transition series first-row bivalent metal ions is uncovered. The latter property not only explicates the Irving-Williams series but also rationalizes quantitatively Pearson's concept of hard and soft acids and bases by correlating the gas-phase to aqueous solution-phase chemistry in a broad sense.

  11. Interference-mediated synaptonemal complex formation with embedded crossover designation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liangran; Espagne, Eric; de Muyt, Arnaud; Zickler, Denise; Kleckner, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Biological systems exhibit complex patterns at length scales ranging from the molecular to the organismic. Along chromosomes, events often occur stochastically at different positions in different nuclei but nonetheless tend to be relatively evenly spaced. Examples include replication origin firings, formation of chromatin loops along chromosome axes and, during meiosis, localization of crossover recombination sites (“crossover interference”). We present evidence in the fungus Sordaria macrospora that crossover interference is part of a broader pattern that includes synaptonemal complex (SC) nucleation. This pattern comprises relatively evenly spaced SC nucleation sites, among which a subset are crossover sites that show a classical interference distribution. This pattern ensures that SC forms regularly along the entire length of the chromosome as required for the maintenance of homolog pairing while concomitantly having crossover interactions locally embedded within the SC structure as required for both DNA recombination and structural events of chiasma formation. This pattern can be explained by a threshold-based designation and spreading interference process. This model can be generalized to give diverse types of related and/or partially overlapping patterns, in two or more dimensions, for any type of object. PMID:25380597

  12. Gel phase formation in dilute triblock copolyelectrolyte complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Srivastava, Samanvaya; Andreev, Marat; Levi, Adam E.; ...

    2017-02-23

    Assembly of oppositely charged triblock copolyelectrolytes into phase-separated gels at low polymer concentrations (<1% by mass) has been observed in scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. Here we show that in contrast to uncharged, amphiphilic block copolymers that form discrete micelles at low concentrations and enter a phase of strongly interacting micelles in a gradual manner with increasing concentration, the formation of a dilute phase of individual micelles is prevented in polyelectrolyte complexation-driven assembly of triblock copolyelectrolytes. Gel phases form and phase separate almost instantaneously on solvation of the copolymers. Furthermore, molecular models of self-assembly demonstrate the presence of oligo-chainmore » aggregates in early stages of copolyelectrolyte assembly, at experimentally unobservable polymer concentrations. Finally, our discoveries contribute to the fundamental understanding of the structure and pathways of complexation-driven assemblies, and raise intriguing prospects for gel formation at extraordinarily low concentrations, with applications in tissue engineering, agriculture, water purification and theranostics.« less

  13. The Pushkin—Varshney—Kamoonpuri equation for the evaluation of association constants for the charge transfer complexes of sparingly soluble acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Pushkin M.; Varshney, Rishi K.; Kamoonpuri, S. Iqbal M.

    The proposed Pushkin—Varshney—Kamoonpuri equation proposes a simple way in which the association constants of complexes of sparingly soluble acceptors may be evaluated. The method can be used where the concentration of the acceptor is not known.

  14. Experimental determination of equilibrium constant for the complexing reaction of nitric oxide with hexamminecobalt(II) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yan-Peng; Chen, Hua; Long, Xiang-Li; Xiao, Wen-de; Li, Wei; Yuan, Wei-Kang

    2009-02-15

    Ammonia solution can be used to scrub NO from the flue gases by adding soluble cobalt(II) salts into the aqueous ammonia solutions. The hexamminecobalt(II), Co(NH3)6(2+), formed by ammonia binding with Co2+ is the active constituent of eliminating NO from the flue gas streams. The hexamminecobalt(II) can combine with NO to form a complex. For the development of this process, the data of the equilibrium constants for the coordination between NO and Co(NH3)6(2+)over a range of temperature is very important. Therefore, a series of experiments were performed in a bubble column to investigate the chemical equilibrium. The equilibrium constant was determined in the temperature range of 30.0-80.0 degrees C under atmospheric pressure at pH 9.14. All experimental data fit the following equation well: [see text] where the enthalpy and entropy are DeltaH degrees = - (44.559 +/- 2.329)kJ mol(-1) and DeltaS degrees = - (109.50 +/- 7.126) J K(-1)mol(-1), respectively.

  15. A complex postnatal mental health intervention: Australian translational formative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Heather J; Wynter, Karen H; Burns, Joanna K; Fisher, Jane R W

    2016-01-07

    Reducing the burden of postnatal maternal mental health problems is an international public health priority. We developed What Were We Thinking (WWWT), a psychoeducation programme for primary postnatal health care that addresses known but neglected risks. We then demonstrated evidence of its effects in a before-and-after controlled study in preventing maternal postnatal mental health problems among women without a psychiatric history participating in the intervention compared to usual care (AOR 0.43; 95% CI 0.21, 0.89) when conducted by specialist nurses. Testing its effectiveness when implemented in routine primary care requires changes at practitioner, organizational and health system levels. This paper describes a programme of translational formative evaluation to inform the protocol for a cluster RCT. Following the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) Guidance for evaluating complex interventions, we conducted a translational formative evaluation using mixed methods. Collection and analysis of postnatal health service documents, semi-structured interviews, group discussions and an online survey were used to investigate service provision, consumers' needs and expectations, clinicians' attitudes and clinical practice, and the implications for health service delivery. Participants were expectant parents, health care providers, health service managers and government policy makers. Results documented current clinical practice, staff training needs, necessary service modifications to standardize advice to parents and include fathers, key priorities and drivers of government health policy, and informed a model of costs and expected health and social outcomes. Implementation of WWWT into routine postnatal care requires adjustments to clinical practice. Staff training, modifications to service opening hours and economic implications for the health system also need to be considered. The MRC Guidance for developing and evaluating complex interventions is a useful framework

  16. The thermodynamic characteristics of complex formation of Cd2+ with N,N-Bis(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid in aqueous solutions at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernyavskaya, N. V.; Litvinenko, V. E.

    2011-01-01

    The equilibrium constants and heats of formation of complexes of N,N-bis(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid (H4Y) with Cd2+ ions at 298.15 K and ionic strengths of 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 (KNO3) were determined by potentiometric titration and calorimetrically. The thermodynamic characteristics of formation of the CdY2- complex at fixed and zero ionic strength values were calculated. The values obtained were interpreted.

  17. Effect of acidity on the equilibria of formation of mixed Co2+ complexes with heparin and arginine in aqueous solutions at 37°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofanova, M. A.; Frantseva, Yu. V.; Semenov, A. N.; Baranova, N. V.; Zhuravlev, E. V.

    2014-02-01

    Results from studying interactions in the heparin-Co2+ ion-arginine system are presented. The constants of formation of mixed Co2+ complexes with heparin and arginine in aqueous solutions in a broad pH range at 37°C are determined potentiometrically. The chemical equilibria in the system are simulated and the stoichiometry of formation of the complex forms is determined.

  18. Interaction between the antibiotic spiramycin and a ribosomal complex active in peptide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Dinos, G; Synetos, D; Coutsogeorgopoulos, C

    1993-10-12

    The inhibition of peptide bond formation by spiramycin was studied in an in vitro system derived from Escherichia coli. Peptide bonds are formed between puromycin (S) and Ac-Phe-tRNA, which is a component of complex C, i.e., of the [Ac-Phe-tRNA-70S ribosome-poly(U)] complex, according to the puromycin reaction: C+S (Ks)<==>CS (k3)==>C'+P [Synetos, D., & Coutsogeorgopoulos, C. (1987) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 923, 275-285]. It is shown that spiramycin (A) reacts with complex C and forms the spiramycin complex C*A, which is inactive toward puromycin. C*A is the tightest complex formed between complex C and any of a number of antibiotics, such as chloramphenicol, blasticidin S, lincomycin, or sparsomycin. C*A remains stable following gel chromatography on Sephadex G-200 and sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. Detailed kinetic study suggests that C*A is formed in a variation of a two-step mechanism in which the initial encounter complex CA is kinetically insignificant and C*A is the product of a conformational change of complex CA according to the equation, C+A (kassoc)<==>(kdissoc) C*A. The rate constants of this reaction (spiramycin reaction) are kassoc = 3.0 x 10(4) M-1 s-1 and kdissoc = 5.0 x 10(-5) s-1. Such values allow the classification of spiramycin as a slow-binding, slowly reversible inhibitor; they also lead to the calculation of an apparent overall dissociation constant equal to 1.8 nM for the C*A complex. Furthermore, they render spiramycin a useful tool in the study of antibiotic action on protein synthesis in vitro. Thus, the spiramycin reaction, in conjunction with the puromycin reaction, is applied (i) to detect a strong preincubation effect exerted by chloramphenicol and lincomycin (this effect constitutes further evidence that these two antibiotics combine with complex C as slow-binding inhibitors) and (ii) to determine the rate constant for the regeneration (k7 = 2.0 x 10(-3) s-1) of complex C from the sparsomycin complex C*I [Theocharis, D. A

  19. Quantitative serine protease assays based on formation of copper(II)-oligopeptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaokang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2015-01-07

    A quantitative protease assay based on the formation of a copper-oligopeptide complex is developed. In this assay, when a tripeptide GGH fragment is cleaved from an oligopeptide chain by serine proteases, the tripeptide quickly forms a pink GGH/Cu(2+) complex whose concentration can be determined quantitatively by using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Therefore, activities of serine proteases can be determined from the formation rate of the GGH/Cu(2+) complex. This principle can be used to detect the presence of serine protease in a real-time manner, or measure proteolytic activities of serine protease cleaving different oligopeptide substrates. For example, by using this assay, we demonstrate that trypsin, a model serine protease, is able to cleave two oligopeptides GGGGKGGH () and GGGGRGGH (). However, the specificity constant (kcat/Km) for is higher than that of (6.4 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)vs. 1.3 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)). This result shows that trypsin is more specific toward arginine (R) than lysine (K) in the oligopeptide sequence.

  20. Influence of structural features of carrageenan on the formation of polyelectrolyte complexes with chitosan.

    PubMed

    Volod'ko, A V; Davydova, V N; Glazunov, V P; Likhatskaya, G N; Yermak, I M

    2016-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte complexes (PEC) of carrageenans (CG)-κ-, κ/β-, λ-and x-CG with chitosan were obtained. The formation of PEC was detected by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and by centrifugation in a Percoll gradient. The influence of the structural peculiarities of CG on its interaction with chitosan was studied. The results of centrifugation showed that x-CG with a high degree of sulphation (SD) was completely bound to chitosan, unlike low SD κ-CG and κ/β-CG. Binding constant values showed there was a high affinity of CG for chitosan. CG with flexible macromolecule conformation and high SD exhibited the greatest binding affinity for chitosan. The full-atomic 3D-structures of the PEC κ-CG: chitosan in solution have been obtained by the experiments in silico for the first time. The amino groups of chitosan make the largest contribution to the energy of the complex formation by means of hydrogen and ionic bonds. The most probable complexes have stoichiometries of 1:1 and 1:1.5.

  1. Equilibrium and kinetic studies on complex formation and decomposition and the movement of Cu(2+)metal ions within polytopic receptors.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Carmen Ester; González-García, Jorge; Llinares, José M; Máñez, M Angeles; Jimenez, Hermas R; García-España, Enrique; Basallote, Manuel G

    2013-05-07

    Potentiometric studies carried out on the interaction of two tritopic double-scorpiand receptors in which two equivalent 5-(2-aminoethyl)-2,5,8-triaza[9]-(2,6)-pyridinophane moieties are linked with 2,9-dimethylphenanthroline (L1) and 2,6-dimethylpyridine (L2) establish the formation of mono-, bi- and trinuclear Cu(2+) complexes. The values of the stability constants and paramagnetic (1)H NMR studies permit one to infer the most likely coordination modes of the various complexes formed. Kinetic studies on complex formation and decomposition have also been carried out. Complex formation occurs with polyphasic kinetics for both receptors, although a significant difference is found between both ligands with respect to the relative values of the rate constants for the metal coordination steps and the structural reorganizations following them. Complex decomposition occurs with two separate kinetic steps, the first one being so fast that it occurs within the stopped-flow mixing time, whereas the second one is slow enough to allow kinetic studies using a conventional spectrophotometer. As a whole, the kinetic experiments also provide information about the movement of the metal ion within the receptors. The differences observed between the different receptors can be interpreted in terms of changes in the network of hydrogen bonds formed in the different species.

  2. Cadmium(II) complex formation with cysteine and penicillamine.

    PubMed

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Leung, Bonnie O; Mah, Vicky

    2009-07-06

    The complex formation between cadmium(II) and the ligands cysteine (H(2)Cys) and penicillamine (H(2)Pen = 3,3'-dimethylcysteine) in aqueous solutions, having C(Cd(II)) approximately 0.1 mol dm(-3) and C(H(2)L) = 0.2-2 mol dm(-3), was studied at pH = 7.5 and 11.0 by means of (113)Cd NMR and Cd K- and L(3)-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For all cadmium(II)-cysteine molar ratios, the mean Cd-S and Cd-(N/O) bond distances were found in the ranges 2.52-2.54 and 2.27-2.35 A, respectively. The corresponding cadmium(II)-penicillamine complexes showed slightly shorter Cd-S bonds, 2.50-2.53 A, but with the Cd-(N/O) bond distances in a similar wide range, 2.28-2.33 A. For the molar ratio C(H(2)L)/C(Cd(II)) = 2, the (113)Cd chemical shifts, in the range 509-527 ppm at both pH values, indicated complexes with distorted tetrahedral CdS(2)N(N/O) coordination geometry. With a large excess of cysteine (molar ratios C(H(2)Cys)/C(Cd(II)) >or= 10), complexes with CdS(4) coordination geometry dominate, consistent with the (113)Cd NMR chemical shifts, delta approximately 680 ppm at pH 7.5 and 636-658 ppm at pH 11.0, and their mean Cd-S distances were 2.53 +/- 0.02 A. At pH 7.5, the complexes are almost exclusively sulfur-coordinated as [Cd(S-cysteinate)(4)](n-), while at higher pH, the deprotonation of the amine groups promotes chelate formation. At pH 11.0, a minor amount of the [Cd(Cys)(3)](4-) complex with CdS(3)N coordination is formed. For the corresponding penicillamine solutions with molar ratios C(H(2)Pen)/C(Cd(II)) >or= 10, the (113)Cd NMR chemical shifts, delta approximately 600 ppm at pH 7.5 and 578 ppm at pH 11.0, together with the average bond distances, Cd-S 2.53 +/- 0.02 A and Cd-(N/O) 2.30-2.33 A, indicate that [Cd(penicillaminate)(3)](n-) complexes with chelating CdS(3)(N/O) coordination dominate already at pH 7.5 and become mixed with CdS(2)N(N/O) complexes at pH 11.0. The present study reveals differences between cysteine and penicillamine as ligands to the

  3. Dynamical complexity in the perception-based network formation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Moon, Eunyoung

    2016-12-01

    Many link formation mechanisms for the evolution of social networks have been successful to reproduce various empirical findings in social networks. However, they have largely ignored the fact that individuals make decisions on whether to create links to other individuals based on cost and benefit of linking, and the fact that individuals may use perception of the network in their decision making. In this paper, we study the evolution of social networks in terms of perception-based strategic link formation. Here each individual has her own perception of the actual network, and uses it to decide whether to create a link to another individual. An individual with the least perception accuracy can benefit from updating her perception using that of the most accurate individual via a new link. This benefit is compared to the cost of linking in decision making. Once a new link is created, it affects the accuracies of other individuals' perceptions, leading to a further evolution of the actual network. As for initial actual networks, we consider both homogeneous and heterogeneous cases. The homogeneous initial actual network is modeled by Erdős-Rényi (ER) random networks, while we take a star network for the heterogeneous case. In any cases, individual perceptions of the actual network are modeled by ER random networks with controllable linking probability. Then the stable link density of the actual network is found to show discontinuous transitions or jumps according to the cost of linking. As the number of jumps is the consequence of the dynamical complexity, we discuss the effect of initial conditions on the number of jumps to find that the dynamical complexity strongly depends on how much individuals initially overestimate or underestimate the link density of the actual network. For the heterogeneous case, the role of the highly connected individual as an information spreader is also discussed.

  4. Mechanism of Formation of Copper(II) Chloro Complexes Revealed by Transient Absorption Spectroscopy and DFT/TDDFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Mereshchenko, Andrey S; Olshin, Pavel K; Karabaeva, Kanykey E; Panov, Maxim S; Wilson, R Marshall; Kochemirovsky, Vladimir A; Skripkin, Mikhail Yu; Tveryanovich, Yury S; Tarnovsky, Alexander N

    2015-07-16

    Copper(II) complexes are extremely labile with typical ligand exchange rate constants on the order of 10(6)-10(9) M(-1) s(-1). As a result, it is often difficult to identify the actual formation mechanism of these complexes. In this work, using UV-vis transient absorption when probing in a broad time range (20 ps to 8 μs) in conjunction with DFT/TDDFT calculations, we studied the dynamics and underlying reaction mechanisms of the formation of extremely labile copper(II) CuCl4(2-) chloro complexes from copper(II) CuCl3(-) trichloro complexes and chloride ions. These two species, produced via photochemical dissociation of CuCl4(2-) upon 420 nm excitation into the ligand-to-metal-charge-transfer electronic state, are found to recombine into parent complexes with bimolecular rate constants of (9.0 ± 0.1) × 10(7) and (5.3 ± 0.4) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) in acetonitrile and dichloromethane, respectively. In dichloromethane, recombination occurs via a simple one-step addition. In acetonitrile, where [CuCl3](-) reacts with the solvent to form a [CuCl3CH3CN](-) complex in less than 20 ps, recombination takes place via ligand exchange described by the associative interchange mechanism that involves a [CuCl4CH3CN](2-) intermediate. In both solvents, the recombination reaction is potential energy controlled.

  5. Formation of Cluster Complexes by Cluster-Cluster-Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihashi, Masahiko; Odaka, Hideho

    2015-03-01

    Multi-element clusters are interested in their chemical and physical properties, and it is expected that they are utilized as catalysts, for example. Their properties critically depend on the size, composition and atomic ordering, and it should be important to adjust the above parameters for their functionality. One of the ways to form a multi-element cluster is to employ a low-energy collision between clusters. Here, we show characteristic results obtained in the collision between a neutral Ar cluster and a size-selected Co cluster ion. Low-energy collision experiment was accomplished by using a newly developed merging-beam apparatus. Cobalt cluster ions were produced by laser ablation, and mass-selected. On the other hand, argon clusters were prepared by the supersonic expansion of Ar gas. Both cluster beams were merged together in an ion guide, and ionic cluster complexes were mass-analyzed. In the collision of Co2+ and ArN, Co2Arn+ (n = 1 - 30) were observed, and the total intensity of Co2Arn+ (n >= 1) is inversely proportional to the relative velocity between Co2+ and ArN. This suggests that the charge-induced dipole interaction between Co2+ and a neutral Ar cluster is dominant in the formation of the cluster complex, Co2+Arn.

  6. Cyclodextrins in pharmaceutical formulations I: structure and physicochemical properties, formation of complexes, and types of complex.

    PubMed

    Jambhekar, Sunil S; Breen, Philip

    2016-02-01

    Cyclodextrins are cyclic oligosaccharides that have been recognized as pharmaceutical adjuvants for the past 20 years. The molecular structure of these glucose derivatives, which approximates a truncated cone, bucket, or torus, generates a hydrophilic exterior surface and a nonpolar interior cavity. Cyclodextrins can interact with appropriately sized drug molecules to yield an inclusion complex. These noncovalent inclusion complexes offer a variety of advantages over the noncomplexed form of a drug. Cyclodextrins are primarily used to enhance the aqueous solubility, physical chemical stability, and bioavailability of drugs. Their other applications include preventing drug-drug interactions, converting liquid drugs into microcrystalline powders, minimizing gastrointestinal and ocular irritation, and reducing or eliminating unpleasant taste and smell. Here, we discuss the physical chemical properties of various cyclodextrins, including the effects of substitutions on these properties. Additionally, we report on the regulatory status of their use, commercial products containing cyclodextrins, toxicological considerations, and the forces involved in complex formation. We also highlight the types of complex formed and discuss the methods used to determine the types of complex present.

  7. Formation of complexes of antimicrobial agent norfloxacin with antitumor antibiotics of anthracycline series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstigneev, M. P.; Rybakova, K. A.; Davies, D. B.

    2007-05-01

    The formation of complexes in solutions of the norfloxacin antimicrobial agent (NOR) with daunomycin (DAU) and nogalamycin (NOG), antitumor anthracycline antibiotics, was studied using 1H NMR spectroscopy. Based on the concentration and temperature dependences of the chemical shifts of the protons of interacting molecules, the equilibrium constants and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy and entropy) of heteroassociation of the antibiotics were calculated. It was shown that NOR interacts with DAU (NOG) in aqueous solutions forming stacked heterocomplexes with parallel orientation of the molecular chromophores. The conclusion was drawn that such interactions should be taken into account when anthracyclines and quinolones are jointly administered during combined chemotherapy, since they can contribute to the medico-biological synergistic effect of these antibiotics.

  8. Variation in DNA binding constants with a change in geometry of ternary copper(II) complexes with N2O donor Schiff base and cyanate or dicyanamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Subrata; Santra, Ramesh Chandra; Das, Saurabh; Chattopadhyay, Shouvik

    2014-09-01

    Two new copper(II) complexes, [Cu(L)(OCN)] (1) and [CuL(dca)]n (2), where HL = 2-(-(2-(diethylamino)ethylimino)methyl)naphthalen-1-ol, dca = N(CN)2-, have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-VIS spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Complex 1 has square planar and complex 2 square pyramidal geometries in solid state around metal centre. Interactions of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) were studied by UV-VIS spectroscopy. Binding constant and site size of interaction were determined. Binding site size and intrinsic binding constant K revealed complex 1 interacted with calf thymus DNA better than complex 2.

  9. Supercoiled pseudocircular domains in single-twisted DNAs under tension: Elastic constants and unwinding dynamics in complexes with Topo I.

    PubMed

    Schurr, J Michael; Fujimoto, Bryant S

    2013-12-01

    Extension versus twist data of Koster et al. (Nature 2005, 434, 671-674) are analyzed to obtain C for the main-chain segments and the twist energy parameter (ET ) for the supercoiled pseudocircular (sp) domain(s) from which C is estimated via simulations. The torsional rigidity in the tension-free sp domain(s) (C = 163 fJ fm) is typical of the unstrained DNA and is less than half the value in the main-chain segments under tension (C = 350-410 fJ fm). Tension is suggested to induce a structural transition to a torsionally stiffer state. Data of Koster et al. for the rate of extension owing to unwinding of a covalent complex of DNA with human Topoisomerase Ib (H Topo I) are analyzed to determine the torque and rate of rotation from which an effective friction coefficient is obtained. A Langevin equation for the unwinding motion in a supercoiled DNA:H Topo I complex is solved to obtain the temporal trajectory of the average winding angle and the time-dependent distribution of winding angles. The mean rate constant for the religation reaction is estimated from the measured probability of reaction per turn. We predict that unwinding proceeds rather far during a single-cleavage and religation cycle, and is effectively completely equilibrated during the 3.2 cleavage and religation cycles that occur during each noncovalent binding and dissociation event. H Topo I is predicted to be completely processive as in accord with observations on calf-thymus Topo I (Brewood et al., Biochemistry 2010, 49, 3367-3380).

  10. Determination of plasma frequency, damping constant, and size distribution from the complex dielectric function of noble metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza Herrera, Luis J.; Arboleda, David Muñetón; Schinca, Daniel C.; Scaffardi, Lucía B.

    2014-12-21

    This paper develops a novel method for simultaneously determining the plasma frequency ω{sub P}   and the damping constant γ{sub free} in the bulk damped oscillator Drude model, based on experimentally measured real and imaginary parts of the metal refractive index in the IR wavelength range, lifting the usual approximation that restricts frequency values to the UV-deep UV region. Our method was applied to gold, silver, and copper, improving the relative uncertainties in the final values for ω{sub p} (0.5%–1.6%) and for γ{sub free} (3%–8%), which are smaller than those reported in the literature. These small uncertainties in ω{sub p} and γ{sub free} determination yield a much better fit of the experimental complex dielectric function. For the case of nanoparticles (Nps), a series expansion of the Drude expression (which includes ω{sub p} and γ{sub free} determined using our method) enables size-dependent dielectric function to be written as the sum of three terms: the experimental bulk dielectric function plus two size corrective terms, one for free electron, and the other for bound-electron contributions. Finally, size distribution of nanometric and subnanometric gold Nps in colloidal suspension was determined through fitting its experimental optical extinction spectrum using Mie theory based on the previously determined dielectric function. Results are compared with size histogram obtained from Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)

  11. Estimation of stability constants for metal-ligand complexes containing neutral nitrogen donor atoms with applications to natural organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atalay, Yasemin B.; Di Toro, Dominic M.; Carbonaro, Richard F.

    2013-12-01

    Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) were developed for estimating 1:1 metal-ligand stability constants (log KML) for small organic molecules containing neutral nitrogen donor atoms. A data set of 44 monodentate and 112 bidentate ligands for six metal ions: Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Cd2+ was employed to parameterize the LFER equations. Monodentate and bidentate log KML values were adequately described using Irving-Rossotti LFERs previously developed for ligands containing negatively-charged oxygen functional groups. Modifications to the LFER equations were necessary to account for steric hindrances to metal complexation by primary, secondary, and tertiary amines. The resulting LFER equations can be used to estimate log KML values for monodentate and bidentate ligands with neutral nitrogen donor groups where such values do not currently exist in the literature. Comparison of these results to our previous work with negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms reveals that neutral nitrogen functional groups are weaker than their oxygen counterparts for metal ions classified as “hard” on the basis of Hard-Soft Acid-Base (HSAB) theory. For “soft” metals, the opposite is true. These LFERs can be used to incorporate nitrogen functional groups in models for metal ion binding to natural organic matter (NOM).

  12. Synthesis of crystalline americium hydroxide, Am(OH){sub 3}, and determination of its enthalpy of formation; estimation of the solubility-product constants of actinide(III) hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Morss, L.R.; Williams, C.W.

    1993-12-31

    This paper reports a new synthesis of pure, microcrystalline Am(OH){sub 3}, its characterization by x-ray powder diffraction and infrared spectroscopy, and the calorimetric determination of its enthalpy of solution in dilute hydrochloric acid. From the enthalpy of solution the enthalpy of formation of Am(OH){sub 3} has been calculated to be {minus}1371.2{plus_minus}7.9 kj{center_dot}mol{sup {minus}1}, which represents the first experimental determination of an enthalpy of formation of any actinide hydroxide. The free energy of formation and solubility product constant of Am(OH){sub 3} (K{sub sp} = 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}31}) have been calculated from our enthalpy of formation and entropy estimates and are compared with literature measurements under near-equilibrium conditions. Since many properties of the tripositive lanthanide and actinide ions (e.g., hydrolysis, complex-ion formation, and thermochemistry) change in a regular manner, these properties can be interpreted systematically in terms of ionic size. This paper compares the thermochemistry of Am(OH){sub 3} with thermochemical studies of lanthanide hydroxides. A combined structural and acid-base model is used to explain the systematic differences in enthalpies of solution between the oxides and hydroxides of the 4f{sup n} and 5f{sup n} subgroups and to predict solubility-product constants for the actinide(III) hydroxides of Pu through Cf.

  13. Probing the Formation of Complex Organic Molecules in Interstellar Ices - Beyond the FTIR - RGA Limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2015-08-01

    An understanding of the formation of key classes of complex organic molecules (COMs) within interstellar ices is of core value to the laboratory astrophysics community with structural isomers - molecules with the same molecular formula but different connectivities of atoms - serving as a molecular clock and tracers in defining the evolutionary stage of cold molecular clouds and star forming regions. Here, the lack of data on products, branching ratios, and rate constants of their formation and how they depend on the ice temperature and composition limits the understanding how COMs are synthesized. Classically, infrared spectroscopy combined with mass spectrometry of the irradiated and subliming ices have been exploited for the last decades, but the usefulness of these methods has reached the limits when it comes to the identification of CMS in those ices. Here, infrared spectroscopy can only untangle the functional groups of COMs; mass spectrometry coupled with electron impact ionization cannot discriminate structural isomers and suffers from extensive fragmentation. This talk presents a novel approach to elucidate the formation of COMs by exploiting - besides classical infrared, Raman, and ultraviolet-visual spectroscopy - reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ReTOF) coupled with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) soft photoionization (ReTOF-PI). This technique has the unique power to identify the molecules based on a cross correlation of their mass-to-charge ratios, their ionization energies (IE), and their sublimation temperatures ultimately unraveling an inventory of individual COMs molecules formed upon interaction of ionizing radiation with interstellar analog ices.

  14. Changes in protein structure at the interface accompanying complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Devlina; Janin, Joël; Robert, Charles H.; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2015-01-01

    Protein interactions are essential in all biological processes. The changes brought about in the structure when a free component forms a complex with another molecule need to be characterized for a proper understanding of molecular recognition as well as for the successful implementation of docking algorithms. Here, unbound (U) and bound (B) forms of protein structures from the Protein–Protein Interaction Affinity Database are compared in order to enumerate the changes that occur at the interface atoms/residues in terms of the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), secondary structure, temperature factors (B factors) and disorder-to-order transitions. It is found that the interface atoms optimize contacts with the atoms in the partner protein, which leads to an increase in their ASA in the bound interface in the majority (69%) of the proteins when compared with the unbound interface, and this is independent of the root-mean-square deviation between the U and B forms. Changes in secondary structure during the transition indicate a likely extension of helices and strands at the expense of turns and coils. A reduction in flexibility during complex formation is reflected in the decrease in B factors of the interface residues on going from the U form to the B form. There is, however, no distinction in flexibility between the interface and the surface in the monomeric structure, thereby highlighting the potential problem of using B factors for the prediction of binding sites in the unbound form for docking another protein. 16% of the proteins have missing (disordered) residues in the U form which are observed (ordered) in the B form, mostly with an irregular conformation; the data set also shows differences in the composition of interface and non-interface residues in the disordered polypeptide segments as well as differences in their surface burial. PMID:26594372

  15. Changes in protein structure at the interface accompanying complex formation.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Devlina; Janin, Joël; Robert, Charles H; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2015-11-01

    Protein interactions are essential in all biological processes. The changes brought about in the structure when a free component forms a complex with another molecule need to be characterized for a proper understanding of molecular recognition as well as for the successful implementation of docking algorithms. Here, unbound (U) and bound (B) forms of protein structures from the Protein-Protein Interaction Affinity Database are compared in order to enumerate the changes that occur at the interface atoms/residues in terms of the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), secondary structure, temperature factors (B factors) and disorder-to-order transitions. It is found that the interface atoms optimize contacts with the atoms in the partner protein, which leads to an increase in their ASA in the bound interface in the majority (69%) of the proteins when compared with the unbound interface, and this is independent of the root-mean-square deviation between the U and B forms. Changes in secondary structure during the transition indicate a likely extension of helices and strands at the expense of turns and coils. A reduction in flexibility during complex formation is reflected in the decrease in B factors of the interface residues on going from the U form to the B form. There is, however, no distinction in flexibility between the interface and the surface in the monomeric structure, thereby highlighting the potential problem of using B factors for the prediction of binding sites in the unbound form for docking another protein. 16% of the proteins have missing (disordered) residues in the U form which are observed (ordered) in the B form, mostly with an irregular conformation; the data set also shows differences in the composition of interface and non-interface residues in the disordered polypeptide segments as well as differences in their surface burial.

  16. Stereospecific formation of dinuclear vanadium(V) tartrato complexes.

    PubMed

    Gáliková, Jana; Schwendt, Peter; Tatiersky, Jozef; Tracey, Alan S; Zák, Zdirad

    2009-09-07

    The first dinuclear nonperoxido tartrato complexes of vanadium(V), (NMe(4))(2)[V(2)O(4)((2R,3R)-H(2)tart)(2)] x 6 H(2)O (1), (NMe(4))(2)[V(2)O(2)((2R,3R)-tart)((2S,3S)-tart)] (2), (NEt(4))(2)[V(2)O(2)((2R,3R)-tart)((2S,3S)-tart)] (3) (tart = tartrato(4-) = C(4)H(2)O(6)(4-)) have been prepared from water-ethanol medium and characterized by X-ray structure analysis and spectral methods. The formation of the complexes has been found to be stereospecific; the composition and structure of anions containing one or both enantiomers of the ligand are profoundly different. The structure of anions in 1-3 also differs significantly from the structure of other dinuclear vanadium(V) alpha-hydroxycarboxylato complexes, but, interestingly, the geometry of the [V(2)O(2)((2R,3R)-tart)((2S,3S)-tart)](2-) ion resembles the structure of the [(VO)(2)((2R,3R)-tart)((2S,3S)-tart)](4-) ion which has a vanadium(IV) center. Using Raman and (51)V NMR spectroscopy the solvent dependent mutual transformations of [V(4)O(8)((2R,3R)-tart)(2)](4-) (V(4)L(2)-RR), [V(4)O(8)((2S,3S)-tart)(2)](4-) (V(4)L(2)-SS), [V(2)O(4)((2R,3R)-H(2)tart)(2)](2-) (V(2)L(2)-RR), [V(2)O(4)((2S,3S)-H(2)tart)(2)](2-) (V(2)L(2)-SS), and [V(2)O(2)((2R,3R)-tart)((2S,3S)-tart)](2-) (V(2)L(2)-rac) have been established. In aqueous solution the following reactions take place; 2 V(2)L(2)-rac --> V(2)L(2)-RR + V(2)L(2)-SS followed by partial decomposition, V(2)L(2)-RR --> V(4)L(2)-RR + 2 L (V(2)L(2)-SS --> V(4)L(2)-SS + 2 L). On the other hand V(2)L(2)-rac is stable in CH(3)CN solution while V(2)L(2)-RR (V(2)L(2)-SS) decomposes into several species.

  17. Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aloke; Karig, David K; Neethirajan, Suresh; Suresh, Anil K; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Mukherjee, Partha P; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.

  18. Structural basis of complement membrane attack complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Serna, Marina; Giles, Joanna L.; Morgan, B. Paul; Bubeck, Doryen

    2016-01-01

    In response to complement activation, the membrane attack complex (MAC) assembles from fluid-phase proteins to form pores in lipid bilayers. MAC directly lyses pathogens by a ‘multi-hit' mechanism; however, sublytic MAC pores on host cells activate signalling pathways. Previous studies have described the structures of individual MAC components and subcomplexes; however, the molecular details of its assembly and mechanism of action remain unresolved. Here we report the electron cryo-microscopy structure of human MAC at subnanometre resolution. Structural analyses define the stoichiometry of the complete pore and identify a network of interaction interfaces that determine its assembly mechanism. MAC adopts a ‘split-washer' configuration, in contrast to the predicted closed ring observed for perforin and cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. Assembly precursors partially penetrate the lipid bilayer, resulting in an irregular β-barrel pore. Our results demonstrate how differences in symmetric and asymmetric components of the MAC underpin a molecular basis for pore formation and suggest a mechanism of action that extends beyond membrane penetration. PMID:26841837

  19. Structural basis of complement membrane attack complex formation.

    PubMed

    Serna, Marina; Giles, Joanna L; Morgan, B Paul; Bubeck, Doryen

    2016-02-04

    In response to complement activation, the membrane attack complex (MAC) assembles from fluid-phase proteins to form pores in lipid bilayers. MAC directly lyses pathogens by a 'multi-hit' mechanism; however, sublytic MAC pores on host cells activate signalling pathways. Previous studies have described the structures of individual MAC components and subcomplexes; however, the molecular details of its assembly and mechanism of action remain unresolved. Here we report the electron cryo-microscopy structure of human MAC at subnanometre resolution. Structural analyses define the stoichiometry of the complete pore and identify a network of interaction interfaces that determine its assembly mechanism. MAC adopts a 'split-washer' configuration, in contrast to the predicted closed ring observed for perforin and cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. Assembly precursors partially penetrate the lipid bilayer, resulting in an irregular β-barrel pore. Our results demonstrate how differences in symmetric and asymmetric components of the MAC underpin a molecular basis for pore formation and suggest a mechanism of action that extends beyond membrane penetration.

  20. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  1. Solvent effect on the complex formation of a crown ether derivative with sodium and potassium ions. Thermodynamic background of selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin; Huszthy, Péter; Móczár, Ildikó; Szemenyei, Balázs; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor

    2013-01-01

    The complexation properties of dimethyl-pyridino-18-crown-6 ether (M2P18C6) with Na+ and K+ in different primary alcohols including methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH) and n-propanol (n-PrOH) were investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy. Stability constants and thermodynamic parameters have been determined applying the van't Hoff theory. In the cases of both Na+ and K+ the stability constants increase with decreasing permittivity of the solvent used. M2P18C6 always exhibits better affinity to K+ in each alcoholic solution compared to Na+. Thermodynamic studies suggest that in both cases there is a correlation between the permittivity of the solvent and the enthalpy and entropy change of complex formation.

  2. Silver(I) complex formation with cysteine, penicillamine, and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Leung, Bonnie O; Jalilehvand, Farideh; Mah, Vicky; Parvez, Masood; Wu, Qiao

    2013-04-15

    The complex formation between silver(I) and cysteine (H2Cys), penicillamine (H2Pen), and glutathione (H3Glu) in alkaline aqueous solution was examined using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and (109)Ag NMR spectroscopic techniques. The complexes formed in 0.1 mol dm(-3) Ag(I) solutions with cysteine and penicillamine were investigated for ligand/Ag(I) (L/Ag) mole ratios increasing from 2.0 to 10.0. For the series of cysteine solutions (pH 10-11) a mean Ag-S bond distance of 2.45 ± 0.02 Å consistently emerged, while for penicillamine (pH 9) the average Ag-S bond distance gradually increased from 2.40 to 2.44 ± 0.02 Å. EXAFS and (109)Ag NMR spectra of a concentrated Ag(I)-cysteine solution (C(Ag(I)) = 0.8 mol dm(-3), L/Ag = 2.2) showed a mean Ag-S bond distance of 2.47 ± 0.02 Å and δ((109)Ag) 1103 ppm, consistent with prevailing, partially oligomeric AgS3 coordinated species, while for penicillamine (C(Ag(I)) = 0.5 mol dm(-3), L/Ag = 2.0) the mean Ag-S bond distance of 2.40 ± 0.02 Å and δ((109)Ag) 922 ppm indicate that mononuclear AgS2 coordinated complexes dominate. For Ag(I)-glutathione solutions (C(Ag(I)) = 0.01 mol dm(-3), pH ∼11), mononuclear AgS2 coordinated species with a mean Ag-S bond distance of 2.36 ± 0.02 Å dominate for L/Ag mole ratios from 2.0 to 10.0. The crystal structure of the silver(I)-cysteine compound (NH4)Ag2(HCys)(Cys)·H2O (1) precipitating at pH ∼10 was solved and showed a layer structure with both AgS3 and AgS3N coordination to the cysteinate ligands. A redetermination of the crystal structure of Ag(HPen)·H2O (2) confirmed the proposed digonal AgS2 coordination environment to bridging thiolate sulfur atoms in polymeric intertwining chains forming a double helix. A survey of Ag-S bond distances for crystalline Ag(I) complexes with S-donor ligands in different AgS2, AgS2(O/N), and AgS3 coordination environments was used, together with a survey of (109)Ag NMR chemical shifts, to assist assignments of the Ag

  3. Mechanistic information from volume profiles for water exchange and complex-formation reactions of aquated Ni(II). pH, buffer and medium effects.

    PubMed

    Gazzaz, Hanaa Asaad; Ember, Erika; Zahl, Achim; van Eldik, Rudi

    2009-11-21

    Rate and activation parameters for the complex-formation reaction of Ni(2+) with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-N,N-dimethyl aniline (PADA) were studied as a function of pH in different buffers in both aqueous and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle solutions. In aqueous Tris buffer solution, the forward and backward rate constants increased with increasing pH, while the complex-formation constant decreased due to a larger increase in the backward rate constant. The activation entropy, DeltaS(#), and activation volume, DeltaV(#), changed with increasing pH from positive to negative values, suggesting an apparent changeover from a dissociative to a more associative mechanism. Complex-formation reactions with 2,2'-bipyridine in Tris buffer showed almost no increase in the forward and backward rate constants on increasing the pH, but the DeltaS(#) and DeltaV(#) values became more negative. N-ethylmorpholine buffer showed no pH effect on the rate constants and activation parameters. Water exchange reactions of aquated Ni(2+) were also studied as a function of pH under the same conditions. The reported rate and activation parameters for water exchange in Tris and N-ethylmorpholine buffers are consistent with those found for the complex-formation reactions of Ni(2+) with PADA. The observed pH and buffer effects for both the complex-formation and water exchange reactions of aquated Ni(2+) can be accounted for in terms of the formation of a Ni(2+)-Tris complex in Tris buffer and general base catalysis by the buffer components. In SDS micelle solution, the complex-formation reaction with PADA was much faster than in aqueous solution, but the increase in rate constant with increasing pH was less significant, while DeltaS(#) and DeltaV(#) became more positive, pointing to a more dissociative mechanism. For SDS micelle solutions there was no effect on the water exchange rate constant or activation volume. Mechanistic interpretations are offered for all observed pH, buffer and medium

  4. Formation of Gold(III) Alkyls from Gold Alkoxide Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The gold(III) methoxide complex (C∧N∧C)AuOMe (1) reacts with tris(p-tolyl)phosphine in benzene at room temperature under O abstraction to give the methylgold product (C∧N∧C)AuMe (2) together with O=P(p-tol)3 ((C∧N∧C) = [2,6-(C6H3tBu-4)2pyridine]2–). Calculations show that this reaction is energetically favorable (ΔG = −32.3 kcal mol–1). The side products in this reaction, the Au(II) complex [Au(C∧N∧C)]2 (3) and the phosphorane (p-tol)3P(OMe)2, suggest that at least two reaction pathways may operate, including one involving (C∧N∧C)Au• radicals. Attempts to model the reaction by DFT methods showed that PPh3 can approach 1 to give a near-linear Au–O–P arrangement, without phosphine coordination to gold. The analogous reaction of (C∧N∧C)AuOEt, on the other hand, gives exclusively a mixture of 3 and (p-tol)3P(OEt)2. Whereas the reaction of (C∧N∧C)AuOR (R = But, p-C6H4F) with P(p-tol)3 proceeds over a period of hours, compounds with R = CH2CF3, CH(CF3)2 react almost instantaneously, to give 3 and O=P(p-tol)3. In chlorinated solvents, treatment of the alkoxides (C∧N∧C)AuOR with phosphines generates [(C∧N∧C)Au(PR3)]Cl, via Cl abstraction from the solvent. Attempts to extend the synthesis of gold(III) alkoxides to allyl alcohols were unsuccessful; the reaction of (C∧N∧C)AuOH with an excess of CH2=CHCH2OH in toluene led instead to allyl alcohol isomerization to give a mixture of gold alkyls, (C∧N∧C)AuR′ (R′ = −CH2CH2CHO (10), −CH2CH(CH2OH)OCH2CH=CH2 (11)), while 2-methallyl alcohol affords R′ = CH2CH(Me)CHO (12). The crystal structure of 11 was determined. The formation of Au–C instead of the expected Au–O products is in line with the trend in metal–ligand bond dissociation energies for Au(III): M–H > M–C > M–O.

  5. Reactions of a Dinitrogen Complex of Molybdenum: Formation of a Carbon-Nitrogen Bond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, David C.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Reports a procedure for the formation of alkyldiazenido complexes of molybdenum in the absence of dioxygen, suitable for inclusion in an advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. Includes background information and experimental procedures for two complexes. (SK)

  6. The morpho-anatomy and histology of the pineal complex in a major Indian carp, Catla catla: identification of the pineal photoreceptor cells and their responsiveness to constant light and constant darkness during different phases of the annual reproductive cycle.

    PubMed

    Dey, R; Bhattacharya, S; Maitra, S K; Banerji, T K

    2003-11-01

    In contrast to mammals in which the pineal gland is a discrete structure situated dorsally in the brain, the "pineal gland" in teleost fishes is composed of a number of separate but connected constituent parts, collectively described as the "pineal complex." In this paper, we have described the pineal complex in a common Indian carp, Catla catla, which exhibits an annual reproductive cycle. Attempts have been made to (a) provide an in-depth description of the structure of the pineal complex; and (b) identify the photoreceptor cells of the pineal, by exposing the animals to constant light (LL) and constant darkness (DD). Furthermore, we examined any possible influence of the reproductive status of the fish on the responsiveness of the pineal photoreceptor cells in C. catla following exposure to LL and DD. To this end, a total of four experiments were carried out during the four different phases of the annual reproductive cycle that is characteristic of this species. Each of these four experiments was carried out for a period of 30 days after which the fishes were sacrificed, different parts of the pineal complex were dissected out, and processed for histological and karyometric studies. Our results showed that the pineal complex in this species is composed of three separate but connected parts, (a) an end vesicle (EV); (b) a dorsal sac (DS); and (c) a long and thin pineal stalk (PS) that attaches the EV to the DS. Detailed karyometric and histo-morphologic studies following exposure of the animals to DD and LL showed that constant darkness led to a stimulatory effect on the pineal photoreceptor cells of the EV as evident from a significant increase in the nuclear diameter. In contrast, the nuclear diameter of the photoreceptor cells in animals subjected to constant light showed a significant reduction. Furthermore, the observed cellular changes in the EV of fish exposed either to LL or DD were independent of the stage of the gonadal cycle. The apparent lack of any

  7. On the formation of dynamic structures in the form of rotating rings and vortices in a thin layer of a magnetodielectric colloid subjected to a constant electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, M. I.; Yastrebov, S. S.

    2012-04-01

    Experimental data on the electrical and optical properties of a thin layer of a magnetodielectric colloid obtained by Kozhevnikov et al. (Tech. Phys. 51 (7), 946 (2006)), are analyzed. Using a three-layer hierarchical model, the possible structure and properties of near-electrode layers are determined, the formation mechanisms of dynamic structures are described, and the variation of the electrical properties of the magnetodielectric colloid layer with time and constant electric field strength are discussed.

  8. Determining resistivity of a formation adjacent to a borehole having casing by generating constant current flow in portion of casing and using at least two voltage measurement electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William Banning

    2000-01-01

    Methods of operation of different types of multiple electrode apparatus vertically disposed in a cased well to measure information related to the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from within the cased well are described. The multiple electrode apparatus has a minimum of two spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes that electrically engage a first portion of the interior of the cased well and that provide at least first voltage information. Current control means are used to control the magnitude of any selected current that flows along a second portion of the interior of the casing to be equal to a predetermined selected constant. The first portion of the interior of the cased well is spaced apart from the second portion of the interior of the cased well. The first voltage information and the predetermined selected constant value of any selected current flowing along the casing are used in part to determine a magnitude related to the formation resistivity adjacent to the first portion of the interior of the cased well. Methods and apparatus having a plurality of voltage measurement electrodes are disclosed that provide voltage related information in the presence of constant currents flowing along the casing which is used to provide formation resistivity.

  9. Monopropionate analogues of DOTA4- and DTPA5-: kinetics of formation and dissociation of their lanthanide(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Edina; Tripier, Raphaël; Fousková, Petra; Reviriego, Felipe; Handel, Henri; Tóth, Eva

    2007-08-28

    The replacement of an acetate function of the macrocyclic DOTA4-(DO3A-Nprop4-) or the acyclic DTPA5- in terminal position (DTTA-Nprop5-) has been recently shown to result in a significant increase of the water exchange rate on the Gd3+ complexes, which makes these chelates potential contrast agents for MRI applications. Here, two novel and straightforward synthetic routes to H4DO3A-Nprop are described. Protonation constants of DO3A-Nprop4- and stability constants with several alkaline earth and transition metal ions have been determined by potentiometry. For each metal, the thermodynamic stability constant is decreased in comparison to the DOTA chelates. The formation reaction of LnDO3A-Nprop- complexes (Ln=Ce, Gd and Yb) proceeds via the rapid formation of a diprotonated intermediate and its subsequent deprotonation and rearrangement in a slow, OH- catalyzed process. The stability of the LnH2DO3A-Nprop* intermediates is similar to those reported for the corresponding DOTA analogues. The rate constants of the OH- catalyzed deprotonation step increase with decreasing lanthanide ion size, and are slightly higher than for DOTA complexes. The kinetic inertness of GdDTTA-Nprop2- was characterized by the rates of its exchange reactions with Zn2+ and Eu3+. The rate of the reaction between GdDTTA-Nprop2- and Zn2+ increases with Zn2+ concentration, while it is independent of pH, implying that the exchange takes place predominantly via direct attack of the metal ion on the complex. In the Eu3+ exchange, the rate decreases with increasing concentration of the exchanging ion which is accounted for by the transitional formation of a dinuclear GdDTTA-NpropEu+ species. The kinetic inertness of the monopropionate GdDTTA-Nprop2- is decreased in comparison to GdDTPA2-: all rate constants, characterizing the dissociation reaction via either proton- or metal-catalyzed pathways being higher by 1-2 orders of magnitude. Similarly, a study of the acid-catalyzed dissociation of the

  10. Cationic lanthanide complexes of neutral tripodal N,O ligands: enthalpy versus entropy-driven podate formation in water.

    PubMed

    Bravard, Florence; Rosset, Caroline; Delangle, Pascale

    2004-07-07

    The cationic lanthanide complexes of two neutral tripodal N,O ligands, tpa (tris[(2-pyridyl)methyl]amine) and tpaam (tris[6-((2-N,N-diethylcarbamoyl)pyridyl)methyl]amine) are studied in water. The analysis of the proton lanthanide induced NMR shifts indicate that there is no abrupt structural change in the middle of the rare-earth series. Unexpectedly, the formation constant values of the lanthanide podates of tpaam and tpa in D2O at 298 K are similar, suggesting that the addition of the three amide groups to the ligand tpa does not lead to any increase in stability of the lanthanide complexes of tpaam in respect to tpa, even though the amide groups are coordinated to the metal in aqueous solution. The measurement of the enthalpy and entropy changes of the complexation reactions shows that the two similar ligands tpa and tpaam have different driving forces for lanthanide complexation. Indeed, the formation of tpa podates benefits from an exothermic enthalpy change associated with a small entropy change, whereas the complexation reaction with tpaam is clearly entropy-driven though opposed by a positive enthalpy change. The hydration states of the europium complexes were measured by luminescence and show the coordination of 4-5 water ligands in [Eu(tpa)]3+ whereas there are only 2 in [Eu(tpaam)]3+. Therefore the heptadentate ligand tpaam releases the translational entropy of more water molecules than does the tetradentate ligand tpa.

  11. Photochemical formation of complexed HNO in low temperature matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R. P.; Murata, S.; Huber, J. Robert

    1982-04-01

    The molecule HNO complexed to N-methylenemethylamine (H 2CNCH 3) was prepared by photolyzing N,N-dimethylnitrosamine [(CH 3) 2NNO] in low temperature matrices. The infrared absorptions of six isotopic such complexed HNO species were measured and assigned. Based on these results a complex between HNO and the amine involving a hydrogen bond is proposed. The bands associated with the hydrogen bond, NH out-of-plane bend and N…HN stretch, were assigned. The NH stretch vibrational band of HNO is blue-shifted by complexation and has a linewidth < 1 cm -1.

  12. [Studies by means of 1H NMR spectroscopy of complex formation of aromatic biologically active compounds with antibiotic topotecan].

    PubMed

    Mosunov, A A; Kostiukov, V V; Evstigneev, M P

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of heteroassociation of antibiotic topotecan (TPT) with aromatic biologically active compounds (BAC): caffeine, mutagens ethidium bromide and proflavine, antibiotic daunomycin, vitamins flavin-mononucleotide and nicotinamide, has been carried out in the work using 1H NMR spectroscopy data. The equilibrium constants of heteroassociation and induced chemical shifts of the protons have been obtained in the complexes with BAC. It is found that the complex formation TPT-BAC has the nature of stacking of the chromophores, additionally stabilized in the case of proflavine by intermolecular hydrogen bond. Calculation of the basic components of the Gibbs free energy of the complexation reactions is carried out, and the factors which stabilize and destabilize the heterocomplexes of molecules are revealed.

  13. Double layer formation at the interface of complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroshenko, V. V.; Thoma, M. H.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-08-15

    Necessary conditions are formulated for the generation of a double layer at the interface of a complex plasma and a particle-free electron-ion plasma in a weakly collisional discharge. Examples are calculated for realistic observed complex plasmas, and it is shown that situations of both ''smooth'' transitions and 'sharp' transitions can exist. The model can explain the abrupt boundaries observed.

  14. Quantifying the association constant and stoichiometry of the complexation between colloidal polyacrylate-coated gold nanoparticles and chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jie; Szaflarski, Diane M; Simon, John D

    2013-04-25

    Qualitative and quantitative insights into the capacity and association constant for the binding of chymotrypsin to polyacrylate-coated gold nanoparticles is determined using fluorescence quenching, optical absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy, isothermal calorimetry, and gel electrophoresis. The collective data reveal a binding capacity and constant for this particular system of ~7 and ~2 × 10(6) M(-1), respectively. These values vary among the individual techniques, and not all techniques are able to provide quantitative information. The present study demonstrates that accurately quantifying the association between nanoparticles and biological materials requires using multiple approaches to ensure consistency among the binding parameters determined.

  15. An Efficient Format for Nearly Constant-Time Access to Arbitrary Time Intervals in Large Trace Files

    DOE PAGES

    Chan, Anthony; Gropp, William; Lusk, Ewing

    2008-01-01

    A powerful method to aid in understanding the performance of parallel applications uses log or trace files containing time-stamped events and states (pairs of events). These trace files can be very large, often hundreds or even thousands of megabytes. Because of the cost of accessing and displaying such files, other methods are often used that reduce the size of the tracefiles at the cost of sacrificing detail or other information. This paper describes a hierarchical trace file format that provides for display of an arbitrary time window in a time independent of the total size of the file andmore » roughly proportional to the number of events within the time window. This format eliminates the need to sacrifice data to achieve a smaller trace file size (since storage is inexpensive, it is necessary only to make efficient use of bandwidth to that storage). The format can be used to organize a trace file or to create a separate file of annotations that may be used with conventional trace files. We present an analysis of the time to access all of the events relevant to an interval of time and we describe experiments demonstrating the performance of this file format.« less

  16. Crystal structures of complexes of NAD{sup +}-dependent formate dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 with formate

    SciTech Connect

    Filippova, E. V. Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Stekhanova, T. N.; Boiko, K. M.; Sadykhov, I. G.; Tishkov, V. I.; Popov, V. O.; Labru, N.

    2006-07-15

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 catalyzes oxidation of formate to NI{sub 2} with the coupled reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}). The three-dimensional structures of the apo form (the free enzyme) and the holo form (the ternary FDH-NAD{sup +}-azide complex) of FDH have been established earlier. In the present study, the structures of FDH complexes with formate are solved at 2.19 and 2.28 A resolution by the molecular replacement method and refined to the R factors of 22.3 and 20.5%, respectively. Both crystal structures contain four protein molecules per asymmetric unit. These molecules form two dimers identical to the dimer of the apo form of FDH. Two possible formatebinding sites are found in the active site of the FDH structure. In the complexes the sulfur atom of residue Cys354 exists in the oxidized state.

  17. Effects of chemical and enzymatic modifications on starch-linoleic acid complex formation.

    PubMed

    Arijaje, Emily Oluwaseun; Wang, Ya-Jane

    2017-02-15

    This study investigated the complexation yield and physicochemical properties of soluble and insoluble starch complexes with linoleic acid when a β-amylase treatment was applied to acetylated and debranched potato starch. The degree of acetylation was generally higher in the soluble complexes than in the insoluble ones. The insoluble complexes from the acetylated starch displayed the V-type pattern, whereas, the soluble complexes displayed a mixture of either the A-/V-type or the B-/V-type pattern. Acetylation decreased onset and peak melting temperatures for the insoluble complexes, whereas no melting endotherm was observed in the soluble complexes. Acetylation substantially increased the amount of complexed linoleic acid in the insoluble complexes, but had little positive effect on the formation of the soluble complexes. The β-amylase treatment significantly increased the complexed linoleic content in both soluble and insoluble complexes for the low acetylated starch, but not for the high acetylated starch.

  18. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  19. A spectrophotometric and thermodynamic study of the sitting-atop complex formation from reaction between free base meso-tetraarylporphyrins and zirconyl nitrate in chloroform solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Hossein; Mansournia, Mohammad Reza

    2009-10-01

    The sitting-atop complexation of meso-tetraarylporphyrins and its para-substituted derivatives (H 2t(4-X)pp, X:H, Br, Cl, CH(CH 3) 2, OCH 3, CH 3), as electron donors, with zirconyl, as an electron acceptor, have been investigated spectrophotometrically in chloroform. The mole ratio studies based on physicochemical techniques were employed clearly and revealed the formation of 1:1 sitting-atop complexes which was confirmed by UV-vis, 1H NMR and IR spectroscopic data. The value of the formation constant was estimated for each complex using a nonlinear optimization of the complex absorbance vs. mole ratio data by package KINFIT. The results showed that the stability of these complexes decreases with the temperature enhancement. Thermodynamic parameters, Δ G°, Δ H° and Δ S°, of the SAT complexes have been determined from the temperature dependence of formation constants by Van't Hoff equation. Also, the influence of the substituents of the aryl rings in H 2t(4-X)pp on the stability of the SAT complexes is discussed.

  20. Ab-Initio Based Computation of Rate Constants of Spin Forbidden Transitions in (Bio)inorganic Complexes and Metalloproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Rodriguez, Jorge H.

    2009-03-01

    Some (bio)chemical reactions are non-adiabatic processes whereby the total spin angular momentum, before and after the reaction, is not conserved. These are named spin- forbidden reactions. The application of spin density functional theory (SDFT) to the prediction of rate constants is a challenging task of fundamental and practical importance. We apply non-adiabatic transition state theory in conjunction with SDFT to predict the rate constant of the spin- forbidden dihydrogen binding to iron tetracarbonyl. To model the surface hopping probability between singlet and triplet states, the Landau-Zener formalism is used. The lowest energy point for singlet-triplet crossing, known as minimum energy crossing point (MECP), was located and used to compute, in a semi-quantum approach, reaction rate constants at 300 K. The predicted rates are in good agreement with experiment. In addition, we present results which are relevant to the ligand binding reactions of metalloproteins. This work is supported in part by NSF via CAREER award CHE-0349189 (JHR).

  1. Anglesite (PbSO 4) solubility in acetate solutions: The determination of stability constants for lead acetate complexes to 85°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Thomas H.

    1989-02-01

    Anglesite solubilities were determined at 25, 40, 55, 70, and 85°C in solutions with equal molal concentrations of acetic acid and sodium acetate (each ranging from 0.001 to 0.25 m) and at pH values near 4.6. Experiments were conducted using 1000 ml, externally heated glass reaction vessels, and lead concentrations were measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. For run conditions with free acetate concentrations less than about 0.01 m, measured a anglesite solubilities are less than or equal to 100 mg/l. Above free acetate concentrations of 0.01 m, measured anglesite solubilities rise sharply to concentrations near 1000 mg/l. Extracted from these solubility data, by a numerical successive linear extrapolation method, were stoichiometries and thermodynamic stability constants (ionic strength = 0) for the complexes Pb(CH 3COO) + and Pb(CH 3COO) 2. Log K1 and log K2 values for the formation reactions Pb + + CH 3COO - = PbCH 3COO + and Pb 2+ + 2CH 3COO - = Pb(CH 3COO) 2 respectively are log K1: (2.4±0.1, 25°C), (2.4±0.1, 40°C), (2.5±0.1, 55°C), (2.6±0.1, 70°C), (2.7±0.2, 85°C) and log K2: (3.4±0.4, 25°C), (3.6±0.2, 40°C), (3.8 ±0.2, 55°C), (4.0±0.2, 70°C), (4.3±0.2, 85°C). Lead hydrolysis was found to be significant in those experiments conducted at 70 and 85°C. However, hydrolyzed lead was not detected at 25, 40, and 55°C. PbOH + as percent of total observed lead ranged from 0.2 to 24% and 2 to 86% in those experiments at 70 and 85°C, respectively. Calculations of lead speciation in acetate solutions show that the equivalence point for PbCH 3COO + and Pb(CH 3COO) 2 shifts to lower acetate concentrations from 25 to 85°C. These speciation calculations also suggest that lead acetate complexes could be significant in high acetate formation waters. These waters typically contain at least 1,000 ppm acetate (0.017 molal as acetic acid). Furthermore, if these waters are not too acid and if concentrations of competing ligands are low, lead

  2. Effect of Solvent Dielectric Constant on the Formation of Large Flat Bilayer Stacks in a Lecithin/Hexadecanol Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yasuharu; Nakazawa, Hiromitsu; Kato, Satoru

    2016-07-12

    We investigated the effect of dielectric properties of the aqueous medium on the novel type of hydrogel composed of a crude lecithin mixture (PC70) and hexadecanol (HD), in which charged sheet-like bilayers are kept far apart due to interbilayer repulsive interaction. We used dipropylene glycol (DPG) as a modifier of the dielectric properties and examined its effect on the hydrogel by synchrotron X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarized optical microscopy, and freeze-fracture electron microscopy. We found that at a DPG weight fraction in the aqueous medium WDPG ≈ 0.4, the bilayer organization is transformed into unusually large flat bilayer stacks with a regular lamellar spacing of 6.25 nm and consequently disintegration of the hydrogel takes place. Semiquantitative calculation of the interbilayer interaction energy based on the Deyaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory suggested that the reduction of the aqueous medium dielectric constant ε by DPG may lower the energy barrier preventing flat bilayers from coming closer together. We inferred that the size of the bilayer sheet increases because the reduction of ε promotes protonation of acidic lipids that work as edge-capping molecules.

  3. The Formation and Thermochemical Properties of Multiligand Complexes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-25

    complexes, binary solvent systems, mass spectrometry, chemi- , .. luminescence, thermochemistry , kinetics V BSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and...Involving Sulfides and Phosphonates ...... I Thermochemistry of Multiligand Cluster Ions*..................... 6 II. BIBLIOGRAPHY...and to explore relationships with the thermochemistry of binary soutions in the condensed phase. The results of this research have formed the basis

  4. Dynamics of Research Team Formation in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Caihong; Wan, Yuzi; Chen, Yu

    Most organizations encourage the formation of teams to accomplish complicated tasks, and vice verse, effective teams could bring lots benefits and profits for organizations. Network structure plays an important role in forming teams. In this paper, we specifically study the dynamics of team formation in large research communities in which knowledge of individuals plays an important role on team performance and individual utility. An agent-based model is proposed, in which heterogeneous agents from research communities are described and empirically tested. Each agent has a knowledge endowment and a preference for both income and leisure. Agents provide a variable input (‘effort’) and their knowledge endowments to production. They could learn from others in their team and those who are not in their team but have private connections in community to adjust their own knowledge endowment. They are allowed to join other teams or work alone when it is welfare maximizing to do so. Various simulation experiments are conducted to examine the impacts of network topology, knowledge diffusion among community network, and team output sharing mechanisms on the dynamics of team formation.

  5. Constant Rate or Stepwise Injection of Cold Fluid into a Geologic Formation: A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Hosseini, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Operations such as CO2 geologic storage, enhanced geothermal systems, and wastewater injection are rendering fluid injection as important as fluid extraction. In particular, injecting fluid colder than the original fluid causes thermal contraction and ensuing decreases in stresses, which yield an effect opposite of what volume expansion driven by the fluid injection imposes. In this study, we conduct numerical simulations to investigate pore-pressure buildup, thermal diffusion, and stress changes for two conditions: (1) constant rate, and (2) stepwise injection of cold fluid. The numerical-simulation method—which combines fluid flow, poroelasticity, thermal diffusion, and thermal stress—is based on the single-phase flow condition to simplify a computation model and thus facilitate a focus on mechanical responses. We also examine temporal evolutions of stress states and mobilized friction angles across base, injection-zone, and caprock layers for two different stress regimes: normal-faulting and reverse-faulting. Under the normal-faulting stress regime, the maximum mobilized friction angle occurs inside of the injection zone, which may act to improve the stability of the caprock. Special attention is required, however, because the location of the maximum mobilized friction angle is close to interfaces with the caprock and base layers. The hypothetical stepwise injection of cold fluid is shown to improve the stability of the injection zone to some extent. Under the reverse-faulting stress regime, the maximum mobilized friction angle occurs near the middle of the injection zone; stability in the injection zone is enhanced while that in the caprock/base is aggravated with time. The hypothetical stepwise injection not only helps improve the stability of the injection zone but also delays the moment when the maximum friction angle is mobilized. Finally, we suggest using dimensionless parameters to determine a prevalence of the thermal-stress effect in the injection

  6. Kinetics and equilibria for the formation of a new DNA metal-intercalator: the cyclic polyamine Neotrien/copper(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Biver, Tarita; Secco, Fernando; Tinè, Maria Rosaria; Venturini, Marcella

    2004-01-01

    A study has been performed of the kinetics and equilibria involved in complex formation between the macrocyclic polyamine 2,5,8,11-tetraaza[12]-[12](2,9)[1,10]-phenanthrolinophane (Neotrien) and Cu(II) in acidic aqueous solution and ionic strength 0.5 M (NaCl), by means of the stopped-flow method and UV spectrophotometry. Spectrophotometric titrations and kinetic experiments revealed that the binding of Cu(II) to Neotrien gives rise to several 1:1 complexes differing in their degree of protonation. Under the experimental hydrogen ion concentration range investigated, complexation occurs by two parallel paths: (a) M2+ + (H4L)4+ <==> (MH4L)6+ and (b) M2+ + (H3L)3+ <==> (MH3L)5+. The rate constants values found for complex formation, by paths (a) and (b), are much lower than the values expected from water exchange at copper(II) and other amine/Cu(II) complexation kinetic constants. Kinetic experiments at different NaCl concentrations indicated that this finding was not due to chloride ion competition in complex formation with Neotrien, but it was related to a ring rigidity effect. As the phenanthroline moiety could, in principle, interact with nucleic acids by intercalation or external binding, some preliminary measurements concerned with the possible interactions occurring between the Cu(II)/Neotrien complex and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have also been carried out. The absorption spectra of the Cu(II)/Neotrien complex change upon addition of CT-DNA at pH 7.0, revealing the occurrence of complex-nucleic acid interactions. Moreover, fluorescence titrations, carried out by adding the Cu(II)/Neotrien complex to CT-DNA, previously saturated with ethidium bromide (EB), show that the Cu(II)/Neotrien complex is able to displace EB from DNA, suggesting the complex is able to intercalate into the polynucleotide and then to cleave the phosphodiester bond of DNA.

  7. Enhanced inhibition of bacterial biofilm formation and reduced leukocyte toxicity by chloramphenicol:β-cyclodextrin:N-acetylcysteine complex.

    PubMed

    Aiassa, Virginia; Zoppi, Ariana; Becerra, M Cecilia; Albesa, Inés; Longhi, Marcela R

    2016-11-05

    The purpose of this study was to improve the physicochemical and biological properties of chloramphenicol (CP) by multicomponent complexation with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). The present work describes the ability of solid multicomponent complex (MC) to decrease biomass and cellular activity of Staphylococcus by crystal violet and XTT assay, and leukocyte toxicity, measuring the increase of reactive oxygen species by chemiluminescence, and using 123-dihydrorhodamine. In addition, MC was prepared by the freeze-drying or physical mixture methods, and then characterized by scanning electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. Nuclear magnetic resonance and phase solubility studies provided information at the molecular level on the structure of the MC and its association binding constants, respectively. The results obtained allowed us to conclude that MC formation is an effective pharmaceutical strategy that can reduce CP toxicity against leukocytes, while enhancing its solubility and antibiofilm activity.

  8. Chemical physics behind formation of efficient charge-separated state for complexation between PC70BM and designed diporphyrin in solution.

    PubMed

    Ray, Anamika; Banerjee, Shrabanti; Ghosh, Shalini; Bauri, Ajoy K; Bhattacharya, Sumanta

    2016-01-05

    The present work reports supramolecular interaction of [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC70BM) with two designed diporphyrin molecules having dithiophene (1) and carbazole (2) spacer in solvent having varying polarity. Studies on complex formation reveal relatively higher binding constant for PC70BM/2 complex in all the solvent studied. Solvent dependence of charge separation and charge recombination processes in PC70BM/diporphyrin non-covalent complexes has been well established in present work. Donor-acceptor geometry and stabilization of the singlet excited state of the diporphyrin during charge recombination are considered to be the possible reasons for this behavior.

  9. Chemical complexity and star-formation in merging galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. A.; Heiderman, A.; Iono, D.; VIXENS Team

    2013-03-01

    When galaxies merge the resulting conditions are some of the most extreme found anywhere in nature. Large gas flows, shocks and active black holes all can affect the ISM. Nearby merging galaxies with strong starbursts are the only places where we can conduct detailed study of star formation in conditions that mimic those under which the majority of stars in the universe formed. Here we study molecular gas tracers in 8 galaxies selected from the VIRUS-P Investigation of the eXtreme ENvironments of Starbursts (VIXENS) survey. Each galaxy has also been observed using the integral field unit spectrograph VIRUS-P, allowing us to investigate the relation between the chemical state of the gas, star formation and total gas content. Full details can be found in Heiderman et al. (2011). Here we report on new results obtained from IRAM-30m/NRO-45m 3mm line surveys towards 14 positions in these 8 merging galaxies. We detect ≈ 25 different molecular transitions towards these objects, many which have never been observed in these galaxies before. Our measurements show that the mean fraction of dense gas increases in later-stage mergers (Fig. 1, left), as does the average optical depth of the gas. Molecular diagnostic diagrams (Fig. 1, right) show that molecular regions we probe are, in general, UV photon dominated. Triggered AGN activity, and/or cosmic ray ionisation (from SNe II in the starburst) are not yet energetically important in determining the state of the gas.

  10. Effect of pH on complex formation between debranched waxy rice starch and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Yotsawimonwat, Songwut; Sriroth, Klanarong; Kaewvichit, Sayam; Piyachomkwan, Kaukoon; Jane, Jay-Lin; Sirithunyalug, Jakkapan

    2008-08-15

    Complex formations between debranched waxy rice starch (DBS) and fatty acids (FA) of different hydrocarbon chain lengths (8:0, 10:0, 12:0, 14:0, 16:0, and 18:0) were studied in an aqueous solution by measuring the blue colour stained with iodine. The objective of this study was to understand the effects of the solubility and hydrophobicity of guest molecules (FA) on the complex formation with DBS. Lauric acid (12:0) displayed the greatest complex forming ability with DBS by showing the least blue colour developed with iodine. The effect of pH (3-7) on the DBS/FA complex formation was evaluated by measuring the iodine-scanning spectra of the mixture. Short-chain FA (8:0) displayed less complex formation at pH>or=5, above the pK(a) of fatty acid (approximately 4.8), which suggested that the charge formation of the short-chain FA caused a lower partitioning of the FA into the hydrophobic cavity of the DBS single helix. On the contrary, FA of 10:0-18:0 displayed an increased complex formation at pH>5, which could be attributed to increased solubility of these longer-chain FA at a dissociated and ionized form. The hydrocarbon chain length of the FA had an important impact on the extent of the complex formation. A FA that had a shorter hydrocarbon chain was more soluble in an aqueous solution and more readily formed a complex with DBS. At pH 6 and 7 (above the pK(a)), 10:0 formed less inclusion complexes with DBS than did 12:0. Iodine-scanning spectra showed that the absorbances of all iodine-stained DBS/FA solutions at higher wavelength were substantially lower than that of the iodine-stained DBS alone, suggesting that FA preferentially formed inclusion complexes with DBS of longer chains.

  11. Module Based Complexity Formation: Periodic Patterning in Feathers and Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Yeh, Chao-Yuan; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Patterns describe order which emerges from homogeneity. Complex patterns on the integument are striking because of their visibility throughout an organism's lifespan. Periodic patterning is an effective design because the ensemble of hair or feather follicles (modules) allows the generation of complexity, including regional variations and cyclic regeneration, giving the skin appendages a new lease on life. Spatial patterns include the arrangements of feathers and hairs in specified number, size, and spacing. We explore how a field of equivalent progenitor cells can generate periodically arranged modules based on genetic information, physical-chemical rules and developmental timing. Reconstitution experiments suggest a competitive equilibrium regulated by activators / inhibitors involving Turing reaction-diffusion. Temporal patterns result from oscillating stem cell activities within each module (micro-environment regulation), reflected as growth (anagen) and resting (telogen) phases during the cycling of feather and hair follicles. Stimulating modules with activators initiates the spread of regenerative hair waves, while global inhibitors outside each module (macro-environment) prevent this. Different wave patterns can be simulated by Cellular Automata principles. Hormonal status and seasonal changes can modulate appendage phenotypes, leading to “organ metamorphosis”, with multiple ectodermal organ phenotypes generated from the same precursors. We discuss potential evolutionary novel steps using this module based complexity in several amniote integument organs, exemplified by the spectacular peacock feather pattern. We thus explore the application of the acquired knowledge of patterning in tissue engineering. New hair follicles can be generated after wounding. Hairs and feathers can be reconstituted through self-organization of dissociated progenitor cells. PMID:23539312

  12. The formation and study of titanium, zirconium, and hafnium complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Bobby; Sarin, Sam; Smith, Laverne; Wilson, Melanie

    1989-01-01

    Research involves the preparation and characterization of a series of Ti, Zr, Hf, TiO, and HfO complexes using the poly(pyrazole) borates as ligands. The study will provide increased understanding of the decomposition of these coordination compounds which may lead to the production of molecular oxygen on the Moon from lunar materials such as ilmenite and rutile. The model compounds are investigated under reducing conditions of molecular hydrogen by use of a high temperature/pressure stainless steel autoclave reactor and by thermogravimetric analysis.

  13. Direct measurements of the total rate constant of the reaction NCN + H and implications for the product branching ratio and the enthalpy of formation of NCN.

    PubMed

    Fassheber, Nancy; Dammeier, Johannes; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2014-06-21

    The overall rate constant of the reaction (2), NCN + H, which plays a key role in prompt-NO formation in flames, has been directly measured at temperatures 962 K < T < 2425 K behind shock waves. NCN radicals and H atoms were generated by the thermal decomposition of NCN3 and C2H5I, respectively. NCN concentration-time profiles were measured by sensitive narrow-line-width laser absorption at a wavelength of λ = 329.1302 nm. The obtained rate constants are best represented by the combination of two Arrhenius expressions, k2/(cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) = 3.49 × 10(14) exp(-33.3 kJ mol(-1)/RT) + 1.07 × 10(13) exp(+10.0 kJ mol(-1)/RT), with a small uncertainty of ±20% at T = 1600 K and ±30% at the upper and lower experimental temperature limits.The two Arrhenius terms basically can be attributed to the contributions of reaction channel (2a) yielding CH + N2 and channel (2b) yielding HCN + N as the products. A more refined analysis taking into account experimental and theoretical literature data provided a consistent rate constant set for k2a, its reverse reaction k1a (CH + N2 → NCN + H), k2b as well as a value for the controversial enthalpy of formation of NCN, ΔfH = 450 kJ mol(-1). The analysis verifies the expected strong temperature dependence of the branching fraction ϕ = k2b/k2 with reaction channel (2b) dominating at the experimental high-temperature limit. In contrast, reaction (2a) dominates at the low-temperature limit with a possible minor contribution of the HNCN forming recombination channel (2d) at T < 1150 K.

  14. Formation of Au and tetrapyridyl porphyrin complexes in superfluid helium.

    PubMed

    Feng, Cheng; Latimer, Elspeth; Spence, Daniel; Al Hindawi, Aula M A A; Bullen, Shem; Boatwright, Adrian; Ellis, Andrew M; Yang, Shengfu

    2015-07-14

    Binary clusters containing a large organic molecule and metal atoms have been formed by the co-addition of 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin (H2TPyP) molecules and gold atoms to superfluid helium nanodroplets, and the resulting complexes were then investigated by electron impact mass spectrometry. In addition to the parent ion H2TPyP yields fragments mainly from pyrrole, pyridine and methylpyridine ions because of the stability of their ring structures. When Au is co-added to the droplets the mass spectra are dominated by H2TPyP fragment ions with one or more Au atoms attached. We also show that by switching the order in which Au and H2TPyP are added to the helium droplets, different types of H2TPyP-Au complexes are clearly evident from the mass spectra. This study suggests a new route for the control over the growth of metal-organic compounds inside superfluid helium nanodroplets.

  15. Flow induced streamer formation in particle laden complex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Nandini; Hassanpourfard, Mahtab; Ghosh, Ranajay; Trivedi, Japan; Thundat, Thomas; Kumar, Aloke

    2016-11-01

    We study the combined flow of a polyacrylamide (PAM)solution with polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles, through a microfluidic device containing an array of micropillars. The flow is characterized by a very low Reynolds number (Re<<1). We find that for exceeding a critical Weissenberg number (Wi >= 20), PS nanoparticles localize near pillar walls to form thin slender string-like structures, which we call 'streamers' due to their morphology. Post-formation, these streamers show significant viscous behavior for short observational time-scales, and at longer observational time scales elastic response dominates. Our abiotic streamers could provide a framework for understanding similar structures that often form in biological systems. PhD student, Department of Mechanical Engineering.

  16. Subcellular location for the formation of the retinol/retinol-binding protein complex in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Crumbaugh, L.M.; Green, E.L.; Smith, J.E.

    1986-03-01

    Retinol complexes with retinol-binding protein (RBP) within the hepatocyte, however the subcellular location where complex formation occurs has not previously been identified. A model similar to that of lipoproteins formation has been hypothesized. The authors have identified the initial site of retinol/RBP complex formation. Furthermore, the authors have elucidated the progression of the complex through the subcellular organelles. Intravenous injections of /sup 3/H-retinol suspended in Tween 40 were administered to vitamin A depleted rats. After intervals of 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 minutes the rat livers were removed and fractions enriched in rough and smooth microsomes and Golgi apparatus were prepared. Extracts of these subcellular fractions were chromatographed on Sephadex G-100. Simultaneous elution of /sup 3/H-retinol and immunoreactive RBP indicated the presence of the complex. The retinol/RBP complex was observed in rough microsomes 2 minute after the injection of /sup 3/H-retinal. The complex appeared subsequently in smooth microsomes and Golgi apparatus. The complex was first detected serum around 10 minutes after injection. Based on the data, they believe that the retinol/RBP complex formation occurs in rough microsomes.

  17. Carbon–heteroatom bond formation catalysed by organometallic complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, John F.

    2010-01-01

    At one time the synthetic chemist’s last resort, reactions catalysed by transition metals are now the preferred method for synthesizing many types of organic molecule. A recent success in this type of catalysis is the discovery of reactions that form bonds between carbon and heteroatoms (such as nitrogen, oxygen, sulphur, silicon and boron) via complexes of transition metals with amides, alkoxides, thiolates, silyl groups or boryl groups. The development of these catalytic processes has been supported by the discovery of new elementary reactions that occur at metal–heteroatom bonds and by the identification of factors that control these reactions. Together, these findings have led to new synthetic processes that are in daily use and have formed a foundation for the development of processes that are likely to be central to synthetic chemistry in the future. PMID:18800130

  18. Formation of ethylene glycol and other complex organic molecules in star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Beltrán, M. T.; Cesaroni, R.; Fontani, F.; Codella, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The detection of complex organic molecules related with prebiotic chemistry in star-forming regions allows us to investigate how the basic building blocks of life are formed. Aims: Ethylene glycol (CH2OH)2 is the simplest sugar alcohol and the reduced alcohol of the simplest sugar glycoladehyde (CH2OHCHO). We study the molecular abundance and spatial distribution of (CH2OH)2, CH2OHCHO and other chemically related complex organic species (CH3OCHO, CH3OCH3, and C2H5OH) towards the chemically rich massive star-forming region G31.41+0.31. Methods: We analyzed multiple single-dish (Green Bank Telescope and IRAM 30 m) and interferometric (Submillimeter Array) spectra towards G31.41+0.31, covering a range of frequencies from 45 to 258 GHz. We fitted the observed spectra with a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) synthetic spectra, and obtained excitation temperatures and column densities. We compared our findings in G31.41+0.31 with the results found in other environments, including low- and high-mass star-forming regions, quiescent clouds and comets. Results: We report for the first time the presence of the aGg' conformer of (CH2OH)2 towards G31.41+0.31, detecting more than 30 unblended lines. We also detected multiple transitions of other complex organic molecules such as CH2OHCHO, CH3OCHO, CH3OCH3, and C2H5OH. The high angular resolution images show that the (CH2OH)2 emission is very compact, peaking towards the maximum of the 1.3 mm continuum. These observations suggest that low abundance complex organic molecules, like (CH2OH)2 or CH2OHCHO, are good probes of the gas located closer to the forming stars. Our analysis confirms that (CH2OH)2 is more abundant than CH2OHCHO in G31.41+0.31, as previously observed in other interstellar regions. Comparing different star-forming regions we find evidence of an increase of the (CH2OH)2/CH2OHCHO abundance ratio with the luminosity of the source. The CH3OCH3/CH3OCHO and (CH2OH)2/C2H5OH ratios are nearly constant with

  19. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; ...

    2016-01-12

    Here, we report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10^ 8 to 10^ 4 Torr (dosage up to 10^6 langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au CO complex formation and diffusion, and Aumore » adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au CO complex result from the reduced Au Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO +) on Au. These studies indicate that the mobile Au CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers.« less

  20. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Maksymovych, Petro; Yates, Jr, John T.

    2016-01-12

    Here, we report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10^ 8 to 10^ 4 Torr (dosage up to 10^6 langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au CO complex formation and diffusion, and Au adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au CO complex result from the reduced Au Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO +) on Au. These studies indicate that the mobile Au CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers.

  1. Zero-point corrections and temperature dependence of HD spin-spin coupling constants of heavy metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes calculated by vibrational averaging.

    PubMed

    Mort, Brendan C; Autschbach, Jochen

    2006-08-09

    Vibrational corrections (zero-point and temperature dependent) of the H-D spin-spin coupling constant J(HD) for six transition metal hydride and dihydrogen complexes have been computed from a vibrational average of J(HD) as a function of temperature. Effective (vibrationally averaged) H-D distances have also been determined. The very strong temperature dependence of J(HD) for one of the complexes, [Ir(dmpm)Cp*H2]2 + (dmpm = bis(dimethylphosphino)methane) can be modeled simply by the Boltzmann average of the zero-point vibrationally averaged JHD of two isomers. For this complex and four others, the vibrational corrections to JHD are shown to be highly significant and lead to improved agreement between theory and experiment in most cases. The zero-point vibrational correction is important for all complexes. Depending on the shape of the potential energy and J-coupling surfaces, for some of the complexes higher vibrationally excited states can also contribute to the vibrational corrections at temperatures above 0 K and lead to a temperature dependence. We identify different classes of complexes where a significant temperature dependence of J(HD) may or may not occur for different reasons. A method is outlined by which the temperature dependence of the HD spin-spin coupling constant can be determined with standard quantum chemistry software. Comparisons are made with experimental data and previously calculated values where applicable. We also discuss an example where a low-order expansion around the minimum of a complicated potential energy surface appears not to be sufficient for reproducing the experimentally observed temperature dependence.

  2. Complex Formation History of Highly Evolved Basaltic Shergottite, Zagami

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niihara, T.; Misawa, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Park, J.; Hirata, D.

    2012-01-01

    Zagami, a basaltic shergottite, contains several kinds of lithologies such as Normal Zagami consisting of Fine-grained (FG) and Coarse-grained (CG), Dark Mottled lithology (DML), and Olivine-rich late-stage melt pocket (DN). Treiman and Sutton concluded that Zagami (Normal Zagami) is a fractional crystallization product from a single magma. It has been suggested that there were two igneous stages (deep magma chamber and shallow magma chamber or surface lava flow) on the basis of chemical zoning features of pyroxenes which have homogeneous Mg-rich cores and FeO, CaO zoning at the rims. Nyquist et al. reported that FG has a different initial Sr isotopic ratio than CG and DML, and suggested the possibility of magma mixing on Mars. Here we report new results of petrology and mineralogy for DML and the Olivine-rich lithology (we do not use DN here), the most evolved lithology in this rock, to understand the relationship among lithologies and reveal Zagami s formation history

  3. Microbanded manganese formations; protoliths in the Franciscan Complex, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huebner, J. Stephen; Flohr, Marta J.

    1990-01-01

    The Buckeye manganese deposit, 93 km southeast of San Francisco in the California Coast Ranges, preserves a geologic history that provides clues to the origin of numerous lenses of manganese carbonate, oxides, and silicates that occur with interbedded radiolarian chert and metashale of the Franciscan Complex. Compositionally and mineralogically laminated Mn-rich protoliths were deformed and dismembered, in a manner that mimics in smaller scale the deformation of the host complex, and then were incipiently metamorphosed at blueschistfacies conditions. Eight phases occur as almost monomineralic protoliths and mixtures: rhodochrosite, caryopilite, chlorite, gageite, taneyamalite, braunite, hausmannite, and laminated chert (quartz). Braunite, gageite, and some chlorite and caryopilite layers were deposited as gel-like materials; rhodochrosite, most caryopilite, and at least some hausmannite layers as lutites; and the chert as turbidites of radiolarian sand. Some gel-like materials are now preserved as transparent, sensibly isotropic relics of materials that fractured or shattered when deformed, creating curved surfaces. In contrast, the micrites flowed between the fragments of gel-like materials. The orebody and most of its constituent minerals have unusually Mn-rich compositions that are described by the system MnO-SiO2-O2-CO2-H2O. High values of Mn/Fe and U/Th, and low concentrations of Co, Cu, and Ni, distinguish the Buckeye deposit from many high-temperature hydrothermal deposits and hydrogenous or diagenetic manganese and ferromanganese nodules and pavements. This chemical signature suggests that ore deposition was related to fluids from the sediment column and seawater. Tungsten is associated exclusively with gageite, in concentrations as high as 80 parts per million. The source of the manganese is unknown; because basalts do not occur near the deposit, it was probably manganese leached from the sediment column by reducing solutions. Low concentrations of calcium

  4. Smog chamber experiments to investigate Henry's law constants of glyoxal using different seed aerosols as well as imidazole formation in the presence of ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Ronit

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere. Hence, they have a direct as well as an indirect impact on the earth's climate. Depending on their formation, one distinguishes between primary and secondary aerosols[1]. Important groups within the secondary aerosols are the secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). In order to improve predictions about these impacts on the earth's climate the existing models need to be optimized, because they still underestimate SOA formation[2]. Glyoxal, the smallest α-dicarbonyl, not only acts as a tracer for SOA formation but also as a direct contributor to SOA. Because glyoxal has such a high vapour pressure, it was common knowledge that it does not take part in gas-particle partitioning and therefore has no impact on direct SOA formation. However, the Henry's law constant for glyoxal is surprisingly high. This has been explained by the hydration of the aldehyde groups, which means that a species with a lower vapour pressure is produced. Therefore the distribution of glyoxal between gas- and particle phase is atmospherically relevant and the direct contribution of glyoxal to SOA can no longer be neglected[3]. Besides this particulate glyoxal is able to undergo heterogeneous chemistry with gaseous ammonia to form imidazoles. This plays an important role for regions with aerosols exhibiting alkaline pH values for example from lifestock or soil dust because imidazoles as nitrogen containing compounds change the optical properties of aerosols[4]. A high salt concentration present in chamber seed aerosols leads to an enhanced glyoxal uptake into the particle. This effect is called "salting-in". The salting effect depends on the composition of the seed aerosol as well as the soluble compound. For very polar compounds, like glyoxal, a "salting-in" is observed[3]. Glyoxal particle formation during a smog chamber campaign at Paul-Scherrer-Institut (PSI) in Switzerland was examined using different seed aerosols

  5. An illustration of the complexity of continent formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    It was pointed out that a consensus may be emerging in crustal growth models, considering the clustering of most growth curves and their uncertainties. Curves most distant from this clustering represent models involving extensive recycling of continental material back into the mantle, but the author wondered if geochemical signatures for this would be recognizable considering the lack of evidence from seismic tomography for discrete mantle reservoirs, and the likelihood of core-mantle interaction based on recent high pressure experiments. Unreactivated Archean rocks represent only 2 percent of present continental area, and the author was uncomfortable about basing inferences on what the early Earth was like on such a small amount of information. He feels that the hypothesis of continental assembly that needs testing is that of banging together of island arcs, such as in Indonesia today. As an example of how complex this process can be, the author described the geology of the Caribbean arc system, which shows evidence for reversals of subduction polarity, numerous collisional events, and substantial strike-slip movements. It seemed unlikely to the author that Archean examples would have been less complicated.

  6. Factors leading to the formation of arc cloud complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welshinger, Mark John; Brundidge, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 12 mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) were investigated. The duration of the gust front, produced by each MCS, was used to classify the MCSs. Category 1 MCSs were defined as ones that produced a gust front and the gust front lasted for more than 6 h. There were 7 category 1 MCSs in the sample. Category 2 MCSs were defined as ones that produced a gust front and the gust front lasted for 6 h or less. There were 4 category 2 MCSs. The MCS of Case 12 was not categorized because the precipitation characteristics were similar to a squall line, rather than an MCS. All of the category 1 MCSs produced arc cloud complexes (ACCs), while only one of the category 2 MCSs produced an ACC. To determine if there were any differences in the characteristics between the MCSs of the two categories, composite analyses were accomplished. The analyses showed that there were significant differences in the characteristics of category 1 and 2 MCSs. Category 1 MCSs, on average, had higher thunderstorm heights, greater precipitation intensities, colder cloud top temperatures and produced larger magnitudes of surface divergence than category 2 MCSs.

  7. Oxidative peptide /and amide/ formation from Schiff base complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strehler, B. L.; Li, M. P.; Martin, K.; Fliss, H.; Schmid, P.

    1982-01-01

    One hypothesis of the origin of pre-modern forms of life is that the original replicating molecules were specific polypeptides which acted as templates for the assembly of poly-Schiff bases complementary to the template, and that these polymers were then oxidized to peptide linkages, probably by photo-produced oxidants. A double cycle of such anti-parallel complementary replication would yield the original peptide polymer. If this model were valid, the Schiff base between an N-acyl alpha mino aldehyde and an amino acid should yield a dipeptide in aqueous solution in the presence of an appropriate oxidant. In the present study it is shown that the substituted dipeptide, N-acetyl-tyrosyl-tyrosine, is produced in high yield in aqueous solution at pH 9 through the action of H2O2 on the Schiff-base complex between N-acetyl-tyrosinal and tyrosine and that a great variety of N-acyl amino acids are formed from amino acids and aliphatic aldehydes under similar conditions.

  8. Interferogram formation in the presence of complex and large deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yun, S.-H.; Zebker, H.; Segall, P.; Hooper, A.; Poland, M.

    2007-01-01

    Sierra Negra volcano in Isabela island, Gala??pagos, erupted from October 22 to October 30 in 2005. During the 8 days of eruption, the center of Sierra Negra's caldera subsided about 5.4 meters. Three hours prior to the onset of the eruption, an earthquake (Mw 5.4) occurred, near the caldera. Because of the large and complex phase gradient due to the huge subsidence and the earthquake, it is difficult to form an interferogram inside the caldera that spans the eruption. The deformation is so large and spatially variable that the approximations used in existing InSAR software (ROI, ROI_PAC, DORIS, GAMMA) cannot properly coregister SAR image pairs spanning the eruption. We have developed here a two-step algorithm that can form intra-caldera interferograms from these data. The first step involves a "rubber-sheeting" SAR image coregistration. In the second step we use range offset estimates to mitigate the steep phase gradient. Using this new algorithm, we retrieve an interferogram with the best coverage to date inside the caldera of Sierra Negra. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Structure of soybean serine acetyltransferase and formation of the cysteine regulatory complex as a molecular chaperone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochem...

  10. Effect of Solvent Dielectric Constant and Acidity on the OH Vibration Frequency in Hydrogen-Bonded Complexes of Fluorinated Ethanols.

    PubMed

    Pines, Dina; Keinan, Sharon; Kiefer, Philip M; Hynes, James T; Pines, Ehud

    2015-07-23

    Infrared spectroscopy measurements were used to characterize the OH stretching vibrations in a series of similarly structured fluoroethanols, RCH2OH (R = CH3, CH2F, CHF2, CF3), a series which exhibits a systematic increase in the molecule acidity with increasing number of F atoms. This study, which expands our earlier efforts, was carried out in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents comprising molecules with and without a permanent dipole moment, with the former solvents being classified as polar solvents and the latter designated as nonpolar. The hydrogen bond interaction in donor-acceptor complexes formed in solution between the fluorinated ethanol H-donors and the H-acceptor base DMSO was investigated in relation to the solvent dielectric and to the differences ΔPA of the gas phase proton affinities (PAs) of the conjugate base of the fluorinated alcohols and DMSO. We have observed that νOH decreases as the acidity of the alcohol increases (ΔPA decreases) and that νOH varies inversely with ε, exhibiting different slopes for nonpolar and polar solvents. These 1/ε slopes tend to vary linearly with ΔPA, increasing with increasing acidity. These experimental findings, including the ΔPA trends, are described with our recently published two-state Valence Bond-based theory for acid-base H-bonded complexes. Lastly, the correlation of the alcohol's conjugate base PAs with Taft σ* values of the fluorinated ethyl groups CH(n)F(3-n)CH2- provides a connection of the inductive effects for these groups with the acidity parameter ΔPA associated with the H-bonded complexes.

  11. Relativistic effect on enthalpy of formation for transition-metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Yuya; Seino, Junji; Nakai, Hiromi

    2017-04-01

    This Letter examines the enthalpy of formation for 12 transition metal diatomic molecules and 23 transition metal complexes from the viewpoint of effect of the relativistic effect by using the infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess method with the local unitary transformation and three types of pseudopotentials for several levels of theory. The spin-orbit effect contribution to the enthalpy of formation is more than 10 kcal/mol for third transition metal complexes. Frozen orbital approximation at the outermost orbitals in pseudopotential methods shows a contribution to the enthalpy of formation that is more than two times larger than those of inner core orbitals.

  12. Are Fundamental Constants Really Constant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Dirac's classical conclusions, that the values of e2, M and m are constants and the quantity of G decreases with time. Evoked considerable interest among researchers and traces historical development by which further experimental evidence points out that both e and G are constant values. (PS)

  13. The chitosan-gelatin (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation in an acidic medium.

    PubMed

    Voron'ko, Nicolay G; Derkach, Svetlana R; Kuchina, Yuliya A; Sokolan, Nina I

    2016-03-15

    The interaction of cationic polysaccharide chitosan and gelatin accompanied by the stoichiometric (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation has been studied by the methods of capillary viscometry, UV and FTIR spectroscopy and dispersion of light scattering. Complexes were formed in the aqueous phase, with pH being less than the isoelectric point of gelatin (pIgel). The particle size of the disperse phase increases along with the growth of the relative viscosity in comparison with sols of the individual components-polysaccharide and gelatin. Possible models and mechanism of (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation have been discussed. It was shown that the complex formation takes place not only due to the hydrogen bonds, but also due to the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged amino-groups of chitosan and negatively charged amino acid residues (glutamic Glu and aspartic Asp acids) of gelatin.

  14. [Contribution of enthalpy to the energetics of complex formation of aromatic ligands with DNA].

    PubMed

    Kostiukov, V V; Khomutova, N M; Evstigneev, M P

    2011-01-01

    The energy contributions of electrostatic, van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonds, and interactions of charge transfer type to the enthalpy of complex formation of the double-stand DNA with the antitumor antibiotics daunomycin, nogalamycin, and novantron, as well as the mutagens ethidium bromide and proflavine have been calculated. According to the calculations, the van der Waals component (except for nogalamycin) is energetically favorable during complex formation of the antibiotics with DNA, and the contributions of H bonds and electrostatic interactions are unfavorable, with the probability of charge transfer in the complexes being low. It has been shown that the relatively low value of the experimental enthalpy of binding is the sum of components greater in absolute value and different in the sign, which is the cause of large errors in estimating the total enthalpy of complex formation of aromatic ligands with DNA.

  15. Rate constants of atomic hydrogen formation in H3O+(H2O) n + e → H + (H2O) n gas-phase processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, N. F.; Novakovskaya, Yu. V.

    2009-09-01

    Using the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and the Breit-Wigner approximation of the reaction cross section, the kinetic parameters of the hydrogen atom formation upon the electron capture by positively charged hydronium-water clusters are estimated. Calculations of the cross sections and rate constants are based on the data of quantum chemical studies of H3O+(H2O) n and H3O(H2O) n clusters, particularly on the detailed analysis of the spacing of high-lying states of the radicals and the character of the unpaired electron density distribution, as well as on the general trend in the electron affinity change of the cations depending on the number of water molecules. The lifetimes of the radicals before the dissociation are taken from the classical nonempirical molecular dynamics runs. The results are compared to available experimental data.

  16. Suilysin-induced Platelet-Neutrophil Complexes Formation is Triggered by Pore Formation-dependent Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengwei; Zheng, Yuling; Chen, Shaolong; Huang, Shujing; Liu, Keke; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Yongqiang; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation and platelet–neutrophil interactions have been found to be involved in inflammation, organ failure and soft-tissue necrosis in bacterial infections. Streptococcus suis, an emerging human pathogen, can cause streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome (STSS) similarly to Streptococcus pyogenes. Currently, S. suis–platelet interactions are poorly understood. Here, we found that suilysin (SLY), the S. suis cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC), was the sole stimulus of S. suis that induced platelet-neutrophil complexes (PNC) formation. Furthermore, P-selectin released in α-granules mediated PNC formation. This process was triggered by the SLY-induced pore forming-dependent Ca2+ influx. Moreover, we demonstrated that the Ca2+ influx triggered an MLCK-dependent pathway playing critical roles in P-selectin activation and PNC formation, however, PLC-β-IP3/DAG-MLCK and Rho-ROCK-MLCK signalling were not involved. Additionally, the “outside-in” signalling had a smaller effect on the SLY-induced P-selectin release and PNC formation. Interestingly, other CDCs including pneumolysin and streptolysin O have also been found to induce PNC formation in a pore forming-dependent Ca2+ influx manner. It is possible that the bacterial CDC-mediated PNC formation is a similar response mechanism used by a wide range of bacteria. These findings may provide useful insight for discovering potential therapeutic targets for S. suis-associated STSS. PMID:27830834

  17. Determination by NMR of the binding constant for the molecular complex between alprostadil and alpha-cyclodextrin. Implications for a freeze-dried formulation.

    PubMed

    Ramstad, Tore; Hadden, Chad E; Martin, Gary E; Speaker, Stanley M; Teagarden, Dirk L; Thamann, Thomas J

    2005-05-30

    A binding constant was determined for the complexation reaction between alprostadil (PGE1) and alpha-cyclodextrin (alpha-CD). This constant was used to calculate the fraction PGE1 free upon reconstitution of Caverject dual chamber syringe, indicated for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. The determination was based on the measurement of the chemical shift of the C20 methyl protons of PGE1. The observed chemical shift varies as a linear function of the amount of PGE1 bound. The binding constant was obtained from the binding isotherm, a curve of the observed chemical shift versus free ligand (alpha-CD) concentration, through the application of non-linear regression analysis. A value K11 = 966 M(-1) +/- 130 M(-1) (2s), measured at 27 degrees C, was obtained. This value is in good agreement with those reported in the literature. The percent PGE1 free was subsequently calculated for the reconstituted solution and in the corpora cavernosum after injection. The latter showed PGE1 to be delivered essentially quantitatively to the targeted site.

  18. Investigation of cu-BTA complex formation during Cu chemical mechanical planarization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byoung-Jun; Shima, Shohei; Hamada, Satomi; Park, Jin-Goo

    2016-10-01

    The effect of Cu surface conditions on Cu-BTA complex formation was investigated using contact angle, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and XPS measurements which is of interest to Cu Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) process. During Cu CMP process BTA is widely used as a corrosion inhibitor, reacts with Cu and forms a strong Cu-BTA complex. Thus, it is very essential to remove Cu-BTA complex during post-Cu CMP cleaning process as Cu-BTA complex causes severe problems such as particle contamination and watermark due to its hydrophobic nature. In this report, the Cu-BTA complex formation at various Cu surfaces (as received, pure Cu and Cu oxide) was investigated in order to understand its adsorption reaction and develop effective post-Cu CMP cleaning process.

  19. Electrochemical detection of oligopeptides through the precolumn formation of biuret complexes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, H Y; Weber, S G

    1991-04-12

    The relatively slow kinetics of formation of the electroactive Cu(II)-peptide complexes from larger (greater than 6 amino acids) peptides requires relatively high temperature and long reaction times for a postcolumn reactor. The precolumn incubation of bradykinin, Tyr8-bradykinin and insulin A chain with biuret reagent for 20 min at 60 degrees C leads to the formation of biuret complexes which can be subjected to chromatography in acidic or basic eluents. These complexes are detected electrochemically with a sensitivity similar to the Cu(II)-(ala)3 complex (1 nC/pmol at 1.0 ml/min). The influence of the column-packing material on the electrochemical detector response of the Cu-peptide complexes has also been studied.

  20. Inhibitory effects of NAMI-A-like ruthenium complexes on prion neuropeptide fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; He, Lei; Du, Weihong

    2015-05-01

    Prion diseases are a group of infectious and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by the conformational conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP) into its abnormal isoform PrP(Sc). PrP106-126 resembles PrP(Sc) in terms of physicochemical and biological characteristics and is used as a common model for the treatment of prion diseases. Inhibitory effects on fibril formation and neurotoxicity of the prion neuropeptide PrP106-126 have been investigated using metal complexes as potential inhibitors. Nevertheless, the binding mechanism between metal complexes and the peptide remains unclear. The present study is focused on the interaction of PrP106-126 with NAMI-A and NAMI-A-like ruthenium complexes, including KP418, KP1019, and KP1019-2. Results demonstrated that these ruthenium complexes could bind to PrP106-126 in a distinctive binding mode through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. NAMI-A-like ruthenium complexes can also effectively inhibit the aggregation and fibril formation of PrP106-126. The complex KP1019 demonstrated the optimal inhibitory ability upon peptide aggregation, and cytotoxicity because of its large aromatic ligand contribution. The studied complexes could also regulate the copper redox chemistry of PrP106-126 and effectually inhibit the formation of reactive oxygen species. Given these findings, ruthenium complexes with relatively low cellular toxicity may be used to develop potential pharmaceutical products against prion diseases.

  1. A Comparative Analysis of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Model Predictions for Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and Mixing with Constant and Complex Accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Oleg

    2016-11-01

    Two-, three- and four-equation, single-velocity, multicomponent Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models, based on the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate or lengthscale, are used to simulate At = 0 . 5 Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing with constant and complex accelerations. The constant acceleration case is inspired by the Cabot and Cook (2006) DNS, and the complex acceleration cases are inspired by the unstable/stable and unstable/neutral cases simulated using DNS (Livescu, Wei & Petersen 2011) and the unstable/stable/unstable case simulated using ILES (Ramaprabhu, Karkhanis & Lawrie 2013). The four-equation models couple equations for the mass flux a and negative density-specific volume correlation b to the K- ɛ or K- L equations, while the three-equation models use a two-fluid algebraic closure for b. The lengthscale-based models are also applied with no buoyancy production in the L equation to explore the consequences of neglecting this term. Predicted mixing widths, turbulence statistics, fields, and turbulent transport equation budgets are compared among these models to identify similarities and differences in the turbulence production, dissipation and diffusion physics represented by the closures used in these models. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. SEPALLATA3: the 'glue' for MADS box transcription factor complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Immink, Richard GH; Tonaco, Isabella AN; de Folter, Stefan; Shchennikova, Anna; van Dijk, Aalt DJ; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; Borst, Jan W; Angenent, Gerco C

    2009-01-01

    Background Plant MADS box proteins play important roles in a plethora of developmental processes. In order to regulate specific sets of target genes, MADS box proteins dimerize and are thought to assemble into multimeric complexes. In this study a large-scale yeast three-hybrid screen is utilized to provide insight into the higher-order complex formation capacity of the Arabidopsis MADS box family. SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) has been shown to mediate complex formation and, therefore, special attention is paid to this factor in this study. Results In total, 106 multimeric complexes were identified; in more than half of these at least one SEP protein was present. Besides the known complexes involved in determining floral organ identity, various complexes consisting of combinations of proteins known to play a role in floral organ identity specification, and flowering time determination were discovered. The capacity to form this latter type of complex suggests that homeotic factors play essential roles in down-regulation of the MADS box genes involved in floral timing in the flower via negative auto-regulatory loops. Furthermore, various novel complexes were identified that may be important for the direct regulation of the floral transition process. A subsequent detailed analysis of the APETALA3, PISTILLATA, and SEP3 proteins in living plant cells suggests the formation of a multimeric complex in vivo. Conclusions Overall, these results provide strong indications that higher-order complex formation is a general and essential molecular mechanism for plant MADS box protein functioning and attribute a pivotal role to the SEP3 'glue' protein in mediating multimerization. PMID:19243611

  3. Determination of equilibrium constant of amino carbamate adduct formation in sisomicin by a high pH based high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wlasichuk, Kenneth B; Tan, Li; Guo, Yushen; Hildebrandt, Darin J; Zhang, Hao; Karr, Dane E; Schmidt, Donald E

    2015-01-01

    Amino carbamate adduct formation from the amino group of an aminoglycoside and carbon dioxide has been postulated as a mechanism for reducing nephrotoxicity in the aminoglycoside class compounds. In this study, sisomicin was used as a model compound for amino carbamate analysis. A high pH based reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method is used to separate the amino carbamate from sisomicin. The carbamate is stable as the breakdown is inhibited at high pH and any reactive carbon dioxide is removed as the carbonate. The amino carbamate was quantified and the molar fraction of amine as the carbamate of sisomicin was obtained from the HPLC peak areas. The equilibrium constant of carbamate formation, Kc, was determined to be 3.3 × 10(-6) and it was used to predict the fraction of carbamate over the pH range in a typical biological systems. Based on these results, the fraction of amino carbamate at physiological pH values is less than 13%, and the postulated mechanism for nephrotoxicity protection is not valid. The same methodology is applicable for other aminoglycosides.

  4. Study of inclusion complex formation between tropaeolin OO and beta-cyclodextrin by spectrophotometry and Infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huai You; Han, Juan; Feng, Xia Guang; Pang, Yan Ling

    2006-09-01

    The mechanism of the inclusion of tropaeolin OO (TPOO) and beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) has been studied by spectrophotometry. The inclusion depth of the guest molecule in the host molecule was demonstrated by infrared spectrometry. Effect of the pH, concentrations of beta-CD, solvents and ionic strength on the inclusion of TPOO and beta-CD were examined. The result showed that TPOO reacts with beta-CD to form a 1:1 host-guest complex with an apparent formation constant of 1.50 x 10(3) l mol(-1). The thermodynamic parameters of inclusion reaction, DeltaG degrees , DeltaH degrees and DeltaS degrees were obtained.

  5. Complex formation in alkyldimethylamine oxide/sodium palmitate/water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shimon; Kawasaki, Hideya; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2005-03-01

    The complex formation between nonionic alkyldimethylamine oxide (CnDMAO, n=14, 16, and 18) and sodium palmitate (NaPa) in the solid phase of CnDMAO/NaPa mixtures and the dependence of the interaction parameter beta of the regular solution theory (RST) on the mixed micelle composition of C16DMAO/NaPa mixtures were investigated. The dissolution temperature showed a maximum at a NaPa mole fraction X(Pa)(*) of 0.3-0.4 for C16DMAO/NaPa and 0.2 for C18DMAO/NaPa. The compositions of the complexes suggested by X(Pa)(*) are C16DMAO: NaPa=3:2 or 2:1 and C18DMAO:NaPa=4:1. The composition X(Pa)(*) depended on the chain length of the amine oxides. The maximum was not observed in the case of the C14DMAO/NaPa/water system. In the range 0.7< or =X(Pa)< or =1.0, dissolution temperature depression was observed with decreasing X(Pa). The dissolution temperature depression was analyzed by taking into account the nonideal behavior in the mixed micelles and the counterion binding on the mixed micelle surface. The negative beta values were obtained for all three mixed systems. It was shown that the counterion activity remained practically constant in the range of 0.7< or =X(Pa)< or =1.0. The cmc values of C16DMAO/NaPa mixtures were determined by pyrene fluorescence measurement. For C16DMAO/NaPa mixtures, the dependence of the RST interaction parameter beta on the mixed micelle composition X(Pa) was determined for a wide range (0.2< or =X(Pa) < or =0.9). In the range 0.2< or =X(Pa)< or =0.5, the beta values were obtained from an analysis of cmc based on the RST. In the range 0.7< or=X(Pa)< or=0.9, the beta values were obtained from an analysis of the dissolution temperature depression. From the analysis of the micelle composition dependence of the beta values, a short-range attractive interaction between the headgroup of C16DMAO and palmitate anion is suggested.

  6. Oligomer formation of the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP: reaction rates and equilibrium constants indicate a monomeric state at physiological concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Martin; Allan, Martin G; Zaehringer, Franziska; Schirmer, Tilman; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2012-01-18

    Cyclic diguanosine-monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial signaling molecule that triggers a switch from motile to sessile bacterial lifestyles. This mechanism is of considerable pharmaceutical interest, since it is related to bacterial virulence, biofilm formation, and persistence of infection. Previously, c-di-GMP has been reported to display a rich polymorphism of various oligomeric forms at millimolar concentrations, which differ in base stacking and G-quartet interactions. Here, we have analyzed the equilibrium and exchange kinetics between these various forms by NMR spectroscopy. We find that the association of the monomer into a dimeric form is in fast exchange (constant of about 1 mM. At concentrations above 100 μM, higher oligomers are formed in the presence of cations. These are presumably tetramers and octamers, with octamers dominating above about 0.5 mM. Thus, at the low micromolar concentrations of the cellular environment and in the absence of additional compounds that stabilize oligomers, c-di-GMP should be predominantly monomeric. This finding has important implications for the understanding of c-di-GMP recognition by protein receptors. In contrast to the monomer/dimer exchange, formation and dissociation of higher oligomers occurs on a time scale of several hours to days. The time course can be described quantitatively by a simple kinetic model where tetramers are intermediates of octamer formation. The extremely slow oligomer dissociation may generate severe artifacts in biological experiments when c-di-GMP is diluted from concentrated stock solution. We present a simple method to quantify c-di-GMP monomers and oligomers from UV spectra and a procedure to dissolve the unwanted oligomers by an annealing step.

  7. Effects of chemical and enzymatic modifications on starch-oleic acid complex formation.

    PubMed

    Arijaje, Emily Oluwaseun; Wang, Ya-Jane

    2015-04-29

    The solubility of starch-inclusion complexes affects the digestibility and bioavailability of the included molecules. Acetylation with two degrees of substitution, 0.041 (low) and 0.091 (high), combined without or with a β-amylase treatment was employed to improve the yield and solubility of the inclusion complex between debranched potato starch and oleic acid. Both soluble and insoluble complexes were recovered and analyzed for their degree of acetylation, complexation yields, molecular size distributions, X-ray diffraction patterns, and thermal properties. Acetylation significantly increased the amount of recovered soluble complexes as well as the complexed oleic acid in both soluble and insoluble complexes. High-acetylated debranched-only starch complexed the highest amount of oleic acid (38.0 mg/g) in the soluble complexes; low-acetylated starch with or without the β-amylase treatment resulted in the highest complexed oleic acid in the insoluble complexes (37.6-42.9 mg/g). All acetylated starches displayed the V-type X-ray pattern, and the melting temperature generally decreased with acetylation. The results indicate that starch acetylation with or without the β-amylase treatment can improve the formation and solubility of the starch-oleic acid complex.

  8. Control of cell fate by the formation of an architecturally complex bacterial community

    PubMed Central

    Vlamakis, Hera; Aguilar, Claudio; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria form architecturally complex communities known as biofilms in which cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. Biofilms harbor multiple cell types, and it has been proposed that within biofilms individual cells follow different developmental pathways, resulting in heterogeneous populations. Here we demonstrate cellular differentiation within biofilms of the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis, and present evidence that formation of the biofilm governs differentiation. We show that motile, matrix-producing, and sporulating cells localize to distinct regions within the biofilm, and that the localization and percentage of each cell type is dynamic throughout development of the community. Importantly, mutants that do not produce extracellular matrix form unstructured biofilms that are deficient in sporulation. We propose that sporulation is a culminating feature of biofilm formation, and that spore formation is coupled to the formation of an architecturally complex community of cells. PMID:18381896

  9. Acidity and complex formation studies of 3-(adenine-9-yl)-propionic and 3-(thymine-1-yl)-propionic acids in ethanol-water media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammud, Hassan H.; El Shazly, Shawky; Sonji, Ghassan; Sonji, Nada; Bouhadir, Kamal H.

    2015-05-01

    The ligands 3-(adenine-9-yl)propionic acid (AA) and 3-(thymine-1-yl)propionic acid (TA) were prepared by N9-alkylation of adenine and N1-alkylation of thymine with ethylacrylate in presence of a base catalyst, followed by acid hydrolysis of the formed ethyl esters to give the corresponding propionic acid derivatives. The products were characterized by spectral methods (FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR), which confirm their structures. The dissociation constants of ligands, were potentiometrically determined in 0.3 M KCl at 20-50 °C temperature range. The work was extended to study complexation behavior of AA and TA with various biologically important divalent metal ions (Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Mn2+ and Pb2+) in 50% v/v water-ethanol medium at four different temperatures, keeping ionic strength constant (0.3 M KCl). The order of the stability constants of the formed complexes decreases in the sequence Cu2+ > Pb2+ > Zn2+ > Ni2+ > Co2+ > Mn2+ > Cd2+ for both ligands. The effect of temperature was also studied and the corresponding thermodynamic functions (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) were derived and discussed. The formation of metal complexes has been found to be spontaneous, and the stability constants were dependant markedly on the basicity of the ligands.

  10. Dapper1 promotes autophagy by enhancing the Beclin1-Vps34-Atg14L complex formation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Benyu; Cao, Weipeng; Li, Wenxia; Gao, Chan; Qi, Zhen; Zhao, Yan; Du, Jun; Xue, Hua; Peng, Junya; Wen, Jun; Chen, Hua; Ning, Yuanheng; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Hong; Gao, Xiang; Yu, Li; Chen, Ye-Guang

    2014-08-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation process to clear up aggregated proteins or aged and damaged organelles. The Beclin1-Vps34-Atg14L complex is essential for autophagosome formation. However, how the complex formation is regulated is unclear. Here, we show that Dapper1 (Dpr1) acts as a critical regulator of the Beclin1-Vps34-Atg14L complex to promote autophagy. Dpr1 ablation in the central nervous system results in motor coordination defect and accumulation of p62 and ubiquitinated proteins. Dpr1 increases autophagosome formation as indicated by elevated puncta formation of LC3, Atg14L and DFCP1 (Double FYVE-containing protein 1). Conversely, loss of Dpr1 impairs LC3 lipidation and causes p62/SQSTM1 accumulation. Dpr1 directly interacts with Beclin1 and Atg14L and enhances the Beclin1-Vps34 interaction and Vps34 activity. Together, our findings suggest that Dpr1 enhances the Atg14L-Beclin1-Vps34 complex formation to drive autophagy.

  11. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-01

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  12. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-13

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  13. Stability constants for mono- and dioxalato-complexes of Y and the REE, potentially important species in groundwaters and surface freshwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schijf, J.; Byrne, R. H.

    2001-04-01

    We present the first measured set of stability constants for mono- and dioxalato-complexes of yttrium and all rare earths except Pm (Y+REE), Oxβ n = [MOx n3-2n] [M 3+] -1 [Ox 2-] -n(where [ ] ≡ concentrations, M ≡ Y+REE, and Ox 2- ≡ C 2O 42-). Aqueous solutions of Y+REE were titrated with oxalic acid in the presence of a cation-exchange resin, and Y+REE concentrations in the solution phase were measured by ICP-MS. This method allows investigation of all Y+REE simultaneously under identical conditions and is thus very sensitive to subtle inter-element variations in log Oxβ n. Experiments were performed at a single ionic strength ( I = 0.05 M), but at two values of pH. Patterns of log Oxβ 1 and log Oxβ 2, determined from our experiments, are similar in shape and reminiscent of those for carbonato-complexes. The average ratio of stepwise stability constants K 2/K 1 = Oxβ 2/( Oxβ 1) 2 is 0.05 ± 0.02 for Y+REE excluding La and Ce. Literature values of Oxβ 1(Eu) for 0.03 mol/L ≤ I ≤ 1 mol/L were used to derive the relation log Oxβ 1(Eu) = log Oxβ 10(Eu) - 6.132√ I/(1 + 1.47√ I) + 0.902 I, where log Oxβ 10(Eu) is the stability constant at infinite dilution. Applying this relation to all Y+REE, the following values of log Oxβ 10 (at zero ionic strength) were found: 6.66 (Y), 5.87 (La), 5.97 (Ce), 6.25 (Pr), 6.31 (Nd), 6.43 (Sm), 6.52 (Eu), 6.53 (Gd), 6.63 (Tb), 6.74 (Dy), 6.77 (Ho), 6.83 (Er), 6.89 (Tm), 6.95 (Yb), 6.96 (Lu). These values, which are based on direct measurements for each individual Y+REE, agree quite well with published extrapolations that are mostly based on linear free-energy relationships. Total oxalate concentrations of 10 -5-10 -3 M have been reported for soil solutions. Free oxalate ions persist at much lower pH than free carbonate ions and a simple speciation model demonstrates that oxalato-complexes can dominate Y+REE speciation in mildly acidic groundwaters of low-to-moderate alkalinity.

  14. Role of complexes formation between drugs and penetration enhancers in transdermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Drakulić, Branko J; Juranić, Ivan O; Erić, Slavica; Zloh, Mire

    2008-11-03

    The use of chemical penetration enhancers (CPE) is growing due to their ability to improve drug delivery through the skin. A possible mechanism of penetration enhancement could involve the complex formation between drug and components in the pharmaceutical formulation, thus altering the physicochemical properties of the active substance. Here, modelling studies indicate that hydrocarbon and oxygen-containing terpenes (penetration enhancers) could form complexes with drugs. Satisfactory correlations have been obtained between the predicted molecular properties of enhancers and their enhancement effects.

  15. An Equilibrium and Kinetic Investigation of Salt-Cycloamylose Complexes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-08

    Coneinut on reverse aide It necessary and identify by blo * number) Equilibrium constants inorganic anions Rate constants Ultrasonic relaxation Inclusion...The equilibrium constants and rate constants for the formation of inclusion complexes of cycloheptaamylose with small inorganic anions were measured by...of cyclo- amylose chemistry. Recently, equilibrium constants for cyclohexaamylose, sometimes denoted by a-CD, with various Tnorganic salts were

  16. "Recognizing Numerical Constants"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The advent of inexpensive, high performance computer and new efficient algorithms have made possible the automatic recognition of numerically computed constants. In other words, techniques now exist for determining, within certain limits, whether a computed real or complex number can be written as a simple expression involving the classical constants of mathematics. In this presentation, some of the recently discovered techniques for constant recognition, notably integer relation detection algorithms, will be presented. As an application of these methods, the author's recent work in recognizing "Euler sums" will be described in some detail.

  17. Communication: Structure, formation, and equilibration of ensembles of Ag-S complexes on an Ag surface

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Selena M.; Kim, Yousoo; Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, J. W.; Thiel, P. A.

    2013-02-15

    We have utilized conditions of very low temperature (4.7 K) and very low sulfur coverage to isolate and identify Ag-S complexes that exist on the Ag(111) surface. The experimental conditions are such that the complexes form at temperatures above the temperature of observation. These complexes can be regarded as polymeric chains of varying length, with an Ag4S pyramid at the core of each monomeric unit. Steps may catalyze the formation of the chains and this mechanism may be reflected in the chain length distribution.

  18. Complex formation equilibria of binary and ternary complexes involving 3,3-bis(1-methylimidazol-2yl)propionic acid and bio-relevant ligands as 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid with reference to plant hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoukry, Mohamed M.; Hassan, Safaa S.

    2014-01-01

    The formation equilibria for the binary complexes of Cu(II) with 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid (ACC) and 3,3-bis(1-methylimidazol-2-yl)propionic acid (BIMP) were investigated. ACC and BIMP form the complexes 1 1 0, 1 2 0 and 1 1 -1. The ternary complexes of Cu(II) with BIMP and biorelevant ligands as some selected amino acids, peptides and DNA constituents are formed in a stepwise mechanism. The stability constants of the complexes formed were determined and their distribution diagrams were evaluated. The kinetics of hydrolysis of glycine methyl ester in presence of [Cu(BIMP)]+ was investigated by pH-stat technique and the mechanism was discussed.

  19. Characterizing Extragalactic Star Formation with GALEX Legacy Photometric Analysis of UV-Bright Stellar Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilker, David

    At the close of nearly a decade of observing, GALEX has accumulated an unprecedented archive of ultraviolet (UV) images revealing both the scope and intricacy of star formation (SF) in many thousands of galaxies inhabiting the local universe. If the observed hierarchical SF morphology can be quantified systematically, and physically interpreted with multi-wavelength ancillary data and modeling, then the low redshift GALEX legacy will approach completion. However, the GALEX GR6 pipeline database contains a highly incomplete census of young stellar complexes even for very well-studied galaxies. We propose to apply a dedicated photometry algorithm that has been optimized for measuring the properties of irregularly shaped sources in crowded galaxy images containing spatially variant, diffuse intra-clump emission. Structures will be selected in the UV, but we will compile UV-visible-MIR SEDs for each detection utilizing Pan-STARRS1+SDSS and WISE data. These SEDs will then be fit using population-synthesis models to derive estimated stellar mass, age, and extinction. Processing will be completed for the entire diameter-limited GALEX Large Galaxy Atlas (GLGA) sample of 20,000+ galaxies, at a variety of standardized spatial resolutions. Although the precise categorization of the cataloged substructures will depend on galaxy distance, the outcome of our analysis will be a catalog similar to the stellar association surveys of past decades for very nearby galaxies based on resolved stars (e.g. van den Bergh 1964, Hodge 1986, Efremov et al. 1987), except that our investigation will probe a galaxy sample of dramatically larger size using the integrated UV light from such groupings of young stars. Our algorithm is multi-scale in nature and will thus preserve the hierarchical properties of the stellar distribution, by linking sub-clumps to their larger-scale parent feature(s). The resulting database will be a fundamental resource for follow-up multi-wavelength studies probing SF

  20. Quantum statistical vibrational entropy and enthalpy of formation of helium-vacancy complex in BCC W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Haohua; Woo, C. H.

    2016-12-01

    High-temperature advance-reactor design and operation require knowledge of in-reactor materials properties far from the thermal ground state. Temperature-dependence due to the effects of lattice vibrations is important to the understanding and formulation of atomic processes involved in irradiation-damage accumulation. In this paper, we concentrate on the formation of He-V complex. The free-energy change in this regard is derived via thermodynamic integration from the phase-space trajectories generated from MD simulations based on the quantum fluctuation-dissipation relation. The change of frequency distribution of vibration modes during the complex formation is properly accounted for, and the corresponding entropy change avoids the classical ln(T) divergence that violates the third law. The vibrational enthalpy and entropy of formation calculated this way have significant effects on the He kinetics during irradiation.

  1. Structure and kinetics of formation of catechol complexes of ferric soybean lipoxygenase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.J.; Brennan, B.A.; Chase, D.B. |

    1995-11-21

    Ferric soybean lipoxygenase forms stable complexes with 4-substituted catechols. The structure of the complex between the enzyme and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile has been studied by resonance Raman, electron paramagnetic resonance, visible, and X-ray spectroscopies. It is a bidentate iron-catecholate complex with at least one water ligand. The kinetics of formation of complexes between lipoxygenase and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile and 3,4-dihydroxyacetophenone have been studied by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The data are consistent with two kinetically distinct, reversible steps. The pH dependence of the first step suggests that the substrate for the reaction is the catechol monoanion. When these results are combined, plausible mechanisms for the complexation reaction are suggested. 51 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Effect of entropy-packing fraction relation on the formation of complex metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourki Samaei, Arash; Mohammadi, Ehsan

    2015-09-01

    By combining a number of elements to form complex metallic materials without a base element, it was recently shown that one can obtain rather complex structures, including random solute solutions, multi-phased mixtures and amorphous structures with/without nano-precipitations. Compared to conventional metallic materials, these complex ones could show excellent mechanical and physical properties across a wide range of temperatures, therefore being a promising advanced material for high-temperature applications; however, designing these complex materials, at present, still lacks a unified physical approach but relies on the choice of a few metallurgical parameters, such as atomic size mismatch, heat of mixing and valence electron concentration. Here, we identify a physical mechanism through the optimization of the excess configurational entropy of mixing in the control of phase formation in these metallic materials. The theoretical framework herein established is expected to provide a new paradigm in pursuit of complex metallic materials with superior properties.

  3. Recrystallized Impact Glasses of the Onaping Formation and the Sudbury Igneous Complex, Sudbury Structure, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, B. O.; Weiser, T.; Brockmeyer, P.

    1996-01-01

    The origin of the Sudbury Structure and of the associated heterolithic breccias of the Onaping Formation and the Sudbury Igneous Complex have been controversial. While an impact origin of the structure has gained wide acceptance over the last 15 years, the origin of the recrystallized Onaping Formation glasses and of the igneous complex is still being debated. Recently the interpretation of the breccias of the Onaping Formation as suevitic fall-back impact breccias has been challenged. The igneous complex is interpreted either as a differentiated impact melt sheet or as a combination of an upper impact melt represented by the granophyre, and a lower, impact-triggered magmatic body consisting of the norite-sublayer formations. The Onaping Formation contains glasses as fluidal and nonfluidal fragments of various shapes and sizes. They are recrystallized, and our research indicates that they are petrographically heterogeneous and span a wide range of chemical compositions. These characteristics are not known from glasses of volcanic deposits. This suggests an origin by shock vitrification, an interpretation consistent with their association with numerous and varied country rock clasts that exhibit microscopic shock metamorphic features. The recrystallized glass fragments represent individual solid-state and liquid-state vitrified rocks or relatively small melt pods. The basal member lies beneath the Gray and Black members of the Onaping Formation and, where not metamorphic, has an igneous matrix. Igneous-textured melt bodies occur in the upper two members and above the Basal Member. A comparison of the chemical compositions of recrystallized glasses and of the matrices of the Basal Member and the melt bodies with the components and the bulk composition of the igneous complex is inconclusive as to the origin of the igneous complex. Basal Member matrix and Melt Bodies, on average, are chemically similar to the granophyre of the Sudbury Igneous Complex, suggesting that

  4. Spectrophotometric determination of penicillamine and carbocisteine based on formation of metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Walash, M I; El-Brashy, A M; Metwally, M E-S; Abdelal, A A

    2004-06-01

    A simple spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of penicillamine and carbocisteine. The method depends on complexation of penicillamine with Ni, Co and Pb ions in acetate buffer pH of 6.3, 6.5 and 5.3, respectively, and carbocisteine with Cu and Ni ions in borate buffer pH of 6.7; 1-70 microg/ml of these drugs could be determined by measuring the absorbance of each complex at its specific lambdamax. The results obtained are in good agreement with those obtained using the official methods. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of these compounds in their dosage forms. Also, the molar ratio and stability constant of the metal complexes were calculated and a proposal of the reaction pathway was postulated.

  5. Enhanced CO2 hydrate formation kinetic under organo-mineral complex environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, D.; Lee, W.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 hydrate formation under marine sediments can be one of the feasible options to mitigate atmospheric concentration of CO2, main source of global warming. For the better application of CO2 sequestration via hydrate form under ocean, it is indispensable to understand the effects of marine environmental factors on hydrate formation kinetic and equilibrium. In this study, we investigated the effect of organo-mineral complex (i.e., Na-montmorillonite (Na-MMT) and glycine complex) on hydrate formation kinetic both experimentally and computationally. Organo-mineral complex suspension showed much more favorable hydrate formation kinetic (2-6 min) than pure water control (48-80 min). TEM image showed that glycine are well distributed and strongly adsorbed on Na-MMT surface and FT/IR results (i.e., increased frequency of N-H stretch) also proved that amine part of glycine can make strong hydrogen bonding with silicon atoms of Na-MMT. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed to fully understand the CO2 hydrate nucleation on the organo-mineral complex and its result showed that high concentration of CO2 molecules are located near Na-MMT surface and glycine attached on Na-MMT can attract water molecules to form intermediate hydrate structure. This one plays a key role in complete hydrate formation as nucleation seeds and can significantly enhance the hydrate formation kinetic. This fundamental knowledge could provide idea to select proper CO2 storage site under marine sediments and be applied to in-situ swapping technology to recover CH4 from deep sea gas hydrate deposits and sequester the CO2 to CH4 hydrate layer.

  6. Stability of furosemide polymorphs and the effects of complex formation with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin.

    PubMed

    Garnero, Claudia; Chattah, Ana Karina; Longhi, Marcela

    2016-11-05

    The effect of the formation of supramolecular binary complexes with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin on the chemical and physical stability of the polymorphs I and II of furosemide was evaluated in solid state. The solid samples were placed under accelerated storage conditions and exposed to daylight into a stability chamber for a 6-month. Chemical stability was monitored by high performance liquid chromatography, while the physical stability was studied by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Changes in the physical appearance of the samples were evaluated. The studies showed a significant stabilizing effect of β-cyclodextrin on furosemide form II. Our results suggest that the complex formation is a useful tool for improving the stability of furosemide polymorphs. These new complexes are promising candidates that can be used in the pharmaceutical industry for the preparation of alternative matrices that improve physicochemical properties.

  7. HCF-1 self-association via an interdigitated Fn3 structure facilitates transcriptional regulatory complex formation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihye; Lammers, Fabienne; Herr, Winship; Song, Ji-Joon

    2012-10-23

    Host-cell factor 1 (HCF-1) is an unusual transcriptional regulator that undergoes a process of proteolytic maturation to generate N- (HCF-1(N)) and C- (HCF-1(C)) terminal subunits noncovalently associated via self-association sequence elements. Here, we present the crystal structure of the self-association sequence 1 (SAS1) including the adjacent C-terminal HCF-1 nuclear localization signal (NLS). SAS1 elements from each of the HCF-1(N) and HCF-1(C) subunits form an interdigitated fibronectin type 3 (Fn3) tandem repeat structure. We show that the C-terminal NLS recruited by the interdigitated SAS1 structure is required for effective formation of a transcriptional regulatory complex: the herpes simplex virus VP16-induced complex. Thus, HCF-1(N)-HCF-1(C) association via an integrated Fn3 structure permits an NLS to facilitate formation of a transcriptional regulatory complex.

  8. Theoretical predictions of hydrolysis and complex formation of the heaviest elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershina, V.

    2000-07-01

    In the presentation, investigations of hydrolysis and complex formation of group 4, 5 and 6 elements, including the transactinide elements 104, 105 and 106 are described. They were carried out on the basis of results of relativistic calculations of the electronic structure of various hydrated, hydrolyzed and complex compounds of these elements using the fully relativistic ab initio density functional method with the GGA approximation for the exchange-correlation potential. Predictions of equilibria of hydrolysis or complex formation reactions have been made using a model which enables determination of free energy changes of the reactions as changes in the ionic and covalent contributions to the binding molecular energy separately. Those contributions were calculated using the Mulliken analysis of the electronic density distribution.

  9. Geminin Inhibits a Late Step in the Formation of Human Pre-replicative Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Lu, Wenyan; Santos, Ruth E.; Frattini, Mark G.; Kelly, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The initial step in initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication involves the assembly of pre-replicative complexes (pre-RCs) at origins of replication during the G1 phase of the cell cycle. In metazoans initiation is inhibited by the regulatory factor Geminin. We have purified the human pre-RC proteins, studied their interactions in vitro with each other and with origin DNA, and analyzed the effects of HsGeminin on formation of DNA-protein complexes. The formation of an initial complex containing the human origin recognition complex (HsORC), HsCdt1, HsCdc6, and origin DNA is cooperative, involving all possible binary interactions among the components. Maximal association of HsMCM2–7, a component of the replicative helicase, requires HsORC, HsCdc6, HsCdt1, and ATP, and is driven by interactions of HsCdt1 and HsCdc6 with multiple HsMCM2–7 subunits. Formation of stable complexes, resistant to high salt, requires ATP hydrolysis. In the absence of HsMCM proteins, HsGeminin inhibits the association of HsCdt1 with DNA or with HsORC-HsCdc6-DNA complexes. However, HsGeminin does not inhibit recruitment of HsMCM2–7 to DNA to form complexes containing all of the pre-RC proteins. In fact, HsGeminin itself is a component of such complexes, and interacts directly with the HsMcm3 and HsMcm5 subunits of HsMCM2–7, as well as with HsCdt1. Although HsGeminin does not prevent the initial formation of DNA-protein complexes containing the pre-RC proteins, it strongly inhibits the formation of stable pre-RCs that are resistant to high salt. We suggest that bound HsGeminin prevents transition of the pre-RC to a state that is competent for initiation of DNA replication. PMID:25231993

  10. The significance of ACTH for the process of formation of complex heparin compounds in the blood during immobilization stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudryashov, B. A.; Shapiro, F. B.; Lomovskaya, F. B.; Lyapina, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) was administered to rats at different times following adrenalectomy. Adrenocorticotropin caused a significant increase in the formation of heparin complexes even in the absence of stress factor. When ACTH secretion is blocked, immobilization stress is not accompanied by an increase in the process of complex formation. The effect of ACTH on the formation of heparin complexes was mediated through its stimulation of the adrenal cortex.

  11. Lethal synergism between organic and inorganic wood preservatives via formation of an unusual lipophilic ternary complex

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo; Li, Yan; Fan, Rui-Mei; Chao, Xi-Juan; Zhu, Ben-Zhan

    2013-02-01

    We have shown previously that exposing bacteria to wood preservatives pentachlorophenol (PCP) and copper-containing compounds together causes synergistic toxicity. However, it is not clear whether these findings also hold true in mammalian cells; and if so, what is the underlying molecular mechanism? Here we show that PCP and a model copper complex bis-(1,10-phenanthroline) cupric (Cu(OP){sub 2}), could also induce synergistic cytotoxicity in human liver cells. By the single crystal X-ray diffraction and atomic absorption spectroscopy assay, the synergism was found to be mainly due to the formation of a lipophilic ternary complex with unusual structural and composition characteristics and subsequent enhanced cellular copper uptake, which markedly promoted cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, leading to apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing pro-apoptotic protein expression, releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria and activating caspase-3, and -9. Analogous results were observed with other polychlorinated phenols (PCPs) and Cu(OP){sub 2}. Synergistic cytotoxicity could be induced by PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} via formation of an unusual lipophilic complex in HepG2 cells. The formation of ternary complexes with similar lipophilic character could be of relevance as a general mechanism of toxicity, which should be taken into consideration especially when evaluating the toxicity of environmental pollutants found at currently-considered non- or sub-toxic concentrations. -- Highlights: ► The combination of PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} induces synergistic cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. ► The synergism is mainly due to forming a lipophilic ternary complex between them. ► The formation of lipophilic ternary complex enhances cellular copper uptake. ► PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} stimulates the cellular ROS production. ► The ROS promoted by PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  12. Complex formation with nucleic acids and aptamers alters the antigenic properties of platelet factor 4

    PubMed Central

    Jaax, Miriam E.; Krauel, Krystin; Marschall, Thomas; Brandt, Sven; Gansler, Julia; Fürll, Birgitt; Appel, Bettina; Fischer, Silvia; Block, Stephan; Helm, Christiane A.; Müller, Sabine; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2013-01-01

    The tight electrostatic binding of the chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF4) to polyanions induces heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, a prothrombotic adverse drug reaction caused by immunoglobulin G directed against PF4/polyanion complexes. This study demonstrates that nucleic acids, including aptamers, also bind to PF4 and enhance PF4 binding to platelets. Systematic assessment of RNA and DNA constructs, as well as 4 aptamers of different lengths and secondary structures, revealed that increasing length and double-stranded segments of nucleic acids augment complex formation with PF4, while single nucleotides or single-stranded polyA or polyC constructs do not. Aptamers were shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy to induce structural changes in PF4 that resemble those induced by heparin. Moreover, heparin-induced anti-human–PF4/heparin antibodies cross-reacted with human PF4/nucleic acid and PF4/aptamer complexes, as shown by an enzyme immunoassay and a functional platelet activation assay. Finally, administration of PF4/44mer–DNA protein C aptamer complexes in mice induced anti–PF4/aptamer antibodies, which cross-reacted with murine PF4/heparin complexes. These data indicate that the formation of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies in postoperative patients may be augmented by PF4/nucleic acid complexes. Moreover, administration of therapeutic aptamers has the potential to induce anti-PF4/polyanion antibodies and a prothrombotic diathesis. PMID:23673861

  13. Complexes of triggered star formation in supergiant shell of Holmberg II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Oleg V.; Lozinskaya, Tatiana A.; Moiseev, Alexei V.; Shchekinov, Yuri A.

    2017-01-01

    We report a detailed analysis of all regions of current star formation in the walls of the supergiant H I shell (SGS) in the galaxy Holmberg II based on observations with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer at the Russian 6-m telescope. We compare the structure and kinematics of ionized gas with that of atomic hydrogen and with the stellar population of the SGS. Our deep Hα images and archival images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope demonstrate that current star formation episodes are larger and more complicated than previously thought: they represent unified star-forming complexes with sizes of several hundred pc rather than `chains' of separate bright nebulae in the walls of the SGS. The fact that we are dealing with unified complexes is evidenced by identified faint shell-like structures of ionized and neutral gas which connect several distinct bright H II regions. Formation of such complexes is due to the feedback of stars with very inhomogeneous ambient gas in the walls of the SGS. The arguments supporting an idea about the triggering of star formation in SGS by the H I supershells collision are presented. We also found a faint ionized supershell inside the H I SGS expanding with a velocity of no greater than 10-15 km s-1. Five OB stars located inside the inner supershell are sufficient to account for its radiation, although a possibility of leakage of ionizing photons from bright H II regions is not ruled out as well.

  14. Ubisemiquinone is the electron donor for superoxide formation by complex III of heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Turrens, J F; Alexandre, A; Lehninger, A L

    1985-03-01

    Much evidence indicates that superoxide is generated from O2 in a cyanide-sensitive reaction involving a reduced component of complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, particularly when antimycin A is present. Although it is generally believed that ubisemiquinone is the electron donor to O2, little experimental evidence supporting this view has been reported. Experiments with succinate as electron donor in the presence of antimycin A in intact rat heart mitochondria, which contain much superoxide dismutase but little catalase, showed that myxothiazol, which inhibits reduction of the Rieske iron-sulfur center, prevented formation of hydrogen peroxide, determined spectrophotometrically as the H2O2-peroxidase complex. Similarly, depletion of the mitochondria of their cytochrome c also inhibited formation of H2O2, which was restored by addition of cytochrome c. These observations indicate that factors preventing the formation of ubisemiquinone also prevent H2O2 formation. They also exclude ubiquinol, which remains reduced under these conditions, as the reductant of O2. Since cytochrome b also remains fully reduced when myxothiazol is added to succinate- and antimycin A-supplemented mitochondria, reduced cytochrome b may also be excluded as the reductant of O2. These observations, which are consistent with the Q-cycle reactions, by exclusion of other possibilities leave ubisemiquinone as the only reduced electron carrier in complex III capable of reducing O2 to O2-.

  15. Formation Control With Size Scaling Via a Complex Laplacian-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhimin; Wang, Lili; Lin, Zhiyun; Zheng, Ronghao

    2016-10-01

    We consider the control of formations of a leader-follower network, where the objective is to steer a team of multiple mobile agents into a formation of variable size. We assume that the shape description of the formation is known to all the agents, which is captured by a complex-valued Laplacian associated with the sensing graph, but the size scaling of the formation is not known or only known to two agents, called the leaders in the network. A distributed linear control strategy is developed in this paper such that the agents converge to the desired formation shape, for which the size of the formation is determined by the two leaders. Moreover, in order to make all agents in a formation move with a common velocity, the distributed control law also incorporates a velocity consensus component, which is implemented with the help of a communication network that may, in general, be of different topology from the sensing graph. Both the setup of single-integrator kinematics and the one of double-integrator dynamics are addressed in the same framework except that the acceleration control in the double-integrator setup has an extra damping term.

  16. p300 is involved in formation of the TBP-TFIIA-containing basal transcription complex, TAC.

    PubMed

    Mitsiou, Dimitra J; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G

    2003-09-01

    We have recently identified a novel basal transcription complex, TAC, that is present and active in embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells but not in other adult cells such as COS7. In the search for factors involved in TAC formation, we found that expression of the adenoviral 12S E1A oncoprotein abolishes TAC formation in EC cells. This effect of E1A depends on its N-terminal domain that is essential for cell differentiation and that targets the transcriptional coactivators p300 and PCAF. Expression of p300 lacking its major E1A interaction domain, CH3, restores TAC formation in the presence of E1A, in a bromodomain- and HAT domain-dependent manner. Consistently, the unprocessed TFIIAalphabeta precursor that is selectively assembled into TAC is acetylated preferentially compared with the processed subunits present in 'free' TFIIA. Intriguingly, expression of p300 in COS7 cells that do not contain detectable levels of TAC instigates formation of TAC from endogenous components. Our data suggest that p300 plays a role in formation of the TBP-TFIIA-containing basal transcription complex, TAC.

  17. Globular cluster formation with multiple stellar populations from hierarchical star cluster complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Most old globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy are observed to have internal chemical abundance spreads in light elements. We discuss a new GC formation scenario based on hierarchical star formation within fractal molecular clouds. In the new scenario, a cluster of bound and unbound star clusters (`star cluster complex', SCC) that have a power-law cluster mass function with a slope (β) of 2 is first formed from a massive gas clump developed in a dwarf galaxy. Such cluster complexes and β = 2 are observed and expected from hierarchical star formation. The most massive star cluster (`main cluster'), which is the progenitor of a GC, can accrete gas ejected from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars initially in the cluster and other low-mass clusters before the clusters are tidally stripped or destroyed to become field stars in the dwarf. The SCC is initially embedded in a giant gas hole created by numerous supernovae of the SCC so that cold gas outside the hole can be accreted onto the main cluster later. New stars formed from the accreted gas have chemical abundances that are different from those of the original SCC. Using hydrodynamical simulations of GC formation based on this scenario, we show that the main cluster with the initial mass as large as [2 - 5] × 105M⊙ can accrete more than 105M⊙ gas from AGB stars of the SCC. We suggest that merging of hierarchical star cluster complexes can play key roles in stellar halo formation around GCs and self-enrichment processes in the early phase of GC formation.

  18. A QUANTITATIVE KINETIC SCHEME FOR 70S TRANSLATION INITIATION COMPLEX FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriadou, Christina; Marzi, Stefano; Kirillov, Stanislas; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Cooperman, Barry S.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Association of the 30S initiation complex (30SIC) and the 50S ribosomal subunit, leading to formation of the 70S initiation complex (70SIC), is a critical step of the translation initiation pathway. The 70SIC contains initiator tRNA, fMet-tRNAfMet, bound in the P (peptidyl)-site in response to the AUG start codon. We have formulated a quantitative kinetic scheme for the formation of an active 70SIC from 30SIC and 50S subunits on the basis of parallel rapid kinetics measurements of GTP hydrolysis, Pi release, light scattering, and changes in fluorescence intensities of fluorophore-labeled IF2 and fMet-tRNAfMet. According to this scheme, an initially formed labile 70S complex, which promotes rapid IF2-dependent GTP hydrolysis, either dissociates reversibly into 30S and 50S subunits or is converted to a more stable form, leading to 70SIC formation. The latter process takes place with intervening conformational changes of ribosome-bound IF2 and fMet-tRNAfMet, which are monitored by spectral changes of fluorescent derivatives of IF2 and fMet-tRNAfMet. The availability of such a scheme provides a useful framework for precisely elucidating the mechanisms by which substituting the nonhydrolyzable analogue GDPCP for GTP or adding thiostrepton inhibit formation of a productive 70SIC. GDPCP does not affect stable 70S formation, but perturbs fMet-tRNAfMet positioning in the P-site. In contrast, thiostrepton severely retards stable 70S formation, but allows normal binding of fMet-tRNAfMet(prf20) to the P-site. PMID:17868692

  19. A Reaction Method for Estimating Gibbs Energy and Enthalpy of Formation of Complex Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruibing; Zhang, Tingan; Liu, Yan; Kuang, Shibo

    2017-04-01

    New and updated thermodynamic data for simple binary compounds are readily available from both experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. Based on these available data, an approach is proposed to predict Gibbs energies and enthalpies of formation for complex minerals of metallurgical, chemical, and other industrial importance. The approach assumes that complex minerals are formed from binary composite oxides, which in turn, are formed from individual pure oxides. The validity of this approach is examined by comparing the calculated values of Gibbs energies and enthalpies against the experimentally measured ones reported in literature. The results show that for typical complex minerals with available experimental data, the calculated results exhibit an average residual of 0.51 pct for Gibbs energies and 0.52 pct for enthalpies, compared to the experimental results. This new approach thus correlates well with experimental approaches and can be applied to most of the complex minerals.

  20. The formation of molecular aggregates of sulfophthalocyanine in complexes with semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadadzhanov, D. R.; Martynenko, I. V.; Orlova, A. O.; Maslov, V. G.; Fedorov, A. V.; Baranov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, complexes of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and quantum rods with sulfophthalocyanine molecules have been formed. Analysis of spectral and luminescent properties of solutions of the complexes has revealed that an increase in the number of molecules per one nanocrystal in a mixed solution results in a noticeable decrease in the intensity of the luminescence of the quantum dots and quantum rods. In addition, it has been found that, upon an increase in the concentration of sulfophthalocyanine molecules, the absorption spectra of the samples in the region of their first absorption band have signs of formation of nonluminiscent aggregates of sulfophthalocyanine molecules. Analysis of the absorption spectra of the mixed solutions has made it possible to demonstrate that the complexes with the quantum rods have a content of the sulfophthalocyanine aggregates significantly lower than the complexes with the quantum dots.

  1. A Reaction Method for Estimating Gibbs Energy and Enthalpy of Formation of Complex Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruibing; Zhang, Tingan; Liu, Yan; Kuang, Shibo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract New and updated thermodynamic data for simple binary compounds are readily available from both experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. Based on these available data, an approach is proposed to predict Gibbs energies and enthalpies of formation for complex minerals of metallurgical, chemical, and other industrial importance. The approach assumes that complex minerals are formed from binary composite oxides, which in turn, are formed from individual pure oxides. The validity of this approach is examined by comparing the calculated values of Gibbs energies and enthalpies against the experimentally measured ones reported in literature. The results show that for typical complex minerals with available experimental data, the calculated results exhibit an average residual of 0.51 pct for Gibbs energies and 0.52 pct for enthalpies, compared to the experimental results. This new approach thus correlates well with experimental approaches and can be applied to most of the complex minerals.

  2. Formation of very stable and selective Cu(II) complexes with a non-macrocyclic ligand: can basicity rival pre-organization?

    PubMed

    Abada, Sabah; Lecointre, Alexandre; Elhabiri, Mourad; Charbonnière, Loïc J

    2010-10-14

    The synthesis of ligand L based on a 2,6-bis[(N,N-bis(methylene phosphonic acid)aminomethyl] pyridine scaffold is described. Potentiometry combined with UV-Vis absorption spectrophotometric titrations were used to determine the protonation constants of the ligand and the stability constants of its corresponding Cu(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Ga(III) cations (0.1 M NaClO(4), 25.0 °C). The physico-chemical approach revealed very large stability constants for Cu(II) complexation (logK(CuL) = 22.71(7)) reflected in a very high pCu(II) value of ∼ 15.5 (pH = 7.4, [L](tot) = 10(-5) M, [Cu](tot) = 10(-6) M), close to those measured for the strong methylphosphonate functionalized cyclen chelators. Based on a literature survey, a correlation is proposed between the pK values of branched polyamine ligands and their stability constants for Cu(II) complexation, allowing for an estimation of the latter on the basis of the protonation constants of L. Ligand L was also shown to be very selective towards Cu(II) compared to the other cations studied (ΔlogK > 4). UV-Vis spectroscopy and kinetic measurements indicated that the formation of the cupric complexes with L is very fast, which, in combination with all other properties, makes it an excellent non-cyclic target for Cu(II) radiopharmaceutical within the frame of (64)Cu positron emission tomography imaging and radiotherapy.

  3. Formation of palladium(II) hydroxychloride complexes and precipitates in sodium chloride solutions and seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Robert H.; Yao, Wensheng

    2000-12-01

    Spectrophotometric measurements of Pd(II) in 0.5 M NaCl indicate that the PdCl3OH2- formation constant at 25°C is ClK∗1 = [PdCl3OH2-][H+][Cl-][PdCl42-]-1 = 10-8.98. This constant is more than two orders of magnitude smaller than previous results derived through solubility analysis. Kinetic experiments indicate that equilibration between PdCl42- and PdCl3OH2- is complete in less than one second. The discrepancy between depictions of Pd(II) speciation obtained by using spectrophotometric and solubility analysis is apparently caused by the formation of mixed hydroxychloride solid phases (PdClaOH2-a), rather than pure Pd(OH)2(s), when Pd(OH)2(s) is equilibrated in concentrated chloride solutions at high pH. In Pd(II) solubility analysis, and solubility analyses of other strongly hydrolyzed metals in seawater, the composition of the solid phase must be carefully examined for appropriate deconvolution of data.

  4. Complex formation of neptunium(V) with 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid studied by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy with ultra-short laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Vulpius, D; Geipel, G; Baraniak, L; Bernhard, G

    2006-03-01

    The complex formation of neptunium(V) with 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid (vanillic acid) was studied by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy with ultra-short laser pulses using the fluorescence properties of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid. A 2:1 complex of neptunium(V) with 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid was found. The stability constant of this complex was determined to be logbeta(210) = 7.33 +/- 0.10 at an ionic strength of 0.1 mol/l (NaClO(4)) and at 21 degrees C. The determination of the stability constant required an investigation of the excited-state proton transfer of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid over the whole pH range. It was realized that 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid undergoes excited-state reactions only at pH values below 5. At pH values above 5 stability constants can be determined without kinetic calculation of the proton transfer.

  5. UV-visible spectroscopic and electrochemical study of the complex formation between Fe(II) and 5-amino-1,10-phenantroline (5-Aphen) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Camargo, María Luisa; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto; Gómez-Hernández, Martín; Pacheco-Hernández, Ma de Lourdes; Galicia, Laura; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa

    2007-06-15

    The system Fe(II)-5-Aphen-H(2)O was studied. The spectroscopic and electrochemical results show that only one stable complex between Fe(II) and 5-Aphen forms, having a 1:3 stoichiometric ratio. The spectrophotometry study allowed determination of the formation constant of the complex (logbeta(3)=23.42+/-0.06). Also, the stability of the complex was evaluated as a function of pH; it was found that it decomposed at low pH values depending on the concentration and a pseudo-first order kinetics constant associated with k'=0.011min(-1). The results are in agreement with the electrochemical behaviour observed in the system, which indicated that at pH 1.33 the destruction of the complex [Fe(5-Aphen)3](2+) took place as a function of time; however, when the experiments were carried out at pH 6.19 the complex was stable. The thermodynamic data obtained through the use of MEDUSA allowed construction of predominance zone diagrams of the system Fe(II)-5-Aphen-H(2)O under the experimental conditions used. The thermodynamic results represented in the PZD describe the experimental behaviour reported in this work.

  6. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying; Billiar, Timothy R

    2012-06-22

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF+ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found that cAMP exerts its affect at the proximal level of TNF signaling by inhibiting the formation of the DISC complex upon the binding of TNF to TNFR1. In conclusion, our study shows that cAMP prevents TNF+ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes by inhibiting DISC complex formation.

  7. Protein complexing in a methanogen suggests electron bifurcation and electron delivery from formate to heterodisulfide reductase

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Kyle C.; Wong, Phoebe M.; Wang, Tiansong; Lie, Thomas J.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Swanson, Ingrid; Burn, June A.; Hackett, Murray; Leigh, John A.

    2010-01-01

    In methanogenic Archaea, the final step of methanogenesis generates methane and a heterodisulfide of coenzyme M and coenzyme B (CoM-S-S-CoB). Reduction of this heterodisulfide by heterodisulfide reductase to regenerate HS-CoM and HS-CoB is an exergonic process. Thauer et al. [Thauer, et al. 2008 Nat Rev Microbiol 6:579–591] recently suggested that in hydrogenotrophic methanogens the energy of heterodisulfide reduction powers the most endergonic reaction in the pathway, catalyzed by the formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase, via flavin-based electron bifurcation. Here we present evidence that these two steps in methanogenesis are physically linked. We identify a protein complex from the hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanococcus maripaludis, that contains heterodisulfide reductase, formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase, F420-nonreducing hydrogenase, and formate dehydrogenase. In addition to establishing a physical basis for the electron-bifurcation model of energy conservation, the composition of the complex also suggests that either H2 or formate (two alternative electron donors for methanogenesis) can donate electrons to the heterodisulfide-H2 via F420-nonreducing hydrogenase or formate via formate dehydrogenase. Electron flow from formate to the heterodisulfide rather than the use of H2 as an intermediate represents a previously unknown path of electron flow in methanogenesis. We further tested whether this path occurs by constructing a mutant lacking F420-nonreducing hydrogenase. The mutant displayed growth equal to wild-type with formate but markedly slower growth with hydrogen. The results support the model of electron bifurcation and suggest that formate, like H2, is closely integrated into the methanogenic pathway. PMID:20534465

  8. 3D structure and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjoberg, Sigurd; Schmiedel, Tobias; Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik H.; Galland, Oliver; Jerram, Dougal A.

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Norwegian Møre margin is regarded as a type example of a volcanic rifted margin, with its formation usually related to the influence of the Icelandic plume activity. The area is characterized by the presence of voluminous basaltic complexes such as extrusive lava sequences, intrusive sills and dikes, and hydrothermal vent complexes within the Møre Basin. Emplacement of hydrothermal vent complexes is accommodated by deformation of the host rock. The edges of igneous intrusions mobilize fluids by heat transfer into the sedimentary host rock (aureoles). Fluid expansion may lead to formation of piercing structures due to upward fluid migration. Hydrothermal vent complexes induce bending of overlying strata, leading to the formation of dome structures at the paleo-surface. These dome structures are important as they indicate the accommodation created for the intrusions by deformation of the upper layers of the stratigraphy, and may form important structures in many volcanic margins. Both the morphological characteristics of the upper part and the underlying feeder-structure (conduit-zone) can be imaged and studied on 3D seismic data. Seismic data from the Tulipan prospect located in the western part of the Møre Basin have been used in this study. The investigation focusses on (1) the vent complex geometries, (2) the induced surface deformation patterns, (3) the relation to the intrusions (heat source), as well as (4) the emplacement depth of the hydrothermal vent complexes. We approach this by doing a detailed 3D seismic interpretation of the Tulipan seismic data cube. The complexes formed during the initial Eocene, and are believed to be a key factor behind the rapid warming event called the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). The newly derived understanding of age, eruptive deposits, and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin enables us to contribute to the general understanding of the igneous plumbing system in volcanic basins and

  9. Using chemical shifts to determine structural changes in proteins upon complex formation.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Andrea; Montalvao, Rinaldo W; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2011-08-04

    Methods for determining protein structures using only chemical shift information are progressively becoming more accurate and reliable. A major problem, however, in the use of chemical shifts for the determination of the structures of protein complexes is that the changes in the chemical shifts upon binding tend to be rather limited and indeed often smaller than the standard errors made in the predictions of chemical shifts corresponding to given structures. We present a procedure that, despite this problem, enables one to use of chemical shifts to determine accurately the conformational changes that take place upon complex formation.

  10. Successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication spectrophotometric method for determination of hydroquinone in complex mixture with its degradation products, tretinoin and methyl paraben.

    PubMed

    Elghobashy, Mohamed R; Bebawy, Lories I; Shokry, Rafeek F; Abbas, Samah S

    2016-03-15

    A sensitive and selective stability-indicating successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication (SRS-CM) spectrophotometric method was studied and developed for the spectrum resolution of five component mixture without prior separation. The components were hydroquinone in combination with tretinoin, the polymer formed from hydroquinone alkali degradation, 1,4 benzoquinone and the preservative methyl paraben. The proposed method was used for their determination in their pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The zero order absorption spectra of hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben were determined at 293, 357.5, 245 and 255.2 nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges of 4.00-46.00, 1.00-7.00, 0.60-5.20, and 1.00-7.00 μg mL(-1) for hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben, respectively. The pharmaceutical formulation was subjected to mild alkali condition and measured by this method resulting in the polymerization of hydroquinone and the formation of toxic 1,4 benzoquinone. The proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the reported method.

  11. Successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication spectrophotometric method for determination of hydroquinone in complex mixture with its degradation products, tretinoin and methyl paraben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elghobashy, Mohamed R.; Bebawy, Lories I.; Shokry, Rafeek F.; Abbas, Samah S.

    2016-03-01

    A sensitive and selective stability-indicating successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication (SRS-CM) spectrophotometric method was studied and developed for the spectrum resolution of five component mixture without prior separation. The components were hydroquinone in combination with tretinoin, the polymer formed from hydroquinone alkali degradation, 1,4 benzoquinone and the preservative methyl paraben. The proposed method was used for their determination in their pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The zero order absorption spectra of hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben were determined at 293, 357.5, 245 and 255.2 nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges of 4.00-46.00, 1.00-7.00, 0.60-5.20, and 1.00-7.00 μg mL- 1 for hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben, respectively. The pharmaceutical formulation was subjected to mild alkali condition and measured by this method resulting in the polymerization of hydroquinone and the formation of toxic 1,4 benzoquinone. The proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the reported method.

  12. Multinuclear complex formation between Ca(II) and gluconate ions in hyperalkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Pallagi, Attila; Bajnóczi, Éva G; Canton, Sophie E; Bolin, Trudy; Peintler, Gábor; Kutus, Bence; Kele, Zoltán; Pálinkó, István; Sipos, Pál

    2014-06-17

    Alkaline solutions containing polyhydroxy carboxylates and Ca(II) are typical in cementitious radioactive waste repositories. Gluconate (Gluc(-)) is a structural and functional representative of these sugar carboxylates. In the current study, the structure and equilibria of complexes forming in such strongly alkaline solutions containing Ca(2+) and gluconate have been studied. It was found that Gluc(-) significantly increases the solubility of portlandite (Ca(OH)2(s)) under these conditions and Ca(2+) complexes of unexpectedly high stability are formed. The mononuclear (CaGluc(+) and [CaGlucOH](0)) complexes were found to be minor species, and predominant multinuclear complexes were identified. The formation of the neutral [Ca2Gluc(OH)3](0) (log β213 = 8.03) and [Ca3Gluc2(OH)4](0) (log β324 = 12.39) has been proven via H2/Pt-electrode potentiometric measurements and was confirmed via XAS, (1)H NMR, ESI-MS, conductometry, and freezing-point depression experiments. The binding sites of Gluc(-) were identified from multinuclear NMR measurements. Besides the carboxylate group, the O atoms on the second and third carbon atoms were proved to be the most probable sites for Ca(2+) binding. The suggested structure of the trinuclear complex was deduced from ab initio calculations. These observations are of relevance in the thermodynamic modeling of radioactive waste repositories, where the predominance of the binuclear Ca(2+) complex, which is a precursor of various high-stability ternary complexes with actinides, is demonstrated.

  13. Green synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles via complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract

    SciTech Connect

    Fatimah, Is Yudha, Septian P.; Mutiara, Nur Afisa Lintang

    2016-02-08

    Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles(NPs) were conducted via Zn(II) complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract as template. Curcuma longa extract has the ability to form zinc ions complex with curcumin as ligating agent. Study on synthesis was conducted by monitoring thermal degradation of the material. Successful formation of zinc oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by employing x-ray diffraction, surface area analysis and transmission electron microscopy(TEM) studies. From the XRD analysis it is denoted that ZnO in hexagonal wurtzite phase was formed and particle size was varied as varied temperature. The data are also confirmed by TEM analysis which shows the particle sie at the range 20-80nm. The NPs exhibited excelent photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation and also significant antibacterial activity for Eschericia coli. The activity in methylene blue degradation was also confirmed from fast chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction.

  14. Green synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles via complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatimah, Is; Yudha, Septian P.; Mutiara, Nur Afisa Lintang

    2016-02-01

    Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles(NPs) were conducted via Zn(II) complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract as template. Curcuma longa extract has the ability to form zinc ions complex with curcumin as ligating agent. Study on synthesis was conducted by monitoring thermal degradation of the material. Successful formation of zinc oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by employing x-ray diffraction, surface area analysis and transmission electron microscopy(TEM) studies. From the XRD analysis it is denoted that ZnO in hexagonal wurtzite phase was formed and particle size was varied as varied temperature. The data are also confirmed by TEM analysis which shows the particle sie at the range 20-80nm. The NPs exhibited excelent photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation and also significant antibacterial activity for Eschericia coli. The activity in methylene blue degradation was also confirmed from fast chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction.

  15. Pattern formation based on complex coupling mechanism in dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weibo; Dong, Lifang; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Hao; Pan, Yuyang

    2016-08-01

    The pattern formation of cinque-dice square superlattice pattern (CDSSP) is investigated based on the complex coupling mechanism in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system. The spatio-temporal structure of CDSSP obtained by using an intensified-charge coupled device indicates that CDSSP is an interleaving of two kinds of subpatterns (mixture of rectangle and square, and dot-line square) which discharge twice in one half voltage, respectively. Selected by the complex coupling of two subpatterns, the CDSSP can be formed and shows good stability. This investigation based on gas discharge theory together with nonlinear theory may provide a deeper understanding for the nonlinear characteristics and even the formation mechanism of patterns in DBD.

  16. Unique behaviour of dinitrogen-bridged dimolybdenum complexes bearing pincer ligand towards catalytic formation of ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Arashiba, Kazuya; Kuriyama, Shogo; Sasada, Akira; Nakajima, Kazunari; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    It is vital to design effective nitrogen fixation systems that operate under mild conditions, and to this end we recently reported an example of the catalytic formation of ammonia using a dinitrogen-bridged dimolybdenum complex bearing a pincer ligand, where up to twenty three equivalents of ammonia were produced based on the catalyst. Here we study the origin of the catalytic behaviour of the dinitrogen-bridged dimolybdenum complex bearing the pincer ligand with density functional theory calculations, based on stoichiometric and catalytic formation of ammonia from molecular dinitrogen under ambient conditions. Comparison of di- and mono-molybdenum systems shows that the dinitrogen-bridged dimolybdenum core structure plays a critical role in the protonation of the coordinated molecular dinitrogen in the catalytic cycle. PMID:24769530

  17. Analysis of functional domains of the host cell factor involved in VP16 complex formation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, T A; La Boissière, S; O'Hare, P

    1999-06-04

    We present biochemical analyses of the regions of the host cell factor (HCF) involved in VP16 complex formation and in the association between the N- and C-terminal domains of HCF itself. We show that the kelch repeat region of HCF (residues 1-380) is sufficient for VP16 complex formation, but that residues C-terminal to the repeats (positions 381-450) interfere with this activity. However, these latter residues are required for the interaction between the N- and C-terminal regions of HCF. The extreme C-terminal region of HCF, corresponding to an area of strong conservation with a Caenorhabditis elegans homologue, is sufficient for interaction with the N-terminal region. These results are discussed with respect to possible differences in the roles of HCF in VP16 activity versus its normal cellular function.

  18. [Energetics of complex formation of the DNA hairpin structure d(GCGAAGC) with aromatic ligands].

    PubMed

    Kostiukov, V V

    2011-01-01

    The energy contributions of various physical interactions to the total Gibbs energy of complex formation of the biologically important DNA hairpin d(GCGAAGC) with aromatic antitumor antibiotics daunomycin and novantron and the mutagens ethidium and proflavine have been calculated. It has been shown that the relatively small value of the total energy of binding of the ligands to the hairpin is the sum of components great in absolute value and different in sign. The contributions of van der Waals interactions and both intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds and bonds with aqueous environment have been studied. According to the calculations, the hydrophobic and van der Waals components are energetically favorable in complex formation of the ligands with the DNA pairpin d(GCGAAGC), whereas the electrostatic (with consideration of hydrogen bonds) and entropic components are unfavorable.

  19. Integrin-Associated Complexes Form Hierarchically with Variable Stoichiometry during Nascent Adhesion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bachir, Alexia I.; Zareno, Jessica; Moissoglu, Konstadinos; Plow, Edward; Gratton, Enrico; Horwitz, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background A complex network of putative molecular interactions underlies the architecture and function of cell-matrix adhesions. Most of these interactions are implicated from co-immunoprecipitation studies using expressed components; but few have been demonstrated or characterized functionally in living cells. Results We introduce fluorescence fluctuation methods to determine, at high spatial and temporal resolution, ‘when’ and ‘where’ molecular complexes form and their stoichiometry in nascent adhesions (NAs). We focus on integrin-associated molecules implicated in integrin-activation and in the integrin-actin linkage in NAs and show that these molecules form integrin containing complexes hierarchically within the adhesion itself. Integrin and kindlin reside in a molecular complex as soon as adhesions are visible; talin, while also present early, associates with the integrin-kindlin complex only after NAs have formed and in response to myosin II activity. Furthermore, talin and vinculin association precedes the formation of the integrin-talin complex. Finally, α-actinin enters NAs periodically and in clusters that transiently associate with integrins. The absolute number and stoichiometry of these molecules varies among the molecules studied and changes as adhesions mature. Conclusions These observations suggest a working model for NA assembly, whereby transient α-actinin- integrin complexes help nucleate NAs within the lamellipodium. Subsequently integrin complexes containing kindlin, but not talin, emerge. Once NAs have formed, myosin II activity promotes talin association with the integrin-kindlin complex in a stoichiometry consistent with each talin molecule linking two integrin-kindlin complexes. PMID:25088556

  20. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of crystalline cobalt tetrakis(4-metoxyphenyl)porphin complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, R. P.; Volkov, A. V.; Bazanov, M. I.; Semeikin, A. S.

    2009-05-01

    The energy of combustion of cobalt tetrakis(4-metoxyphenyl)porphin was determined in an isothermic-shell liquid calorimeter with a stationary calorimetric bomb. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of the complex were calculated, -Δ c H o = 27334.06 ± 50.98 kJ/mol and Δf H o = 3062.90 ± 50.97 kJ/mol.

  1. Display format and highlight validity effects on search performance using complex visual displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donner, Kimberly A.; Mckay, Tim; O'Brien, Kevin M.; Rudisill, Marianne

    1991-01-01

    Display format and highlight validity were shown to affect visual display search performance; however, these studies were conducted on small, artificial displays of alphanumeric stimuli. A study manipulating these variables was conducted using realistic, complex Space Shuttle information displays. A 2x2x3 within-subjects analysis of variance found that search times were faster for items in reformatted displays than for current displays. The significant format by highlight validity interaction showed that there was little difference in response time to both current and reformatted displays when the highlight validity was applied; however, under the non or invalid highlight conditions, search times were faster with reformatted displays. Benefits of highlighting and reformatting displays to enhance search and the necessity to consider highlight validity and format characteristics in tandem for predicting search performance are discussed.

  2. Microscopic Mechanism and Kinetics of Ice Formation at Complex Interfaces: Zooming in on Kaolinite.

    PubMed

    Sosso, Gabriele C; Li, Tianshu; Donadio, Davide; Tribello, Gareth A; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-07-07

    Most ice in nature forms because of impurities which boost the exceedingly low nucleation rate of pure supercooled water. However, the microscopic details of ice nucleation on these substances remain largely unknown. Here, we have unraveled the molecular mechanism and the kinetics of ice formation on kaolinite, a clay mineral playing a key role in climate science. We find that the formation of ice at strong supercooling in the presence of this clay is about 20 orders of magnitude faster than homogeneous freezing. The critical nucleus is substantially smaller than that found for homogeneous nucleation and, in contrast to the predictions of classical nucleation theory (CNT), it has a strong two-dimensional character. Nonetheless, we show that CNT describes correctly the formation of ice at this complex interface. Kaolinite also promotes the exclusive nucleation of hexagonal ice, as opposed to homogeneous freezing where a mixture of cubic and hexagonal polytypes is observed.

  3. Microscopic Mechanism and Kinetics of Ice Formation at Complex Interfaces: Zooming in on Kaolinite

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Most ice in nature forms because of impurities which boost the exceedingly low nucleation rate of pure supercooled water. However, the microscopic details of ice nucleation on these substances remain largely unknown. Here, we have unraveled the molecular mechanism and the kinetics of ice formation on kaolinite, a clay mineral playing a key role in climate science. We find that the formation of ice at strong supercooling in the presence of this clay is about 20 orders of magnitude faster than homogeneous freezing. The critical nucleus is substantially smaller than that found for homogeneous nucleation and, in contrast to the predictions of classical nucleation theory (CNT), it has a strong two-dimensional character. Nonetheless, we show that CNT describes correctly the formation of ice at this complex interface. Kaolinite also promotes the exclusive nucleation of hexagonal ice, as opposed to homogeneous freezing where a mixture of cubic and hexagonal polytypes is observed. PMID:27269363

  4. The LINC complex component Sun4 plays a crucial role in sperm head formation and fertility

    PubMed Central

    Pasch, Elisabeth; Link, Jana; Beck, Carolin; Scheuerle, Stefanie; Alsheimer, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT LINC complexes are evolutionarily conserved nuclear envelope bridges, physically connecting the nucleus to the peripheral cytoskeleton. They are pivotal for dynamic cellular and developmental processes, like nuclear migration, anchoring and positioning, meiotic chromosome movements and maintenance of cell polarity and nuclear shape. Active nuclear reshaping is a hallmark of mammalian sperm development and, by transducing cytoskeletal forces to the nuclear envelope, LINC complexes could be vital for sperm head formation as well. We here analyzed in detail the behavior and function of Sun4, a bona fide testis-specific LINC component. We demonstrate that Sun4 is solely expressed in spermatids and there localizes to the posterior nuclear envelope, likely interacting with Sun3/Nesprin1 LINC components. Our study revealed that Sun4 deficiency severely impacts the nucleocytoplasmic junction, leads to mislocalization of other LINC components and interferes with the formation of the microtubule manchette, which finally culminates in a globozoospermia-like phenotype. Together, our study provides direct evidence for a critical role of LINC complexes in mammalian sperm head formation and male fertility. PMID:26621829

  5. Role of thiol-complex formation in 2-hydroxyethyl- methacrylate-induced toxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Samuelsen, J T; Kopperud, H M; Holme, J A; Dragland, I S; Christensen, T; Dahl, J E

    2011-02-01

    Methacrylate monomers that are found to leach from cured resin-based dental materials induce biological effects in vitro. The underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated although involvement of increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA-damage has been suggested. In this in vitro study we have elucidated the impact of a commonly used methacrylate monomer, HEMA, on the level and oxidation state of cellular glutathione, intracellular ROS level, as well as the formation of complex between HEMA and glutathione. HEMA exposure rapidly led to increased level of ROS and reduced level of GSH (reduced form of glutathione). Antioxidants effectively counteracted the ROS increase, but had no effect on the GSH depletion. No change in glutathione-disulphide (GSSG; oxidized form of glutathione) concentration was detected in the HEMA treated cells, showing that oxidation of glutathione was not responsible for the reduced GSH concentration. Further we demonstrated spontaneous formation of a complex between HEMA and GSH. In conclusion, we showed that exposure to HEMA led to drop in cellular glutathione level probably caused by complex formation with HEMA. A similar covalent binding of HEMA to macromolecules combined with increased level of cellular ROS due to lower levels of GSH is suggested to be important factors triggering the toxic response.

  6. True boundary for the formation of homoleptic transition-metal hydride complexes.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Iijima, Yuki; Sato, Toyoto; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Miwa, Kazutoshi; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2015-05-04

    Despite many exploratory studies over the past several decades, the presently known transition metals that form homoleptic transition-metal hydride complexes are limited to the Groups 7-12. Here we present evidence for the formation of Mg3 CrH8 , containing the first Group 6 hydride complex [CrH7 ](5-) . Our theoretical calculations reveal that pentagonal-bipyramidal H coordination allows the formation of σ-bonds between H and Cr. The results are strongly supported by neutron diffraction and IR spectroscopic measurements. Given that the Group 3-5 elements favor ionic/metallic bonding with H, along with the current results, the true boundary for the formation of homoleptic transition-metal hydride complexes should be between Group 5 and 6. As the H coordination number generally tends to increase with decreasing atomic number of transition metals, the revised boundary suggests high potential for further discovery of hydrogen-rich materials that are of both technological and fundamental interest.

  7. Rapid formation of cell-particle complexes via dielectrophoretic manipulation for the detection of surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Horii, Takuma; Yamamoto, Masashi; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Fumio

    2014-11-15

    A rapid and simple method for the fabrication of the island patterns with particles and cells was applied to detect the presence of specific antigens on the cell surface. An upper interdigitated microband array (IDA) electrode was mounted on a lower substrate with the same design to fabricate a microfluidic-channel device for dielectrophoretic manipulation. The electrode grid structure was fabricated by rotating the upper template IDA by 90° relative to the lower IDA. A suspension of anti-CD33 modified particles and HL-60 cells was introduced into the channel. An AC electrical signal (typically 20 V peak-to-peak, 100 kHz) was then applied to the bands of the upper and lower IDAs, resulting in the formation of island patterns at the intersections with low electric fields. Immunoreactions between the antibodies immobilized on the accumulated particles and the CD33 present on the surface of the cells led to the formation of complexes comprising corresponding antigen-antibody pairs. Non-specific pairs accumulated at the intersection, which did not form complexes, were then dispersed after removal of the applied field. The time required for the detection of the formation/dispersion of the complexes is as short as 6 min in the present procedure. Furthermore, this novel cell binding assay does not require pretreatment such as target labeling or washing of the unbound cells.

  8. Premelting base pair opening probability and drug binding constant of a daunomycin-poly d(GCAT).poly d(ATGC) complex.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y Z; Prohofsky, E W

    1994-01-01

    We calculate room temperature thermal fluctuational base pair opening probability of a daunomycin-poly d(GCAT).poly d(ATGC) complex. This system is constructed at an atomic level of detail based on x-ray analysis of a crystal structure. The base pair opening probabilities are calculated from a modified self-consistent phonon approach of anharmonic lattice dynamics theory. We find that daunomycin binding substantially enhances the thermal stability of one of the base pairs adjacent the drug because of strong hydrogen bonding between the drug and the base. The possible effect of this enhanced stability on the drug inhibition of DNA transcription and replication is discussed. We also calculate the probability of drug dissociation from the helix based on the selfconsistent calculation of the probability of the disruption of drug-base H-bonds and the unstacking probability of the drug. The calculations can be used to determine the equilibrium drug binding constant which is found to be in good agreement with observations on similar daunomycin-DNA systems. PMID:8011914

  9. Massive Star Formation in the Cygnus-X DR15 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Anna; Hora, Joseph L.; Zhang, Qizhou

    2017-01-01

    To unravel the mysteries of massive star formation it is necessary to observe Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) in a variety of environments and evolutionary stages. The Cygnus-X region, at a distance of 1.4kpc, is one of the closest massive star-forming complexes and so offers an excellent view of the earliest stages of massive stars and clusters. A key area in this complex is DR15, a cluster population with many intriguing objects including a molecular pillar and InfraRed Dark Cloud (IRDC) that is likely to host newly forming massive stars. Previous infrared studies incorporating data from Spitzer and Herschel have built catalogs of YSOs in the DR15 region, revealing its abundance of massive star formation. To improve on these catalogs and to probe the earliest stages of star formation, we have observed the region at high spatial resolution using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA data are more sensitive to objects in earlier evolutionary phases and provide additional constraints when modeling the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of each star, resulting in more accurate values for each star’s mass and accretion rate. The SMA data allow us to trace the particular YSOs that are actively accreting and drive molecular outflows, which influence the ISM and chemical trends across the region. DR15 offers an exciting chance to expand our understanding of the processes behind massive star formation.

  10. Carotenoid-induced cooperative formation of bacterial photosynthetic LH1 complex.

    PubMed

    Fiedor, Leszek; Akahane, Junji; Koyama, Yasushi

    2004-12-28

    A simple reconstitution technique has been developed and then applied to prepare a series of light-harvesting antenna 1 (LH1) complexes with a programmed carotenoid composition, not available from native photosynthetic membranes. The complexes were reconstituted with different C(40) carotenoids, having two structural parameters variable: the functional side groups and the number of conjugated C-C double bonds, systematically increasing from 9 to 13. The complexes, differing only in the type of carotenoid, bound to an otherwise identical bacteriochlorophyll-polypeptide matrix, can serve as a unique model system in which the relationship between the carotenoid character and the functioning of pigment-protein complexes can be investigated. The reconstituted LH1 complexes resemble the native antenna, isolated from wild-type Rhodospirillum rubrum, but their coloration is entirely determined by carotenoid. Along with the increase in its conjugation size, the carotenoid absorption transitions gradually shift to the red. Thus, the extension of the conjugation size of the antenna carotenoids provides a mechanism for the spectral tuning of light harvesting in the visible part of the spectrum. The carotenoids in the reconstitution system promote the LH1 formation and seem to bind and transfer the excitation energy specifically only to a species with characteristically red-shifted absorption and emission maxima, apparently, due to a cooperative effect. Monitoring the LH1 formation by steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies reveals that in the presence of carotenoids it proceeds without spectrally resolved intermediates, leading directly to B880. The effect of the carotenoid is enhanced when the pigment contains the hydroxy or methoxy side groups, implying that, in parallel to hydrophobic interactions and pi-pi stacking, other interactions are also involved in the formation and stabilization of LH1.

  11. Formylglycinamide Ribonucleotide Amidotransferase from Thermotoga maritima: Structural Insights into Complex Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Morar, Mariya; Hoskins, Aaron A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-10-02

    In the fourth step of the purine biosynthetic pathway, formyl glycinamide ribonucleotide (FGAR) amidotransferase, also known as PurL, catalyzes the conversion of FGAR, ATP, and glutamine to formyl glycinamidine ribonucleotide (FGAM), ADP, P{sub i}, and glutamate. Two forms of PurL have been characterized, large and small. Large PurL, present in most Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes, consists of a single polypeptide chain and contains three major domains: the N-terminal domain, the FGAM synthetase domain, and the glutaminase domain, with a putative ammonia channel located between the active sites of the latter two. Small PurL, present in Gram-positive bacteria and archaea, is structurally homologous to the FGAM synthetase domain of large PurL, and forms a complex with two additional gene products, PurQ and PurS. The structure of the PurS dimer is homologous with the N-terminal domain of large PurL, while PurQ, whose structure has not been reported, contains the glutaminase activity. In Bacillus subtilis, the formation of the PurLQS complex is dependent on glutamine and ADP and has been demonstrated by size-exclusion chromatography. In this work, a structure of the PurLQS complex from Thermotoga maritima is described revealing a 2:1:1 stoichiometry of PurS:Q:L, respectively. The conformational changes observed in TmPurL upon complex formation elucidate the mechanism of metabolite-mediated recruitment of PurQ and PurS. The flexibility of the PurS dimer is proposed to play a role in the activation of the complex and the formation of the ammonia channel. A potential path for the ammonia channel is identified.

  12. Formation and Recondensation of Complex Organic Molecules during Protostellar Luminosity Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Vianney; Wirström, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-04-01

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion-molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude.

  13. FORMATION AND RECONDENSATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES DURING PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY OUTBURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Taquet, Vianney; Wirström, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-04-10

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion–molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude.

  14. Formation and Recondensation of Complex Organic Molecules During Protostellar Luminosity Outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taquet, Vianney; Wirstrom, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion-molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude.

  15. Structure of solvated Fe(CO)5: complex formation during solvation in alcohols.

    PubMed

    Lessing, Joshua; Li, Xiaodi; Lee, Taewoo; Rose-Petruck, Christoph G

    2008-03-20

    The equilibrium structure of iron pentacarbonyl, Fe(CO)5, solvated in various alcohols has been investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements and density functional theory calculations. This system was studied because it is prototypical of a larger class of monometallic systems, which are electronically saturated but not sterically crowded. Upon solvation, the Fe(CO)5 is not just surrounded by a solvation shell. Instead, solute-solvent complexes are formed with the oxygen of the alcohol oriented toward an axial ligand of the Fe(CO)5 giving a formation energy on the order of -5 kJ/mol. This complexation is not a chemical reaction but rather a "preassembly" of the solute molecules with a single solvent molecule. For instance, at room temperature the interaction between Fe(CO)5 and ethanol results in 87% of all Fe(CO)5 molecules being complexated with a single ethanol molecule. This complexation was found in all the alcohol systems studied in this paper. The stability of these complexes was found to depend on the alcohol chain length and branching. The observed complexation mechanism is accompanied by an electron density shift from the complexed alcohol molecule toward Fe(CO)5 where it induces a dipole moment. The finding that Fe(CO)5 forms a complex with the hydroxyl group of a single solvent molecule might have significant implications for ligand substitution reactions. This implies that ligand substitution reactions do not have to proceed via a dissociative mechanism. Instead, the reaction might proceed through a concerted mechanism with the leaving CO simultaneously being replaced by the incoming alcohol that was complexed to Fe(CO)5 prior to the photoexcitation.

  16. Spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric determination of certain diuretics through ternary complex formation with eosin and lead (II).

    PubMed

    Omar, Mahmoud A

    2010-01-01

    Simple and sensitive spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric methods have been developed for the determination of hydrochlorothiazide (I), indapamide (II) and xipamide(III) based on ternary complex formation with eosin and lead (II) in the presence of methylcellulose as surfactant. The methods do not involve solvent extraction. For spectrophotometric method, the ternary complex showed an absorption maximum at 543 nm. The factors affecting the formation of ternary complex were studied and optimized. The method obeys Beer's law over concentration range of 8-40 microg mL(-1). A fluorescence quenching method for the determination of the cited drugs by forming this ternary complex was also investigated for the purpose of enhancing the sensitivity of the determination. The analytical performance of both methods was fully validated, and the results were satisfactory. The methods have been successfully applied for the determination of the studied drugs in their pharmaceutical tablets and the results obtained ware in good agreement with those obtained by the reference method. Common excipients used as additives in tablets do not interfere with the proposed methods.

  17. Modifications of the acyl-d-alanyl-d-alanine terminus affecting complex-formation with vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, M.; Perkins, H. R.

    1971-01-01

    Vancomycin forms complexes with peptides terminating in d-alanyl-d-alanine that are analogous to the biosynthetic precursors of bacterial mucopeptides. The specificity of complex-formation has been studied by means of many synthetic peptides, prepared by both solid-phase and conventional methods. The following conclusions can be drawn: (a) three amide linkages are required to form a stable complex; (b) the terminal carboxyl group must be free; (c) the carboxyl terminal and subterminal residues must be either glycine or of the d-configuration; (d) the size of the side chain in these residues greatly influences the affinity for vancomycin, a methyl group being the optimum in each case; (e) the nature of the side chain in the third and fourth residues has a smaller effect on complex-formation, but an l-configuration was somewhat better than a d-configuration in the third position. In addition to acyl-d-alanyl-d-alanine, other peptides that occur in bacterial cell walls will combine with vancomycin, although less strongly, e.g. acyl-d-alanyl-d-α-amino acid (where the terminal d-residue may form the cross-link in mucopeptide structure) and acyl-l-alanyl-d-glutamylglycine (a sequence found in the mucopeptide of Micrococcus lysodeikticus and related organisms). These results throw some light on the specificity of the uptake of vancomycin by living bacteria. PMID:5124386

  18. Perfluoroalkyl Cobalt(III) Fluoride and Bis(perfluoroalkyl) Complexes: Catalytic Fluorination and Selective Difluorocarbene Formation.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Matthew C; Bayne, Julia M; Lee, Graham M; Gorelsky, Serge I; Vasiliu, Monica; Korobkov, Ilia; Harrison, Daniel J; Dixon, David A; Baker, R Tom

    2015-12-30

    Four perfluoroalkyl cobalt(III) fluoride complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and powder X-ray diffraction. The remarkable cobalt fluoride (19)F NMR chemical shifts (-716 to -759 ppm) were studied computationally, and the contributing paramagnetic and diamagnetic factors were extracted. Additionally, the complexes were shown to be active in the catalytic fluorination of p-toluoyl chloride. Furthermore, two examples of cobalt(III) bis(perfluoroalkyl)complexes were synthesized and their reactivity studied. Interestingly, abstraction of a fluoride ion from these complexes led to selective formation of cobalt difluorocarbene complexes derived from the trifluoromethyl ligand. These electrophilic difluorocarbenes were shown to undergo insertion into the remaining perfluoroalkyl fragment, demonstrating the elongation of a perfluoroalkyl chain arising from a difluorocarbene insertion on a cobalt metal center. The reactions of both the fluoride and bis(perfluoroalkyl) complexes provide insight into the potential catalytic applications of these model systems to form small fluorinated molecules as well as fluoropolymers.

  19. Actomyosin-dependent formation of the mechanosensitive talin-vinculin complex reinforces actin anchoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanasu, Corina; Faivre, Bruno; Le Clainche, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The force generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton controls focal adhesion dynamics during cell migration. This process is thought to involve the mechanical unfolding of talin to expose cryptic vinculin-binding sites. However, the ability of the actomyosin cytoskeleton to directly control the formation of a talin-vinculin complex and the resulting activity of the complex are not known. Here we develop a microscopy assay with pure proteins in which the self-assembly of actomyosin cables controls the association of vinculin to a talin-micropatterned surface in a reversible manner. Quantifications indicate that talin refolding is limited by vinculin dissociation and modulated by the actomyosin network stability. Finally, we show that the activation of vinculin by stretched talin induces a positive feedback that reinforces the actin-talin-vinculin association. This in vitro reconstitution reveals the mechanism by which a key molecular switch senses and controls the connection between adhesion complexes and the actomyosin cytoskeleton.

  20. Effects of formate binding on the quinone-iron electron acceptor complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Sedoud, Arezki; Kastner, Lisa; Cox, Nicholas; El-Alaoui, Sabah; Kirilovsky, Diana; Rutherford, A William

    2011-02-01

    EPR was used to study the influence of formate on the electron acceptor side of photosystem II (PSII) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Two new EPR signals were found and characterized. The first is assigned to the semiquinone form of Q(B) interacting magnetically with a high spin, non-heme-iron (Fe²(+), S=2) when the native bicarbonate/carbonate ligand is replaced by formate. This assignment is based on several experimental observations, the most important of which were: (i) its presence in the dark in a significant fraction of centers, and (ii) the period-of-two variations in the concentration expected for Q(B)(•-) when PSII underwent a series of single-electron turnovers. This signal is similar but not identical to the well-know formate-modified EPR signal observed for the Q(A)(•-)Fe²(+) complex (W.F.J. Vermaas and A.W. Rutherford, FEBS Lett. 175 (1984) 243-248). The formate-modified signals from Q(A)(•-)Fe²(+) and Q(B)(•-)Fe²(+) are also similar to native semiquinone-iron signals (Q(A)(•-)Fe²(+)/Q(B)(•-)Fe²(+)) seen in purple bacterial reaction centers where a glutamate provides the carboxylate ligand to the iron. The second new signal was formed when Q(A)(•-) was generated in formate-inhibited PSII when the secondary acceptor was reduced by two electrons. While the signal is reminiscent of the formate-modified semiquinone-iron signals, it is broader and its main turning point has a major sub-peak at higher field. This new signal is attributed to the Q(A)(•-)Fe²(+) with formate bound but which is perturbed when Q(B) is fully reduced, most likely as Q(B)H₂ (or possibly Q(B)H(•-) or Q(B)(²•-)). Flash experiments on formate-inhibited PSII monitoring these new EPR signals indicate that the outcome of charge separation on the first two flashes is not greatly modified by formate. However on the third flash and subsequent flashes, the modified Q(A)(•-)Fe²(+)Q(B)H₂ signal is trapped in the EPR experiment and there is a marked

  1. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found

  2. Structural Complexities Influencing Biostratigraphic Interpretations of the Permian Nansen Formation type-section, Ellesmere Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, M.; Guest, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Carboniferous to Permian aged Nansen Formation is a cyclic carbonate shelf deposit and potential hydrocarbon reservoir. This formation is the thickest, most widespread carbonate sequence in the Sverdrup Basin. Deformed during the Eurekan Orogeny, the Nansen Fm. is topographically prominent and responsible for the rugged topography on Axel Heiburg and Ellesmere Island. The type-section for the Nansen Fm. is located on the north side of Hare Fiord, along Girty Creek. At this location there is an estimated stratigraphic thickness of 2 km. Due to easier access most of the stratigraphic work has been completed on nearby glacially exposed sections that traverse parallel to Girty Creek along glacial margins. Extensive biostratigraphy was completed on a glacier section to the west, however, in a glacier section to the east of Girty Creek, structural complexities appear to be repeating sections of the formation. Here, the Nansen formation is bounded by two regional reverse faults. This has produced duplex structures, with clearly exposed stacked horses, footwall synclines, and truncations. By projecting the structures observed along the eastern glacier section to the western glacier section that was used for biostratigraphic studies, it is clear that these structures would affect biostratigraphic interpretations. It was previously noted by biostratigraphers that thrust faults appear to be repeating sections of the Nansen formation. However by correlating all observed faults with the biostratigraphy, we can determine the extent to which the faulting has affected the interpretations, and whether all faults or stratigraphic repetitions are accounted for.

  3. Toward a Reduced Complexity Channel Resolving Model for Sedimentary Delta Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, M.; Voller, V. R.; Edmonds, D. A.; Paola, C.

    2010-12-01

    Predicting styles of delta growth in restoration areas is a challenge as we try to restore impacted coastlines. Cellular and rule-based reduced complexity models offer a worthwhile means of uncovering key dynamics in delta morphodynamics without the need to fully solve the governing transport equations. In terms of modeling sedimentary delta building processes a critical ingredients is accounting for the formation and bifurcation of channels; phenomena that can be related to the formation of levees and mouth-bars. To that end, we have developed a reduced complexity model that uses a simplified shallow-water solver to study channel formation, mouth bar deposition, and delta development under different forcings. Under the assumption that the flow has a very low Froude Number (Fr2<<1), the inertia term is dropped out and only the gravitational term and friction term remain in the momentum equation. The coupled mass conservation equation becomes a non-linear diffusive equation, which is linearized by a Kirchhoff transformation. Directional diffusivity is added to this system to compensate the loss of inertia and promote spreading of the turbulent jet. We test the reduced model against flow over Gaussian-shaped bumps of various heights. Comparison of results from this model with results from a full scale commercial code (Delft3D) show a satisfactory agreement on the critical mouth bar height needed to divert flow around the bar. Based on the same diffusive equation, we develop a low-Froude water-routing method for reduced complexity morphodynamics models. The preliminary results show that the method is capable of producing reasonable channel forms and mouth bar formation, and provides a good starting point for development of a channel resolving delta building model.

  4. Galvanic Cells and the Determination of Equilibrium Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosmer, Jonathan L.; Peters, Dennis G.

    2012-01-01

    Readily assembled mini-galvanic cells can be employed to compare their observed voltages with those predicted from the Nernst equation and to determine solubility products for silver halides and overall formation constants for metal-ammonia complexes. Results obtained by students in both an honors-level first-year course in general chemistry and…

  5. Ab initio study of the formation of vacancy and hydrogen-vacancy complexes in palladium and its hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supryadkina, I. A.; Bazhanov, D. I.; Ilyushin, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the results of ab initio calculations of vacancy and hydrogen-vacancy complexes in palladium and palladium hydride. Comparative analysis of the energies of the formation of defect complexes in palladium and its hydride has revealed that the formation of vacancy clusters is easier in the palladium hydride structure. Investigation of hydrogen-vacancy complexes in bulk crystalline palladium has shown that a hydrogen atom and a vacancy interact to form a stable hydrogen-vacancy (H-Vac) defect complex with a binding energy of E b = -0.21 eV. To investigate the initial stage in the formation of hydrogen-vacancy complexes (H n -Vac m ), we consider the clusterization of defects into clusters containing H-Vac and H2-Vac complexes as a structural unit. It is found that hydrogen-vacancy complexes form 2D defect structures in palladium in the (100)-type planes.

  6. Rate of carotenoid triplet formation in solubilized light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) from spinach.

    PubMed Central

    Schödel, R; Irrgang, K D; Voigt, J; Renger, G

    1998-01-01

    In the present study the rate of triplet transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids in solubilized LHCII was investigated by flash spectroscopy using laser pulses of approximately 2 ns for both pump and probe. Special attention has been paid to calibration of the experimental setup and to avoid saturation effects. Carotenoid triplets were identified by the pronounced positive peak at approximately 507 nm in the triplet-singlet difference spectra. DeltaOD (507 nm) exhibits a monoexponential relaxation kinetics with characteristic lifetimes of 2-9 micros (depending on the oxygen content) that was found to be independent of the pump pulse intensity. The rise of DeltaOD (507 nm) was resolved via a pump probe technique where an optical delay of up to 20 ns was used. A thorough analysis of these experimental data leads to the conclusion that the kinetics of carotenoid triplet formation in solubilized LHCII is almost entirely limited by the lifetime of the excited singlet state of chlorophyll but neither by the pulse width nor by the rate constant of triplet-triplet transfer. Within the experimental error the rate constant of triplet-triplet transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids was estimated to be kTT > (0.5 ns)-1. This value exceeds all data reported so far by at least one order of magnitude. The implications of this finding are briefly discussed. PMID:9826635

  7. Complete stereocontrol in the synthesis of macrocyclic lanthanide complexes: direct formation of enantiopure systems for circularly polarised luminescence applications.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nicholas H; Carr, Rachel; Delbianco, Martina; Pal, Robert; Yufit, Dmitry S; Parker, David

    2013-11-28

    Mono-C-substitution of the 1,4,7-triazacyclononane ring induces formation of single enantiomers of Eu(III) complexes with nonadentate N6O3 ligands. The absolute configuration of each complex is determined by the stereogenicity of the C-substituent, revealed by comparison of the sign and sequence of CPL transitions for a series of complexes.

  8. Molybdenum Hydride and Dihydride Complexes Bearing Diphosphine Ligands with a Pendant Amine: Formation of Complexes With Bound Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shaoguang; Bullock, R. Morris

    2015-07-06

    CpMo(CO)(PNP)H complexes (PNP = (R2PCH2)2NMe, R = Et or Ph) were synthesized by displacement of two CO ligands of CpMo(CO)3H by the PNP ligand; these complexes were characterized by IR and variable temperature 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. CpMo(CO)(PNP)H complexes are formed as mixture of cis and trans-isomers. Both cis-CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and trans-CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H were analyzed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical oxidation of CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H in CH3CN are both irreversible at slow scan rates and quasi-reversible at higher scan rates, with E1/2 = -0.36 V (vs. Cp2Fe+/0) for CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and E1/2 = -0.18 V for CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H. Hydride abstraction from CpMo(CO)(PNP)H with [Ph3C]+[A]- (A = B(C6F5)4 or BArF4; [ArF = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]) afforded “tuck-in” [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PNP)]+ complexes that feature the amine bound to the metal. Displacement of the κ3 Mo-N bond by CD3CN gives [CpMo(CO)(PNP)(CD3CN)]+. The kinetics of this reaction were studied by NMR spectroscopy, providing the activation parameters ΔH‡ = 22.1 kcal/mol, ΔS‡ = 1.89 cal/(mol·K), Ea = 22.7 kcal/mol. Protonation of CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H affords [CpMo(CO)(κ2-PEtNMePEt)(H)2]+ as a Mo dihydride complex, which loses H2 to generate [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PEtNMePEt)]+ at room temperature. CpMo(CO)(dppp)H (dppp = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) was studied as a Mo diphosphine analogue without a pendant amine, and the product of protonation of this complex gives [CpMo(CO)(dppp)(H)2]+. Our results show that the pendant amine has a strong driving force to form stable “tuck-in” [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PNP)]+ complexes, and also promotes hydrogen elimination from [CpMo(CO)(PNP)(H)2]+ complexes by formation of Mo-N dative bond. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by

  9. Revised nomenclature and stratigraphic relationships of the Fredericksburg Complex and Quantico Formation of the Virginia Piedmont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlides, Louis

    1980-01-01

    The Fredericksburg Complex, in part a migmatitic terrane in northeast Virginia, is subdivided on the basis of lithology, as well as aeromagnetic and aeroradiometric data, into two metamorphic suites. These suites are separated by the northeast-trending Spotsylvania lineament, a rectilinear geophysical feature that is probably the trace of an old fault zone. East of the lineament, the Po River Metamorphic Suite, of Proterozoic Z and (or) early Paleozoic age, consists dominantly of biotite gneiss, generally augen gneiss, and lesser amounts of hornblende gneiss and mica schist. West of the Spotsylvania lineament is the Ta River Metamorphic Suite, composed mostly of amphibolite and amphibole gneiss. However, to the southwest, along its strike belt, the Ta River contains abundant biotite gneiss and mica schist. Both the Ta River and Po River contain abundant foliated granitoid and pegmatoid bodies as concordant tabular masses and as crosscutting dikes; these rocks are considered part of the Ta River and Po River Metamorphic Suites. The amphibolitic Holly Corner Gneiss is interpreted to be a western allochthonous equivalent of the Ta River. Both the Ta River and Holly Corner are considered to be coeval, eastern, distal facies of the Lower Cambrian(?) Chopawamsic Formation. The Paleozoic Falls Run Granite Gneiss intrudes the Ta River Metamorphic Suite and the Holly Corner Gneiss; locally the Falls Run is interpreted to have been transported westward with the Holly Corner after intrusion. The Quantico Formation, in the core of the Quantico-Columbia synclinorium, rests with angular unconformity along its northwest and southeast limbs, respectively, on the Chopawamsic Formation and the Ta River Metamorphic Suite. The Quantico Formation is assigned the same Late Ordovician age and similar stratigraphic position as the Arvonia Slate of the Arvonia syncline. The youngest rocks of the area are the granitoid and pegmatoid bodies of the Falmouth Intrusive Suite. They consist of

  10. Experimental studies of complex crater formation under cluster implantation of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasalovich, S.; Popok, V.; Persson, P.; Campbell, E. E. B.

    2005-10-01

    The results of a systematic study of surface defect formation after energetic Arn+ (n = 12, 22, 32, 54) and Xen+ (n = 4, 16) cluster ion implantation into silicon and sapphire are presented. Implantation energies vary from 3 to 18 keV/ion. Two cases of comparative studies are carried out: the same cluster species are implanted into two different substrates, i.e. Arn+ cluster ions into silicon and sapphire and two different cluster species Arn+ and Xen+ are implanted into the same kind of substrate (silicon). Atomic force, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopies (AFM, SEM and TEM) are used to study the implanted samples. The analysis reveals the formation of two types of surface erosion defects: simple and complex (with centrally positioned hillock) craters. It is found that the ratio of simple to complex crater formation as well as the hillock dimensions depend strongly on the cluster species, size and impact energy as well as on the type of substrate material. Qualitative models describing the two comparative cases of cluster implantation, the case of different cluster species and the case of different substrate materials, are proposed.

  11. CARBON DIOXIDE INFLUENCE ON THE THERMAL FORMATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Cottin, H.; Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T.

    2015-08-20

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Influence on the Thermal Formation of Complex Organic Molecules in Interstellar Ice Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Duvernay, F.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Chiavassa, T.; Cottin, H.

    2015-08-01

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H2O, NH3, CO2, H2CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites.

  13. In vivo formation and binding of SeHg complexes to the erythrocyte surface.

    PubMed

    Cherdwongcharoensuk, Duangrudee; Oliveira, Maria João; Aguas, Artur Perez

    2010-08-01

    The in vivo dynamics of selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) interaction was studied in mouse tissues using direct visualization of individual Se, Hg, and SeHg particles on the surface of circulating erythrocytes. This high-resolution detection of Se and Hg was obtained by scanning electron microscopy coupled to X-ray microanalysis. BALB/c mice were injected in the peritoneal cavity with Se and Hg salts, and the animals were sacrificed 3 min after the Hg injection. Only a minority (9%) of the metal dots seen on mouse liver erythrocytes were SeHg complexes when Se and Hg salts were mixed together before injection. In contrast, the majority (73%) of metal dots on liver erythrocytes were SeHg complexes if Se was injected at least 5 min before Hg injection. All metal dots on liver erythrocytes were of SeHg complexes if Se was injected 9 or 12 min before the Hg injection. We conclude that the formation of stable in vivo SeHg complexes requires preliminary interaction of Se with a putative serum factor before complexes between Se and Hg are formed and are bound to the erythrocyte cell surface.

  14. In vivo dynamics of chromatin-associated complex formation in mammalian nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Moné, Martijn J.; Bernas, Tytus; Dinant, Christoffel; Goedvree, Feliks A.; Manders, Erik M. M.; Volker, Marcel; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Vermeulen, Wim; van Driel, Roel

    2004-01-01

    Chromatin is the substrate for many processes in the cell nucleus, including transcription, replication, and various DNA repair systems, all of which require the formation of multiprotein machineries on the chromatin fiber. We have analyzed the kinetics of in vivo assembly of the protein complex that is responsible for nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Assembly is initiated by UV irradiation of a small area of the cell nucleus, after which the accumulation of GFP-tagged NER proteins in the DNA-damaged area is measured, reflecting the establishment of the dual-incision complex. The dynamic behavior of two NER proteins, ERCC1-XPF and TFIIH, was studied in detail. Results show that the repair complex is assembled with a rate of ≈30 complexes per second and is not diffusion limited. Furthermore, we provide in vivo evidence that not only binding of TFIIH, but also its helicase activity, is required for the recruitment of ERCC1-XPF. These studies give quantitative insight into the de novo assembly of a chromatin-associated protein complex in living cells. PMID:15520397

  15. Formation mechanism and biological activity of novel thiolated human-like collagen iron complex.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chenhui; Liu, Lingyun; Deng, Jianjun; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Hui, Junfeng; Fan, Daidi

    2016-03-01

    To develop an iron supplement that is effectively absorbed and utilized, thiolated human-like collagen was created to improve the iron binding capacity of human-like collagen. A thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex was prepared in a phosphate buffer, and one mole of thiolated human-like collagen-iron possessed approximately 28.83 moles of iron. The characteristics of thiolated human-like collagen-iron were investigated by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry. The results showed that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex retained the secondary structure of human-like collagen and had greater thermodynamic stability than human-like collagen, although interactions between iron ions and human-like collagen occurred during the formation of the complex. In addition, to evaluate the bioavailability of thiolated human-like collagen-iron, an in vitro Caco-2 cell model and an in vivo iron deficiency anemia mouse model were employed. The data demonstrated that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex exhibited greater bioavailability and was more easily utilized than FeSO4, ferric ammonium citrate, or ferrous glycinate. These results indicated that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex is a potential iron supplement in the biomedical field.

  16. Interaction and formation mechanism of binary complex between zein and propylene glycol alginate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cuixia; Dai, Lei; Gao, Yanxiang

    2017-02-10

    The anti-solvent co-precipitation method was used to fabricate the zein-propylene glycol alginate (PGA) binary complex with different mass ratios of zein to PGA (20:1, 10:1, 5:1, 2:1 and 1:1) at pH 4.0. Results showed that attractive electrostatic interaction between zein and PGA occurred and negatively charged binary complex with large size and high turbidity was formed due to the charge neutralization. Hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic effects were involved in the interactions between zein and PGA, leading to the changed secondary structure and improved thermal stability of zein. Aggregates in the irregular shape with large size were obviously observed in the AFM images. PGA alone exhibited a fine filamentous network structure, while zein-PGA binary complex showed a rough branch-like pattern and the surface of "branch" was closely adsorbed by lots of spherical zein particles. Q in zein-PGA binary complex dispersions presented the improved photochemical and thermal stability. The potential mechanism of a two-step process was proposed to explain the formation of zein-PGA binary complexes.

  17. Presenilin and nicastrin regulate each other and determine amyloid β-peptide production via complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Edbauer, Dieter; Winkler, Edith; Haass, Christian; Steiner, Harald

    2002-01-01

    Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is generated by the consecutive cuts of two membrane-bound proteases. β-Secretase cuts at the N terminus of the Aβ domain, whereas γ-secretase mediates the C-terminal cut. Recent evidence suggests that the presenilin (PS) proteins, PS1 and PS2, may be γ-secretases. Because PSs principally exist as high molecular weight protein complexes, biologically active γ-secretases likely require other cofactors such as nicastrin (Nct) for their activities. Here we show that preferentially mature Nct forms a stable complex with PSs. Furthermore, we have down-regulated Nct levels by using a highly specific and efficient RNA interference approach. Very similar to a loss of PS function, down-regulation of Nct levels leads to a massive accumulation of the C-terminal fragments of the β-amyloid precursor protein. In addition, Aβ production was markedly reduced. Strikingly, down-regulation of Nct destabilized PS and strongly lowered levels of the high molecular weight PS1 complex. Interestingly, absence of the PS1 complex in PS1−/− cells was associated with a strong down-regulation of the levels of mature Nct, suggesting that binding to PS is required for trafficking of Nct through the secretory pathway. Based on these findings we conclude that Nct and PS regulate each other and determine γ-secretase function via complex formation. PMID:12048259

  18. Complex formation equilibria of Cu(II) and Zn(II) with triethylenetetramine and its mono- and di-acetyl metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nurchi, Valeria M; Crisponi, Guido; Crespo-Alonso, Miriam; Lachowicz, Joanna I; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Cooper, Garth J S

    2013-05-07

    Triethylenetetramine (TETA) dihydrochloride, or trientine, is a therapeutic molecule that has long been used as a copper-chelating agent for the second-line treatment of patients with Wilson's disease. More recently, it has also been employed as an experimental therapeutic molecule in diabetes where it improves cardiac structure in patients with diabetic cardiomyopathy and left-ventricular hypertrophy. TETA is metabolized by acetylation, which leads to the formation of two main metabolites in humans and other mammals, monoacetyl-TETA (MAT) and diacetyl-TETA (DAT). These metabolites have been identified in the plasma and urine of healthy and diabetic subjects treated with TETA, and could themselves play a role in TETA-mediated copper chelation and restoration of physiological copper regulation in diabetes. In this regard, a potentiometric and spectrophotometric study of Cu(II)-complex formation equilibria of TETA, MAT and DAT is presented here, to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the stoichiometries of the complexes formed and of their relative stability constants. A potentiometric study has also been conducted on the corresponding Zn(II) complexes, to evaluate any possible interference with TETA-mediated Cu(II) binding by this second physiological transition-metal ion, which is present in similar concentrations in human plasma and which also binds to TETA. An ESI-MS study of these systems has both confirmed the complex formation mechanisms established from the potentiometric and spectrophotometric results, and in addition provided direct information on the stoichiometry of the complexes formed in solution. These data when taken together show that the 1 : 1 complexes formed with Cu(II) and Zn(II) have different degrees of protonation. The stability of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with the three ligands, evaluated by the parameters pCu and pZn, decreases with the introduction of the acetyl groups. Nevertheless the stability of Cu(II) complexes with MAT is

  19. GTP binding controls complex formation by the human ROCO protein MASL1.

    PubMed

    Dihanich, Sybille; Civiero, Laura; Manzoni, Claudia; Mamais, Adamantios; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Greggio, Elisa; Lewis, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    The human ROCO proteins are a family of multi-domain proteins sharing a conserved ROC-COR supra-domain. The family has four members: leucine-rich repeat kinase 1 (LRRK1), leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) and malignant fibrous histiocytoma amplified sequences with leucine-rich tandem repeats 1 (MASL1). Previous studies of LRRK1/2 and DAPK1 have shown that the ROC (Ras of complex proteins) domain can bind and hydrolyse GTP, but the cellular consequences of this activity are still unclear. Here, the first biochemical characterization of MASL1 and the impact of GTP binding on MASL1 complex formation are reported. The results demonstrate that MASL1, similar to other ROCO proteins, can bind guanosine nucleotides via its ROC domain. Furthermore, MASL1 exists in two distinct cellular complexes associated with heat shock protein 60, and the formation of a low molecular weight pool of MASL1 is modulated by GTP binding. Finally, loss of GTP enhances MASL1 toxicity in cells. Taken together, these data point to a central role for the ROC/GTPase domain of MASL1 in the regulation of its cellular function.

  20. The plant cell cycle: Pre-Replication complex formation and controls.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Juliana Nogueira; Costa, Carinne N Monteiro; Cabral, Luiz Mors; Ferreira, Paulo C G; Hemerly, Adriana S

    2017-03-16

    The multiplication of cells in all living organisms requires a tight regulation of DNA replication. Several mechanisms take place to ensure that the DNA is replicated faithfully and just once per cell cycle in order to originate through mitoses two new daughter cells that contain exactly the same information from the previous one. A key control mechanism that occurs before cells enter S phase is the formation of a pre-replication complex (pre-RC) that is assembled at replication origins by the sequential association of the origin recognition complex, followed by Cdt1, Cdc6 and finally MCMs, licensing DNA to start replication. The identification of pre-RC members in all animal and plant species shows that this complex is conserved in eukaryotes and, more importantly, the differences between kingdoms might reflect their divergence in strategies on cell cycle regulation, as it must be integrated and adapted to the niche, ecosystem, and the organism peculiarities. Here, we provide an overview of the knowledge generated so far on the formation and the developmental controls of the pre-RC mechanism in plants, analyzing some particular aspects in comparison to other eukaryotes.

  1. Gas Phase Uranyl Activation: Formation of a Uranium Nitrosyl Complex from Uranyl Azide

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; De Jong, Wibe A.; Gibson, John K.

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO22+, was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2– in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2– was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2– resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2–, in which the “inert” uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2– via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2– complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2– complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO3–, suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2– to form UO(NO)Cl2– and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2– and UO2Cl2–. The observation of UO2Cl2– during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss.

  2. Mode of formation and structural features of DNA-cationic liposome complexes used for transfection.

    PubMed

    Gershon, H; Ghirlando, R; Guttman, S B; Minsky, A

    1993-07-20

    Complexes formed between cationic liposomes and nucleic acids represent a highly efficient vehicle for delivery of DNA and RNA molecules into a large variety of eukaryotic cells. By using fluorescence, gel electrophoresis, and metal-shadowing electron microscopy techniques, the factors that affect the, yet unclear, interactions between DNA and cationic liposomes as well as the structural features of the resulting complexes have been elucidated. A model is suggested according to which cationic liposomes bind initially to DNA molecules to form clusters of aggregated vesicles along the nucleic acids. At a critical liposome density, two processes occur, namely, DNA-induced membrane fusion, indicated by lipid mixing studies, and liposome-induced DNA collapse, pointed out by the marked cooperativity of the encapsulation processes, by their modulations by DNA-condensing agents, and also by their conspicuous independence upon DNA length. The DNA collapse leads to the formation of condensed structures which can be completely encapsulated within the fused lipid bilayers in a fast, highly cooperative process since their exposed surface is substantially smaller than that of extended DNA molecules. The formation of the transfecting DNA-liposome complexes in which the nucleic acids are fully encapsulated within a positively-charged lipid bilayer is proposed, consequently, to be dominated by mutual effects exerted by the DNA and the cationic liposomes, leading to interrelated lipid fusion and DNA collapse.

  3. Model of formation of the Khibiny-Lovozero ore-bearing volcanic-plutonic complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzamastsev, A. A.; Arzamastseva, L. V.; Zhirova, A. M.; Glaznev, V. N.

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents the results of a study of the large Paleozoic ore-magmatic system in the northeastern Fennoscandian Shield comprising the Khibiny and Lovozero plutons, the Kurga intrusion, volcanic rocks, and numerous alkaline dike swarms. As follows from the results of deep drilling and 3D geophysical simulation, large bodies of rocks pertaining to the ultramafic alkaline complex occur at the lower level of the ore-magmatic system. Peridotite, pyroxenite, melilitolite, melteigite, and ijolite occupy more than 50 vol % of the volcanic-plutonic complex within the upper 15 km accessible to gravity exploration. The proposed model represents the ore-magmatic system as a conjugate network of mantle magmatic sources localized at different depth levels and periodically supplying the melts belonging to the two autonomous groups: (1) ultramafic alkaline rocks with carbonatites and (2) alkali syenites-peralkaline syenites, which were formed synchronously having a common system of outlet conduits. With allowance for the available isotopic datings and new geochronological evidence, the duration of complex formation beginning from supply of the first batches of melt into calderas and up to postmagmatic events, expressed in formation of late pegmatoids, was no less than 25 Ma.

  4. Gas phase uranyl activation: formation of a uranium nitrosyl complex from uranyl azide.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; de Jong, Wibe A; Gibson, John K

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO2(2+), was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2(-) was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2(-), in which the "inert" uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2(-) via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO(3-), suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2(-) to form UO(NO)Cl2(-) and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2(-) and UO2Cl2(-). The observation of UO2Cl2(-) during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss.

  5. Imprime PGG-Mediated Anti-Cancer Immune Activation Requires Immune Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiaohong; Ottoson, Nadine R.; Walsh, Richard M.; Gorden, Keith B; Harrison, Ben; Maimonis, Peter J.; Leonardo, Steven M.; Ertelt, Kathleen E.; Danielson, Michael E.; Michel, Kyle S.; Nelson, Mariana; Graff, Jeremy R.; Patchen, Myra L.; Bose, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    Imprime PGG (Imprime), an intravenously-administered, soluble β-glucan, has shown compelling efficacy in multiple phase 2 clinical trials with tumor targeting or anti-angiogenic antibodies. Mechanistically, Imprime acts as pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) directly activating innate immune effector cells, triggering a coordinated anti-cancer immune response. Herein, using whole blood from healthy human subjects, we show that Imprime-induced anti-cancer functionality is dependent on immune complex formation with naturally-occurring, anti-β glucan antibodies (ABA). The formation of Imprime-ABA complexes activates complement, primarily via the classical complement pathway, and is opsonized by iC3b. Immune complex binding depends upon Complement Receptor 3 and Fcg Receptor IIa, eliciting phenotypic activation of, and enhanced chemokine production by, neutrophils and monocytes, enabling these effector cells to kill antibody-opsonized tumor cells via the generation of reactive oxygen species and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis. Importantly, these innate immune cell changes were not evident in subjects with low ABA levels but could be rescued with exogenous ABA supplementation. Together, these data indicate that pre-existing ABA are essential for Imprime-mediated anti-cancer immune activation and suggest that pre-treatment ABA levels may provide a plausible patient selection biomarker to delineate patients most likely to benefit from Imprime-based therapy. PMID:27812183

  6. Decay of Activity Complexes, Formation of Unipolar Magnetic Regions, and Coronal Holes in Their Causal Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubeva, E. M.; Mordvinov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The peculiar development of solar activity in the current cycle resulted in an asynchronous reversal of the Sun's polar fields. The asymmetry is also observed in the formation of polar coronal holes. A stable coronal hole was first formed at the South Pole, despite the later polar-field reversal there. The aim of this study is to understand the processes making this situation possible. Synoptic magnetic maps from the Global Oscillation Network Group and corresponding coronal-hole maps from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory are analyzed here to study the causal relationship between the decay of activity complexes, evolution of large-scale magnetic fields, and formation of coronal holes. Ensembles of coronal holes associated with decaying active regions and activity complexes are presented. These ensembles take part in global rearrangements of the Sun's open magnetic flux. In particular, the south polar coronal hole was formed from an ensemble of coronal holes that came into existence after the decay of multiple activity complexes observed during 2014.

  7. SOHLH2 is essential for synaptonemal complex formation during spermatogenesis in early postnatal mouse testes.

    PubMed

    Park, Miree; Lee, Youngeun; Jang, Hoon; Lee, Ok-Hee; Park, Sung-Won; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Hong, Kwonho; Song, Hyuk; Park, Se-Pill; Park, Yun-Yong; Ko, Jung Jae; Choi, Youngsok

    2016-02-12

    Spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific helix-loop-helix transcription factor 2 (SOHLH2) is exclusively expressed in germ cells of the gonads. Previous studies show that SOHLH2 is critical for spermatogenesis in mouse. However, the regulatory mechanism of SOHLH2 during early spermatogenesis is poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed the gene expression profile of the Sohlh2-deficient testis and examined the role of SOHLH2 during spermatogenesis. We found 513 genes increased in abundance, while 492 genes decreased in abundance in 14-day-old Sohlh2-deficient mouse testes compared to wildtype mice. Gene ontology analysis revealed that Sohlh2 disruption effects the relative abundance of various meiotic genes during early spermatogenesis, including Spo11, Dmc1, Msh4, Prdm9, Sycp1, Sycp2, Sycp3, Hormad1, and Hormad2. Western blot analysis and immunostaining showed that SYCP3, a component of synaptonemal complex, was significantly less abundant in Sohlh2-deficient spermatocytes. We observed a lack of synaptonemal complex formation during meiosis in Sohlh2-deficient spermatocytes. Furthermore, we found that SOHLH2 interacted with two E-boxes on the mouse Sycp1 promoter and Sycp1 promoter activity increased with ectopically expressed SOHLH2. Taken together, our data suggest that SOHLH2 is critical for the formation of synaptonemal complexes via its regulation of Sycp1 expression during mouse spermatogonial differentiation.

  8. Isolation and Characterization of FORMATE/NI(CYCLAM)^{2+} Complexes with Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Predissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolk, Arron B.; Fournier, Joseph A.; Wolke, Conrad T.; Johnson, Mark A.

    2013-06-01

    Transition metal-based organometallic catalysts are a promising means of converting CO_{2} to transportable fuels. Ni(cyclam)^{2+}(cyclam = 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane), a Ni^{II} complex ligated by four nitrogen centers, has shown promise as a catalyst selective for CO_{2} reduction in aqueous solutions. The cyclam ligand has four NH hydrogen bond donors that can adopt five conformations, each offering distinct binding motifs for coordination of CO_{2} close to the metal center. To probe the ligand conformation and the role of hydrogen bonding in adduct binding, we extract Ni(cyclam)^{2+} complexes with the formate anion and some of its analogs from solution using electrospray ionization, and characterize their structures using cryogenic ion vibrational predissociation spectroscopy. Using the signature vibrational features of the embedded carboxylate anion and the NH groups as reporters, we compare the binding motifs of oxalate, benzoate, and formate anions to the Ni(cyclam)^{2+} framework. Finally, we comment on possible routes to generate the singly charged Ni(cyclam)^{+} complex, a key intermediate that has been invoked in the catalytic CO_{2} reduction cycle, but has never been isolated through ion processing techniques.

  9. SOHLH2 is essential for synaptonemal complex formation during spermatogenesis in early postnatal mouse testes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miree; Lee, Youngeun; Jang, Hoon; Lee, Ok-Hee; Park, Sung-Won; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Hong, Kwonho; Song, Hyuk; Park, Se-Pill; Park, Yun-Yong; Ko, Jung Jae; Choi, Youngsok

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific helix-loop-helix transcription factor 2 (SOHLH2) is exclusively expressed in germ cells of the gonads. Previous studies show that SOHLH2 is critical for spermatogenesis in mouse. However, the regulatory mechanism of SOHLH2 during early spermatogenesis is poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed the gene expression profile of the Sohlh2-deficient testis and examined the role of SOHLH2 during spermatogenesis. We found 513 genes increased in abundance, while 492 genes decreased in abundance in 14-day-old Sohlh2-deficient mouse testes compared to wildtype mice. Gene ontology analysis revealed that Sohlh2 disruption effects the relative abundance of various meiotic genes during early spermatogenesis, including Spo11, Dmc1, Msh4, Prdm9, Sycp1, Sycp2, Sycp3, Hormad1, and Hormad2. Western blot analysis and immunostaining showed that SYCP3, a component of synaptonemal complex, was significantly less abundant in Sohlh2-deficient spermatocytes. We observed a lack of synaptonemal complex formation during meiosis in Sohlh2-deficient spermatocytes. Furthermore, we found that SOHLH2 interacted with two E-boxes on the mouse Sycp1 promoter and Sycp1 promoter activity increased with ectopically expressed SOHLH2. Taken together, our data suggest that SOHLH2 is critical for the formation of synaptonemal complexes via its regulation of Sycp1 expression during mouse spermatogonial differentiation. PMID:26869299

  10. Solid inclusion complexes of vanillin with cyclodextrins: their formation, characterization, and high-temperature stability.

    PubMed

    Kayaci, Fatma; Uyar, Tamer

    2011-11-09

    This study reports the formation of solid vanillin/cyclodextrin inclusion complexes (vanillin/CD ICs) with the aim to enhance the thermal stability and sustained release of vanillin by inclusion complexation. The solid vanillin/CD ICs with three types of CDs (α-CD, β-CD, and γ-CD) were prepared using the freeze-drying method; in addition, a coprecipitation method was also used in the case of γ-CD. The presence of vanillin in CD ICs was confirmed by FTIR and (1)H NMR studies. Moreover, (1)H NMR study elucidated that the complexation stoichiometry for both vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC was a 1:1 molar ratio, whereas it was 0.625:1 for vanillin/α-CD IC. XRD studies have shown channel-type arrangement for CD molecules, and no diffraction peak for free vanillin was observed for vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC, indicating that complete inclusion complexation was successfully achieved for these CD ICs. In the case of vanillin/α-CD IC, the sample was mostly amorphous and some uncomplexed vanillin was present, suggesting that α-CD was not very effective for complexation with vanillin compared to β-CD and γ-CD. Furthermore, DSC studies for vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC have shown no melting point for vanillin, elucidating the true complex formation, whereas a melting point for vanillin was recorded for vanillin/α-CD IC, confirming the presence of some uncomplexed vanillin in this sample. TGA thermograms indicated that thermal evaporation/degradation of vanillin occurred over a much higher temperature range (150-300 °C) for vanillin/CD ICs samples when compared to pure vanillin (80-200 °C) or vanillin/CD physical mixtures, signifying that the thermal stability of vanillin was increased due to the inclusion complexation with CDs. Moreover, headspace GC-MS analyses indicated that the release of vanillin was sustained at higher temperatures in the case of vanillin/CD ICs due to the inclusion complexation when compared to vanillin

  11. Calcium l-tartrate complex formation in neutral and in hyperalkaline aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Gácsi, Attila; Kutus, Bence; Csendes, Zita; Faragó, Tünde; Peintler, Gábor; Pálinkó, István; Sipos, Pál

    2016-11-01

    The complex formation reaction between the l-tartrate (Tar(2-)) and calcium ions taking place in neutral and in hyperalkaline (pH > 13) aqueous solutions has been investigated. It was demonstrated that upon NaOH addition the solubility of the CaTar(s) precipitate significantly increases. Conductometric and freezing point depression measurements further confirmed that in this process water soluble species are formed as a result of a reaction between the CaTar(s) and the hydroxide ion (or, conversely, between Ca(OH)2(s) and the Tar(2-) ion). (13)C NMR spectroscopic measurements yielded the value of pK3 = 15.4 ± 0.2 for the proton dissociation of one of the alcoholic OH groups of Tar(2-) (at 25.0 °C and 4 M Na(Cl) ionic strength). Upon addition of calcium ions to an alkaline Tar(2-) solution, the (1)H NMR signal gradually broadened and the (13)C-satellite peaks split to two components, which also indicate complexation. From H2/Pt potentiometric titrations performed with solutions in the 13.6 ≤ pH ≤ 14.4 range, it was observed, that this complex formation is accompanied by a hydroxide ion consuming process. The titration curves can be best described via assuming the formation of the CaTarH-1(-)(aq) (lg β11-1 = -11.2 ± 0.1) and CaTarH-2(2-)(aq) (lg β11-2 = -25.3 ± 0.1) complexes. In hyperalkaline solutions, these two species account for more than 90-99% of the calcium ions present and the contribution of the other reasonable and well-established calcium-containing solution species is rather small. The possible structures of the above complexes have been modeled via ab initio calculations. The stoichiometries are consistent both with species containing coordinated alcoholate group(s) and with mixed Ca(ii)-hydroxo-tartrato complexes. From the data available at present, both types of structures can be considered as chemically reasonable.

  12. Coordination Modes in the Formation of Ternary Complexes of Am(III), Cm(III) and Eu(III) with EDTA and NTA: TRLFS, 13C NMR, EXAFS, and Thermodynamics of the complexation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur,J.; Thakur, P.; Dodge, C.; Francis, A.; Choppin, G.

    2006-01-01

    The formation and the structure of the ternary complexes of trivalent Am, Cm, and Eu with mixtures of EDTA+NTA (ethylenediamine tetraacetate and nitrilotriacetate) have been studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy, {sup 13}C NMR, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and two-phase metal ion equilibrium distribution at 6.60 m (NaClO{sub 4}) and a hydrogen ion concentration value (pcH) between 3.60 and 11.50. In the ternary complexes, EDTA binds via four carboxylates and two nitrogens, while the binding of the NTA varies with the hydrogen ion concentration, pcH, and the concentration ratios of the metal ion and the ligand. When the concentration ratios of the metal to ligand is low (1:1:1-1:1:2), two ternary complexes, M(EDTA)(NTAH){sup 3-} and M(EDTA)(NTA){sup 4-}, are formed at pcH ca. 9.00 in which NTA binds via three carboxylates, via two carboxylates and one nitrogen, or via two carboxylates and a H{sub 2}O. At higher ratios (1:1:20 and 1:10:10) and pcH's of ca. 9.00 and 11.50, one ternary complex, M(EDTA)(NTA){sup 4-}, is formed in which NTA binds via three carboxylates and not via nitrogen. The two-phase equilibrium distribution studies at tracer concentrations of Am, Cm, and Eu have also confirmed the formation of the ternary complex M(EDTA)(NTA){sup 4-} at temperatures between 0 and 60 {sup o}C. The stability constants (log{beta}{sub 111}) for these metal ions increase with increasing temperature. The endothermic enthalpy and positive entropy indicated a significant effect of cation dehydration in the formation of the ternary complexes at high ionic strength.

  13. Complex Organic Molecules Formation in Space Through Gas Phase Reactions: A Theoretical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Chemistry in the interstellar medium (ISM) is capable of producing complex organic molecules (COMs) of great importance to astrobiology. Gas phase and grain surface chemistry almost certainly both contribute to COM formation. Amino acids as building blocks of proteins are some of the most interesting COMs. The simplest one, glycine, has been characterized in meteorites and comets and, its conclusive detection in the ISM seems to be highly plausible. In this work, we analyze the gas phase reaction of glycine and {{{CH}}5}+ to establish the role of this process in the formation of alanine or other COMs in the ISM. Formation of protonated α- and β-alanine in spite of being exothermic processes is not viable under interstellar conditions because the different paths leading to these isomers present net activation energies. Nevertheless, glycine can evolve to protonated 1-imide-2, 2-propanediol, protonated amino acetone, protonated hydroxyacetone, and protonated propionic acid. However, formation of acetic acid and protonated methylamine is also a favorable process and therefore will be a competitive channel with the evolution of glycine to COMs.

  14. Struvite crystal growth inhibition by trisodium citrate and the formation of chemical complexes in growth solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prywer, Jolanta; Mielniczek-Brzóska, Ewa; Olszynski, Marcin

    2015-05-01

    Effect of trisodium citrate on the crystallization of struvite was studied. To evaluate such an effect an experiment of struvite growth from artificial urine was performed. The investigations are related to infectious urinary stones formation. The crystallization process was induced by the addition of aqueous ammonia solution to mimic the bacterial activity. The spectrophotometric results demonstrate that trisodium citrate increases induction time with respect to struvite formation and decreases the growth efficiency of struvite. The inhibitory effect of trisodium citrate on the nucleation and growth of struvite is explained in base of chemical speciation analysis. Such an analysis demonstrates that the inhibitory effect is related with the fact that trisodium citrate binds NH4 + and Mg2+ ions in the range of pH from 7 to 9.5 characteristic for struvite precipitation. The most important is the MgCit- complex whose concentration strongly depends on an increase in pH rather than on an increase in citrate concentrations.

  15. Two quorum sensing systems control biofilm formation and virulence in members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    PubMed Central

    Suppiger, Angela; Schmid, Nadine; Aguilar, Claudio; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo

    2013-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) consists of 17 closely related species that are problematic opportunistic bacterial pathogens for cystic fibrosis patients and immunocompromised individuals. These bacteria are capable of utilizing two different chemical languages: N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and cis-2-unsaturated fatty acids. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the underlying molecular architectures of these communication systems, showing how they are interlinked and discussing how they regulate overlapping as well as specific sets of genes. A particular focus is laid on the role of these signaling systems in the formation of biofilms, which are believed to be highly important for chronic infections. We review genes that have been implicated in the sessile lifestyle of this group of bacteria. The new emerging role of the intracellular second messenger cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) as a downstream regulator of the fatty acid signaling cascade and as a key factor in biofilm formation is also discussed. PMID:23799665

  16. Chiral symmetry breaking in complex chemical systems during formation of life on earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova, A. F.; Konstantinov, K. K.

    2015-09-01

    The chiral symmetry in complex chemical systems containing many amino acids and characterized by many similar chemical reactions (a situation corresponding to the formation of life on Earth) is considered. It is shown that effective averaging over similar reaction channels may lead to very weak effective enantioselectivity, which does not allow for chiral symmetry breaking in most known models. A class of models with simple and catalytic synthesis of one amino acid, the formation of peptides with a length reaching three, and the precipitation of one insoluble pair of materials is analyzed. It is proven that chiral symmetry breaking may occur in one possible version from an insoluble pair of materials even in the complete absence of catalytic synthesis of amino acid. It is shown that the presence of weakly enantioselective catalytic synthesis in a model significantly increases the number of possible versions in which chiral symmetry breaks.

  17. Interaction of ortho-Phospho-l-serine with Hydroxyapatite: Formation of a Surface Complex

    PubMed

    Misra

    1997-10-01

    ortho-Phospho-l-serine (H2Psi, where Psi represents the serinephosphato ion), a constituent of salivary proteins, seems to play an important role in the mineralization of teeth. To understand the basic mechanism of this interaction, the uptake of o-phospho-l-serine from relatively concentrated aqueous solutions (up to 100 mmol/L) onto synthetic hydroxyapatite was studied. Previous studies have shown that in the dilute concentration range (<12.5 mmol/L) the uptake followed a regular Langmuirian adsorption plot. At higher concentrations the uptake curve increased steeply, but no formation of a separate phase in the reacted apatite was discernible, either by optical or by scanning electron microscopy. The dissolution of apatite released phosphate and calcium ions into the solution in amounts linearly related to the uptake of serine with P/Psi = 1 and Ca/Psi = 2. The charge and mass balance of the reaction can be reconciled with the formation of the surface complex (shown within brackets):Ca10(OH)2(PO4)6 + 6H2Psi --> [Ca6(HPsi)2(HPO4)2(PO4)2] + 4Ca2+ + 2HPsi1- + 2Psi2- + 2H2PO1-4 + 2H2O.The formation of two other surface complexes is possible; however, the complex shown above probably disrupts the apatite lattice the least. Traces of CaPsi·H2O precipitate out from the filtrates of highly concentrated solutions after 6 days. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. Copyright 1997Academic Press

  18. Effect of fat type in baked bread on amylose-lipid complex formation and glycaemic response.

    PubMed

    Lau, Evelyn; Zhou, Weibiao; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2016-06-01

    The formation of amylose-lipid complexes (ALC) had been associated with reduced starch digestibility. A few studies have directly characterised the extent of ALC formation with glycaemic response. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of using fats with varying degree of saturation and chain length on ALC formation as well as glycaemic and insulinaemic responses after consumption of bread. Healthy men consumed five test breads in a random order: control bread without any added fats (CTR) and breads baked with butter (BTR), coconut oil (COC), grapeseed oil (GRP) or olive oil (OLV). There was a significant difference in glycaemic response between the different test breads (P=0·002), primarily due to COC having a lower response than CTR (P=0·016), but no significant differences between fat types were observed. Insulinaemic response was not altered by the addition of fats/oils. Although BTR was more insulinotropic than GRP (P<0·05), postprandial β-cell function did not differ significantly. The complexing index (CI), a measure of ALC formation, was significantly higher for COC and OLV compared with BTR and GRP (P<0·05). CI was significantly negatively correlated with incremental AUC (IAUC) of change in blood glucose concentrations over time (IAUCglucose) (r -0·365, P=0·001). Linear regression analysis showed that CI explained 13·3 % of the variance and was a significant predictor of IAUCglucose (β=-1·265, P=0·001), but IAUCinsulin did not predict IAUCglucose. Our study indicated that a simple way to modulate glycaemic response in bread could lie in the choice of fats/oils, with coconut oil showing the greatest attenuation of glycaemic response.

  19. Formation of charge-transfer-complex in organic:metal oxides systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. P.; Kang, Y.; Liu, T. L.; Jin, Z. H.; Jiang, N.; Lu, Z. H.

    2013-04-01

    It is found that composite systems consisting of 4,4'-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) form an IR absorption band around 847 nm. It is also found that the vibrational modes of the CBP, as measured by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, are quenched upon the formation of charge-transfer-complex (CTC) between CBP and MoO3. By examining several sets of organic:metal oxides systems, we discovered that the IR absorption band of the CTCs follow two distinct mechanisms depending on the nature and location of the HOMOs in the organic molecules.

  20. Peculiarities of latent inhibition formation in SHR rats in conditioned task of different complexity.

    PubMed

    Kostyunina, N V; Loskutova, L V

    2012-05-01

    Inhibition of attention to irrelevant stimuli was studied in SHR rats using latent inhibition test. Latent inhibition was formed in two types of conditioned tasks with different levels of complexity and stress. Passive and active avoidance conditioning was preceded by preexposure to conditioned stimulus consisting of 20 and 100 non-reinforced presentations, respectively. Control Wistar rats demonstrated successful formation of latent inhibition in both tasks. SHR rats showed different degree of disruption of latent inhibition depending on the type of behavioral task. We assume that learning defect in these animals in respect to both novel and preexposed conditioned stimuli is associated with the lack of behavioral inhibition.

  1. Preferential formation of the different hydrogen bonds and their effects in tetrahydrofuran and tetrahydropyran microhydrated complexes.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Margarita M; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2012-04-26

    The role of cycloether-water (c-w) and water-water (w-w) hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) on the stability of the tetrahydrofuran THF/(H(2)O)(n) and the tetrahydropyran THP/(H(2)O)(n) complexes with n = 1-4 was investigated herein using the density functional and ab initio methods and the atoms in molecules theory. Geometry optimizations for these complexes were carried out with various possible initial guess structures. It was revealed that the major contributions of the mono and dihydrated complexes came from c-w H-bonds. A competition between c-w and w-w H-bonds contribution was observed for trihydrated complexes. For most of tetrahydrated complexes, the inter-water H-bonds provided the greatest contribution, whereas the c-w contributions were small but not negligible. It was confirmed that to produce a hydrophobic hydration of cycloethers, the C-H···O(w) H-bond should be associated with a network of H-bonds that connects both portions of the solute, through the formation of a bifunctional H-bond. A linear correlation is obtained for the sum of electron density at the bond critical points (ρ(b)) with the interaction energy (ΔE) and with the solute-solvent interaction energy (ΔE(s-w)) of the microhydrated complexes. In addition, a new way to estimate the energetic contribution as well as the preferential formation of the different H-bonds based completely on ρ(b) was found. Even more, it allows to differentiate the contribution from c-w interactions in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic contributions, it is therefore a useful tool for studying the hydration of large biomolecules. The analysis of the modifications in the atomic and group properties brought about by successive addition of H(2)O molecules allowed to pinpoint the atoms or molecular groups that undergo the greatest changes in electron population and energetic stabilization. It was identified that the remarkable stabilization of the water oxygen atoms is crucial for the stabilization of the complexes.

  2. Formation of colloidal silver nanoparticles stabilized by Na+-poly(gamma-glutamic acid)-silver nitrate complex via chemical reduction process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Da-Guang

    2007-10-01

    Macromolecular and polyanionic Na(+)-poly(gamma-glutamic acid) (PGA) silver nitrate complex acted as both a metal ion provider and a particle protector to fabricate nanosized silver colloids under chemical reduction by dextrose. The formation and size of particles have been characterized from transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering analysis and UV-vis spectrophotometer. The results showed that the average particle size was 17.2+/-3.4 to 37.3+/-5.5 nm, apparently depending on the complex concentration. It was found that the rate constant and conversion of silver nanoparticles were proportional to the concentration of PGA. The growth mechanism of nanosized silver colloid was fully discussed. In addition, the in vitro cytotoxicity evaluated by L929 fibroblasts proliferation and antibacterial activity against Gram-positive strain (methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative strain (P. aeruginosa) bacteria have been assessed.

  3. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic investigation of cationic polymer/DNA complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, Cosimo; Bassi, Andrea; Taroni, Paola; Pezzoli, Daniele; Volonterio, Alessandro; Candiani, Gabriele

    2011-07-01

    Since DNA is not internalized efficiently by cells, the success of gene therapy depends on the availability of carriers to efficiently deliver genetic material into target cells. Gene delivery vectors can be broadly categorized into viral and non-viral ones. Non-viral gene delivery systems are represented by cationic lipids and polymers rely on the basics of supramolecular chemistry termed "self-assembling": at physiological pH, they are cations and spontaneously form lipoplexes (for lipids) and polyplexes (for polymers) complexing nucleic acids. In this scenario, cationic polymers are commonly used as non-viral vehicles. Their effectiveness is strongly related to key parameters including DNA binding ability and stability in different environments. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of SYBR Green I (DNA dye) was carried out to characterize cationic polymer/DNA complex (polyplex) formation dispersed in aqueous solution. Both fluorescence amplitude and lifetime proved to be very sensitive to the polymer/DNA ratio (N/P ratio, +/-).

  4. Formation and dynamics of "waterproof" photoluminescent complexes of rare earth ions in crowded environment.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Tetyana; Blades, Michael; Duque, Juan G; Doorn, Stephen K; Biaggio, Ivan; Rotkin, Slava V

    2014-12-28

    Understanding behavior of rare-earth ions (REI) in crowded environments is crucial for several nano- and bio-technological applications. Evolution of REI photoluminescence (PL) in small compartments inside a silica hydrogel, mimic to a soft matter bio-environment, has been studied and explained within a solvation model. The model uncovered the origin of high PL efficiency to be the formation of REI complexes, surrounded by bile salt (DOC) molecules. Comparative study of these REI-DOC complexes in bulk water solution and those enclosed inside the hydrogel revealed a strong correlation between an up to 5×-longer lifetime of REIs and appearance of the DOC ordered phase, further confirmed by dynamics of REI solvation shells, REI diffusion experiments and morphological characterization of microstructure of the hydrogel.

  5. Conductance studies on complex formation between c-methylcalix[4]resorcinarene and titanium (III) in acetonitrile-H₂O binary solutions.

    PubMed

    Rezayi, Majid; Alias, Yatimah; Abdi, Mahnaz M; Saeedfar, Kasra; Saadati, Naghmeh

    2013-09-27

    Calixresorcinarenes have proved to be unique molecules for molecular recognition via hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic and ionic interactions with suitable substrates such as cations. The study of the interactions involved in the complexation of different cations with calixresorcinarenes in solvent mixtures is important for a better understanding of the mechanism of biological transport, molecular recognition, and other analytical applications. This article summarizes different aspects of the complexes of the Ti(3+) metal cation with c-methylcalix[4]resorcinarene (CMCR) as studied by conductometry in acetonitrile (AN)-water (H₂O) binary mixtures at different temperatures. Conductance data show that the metal cation/ligand (ML) stoichiometry of the complexes in solution is 1:1 in all cases. Non-linear behaviour was observed for the variation of logKf of the complexes vs. the composition of the binary solvent mixtures. Selectivity of CMCR for the Ti(3+) cation is sensitive to solvent composition; in some cases and at certain compositions of the mixed solvent systems, the selectivity order is changed. Values of thermodynamic parameters (ΔH(c)(0), ΔS(c)(0)) for formation of the CMCR-Ti(3+) complexes in AN-H₂O binary systems were obtained from the temperature dependence of stability constants, and the results show that the thermodynamics of complexation reactions are affected by the nature and composition of the mixed solvents.

  6. Experimental study of aluminum-oxalate complexing at 80 °C: Implications for the formation of secondary porosity within sedimentary reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Jeremy B.

    1991-10-01

    An experimental study of aluminum-oxalate complexing at 80 °C indicates that the presence of oxalate in sedimentary basin fluids may play an important role in creating secondary porosity in reservoir rocks. The solubility of gibbsite was measured as a function of oxalate concentration. Geologically realistic oxalate concentrations were used in order to simulate the aluminum mobilities that occur in reservoir fluids. Although the stoichiometry of the important aluminum-oxalate species cannot be determined from these data, the results are used to quantify the minimum extent of aluminum-oxalate complexing that occurs in solution. Assuming that Al(Ox)33- is the only important aluminum-oxalate complex, the data limit the log of the dissociation constant of Al(Ox)33- to be ≤-16.5. Thermodynamic modeling of aluminum systems with fluids that contain NaCl, acetate, and oxalate illustrates that aluminum-oxalate complexing is much more important than aluminum-acetate complexing, even at relatively low oxalate concentrations and at very high acetate concentrations. In addition, these calculations show that aluminum-oxalate complexing can greatly increase aluminum mobility in formation waters and, therefore, may increase aluminosilicate mineral dissolution within sedimentary basin fluid-rock systems.

  7. Gas Phase Reactions of Ions Derived from Anionic Uranyl Formate and Uranyl Acetate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Perez, Evan; Hanley, Cassandra; Koehler, Stephen; Pestok, Jordan; Polonsky, Nevo; Van Stipdonk, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of uranium are topics of sustained interest because of their importance to the development of nuclear fuel processing methods, and a more complete understanding of the factors that govern the mobility and fate of the element in the environment. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used to examine the intrinsic reactivity (i.e., free from influence of solvent and other condensed phase effects) of a wide range of metal ion complexes in a species-specific fashion. Here, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and gas-phase ion-molecule reactions were used to create and characterize ions derived from precursors composed of uranyl cation (U(VI)O2(2+)) coordinated by formate or acetate ligands. Anionic complexes containing U(VI)O2(2+) and formate ligands fragment by decarboxylation and elimination of CH2=O, ultimately to produce an oxo-hydride species [U(VI)O2(O)(H)](-). Cationic species ultimately dissociate to make [U(VI)O2(OH)](+). Anionic complexes containing acetate ligands exhibit an initial loss of acetyloxyl radical, CH3CO2•, with associated reduction of uranyl to U(V)O2(+). Subsequent CID steps cause elimination of CO2 and CH4, ultimately to produce [U(V)O2(O)](-). Loss of CH4 occurs by an intra-complex H(+) transfer process that leaves U(V)O2(+) coordinated by acetate and acetate enolate ligands. A subsequent dissociation step causes elimination of CH2=C=O to leave [U(V)O2(O)](-). Elimination of CH4 is also observed as a result of hydrolysis caused by ion-molecule reaction with H2O. The reactions of other anionic species with gas-phase H2O create hydroxyl products, presumably through the elimination of H2. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Ubiquitination of p27 is regulated by Cdk-dependent phosphorylation and trimeric complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Montagnoli, Alessia; Fiore, Francesca; Eytan, Esther; Carrano, Andrea C.; Draetta, Giulio F.; Hershko, Avram; Pagano, Michele

    1999-01-01

    The cellular abundance of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p27 is regulated by the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Activation of p27 degradation is seen in proliferating cells and in many types of aggressive human carcinomas. p27 can be phosphorylated on threonine 187 by Cdks, and cyclin E/Cdk2 overexpression can stimulate the degradation of wild-type p27, but not of a threonine 187-to-alanine p27 mutant [p27(T187A)]. However, whether threonine 187 phosphorylation stimulates p27 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome system or an alternative pathway is still not known. Here, we demonstrate that p27 ubiquitination (as assayed in vivo and in an in vitro reconstituted system) is cell-cycle regulated and that Cdk activity is required for the in vitro ubiquitination of p27. Furthermore, ubiquitination of wild-type p27, but not of p27(T187A), can occur in G1-enriched extracts only upon addition of cyclin E/Cdk2 or cyclin A/Cdk2. Using a phosphothreonine 187 site-specific antibody for p27, we show that threonine 187 phosphorylation of p27 is also cell-cycle dependent, being present in proliferating cells but undetectable in G1 cells. Finally, we show that in addition to threonine 187 phosphorylation, efficient p27 ubiquitination requires formation of a trimeric complex with the cyclin and Cdk subunits. In fact, cyclin B/Cdk1 which can phosphorylate p27 efficiently, but cannot form a stable complex with it, is unable to stimulate p27 ubiquitination by G1 extracts. Furthermore, another p27 mutant [p27(CK−)] that can be phosphorylated by cyclin E/Cdk2 but cannot bind this kinase complex, is refractory to ubiquitination. Thus throughout the cell cycle, both phosphorylation and trimeric complex formation act as signals for the ubiquitination of a Cdk inhibitor. PMID:10323868

  9. Gas Phase Reactions of Ions Derived from Anionic Uranyl Formate and Uranyl Acetate Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Evan; Hanley, Cassandra; Koehler, Stephen; Pestok, Jordan; Polonsky, Nevo; Van Stipdonk, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of uranium are topics of sustained interest because of their importance to the development of nuclear fuel processing methods, and a more complete understanding of the factors that govern the mobility and fate of the element in the environment. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used to examine the intrinsic reactivity (i.e., free from influence of solvent and other condensed phase effects) of a wide range of metal ion complexes in a species-specific fashion. Here, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and gas-phase ion-molecule reactions were used to create and characterize ions derived from precursors composed of uranyl cation (UVIO2 2+) coordinated by formate or acetate ligands. Anionic complexes containing UVIO2 2+ and formate ligands fragment by decarboxylation and elimination of CH2=O, ultimately to produce an oxo-hydride species [UVIO2(O)(H)]-. Cationic species ultimately dissociate to make [UVIO2(OH)]+. Anionic complexes containing acetate ligands exhibit an initial loss of acetyloxyl radical, CH3CO2•, with associated reduction of uranyl to UVO2 +. Subsequent CID steps cause elimination of CO2 and CH4, ultimately to produce [UVO2(O)]-. Loss of CH4 occurs by an intra-complex H+ transfer process that leaves UVO2 + coordinated by acetate and acetate enolate ligands. A subsequent dissociation step causes elimination of CH2=C=O to leave [UVO2(O)]-. Elimination of CH4 is also observed as a result of hydrolysis caused by ion-molecule reaction with H2O. The reactions of other anionic species with gas-phase H2O create hydroxyl products, presumably through the elimination of H2.

  10. Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazawa, Masaharu; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Obara, Chizuka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Gotoh, Takaya; Tanaka, Izumi; Yakumaru, Haruko; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Tajima, Katsushi

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Radiation increases cellular uptake of exosomes. • Radiation induces colocalization of CD29 and CD81. • Exosomes selectively bind the CD29/CD81 complex. • Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. - Abstract: Exosomes mediate intercellular communication, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or their secreted exosomes affect a number of pathophysiologic states. Clinical applications of MSC and exosomes are increasingly anticipated. Radiation therapy is the main therapeutic tool for a number of various conditions. The cellular uptake mechanisms of exosomes and the effects of radiation on exosome–cell interactions are crucial, but they are not well understood. Here we examined the basic mechanisms and effects of radiation on exosome uptake processes in MSC. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes. Radiation markedly enhanced the initial cellular attachment to exosomes and induced the colocalization of integrin CD29 and tetraspanin CD81 on the cell surface without affecting their expression levels. Exosomes dominantly bound to the CD29/CD81 complex. Knockdown of CD29 completely inhibited the radiation-induced uptake, and additional or single knockdown of CD81 inhibited basal uptake as well as the increase in radiation-induced uptake. We also examined possible exosome uptake processes affected by radiation. Radiation-induced changes did not involve dynamin2, reactive oxygen species, or their evoked p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent endocytic or pinocytic pathways. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. These findings provide essential basic insights for potential therapeutic applications of exosomes or MSC in combination with radiation.

  11. Fluids circulations during the formation of the Naxos Metamorphic Core Complex (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhaeghe, Olivier; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Siebenaller, Luc

    2015-04-01

    The island of Naxos, in the central part of the Cycladic Metamorphic Core Complex (Greece) represents a perfect example to address the evolution of fluid circulations during collapse of an orogenic belt. It displays a complex detachment system characterized by mylonites, cataclasites and high-angle normal faults which geometric relationships reflect rheological layering of the orogenic crust and its evolution during collapse. The chemistry of fluid inclusions determined by microthermometry, RAMAN spectroscopy, LA-ICPMS, and crush-leach combined with C and H isotopic signatures point to three distinct types of fluids, namely (i) a H2O-dominated fluid, (ii) a composite H2O-CO2 fluid, and (iii) a NaCl-rich fluid concentrated in metals. These different types of fluids are interpreted to reflect mixtures to various degrees among fluids generated by (i) condensation of clouds (meteoric aqueous fluid), (ii) dehydration and decarbonatation of metasedimentary rocks during metamorphism (metamorphic aqueous-carbonic fluid), and (iii) crystallization of granitic magmas (magmatic saline fluid with high metal contents). The distribution of fluids with respect to microstructures evidences the close link between deformation and fluid circulations at the mineral scale from intracristalline deformation to fracturing. The orientation of fluid inclusion planes, veins and alteration zones allows to identify the scale and geometry of the reservoir into which fluids are circulating and their evolution during the formation of the Metamorphic Core Complex. These data indicate that the orogenic crust is subdivided in two reservoirs separated by the ductile/fragile transition. Meteoric fluids circulate in the upper crust affected by brittle deformation whereas metamorphic and magmatic fluids circulate in relation to intracristalline ductile deformation affecting the lower crust. The geometry of these reservoirs evolves during the formation of the Naxos Metamorphic Core Complex as the

  12. Hormad1 mutation disrupts synaptonemal complex formation, recombination, and chromosome segregation in mammalian meiosis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Hyun; Choi, Youngsok; Erdin, Serpil Uckac; Yatsenko, Svetlana A; Kloc, Malgorzata; Yang, Fang; Wang, P Jeremy; Meistrich, Marvin L; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2010-11-04

    Meiosis is unique to germ cells and essential for reproduction. During the first meiotic division, homologous chromosomes pair, recombine, and form chiasmata. The homologues connect via axial elements and numerous transverse filaments to form the synaptonemal complex. The synaptonemal complex is a critical component for chromosome pairing, segregation, and recombination. We previously identified a novel germ cell-specific HORMA domain encoding gene, Hormad1, a member of the synaptonemal complex and a mammalian counterpart to the yeast meiotic HORMA domain protein Hop1. Hormad1 is essential for mammalian gametogenesis as knockout male and female mice are infertile. Hormad1 deficient (Hormad1(-/) (-)) testes exhibit meiotic arrest in the early pachytene stage, and synaptonemal complexes cannot be visualized by electron microscopy. Hormad1 deficiency does not affect localization of other synaptonemal complex proteins, SYCP2 and SYCP3, but disrupts homologous chromosome pairing. Double stranded break formation and early recombination events are disrupted in Hormad1(-/) (-) testes and ovaries as shown by the drastic decrease in the γH2AX, DMC1, RAD51, and RPA foci. HORMAD1 co-localizes with γH2AX to the sex body during pachytene. BRCA1, ATR, and γH2AX co-localize to the sex body and participate in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing. Hormad1 deficiency abolishes γH2AX, ATR, and BRCA1 localization to the sex chromosomes and causes transcriptional de-repression on the X chromosome. Unlike testes, Hormad1(-/) (-) ovaries have seemingly normal ovarian folliculogenesis after puberty. However, embryos generated from Hormad1(-/) (-) oocytes are hyper- and hypodiploid at the 2 cell and 8 cell stage, and they arrest at the blastocyst stage. HORMAD1 is therefore a critical component of the synaptonemal complex that affects synapsis, recombination, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing.

  13. E-ring conformation has a key role in cleavable complex formation: homocamptothecin versus camptothecins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvier, D.; Chourpa, I.; Maizieres, M.; Riou, J.-F.; Dauchez, M.; Alix, A. J. P.; Manfait, M.

    2003-06-01

    Homocamptothecin (hCPT) is a new camptothecin (CPT) derivative with a seven-membered β-hydroxylactone E-ring. This modification provides higher lactone stability and did not impair its activity against topoisomerase I (top1), but rather appears to improve it compared to CPT. Such lactone modification was unexpected regarding the previous structure-activity relationship data inside the CPT series, and may have crucial mechanistic implications in the ternary cleavable complex formation. In this study, the detailed characterization of the E-ring homologation and lactone/carboxylate conversion, self-aggregation, influence of pH and polarity of the molecular environment have been performed for hCPT by frequency-domain fluorescence. The real-time spectrofluorometry confirmed the enhanced stability of hCPT. We have also investigated the E-ring status of hCPT within the top1 ternary complex with DNA, and with top1 or DNA binary complexes. Unlike CPT, no modification of the (β-hydroxy-) lactone-carboxylate conversion rates was observed, suggesting that E-ring opening is not required for cleavable complex stabilization in presence of hCPT. Comparison of the two structures by molecular modeling revealed similar conformation and steric volumes between the β-hydroxylactone ring conformation of hCPT and the opened ring of CPT. The lack of hCPT E-ring opening was discussed in the light of these molecular modeling results.

  14. Formation of novel transition metal hydride complexes with ninefold hydrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Iijima, Yuki; Sato, Toyoto; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Miwa, Kazutoshi; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Ninefold coordination of hydrogen is very rare, and has been observed in two different hydride complexes comprising rhenium and technetium. Herein, based on a theoretical/experimental approach, we present evidence for the formation of ninefold H- coordination hydride complexes of molybdenum ([MoH9]3−), tungsten ([WH9]3−), niobium ([NbH9]4−) and tantalum ([TaH9]4−) in novel complex transition-metal hydrides, Li5MoH11, Li5WH11, Li6NbH11 and Li6TaH11, respectively. All of the synthesized materials are insulated with band gaps of approximately 4 eV, but contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to cause the H 1s-derived states to reach the Fermi level. Such hydrogen-rich materials might be of interest for high-critical-temperature superconductivity if the gaps close under compression. Furthermore, the hydride complexes exhibit significant rotational motions associated with anharmonic librations at room temperature, which are often discussed in relation to the translational diffusion of cations in alkali-metal dodecahydro-closo-dodecaborates and strongly point to the emergence of a fast lithium conduction even at room temperature. PMID:28287143

  15. Formation of novel transition metal hydride complexes with ninefold hydrogen coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Iijima, Yuki; Sato, Toyoto; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Miwa, Kazutoshi; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Orimo, Shin-Ichi

    2017-03-01

    Ninefold coordination of hydrogen is very rare, and has been observed in two different hydride complexes comprising rhenium and technetium. Herein, based on a theoretical/experimental approach, we present evidence for the formation of ninefold H- coordination hydride complexes of molybdenum ([MoH9]3‑), tungsten ([WH9]3‑), niobium ([NbH9]4‑) and tantalum ([TaH9]4‑) in novel complex transition-metal hydrides, Li5MoH11, Li5WH11, Li6NbH11 and Li6TaH11, respectively. All of the synthesized materials are insulated with band gaps of approximately 4 eV, but contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to cause the H 1s-derived states to reach the Fermi level. Such hydrogen-rich materials might be of interest for high-critical-temperature superconductivity if the gaps close under compression. Furthermore, the hydride complexes exhibit significant rotational motions associated with anharmonic librations at room temperature, which are often discussed in relation to the translational diffusion of cations in alkali-metal dodecahydro-closo-dodecaborates and strongly point to the emergence of a fast lithium conduction even at room temperature.

  16. Formation of novel transition metal hydride complexes with ninefold hydrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Iijima, Yuki; Sato, Toyoto; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Miwa, Kazutoshi; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Orimo, Shin-Ichi

    2017-03-13

    Ninefold coordination of hydrogen is very rare, and has been observed in two different hydride complexes comprising rhenium and technetium. Herein, based on a theoretical/experimental approach, we present evidence for the formation of ninefold H- coordination hydride complexes of molybdenum ([MoH9](3-)), tungsten ([WH9](3-)), niobium ([NbH9](4-)) and tantalum ([TaH9](4-)) in novel complex transition-metal hydrides, Li5MoH11, Li5WH11, Li6NbH11 and Li6TaH11, respectively. All of the synthesized materials are insulated with band gaps of approximately 4 eV, but contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to cause the H 1s-derived states to reach the Fermi level. Such hydrogen-rich materials might be of interest for high-critical-temperature superconductivity if the gaps close under compression. Furthermore, the hydride complexes exhibit significant rotational motions associated with anharmonic librations at room temperature, which are often discussed in relation to the translational diffusion of cations in alkali-metal dodecahydro-closo-dodecaborates and strongly point to the emergence of a fast lithium conduction even at room temperature.

  17. Ice Complex formation in arctic East Siberia during the MIS3 Interstadial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, Sebastian; Tumskoy, Vladimir; Rudaya, Natalia; Andreev, Andrei A.; Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Hüls, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    A continuous 15 m long sequence of Ice Complex permafrost (Yedoma) exposed in a thermo-cirque at the southern coast of Bol'shoy Lyakhovsky Island (New Siberian Archipelago, Dmitry Laptev Strait) was studied to reconstruct past landscape and environmental dynamics. The sequence accumulated during the Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS3) Interstadial between >49 and 29 ka BP in an ice-wedge polygon. The frozen deposits were cryolithologically described and sampled on a vertical bluff between two ice wedges. According to sedimentological and geochronological data, the section is subdivided into three units which correlate with environmental conditions of the early, middle, and late MIS3 period. Palynological data support this stratification. The stable isotope signature of texture ice in the polygon structure reflects fractionation due to local freeze-thaw processes, while the signature of an approximately 5 m wide and more than 17 m high ice wedge fits very well into the regional stable-water isotope record. Regional climate dynamics during the MIS3 Interstadial and local landscape conditions of the polygonal patterned ground controlled the Ice Complex formation. The sequence presented here completes previously published MIS3 permafrost records in Northeast Siberia. Late Quaternary stadial-interstadial climate variability in arctic West Beringia is preserved at millennial resolution in the Ice Complex. A MIS3 climate optimum was revealed between 48 and 38 ka BP from the Ice Complex on Bol'shoy Lyakhovsky Island.

  18. Zeaxanthin Radical Cation Formation in Minor Light-Harvesting Complexes of Higher Plant Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Avenson, Thomas H.; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Zigmantas, Donatas; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Li, Zhirong; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-31

    Previous work on intact thylakoid membranes showed that transient formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation was correlated with regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting via energy-dependent quenching. A molecular mechanism for such quenching was proposed to involve charge transfer within a chlorophyll-zeaxanthin heterodimer. Using near infrared (880-1100 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that carotenoid (mainly zeaxanthin) radical cation generation occurs solely in isolated minor light-harvesting complexes that bind zeaxanthin, consistent with the engagement of charge transfer quenching therein. We estimated that less than 0.5percent of the isolated minor complexes undergo charge transfer quenching in vitro, whereas the fraction of minor complexes estimated to be engaged in charge transfer quenching in isolated thylakoids was more than 80 times higher. We conclude that minor complexes which bind zeaxanthin are sites of charge transfer quenching in vivo and that they can assume Non-quenching and Quenching conformations, the equilibrium LHC(N)<--> LHC(Q) of which is modulated by the transthylakoid pH gradient, the PsbS protein, and protein-protein interactions.

  19. Ternary complex formation facilitates a redox mechanism for iron release from a siderophore.

    PubMed

    Mies, Kassy A; Wirgau, Joseph I; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2006-04-01

    While the naturally occurring reducing agents glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (H2A) alone are ineffective at reducing iron(III) sequestered by the siderophore ferrioxamine B, the addition of an iron(II) chelator, sulfonated bathophenanthroline (BPDS), facilitates reduction by either reducing agent. A mechanism is described in which a ternary complex is formed between ferrioxamine B and BPDS in a rapidly established pre-equilibrium step, which is followed by rate limiting reduction of the ternary complex by glutathione or ascorbate. Spectral, thermodynamic, and kinetic evidence are given for ternary complex formation. Ascorbate was found to be slightly more efficient at reducing the ternary complex than glutathione (k4=2.1 x 10(-3) M(-1) s(-1) and k4=6.3 x 10(-4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively) at pH 7. Reduction is followed by a rapid ligand exchange step where iron is released from ferrioxamine B to form tris-(BPDS)iron(II). The implications of these results for siderophore mediated iron transport and release are discussed.

  20. Cas1-Cas2 complex formation mediates spacer acquisition during CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, James K; Kranzusch, Philip J; Noeske, Jonas; Wright, Addison V; Davies, Christopher W; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-06-01

    The initial stage of CRISPR-Cas immunity involves the integration of foreign DNA spacer segments into the host genomic CRISPR locus. The nucleases Cas1 and Cas2 are the only proteins conserved among all CRISPR-Cas systems, yet the molecular functions of these proteins during immunity are unknown. Here we show that Cas1 and Cas2 from Escherichia coli form a stable complex that is essential for spacer acquisition and determine the 2.3-Å-resolution crystal structure of the Cas1-Cas2 complex. Mutations that perturb Cas1-Cas2 complex formation disrupt CRISPR DNA recognition and spacer acquisition in vivo. Active site mutants of Cas2, unlike those of Cas1, can still acquire new spacers, thus indicating a nonenzymatic role of Cas2 during immunity. These results reveal the universal roles of Cas1 and Cas2 and suggest a mechanism by which Cas1-Cas2 complexes specify sites of CRISPR spacer integration.

  1. Complex formation between ovalbumin and strong polyanion PSSNa: study of structure and properties.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Saber; Aschi, Adel; Othman, Tahar; Gharbi, Abdelhafidh

    2014-09-01

    The mixture system of long-chain polyelectrolyte complexed with a globular protein was investigated based on dynamic light scattering and turbidimetric measurements. We have discussed at different pH values the influence of high salt concentration and mass ratio (protein:PSSNa) on the behavior of the mixture. In dilute concentration regime, the PSSNa chain contracts at pHc by patch binding. We found two critical values of mass ratio: The first corresponds to the maximum shrinking of PSSNa. The second indicates the system that became more stable where the number of proteins attached to the PSSNa chain was constant. The screen of electrostatic interaction shows a high contribution of hydrophobic interaction at large salt concentration to form the coacervates. By building phase diagram, the continuity of pHφ1 in over whole range of salt concentrations and the widening of pH window (pHφ1-pHφ2) were observed. At certain salt concentrations, we can obtain the coexistence of two types of complex particles formed by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

  2. Improving the aqueous solubility of triclosan by solubilization, complexation, and in situ salt formation.

    PubMed

    Grove, Christine; Liebenberg, Wilna; du Preez, Jan L; Yang, Wenzhan; de Villiers, Melgardt M

    2003-01-01

    Triclosan, an antimicrobial, although widely incorporated into many skin care products, toothpastes, and liquid soaps, presents formulation difficulties because it is practically insoluble in water. The objective of this study was to improve the aqueous solubility of triclosan through solubilization, complexation, and salt formation. The solubility of triclosan in distilled water and in phosphate buffers (pH 7.4) was determined at 30 degrees C. The order of solubilizing performance of the solubilizers was: N-methylglucamine> or =L-arginine>sodium lauryl sulfate>beta-cyclodextrin> or =hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin>ethanolamine>sodium benzoate>sodium methyl 4-hydroxybenzoate>triethanolamine> or =diethanolamine. These solubilizers increased the solubility of triclosan from 80- to 6000-fold. Micellar solubilization and the formation of either salts or complexes are postulated as possible mechanisms for the increase in the solubility of triclosan by the surfactant sodium lauryl sulphate, the cyclic sugar derivatives beta-cyclodextrin and 2-hydropropyl-beta-cyclodextrin, the amino acid L-arginine, and the amino sugar alcohol N-methylglucamine. Furthermore, although the bacteriostatic efficacy of triclosan was significantly increased when solubilized with N-methylglucamine, L-arginine, and ethanolamine, increased solubilization did not increase the effectiveness of triclosan for all solubilizers tested.

  3. Interaction and complex formation between catalase and cationic polyelectrolytes: chitosan and Eudragit E100.

    PubMed

    Boeris, Valeria; Romanini, Diana; Farruggia, Beatriz; Picó, Guillemo

    2009-08-01

    Interactions between catalase and the cationic polyelectrolytes: chitosan and Eudragit E100 have been investigated owing to their scientific and technological importance. These interactions have been characterized by turbidimetry, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that the catalase conformation does not change significantly during the chain entanglements between the protein and the polyelectrolytes. The effects of pH, ionic strength and anions which modify the water structure were evaluated on the polymer-protein complex formation. A net coulombic interaction force between them was found since the insoluble complex formation decreased after the NaCl addition. Both polymers were found to precipitate around 80% of the protein in solution. No modification of the tertiary and secondary protein structure or the enzymatic activity was observed when the precipitate was dissolved by changing the pH of the medium. Chitosan and Eudragit E100 proved to be a useful framework to isolate catalase or proteins with a slightly acid isoelectrical pH by means of precipitation.

  4. Paleobiology of a Neoproterozoic tidal flat/lagoonal complex: the Draken Conglomerate Formation, Spitsbergen.

    PubMed

    Knoll, A H; Swett, K; Mark, J

    1991-01-01

    Carbonates and rare shales of the ca 700-800 Ma old Draken Conglomerate Formation, northeastern Spitsbergen, preserve a record of environmental variation within a Neoproterozoic tidal flat/lagoon complex. Forty-two microfossil taxa have been recognized in Draken rocks, and of these, 39 can be characterized in terms of their paleoenvironmental distributions along a gradient from the supratidal zone to permanently submerged lagoons. Supratidal to subtidal trends include: increasing microbenthic diversity, increasing abundance and diversity of included allochthonous (presumably planktonic) elements, decreasing sheath thickness of mat-building organisms (with significant taphonomic consequences), and an increasing sediment/fossil ratio in fossiliferous rocks. Five principal and several minor biofacies can be distinguished. The paleoecological resolution obtainable in the Draken Conglomerate Formation rivals that achieved for most Phanerozoic fossil deposits. It documents the complexity and diversity of Proterozoic coastal ecosystems and indicates that both environment and taphonomy need to be taken into explicit consideration in attempts to understand evolutionary trends in early fossil record. Three species, Coniunctiophycus majorinum, Myxococcoides distola, and M. chlorelloidea, are described as new; Siphonophycus robustum, Siphonophycus septatum, and Gorgonisphaeridium maximum are proposed as new combinations.

  5. Paleobiology of a Neoproterozoic tidal flat/lagoonal complex: the Draken Conglomerate Formation, Spitsbergen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, A. H.; Swett, K.; Mark, J.

    1991-01-01

    Carbonates and rare shales of the ca 700-800 Ma old Draken Conglomerate Formation, northeastern Spitsbergen, preserve a record of environmental variation within a Neoproterozoic tidal flat/lagoon complex. Forty-two microfossil taxa have been recognized in Draken rocks, and of these, 39 can be characterized in terms of their paleoenvironmental distributions along a gradient from the supratidal zone to permanently submerged lagoons. Supratidal to subtidal trends include: increasing microbenthic diversity, increasing abundance and diversity of included allochthonous (presumably planktonic) elements, decreasing sheath thickness of mat-building organisms (with significant taphonomic consequences), and an increasing sediment/fossil ratio in fossiliferous rocks. Five principal and several minor biofacies can be distinguished. The paleoecological resolution obtainable in the Draken Conglomerate Formation rivals that achieved for most Phanerozoic fossil deposits. It documents the complexity and diversity of Proterozoic coastal ecosystems and indicates that both environment and taphonomy need to be taken into explicit consideration in attempts to understand evolutionary trends in early fossil record. Three species, Coniunctiophycus majorinum, Myxococcoides distola, and M. chlorelloidea, are described as new; Siphonophycus robustum, Siphonophycus septatum, and Gorgonisphaeridium maximum are proposed as new combinations.

  6. The Scaling Relations and Star Formation Laws of Mini-starburst Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Luong, Quang; Nguyen, Hans V. V.; Motte, Fredérique; Schneider, Nicola; Fujii, Michiko; Louvet, Fabien; Hill, Tracey; Sanhueza, Patricio; Chibueze, James O.; Didelon, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The scaling relations and star formation laws for molecular cloud complexes (MCCs) in the Milky Way are investigated. MCCs are mostly large (R > 50 pc), massive (˜106 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ ) gravitationally unbound cloud structures. We compare their masses {M}{gas}, mass surface densities {{{Σ }}}{M{gas}}, radii R, velocity dispersions σ, star formation rates (SFRs), and SFR densities {{{Σ }}}{SFR} with those of structures ranging from cores, clumps, and giant molecular clouds, to MCCs, and galaxies, spanning eight orders of magnitudes in size and 13 orders of magnitudes in mass. This results in the following universal relations:σ ˜ {R}0.5,{M}{gas}˜ {R}2,{{{Σ }}}{SFR}˜ {{{Σ }}}{M{gas}}1.5, {SFR}˜ {{M}{gas}}0.9, {and} {SFR}˜ {σ }2.7. Variations in the slopes and coefficients of these relations are found at individual scales, signifying different physics acting at different scales. Additionally, there are breaks at the MCC scale in the σ {--}R relation and between starburst and normal star-forming objects in the {SFR}{--}{M}{gas} and {{{Σ }}}{SFR}-{{{Σ }}}{{{M}}{gas}} relations. Therefore, we propose to use the Schmidt-Kennicutt diagram to distinguish starburst from normal star-forming structures by applying a {{{Σ }}}{M{gas}} threshold of ˜100 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ pc-2 and a {{{Σ }}}{SFR} threshold of 1 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. Mini-starburst complexes are gravitationally unbound MCCs that have enhanced {{{Σ }}}{SFR} (>1 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ yr-1 kpc-2), probably caused by dynamic events such as radiation pressure, colliding flows, or spiral arm gravitational instability. Because of dynamical evolution, gravitational boundedness does not play a significant role in regulating the star formation activity of MCCs, especially the mini-starburst complexes, which leads to the dynamical formation of massive stars and clusters. We emphasize the importance of understanding mini-starbursts in investigating the physics of starburst galaxies.

  7. Quantum chemical insights in energy dissipation and carotenoid radical cation formation in light harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2007-06-21

    Light harvesting complexes (LHCs) have been identified in all photosynthetic organisms. To understand their function in light harvesting and energy dissipation, detailed knowledge about possible excitation energy transfer (EET) and electron transfer (ET) processes in these pigment proteins is of prime importance. This again requires the study of electronically excited states of the involved pigment molecules, in LHCs of chlorophylls and carotenoids. This paper represents a critical review of recent quantum chemical calculations on EET and ET processes between pigment pairs relevant for the major LHCs of green plants (LHC-II) and of purple bacteria (LH2). The theoretical methodology for a meaningful investigation of such processes is described in detail, and benefits and limitations of standard methods are discussed. The current status of excited state calculations on chlorophylls and carotenoids is outlined. It is focused on the possibility of EET and ET in the context of chlorophyll fluorescence quenching in LHC-II and carotenoid radical cation formation in LH2. In the context of non-photochemical quenching of green plants, it is shown that replacement of the carotenoid violaxanthin by zeaxanthin in its binding pocket of LHC-II can not result in efficient quenching. In LH2, our computational results give strong evidence that the S(1) states of the carotenoids are involved in carotenoid cation formation. By comparison of theoretical findings with recent experimental data, a general mechanism for carotenoid radical cation formation is suggested.

  8. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-04-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas-phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm ( ≳ 30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas-phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthesized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairly well the observations towards L1544. It also explains, in a natural way, the observed correlation between DME and MF. We conclude that gas-phase reactions are major actors in the formation of MF, DME and methoxy in cold gas. This challenges the exclusive role of grain-surface chemistry and favours a combined grain-gas chemistry.

  9. Effect of exciplex formation on organic light emitting diodes based on rare-earth complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. Y.; Li, W. L.; Chu, B.; Liang, C. J.; Hong, Z. R.; Li, M. T.; Wei, H. Z.; Xin, Q.; Niu, J. H.; Xu, J. B.

    2006-07-01

    An exciplex can be formed due to the charge transfer between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the acceptor and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the donor. By introducing a mixing layer composed of [N ,N'-diphenyl-N ,N'bis (3-methylphenyl)-1,1'-diphenyl-4,4'-diamine] (TPD) and europium(dibenzoylmethanato)3(bathophenanthroline) [Eu(DBM)3bath] and a graded interface, elimination of light emission from the exciplex and significant luminescence enhancement of trivalent europium ions (Eu3+) in organic light emitting devices have been achieved. The elimination mechanism of exciplex emission based on the concept that an exciplex can be formed between LUMO of the acceptor (Eu complex) and HOMO of donor (TPD) was investigated. To comprehensively understand the mechanism, devices consisting of a Eu(DBM)3bath as the emitting material and the devices using other rare-earth (RE) complex [RE(DBM)3bath] as the emitting material were fabricated with the same device configuration. As a reference, four spin-coated films with the blend composed of TPD and the gadolinium complex [Gd(DBM)3bath] were also fabricated. The electroluminescence (EL) spectra from the devices and photoluminescence spectra from the spin-coating films were fully investigated. The results show that the exciplex was formed by the charge transfer from the donor TPD to the acceptor RE complex, the exciplex state that acted as a transient excited state can be controlled by altering the molecular ratio in the mixing films. The relation of the exciplex formation based on EL devices with the RE complex versus the variety of the RE ions is also discussed by manipulating the energy level of the excited state.

  10. The Interaction of Arp2/3 Complex with Actin: Nucleation, High Affinity Pointed End Capping, and Formation of Branching Networks of Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyche Mullins, R.; Heuser, John A.; Pollard, Thomas D.

    1998-05-01

    The Arp2/3 complex is a stable assembly of seven protein subunits including two actin-related proteins (Arp2 and Arp3) and five novel proteins. Previous work showed that this complex binds to the sides of actin filaments and is concentrated at the leading edges of motile cells. Here, we show that Arp2/3 complex purified from Acanthamoeba caps the pointed ends of actin filaments with high affinity. Arp2/3 complex inhibits both monomer addition and dissociation at the pointed ends of actin filaments with apparent nanomolar affinity and increases the critical concentration for polymerization at the pointed end from 0.6 to 1.0 μ M. The high affinity of Arp2/3 complex for pointed ends and its abundance in amoebae suggest that in vivo all actin filament pointed ends are capped by Arp2/3 complex. Arp2/3 complex also nucleates formation of actin filaments that elongate only from their barbed ends. From kinetic analysis, the nucleation mechanism appears to involve stabilization of polymerization intermediates (probably actin dimers). In electron micrographs of quick-frozen, deep-etched samples, we see Arp2/3 bound to sides and pointed ends of actin filaments and examples of Arp2/3 complex attaching pointed ends of filaments to sides of other filaments. In these cases, the angle of attachment is a remarkably constant 70 ± 7 degrees. From these in vitro biochemical properties, we propose a model for how Arp2/3 complex controls the assembly of a branching network of actin filaments at the leading edge of motile cells.

  11. A defined peptide that inhibits the formation of the glycoprotein IIb and IIIa complex.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Thomas M; Zhu, Jiaqian

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-platelet interaction plays an important role in hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. The proposed mechanism of the interaction was the activation of platelets-->releasing of contents from granules-->aggregation. The common end point is the platelets and fibrin aggregates. Platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa (the alphaIIbbeta3 integrin) complexes serve as a receptor for the binding of fibrinogen to form firmed aggregates. Blockading of GP IIb/IIIa has been proposed to prevent platelet aggregation independent of the substance(s) responsible for activating the platelets. The development of various forms of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor has resulted in the inhibition of platelet aggregation, although studies of alphaIIbbeta3 receptor function and various GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors have demonstrated the potential for these agents to produce effects on other aspects of platelet function as well as having nonplatelet effects. This study investigated platelet inhibition provided by blocking the GP IIb/IIIa complex formation by using a peptide derived from the GP IIIa molecule. The peptide inhibits both types I and III collagen-induced platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent manner. The defined peptide interferes with the formation of the GP IIb/IIIa complex by inhibiting the binding of FITC-PAC-1 onto ADP-, type I collagen-, and type III collagen-activated platelets. However, P-selectin secretion is not affected by the peptide. In addition, the peptide is not interfering with the binding of FITC-PAC-1 to platelets that were preincubated with indomethacin. Results from this study may suggest that the defined peptide is an effective agent to block the interaction of types I and III collagen with platelets.

  12. A Multi-wavelength Study of Star Formation Activity in the S235 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Luna, A.; Anandarao, B. G.; Ninan, J. P.; Mallick, K. K.; Mayya, Y. D.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out an extensive multi-wavelength study to investigate the star formation process in the S235 complex. The S235 complex has a spherelike shell appearance at wavelengths longer than 2 μm and harbors an O9.5V type star approximately at its center. A near-infrared extinction map of the complex traces eight subregions (having AV > 8 mag), and five of them appear to be distributed in an almost regularly spaced manner along the spherelike shell surrounding the ionized emission. This picture is also supported by the integrated 12CO and 13CO intensity maps and by Bolocam 1.1 mm continuum emission. The position-velocity analysis of CO reveals an almost semi-ringlike structure, suggesting an expanding H ii region. We find that the Bolocam clump masses increase as we move away from the location of the ionizing star. This correlation is seen only for those clumps that are distributed near the edges of the shell. Photometric analysis reveals 435 young stellar objects (YSOs), 59% of which are found in clusters. Six subregions (including five located near the edges of the shell) are very well correlated with the dust clumps, CO gas, and YSOs. The average values of Mach numbers derived using NH3 data for three (East 1, East 2, and Central E) out of these six subregions are 2.9, 2.3, and 2.9, indicating these subregions are supersonic. The molecular outflows are detected in these three subregions, further confirming the ongoing star formation activity. Together, all these results are interpreted as observational evidence of positive feedback of a massive star.

  13. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE S235 COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Dewangan, L. K.; Luna, A.; Mayya, Y. D.; Ojha, D. K.; Ninan, J. P.; Mallick, K. K.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out an extensive multi-wavelength study to investigate the star formation process in the S235 complex. The S235 complex has a spherelike shell appearance at wavelengths longer than 2 μm and harbors an O9.5V type star approximately at its center. A near-infrared extinction map of the complex traces eight subregions (having A{sub V} > 8 mag), and five of them appear to be distributed in an almost regularly spaced manner along the spherelike shell surrounding the ionized emission. This picture is also supported by the integrated {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO intensity maps and by Bolocam 1.1 mm continuum emission. The position–velocity analysis of CO reveals an almost semi-ringlike structure, suggesting an expanding H ii region. We find that the Bolocam clump masses increase as we move away from the location of the ionizing star. This correlation is seen only for those clumps that are distributed near the edges of the shell. Photometric analysis reveals 435 young stellar objects (YSOs), 59% of which are found in clusters. Six subregions (including five located near the edges of the shell) are very well correlated with the dust clumps, CO gas, and YSOs. The average values of Mach numbers derived using NH{sub 3} data for three (East 1, East 2, and Central E) out of these six subregions are 2.9, 2.3, and 2.9, indicating these subregions are supersonic. The molecular outflows are detected in these three subregions, further confirming the ongoing star formation activity. Together, all these results are interpreted as observational evidence of positive feedback of a massive star.

  14. A Natural Mutation Involving both Pathogenicity and Perithecium Formation in the Fusarium graminearum Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Haruhisha; Kageyama, Koji; Shimizu, Masafumi; Hyakumachi, Misturo

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (Fg complex or FGSC) are the primary pathogens causing Fusarium head blight in wheat and barley worldwide. A natural pathogenicity mutant (strain 0225022) was found in a sample of the Fg complex collected in Japan. The mutant strain did not induce symptoms in wheat spikes beyond the point of inoculation, and did not form perithecia. No segregation of phenotypic deficiencies occurred in the progenies of a cross between the mutant and a fully pathogenic wild-type strain, which suggested that a single genetic locus controlled both traits. The locus was mapped to chromosome 2 by using sequence-tagged markers; and a deletion of ∼3 kb was detected in the mapped region of the mutant strain. The wild-type strain contains the FGSG_02810 gene, encoding a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor protein, in this region. The contribution of FGSG_02810 to pathogenicity and perithecium formation was confirmed by complementation in the mutant strain using gene transfer, and by gene disruption in the wild-type strain. PMID:27678518

  15. Formation of coronene:water complexes: FTIR study in argon matrices and theoretical characterisation.

    PubMed

    Simon, A; Noble, J A; Rouaut, G; Moudens, A; Aupetit, C; Iftner, C; Mascetti, J

    2017-03-13

    In this paper, we report a combined theoretical and experimental study of coronene:water interactions in low temperature argon matrices. The theoretical calculations were performed using the mixed density functional-based tight binding/force field approach. The results are discussed in the light of experimental matrix isolation FTIR spectroscopic data. We show that, in the solid phase, (C24H12)(H2O)n (n ≤ 6) σ-type complexes, i.e. with water molecules coordinated on the edge of coronene, are formed, whereas in the gas phase, π-interaction is preferred. These σ-complexes are characterised by small shifts in water absorption bands and a larger blue shift of the out-of-plane γ(CH) deformation of coronene, with the shift increasing with the number of complexed water molecules. Such σ interaction is expected to favour photochemical reaction between water and coronene at the edges of the coronene molecule, leading to the formation of oxidation products at low temperature, even in the presence of only a few water molecules and at radiation energies below the ionisation potential of coronene.

  16. Incorporation of polyoxotungstate complexes in silica spheres and in situ formation of tungsten trioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Fan, Haimei; Li, Wen; Bi, Lihua; Wang, Dejun; Wu, Lixin

    2010-09-21

    In this paper, we demonstrated a new convenient route for in situ fabrication of well separated small sized WO(3) nanoparticles in silica spheres, through a predeposition of surfactant encapsulated polyoxotungates as tungsten source, and followed by a calcination process. In a typical procedure, selected polyoxotungates with different charges were enwrapped with dioctadecyldimethylammonium cations through electrostatic interaction. Elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and spectral characterization confirmed the formation of prepared complexes with the anticipated chemical structure. The complexes were then phase-transferred into aqueous solution that predissolved surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, and finally incorporated into silica spheres through a joint sol-gel reaction with tetraethyl orthosilicate in a well dispersed state under the protection of organic layer for polyoxotungates from the alkaline reaction condition. Transmission electron microscopic images illustrated the well dispersed WO(3) nanoparticles in the size range of ca. 2.2 nm in the silica spheres after the calcination at 465 °C. The sizes of both the silica spheres and WO(3) nanoparticles could be adjusted independently through changing the doping content to a large extent. Meanwhile, the doped polyoxotungate complexes acted as the template for the mesoporous structure in silica spheres after the calcination. Along with the increase of doping content and surfactant, the mesopore size changed little (2.0-2.9 nm), but the specific surface areas increased quite a lot. Importantly, the WO(3)-nanoparticle-doped silica spheres displayed an interesting photovoltaic property, which is favorable for the funtionalization of these nanomaterials.

  17. Sensitive and selective spectrophotometric assay of piroxicam in pure form, capsule and human blood serum samples via ion-pair complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Nina; Keyhanian, Fereshteh

    2014-09-01

    A simple, accurate and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the rapid determination of piroxicam (PX) in pure and pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method involves formation of stable yellow colored ion-pair complexes of the amino derivative (basic nitrogen) of PX with three sulphonphthalein acid dyes namely; bromocresol green (BCG), bromothymol blue (BTB), bromophenol blue (BPB) in acidic medium. The colored species exhibited absorption maxima at 438, 429 and 432 nm with molar absorptivity values of 9.400 × 103, 1.218 × 103 and 1.02 × 104 L mol-1 cm-1 for PX-BCG, PX-BTB and PX-BPB complexes, respectively. The effect of optimum conditions via acidity, reagent concentration, time and solvent were studied. The reactions were extremely rapid at room temperature and the absorbance values remained constant for 48 h. Beer’s law was obeyed with a good correlation coefficient in the concentration ranges 1-100 μg mL-1 for BCG, BTB complexes and 1-95 μg mL-1 for BPB complex. The composition ratio of the ion-pair complexes were found to be 1:1 in all cases as established by Job’s method. No interference was observed from common additives and excipients which may be present in the pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of PX in capsule and human blood serum samples with good accuracy and precision.

  18. Sensitive and selective spectrophotometric assay of piroxicam in pure form, capsule and human blood serum samples via ion-pair complex formation.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Nina; Keyhanian, Fereshteh

    2014-09-15

    A simple, accurate and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the rapid determination of piroxicam (PX) in pure and pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method involves formation of stable yellow colored ion-pair complexes of the amino derivative (basic nitrogen) of PX with three sulphonphthalein acid dyes namely; bromocresol green (BCG), bromothymol blue (BTB), bromophenol blue (BPB) in acidic medium. The colored species exhibited absorption maxima at 438, 429 and 432 nm with molar absorptivity values of 9.400×10(3), 1.218×10(3) and 1.02×10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1) for PX-BCG, PX-BTB and PX-BPB complexes, respectively. The effect of optimum conditions via acidity, reagent concentration, time and solvent were studied. The reactions were extremely rapid at room temperature and the absorbance values remained constant for 48h. Beer's law was obeyed with a good correlation coefficient in the concentration ranges 1-100 μg mL(-1) for BCG, BTB complexes and 1-95 μg mL(-1) for BPB complex. The composition ratio of the ion-pair complexes were found to be 1:1 in all cases as established by Job's method. No interference was observed from common additives and excipients which may be present in the pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of PX in capsule and human blood serum samples with good accuracy and precision.

  19. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE GALACTIC H II COMPLEX S255-S257

    SciTech Connect

    Ojha, D. K.; Ghosh, S. K.; Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Bhatt, B. C.; Tamura, M.; Mohan, V.; Zinchenko, I.

    2011-09-10

    We present results on the star formation activity of an optically obscured region containing an embedded cluster (S255-IR) and molecular gas between two evolved H II regions, S255 and S257. We have studied the complex using optical and near-infrared (NIR) imaging, optical spectroscopy, and radio continuum mapping at 15 GHz, along with Spitzer-IRAC results. We found that the main exciting sources of the evolved H II regions S255 and S257 and the compact H II regions associated with S255-IR are of O9.5-B3 V nature, consistent with previous observations. Our NIR observations reveal 109 likely young stellar object (YSO) candidates in an area of {approx}4.'9 x 4.'9 centered on S255-IR, which include 69 new YSO candidates. To see the global star formation, we constructed the V - I/V diagram for 51 optically identified IRAC YSOs in an area of {approx}13' x 13' centered on S255-IR. We suggest that these YSOs have an approximate age between 0.1 and 4 Myr, indicating a non-coeval star formation. Using spectral energy distribution models, we constrained physical properties and evolutionary status of 31 and 16 YSO candidates outside and inside the gas ridge, respectively. The models suggest that the sources associated with the gas ridge are younger (mean age {approx}1.2 Myr) than the sources outside the gas ridge (mean age {approx}2.5 Myr). The positions of the young sources inside the gas ridge at the interface of the H II regions S255 and S257 favor a site of induced star formation.

  20. Stability constant estimator user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.; Castleton, K.J.; Rustad, J.R.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of the Stability Constant Estimator (SCE) program is to estimate aqueous stability constants for 1:1 complexes of metal ions with ligands by using trends in existing stability constant data. Such estimates are useful to fill gaps in existing thermodynamic databases and to corroborate the accuracy of reported stability constant values.

  1. When constants are important

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors discuss several complexity aspects pertaining to neural networks, commonly known as the curse of dimensionality. The focus will be on: (1) size complexity and depth-size tradeoffs; (2) complexity of learning; and (3) precision and limited interconnectivity. Results have been obtained for each of these problems when dealt with separately, but few things are known as to the links among them. They start by presenting known results and try to establish connections between them. These show that they are facing very difficult problems--exponential growth in either space (i.e. precision and size) and/or time (i.e., learning and depth)--when resorting to neural networks for solving general problems. The paper will present a solution for lowering some constants, by playing on the depth-size tradeoff.

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of formation of the platinum-thallium bond: the [(CN)(5)Pt-Tl(CN)(3)](3)(-) complex.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Péter; Tóth, Imre; Fábián, István; Maliarik, Mikhail; Glaser, Julius

    2003-10-20

    Formation kinetics of the metal-metal bonded [(CN)(5)PtTl(CN)(3)](3)(-) complex from Pt(CN)(4)(2)(-) and Tl(CN)(4)(-) has been studied in the pH range of 5-10, using standard mix-and-measure spectrophotometric technique at pH 5-8 and stopped-flow method at pH > 8. The overall order of the reaction, Pt(CN)(4)(2)(-) + Tl(CN)(4)(-) right harpoon over left harpoon [(CN)(5)PtTl(CN)(3)](3)(-), is 2 in the slightly acidic region and 3 in the alkaline region, which means first order for the two reactants in both cases and also for CN(-) at high pH. The two-term rate law corresponds to two different pathways via the Tl(CN)(3) and Tl(CN)(4)(-) complexes in acidic and alkaline solution, respectively. The two complexes are in fast equilibrium, and their actual concentration ratio is controlled by the concentration of free cyanide ion. The following expression was derived for the pseudo-first-order rate constant of the overall reaction: k(obs) = (k(1)(a)[Tl(CN)(4)(-) + (k(1)(a)/K(f)))(1/(1 + K(p)[H(+)]))[CN(-)](free) + k(1)(b)[Tl(CN)(4)(-)] + (k(1)(b)/K(f)), where k(1)(a) and k(1)(b) are the forward rate constants for the alkaline and slightly acidic paths, K(f) is the stability constant of [(CN)(5)PtTl(CN)(3)](3)(-), and K(p) is the protonation constant of cyanide ion. k(1)(a) = 143 +/- 13 M(-)(2) s(-)(1), k(1)(b) = 0.056 +/- 0.004 M(-)(1) s(-)(1), K(f) = 250 +/- 54 M(-)(1), and log K(p) = 9.15 +/- 0.05 (I = 1 M NaClO(4), T = 298 K). Two possible mechanisms were postulated for the overall reaction in both pH regions, which include a metal-metal bond formation step and the coordination of the axial cyanide ion to the platinum center. The alternative mechanisms are different in the sequence of these steps.

  3. Determination of the molecular complexation constant between alprostadil and alpha-cyclodextrin by conductometry: implications for a freeze-dried formulation.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Philip M; Ramstad, Tore

    2005-10-04

    The binding constant between alprostadil (PGE1) and alpha-cyclodextrin (alpha-CD) was determined at four temperatures using conductance measurements. Alpha-cyclodextrin is an excipient material in Caverject dual chamber syringe (DCS) that was added to enhance stability. The binding constant was used to calculate the amount of PGE1 free upon reconstitution and injection, since only the free drug is clinically active. The conductivity measurement is based on a decrease in specific conductance as alprostadil is titrated with alpha-CD. The change in conductivity was plotted versus free ligand concentration (alpha-CD) to generate a binding curve. As the value of the binding constant proved to be dependent on substrate concentration, it is really a pseudo binding constant. A value of 742+/-60 M(-1) was obtained for a 0.5 mM solution of alprostadil at 27 degrees C and a value of 550+/-52 M(-1) at 37 degrees C. These results compare favorably to values previously obtained by NMR and capillary electrophoresis. Calculation of the fraction PGE1 free upon reconstitution and injection show it to approach the desired outcome of one. Hence, the amount of drug delivered by Caverject DCS is nominally equivalent to that delivered by Caverject S. Po., a predecessor product that contains no alpha-cyclodextrin.

  4. Dimerisation, rhodium complex formation and rearrangements of N-heterocyclic carbenes of indazoles

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zong; Namyslo, Jan C; Drafz, Martin H H; Nieger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Deprotonation of indazolium salts at low temperatures gives N-heterocyclic carbenes of indazoles (indazol-3-ylidenes) which can be trapped as rhodium complexes (X-ray analysis). In the absence of Rh, the indazol-3-ylidenes spontaneously dimerize under ring cleavage of one of the N,N-bonds and ring closure to an indazole–indole spiro compound which possesses an exocyclic imine group. The E/Z isomers of the imines can be separated by column chromatography when methanol is used as eluent. We present results of a single crystal X-ray analysis of one of the E-isomers, which equilibrate in solution as well as in the solid state. Heating of the indazole–indole spiro compounds results in the formation of quinazolines by a ring-cleavage/ring-closure sequence (X-ray analysis). Results of DFT calculations are presented. PMID:24778738

  5. Spontaneous formation of complex structures made from elastic membranes in an aluminum-hydroxide-carbonate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiehl, Micah; Kaminker, Vitaliy; Pantaleone, James; Nowak, Piotr; Dyonizy, Agnieszka; Maselko, Jerzy

    2015-06-01

    A popular playground for studying chemo-hydrodynamic patterns and instabilities is chemical gardens, also known as silicate gardens. In these systems, complex structures spontaneously form, driven by buoyant forces and either osmotic or mechanical pumps. Here, we report on systems that differ somewhat from classical chemical gardens in that the membranes are much more deformable and soluble. These properties lead to structures that self-construct and evolve in new ways. For example, they exhibit the formation of chemical balloons, a new growth mechanism for tubes, and also the homologous shrinking of these tubes. The stretching mechanism for the membranes is probably different than for other systems by involving membrane "self-healing." Other unusual properties are osmosis that sometimes occurs out of the structure and also small plumes that flow away from the structure, sometimes upwards, and sometimes downwards. Mathematical models are given that explain some of the observed phenomena.

  6. Thermodynamics of Complex Sulfide Inclusion Formation in Ca-Treated Al-Killed Structural Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yin-tao; He, Sheng-ping; Chen, Gu-jun; Wang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Controlling the morphology of the sulfide inclusion is of vital importance in enhancing the properties of structural steel. Long strip-shaped sulfides in hot-rolled steel can spherize when, instead of the inclusion of pure single-phase MnS, the guest is a complex sulfide, such as an oxide-sulfide duplex and a solid-solution sulfide particle. In this study, the inclusions in a commercial rolled structural steel were investigated. Spherical and elongated oxide-sulfide duplex as well as single-phase (Mn,Ca)S solid solution inclusions were observed in the steel. A thermodynamic equilibrium between the oxide and sulfide inclusions was proposed to understand the oxide-sulfide duplex inclusion formation. Based on the equilibrium solidification principle, thermodynamic discussions on inclusion precipitation during the solidification process were performed for both general and resulfurized structural steel. The predicted results of the present study agreed well with the experimental ones.

  7. Probing formation of cargo/importin-α transport complexes in plant cells using a pathogen effector

    PubMed Central

    Wirthmueller, Lennart; Roth, Charlotte; Fabro, Georgina; Caillaud, Marie-Cécile; Rallapalli, Ghanasyam; Asai, Shuta; Sklenar, Jan; Jones, Alexandra M E; Wiermer, Marcel; Jones, Jonathan D G; Banfield, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Importin-αs are essential adapter proteins that recruit cytoplasmic proteins destined for active nuclear import to the nuclear transport machinery. Cargo proteins interact with the importin-α armadillo repeat domain via nuclear localization sequences (NLSs), short amino acids motifs enriched in Lys and Arg residues. Plant genomes typically encode several importin-α paralogs that can have both specific and partially redundant functions. Although some cargos are preferentially imported by a distinct importin-α it remains unknown how this specificity is generated and to what extent cargos compete for binding to nuclear transport receptors. Here we report that the effector protein HaRxL106 from the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis co-opts the host cell's nuclear import machinery. We use HaRxL106 as a probe to determine redundant and specific functions of importin-α paralogs from Arabidopsis thaliana. A crystal structure of the importin-α3/MOS6 armadillo repeat domain suggests that five of the six Arabidopsis importin-αs expressed in rosette leaves have an almost identical NLS-binding site. Comparison of the importin-α binding affinities of HaRxL106 and other cargos in vitro and in plant cells suggests that relatively small affinity differences in vitro affect the rate of transport complex formation in vivo. Our results suggest that cargo affinity for importin-α, sequence variation at the importin-α NLS-binding sites and tissue-specific expression levels of importin-αs determine formation of cargo/importin-α transport complexes in plant cells. PMID:25284001

  8. Colorimetric determination of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) through ion-associate complex formation.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alaa S; Moustafa, Moustafa E; El-Dosoky, Reham

    2009-01-01

    A simple, quick, accurate, and sensitive colorimetric method is described for the determination of sildenafil citrate (SLD). The method is based on the reaction of SLD with Congo Red, Sudan II, and Gentian Violet in buffered aqueous solutions at pH 2.5, 6.5, and 11.0, respectively, to give highly colored soluble ion-associate complex species; the colored products are quantitated colorimetrically at 523, 554, and 569 nm, respectively. The various experimental conditions were optimized. The stoichiometric ratio was found to be 1:1 for all ion associates; the calculated logarithmic stability constants were 8.51, 7.79, and 5.58, respectively. Beer's law was obeyed over the concentration range of 0.2-7.0 microg/mL, whereas the Ringbom optimum concentration range was 0.4-6.5 microg/mL. Values for molar absorptivity, Sandell sensitivity, and detection and quantification limits were also calculated. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of SLD in Viagra tablets and in serum samples by using the technique of standard additions with mean accuracy values of 100.06 +/- 1.14, 99.87 +/- 0.70, and 99.86 +/- 0.97% for Viagra tablets and 99.88 +/- 0.60, 99.90 +/- 0.90, and 100.24 +/- 0.80% for serum samples, respectively.

  9. Formation of Large Polysulfide Complexes during the Lithium-Sulfur Battery Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Alhassan, Saeed M.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2014-09-01

    Sulfur cathodes have much larger capacities than transition-metal-oxide cathodes used in commercial lithium-ion batteries but suffer from unsatisfactory capacity retention and long-term cyclability. Capacity degradation originates from soluble lithium polysulfides gradually diffusing into the electrolyte. Understanding of the formation and dynamics of soluble polysulfides during the discharging process at the atomic level remains elusive, which limits further development of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. Here we report first-principles molecular dynamics simulations and density functional calculations, through which the discharging products of Li-S batteries are studied. We find that, in addition to simple Li2Sn (1≤n ≤8) clusters generated from single cyclooctasulfur (S8) rings, large Li-S clusters form by collectively coupling several different rings to minimize the total energy. At high lithium concentration, a Li-S network forms at the sulfur surfaces. The results can explain the formation of the soluble Li-S complex, such as Li2S8, Li2S6, and Li2S4, and the insoluble Li2S2 and Li2S structures. In addition, we show that the presence of oxygen impurities in graphene, particularly oxygen atoms bonded to vacancies and edges, may stabilize the lithium polysulfides that may otherwise diffuse into the electrolyte.

  10. P31comet, a member of the synaptonemal complex, participates in meiotic DSB formation in rice.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jianhui; Tang, Ding; Shen, Yi; Xue, Zhihui; Wang, Hongjun; Shi, Wenqing; Zhang, Chao; Du, Guijie; Li, Yafei; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-09-20

    The human mitotic arrest-deficient 2 (Mad2) binding protein p31(comet) participates in the spindle checkpoint and coordinates cell cycle events in mitosis although its function in meiosis remains unknown in all organisms. Here, we reveal P31(comet) as a synaptonemal complex (SC) protein in rice (Oryza sativa L.). In p31(comet), homologous pairing and synapsis are eliminated, leading to the homologous nondisjunction and complete sterility. The failure in loading of histone H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) in p31(comet), together with the suppressed chromosome fragmentation in rice completion of meiotic recombination 1 (com1) p31(comet) and radiation sensitive 51c (rad51c) p31(comet) double mutants, indicates that P31(comet) plays an essential role in double-strand break (DSB) formation. Interestingly, the dynamic colocalization pattern between P31(comet) and ZEP1 (a transverse filament protein of SC) by immunostaining, as well as the interaction between P31(comet) and CENTRAL REGION COMPONENT 1 (CRC1) in yeast two-hybrid assays, suggests possible involvement of P31(comet) in SC installation. Together, these data indicate that P31(comet) plays a key role in DSB formation and SC installation, mainly through its cooperation with CRC1.

  11. Complex organic molecules during low-mass star formation: Pilot survey results

    SciTech Connect

    Öberg, Karin I.; Graninger, Dawn; Lauck, Trish

    2014-06-10

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) are known to be abundant toward some low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs), but how these detections relate to typical COM abundance are not yet understood. We aim to constrain the frequency distribution of COMs during low-mass star formation, beginning with this pilot survey of COM lines toward six embedded YSOs using the IRAM 30 m Telescope. The sample was selected from the Spitzer c2d ice sample and covers a range of ice abundances. We detect multiple COMs, including CH{sub 3}CN, toward two of the YSOs, and tentatively toward a third. Abundances with respect to CH{sub 3}OH vary between 0.7% and 10%. This sample is combined with previous COM observations and upper limits to obtain a frequency distributions of CH{sub 3}CN, HCOOCH{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}CHO. We find that for all molecules more than 50% of the sample have detections or upper limits of 1%-10% with respect to CH{sub 3}OH. Moderate abundances of COMs thus appear common during the early stages of low-mass star formation. A larger sample is required, however, to quantify the COM distributions, as well as to constrain the origins of observed variations across the sample.

  12. P31comet, a member of the synaptonemal complex, participates in meiotic DSB formation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jianhui; Tang, Ding; Shen, Yi; Xue, Zhihui; Wang, Hongjun; Shi, Wenqing; Zhang, Chao; Du, Guijie; Li, Yafei; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-01-01

    The human mitotic arrest-deficient 2 (Mad2) binding protein p31comet participates in the spindle checkpoint and coordinates cell cycle events in mitosis although its function in meiosis remains unknown in all organisms. Here, we reveal P31comet as a synaptonemal complex (SC) protein in rice (Oryza sativa L.). In p31comet, homologous pairing and synapsis are eliminated, leading to the homologous nondisjunction and complete sterility. The failure in loading of histone H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) in p31comet, together with the suppressed chromosome fragmentation in rice completion of meiotic recombination 1 (com1) p31comet and radiation sensitive 51c (rad51c) p31comet double mutants, indicates that P31comet plays an essential role in double-strand break (DSB) formation. Interestingly, the dynamic colocalization pattern between P31comet and ZEP1 (a transverse filament protein of SC) by immunostaining, as well as the interaction between P31comet and CENTRAL REGION COMPONENT 1 (CRC1) in yeast two-hybrid assays, suggests possible involvement of P31comet in SC installation. Together, these data indicate that P31comet plays a key role in DSB formation and SC installation, mainly through its cooperation with CRC1. PMID:27601671

  13. Unraveling the complexities of circadian and sleep interactions with memory formation through invertebrate research

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Maximilian; Lyons, Lisa C.

    2014-01-01

    Across phylogeny, the endogenous biological clock has been recognized as providing adaptive advantages to organisms through coordination of physiological and behavioral processes. Recent research has emphasized the role of circadian modulation of memory in generating peaks and troughs in cognitive performance. The circadian clock along with homeostatic processes also regulates sleep, which itself impacts the formation and consolidation of memory. Thus, the circadian clock, sleep and memory form a triad with ongoing dynamic interactions. With technological advances and the development of a global 24/7 society, understanding the mechanisms underlying these connections becomes pivotal for development of therapeutic treatments for memory disorders and to address issues in cognitive performance arising from non-traditional work schedules. Invertebrate models, such as Drosophila melanogaster and the mollusks Aplysia and Lymnaea, have proven invaluable tools for identification of highly conserved molecular processes in memory. Recent research from invertebrate systems has outlined the influence of sleep and the circadian clock upon synaptic plasticity. In this review, we discuss the effects of the circadian clock and sleep on memory formation in invertebrates drawing attention to the potential of in vivo and in vitro approaches that harness the power of simple invertebrate systems to correlate individual cellular processes with complex behaviors. In conclusion, this review highlights how studies in invertebrates with relatively simple nervous systems can provide mechanistic insights into corresponding behaviors in higher organisms and can be used to outline possible therapeutic options to guide further targeted inquiry. PMID:25136297

  14. Generalized additive models reveal the intrinsic complexity of wood formation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Henri E; Rathgeber, Cyrille B K; Kiessé, Tristan Senga; Hartmann, Felix P; Barbeito, Ignacio; Fournier, Meriem

    2013-04-01

    The intra-annual dynamics of wood formation, which involves the passage of newly produced cells through three successive differentiation phases (division, enlargement, and wall thickening) to reach the final functional mature state, has traditionally been described in conifers as three delayed bell-shaped curves followed by an S-shaped curve. Here the classical view represented by the 'Gompertz function (GF) approach' was challenged using two novel approaches based on parametric generalized linear models (GLMs) and 'data-driven' generalized additive models (GAMs). These three approaches (GFs, GLMs, and GAMs) were used to describe seasonal changes in cell numbers in each of the xylem differentiation phases and to calculate the timing of cell development in three conifer species [Picea abies (L.), Pinus sylvestris L., and Abies alba Mill.]. GAMs outperformed GFs and GLMs in describing intra-annual wood formation dynamics, showing two left-skewed bell-shaped curves for division and enlargement, and a right-skewed bimodal curve for thickening. Cell residence times progressively decreased through the season for enlargement, whilst increasing late but rapidly for thickening. These patterns match changes in cell anatomical features within a tree ring, which allows the separation of earlywood and latewood into two distinct cell populations. A novel statistical approach is presented which renews our understanding of xylogenesis, a dynamic biological process in which the rate of cell production interplays with cell residence times in each developmental phase to create complex seasonal patterns.

  15. Bacillus subtilis δ Factor Functions as a Transcriptional Regulator by Facilitating the Open Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Sengupta, Shreya; Rudra, Paulami; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2016-01-15

    Most bacterial RNA polymerases (RNAP) contain five conserved subunits, viz. 2α, β, β', and ω. However, in many Gram-positive bacteria, especially in fermicutes, RNAP is associated with an additional factor, called δ. For over three decades since its identification, it had been thought that δ functioned as a subunit of RNAP to enhance the level of transcripts by recycling RNAP. In support of the previous observations, we also find that δ is involved in recycling of RNAP by releasing the RNA from the ternary complex. We further show that δ binds to RNA and is able to recycle RNAP when the length of the nascent RNA reaches a critical length. However, in this work we decipher a new function of δ. Performing biochemical and mutational analysis, we show that Bacillus subtilis δ binds to DNA immediately upstream of the promoter element at A-rich sequences on the abrB and rrnB1 promoters and facilitates open complex formation. As a result, δ facilitates RNAP to initiate transcription in the second scale, compared with minute scale in the absence of δ. Using transcription assay, we show that δ-mediated recycling of RNAP cannot be the sole reason for the enhancement of transcript yield. Our observation that δ does not bind to RNAP holo enzyme but is required to bind to DNA upstream of the -35 promoter element for transcription activation suggests that δ functions as a transcriptional regulator.

  16. Enhanced conformational sampling to visualize a free-energy landscape of protein complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Shinji; Nakamura, Haruki; Higo, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    We introduce various, recently developed, generalized ensemble methods, which are useful to sample various molecular configurations emerging in the process of protein–protein or protein–ligand binding. The methods introduced here are those that have been or will be applied to biomolecular binding, where the biomolecules are treated as flexible molecules expressed by an all-atom model in an explicit solvent. Sampling produces an ensemble of conformations (snapshots) that are thermodynamically probable at room temperature. Then, projection of those conformations to an abstract low-dimensional space generates a free-energy landscape. As an example, we show a landscape of homo-dimer formation of an endothelin-1-like molecule computed using a generalized ensemble method. The lowest free-energy cluster at room temperature coincided precisely with the experimentally determined complex structure. Two minor clusters were also found in the landscape, which were largely different from the native complex form. Although those clusters were isolated at room temperature, with rising temperature a pathway emerged linking the lowest and second-lowest free-energy clusters, and a further temperature increment connected all the clusters. This exemplifies that the generalized ensemble method is a powerful tool for computing the free-energy landscape, by which one can discuss the thermodynamic stability of clusters and the temperature dependence of the cluster networks. PMID:27288028

  17. Efficient Super Energy Transfer Collisions Through Reactive-Complex Formation: H + SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jonathan M.; Wilhelm, Michael J.; Ma, Jianqiang; Dai, HAI-LUNG

    2015-06-01

    Translational-to-vibrational energy transfer (ET) from a hyperthermal H atom to ambient SO2 was characterized using time-resolved Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy. Vibrational excitation of SO2, following collisions with H atoms containing 59 kcal/mol of kinetic energy, generated from the 193 nm photolysis of HBr, is detected in two distinct energy distributions: one with excitation predominantly at the fundamental vibrational levels is attributable to classical impulsive collisions, while the other, accounting for 80% of the excited SO2 with vibrational energy as high as 14,000 wn, is proposed to arise from the formation of a transient reactive-complex during the collision. The cross-section for this super ET collision is determined to be 0.53±0.05 Å2, or roughly 2% of all hard sphere collisions. This observation reveals that in collisions between a hyperthermal atom and an ambient molecule, for which a reactive-complex exists on the potential energy surface, a large quantity of translational energy can be transferred to the molecule with high efficiency.

  18. Requirements of fission yeast septins for complex formation, localization, and function.

    PubMed

    An, Hanbing; Morrell, Jennifer L; Jennings, Jennifer L; Link, Andrew J; Gould, Kathleen L

    2004-12-01

    Septins are GTP binding proteins important for cytokinesis in many eukaryotes. The Schizosaccaromyces pombe genome sequence predicts orthologues of four of five Saccharomyces cerevisiae septins involved in cytokinesis and these are named Spns1-4p. That spns1-4 are not essential genes permitted the application of a combined genetic and proteomics approach to determine their functional relationships. Our findings indicate that Spns1-4p are present throughout interphase as a diffusely localized approximately 8.5S complex containing two copies of each septin linked together as a chain in the order Spn3p-Spn4p-Spn1p-Spn2p. Septin recruitment to the medial region of the cell is genetically separable from ring formation, and whereas it is normally restricted to mitosis, it can be promoted without activation of the mitotic cell cycle machinery. Coalescence into ring structures requires Spn1p and Spn4p associate with at least one other septin subunit and the expression of Mid2p that is normally restricted to mitosis. This study establishes the functional requirements for septin complex organization in vivo.

  19. Requirements of Fission Yeast Septins for Complex Formation, Localization, and FunctionD⃞

    PubMed Central

    An, Hanbing; Morrell, Jennifer L.; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Link, Andrew J.; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2004-01-01

    Septins are GTP binding proteins important for cytokinesis in many eukaryotes. The Schizosaccaromyces pombe genome sequence predicts orthologues of four of five Saccharomyces cerevisiae septins involved in cytokinesis and these are named Spns1-4p. That spns1-4 are not essential genes permitted the application of a combined genetic and proteomics approach to determine their functional relationships. Our findings indicate that Spns1-4p are present throughout interphase as a diffusely localized ∼8.5S complex containing two copies of each septin linked together as a chain in the order Spn3p-Spn4p-Spn1p-Spn2p. Septin recruitment to the medial region of the cell is genetically separable from ring formation, and whereas it is normally restricted to mitosis, it can be promoted without activation of the mitotic cell cycle machinery. Coalescence into ring structures requires Spn1p and Spn4p associate with at least one other septin subunit and the expression of Mid2p that is normally restricted to mitosis. This study establishes the functional requirements for septin complex organization in vivo. PMID:15385632

  20. A SPITZER VIEW OF STAR FORMATION IN THE CYGNUS X NORTH COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Beerer, I. M.; Koenig, X. P.; Hora, J. L.; Keto, E.; Smith, H. A.; Fazio, G. G.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Bontemps, S.; Schneider, N.; Megeath, S. T.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Allen, L. E.; Kraemer, K. E.; Price, S.; Mizuno, D.; Adams, J. D.; Hernandez, J.; Lucas, P. W.

    2010-09-01

    We present new images and photometry of the massive star-forming complex Cygnus X obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. A combination of IRAC, MIPS, UKIRT Deep Infrared Sky Survey, and Two Micron All Sky Survey data are used to identify and classify young stellar objects (YSOs). Of the 8231 sources detected exhibiting infrared excess in Cygnus X North, 670 are classified as class I and 7249 are classified as class II. Using spectra from the FAST Spectrograph at the Fred L. Whipple Observatory and Hectospec on the MMT, we spectrally typed 536 sources in the Cygnus X complex to identify the massive stars. We find that YSOs tend to be grouped in the neighborhoods of massive B stars (spectral types B0 to B9). We present a minimal spanning tree analysis of clusters in two regions in Cygnus X North. The fraction of infrared excess sources that belong to clusters with {>=}10 members is found to be 50%-70%. Most class II objects lie in dense clusters within blown out H II regions, while class I sources tend to reside in more filamentary structures along the bright-rimmed clouds, indicating possible triggered star formation.

  1. Dorsal-Mediated Repression Requires the Formation of a Multiprotein Repression Complex at the Ventral Silencer

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Scott A.; Chen, Guoqing; Shandala, Tatiana; Fernandez, Joseph; Mische, Sheenah; Saint, Robert; Courey, Albert J.

    1998-01-01

    Dorsal functions as both an activator and repressor of transcription to determine dorsoventral fate in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo. Repression by Dorsal requires the corepressor Groucho (Gro) and is mediated by silencers termed ventral repression regions (VRRs). A VRR in zerknüllt (zen) contains Dorsal binding sites as well as an essential element termed AT2. We have identified and purified an AT2 DNA binding activity in embryos and shown it to consist of cut (ct) and dead ringer (dri) gene products. Studies of loss-of-function mutations in ct and dri demonstrate that both genes are required for the activity of the AT2 site. Dorsal and Dri both bind Gro, acting cooperatively to recruit it to the DNA. Thus, ventral repression may require the formation of a multiprotein complex at the VRR. This complex includes Dorsal, Gro, and additional DNA binding proteins, which appear to convert Dorsal from an activator to a repressor by enabling it to recruit Gro to the template. By showing how binding site context can dramatically alter transcription factor function, these findings help clarify the mechanisms responsible for the regulatory specificity of transcription factors. PMID:9774673

  2. Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Formate with Nickel Diphosphane Dipeptide Complexes. Effect of Ligands Modified with Amino Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Galan, Brandon R.; Reback, Matthew L.; Jain, Avijita; Appel, Aaron M.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-09-03

    A series of nickel bis-diphosphine complexes with dipeptides appended to the ligands were investigated for the catalytic oxidation of formate. Typical rates of ~7 s-1 were found, similar to the parent complex (~8 s-1), with amino acid size and positioning contributing very little to rate or operating potential. Hydroxyl functionalities did result in lower rates, which were recovered by protecting the hydroxyl group. The results suggest that the overall dielectric introduced by the dipeptides does not play an important role in catalysis, but free hydroxyl groups do influence activity suggesting contributions from intra- or intermolecular interactions. These observations are important in developing a fundamental understanding of the affect that an enzyme-like outer coordination sphere can have upon molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (BRG, AJ, AMA, WJS), the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Physical Bioscience program (MLR). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Associative and dissociative mechanisms in the formation of phthalazine bridged organodiplatinum(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Mehdi; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Zare, Ahad; Jamali, Sirous; Puddephatt, Richard J

    2010-09-20

    The reaction of phthalazine with the binuclear organoplatinum complexes [Me(2)Pt(μ-SMe(2))(μ-dppm)PtR(2)], R = Me, Ph, 4-tolyl or R(2) = (CH(2))(4), dppm = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane, gives the corresponding complexes [Me(2)Pt(μ-phthalazine)(μ-dppm)PtR(2)] by displacement of the bridging dimethylsulfide ligand. The structures of [Me(2)Pt(μ-SMe(2))(μ-dppm)PtMe(2)] and [Me(2)Pt(μ-phthalazine)(μ-dppm)PtMe(2)] have been determined. Kinetic studies show that the reactions occur mostly by a second order reaction when R = Me or R(2) = (CH(2))(4) but entirely by a first order reaction when R = Ph or 4-tolyl. Evidence is presented that the reactions when R = Me or R(2) = (CH(2))(4) can occur by either associative or dissociative mechanisms but that the reactions when R = Ph or 4-tolyl occur only by an unusual dissociative mechanism involving formation of an intermediate with a donor-acceptor Pt-Pt bond.

  4. Enhanced conformational sampling to visualize a free-energy landscape of protein complex formation.

    PubMed

    Iida, Shinji; Nakamura, Haruki; Higo, Junichi

    2016-06-15

    We introduce various, recently developed, generalized ensemble methods, which are useful to sample various molecular configurations emerging in the process of protein-protein or protein-ligand binding. The methods introduced here are those that have been or will be applied to biomolecular binding, where the biomolecules are treated as flexible molecules expressed by an all-atom model in an explicit solvent. Sampling produces an ensemble of conformations (snapshots) that are thermodynamically probable at room temperature. Then, projection of those conformations to an abstract low-dimensional space generates a free-energy landscape. As an example, we show a landscape of homo-dimer formation of an endothelin-1-like molecule computed using a generalized ensemble method. The lowest free-energy cluster at room temperature coincided precisely with the experimentally determined complex structure. Two minor clusters were also found in the landscape, which were largely different from the native complex form. Although those clusters were isolated at room temperature, with rising temperature a pathway emerged linking the lowest and second-lowest free-energy clusters, and a further temperature increment connected all the clusters. This exemplifies that the generalized ensemble method is a powerful tool for computing the free-energy landscape, by which one can discuss the thermodynamic stability of clusters and the temperature dependence of the cluster networks.

  5. The development of folds and cleavages in slate belts by underplating in accretionary complexes: A comparison of the Kodiak Formation, Alaska and the Calaveras Complex, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, Scott R.; Sample, James C.

    1988-08-01

    The development of folds and cleavages in slate and graywacke belts is commonly attributed to arc-continent or continent-continent collisions. However, the Kodiak Formation of southern Alaska and the Calaveras Complex of the western Sierra Nevada, California, are two slate and graywacke belts in which folds and slaty cleavages developed during simple underthrusting and underplating within accretionary wedges. The Maastrichtian Kodiak Formation is composed dominantly of coherent turbidites but includes lesser pebbly mudstone, minor conglomerate, and rare chert. The Kodiak Formation is part of a large accretionary complex that youngs in age seaward, but bedding tops generally show landward younging. A progression of structures has been determined by crosscutting relationships and includes (1) syndeformational depositional features; (2) broken formation; (3) slaty cleavage, folds, and thrust faults; (4) crenulations and crenulation cleavage; (5) late brittle thrust faults; and (6) right-lateral strike-slip faults. Broken formation, slaty cleavage, thrust faults, and folds developed during underthrusting and underplating within an accretionary wedge. Crenulations and brittle thrust faults are related to subsequent intrawedge shortening. Based on peak metamorphism in the uppermost zeolite to prehnite-pumpellyite facies, underplating occurred at a minimum depth of 10 km. The Calaveras Complex is composed of argillite, chert, graywacke, pebbly mudstone, limestone, and volcanic rocks. Its age of deposition has a maximum range from Permian to Early Jurassic. Overall, the unit appears to young westward, but local facing indicators show eastward younging of individual blocks. The sequence of structures developed in the Calaveras Complex is (1) syn-depositional olistostromes; (2) broken formation; (3) slaty cleavage, folds, and thrust faults; and (4) younger Jura-Triassic folds and crenulation cleavages. Broken formation and slaty cleavage developed during underthrusting and

  6. Spitzer Analysis of H II Region Complexes in the Magellanic Clouds: Determining a Suitable Monochromatic Obscured Star Formation Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, B.; Gordon, K. D.; Babler, B.; Block, M.; Bolatto, A. D.; Bracker, S.; Carlson, L. R.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Hora, J. L.; Indebetouw, R.; Madden, S. C.; Meade, M.; Meixner, M.; Misselt, K.; Oey, M. S.; Oliveira, J. M.; Robitaille, T.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Vijh, U. P.; Whitney, B.

    2010-06-01

    H II regions are the birth places of stars, and as such they provide the best measure of current star formation rates (SFRs) in galaxies. The close proximity of the Magellanic Clouds allows us to probe the nature of these star forming regions at small spatial scales. To study the H II regions, we compute the bolometric infrared flux, or total infrared (TIR), by integrating the flux from 8 to 500 μm. The TIR provides a measure of the obscured star formation because the UV photons from hot young stars are absorbed by dust and re-emitted across the mid-to-far-infrared (IR) spectrum. We aim to determine the monochromatic IR band that most accurately traces the TIR and produces an accurate obscured SFR over large spatial scales. We present the spatial analysis, via aperture/annulus photometry, of 16 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and 16 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) H II region complexes using the Spitzer Space Telescope's IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 8 μm) and MIPS (24, 70, 160 μm) bands. Ultraviolet rocket data (1500 and 1900 Å) and SHASSA Hα data are also included. All data are convolved to the MIPS 160 μm resolution (40 arcsec full width at half-maximum), and apertures have a minimum radius of 35''. The IRAC, MIPS, UV, and Hα spatial analysis are compared with the spatial analysis of the TIR. We find that nearly all of the LMC and SMC H II region spectral energy distributions (SEDs) peak around 70 μm at all radii, from ~10 to ~400 pc from the central ionizing sources. As a result, we find the following: the sizes of H II regions as probed by 70 μm are approximately equal to the sizes as probed by TIR (≈70 pc in radius); the radial profile of the 70 μm flux, normalized by TIR, is constant at all radii (70 μm ~ 0.45TIR); the 1σ standard deviation of the 70 μm fluxes, normalized by TIR, is a lower fraction of the mean (0.05-0.12 out to ~220 pc) than the normalized 8, 24, and 160 μm normalized fluxes (0.12-0.52); and these results are the same for the LMC and the SMC

  7. Soft versus hard junction formation for α-terthiophene molecular wires and their charge transfer complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Grace, Iain M.; Brooke, Carly; Nichols, Richard J.; Lambert, Colin J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2017-03-01

    We used a range of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM)-based methods to conduct a detailed study of single molecule junction conductance enhancement upon charge transfer complex formation, using bis(thiaalkyl)arene molecular wires as electron donors and tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) as an electron acceptor. Using the "hard" STM break junction (STM-BJ) method, in which a Au STM tip is pushed into a Au substrate and then withdrawn in the presence of molecules, we see a single, very broad, peak in the resulting conductance histogram when all data are used; the conductance enhancement is 25-fold for a terthiophene donor and 15-fold for a phenyl group. After rational data selection, in which only current-distance curves that contain a current plateau >0.2 nm long are used in the conductance histogram, three sharper peaks are resolved in the histograms for the charge transfer complexes; two substantially lower-conductance peaks are resolved for the uncomplexed molecules. Using the "soft" STM I(s) technique, in which initial contact between tip and substrate is avoided and the current limit is about an order of magnitude lower, we were able to resolve two peaks for the uncomplexed molecules depending upon the initial set point current (i.e., tip height), one at the same value as the lower of the two data-selected STM-BJ histogram peaks and an additional peak beyond the low-current limit for the STM-BJ experiment. For the terthiophene, the low, medium, and high conductance peaks for the TCNE complex are, respectively, ca. 70, 70, and 46 times higher in conductance than the corresponding peaks for the free molecule.

  8. Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Experiment: The Determination of Formation Constants for Acetate and Mono-and Dichloroacetate Salts of Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Methyl-and Ethylamines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amelia, Ronald P.; Chiang, Stephanie; Pollut, Stephanie; Nirode, William F.

    2014-01-01

    The formation and the hydrolysis of organic salts produced by the titration of a 0.1 M solution of the following amines: methyl-, dimethyl-, trimethyl-, ethyl-, diethyl-, and triethylamine with a 0.1 M solution of acetic, chloroacetic, and dichloracetic acids are studied. The pK[subscript b] of the amine and the pH at the end point were determined…

  9. Oceanic crust formation in the Egeria Fracture Zone Complex (Central Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Minor, Marine; Gaina, Carmen; Sigloch, Karin; Minakov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to analyse in detail the oceanic crust fabric and volcanic features (seamounts) formed for the last 10 million years at the Central Indian Ridge between 19 and 21 latitude south. Multibeam bathymetry and magnetic data has been collected in 2013 as part of the French-German expedition RHUM-RUM (Reunion hotspot and upper mantle - Reunion's unterer mantel). Three long profiles perpendicular on the Central Indian Ridge (CIR), south of the Egeria fracture zone, document the formation of oceanic crust since 10 million years, along with changes in plate kinematics and variations in the magmatic input. We have inspected the abyssal hill geometry and orientation along conjugate oceanic flanks and within one fracture zone segment where we could identify J-shaped features that are indicators of changes in plate kinematics. The magnetic anomaly data shows a slight asymmetry in seafloor spreading rates on conjugate flanks: while a steady increase in spreading rate from 10 Ma to the present is shown by the western flank, the eastern part displays a slowing down from 5 Ma onwards. The deflection of the anti J-shaped abyssal hill lineations suggest that the left-stepping Egeria fracture zone complex (including the Egeria, Flinders and an un-named fracture zone to the southeast) was under transpression from 9 to 6 Ma and under transtension since 3 Ma. The transpressional event was triggered by a clockwise mid-ocean ridge reorientation and a decrease of its offset, whereas the transtensional regime was probably due to a counter-clockwise change in the spreading direction and an increase of the ridge offset. The new multibeam data along the three profiles reveal that crust on the eastern side is smoother (as shown by the abyssal hill number and structure) and hosts several seamounts (with age estimations of 7.67, 6.10 and 0.79 Ma), in contrast to the rougher conjugate western flank. Considering that the western flank was closer to the Reunion plume, and therefore

  10. The earliest phases of high-mass star formation: the NGC 6334-NGC 6357 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russeil, D.; Zavagno, A.; Motte, F.; Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Walsh, A. J.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Our knowledge of high-mass star formation has been mainly based on follow-up studies of bright sources found by IRAS, and has thus been incomplete for its earliest phases, which are inconspicuous at infrared wavelengths. With a new generation of powerful bolometer arrays, unbiased large-scale surveys of nearby high-mass star-forming complexes now search for the high-mass analog of low-mass cores and class 0 protostars. Aims: Following the pioneering study of Cygnus X, we investigate the star-forming region NGC 6334-NGC 6357 (~1.7 kpc). Methods: We study the complex NGC 6334-NGC 6357 in an homogeneous way following the previous work of Motte and collaborators. We used the same method to extract the densest cores which are the most likely sites for high-mass star formation. We analyzed the SIMBA/SEST 1.2 mm data presented in Munoz and coworkers, which covers all high-column density areas (A v ≥ 15 mag) of the NGC 6334-NGC 6357 complex and extracted dense cores following the method used for Cygnus X. We constrain the properties of the most massive dense cores (M > 100 M_⊙) using new molecular line observations (as SiO, N2H+,H13CO+, HCO+ (1-0) and CH3CN) with Mopra and a complete cross-correlation with infrared databases (MSX, GLIMPSE, MIPSGAL) and literature. Results: We extracted 163 massive dense cores of which 16 are more massive than 200 M_⊙. These high-mass dense cores have a typical FWHM size of 0.37 pc, an average mass of M ~ 600 M_⊙, and a volume-averaged density of ~ 1.5 × 105 cm-3. Among these massive dense cores, 6 are good candidates for hosting high-mass infrared-quiet protostars, 9 cores are classified as high-luminosity infrared protostars, and we find only one high-mass starless clump (~0.3 pc, ~ 4 × 104 cm-3) that is gravitationally bound. Conclusions: Since our sample is derived from a single molecular complex and covers every embedded phase of high-mass star formation, it provides a statistical estimate of the lifetime of massive

  11. Formation of bacteriochlorophyll form B820 in light harvesting 2 complexes from purple sulfur bacteria treated with dioxane.

    PubMed

    Makhneva, Z K; Toropygina, O A; Moskalenko, A A

    2005-10-01

    Treatment of some sulfur bacteria (Allochromatium minutissimum, Thiorhodospira sibirica, and Ectothiorhodospira halovacuolata WN22) with dioxane results in formation of the bacteriochlorophyll form B820 in the light harvesting complex LH2. This form characterized by absorption maximum at 820 nm has the same absorption spectrum as B820 subcomplex from LH1 complex. Appearance of the B820 form was accompanied by a sharp decrease in absorption in the carotenoid region. This phenomenon observed in all LH2 complexes investigated may be attributed to formation of colorless carotenoid aggregates. This is very similar to the previously reported dissociation of the LH1 complex with carotenoids into B820 subcomplexes. Although the B820 form corresponded the bacteriochlorophyll dimer, its circular dichroism spectrum showed that pigment molecules in this dimer exhibit different interaction than those in the B820 subcomplex. The dioxane treatment of LH2 complexes isolated from Rhodopseudomonas palustris bacteria grown under normal or low intensity illumination did not result in formation of such dimers. It is suggested that bacteriochlorophyll B820 formation is related to unique structure of LH2 complexes from the sulfur bacteria.

  12. Mercury(II) Complex Formation With Glutathione in Alkaline Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mah, V.; Jalilehvand, F.

    2009-05-19

    The structure and speciation of the complexes formed between mercury(II) ions and glutathione (GSH = L-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine) have been studied for a series of alkaline aqueous solutions (C{sub Hg{sup 2+}} {approx} 18 mmol dm{sup -3} and C{sub GSH} = 40-200 mmol dm{sup -3} at pH {approx} 10.5) by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and {sup 199}Hg NMR spectroscopy at ambient temperature. The dominant complexes are [Hg(GS){sub 2}]{sup 4-} and [Hg(GS){sub 3}]{sup 7-}, with mean Hg-S bond distances of 2.32(1) and 2.42(2) {angstrom} observed in digonal and trigonal Hg-S coordination, respectively. The proportions of the Hg{sup 2+}-glutathione complexes were evaluated by fitting linear combinations of model EXAFS oscillations representing each species to the experimental EXAFS spectra. The [Hg(GS){sub 4}]{sup 10-} complex, with four sulfur atoms coordinated at a mean Hg-S bond distance of 2.52(2) {angstrom}, is present in minor amounts (<30%) in solutions containing a large excess of glutathione (C{sub GSH} {ge} 160 mmol dm{sup -3}). Comparable alkaline mercury(II) cysteine (H{sub 2}Cys) solutions were also investigated and a reduced tendency to form higher complexes was observed, because the deprotonated amino group of Cys{sup 2-} allows the stable [Hg(S,N-Cys){sub 2}]{sup 2-} chelate to form. The effect of temperature on the distribution of the Hg{sup 2+}-glutathione complexes was studied by comparing the EXAFS spectra at ambient temperature and at 25 K of a series of glycerol/water (33/67, v/v) frozen glasses with and C{sub Hg{sup 2+}} {approx} 7 mmol dm{sup -3} and C{sub GSH} = 16-81 mmol dm{sup -3}. Complexes with high Hg-S coordination numbers, [Hg(GS){sub 3}]{sup 7-} and [Hg(GS){sub 4}]{sup 10-}, became strongly favored when just a moderate excess of glutathione (C{sub GSH} {ge} 28 mmol dm{sup -3}) was used in the glassy samples, as expected for a stepwise exothermic bond formation. Addition of glycerol had no effect on the Hg

  13. Iron(II) Complexes with Scorpiand-Like Macrocyclic Polyamines: Kinetico-Mechanistic Aspects of Complex Formation and Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Coordinated Amines.

    PubMed

    Clares, M Paz; Acosta-Rueda, Laura; Castillo, Carmen E; Blasco, Salvador; Jiménez, Hermas R; García-España, Enrique; Basallote, Manuel G

    2017-03-24

    The Fe(II) coordination chemistry of a pyridinophane tren-derived scorpiand type ligand containing a pyridine ring in the pendant arm is explored by potentiometry, X-ray, NMR, and kinetics methods. Equilibrium studies in water show the formation of a stable [FeL](2+) complex that converts to monoprotonated and monohydroxylated species when the pH is changed. A [Fe(H-2L)](2+) complex containing an hexacoordinated dehydrogenated ligand has been isolated, and its crystal structure shows the formation of an imine bond involving the aliphatic nitrogen of the pendant arm. This complex is low spin Fe(II) both in the solid state and in solution, as revealed by the Fe-N bond lengths and by the NMR spectra, respectively. The formation rate of [Fe(H-2L)](2+) in aqueous solutions containing Fe(2+) and L (1:1 molar ratio) is strongly dependent on the pH, the process being completed in times that range from months in acid solutions to hours in basic conditions. However, detailed kinetic studies show that those differences are caused, at least in part, by the effect of pH on the rate of formation of the unoxidized [FeL](2+) complex. In this sense, the protonation of the donor atoms in the pendant arm of the scorpiand ligand leads to the formation of protonated species resistant to oxidative dehydrogenation. Complementary studies in acetonitrile solution indicate that the initial stage in the oxidative dehydrogenation process is the oxidation of the starting complex to form a [FeL](3+) complex, which then undergoes disproportionation into [Fe(H-2L)](2+) and [FeL](2+). Experiments starting with Fe(III) have allowed us to determine that disproportionation occurs with first order kinetics both in water and acetonitrile solutions. However, whereas a significant acceleration is observed in water when the pH is increased, no effect of the addition of acid or base on the rate of disproportionation is observed in acetonitrile. Oxidative dehydrogenation of the Fe(II) complex formed in

  14. Use of an exchange method to estimate the association and dissociation rate constants of cadmium complexes formed with low-molecular-weight organic acids commonly exuded by plant roots.

    PubMed

    Schneider, André; Nguyen, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Organic acids released from plant roots can form complexes with cadmium (Cd) in the soil solution and influence metal bioavailability not only due to the nature and concentration of the complexes but also due to their lability. The lability of a complex influences its ability to buffer changes in the concentration of free ions (Cd); it depends on the association (, m mol s) and dissociation (, s) rate constants. A resin exchange method was used to estimate and (m mol s), which is the conditional estimate of depending on the calcium (Ca) concentration in solution. The constants were estimated for oxalate, citrate, and malate, three low-molecular-weight organic acids commonly exuded by plant roots and expected to strongly influence Cd uptake by plants. For all three organic acids, the and estimates were around 2.5 10 m mol s and 1.3 × 10 s, respectively. Based on the literature, these values indicate that the Cd- low-molecular-weight organic acids complexes formed between Cd and low-molecular-weight organic acids may be less labile than complexes formed with soil soluble organic matter but more labile than those formed with aminopolycarboxylic chelates.

  15. Formation and reactivity of a porphyrin iridium hydride in water: acid dissociation constants and equilibrium thermodynamics relevant to Ir-H, Ir-OH, and Ir-CH2- bond dissociation energetics.

    PubMed

    Bhagan, Salome; Wayland, Bradford B

    2011-11-07

    Aqueous solutions of group nine metal(III) (M = Co, Rh, Ir) complexes of tetra(3,5-disulfonatomesityl)porphyrin [(TMPS)M(III)] form an equilibrium distribution of aquo and hydroxo complexes ([(TMPS)M(III)(D(2)O)(2-n)(OD)(n)]((7+n)-)). Evaluation of acid dissociation constants for coordinated water show that the extent of proton dissociation from water increases regularly on moving down the group from cobalt to iridium, which is consistent with the expected order of increasing metal-ligand bond strengths. Aqueous (D(2)O) solutions of [(TMPS)Ir(III)(D(2)O)(2)](7-) react with dihydrogen to form an iridium hydride complex ([(TMPS)Ir-D(D(2)O)](8-)) with an acid dissociation constant of 1.8(0.5) × 10(-12) (298 K), which is much smaller than the Rh-D derivative (4.3 (0.4) × 10(-8)), reflecting a stronger Ir-D bond. The iridium hydride complex adds with ethene and acetaldehyde to form organometallic derivatives [(TMPS)Ir-CH(2)CH(2)D(D(2)O)](8-) and [(TMPS)Ir-CH(OD)CH(3)(D(2)O)](8-). Only a six-coordinate carbonyl complex [(TMPS)Ir-D(CO)](8-) is observed for reaction of the Ir-D with CO (P(CO) = 0.2-2.0 atm), which contrasts with the (TMPS)Rh-D analog which reacts with CO to produce an equilibrium with a rhodium formyl complex ([(TMPS)Rh-CDO(D(2)O)](8-)). Reactivity studies and equilibrium thermodynamic measurements were used to discuss the relative M-X bond energetics (M = Rh, Ir; X = H, OH, and CH(2)-) and the thermodynamically favorable oxidative addition of water with the (TMPS)Ir(II) derivatives.

  16. Granodiorite Pluton Formation at the Mid-Cenozoic Never Summer Igneous Complex, North-Central Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, K. H.; Farmer, G.

    2012-12-01

    Field observations, major- and trace-element geochemistry, and Sr and Nd isotopic data were used to assess the petrogenesis of epizonal intrusive rocks and related volcanic rocks from the ~28 Ma Never Summer igneous complex in north-central Colorado. Intrusive igneous rocks at this igneous center consist of an older granodiorite pluton (the Mt Richthofen stock, MRS) that is intruded by the granitic Mt. Cumulus stock. The latter has a uniform bulk composition equivalent to that of high silica rhyolite (~77 wt % SiO2, ɛNd(T) ~ -6). Whole rock studies of the MRS reveal that it is compositionally zoned (55-67 wt % SiO2,ɛNd(T) -0.5 to -5.7, 87Sr/86Sr(T) 0.7049 to 0.7119), with the lowest wt % SiO2 and highest ɛNd(T) occurring along the western margin of the pluton. Field observations, combined with the observed compositional variations, suggest that the pluton was originally a shallowly intruded (< 2 km), ~1 km thick sill that was vertically zoned from a mafic base to more felsic roof. The entire pluton has been tilted ~25 degrees to the west after emplacement. Given the lack of obvious wall-rock assimilation at the level of pluton emplacement, the isotopic variations in the pluton most likely reflect differences in the isotopic compositions of melts from which the pluton was assembled. Obvious field evidence exists for underplating of the developing pluton by mafic, high ɛNd (T) (>-2) melts and illustrates that mafic magmas were present in the uppermost crust and likely participated in pluton formation. The higher wt % SiO2 and lower ɛNd(T) portions of the MRS, however, could not have been derived directly from the mafic magmas in any closed system process. One option is that the MRS ultimately represents the product of mixing of >70 wt % SiO2 melts (+ crystals), analogous to the melts from which the Mt. Cumulus stock crystallized, and underplating mafic magma. This model implies that two primary magmas types, high silica rhyolite and basalt/basaltic andesite

  17. Polyprotein-Driven Formation of Two Interdependent Sets of Complexes Supporting Hepatitis C Virus Genome Replication

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Rafael G. B.; Isken, Olaf; Tautz, Norbert; McLauchlan, John

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) requires proteins from the NS3-NS5B polyprotein to create a replicase unit for replication of its genome. The replicase proteins form membranous compartments in cells to facilitate replication, but little is known about their functional organization within these structures. We recently reported on intragenomic replicons, bicistronic viral transcripts expressing an authentic replicase from open reading frame 2 (ORF2) and a second duplicate nonstructural (NS) polyprotein from ORF1. Using these constructs and other methods, we have assessed the polyprotein requirements for rescue of different lethal point mutations across NS3-5B. Mutations readily tractable to rescue broadly fell into two groupings: those requiring expression of a minimum NS3-5A and those requiring expression of a minimum NS3-5B polyprotein. A cis-acting mutation that blocked NS3 helicase activity, T1299A, was tolerated when introduced into either ORF within the intragenomic replicon, but unlike many other mutations required the other ORF to express a functional NS3-5B. Three mutations were identified as more refractile to rescue: one that blocked cleavage of the NS4B5A boundary (S1977P), another in the NS3 helicase (K1240N), and a third in NS4A (V1665G). Introduced into ORF1, these exhibited a dominant negative phenotype, but with K1240N inhibiting replication as a minimum NS3-5A polyprotein whereas V1665G and S1977P only impaired replication as a NS3-5B polyprotein. Furthermore, an S1977P-mutated NS3-5A polyprotein complemented other defects shown to be dependent on NS3-5A for rescue. Overall, our findings suggest the existence of two interdependent sets of protein complexes supporting RNA replication, distinguishable by the minimum polyprotein requirement needed for their formation. IMPORTANCE Positive-strand RNA viruses reshape the intracellular membranes of cells to form a compartment within which to replicate their genome, but little is known about the functional

  18. Thermodynamics of the formation of Cu2+-glycyl-glycyl-glycine complex in water-ethanol solutions at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham Thi, L.; Usacheva, T. R.; Tukumova, N. V.; Koryshev, N. E.; Khrenova, T. M.; Sharnin, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    The stability constants of monoligand complexes of copper(II) ions with glycyl-glycyl-glycine zwitterions (triglycine, HL±) and triglycinate ions (L-) in a water-ethanol solvent with 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mole fractions of ethanol at an ionic strength of 0.1 created by sodium perchlorate and temperature T = 298.15 K are determined by means of potentiometric titration. It is found that an increase of ethanol content improves the stability of the investigated complexes, due mainly to the resolvation of ligands.

  19. Pore-controlled formation of 0D metal complexes in anionic 3D metal-organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, MW; Bosch, M; Zhou, HC

    2015-01-01

    The host-guest chemistry between a series of anionic MOFs and their trapped counterions was investigated by single crystal XRD. The PCN-514 series contains crystallographically identifiable metal complexes trapped in the pores, where their formation is controlled by the size and shape of the MOF pores. A change in the structure and pore size of PCN-518 indicates that the existence of guest molecules may reciprocally affect the formation of host MOFs.

  20. Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS): Constraining the formation of complex organic molecules with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Jes K.; Coutens, Audrey; Bourke, Tyler L.; Favre, Cecile; Garrod, Robin; Lykke, Julie; Mueller, Holger; Oberg, Karin I.; Schmalzl, Markus; van der Wiel, Matthijs; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Wampfler, Susanne F.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding how, when and where complex organic and potentially prebiotic molecules are formed is a fundamental goal of astrochemistry and an integral part of origins of life studies. Already now ALMA is showing its capabilities for studies of the chemistry of solar-type stars with its high sensitivity for faint lines, high spectral resolution which limits line confusion, and high angular resolution making it possible to study the structure of young protostars on solar-system scales. We here present the first results from a large unbiased survey “Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS)” targeting one of the astrochemical template sources, the low-mass protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422. The survey is more than an order of magnitude more sensitive than previous surveys of the source and provide imaging down to 25 AU scales (radius) around each of the two components of the binary. An example of one of the early highlights from the survey is unambiguous detections of the (related) prebiotic species glycolaldehyde, ethylene glycol (two lowest energy conformers), methyl formate and acetic acid. The glycolaldehyde-ethylene glycol abundance ratio is high in comparison to comets and other protostars - but agrees with previous measurements, e.g., in the Galactic Centre clouds possibly reflecting different environments and/or evolutionary histories. Complete mapping of this and other chemical networks in comparison with detailed chemical models and laboratory experiments will reveal the origin of complex organic molecules in a young protostellar system and investigate the link between these protostellar stages and the early Solar System.

  1. STAR FORMATION AND YOUNG POPULATION OF THE H II COMPLEX Sh2-294

    SciTech Connect

    Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Chauhan, N.; Jose, J.; Ojha, D. K.; Pandey, B.

    2012-08-10

    The Sh2-294 H II region ionized by a single B0V star features several infrared excess sources, a photodissociation region, and also a group of reddened stars at its border. The star formation scenario in this region seems to be quite complex. In this paper, we present follow-up results of Sh2-294 H II region at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), coupled with H{sub 2} (2.12 {mu}m) observation, to characterize the young population of the region and to understand its star formation history. We identified 36 young stellar object (YSO, Class I, Class II, and Class I/II) candidates using IRAC color-color diagrams. It is found that Class I sources are preferentially located at the outskirts of the H II region and associated with enhanced H{sub 2} emission; none of them are located near the central cluster. Combining the optical to mid-infrared (MIR) photometry of the YSO candidates and using the spectral energy distribution fitting models, we constrained stellar parameters and the evolutionary status of 33 YSO candidates. Most of them are interpreted by the model as low-mass (<4 M{sub Sun }) YSOs; however, we also detected a massive YSO ({approx}9 M{sub Sun }) of Class I nature, embedded in a cloud of visual extinction of {approx}24 mag. Present analysis suggests that the Class I sources are indeed a younger population of the region relative to Class II sources (age {approx} 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} yr). We suggest that the majority of the Class I sources, including the massive YSOs, are second-generation stars of the region whose formation is possibly induced by the expansion of the H II region powered by a {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} yr B0 main-sequence star.

  2. Formation of Complex Organic molecules from Formaldehyde Chemistry in Cometary Ice Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvernay, fabrice; Vinogradoff, Vassilissa; Danger, Grégoire; Theulé, Patrice; Chiavassa, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    There is convincing evidence that the formation of complex organic molecules occurred in a variety of astrophysical environments. Among them, precursors of biomolecules are of particular significance due to their exobiological implications. Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT, C6H12N4) and the polyoxymethylene (POM, -(CH2-O)n-) are of prime interest since they are supposed to be present in cometary environments. They are also ones of the main components of the organic residue formed from the warming of photolysed interstellar/cometary ice analogs. In this work, we study the warming of water-dominated cometary ice analogs containing formaldehyde (H2CO). Based on infrared and mass spectrometry measurements, and complemented by quantum chemical calculations, we report that NH2CH2OH, HOCH2OH, and POM are the only reaction products when the ice also contains NH3. The branching ratio between the three products strongly depends on the initial H2CO/NH3 concentration ratio. Moreover, the influence of the initial ice composition on the formation of POM oligomers (HO-(CH2O)n-H, n<5) as well as their thermal instability between 200 and 320 K are investigated. Finally, the implications of these results with respect to cometary nucleus chemistry and their impact on POM detection by the Rosetta mission are discussed. In addition, the mechanism for HMT formation in interstellar or cometary ice analogs containing H2CO, NH3, and HCOOH has been determined by combining laboratory experiments and DFT calculations. We show that HMT is thermally formed from H2CO and NH3 activated by HCOOH. Two intermediates has been unambiguously detected: NH2CH2OH and the trimer of CH2NH (1,3,5-triazinane, TMT). Unlike to what it was previously thought, HMT is not an indicator of ice photochemistry, but an indicator of thermal processing of ice. These results strengthen the hypothesis that HMT and its intermediates should be present in comets, where they may be detected with the COSAC or COSIMA instrument of

  3. Influence of electronic and steric effects on stability constants and electrochemical reversibility of divalent ion complexes with glycine and sarcosine. A glass electrode potentiometric, sampled direct current polarographic, virtual potentiometric, and molecular modelling study.

    PubMed

    Cukrowski, Ignacy; Marques, Helder M; Mkwizu, Tumaini S; Magampa, Philemon P; Serge, Claudette

    2007-05-08

    Cd(II) complexes with glycine (gly) and sarcosine (sar) were studied by glass electrode potentiometry, direct current polarography, virtual potentiometry, and molecular modelling. The electrochemically reversible Cd(II)-glycine-OH labile system was best described by a model consisting of M(HL), ML, ML2, ML3, ML(OH) and ML2(OH) (M = Cd(II), L = gly) with the overall stability constants, as log beta, determined to be 10.30+/-0.05, 4.21+/-0.03, 7.30+/-0.05, 9.84+/-0.04, 8.9+/-0.1, and 10.75+/-0.10, respectively. In case of the electrochemically quasi-reversible Cd(II)-sarcosine-OH labile system, only ML, ML2 and ML3 (M = Cd(II), L = sar) were found and their stability constants, as log beta, were determined to be 3.80+/-0.03, 6.91+/-0.07, and 8.9+/-0.4, respectively. Stability constants for the ML complexes, the prime focus of this work, were thus established with an uncertainty smaller than 0.05 log units. The observed departure from electrochemical reversibility for the Cd-sarcosine-OH system was attributed mainly to the decrease in the transfer coefficient alpha. The MM2 force field, supplemented by additional parameters, reproduced the reported crystal structures of diaqua-bis(glycinato-O,N)nickel(II) and fac-tri(glycinato)-nickelate(II) very well. These parameters were used to predict structures of all possible isomers of (i) [Ni(H2O)4(gly)]+ and [Ni(H2O)4(sar)]+; and (ii) [Ni(H2O)3(IDA)] and [Ni(H2O)3(MIDA)] (IDA = iminodiacetic acid, MIDA = N-methyl iminodiacetic acid) by molecular mechanics/simulated annealing methods. The change in strain energy, deltaU(str), that accompanies the substitution of one ligand by another (ML + L' --> ML' + L), was computed and a strain energy deltaU(str) = +0.28 kcal mol(-1) for the reaction [Ni(H2O)4(gly)]+ + sar --> [Ni(H2O)4(sar)]+ + gly was found. This predicts the monoglycine complex to be marginally more stable. By contrast, for the reaction [Ni(H2O)3IDA] + MIDA --> [Ni(H2O)3MIDA] + IDA, deltaU(str) = -0.64 kcal mol(-1

  4. Ab-initio calculation study on the formation mechanism of boron-oxygen complexes in c-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xuegong; Chen, Peng; Chen, Xianzi; Liu, Yong; Yang, Deren

    2015-07-15

    Boron-oxygen (B-O) complex in crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells is responsible for the light-induced efficiency degradation of solar cell. However, the formation mechanism of B-O complex is not clear yet. By Ab-initio calculation, it is found that the stagger-type oxygen dimer (O{sub 2i}{sup st}) should be the component of B-O complex, whose movement occurs through its structure reconfiguration at low temperature, instead of its long-distance diffusion. The O{sub 2i}{sup st} can form two stable “latent centers” with the B{sub s}, which are recombination-inactive. The latent centers can be evolved into the metastable recombination centers via their structure transformation in the presence of excess carriers. These results can well explain the formation behaviors of B-O complexes in c-Si.

  5. Age range of formation of sedimentary-volcanogenic complex of the Vetreny Belt (the southeast of the Baltic Shield)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhelovskaya, S. V.; Korsakov, A. K.; Mezhelovskii, A. D.; Bibikova, E. V.

    2016-03-01

    As a result of studying the Vetreny Belt greenstone structure (the southeast of the Baltic Shield), zircons from terrigenous deposits of the Toksha Formation, underlying the section of the sedimentary-volcanogenic complex, and zircons of the Vetreny Belt Formation, deposits of which crown the section, were dated. The results of analysis of age data of detrital zircons from quartzites of the Toksha Formation indicate that Mesoarchean greenstone complexes and paleo-Archean granitogneisses of the Vodlozero Block (Karelia) were the provenance area from which these zircons were derived. The occurrence of the youngest zircons with age of 2654.3 ± 38.5 Ma is evidence that the formation of the Vetreny Belt, including the Toksha Formation, began no earlier than this time. Zircons from volcanic rocks of the Vetreny Belt yielded the age of 2405 ± 5 Ma. Thus, the age interval of the formation of the sedimentary-volcanogenic complex of the Vetreny Belt ranges from 2654.3 ± 38.5 to 2405 ± 5 Ma.

  6. Formation, dynamic behavior, and chemical transformation of Pt complexes with a rotaxane-like structure.

    PubMed

    Suzaki, Yuji; Osakada, Kohtaro

    2006-09-18

    The reaction of [Pt(CH2COMe)(Ph)(cod)] (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) with (ArCH2NH2CH2-C6H4COOH)+ (PF6)- (Ar = 4-tBuC6H4 or 9-anthryl) in the presence of cyclic oligoethers such as dibenzo[24]crown-8 (DB24C8) and dicyclohexano[24]crown-8 (DC24C8) produces {(ce)[ArCH2NH2CH2C6H4COOPt(Ph)(cod)]}+ (PF6)- (ce = DB24C8 or DC24C8, Ar = 4-tBuC6H4 or 9-anthryl) with interlocked structures. FABMS and NMR spectra of a solution of these compounds indicate that the Pt complexes with a secondary ammonium group and DB24C8 (or DC24C8) make up the axis and cyclic components, respectively. Temperature-dependent 1H NMR spectra of a solution of {(DB24C8)[4-tBuC6H4CH2NH2CH2-C6H4COOPt(Ph)(cod)]}+ (PF6)- ({(DB24C8)[4-H]}+ (PF6)-) show equilibration with free DB24C8 and the axis component. The addition of DB24C8 to a solution of {(DC24C8)[4-H]}+ (PF6)- causes partial exchange of the macrocyclic component of the interlocked molecules, giving a mixture of {(DC24C8)[4-H]}+ (PF6)-, {(DB24C8)[4-H]}+ (PF6)-, and free macrocyclic compounds. The reaction of 3,5-Me2C6H3COCl with {(DB24C8)[4-H]}+ (PF6)- affords the organic rotaxane {(DB24C8)(4-tBuC6H4CH2NH2CH2-C6H4COOCOC6H3Me2-3,5)}+ (PF6)- through C-O bond formation between the aroyl group and the carboxylate ligand of the axis component. The addition of 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) to a solution of {(DB24C8)[4-H]}+ (PF6)- induces the degradation of the interlocked structure to form a complex with trigonal bipyramidal coordination, [Pt(Ph)(bpy)(cod)]+ (PF6)-, whereas the reaction of bpy with [Pt(OCOC6H4Me-4)(Ph)(cod)] produces the square-planar complex [Pt(OCOC6H4Me-4)(Ph)(bpy)].

  7. Apatite formation behaviour during metasomatism in the Bathtub Intrusion (Babbitt deposit, Duluth Complex, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raič, Sara; Mogessie, Aberra; Krenn, Kurt; Hauzenberger, Christoph A.; Tropper, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The mineralized troctolitic Bathtub intrusion (Duluth Complex, NE-Minnesota) is known for its famous Cu-Ni-Sulfide±PGM Babbitt deposit, where platinum group minerals (PGMs) are either hosted by primary magmatic sulfides (base metal sulfides) or associated with hydrothermally altered portions. This secondary generation of PGMs is present in alteration patches and suggests the involvement of hydrothermal fluids in the mobilization of platinum-group elements (PGEs). Accessory fluorapatite in these samples reveals besides H2O- and CO2-rich primary fluid inclusions, textural and compositional variations that also record magmatic and metasomatic events. Based on detailed back-scattered electron imaging (BSE) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS), a primary magmatic origin is reflected by homogeneous or zoned grains, where zoning patterns are either concentric or oscillatory, with respect to LREE. Late magmatic to hydrothermal processes are indicated by grains with bright LREE-enriched rims or conversion textures with REE-enriched patches in the interior of the apatite. A metasomatic formation of monazite from apatite is documented by the presence of monazite inclusions in apatite and newly grown monazite at altered apatite rims. They formed by the release of REEs from the apatite during a fluid-induced alteration, based on the coupled substitution Ca2+ + P5+ = REE3+ + Si4+ (Rønsbo 1989; Rønsbo 2008). Samples with monazite inclusions in apatite further display occurrences of PGMs associated with hydrothermal alteration patches (chlorite + amphibole). The presence of H2O- and CO2-rich fluid inclusions in apatite, the metasomatically induced monazite growth, as well as the occurrence of PGMs in hydrothermally alteration zones, also suggest the involvement of aqueous chloride complexes in a H2O dominated fluid in the transportation of LREE and redistribution of the second generation of PGEs. Rønsbo, J.G. (1989): Coupled substitutions

  8. Cluster formation by allelomimesis in real-world complex adaptive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanico, Dranreb Earl; Monterola, Christopher; Saloma, Caesar

    2005-04-01

    Animal and human clusters are complex adaptive systems and many organize in cluster sizes s that obey the frequency distribution D(s)∝s-τ . The exponent τ describes the relative abundance of the cluster sizes in a given system. Data analyses reveal that real-world clusters exhibit a broad spectrum of τ values, 0.7 (tuna fish schools) ⩽τ⩽4.61 (T4 bacteriophage gene family sizes). Allelomimesis is proposed as an underlying mechanism for adaptation that explains the observed broad τ spectrum. Allelomimesis is the tendency of an individual to imitate the actions of others and two cluster systems have different τ values when their component agents display unequal degrees of allelomimetic tendencies. Cluster formation by allelomimesis is shown to be of three general types: namely, blind copying, information-use copying, and noncopying. Allelomimetic adaptation also reveals that the most stable cluster size is formed by three strongly allelomimetic individuals. Our finding is consistent with available field data taken from killer whales and marmots.

  9. Mouse Sycp1 functions in synaptonemal complex assembly, meiotic recombination, and XY body formation

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Femke A.T.; de Boer, Esther; van den Bosch, Mike; Baarends, Willy M.; Ooms, Marja; Yuan, Li; Liu, Jian-Guo; van Zeeland, Albert A.; Heyting, Christa; Pastink, Albert

    2005-01-01

    In meiotic prophase, synaptonemal complexes (SCs) closely appose homologous chromosomes (homologs) along their length. SCs are assembled from two axial elements (AEs), one along each homolog, which are connected by numerous transverse filaments (TFs). We disrupted the mouse gene encoding TF protein Sycp1 to analyze the role of TFs in meiotic chromosome behavior and recombination. Sycp1-/- mice are infertile, but otherwise healthy. Sycp1-/- spermatocytes form normal AEs, which align homologously, but do not synapse. Most Sycp1-/- spermatocytes arrest in pachynema, whereas a small proportion reaches diplonema, or, exceptionally, metaphase I. In leptotene Sycp1-/- spermatocytes, γH2AX (indicative of DNA damage, including double-strand breaks) appears normal. In pachynema, Sycp1-/- spermatocytes display a number of discrete γH2AX domains along each chromosome, whereas γH2AX disappears from autosomes in wild-type spermatocytes. RAD51/DMC1, RPA, and MSH4 foci (which mark early and intermediate steps in pairing/recombination) appear in similar numbers as in wild type, but do not all disappear, and MLH1 and MLH3 foci (which mark late steps in crossing over) are not formed. Crossovers were rare in metaphase I of Sycp1-/- mice. We propose that SYCP1 has a coordinating role, and ensures formation of crossovers. Unexpectedly, Sycp1-/- spermatocytes did not form XY bodies. PMID:15937223

  10. Formation and Identification of Unresolved Complex Mixtures in Lacustrine Biodegraded Oil from Nanxiang Basin, China

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Pengfei; He, Sheng; Zhu, Shukui; Chai, Derong; Yin, Shiyan; Dai, Wei; Zhang, Wanfeng

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC/TOFMS) method has been developed for the formation and identification of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) in lacustrine biodegraded oils that with the same source rock, similar maturity, and increasing degradation rank from Nanxiang Basin, China. Normal alkanes, light hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, steranes, and terpanes are degraded gradually from oil B330 to oil G574. The compounds in biodegraded oil (oil G574) have fewer types, the polarity difference of compounds in different types is minor, and the relative content of individual compounds is similar. All the features make the compounds in biodegraded oil coelute in GC analysis and form the raised “baseline hump” named UCMs. By injecting standard materials and analyzing mass spectrums of target compounds, it is shown that cyclic alkanes with one to five rings are the major components of UCMs. Furthermore, UCMs were divided into six classes. Classes I and II, composed of alkyl-cyclohexanes, alkyl-naphthanes, and their isomers, are originated from the enrichment of hydrocarbons resistant to degradation in normal oils. Classes III ~ VI, composed of sesquiterpenoids, tricyclic terpanes, low molecular steranes, diasteranes, norhopanes, and their isomers, are probably from some newly formed compounds during the microbial transformation of oil. PMID:25177711

  11. Decamethylytterbocene complexes of bipyridines and diazabutadines: multiconfigurational ground states and open-shell singlet formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Eric D; Booth, C H; Walter, M D; Kazhdan, D; Hu, Y - J; Lukens, Wayne; Maron, Laurent; Eisentein, Odile; Anderson, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Partial ytterbium f-orbital occupancy (i.e. intermediate valence) and open-shell singlet Draft 12/formation are established for a variety of bipyridine and diazabutadiene adducts to decamethylytterbocene, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb or Cp*{sub 2}Yb. Data used to support this claim includes ytterbium valence measurements using Yb Lm-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility and Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) multi configurational calculations, as well as structural measurements compared to density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The CASSCF calculations indicate that the intermediate valence is the result of a multiconfigurational ground state wave function that has both an open-shell singlet f{sup 13} and a closed-shell singlet f{sup 14} component. A number of other competing theories for the unusual magnetism in these materials are ruled out by the presence of intermediate valence and its lack of any significant temperature dependence. These results have implications for understanding chemical bonding not only in organolanthanide complexes, but also for organometallic chemistry in general, as well as understanding magnetic interactions in nanopartic1es and devices.

  12. Accelerated fluctuation analysis by graphic cards and complex pattern formation in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, Tobias; Virnau, Peter; Paul, Wolfgang; Schneider, Johannes J.

    2009-09-01

    The compute unified device architecture is an almost conventional programming approach for managing computations on a graphics processing unit (GPU) as a data-parallel computing device. With a maximum number of 240 cores in combination with a high memory bandwidth, a recent GPU offers resources for computational physics. We apply this technology to methods of fluctuation analysis, which includes determination of the scaling behavior of a stochastic process and the equilibrium autocorrelation function. Additionally, the recently introduced pattern formation conformity (Preis T et al 2008 Europhys. Lett. 82 68005), which quantifies pattern-based complex short-time correlations of a time series, is calculated on a GPU and analyzed in detail. Results are obtained up to 84 times faster than on a current central processing unit core. When we apply this method to high-frequency time series of the German BUND future, we find significant pattern-based correlations on short time scales. Furthermore, an anti-persistent behavior can be found on short time scales. Additionally, we compare the recent GPU generation, which provides a theoretical peak performance of up to roughly 1012 floating point operations per second with the previous one. .

  13. Efficient formation of bipolar microtubule bundles requires microtubule-bound γ-tubulin complexes

    PubMed Central

    Janson, Marcel E.; Setty, Thanuja Gangi; Paoletti, Anne; Tran, P.T.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism for forming linear microtubule (MT) arrays in cells such as neurons, polarized epithelial cells, and myotubes is not well understood. A simpler bipolar linear array is the fission yeast interphase MT bundle, which in its basic form contains two MTs that are bundled at their minus ends. Here, we characterize mto2p as a novel fission yeast protein required for MT nucleation from noncentrosomal γ-tubulin complexes (γ-TuCs). In interphase mto2Δ cells, MT nucleation was strongly inhibited, and MT bundling occurred infrequently and only when two MTs met by chance in the cytoplasm. In wild-type 2, we observed MT nucleation from γ-TuCs bound along the length of existing MTs. We propose a model on how these nucleation events can more efficiently drive the formation of bipolar MT bundles in interphase. Key to the model is our observation of selective antiparallel binding of MTs, which can both explain the generation and spatial separation of multiple bipolar bundles. PMID:15837798

  14. Decamethylytterbocene Complexes of Bipyridines and Diazabutadienes: Multiconfigurational Ground States and Open-Shell Singlet Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Corwin H.; Walter, Marc D.; Kazhdan, Daniel; Hu, Yung-Jin; Lukens, Wayne W.; Bauer, Eric D.; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard A.

    2009-04-22

    Partial ytterbium f-orbital occupancy (i.e., intermediate valence) and open-shell singlet formation are established for a variety of bipyridine and diazabutadiene adducts with decamethylytterbocene, (C5Me5)2Yb, abbreviated as Cp*2Yb. Data used to support this claim include ytterbium valence measurements using Yb LIII-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) multiconfigurational calculations, as well as structural measurements compared to density functional theory calculations. The CASSCF calculations indicate that the intermediate valence is the result of a multiconfigurational ground-state wave function that has both an open-shell singlet f13(?*)1, where pi* is the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the bipyridine or dpiazabutadiene ligands, and a closed-shell singlet f14 component. A number of other competing theories for the unusual magnetism in these materials are ruled out by the lack of temperature dependence of the measured intermediate valence. These results have implications for understanding chemical bonding not only in organolanthanide complexes but also for f-element chemistry in general, as well as understanding magnetic interactions in nanoparticles and devices.

  15. Formation and identification of unresolved complex mixtures in lacustrine biodegraded oil from Nanxiang Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pengfei; He, Sheng; Zhu, Shukui; Chai, Derong; Yin, Shiyan; Dai, Wei; Zhang, Wanfeng

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC/TOFMS) method has been developed for the formation and identification of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) in lacustrine biodegraded oils that with the same source rock, similar maturity, and increasing degradation rank from Nanxiang Basin, China. Normal alkanes, light hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, steranes, and terpanes are degraded gradually from oil B330 to oil G574. The compounds in biodegraded oil (oil G574) have fewer types, the polarity difference of compounds in different types is minor, and the relative content of individual compounds is similar. All the features make the compounds in biodegraded oil coelute in GC analysis and form the raised "baseline hump" named UCMs. By injecting standard materials and analyzing mass spectrums of target compounds, it is shown that cyclic alkanes with one to five rings are the major components of UCMs. Furthermore, UCMs were divided into six classes. Classes I and II, composed of alkyl-cyclohexanes, alkyl-naphthanes, and their isomers, are originated from the enrichment of hydrocarbons resistant to degradation in normal oils. Classes III ~ VI, composed of sesquiterpenoids, tricyclic terpanes, low molecular steranes, diasteranes, norhopanes, and their isomers, are probably from some newly formed compounds during the microbial transformation of oil.

  16. Measurement of the formation of complexes in tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ladbury, John E.

    2007-01-01

    The use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a full thermodynamic characterization of an interaction in one experiment. The determination of the affinity is an important value; however, the additional layer of information provided by the change in enthalpy and entropy can help in understanding the biology. This is demonstrated with respect to tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides highly complementary data to high-resolution structural detail. An overview of the methodology of the technique is provided. Ultimately, the correlation of the thermodynamic parameters determined by ITC with structural perturbation observed on going from the free to the bound state should be possible at an atomic level. Currently, thermodynamic data provide some insight as to potential changes occurring on complex formation. Here, this is demonstrated in the context of in vitro quantification of intracellular tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction and the issue of specificity of the important interactions. The apparent lack of specificity in the interactions of domains of proteins involved in early signalling from membrane-bound receptors is demonstrated using data from ITC.

  17. Reaction of a copper(II)-nitrosyl complex with hydrogen peroxide: putative formation of a copper(I)-peroxynitrite intermediate.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Apurba; Kumar, Pankaj; Mondal, Biplab

    2012-05-14

    The reaction of a Cu(II)-nitrosyl complex (1) with hydrogen peroxide at -20 °C in acetonitrile results in the formation of the corresponding Cu(I)-peroxynitrite intermediate. The reduction of the Cu(II) center was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopic studies. Formation of the peroxynitrite intermediate has been confirmed by its characteristic phenol ring nitration reaction as well as isolation of corresponding Cu(I)-nitrate (2). On air oxidation, 2 resulted in the corresponding Cu(II)-nitrate (3). Thus, these results demonstrate a possible decomposition pathway for H(2)O(2) and NO through the formation of a peroxynitrite intermediate in biological systems.

  18. Cord Formation in BACTEC Medium Is a Reliable, Rapid Method for Presumptive Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    McCarter, Yvette S.; Ratkiewicz, Irene N.; Robinson, Ann

    1998-01-01

    Serpentine cord formation in BACTEC 12B medium was evaluated as a rapid method for the presumptive identification of M. tuberculosis complex. Kinyoun acid-fast stained smears were prepared from 666 positive BACTEC 12B bottles and examined for the presence or absence of serpentine cording. Cord formation had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 89.2, 99.2, 98.5, and 94.2%, respectively. The evaluation of the presence of cord formation in BACTEC 12B medium is reliable and permits the rapid presumptive reporting of M. tuberculosis. PMID:9705435

  19. Cord formation in BACTEC medium is a reliable, rapid method for presumptive identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    McCarter, Y S; Ratkiewicz, I N; Robinson, A

    1998-09-01

    Serpentine cord formation in BACTEC 12B medium was evaluated as a rapid method for the presumptive identification of M. tuberculosis complex. Kinyoun acid-fast stained smears were prepared from 666 positive BACTEC 12B bottles and