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Sample records for complex genetic structure

  1. Predicting complex mineral structures using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Mohn, Chris E; Kob, Walter

    2015-10-28

    We show that symmetry-adapted genetic algorithms are capable of finding the ground state of a range of complex crystalline phases including layered- and incommensurate super-structures. This opens the way for the atomistic prediction of complex crystal structures of functional materials and mineral phases.

  2. The influence of climatic niche preferences on the population genetic structure of a mistletoe species complex.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Barahona, Santiago; González, Clementina; González-Rodríguez, Antonio; Ornelas, Juan Francisco

    2017-02-16

    The prevalent view on genetic structuring in parasitic plants is that host-race formation is caused by varying degrees of host specificity. However, the relative importance of ecological niche divergence and host specificity to population differentiation remains poorly understood. We evaluated the factors associated with population differentiation in mistletoes of the Psittacanthus schiedeanus complex (Loranthaceae) in Mexico. We used genetic data from chloroplast sequences and nuclear microsatellites to study population genetic structure and tested its association with host preferences and climatic niche variables. Pairwise genetic differentiation was associated with environmental and host preferences, independent of geography. However, environmental predictors appeared to be more important than host preferences to explain genetic structure, supporting the hypothesis that the occurrence of the parasite is largely determined by its own climatic niche and, to a lesser degree, by host specificity. Genetic structure is significant within this mistletoe species complex, but the processes associated with this structure appear to be more complex than previously thought. Although host specificity was not supported as the major determinant of population differentiation, we consider this to be part of a more comprehensive ecological model of mistletoe host-race formation that incorporates the effects of climatic niche evolution.

  3. Complex Ancient Genetic Structure and Cultural Transitions in Southern African Populations.

    PubMed

    Montinaro, Francesco; Busby, George B J; Gonzalez-Santos, Miguel; Oosthuitzen, Ockie; Oosthuitzen, Erika; Anagnostou, Paolo; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Pascali, Vincenzo L; Capelli, Cristian

    2017-01-01

    The characterization of the structure of southern African populations has been the subject of numerous genetic, medical, linguistic, archaeological, and anthropological investigations. Current diversity in the subcontinent is the result of complex events of genetic admixture and cultural contact between early inhabitants and migrants that arrived in the region over the last 2000 years. Here, we analyze 1856 individuals from 91 populations, comprising novel and published genotype data, to characterize the genetic ancestry profiles of 631 individuals from 51 southern African populations. Combining both local ancestry and allele frequency based analyses, we identify a tripartite, ancient, Khoesan-related genetic structure. This structure correlates neither with linguistic affiliation nor subsistence strategy, but with geography, revealing the importance of isolation-by-distance dynamics in the area. Fine-mapping of these components in southern African populations reveals admixture and cultural reversion involving several Khoesan groups, and highlights that Bantu speakers and Coloured individuals have different mixtures of these ancient ancestries.

  4. Complex Ancient Genetic Structure and Cultural Transitions in Southern African Populations

    PubMed Central

    Montinaro, Francesco; Busby, George B. J.; Gonzalez-Santos, Miguel; Oosthuitzen, Ockie; Oosthuitzen, Erika; Anagnostou, Paolo; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Pascali, Vincenzo L.; Capelli, Cristian

    2017-01-01

    The characterization of the structure of southern African populations has been the subject of numerous genetic, medical, linguistic, archaeological, and anthropological investigations. Current diversity in the subcontinent is the result of complex events of genetic admixture and cultural contact between early inhabitants and migrants that arrived in the region over the last 2000 years. Here, we analyze 1856 individuals from 91 populations, comprising novel and published genotype data, to characterize the genetic ancestry profiles of 631 individuals from 51 southern African populations. Combining both local ancestry and allele frequency based analyses, we identify a tripartite, ancient, Khoesan-related genetic structure. This structure correlates neither with linguistic affiliation nor subsistence strategy, but with geography, revealing the importance of isolation-by-distance dynamics in the area. Fine-mapping of these components in southern African populations reveals admixture and cultural reversion involving several Khoesan groups, and highlights that Bantu speakers and Coloured individuals have different mixtures of these ancient ancestries. PMID:27838627

  5. Risk of false positive genetic associations in complex traits with underlying population structure: a case study.

    PubMed

    Finno, Carrie J; Aleman, Monica; Higgins, Robert J; Madigan, John E; Bannasch, Danika L

    2014-12-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies are widely used to investigate the genetic etiology of diseases in domestic animals. In the horse, GWA studies using 40-50,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in sample sizes of 30-40 individuals, consisting of only 6-14 affected horses, have led to the discovery of genetic mutations for simple monogenic traits. Equine neuroaxonal dystrophy is a common inherited neurological disorder characterized by symmetric ataxia. A case-control GWA study was performed using genotypes from 42,819 SNP marker loci distributed across the genome in 99 clinically phenotyped Quarter horses (37 affected, 62 unaffected). A significant GWA was not achieved although a suggestive association was uncovered when only the most stringently phenotyped NAD-affected horses (n = 10) were included (chromosome 8:62130605 and 62134644 [log(1/P) = 5.56]). Candidate genes (PIK3C3, RIT2, and SYT4) within the associated region were excluded through sequencing, association testing of uncovered variants and quantitative RT-PCR. It was concluded that variants in PIK3C3, RIT2, and SYT4 are not responsible for equine neuroaxonal dystrophy. This study demonstrates the risk of false positive associations when performing GWA studies on complex traits and underlying population structure when using 40-50,000 SNP markers and small sample size.

  6. Evolution and genetic structure of the great tit (Parus major) complex.

    PubMed

    Kvist, Laura; Martens, Jochen; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi; Nazarenko, Alexander A; Valchuk, Olga P; Orell, Markku

    2003-07-22

    The great tit complex is divided into four groups, each containing several subspecies. Even though the groups are known to differ markedly on morphological, vocal and behavioural characters, some hybridization occurs in the regions where they meet. The great tit has often been referred to as an example of a ring species, although this has later been questioned. Here, we have studied the genetic structure and phylogenetic relationships of the subspecies groups to clarify the evolutionary history of the complex using control region sequences of the mitochondrial DNA. The subspecies groups were found to be monophyletic and clearly distinct in mitochondrial haplotypes, and therefore must have had long-independent evolutionary histories. This conflicts with the ring species assignment and supports the formation of secondary contact zones of previously temporarily isolated groups. According to the phylogenetic species concept, all the subspecies groups could be considered as separate species, but if the definition of the biological species concept is followed, none of the subspecies groups is a true species because hybridization still occurs.

  7. Genetic diversity and population genetic structure analysis of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto complex based on mitochondrial DNA signature.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Fomda, Bashir Ahmad; Mazta, Saligram; Sehgal, Rakesh; Singh, Balbir Bagicha; Malla, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The genetic diversity and population genetics of the Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto complex were investigated based on sequencing of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Total 81 isolates of hydatid cyst collected from ungulate animals from different geographical areas of North India were identified by sequencing of cytochrome c oxidase subunit1 (coxi) gene. Three genotypes belonging to E. granulosus sensu stricto complex were identified (G1, G2 and G3 genotypes). Further the nucleotide sequences (retrieved from GenBank) for the coxi gene from seven populations of E. granulosus sensu stricto complex covering 6 continents, were compared with sequences of isolates analysed in this study. Molecular diversity indices represent overall high mitochondrial DNA diversity for these populations, but low nucleotide diversity between haplotypes. The neutrality tests were used to analyze signatures of historical demographic events. The Tajima's D test and Fu's FS test showed negative value, indicating deviations from neutrality and both suggested recent population expansion for the populations. Pairwise fixation index was significant for pairwise comparison of different populations (except between South America and East Asia, Middle East and Europe, South America and Europe, Africa and Australia), indicating genetic differentiation among populations. Based on the findings of the present study and those from earlier studies, we hypothesize that demographic expansion occurred in E. granulosus after the introduction of founder haplotype particular by anthropogenic movements.

  8. Genetic structure of pike (Esox lucius) reveals a complex and previously unrecognized colonization history of Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Pedreschi, Debbi; Kelly-Quinn, Mary; Caffrey, Joe; O’Grady, Martin; Mariani, Stefano; Phillimore, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Aim We investigated genetic variation of Irish pike populations and their relationship with European outgroups, in order to elucidate the origin of this species to the island, which is largely assumed to have occurred as a human-mediated introduction over the past few hundred years. We aimed thereby to provide new insights into population structure to improve fisheries and biodiversity management in Irish freshwaters. Location Ireland, Britain and continental Europe. Methods A total of 752 pike (Esox lucius) were sampled from 15 locations around Ireland, and 9 continental European sites, and genotyped at six polymorphic microsatellite loci. Patterns and mechanisms of population genetic structure were assessed through a diverse array of methods, including Bayesian clustering, hierarchical analysis of molecular variance, and approximate Bayesian computation. Results Varying levels of genetic diversity and a high degree of population genetic differentiation were detected. Clear substructure within Ireland was identified, with two main groups being evident. One of the Irish populations showed high similarity with British populations. The other, more widespread, Irish strain did not group with any European population examined. Approximate Bayesian computation suggested that this widespread Irish strain is older, and may have colonized Ireland independently of humans. Main conclusions Population genetic substructure in Irish pike is high and comparable to the levels observed elsewhere in Europe. A comparison of evolutionary scenarios upholds the possibility that pike may have colonized Ireland in two ‘waves’, the first of which, being independent of human colonization, would represent the first evidence for natural colonization of a non-anadromous freshwater fish to the island of Ireland. Although further investigations using comprehensive genomic techniques will be necessary to confirm this, the present results warrant a reappraisal of current management strategies

  9. Exploring the Structural Complexity of Intermetallic Compounds by an Adaptive Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Nguyen, M. C.; Zhang, W. Y.; Wang, C. Z.; Kramer, M. J.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Li, X. Z.; Zhang, F.; Ke, L. Q.; Antropov, V. P.; Ho, K. M.

    2014-01-01

    Solving the crystal structures of novel phases with nanoscale dimensions resulting from rapid quenching is difficult due to disorder and competing polymorphic phases. Advances in computer speed and algorithm sophistication have now made it feasible to predict the crystal structure of an unknown phase without any assumptions on the Bravais lattice type, atom basis, or unit cell dimensions, providing a novel approach to aid experiments in exploring complex materials with nanoscale grains. This approach is demonstrated by solving a long-standing puzzle in the complex crystal structures of the orthorhombic, rhombohedral, and hexagonal polymorphs close to the Zr2Co11 intermetallic compound. From our calculations, we identified the hard magnetic phase and the origin of high coercivity in this compound, thus guiding further development of these materials for use as high performance permanent magnets without rare-earth elements.

  10. Application of Genetic Algorithm to the Design Optimization of Complex Energy Saving Glass Coating Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johar, F. M.; Azmin, F. A.; Shibghatullah, A. S.; Suaidi, M. K.; Ahmad, B. H.; Abd Aziz, M. Z. A.; Salleh, S. N.; Shukor, M. Md

    2014-04-01

    Attenuation of GSM, GPS and personal communication signal leads to poor communication inside the building using regular shapes of energy saving glass coating. Thus, the transmission is very low. A brand new type of band pass frequency selective surface (FSS) for energy saving glass application is presented in this paper for one unit cell. Numerical Periodic Method of Moment approach according to a previous study has been applied to determine the new optimum design of one unit cell energy saving glass coating structure. Optimization technique based on the Genetic Algorithm (GA) is used to obtain an improved in return loss and transmission signal. The unit cell of FSS is designed and simulated using the CST Microwave Studio software at based on industrial, scientific and medical bands (ISM). A unique and irregular shape of an energy saving glass coating structure is obtained with lower return loss and improved transmission coefficient.

  11. Genetic structure and evolution of Alpine polyploid complexes: Ranunculus kuepferi (Ranunculaceae) as a case study.

    PubMed

    Burnier, J; Buerki, S; Arrigo, N; Küpfer, P; Alvarez, N

    2009-09-01

    The alpine white-flowered buttercup, Ranunculus kuepferi Greuter & Burdet, is a polyploid complex with diploids endemic to the southwestern Alps and polyploids - which have been previously described as apomictic - widespread throughout European mountains. Due to the polymorphic status of both its ploidy level and its reproductive mode, R. kuepferi represents a key species for understanding the evolution of polyploid lineages in alpine habitats. To disentangle the phylogeography of this polyploid taxon, we used cpDNA sequences and AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) markers in 33 populations of R. kuepferi representative of its ploidy level and distribution area. Polyploid individuals were shown to be the result of at least two polyploidization events that may have taken place in the southwestern Alps. From this region, one single main migration of tetraploids colonized the entire Alpine range, the Apennines and Corsica. Genetic recombination among tetraploids was also observed, revealing the facultative nature of the apomictic reproductive mode in R. kuepferi polyploids. Our study shows the contrasting role played by diploid lineages mostly restricted to persistent refugia and by tetraploids, whose dispersal abilities have permitted their range extension all over the previously glaciated Alpine area and throughout neighbouring mountain massifs.

  12. [Characterization of the Structure of the Prokaryotic Complex of Antarctic Permafrost by Molecular Genetic Techniques].

    PubMed

    Manucharova, N A; Trosheva, E V; Kol'tsova, E M; Demkina, E V; Karaevskaya, E V; Rivkina, E M; Mardanov, A V; El'-Registan, G I

    2016-01-01

    A prokaryotic mesophilic organotrophic community responsible for 10% of the total microbial number determined by epifluorescence microscopy was reactivated in the samples ofAntarctic permafrost retrieved from the environment favoring long-term preservation of microbial communities (7500 years). No culturable forms were obtained without resuscitation procedures (CFU = 0). Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes were the dominant microbial groups in the complex. Initiation of the reactivated microbial complex by addition of chitin (0.1% wt/vol) resulted in an increased share of metabolically active biomass (up to 50%) due to the functional domination of chitinolytics caused by the target resource. Thus, sequential application of resuscitation procedures and initiation of a specific physiological group (in this case, chitinolytics) to a permafrost-preserved microbial community made it possible to reveal a prokaryotic complex capable of reversion of metabolic activity (FISH data), to determine its phylogenetic structure by metagenomic anal-ysis, and to isolate a pure culture of the dominant microorganism with high chitinolytic activity.

  13. Genetic, structural, and molecular insights into the function of ras of complex proteins domains.

    PubMed

    Civiero, Laura; Dihanich, Sybille; Lewis, Patrick A; Greggio, Elisa

    2014-07-17

    Ras of complex proteins (ROC) domains were identified in 2003 as GTP binding modules in large multidomain proteins from Dictyostelium discoideum. Research into the function of these domains exploded with their identification in a number of proteins linked to human disease, including leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) and death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) in Parkinson's disease and cancer, respectively. This surge in research has resulted in a growing body of data revealing the role that ROC domains play in regulating protein function and signaling pathways. In this review, recent advances in the structural information available for proteins containing ROC domains, along with insights into enzymatic function and the integration of ROC domains as molecular switches in a cellular and organismal context, are explored.

  14. Genetic Structure of a Local Population of the Anopheles gambiae Complex in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Markianos, Kyriacos; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Mitri, Christian; Guelbeogo, Wamdaogo M.; Gneme, Awa; Eiglmeier, Karin; Holm, Inge; Sagnon, N’Fale; Vernick, Kenneth D.; Riehle, Michelle M.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Anopheles gambiae species complex are primary vectors of human malaria in Africa. Population heterogeneities for ecological and behavioral attributes expand and stabilize malaria transmission over space and time, and populations may change in response to vector control, urbanization and other factors. There is a need for approaches to comprehensively describe the structure and characteristics of a sympatric local mosquito population, because incomplete knowledge of vector population composition may hinder control efforts. To this end, we used a genome-wide custom SNP typing array to analyze a population collection from a single geographic region in West Africa. The combination of sample depth (n = 456) and marker density (n = 1536) unambiguously resolved population subgroups, which were also compared for their relative susceptibility to natural genotypes of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The population subgroups display fluctuating patterns of differentiation or sharing across the genome. Analysis of linkage disequilibrium identified 19 new candidate genes for association with underlying population divergence between sister taxa, A. coluzzii (M-form) and A. gambiae (S-form). PMID:26731649

  15. Coalgebraic structure of genetic inheritance.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianjun; Li, Bai-Lian

    2004-09-01

    Although in the broadly defined genetic algebra, multiplication suggests a forward direction of from parents to progeny, when looking from the reverse direction, it also suggests to us a new algebraic structure-coalge- braic structure, which we call genetic coalgebras. It is not the dual coalgebraic structure and can be used in the construction of phylogenetic trees. Math- ematically, to construct phylogenetic trees means we need to solve equations x([n]) = a, or x([n]) = b. It is generally impossible to solve these equations inalgebras. However, we can solve them in coalgebras in the sense of tracing back for their ancestors. A thorough exploration of coalgebraic structure in genetics is apparently necessary. Here, we develop a theoretical framework of the coalgebraic structure of genetics. From biological viewpoint, we defined various fundamental concepts and examined their elementary properties that contain genetic significance. Mathematically, by genetic coalgebra, we mean any coalgebra that occurs in genetics. They are generally noncoassociative and without counit; and in the case of non-sex-linked inheritance, they are cocommutative. Each coalgebra with genetic realization has a baric property. We have also discussed the methods to construct new genetic coalgebras, including cocommutative duplication, the tensor product, linear combinations and the skew linear map, which allow us to describe complex genetic traits. We also put forward certain theorems that state the relationship between gametic coalgebra and gametic algebra. By Brower's theorem in topology, we prove the existence of equilibrium state for the in-evolution operator.

  16. Genetic population structure of Fusarium graminearum species complex in Korean cereals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small grain cereals are frequently contaminated with toxigenic Fusarium species. Members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) are known as a head blight pathogens and mycotoxin producers. In order to characterize the FGSC populations associated with cereals in Korea, barley, corn, maiz...

  17. Genetic structure and diversity in the Dioscorea cayenensis/D. rotundata complex revealed by morphological and isozyme markers.

    PubMed

    Bressan, E A; Briner Neto, T; Zucchi, M I; Rabello, R J; Veasey, E A

    2014-01-21

    Of the 600 known yam species, only 10 are utilized as food, and the Dioscorea cayenensis/D. rotundata species complex is among the most cultivated. In Brazil, these species are commercially cultivated in the northeast region and are cultivated in the south and southeast regions as subsistence crops by traditional agriculturists. This study aimed to evaluate the genetic diversity of 21 local varieties of D. cayenensis and 2 D. rotundata accessions using 7 isozymic loci and 24 morphological markers, and to investigate the diversity distribution in different levels of organization, such as swidden fields and communities of Vale do Ribeira. Cluster analyses for both the isozymic and morphological data separated the 2 D. rotundata accessions from the D. cayenensis accessions from Vale do Ribeira. The analysis with morphological characteristics showed the presence of 2 subgroups (Iguape and Cananéia) within group I, which included all of the local varieties from Vale do Ribeira; this result may indicate the influence of the cultural units on the morphological variation. Molecular analysis of variance indicated that most of the isozymic variability was concentrated among swiddens within communities (42.5%) and within communities (40.3%). Most of the morphological variability was also concentrated among swidden fields within communities (44.8%). The correlation between geographic and genetic distances indicated that neither morphological (r = 0.17) nor isozymic diversity (r = -0.15) is structured in space. Thus, the traditional agriculturists of Vale do Ribeira maintain and manage a great diversity of D. cayenensis varieties in their communities.

  18. [Genetic structure and peculiarities of earthworms Aporrectodea (superspecies) caliginosa (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae) complex on the territory of Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Mezhzherin, S V; Vlasenko, R P; Garbar, A V

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of genetic structure of Aporrectodea caliginosa--A. trapezoides diploid--polyploid complex on the territory of Ukraine has been done both with biochemical gene marking of 6 loci (Aat, Es-1,-2,-3, -4, Mdh) and karyotyping. All 646 individuals of 21 samples were analyzed on the biochemical gene level. Karyotype preparations were received from 70 specimens. As a result diploid amphimictic A. caliginosa individuals (2n = 36) forming panmictic populations and triploid (2n = 54) A. trapezoides ones represented by 20 supposed clones were clearly differentiated in 157 specimens. A clear tendency of triploid form domination in the steppe zone of Ukraine where they form 70% in comparison to 12% of all A. (superspecies) caliginosa in the northern forest regions was detected. Taking into account the constant heterozygosity of the investigated loci and chromosome reaction in meiosis, the clone forms are allotriploids formed as a result of close species hybridization, but according to allele pools the amphimictic species living in Ukraine is absent. It means that either apomictic clones of A. trapezoides are not of the local origin and their appearance in the fauna of Ukraine is the result of earthworm introduction into the arid steppe regions or amphimictic A. caliginosa is an invasive species.

  19. Influence of the larval phase on connectivity: strong differences in the genetic structure of brooders and broadcasters in the Ophioderma longicauda species complex.

    PubMed

    Weber, A A-T; Mérigot, B; Valière, S; Chenuil, A

    2015-12-01

    Closely related species with divergent life history traits are excellent models to infer the role of such traits in genetic diversity and connectivity. Ophioderma longicauda is a brittle star species complex composed of different genetic clusters, including brooders and broadcasters. These species diverged very recently and some of them are sympatric and ecologically syntopic, making them particularly suitable to study the consequences of their trait differences. At the scale of the geographic distribution of the broadcasters (Mediterranean Sea and northeastern Atlantic), we sequenced the mitochondrial marker COI and genotyped an intron (i51) for 788 individuals. In addition, we sequenced 10 nuclear loci newly developed from transcriptome sequences, for six sympatric populations of brooders and broadcasters from Greece. At the large scale, we found a high genetic structure within the brooders (COI: 0.07 < F(ST) < 0.65) and no polymorphism at the nuclear locus i51. In contrast, the broadcasters displayed lower genetic structure (0 < F(ST) < 0.14) and were polymorphic at locus i51. At the regional scale, the multilocus analysis confirmed the contrasting genetic structure between species, with no structure in the broadcasters (global F(ST) < 0.001) and strong structure in the brooders (global F(ST) = 0.49), and revealed a higher genetic diversity in broadcasters. Our study showed that the lecithotrophic larval stage allows on average a 50-fold increase in migration rates, a 280-fold increase in effective size and a threefold to fourfold increase in genetic diversity. Our work, investigating complementary genetic markers on sympatric and syntopic taxa, highlights the strong impact of the larval phase on connectivity and genetic diversity.

  20. Genetic structure of the four wild tomato species in the Solanum peruvianum s.l. species complex.

    PubMed

    Labate, Joanne A; Robertson, Larry D; Strickler, Susan R; Mueller, Lukas A

    2014-03-01

    The most diverse wild tomato species Solanum peruvianum sensu lato (s.l.) has been reclassified into four separate species: Solanum peruvianum sensu stricto (s.s.), Solanum corneliomuelleri, Solanum huaylasense, and Solanum arcanum. However, reproductive barriers among the species are incomplete and this can lead to discrepancies regarding genetic identity of germplasm. We used genotyping by sequencing (GBS) of S. peruvianum s.l., Solanum neorickii, and Solanum chmielewskii to develop tens of thousands of mapped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to analyze genetic relationships within and among species. The data set was condensed to 14,043 SNPs with no missing data across 46 sampled plants. Origins of accessions were mapped using geographical information systems (GIS). Isolation by distance, pairwise genetic distances, and number of clusters were estimated using population genetics approaches. Isolation by distance was strongly supported, especially between interspecific pairs. Eriopersicon (S. peruvianum s.s., S. corneliomuelleri, S. huaylasense) and Arcanum (S. arcanum, S. neorickii, S. chmielewskii) species groups were genetically distinct, except for S. huaylasense which showed 50% membership proportions in each group. Solanum peruvianum and S. corneliomuelleri were not significantly differentiated from each other. Many thousands of SNP markers were identified that could potentially be used to distinguish pairs of species, including S. peruvianum versus S. corneliomuelleri, if they are verified on larger numbers of samples. Diagnostic markers will be valuable for delimiting morphologically similar and interfertile species in germplasm management. Approximately 12% of the SNPs rejected a genome-wide test of selective neutrality based on differentiation among species of S. peruvianum s.l. These are candidates for more comprehensive studies of microevolutionary processes within this species complex.

  1. Analysis of Genetically Complex Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Ottman, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade, great progress has been made in the discovery of genes that influence risk for epilepsy. However, these gene discoveries have been in epilepsies with Mendelian modes of inheritance, which comprise only a tiny fraction of all epilepsy. Most people with epilepsy have no affected relatives, suggesting that the great majority of all epilepsies are genetically complex: multiple genes contribute to their etiology, none of which has a major effect on disease risk. Gene discovery in the genetically complex epilepsies is a formidable task. It is unclear which epilepsy phenotypes are most advantageous to study, and chromosomal localization and mutation detection are much more difficult than in Mendelian epilepsies. Association studies are very promising for the identification of complex epilepsy genes, but we are still in the earliest stages of their application in the epilepsies. Future studies should employ very large sample sizes to ensure adequate statistical power, clinical phenotyping methods of the highest quality, designs and analytic techniques that control for population stratification, and state-of-the-art molecular methods. Collaborative studies are essential to achieve these goals. PMID:16359464

  2. Complex genetic structure of the rabies virus in Bangkok and its surrounding provinces, Thailand: implications for canine rabies control.

    PubMed

    Lumlertdacha, Boonlert; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Denduangboripant, Jessada; Ruankaew, Nipada; Hoonsuwan, Wirongrong; Puanghat, Apirom; Sakarasaeranee, Plyyonk; Briggs, Deborrah; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2006-03-01

    Dog vaccination and population management have been suggested as priorities in attempts at disease control in canine rabies-endemic countries. Budget limitations and the complexity of social, cultural and religious variables have complicated progress in the developing world. In Bangkok, Thailand, an intensive canine vaccination and sterilization programme has been in place since November 2002. Our objective was to determine if the rabies virus could be mapped according to its genetic variations and geographical location on the small localized scale of Bangkok and its surrounding provinces. Phylogenetic characterization of 69 samples from Bangkok and five neighbouring and two remote provinces, by limited sequence analysis of the rabies virus nucleoprotein gene, distinguished six different clades. Rabies viruses of four clades were intermixed in Bangkok and in the surrounding highly populated regions whereas the other two clades were confined to rural and less populated provinces. Such a complex pattern of gene flow, particularly in Bangkok, may affect the outcome of canine control programmes.

  3. Complex pattern of genetic structuring in the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) of the River Foyle system in northwest Ireland: disentangling the evolutionary signal from population stochasticity

    PubMed Central

    Ensing, Dennis; Prodöhl, Paulo A; McGinnity, Philip; Boylan, Patrick; O'Maoiléidigh, Niall; Crozier, Walter W

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the microevolutionary processes shaping within river population genetic structure of aquatic organisms characterized by high levels of homing and spawning site fidelity. Using a microsatellite panel, we observed complex and highly significant levels of intrariver population genetic substructure and Isolation-by-Distance, in the Atlantic salmon stock of a large river system. Two evolutionary models have been considered explaining mechanisms promoting genetic substructuring in Atlantic salmon, the member-vagrant and metapopulation models. We show that both models can be simultaneously used to explain patterns and levels of population structuring within the Foyle system. We show that anthropogenic factors have had a large influence on contemporary population structure observed. In an analytical development, we found that the frequently used estimator of genetic differentiation, FST, routinely underestimated genetic differentiation by a factor three to four compared to the equivalent statistic Jost's Dest (Jost 2008). These statistics also showed a near-perfect correlation. Despite ongoing discussions regarding the usefulness of “adjusted”FST statistics, we argue that these could be useful to identify and quantify qualitative differences between populations, which are important from management and conservation perspectives as an indicator of existence of biologically significant variation among tributary populations or a warning of critical environmental damage. PMID:22393506

  4. Quantifying and analyzing the network basis of genetic complexity.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ethan G; Galitski, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Genotype-to-phenotype maps exhibit complexity. This genetic complexity is mentioned frequently in the literature, but a consistent and quantitative definition is lacking. Here, we derive such a definition and investigate its consequences for model genetic systems. The definition equates genetic complexity with a surplus of genotypic diversity over phenotypic diversity. Applying this definition to ensembles of Boolean network models, we found that the in-degree distribution and the number of periodic attractors produced determine the relative complexity of different topology classes. We found evidence that networks that are difficult to control, or that exhibit a hierarchical structure, are genetically complex. We analyzed the complexity of the cell cycle network of Sacchoromyces cerevisiae and pinpointed genes and interactions that are most important for its high genetic complexity. The rigorous definition of genetic complexity is a tool for unraveling the structure and properties of genotype-to-phenotype maps by enabling the quantitative comparison of the relative complexities of different genetic systems. The definition also allows the identification of specific network elements and subnetworks that have the greatest effects on genetic complexity. Moreover, it suggests ways to engineer biological systems with desired genetic properties.

  5. Genetics of brain structure and intelligence.

    PubMed

    Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2005-01-01

    Genetic influences on brain morphology and IQ are well studied. A variety of sophisticated brain-mapping approaches relating genetic influences on brain structure and intelligence establishes a regional distribution for this relationship that is consistent with behavioral studies. We highlight those studies that illustrate the complex cortical patterns associated with measures of cognitive ability. A measure of cognitive ability, known as g, has been shown highly heritable across many studies. We argue that these genetic links are partly mediated by brain structure that is likewise under strong genetic control. Other factors, such as the environment, obviously play a role, but the predominant determinant appears to be genetic.

  6. Impact of population age structure on Wolbachia transgene driver efficacy: ecologically complex factors and release of genetically modified mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Rasgon, Jason L; Scott, Thomas W

    2004-07-01

    Wolbachia symbionts hold theoretical promise as a way to drive transgenes into insect vector populations for disease prevention. For simplicity, current models of Wolbachia dynamics and spread ignore ecologically complex factors such as the age structure of vector populations and overlapping vector generations. We developed a model including these factors to assess their impact on the process of Wolbachia spread into populations of three mosquito species (Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens). Depending on the mosquito species, Wolbachia parameters, released mosquito life stage and initial age structure of the target population, the number of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes that we predict would need to be released ranged from less than the threshold calculated by the simple model to a 10-30-fold increase. Transgenic releases into age-structured populations, which is an expectation for wild mosquitoes, will be difficult and depending on the circumstances may not be economically or logistically feasible due to the large number of infected mosquitoes that must be released. Our results support the perspective that understanding ecological factors is critical for designing transgenic vector-borne disease control strategies.

  7. Nephelines from the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex (Southern Italy): crystal-chemical, structural and genetic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balassone, Giuseppina; Kahlenberg, Volker; Altomare, Angela; Mormone, Angela; Rizzi, Rosanna; Saviano, Michele; Mondillo, Nicola

    2013-05-01

    Sixteen nephelines from different geological occurrences were sampled at the type-locality, the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex (southern Italy), and investigated for their chemistry and crystal structure obtained by both single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. Nepheline-bearing samples are metamorphic or from magmatic ejecta and pumice deposits. The lower K contents characterize the pumice- and some metamorphic-derived nephelines, whereas the higher ones are found in some samples from magmatic nodules. The amount of the anorthite molecule, quite low on average, can be more variable in the metamorphic nephelines. The crystal-structure investigations on Somma-Vesuvius samples compare well with previous studies of natural nephelines. All 16 nepheline samples adopt space group P63. The observed lattice parameters vary between 9.9768-9.9946 Å (for a) and 8.3614-8.3777 Å (for c), respectively. Furthermore, chemical analysis revealed that all specimens exhibit an excess of Si relative the ideal Si:Al ratio of 1:1. The analysis of the T-O distances in our samples clearly indicates a distinct ordering process of aluminium and silicon on the tetrahedral sites which is an agreement with Loewenstein's rule. A linear correlation between the distance of symmetry equivalent split atoms O(1)-O(1)' and the T(1)-O(1)-T(2) tilt angle was observed. The average (B = Na) distances of all crystals are very similar which is consistent with the outcome of the site population refinement indicating full occupancy with sodium. Oriented precession-type sections of reciprocal space indicated the presence of at least the most intense family of satellite peaks, demonstrating that this group of satellite reflections can occur not only in nephelines from pegmatites and ijolites but also in rocks from completely different petrological settings.

  8. Nephelines from the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex (Southern Italy): crystal-chemical, structural and genetic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balassone, Giuseppina; Kahlenberg, Volker; Altomare, Angela; Mormone, Angela; Rizzi, Rosanna; Saviano, Michele; Mondillo, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Sixteen nephelines from different geological occurrences were sampled at the type-locality, the Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complex (southern Italy), and investigated for their chemistry and crystal structure obtained by both single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. Nepheline-bearing samples are metamorphic or from magmatic ejecta and pumice deposits. The lower K contents characterize the pumice- and some metamorphic-derived nephelines, whereas the higher ones are found in some samples from magmatic nodules. The amount of the anorthite molecule, quite low on average, can be more variable in the metamorphic nephelines. The crystal-structure investigations on Somma-Vesuvius samples compare well with previous studies of natural nephelines. All 16 nepheline samples adopt space group P63. The observed lattice parameters vary between 9.9768-9.9946 Å (for a) and 8.3614-8.3777 Å (for c), respectively. Furthermore, chemical analysis revealed that all specimens exhibit an excess of Si relative the ideal Si:Al ratio of 1:1. The analysis of the T-O distances in our samples clearly indicates a distinct ordering process of aluminium and silicon on the tetrahedral sites which is an agreement with Loewenstein's rule. A linear correlation between the distance of symmetry equivalent split atoms O(1)-O(1)' and the T(1)-O(1)- T(2) tilt angle was observed. The average < B-O> ( B = Na) distances of all crystals are very similar which is consistent with the outcome of the site population refinement indicating full occupancy with sodium. Oriented precession-type sections of reciprocal space indicated the presence of at least the most intense family of satellite peaks, demonstrating that this group of satellite reflections can occur not only in nephelines from pegmatites and ijolites but also in rocks from completely different petrological settings.

  9. Genetic structure and contrasting selection pattern at two major histocompatibility complex genes in wild house mouse populations

    PubMed Central

    Čížková, D; de Bellocq, J Gouy; Baird, S J E; Piálek, J; Bryja, J

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a tightly linked cluster of immune genes, and is often thought of as inherited as a unit. This has led to the hope that studying a single MHC gene will reveal patterns of evolution representative of the MHC as a whole. In this study we analyse a 1000-km transect of MHC variation traversing the European house mouse hybrid zone to compare signals of selection and patterns of diversification at two closely linked MHC class II genes, H-2Aa and H-2Eb. We show that although they are 0.01 cM apart (that is, recombination is expected only once in 10 000 meioses), disparate evolutionary patterns were detected. H-2Aa shows higher allelic polymorphism, faster allelic turnover due to higher mutation rates, stronger positive selection at antigen-binding sites and higher population structuring than H-2Eb. H-2Eb alleles are maintained in the gene pool for longer, including over separation of the subspecies, some H-2Eb alleles are positively and others negatively selected and some of the alleles are not expressed. We conclude that studies on MHC genes in wild-living vertebrates can give substantially different results depending on the MHC gene examined and that the level of polymorphism in a related species is a poor criterion for gene choice. PMID:20823902

  10. Complex postglacial recolonization inferred from population genetic structure of mottled sculpin Cottus bairdii in tributaries of eastern Lake Michigan, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Homola, J J; Ruetz, C R; Kohler, S L; Thum, R A

    2016-11-01

    This study used analyses of the genetic structure of a non-game fish species, the mottled sculpin Cottus bairdii to hypothesize probable recolonization routes used by cottids and possibly other Laurentian Great Lakes fishes following glacial recession. Based on samples from 16 small streams in five major Lake Michigan, U.S.A., tributary basins, significant interpopulation differentiation was documented (overall FST = 0·235). Differentiation was complex, however, with unexpectedly high genetic similarity among basins as well as occasionally strong differentiation within basins, despite relatively close geographic proximity of populations. Genetic dissimilarities were identified between eastern and western populations within river basins, with similarities existing between eastern and western populations across basins. Given such patterns, recolonization is hypothesized to have occurred on three occasions from more than one glacial refugium, with a secondary vicariant event resulting from reduction in the water level of ancestral Lake Michigan. By studying the phylogeography of a small, non-game fish species, this study provides insight into recolonization dynamics of the region that could be difficult to infer from game species that are often broadly dispersed by humans.

  11. Drainage isolation and climate change-driven population expansion shape the genetic structures of Tuber indicum complex in the Hengduan Mountains region

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bang; Zhao, Qi; Xu, Jianping; Qin, Jiao; Yang, Zhu L.

    2016-01-01

    The orogenesis of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and the Quaternary climate changes have played key roles in driving the evolution of flora and fauna in Southwest China, but their effects on higher fungi are poorly addressed. In this study, we investigated the phylogeographic pattern of the Tuber indicum species complex, an economically important fungal group distributed in the Hengduan Mountains region. Our data confirmed the existence of two distinct lineages, T. indicum and T. himalayense, within this species complex. Three geographic groups (Groups W, N and C) were revealed within T. indicum, with Group W found in the paleo-Lancang River region, while Groups N and C corresponded to the two banks along the contemporary Jinsha River, suggesting that rivers have acted as barriers for gene flow among populations from different drainages. Historical range expansion resulted from climate changes was inferred in Group C, contributing to the observed gene flow among geographic populations within this group. Although no significant geographic structure was identified in T. himalayense, evidence of drainage isolation for this species was also detected. Our findings demonstrate that both topographic changes and Quaternary climate oscillations have played important roles in driving the genetic structures of the T. indicum species complex. PMID:26906144

  12. Drainage isolation and climate change-driven population expansion shape the genetic structures of Tuber indicum complex in the Hengduan Mountains region.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bang; Zhao, Qi; Xu, Jianping; Qin, Jiao; Yang, Zhu L

    2016-02-24

    The orogenesis of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and the Quaternary climate changes have played key roles in driving the evolution of flora and fauna in Southwest China, but their effects on higher fungi are poorly addressed. In this study, we investigated the phylogeographic pattern of the Tuber indicum species complex, an economically important fungal group distributed in the Hengduan Mountains region. Our data confirmed the existence of two distinct lineages, T. indicum and T. himalayense, within this species complex. Three geographic groups (Groups W, N and C) were revealed within T. indicum, with Group W found in the paleo-Lancang River region, while Groups N and C corresponded to the two banks along the contemporary Jinsha River, suggesting that rivers have acted as barriers for gene flow among populations from different drainages. Historical range expansion resulted from climate changes was inferred in Group C, contributing to the observed gene flow among geographic populations within this group. Although no significant geographic structure was identified in T. himalayense, evidence of drainage isolation for this species was also detected. Our findings demonstrate that both topographic changes and Quaternary climate oscillations have played important roles in driving the genetic structures of the T. indicum species complex.

  13. Complex genetic patterns in closely related colonizing invasive species

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Aibin; Darling, John A; Bock, Dan G; Lacoursière-Roussel, Anaïs; MacIsaac, Hugh J; Cristescu, Melania E

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities frequently result in both rapidly changing environments and translocation of species from their native ranges (i.e., biological invasions). Empirical studies suggest that many factors associated with these changes can lead to complex genetic patterns, particularly among invasive populations. However, genetic complexities and factors responsible for them remain uncharacterized in many cases. Here, we explore these issues in the vase tunicate Ciona intestinalis (Ascidiacea: Enterogona: Cionidae), a model species complex, of which spA and spB are rapidly spreading worldwide. We intensively sampled 26 sites (N = 873) from both coasts of North America, and performed phylogenetic and population genetics analyses based on one mitochondrial fragment (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 3–NADH dehydrogenase subunit I, COX3-ND1) and eight nuclear microsatellites. Our analyses revealed extremely complex genetic patterns in both species on both coasts. We detected a contrasting pattern based on the mitochondrial marker: two major genetic groups in C. intestinalis spA on the west coast versus no significant geographic structure in C. intestinalis spB on the east coast. For both species, geo-graphically distant populations often showed high microsatellite-based genetic affinities whereas neighboring ones often did not. In addition, mitochondrial and nuclear markers provided largely inconsistent genetic patterns. Multiple factors, including random genetic drift associated with demographic changes, rapid selection due to strong local adaptation, and varying propensity for human-mediated propagule dispersal could be responsible for the observed genetic complexities. PMID:22957143

  14. Genetic structure of the four wil tomato species in the Solanum peruvianum s.l. species complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most diverse wild tomato species Solanum peruvianum sensu lato (s.l.) has been reclassified into four separate species. However, reproductive barriers among the species are incomplete and this can lead to discrepancies regarding genetic identity of germplasm. We used genotyping by sequencing (...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: tuberous sclerosis complex

    MedlinePlus

    ... phenotype in tuberous sclerosis. J Med Genet. 2004 Mar;41(3):203-7. Citation on PubMed or ... sclerosis complex: a review. Semin Pediatr Neurol. 2006 Mar;13(1):27-36. Review. Citation on PubMed ...

  16. Ocean currents help explain population genetic structure

    PubMed Central

    White, Crow; Selkoe, Kimberly A.; Watson, James; Siegel, David A.; Zacherl, Danielle C.; Toonen, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Management and conservation can be greatly informed by considering explicitly how environmental factors influence population genetic structure. Using simulated larval dispersal estimates based on ocean current observations, we demonstrate how explicit consideration of frequency of exchange of larvae among sites via ocean advection can fundamentally change the interpretation of empirical population genetic structuring as compared with conventional spatial genetic analyses. Both frequency of larval exchange and empirical genetic difference were uncorrelated with Euclidean distance between sites. When transformed into relative oceanographic distances and integrated into a genetic isolation-by-distance framework, however, the frequency of larval exchange explained nearly 50 per cent of the variance in empirical genetic differences among sites over scales of tens of kilometres. Explanatory power was strongest when we considered effects of multiple generations of larval dispersal via intermediary locations on the long-term probability of exchange between sites. Our results uncover meaningful spatial patterning to population genetic structuring that corresponds with ocean circulation. This study advances our ability to interpret population structure from complex genetic data characteristic of high gene flow species, validates recent advances in oceanographic approaches for assessing larval dispersal and represents a novel approach to characterize population connectivity at small spatial scales germane to conservation and fisheries management. PMID:20133354

  17. Ocean currents help explain population genetic structure.

    PubMed

    White, Crow; Selkoe, Kimberly A; Watson, James; Siegel, David A; Zacherl, Danielle C; Toonen, Robert J

    2010-06-07

    Management and conservation can be greatly informed by considering explicitly how environmental factors influence population genetic structure. Using simulated larval dispersal estimates based on ocean current observations, we demonstrate how explicit consideration of frequency of exchange of larvae among sites via ocean advection can fundamentally change the interpretation of empirical population genetic structuring as compared with conventional spatial genetic analyses. Both frequency of larval exchange and empirical genetic difference were uncorrelated with Euclidean distance between sites. When transformed into relative oceanographic distances and integrated into a genetic isolation-by-distance framework, however, the frequency of larval exchange explained nearly 50 per cent of the variance in empirical genetic differences among sites over scales of tens of kilometres. Explanatory power was strongest when we considered effects of multiple generations of larval dispersal via intermediary locations on the long-term probability of exchange between sites. Our results uncover meaningful spatial patterning to population genetic structuring that corresponds with ocean circulation. This study advances our ability to interpret population structure from complex genetic data characteristic of high gene flow species, validates recent advances in oceanographic approaches for assessing larval dispersal and represents a novel approach to characterize population connectivity at small spatial scales germane to conservation and fisheries management.

  18. Complex patterns of population genetic structure of moose, Alces alces, after recent spatial expansion in Poland revealed by sex-linked markers.

    PubMed

    Swisłocka, Magdalena; Czajkowska, Magdalena; Duda, Norbert; Danyłow, Jan; Owadowska-Cornil, Edyta; Ratkiewicz, Mirosław

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, human activity directly and indirectly influenced the demography of moose in Poland. The species was close to extinction, and only a few isolated populations survived after the Second World War; then, unprecedented demographic and spatial expansions had occurred, possibly generating a very complex pattern of population genetic structure at the present-day margins of the species range in Poland. Over 370 moose from seven populations were collected from Poland, and partial sequences of the mitochondrial control region (mtDNA-cr; 607 bp) were obtained. In addition, the entire mtDNA cytochrome b gene (1,140 bp) and Y-chromosome markers (1,982 bp in total) were studied in a chosen set of individuals. Twelve mtDNA haplotypes that all belonged to the European moose phylogroup were recorded. They could be divided into two distinct clades: Central Europe and the Ural Mountains. The first clade consists of three distinct groups/branches: Biebrza, Polesie, and Fennoscandia. The Biebrza group has experienced spatial and demographic expansion in the recent past. Average genetic differentiation among moose populations in Poland at mtDNA-cr was great and significant (ΦST = 0.407, p < 0.001). Using mtDNA-cr data, four separate groups of population were recognized using spatial analysis of molecular variance and principal coordinate analysis, including a relict population in Biebrza National Park, a reintroduced Kampinos National Park population, as well as populations that were descendants of moose that colonized Poland from the east (Lithuania, Belarus, and Ukraine) and the north (former East Prussia). Among all the sequenced Y-chromosome markers, polymorphisms were found in the DBY14 marker in three populations only; four haplotypes were recorded in total. No significant differentiation was detected for this Y-linked marker among moose populations in Poland. Our mtDNA study revealed that a variety of different factors-bottleneck, the presence of

  19. Distilling pathophysiology from complex disease genetics.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clark, Andrew G; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2013-09-26

    Technologies for genome-wide sequence interrogation have dramatically improved our ability to identify loci associated with complex human disease. However, a chasm remains between correlations and causality that stems, in part, from a limiting theoretical framework derived from Mendelian genetics and an incomplete understanding of disease physiology. Here we propose a set of criteria, akin to Koch's postulates for infectious disease, for assigning causality between genetic variants and human disease phenotypes.

  20. Assessing population genetic structure via the maximisation of genetic distance

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The inference of the hidden structure of a population is an essential issue in population genetics. Recently, several methods have been proposed to infer population structure in population genetics. Methods In this study, a new method to infer the number of clusters and to assign individuals to the inferred populations is proposed. This approach does not make any assumption on Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium. The implemented criterion is the maximisation (via a simulated annealing algorithm) of the averaged genetic distance between a predefined number of clusters. The performance of this method is compared with two Bayesian approaches: STRUCTURE and BAPS, using simulated data and also a real human data set. Results The simulations show that with a reduced number of markers, BAPS overestimates the number of clusters and presents a reduced proportion of correct groupings. The accuracy of the new method is approximately the same as for STRUCTURE. Also, in Hardy-Weinberg and linkage disequilibrium cases, BAPS performs incorrectly. In these situations, STRUCTURE and the new method show an equivalent behaviour with respect to the number of inferred clusters, although the proportion of correct groupings is slightly better with the new method. Re-establishing equilibrium with the randomisation procedures improves the precision of the Bayesian approaches. All methods have a good precision for FST ≥ 0.03, but only STRUCTURE estimates the correct number of clusters for FST as low as 0.01. In situations with a high number of clusters or a more complex population structure, MGD performs better than STRUCTURE and BAPS. The results for a human data set analysed with the new method are congruent with the geographical regions previously found. Conclusion This new method used to infer the hidden structure in a population, based on the maximisation of the genetic distance and not taking into consideration any assumption about Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium

  1. Population genetic structure in Lahontan cutthroat trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Sage, George K.

    2002-01-01

    We used 10 microsatellite loci to examine the genetic population structure of cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki within the Lahontan Basin complex. Genetic diversity was analyzed for trout from Nevada, California, and Utah representing three putative subspecies: Lahontan O. c. henshawi, Paiute O. c. seleniris, and Humboldt (an unnamed subspecies) cutthroat trout. We found significant differences in microsatellite diversity among the three putative subspecies found in this area. Analysis of molecular variance partitioned microsatellite variation as 9.8% among subspecies, 27.7% among populations, and 62.5% within populations of Lahontan Basin cutthroat trout. Genetic distance analyses (Cavalli-Sforza-Edwards and F st) supported unique population structure in cutthroat trout from the Humboldt and Pilot Peak drainages. Pairwise F st values for Lahontan cutthroat trout were not significantly correlated with geographic distance between population pairs (r 2 = 0.008; P < 0.0001), suggesting that they are extremely isolated populations with small effective sizes that are vulnerable to extinction. Two extant hatchery strains of Lahontan cutthroat trout showed genetic associations with different geographic source populations. The Pyramid Lake hatchery strain was most closely associated genetically with fish from Summit Lake. The Pilot Peak hatchery strain was associated genetically with Pilot Peak wild trout (Utah) and Macklin Creek trout (California). The phylogeographic diversity depicted in this study supports unique population structure and suggests important evolutionary relationships needed to evaluate transplanted populations and hatchery supplementation within the basin.

  2. Explaining additional genetic variation in complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Matthew R.; Wray, Naomi R.; Visscher, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided valuable insights into the genetic basis of complex traits, discovering >6000 variants associated with >500 quantitative traits and common complex diseases in humans. The associations identified so far represent only a fraction of those which influence phenotype, as there are likely to be very many variants across the entire frequency spectrum, each of which influences multiple traits, with only a small average contribution to the phenotypic variance. This presents a considerable challenge to further dissection of the remaining unexplained genetic variance within populations, which limits our ability to predict disease risk, identify new drug targets, improve and maintain food sources, and understand natural diversity. This challenge will be met within the current framework through larger sample size, better phenotyping including recording of non-genetic risk factors, focused study designs, and an integration of multiple sources of phenotypic and genetic information. The current evidence supports the application of quantitative genetic approaches, and we argue that one should retain simpler theories until simplicity can be traded for greater explanatory power. PMID:24629526

  3. Complex approaches to study complex trait genetics in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kálmán, Bernadette

    2014-09-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex trait disorder defined by several genes and their interactions with environmental factors. A comprehensive exploration of the susceptibility variants had not been feasible until recently when new developments in biotechnology and bioinformatics made possible sequencing of the whole human genome, cataloguing of nucleotide variants and alignments of these variants in haplotypes. Earlier observations from epidemiological, candidate gene and linkage studies provided ample evidence to support a complex genetic determination of MS. New biotechnology and bioinformatics resources have been recently applied to further successful explorations of the disease. These efforts were paralleled by more careful and reliable ascertainments of disease phenotypes, collaborations among specialized centers to generate sufficient sample size and involvement of clinician-scientists capable of working both on the clinical and scientific study sides. Data obtained from the whole genome association studies (GWAS) elevated our understanding of MS genetics to a new level by identifying an extensive list of genetic determinants. Pathway analyses of MS-associated variants provided evidence to support the immune etiology of the disease. Future research will likely explore how environmental factors interact with the genome, and contribute to the abnormal immune activation and inflammation. This review summarizes the outcomes of MS genetic explorations including those of recent GWAS, and highlights practical consequences of genetic and genomic studies by pointing out as to how the derived data facilitate further elucidation of MS pathogenesis. A better understanding of disease processes is necessary for future advancements in therapeutics and the development of disease prevention strategies.

  4. Complex relationships between occupation, environment, DNA adducts, genetic polymorphisms and bladder cancer in a case-control study using a structural equation modeling.

    PubMed

    Porru, Stefano; Pavanello, Sofia; Carta, Angela; Arici, Cecilia; Simeone, Claudio; Izzotti, Alberto; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA adducts are considered an integrate measure of carcinogen exposure and the initial step of carcinogenesis. Their levels in more accessible peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) mirror that in the bladder tissue. In this study we explore whether the formation of PBL DNA adducts may be associated with bladder cancer (BC) risk, and how this relationship is modulated by genetic polymorphisms, environmental and occupational risk factors for BC. These complex interrelationships, including direct and indirect effects of each variable, were appraised using the structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis. Within the framework of a hospital-based case/control study, study population included 199 BC cases and 213 non-cancer controls, all Caucasian males. Data were collected on lifetime smoking, coffee drinking, dietary habits and lifetime occupation, with particular reference to exposure to aromatic amines (AAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). No indirect paths were found, disproving hypothesis on association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk. DNA adducts were instead positively associated with occupational cumulative exposure to AAs (p = 0.028), whereas XRCC1 Arg 399 (p<0.006) was related with a decreased adduct levels, but with no impact on BC risk. Previous findings on increased BC risk by packyears (p<0.001), coffee (p<0.001), cumulative AAs exposure (p = 0.041) and MnSOD (p = 0.009) and a decreased risk by MPO (p<0.008) were also confirmed by SEM analysis. Our results for the first time make evident an association between occupational cumulative exposure to AAs with DNA adducts and BC risk, strengthening the central role of AAs in bladder carcinogenesis. However the lack of an association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk advises that these snapshot measurements are not representative of relevant exposures. This would envisage new scenarios for biomarker discovery and new challenges such as repeated measurements at different critical life

  5. Genetic and environmental pathways to complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gohlke, Julia M; Thomas, Reuben; Zhang, Yonqing; Rosenstein, Michael C; Davis, Allan P; Murphy, Cynthia; Becker, Kevin G; Mattingly, Carolyn J; Portier, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    Background Pathogenesis of complex diseases involves the integration of genetic and environmental factors over time, making it particularly difficult to tease apart relationships between phenotype, genotype, and environmental factors using traditional experimental approaches. Results Using gene-centered databases, we have developed a network of complex diseases and environmental factors through the identification of key molecular pathways associated with both genetic and environmental contributions. Comparison with known chemical disease relationships and analysis of transcriptional regulation from gene expression datasets for several environmental factors and phenotypes clustered in a metabolic syndrome and neuropsychiatric subnetwork supports our network hypotheses. This analysis identifies natural and synthetic retinoids, antipsychotic medications, Omega 3 fatty acids, and pyrethroid pesticides as potential environmental modulators of metabolic syndrome phenotypes through PPAR and adipocytokine signaling and organophosphate pesticides as potential environmental modulators of neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Conclusion Identification of key regulatory pathways that integrate genetic and environmental modulators define disease associated targets that will allow for efficient screening of large numbers of environmental factors, screening that could set priorities for further research and guide public health decisions. PMID:19416532

  6. Genetic dissection of the budding yeast Arp2/3 complex: A comparison of the in vivo and structural roles of individual subunits

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Dirk C.; Choe, Elizabeth Y.; Li, Rong

    1999-01-01

    In previous work, we identified the yeast Arp2/3 complex, which localizes to cortical actin patches and is required for their motility and integrity in vivo. This complex contains proteins homologous to each subunit of the Acanthamoeba and human Arp2/3 complex except for a 40-kDa subunit (p40), which was missing from the purified yeast complex. Here, we demonstrate by using immunoprecipitation and gel-filtration analysis that Arc40p, the homolog of p40 identified from the yeast genome database, associates with the yeast Arp2/3 complex. We have carried out gene disruptions of each subunit of the yeast Arp2/3 complex to study each subunit’s role in the function of the complex. Surprisingly, we find that only ARC40 is fully essential for cell viability. Strains lacking each of the other subunits exhibit varying degrees of defects in cell growth and viability and in assembly and polarization of cortical actin patches. We have also examined each subunit’s role in maintaining the structural integrity of the Arp2/3 complex. Arp2p, Arp3p, and Arc40p fall into the monomer pool in Δarc19 and Δarc35 cells, suggesting that Arc19p and Arc35p are the central scaffolding components of the complex. Arp2p and Arp3p do not have major roles in maintaining complex integrity, and Arc15p is required for association of Arp2p and Arc40p, but not other subunits, with the complex. These results provide evidence that each subunit contributes differently to the assembly and function of the Arp2/3 complex. PMID:10377407

  7. Mitochondrial control region diversity of the houbara bustard Chlamydotis undulata complex and genetic structure along the Atlantic seaboard of North Africa.

    PubMed

    Idaghdour, Youssef; Broderick, Damien; Korrida, Amal; Chbel, Faiza

    2004-01-01

    The houbara bustard, Chlamydotis undulata, is a declining cryptic desert bird whose range extends from North Africa to Central Asia. Three subspecies are currently recognized by geographical distribution and morphology: C.u.fuertaventurae, C.u.undulata and C.u.macqueenii. We have sequenced 854 bp of mitochondrial control region from 73 birds to describe their population genetic structure with a particular sampling focus on the connectivity between C.u.fuertaventurae and C.u.undulata along the Atlantic seaboard of North Africa. Nucleotide and haplotypic diversity varied among the subspecies being highest in C.u.undulata, lowest in C.u.fuertaventurae and intermediate in C.u.macqueenii. C.u.fuertaventurae and C.u.undulata are paraphyletic and an average nucleotide divergence of 2.08% splits the later from C.u.macqueenii. We estimate that C.u.fuertaventurae and C.u.undulata split from C.u.macqueenii approximately 430 000 years ago. C.u.fuertaventurae and C.u.undulata are weakly differentiated (FST = 0.27, Nm = 1.3), indicative of a recent shared history. Archaeological evidence indicates that houbara bustards have been present on the Canary Islands for 130-170 000 years. However, our genetic data point to a more recent separation of C.u.fuertaventurae and C.u.undulata at around 20-25 000 years. Concordant archaeological, climatic opportunities for colonization and genetic data point to a scenario of: (i) initial colonization of the Canary Islands about 130 000 years ago; (ii) a period of secondary contact 19-30 000 years ago homogenizing any pre-existing genetic structure followed by; (iii) a period of relative isolation that persists today.

  8. Molecular Genetic Studies of Complex Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Marian, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    The approach to molecular genetic studies of complex phenotypes has evolved considerably during the recent years. The candidate gene approach, restricted to analysis of a few single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a modest number of cases and controls, has been supplanted by the unbiased approach of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), wherein a large number of tagger SNPs are typed in a large number of individuals. GWAS, which are designed upon the common disease- common variant hypothesis (CD-CV), have identified a large number of SNPs and loci for complex phenotypes. However, alleles identified through GWAS are typically not causative but rather in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the true causal variants. The common alleles, which may not capture the uncommon and rare variants, account only for a fraction of heritability of the complex traits. Hence, the focus is being shifted to rare variants – common disease (RV-CD) hypothesis, surmising that rare variants exert large effect sizes on the phenotype. In conjunctional with this conceptual shift technological advances in DNA sequencing techniques have dramatically enhanced whole genome or whole exome sequencing capacity. The sequencing approach affords identification of not only the rare but also the common variants. The approach – whether used in complementation with GWAS or as a stand-alone approach - could define the genetic architecture of the complex phenotypes. Robust phenotyping and large-scale sequencing studies are essential to extract the information content of the vast number of DNA sequence variants (DSVs) in the genome. To garner meaningful clinical information and link the genotype to a phenotype, identification and characterization of a very large number of causal fields beyond the information content of DNA sequence variants would be necessary. This review provides an update on the current progress and limitations in identifying DSVs that are associated with phenotypic effects. PMID

  9. Genetic code expansion for multiprotein complex engineering.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Christine; Sauter, Paul F; Wawryszyn, Mirella; Girona, Gemma Estrada; Gupta, Kapil; Landry, Jonathan J M; Fritz, Markus Hsi-Yang; Radic, Ksenija; Hoffmann, Jan-Erik; Chen, Zhuo A; Zou, Juan; Tan, Piau Siong; Galik, Bence; Junttila, Sini; Stolt-Bergner, Peggy; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Gyenesei, Attila; Schultz, Carsten; Biskup, Moritz Bosse; Besir, Hueseyin; Benes, Vladimir; Rappsilber, Juri; Jechlinger, Martin; Korbel, Jan O; Berger, Imre; Braese, Stefan; Lemke, Edward A

    2016-12-01

    We present a baculovirus-based protein engineering method that enables site-specific introduction of unique functionalities in a eukaryotic protein complex recombinantly produced in insect cells. We demonstrate the versatility of this efficient and robust protein production platform, 'MultiBacTAG', (i) for the fluorescent labeling of target proteins and biologics using click chemistries, (ii) for glycoengineering of antibodies, and (iii) for structure-function studies of novel eukaryotic complexes using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer as well as site-specific crosslinking strategies.

  10. Predicting Protein Structure Using Parallel Genetic Algorithms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    By " Predicting rotein Structure D istribticfiar.. ................ Using Parallel Genetic Algorithms ,Avaiu " ’ •"... Dist THESIS I IGeorge H...iiLite-d Approved for public release; distribution unlimited AFIT/ GCS /ENG/94D-03 Predicting Protein Structure Using Parallel Genetic Algorithms ...1-1 1.2 Genetic Algorithms ......... ............................ 1-3 1.3 The Protein Folding Problem

  11. Crystal Structure of a Cytochrome P450 2B6 Genetic Variant in Complex with the Inhibitor 4-(4-Chlorophenyl)imidazole at 2.0-Å Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manish B.; Talakad, Jyothi C.; Maekawa, Keiko; Roberts, Arthur G.; Wilderman, P. Ross; Sun, Ling; Yang, Jane Y.; Huelga, Stephanie C.; Hong, Wen-Xu; Zhang, Qinghai; Stout, C. David; Halpert, James R.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the K262R genetic variant of human cytochrome P450 2B6 in complex with the inhibitor 4-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazole (4-CPI) has been determined using X-ray crystallography to 2.0-Å resolution. Production of diffraction quality crystals was enabled through a combination of protein engineering, chaperone coexpression, modifications to the purification protocol, and the use of unique facial amphiphiles during crystallization. The 2B6-4-CPI complex is virtually identical to the rabbit 2B4 structure bound to the same inhibitor with respect to the arrangement of secondary structural elements and the placement of active site residues. The structure supports prior P450 2B6 homology models based on other mammalian cytochromes P450 and is consistent with the limited site-directed mutagenesis studies on 2B6 and extensive studies on P450 2B4 and 2B1. Although the K262R genetic variant shows unaltered binding of 4-CPI, altered binding affinity, kinetics, and/or product profiles have been previously shown with several other ligands. On the basis of new P450 2B6 crystal structure and previous 2B4 structures, substitutions at residue 262 affect a hydrogen-bonding network connecting the G and H helices, where subtle differences could be transduced to the active site. Docking experiments indicate that the closed protein conformation allows smaller ligands such as ticlopidine to bind to the 2B6 active site in the expected orientation. However, it is unknown whether 2B6 undergoes structural reorganization to accommodate bulkier molecules, as previously inferred from multiple P450 2B4 crystal structures. PMID:20061448

  12. Crystal structure of a cytochrome P450 2B6 genetic variant in complex with the inhibitor 4-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazole at 2.0-A resolution.

    PubMed

    Gay, Sean C; Shah, Manish B; Talakad, Jyothi C; Maekawa, Keiko; Roberts, Arthur G; Wilderman, P Ross; Sun, Ling; Yang, Jane Y; Huelga, Stephanie C; Hong, Wen-Xu; Zhang, Qinghai; Stout, C David; Halpert, James R

    2010-04-01

    The structure of the K262R genetic variant of human cytochrome P450 2B6 in complex with the inhibitor 4-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazole (4-CPI) has been determined using X-ray crystallography to 2.0-A resolution. Production of diffraction quality crystals was enabled through a combination of protein engineering, chaperone coexpression, modifications to the purification protocol, and the use of unique facial amphiphiles during crystallization. The 2B6-4-CPI complex is virtually identical to the rabbit 2B4 structure bound to the same inhibitor with respect to the arrangement of secondary structural elements and the placement of active site residues. The structure supports prior P450 2B6 homology models based on other mammalian cytochromes P450 and is consistent with the limited site-directed mutagenesis studies on 2B6 and extensive studies on P450 2B4 and 2B1. Although the K262R genetic variant shows unaltered binding of 4-CPI, altered binding affinity, kinetics, and/or product profiles have been previously shown with several other ligands. On the basis of new P450 2B6 crystal structure and previous 2B4 structures, substitutions at residue 262 affect a hydrogen-bonding network connecting the G and H helices, where subtle differences could be transduced to the active site. Docking experiments indicate that the closed protein conformation allows smaller ligands such as ticlopidine to bind to the 2B6 active site in the expected orientation. However, it is unknown whether 2B6 undergoes structural reorganization to accommodate bulkier molecules, as previously inferred from multiple P450 2B4 crystal structures.

  13. Band-structure parameters by genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Starrost, F.; Bornholdt, S.; Solterbeck, C.; Schattke, W.

    1996-05-01

    A genetic algorithm has been used to solve a complex multidimensional parameter-fitting problem. We will focus on the parameters of an empirical tight-binding Hamiltonian. The method is used to approximate the electronic energy band structure if energy values are known for a few wave vectors of high symmetry. Compared to the usual manual procedure this method is more accurate and automatic. This approach, based on the extended H{umlt u}ckel theory (EHT), has provided a list of EHT parameters for IV-IV and III-V semiconductors with zinc-blende structure and helped us to find a symmetry in the EHT. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. Genetic Structure and Drug Susceptibility Patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains Responsible of Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis in the Major Rearing Region in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Koro Koro, Francioli; Um Boock, Alphonse; Kaiyven, Afi Leslie; Noeske, Juergen; Gutierrez, Cristina; Kuaban, Christopher; Etoa, François-Xavier; Eyangoh, Sara Irène

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cameroon this last decade continues to present a low contribution of M. africanum and M. bovis in human tuberculosis (TB), while M. bovis was prevalent in cattle but all these pieces of information only concerned West and Center regions. Methods. We carried out the first study in Adamaoua, one of the most rearing regions of Cameroon, on the genetic structure and drug susceptibility of the MTBC strains isolated from newly diagnosed sputum smear-positive patients aged 15 years and above. For that purpose, spoligotyping, a modified 15 standard MIRU/VNTR loci typing, and the proportion method were used. Results. Four hundred and thirty-seven MTBC isolates were analyzed by spoligotyping. Of these, 423 were identified as M. tuberculosis, within the Cameroon family being dominant with 278 (65.7%) isolates; twelve (2.75%) isolates were classified as M. africanum and two as M. bovis. MIRU/VNTR typing of the most prevalent sublineage (SIT 61) suggested that this lineage is not a unique clone as thought earlier but could constitute a group of strains implicated to different pocket of TB transmission. Only M. tuberculosis sublineages were associated with antituberculosis drug resistance. Conclusion. These results showed the weak contribution of M. africanum and M. bovis to human active pulmonary tuberculosis in Cameroon even in the rearing region.

  15. Genetic Structure and Drug Susceptibility Patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains Responsible of Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis in the Major Rearing Region in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Um Boock, Alphonse; Noeske, Juergen; Gutierrez, Cristina; Kuaban, Christopher; Etoa, François-Xavier; Eyangoh, Sara Irène

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cameroon this last decade continues to present a low contribution of M. africanum and M. bovis in human tuberculosis (TB), while M. bovis was prevalent in cattle but all these pieces of information only concerned West and Center regions. Methods. We carried out the first study in Adamaoua, one of the most rearing regions of Cameroon, on the genetic structure and drug susceptibility of the MTBC strains isolated from newly diagnosed sputum smear-positive patients aged 15 years and above. For that purpose, spoligotyping, a modified 15 standard MIRU/VNTR loci typing, and the proportion method were used. Results. Four hundred and thirty-seven MTBC isolates were analyzed by spoligotyping. Of these, 423 were identified as M. tuberculosis, within the Cameroon family being dominant with 278 (65.7%) isolates; twelve (2.75%) isolates were classified as M. africanum and two as M. bovis. MIRU/VNTR typing of the most prevalent sublineage (SIT 61) suggested that this lineage is not a unique clone as thought earlier but could constitute a group of strains implicated to different pocket of TB transmission. Only M. tuberculosis sublineages were associated with antituberculosis drug resistance. Conclusion. These results showed the weak contribution of M. africanum and M. bovis to human active pulmonary tuberculosis in Cameroon even in the rearing region. PMID:28119925

  16. Crystal structures of Streptococcus suis mannonate dehydratase (ManD) and its complex with substrate: genetic and biochemical evidence for a catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangmin; Gao, Feng; Peng, Hao; Cheng, Hao; Liu, Yiwei; Tang, Jiaqi; Thompson, John; Wei, Guohua; Zhang, Jingren; Du, Yuguo; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F

    2009-09-01

    Mannonate dehydratase (ManD) is found only in certain bacterial species, where it participates in the dissimilation of glucuronate. ManD catalyzes the dehydration of d-mannonate to yield 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate (2-KDG), the carbon and energy source for growth. Selective inactivation of ManD by drug targeting is of therapeutic interest in the treatment of human Streptococcus suis infections. Here, we report the overexpression, purification, functional characterization, and crystallographic structure of ManD from S. suis. Importantly, by Fourier transform mass spectrometry, we show that 2-KDG is formed when the chemically synthesized substrate (d-mannonate) is incubated with ManD. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of Mn(2+) in the purified protein, and in the solution state catalytically active ManD exists as a homodimer of two 41-kDa subunits. The crystal structures of S. suis ManD in native form and in complex with its substrate and Mn(2+) ion have been solved at a resolution of 2.9 A. The core structure of S. suis ManD is a TIM barrel similar to that of other members of the xylose isomerase-like superfamily. Structural analyses and comparative amino acid sequence alignments provide evidence for the importance of His311 and Tyr325 in ManD activity. The results of site-directed mutagenesis confirmed the functional role(s) of these residues in the dehydration reaction and a plausible mechanism for the ManD-catalyzed reaction is proposed.

  17. Complex DNA structures and structures of DNA complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chazin, W.J.; Carlstroem, G.; Shiow-Meei Chen; Miick, S.; Gomez-Paloma, L.; Smith, J.; Rydzewski, J.

    1994-12-01

    Complex DNA structures (for example, triplexes, quadruplexes, junctions) and DNA-ligand complexes are more difficult to study by NMR than standard DNA duplexes are because they have high molecular weights, show nonstandard or distorted local conformations, and exhibit large resonance linewidths and severe {sup 1}H spectral overlap. These systems also tend to have limited solubility and may require specialized solution conditions to maintain favorable spectral characteristics, which adds to the spectroscopic difficulties. Furthermore, with more atoms in the system, both assignment and structure calculation become more challenging. In this article, we focus on demonstrating the current status of NMR studies of such systems and the limitations to further progress; we also indicate in what ways isotopic enrichment can be useful.

  18. Probing genetic overlap among complex human phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rzhetsky, Andrey; Wajngurt, David; Park, Naeun; Zheng, Tian

    2007-07-10

    Geneticists and epidemiologists often observe that certain hereditary disorders cooccur in individual patients significantly more (or significantly less) frequently than expected, suggesting there is a genetic variation that predisposes its bearer to multiple disorders, or that protects against some disorders while predisposing to others. We suggest that, by using a large number of phenotypic observations about multiple disorders and an appropriate statistical model, we can infer genetic overlaps between phenotypes. Our proof-of-concept analysis of 1.5 million patient records and 161 disorders indicates that disease phenotypes form a highly connected network of strong pairwise correlations. Our modeling approach, under appropriate assumptions, allows us to estimate from these correlations the size of putative genetic overlaps. For example, we suggest that autism, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia share significant genetic overlaps. Our disease network hypothesis can be immediately exploited in the design of genetic mapping approaches that involve joint linkage or association analyses of multiple seemingly disparate phenotypes.

  19. SHM in complex structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxford, Anthony J.; Wilcox, Paul D.; Courtney, Charles R. P.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2009-03-01

    The use of permanently attached arrays of sensors has made it clear that guided waves can be used for the SHM of structures. The approaches developed have relied on the use of reference signal subtraction to indicate changes to the state of the structure, such as the appearance of damage. The limit of performance of any system is defined by the post subtraction noise. In order to confirm the basic principles at work the majority of this work has been carried out on simple metallic plates. While important to confirm the levels of understanding, this is not sufficient for practical use. This paper looks at the application of SHM techniques in more complex structures, more typical of those any system would be used on in practise. A rib from a BaE 146 aircraft is used to demonstrate the practical difficulties of applying guided wave SHM methods to densely featured structures. A model system comprising a plate with a single stringer is used to demonstrate a method for normalizing signals to give responses directly related to the scattering properties of the change in the system, mitigating the effect of the position of the change, and a method is proposed to generalize the approach to complex systems. Preliminary tests in the region of the stringer are used to identify the experimental challenges to realizing the calibration on complex systems.

  20. Dissecting the genetics of complex traits using summary association statistics.

    PubMed

    Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Price, Alkes L

    2017-02-01

    During the past decade, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been used to successfully identify tens of thousands of genetic variants associated with complex traits and diseases. These studies have produced extensive repositories of genetic variation and trait measurements across large numbers of individuals, providing tremendous opportunities for further analyses. However, privacy concerns and other logistical considerations often limit access to individual-level genetic data, motivating the development of methods that analyse summary association statistics. Here, we review recent progress on statistical methods that leverage summary association data to gain insights into the genetic basis of complex traits and diseases.

  1. [Comparative hierarchic structure of the genetic language].

    PubMed

    Ratner, V A

    1993-05-01

    The genetical texts and genetic language are built according to hierarchic principle and contain no less than 6 levels of coding sequences, separated by marks of punctuation, separation and indication: codons, cistrons, scriptons, replicons, linkage groups, genomes. Each level has all the attributes of the language. This hierarchic system expresses some general properties and regularities. The rules of genetic language being determined, the variability of genetical texts is generated by block-modular combinatorics on each level. Between levels there are some intermediate sublevels and module types capable of being combined. The genetic language is compared with two different independent linguistic systems: human natural languages and artificial programming languages. Genetic language is a natural one by its origin, but it is a typical technical language of the functioning genetic regulatory system--by its predestination. All three linguistic systems under comparison have evident similarity of the organization principles and hierarchical structures. This argues for similarity of their principles of appearance and evolution.

  2. Genetic Network Inference Using Hierarchical Structure

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Shuhei; Tokuhisa, Masato; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    Many methods for inferring genetic networks have been proposed, but the regulations they infer often include false-positives. Several researchers have attempted to reduce these erroneous regulations by proposing the use of a priori knowledge about the properties of genetic networks such as their sparseness, scale-free structure, and so on. This study focuses on another piece of a priori knowledge, namely, that biochemical networks exhibit hierarchical structures. Based on this idea, we propose an inference approach that uses the hierarchical structure in a target genetic network. To obtain a reasonable hierarchical structure, the first step of the proposed approach is to infer multiple genetic networks from the observed gene expression data. We take this step using an existing method that combines a genetic network inference method with a bootstrap method. The next step is to extract a hierarchical structure from the inferred networks that is consistent with most of the networks. Third, we use the hierarchical structure obtained to assign confidence values to all candidate regulations. Numerical experiments are also performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of using the hierarchical structure in the genetic network inference. The improvement accomplished by the use of the hierarchical structure is small. However, the hierarchical structure could be used to improve the performances of many existing inference methods. PMID:26941653

  3. Genetic specificity of a plant–insect food web: Implications for linking genetic variation to network complexity

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Matthew A.; Fortuna, Miguel A.; Bascompte, Jordi; Nicholson, Joshua R.; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Jules, Erik S.; Crutsinger, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Theory predicts that intraspecific genetic variation can increase the complexity of an ecological network. To date, however, we are lacking empirical knowledge of the extent to which genetic variation determines the assembly of ecological networks, as well as how the gain or loss of genetic variation will affect network structure. To address this knowledge gap, we used a common garden experiment to quantify the extent to which heritable trait variation in a host plant determines the assembly of its associated insect food web (network of trophic interactions). We then used a resampling procedure to simulate the additive effects of genetic variation on overall food-web complexity. We found that trait variation among host-plant genotypes was associated with resistance to insect herbivores, which indirectly affected interactions between herbivores and their insect parasitoids. Direct and indirect genetic effects resulted in distinct compositions of trophic interactions associated with each host-plant genotype. Moreover, our simulations suggest that food-web complexity would increase by 20% over the range of genetic variation in the experimental population of host plants. Taken together, our results indicate that intraspecific genetic variation can play a key role in structuring ecological networks, which may in turn affect network persistence. PMID:26858398

  4. Structural Complexity of DNA Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Cheng-Yuan; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Tsai, Huai-Ying

    2013-01-01

    In modern bioinformatics, finding an efficient way to allocate sequence fragments with biological functions is an important issue. This paper presents a structural approach based on context-free grammars extracted from original DNA or protein sequences. This approach is radically different from all those statistical methods. Furthermore, this approach is compared with a topological entropy-based method for consistency and difference of the complexity results. PMID:23662161

  5. Genetic and Environmental Factors in Complex Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, K.M.J; Martens, G.J.M

    2007-01-01

    Complex neurodevelopmental disorders, such as schizophrenia, autism, attention deficit (hyperactivity) disorder, (manic) depressive illness and addiction, are thought to result from an interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Association studies on candidate genes and genome-wide linkage analyses have identified many susceptibility chromosomal regions and genes, but considerable efforts to replicate association have been surprisingly often disappointing. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of the genetic contribution to complex neurodevelopmental disorders, focusing on the findings from association and linkage studies. Furthermore, the contribution of the interaction of the genetic with environmental and epigenetic factors to the aetiology of complex neurodevelopmental disorders as well as suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:19412416

  6. The Genetic Structure of Domestic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Miguel; Afonso, Sandra; Geraldes, Armando; Garreau, Hervé; Bolet, Gerard; Boucher, Samuel; Tircazes, Aurélie; Queney, Guillaume; Nachman, Michael W.; Ferrand, Nuno

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the genetic structure of domestic species provides a window into the process of domestication and motivates the design of studies aimed at making links between genotype and phenotype. Rabbits exhibit exceptional phenotypic diversity, are of great commercial value, and serve as important animal models in biomedical research. Here, we provide the first comprehensive survey of nucleotide polymorphism and linkage disequilibrium (LD) within and among rabbit breeds. We resequenced 16 genomic regions in population samples of both wild and domestic rabbits and additional 35 fragments in 150 rabbits representing six commonly used breeds. Patterns of genetic variation suggest a single origin of domestication in wild populations from France, supporting historical records that place rabbit domestication in French monasteries. Levels of nucleotide diversity both within and among breeds were ∼0.2%, but only 60% of the diversity present in wild populations from France was captured by domestic rabbits. Despite the recent origin of most breeds, levels of population differentiation were high (FST = 17.9%), but the majority of polymorphisms were shared and thus transferable among breeds. Coalescent simulations suggest that domestication began with a small founding population of less than 1,200 individuals. Taking into account the complex demographic history of domestication with two successive bottlenecks, two loci showed deviations that were consistent with artificial selection, including GPC4, which is known to be associated with growth rates in humans. Levels of diversity were not significantly different between autosomal and X-linked loci, providing no evidence for differential contributions of males and females to the domesticated gene pool. The structure of LD differed substantially within and among breeds. Within breeds, LD extends over large genomic distances. Markers separated by 400 kb typically showed r2 higher than 0.2, and some LD extended up to 3,200 kb

  7. Complex genetic patterns in closely related colonizing invasive species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic activities frequently result in both rapidly changing environments and translocation of species from their native ranges (i.e., biological invasions). Empirical studies suggest that many factors associated with these changes can lead to complex genetic patterns, par...

  8. Genetic Diversity and Genome Complexity of Sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) as a C4 plant, is one of the most efficient crops in converting solar energy into chemical energy. Sugarcane cultivar improvement programs have not yet systematically utilized the most of the genetic sources of yield potential and resistance to stresses that may exist in t...

  9. Controlling complexity: the clinical relevance of mouse complex genetics

    PubMed Central

    Schughart, Klaus; Libert, Claude; Kas, Martien J

    2013-01-01

    Experimental animal models are essential to obtain basic knowledge of the underlying biological mechanisms in human diseases. Here, we review major contributions to biomedical research and discoveries that were obtained in the mouse model by using forward genetics approaches and that provided key insights into the biology of human diseases and paved the way for the development of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:23632795

  10. How spatio-temporal habitat connectivity affects amphibian genetic structure

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Alexander G.; Schlichting, Peter E.; Billerman, Shawn M.; Jesmer, Brett R.; Micheletti, Steven; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Funk, W. Chris; Hapeman, Paul; Muths, Erin; Murphy, Melanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous landscapes and fluctuating environmental conditions can affect species dispersal, population genetics, and genetic structure, yet understanding how biotic and abiotic factors affect population dynamics in a fluctuating environment is critical for species management. We evaluated how spatio-temporal habitat connectivity influences dispersal and genetic structure in a population of boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata) using a landscape genetics approach. We developed gravity models to assess the contribution of various factors to the observed genetic distance as a measure of functional connectivity. We selected (a) wetland (within-site) and (b) landscape matrix (between-site) characteristics; and (c) wetland connectivity metrics using a unique methodology. Specifically, we developed three networks that quantify wetland connectivity based on: (i) P. maculata dispersal ability, (ii) temporal variation in wetland quality, and (iii) contribution of wetland stepping-stones to frog dispersal. We examined 18 wetlands in Colorado, and quantified 12 microsatellite loci from 322 individual frogs. We found that genetic connectivity was related to topographic complexity, within- and between-wetland differences in moisture, and wetland functional connectivity as contributed by stepping-stone wetlands. Our results highlight the role that dynamic environmental factors have on dispersal-limited species and illustrate how complex asynchronous interactions contribute to the structure of spatially-explicit metapopulations. PMID:26442094

  11. How spatio-temporal habitat connectivity affects amphibian genetic structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, Alexander G.; Schlichting, P; Billerman, S; Jesmer, B; Micheletti, S; Fortin, M.-J.; Funk, W.C.; Hapeman, P; Muths, Erin L.; Murphy, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous landscapes and fluctuating environmental conditions can affect species dispersal, population genetics, and genetic structure, yet understanding how biotic and abiotic factors affect population dynamics in a fluctuating environment is critical for species management. We evaluated how spatio-temporal habitat connectivity influences dispersal and genetic structure in a population of boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata) using a landscape genetics approach. We developed gravity models to assess the contribution of various factors to the observed genetic distance as a measure of functional connectivity. We selected (a) wetland (within-site) and (b) landscape matrix (between-site) characteristics; and (c) wetland connectivity metrics using a unique methodology. Specifically, we developed three networks that quantify wetland connectivity based on: (i) P. maculata dispersal ability, (ii) temporal variation in wetland quality, and (iii) contribution of wetland stepping-stones to frog dispersal. We examined 18 wetlands in Colorado, and quantified 12 microsatellite loci from 322 individual frogs. We found that genetic connectivity was related to topographic complexity, within- and between-wetland differences in moisture, and wetland functional connectivity as contributed by stepping-stone wetlands. Our results highlight the role that dynamic environmental factors have on dispersal-limited species and illustrate how complex asynchronous interactions contribute to the structure of spatially-explicit metapopulations.

  12. Efficient Analysis of Complex Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2000-01-01

    Last various accomplishments achieved during this project are : (1) A Survey of Neural Network (NN) applications using MATLAB NN Toolbox on structural engineering especially on equivalent continuum models (Appendix A). (2) Application of NN and GAs to simulate and synthesize substructures: 1-D and 2-D beam problems (Appendix B). (3) Development of an equivalent plate-model analysis method (EPA) for static and vibration analysis of general trapezoidal built-up wing structures composed of skins, spars and ribs. Calculation of all sorts of test cases and comparison with measurements or FEA results. (Appendix C). (4) Basic work on using second order sensitivities on simulating wing modal response, discussion of sensitivity evaluation approaches, and some results (Appendix D). (5) Establishing a general methodology of simulating the modal responses by direct application of NN and by sensitivity techniques, in a design space composed of a number of design points. Comparison is made through examples using these two methods (Appendix E). (6) Establishing a general methodology of efficient analysis of complex wing structures by indirect application of NN: the NN-aided Equivalent Plate Analysis. Training of the Neural Networks for this purpose in several cases of design spaces, which can be applicable for actual design of complex wings (Appendix F).

  13. Human copy number variation and complex genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Girirajan, Santhosh; Campbell, Catarina D; Eichler, Evan E

    2011-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) play an important role in human disease and population diversity. Advancements in technology have allowed for the analysis of CNVs in thousands of individuals with disease in addition to thousands of controls. These studies have identified rare CNVs associated with neuropsychiatric diseases such as autism, schizophrenia, and intellectual disability. In addition, copy number polymorphisms (CNPs) are present at higher frequencies in the population, show high diversity in copy number, sequence, and structure, and have been associated with multiple phenotypes, primarily related to immune or environmental response. However, the landscape of copy number variation still remains largely unexplored, especially for smaller CNVs and those embedded within complex regions of the human genome. An integrated approach including characterization of single nucleotide variants and CNVs in a large number of individuals with disease and normal genomes holds the promise of thoroughly elucidating the genetic basis of human disease and diversity.

  14. Central Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism: Genetic Complexity of a Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Central hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is an emerging pathological condition frequently associated with overweight, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and midline defects. The genetic mechanisms involve mutations in at least twenty-four genes regulating GnRH neuronal migration, secretion, and activity. So far, the mechanisms underlying CHH, both in prepubertal and in adulthood onset forms, remain unknown in most of the cases. Indeed, all detected gene variants may explain a small proportion of the affected patients (43%), indicating that other genes or epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the onset of CHH. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on genetic background of CHH, organizing the large amount of data present in the literature in a clear and concise manner, to produce a useful guide available for researchers and clinicians. PMID:25254043

  15. Distinct Genetic Influences on Cortical and Subcortical Brain Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Wei; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Mather, Karen A.; Zhu, Wanlin; Jiang, Jiyang; de Micheaux, Pierre Lafaye; Wright, Margaret J.; Ames, David; Sachdev, Perminder S.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the heritability of brain grey matter structures in a subsample of older adult twins (93 MZ and 68 DZ twin pairs; mean age 70 years) from the Older Australian Twins Study. The heritability estimates of subcortical regions ranged from 0.41 (amygdala) to 0.73 (hippocampus), and of cortical regions, from 0.55 (parietal lobe) to 0.78 (frontal lobe). Corresponding structures in the two hemispheres were influenced by the same genetic factors and high genetic correlations were observed between the two hemispheric regions. There were three genetically correlated clusters, comprising (i) the cortical lobes (frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes); (ii) the basal ganglia (caudate, putamen and pallidum) with weak genetic correlations with cortical lobes, and (iii) the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus and nucleus accumbens grouped together, which genetically correlated with both basal ganglia and cortical lobes, albeit relatively weakly. Our study demonstrates a complex but patterned and clustered genetic architecture of the human brain, with divergent genetic determinants of cortical and subcortical structures, in particular the basal ganglia. PMID:27595976

  16. Genetic population structure of muskellunge in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kapuscinski, Kevin L.; Sloss, Brian L.; Farrell, John M.

    2013-01-01

    We quantified genetic relationships among Muskellunge Esox masquinongy from 15 locations in the Great Lakes to determine the extent and distribution of measurable population structure and to identify appropriate spatial scales for fishery management and genetic conservation. We hypothesized that Muskellunge from each area represented genetically distinct populations, which would be evident from analyses of genotype data. A total of 691 Muskellunge were sampled (n = 10–127/site) and genetic data were collected at 13 microsatellite loci. Results from a suite of analyses (including pairwise genetic differentiation, Bayesian admixture prediction, analysis of molecular variance, and tests of isolation by distance) indicated the presence of nine distinct genetic groups, including two that were approximately 50 km apart. Geographic proximity and low habitat complexity seemed to facilitate genetic similarity among areas, whereas Muskellunge from areas of greater habitat heterogeneity exhibited high differentiation. Muskellunge from most areas contained private alleles, and mean within-area genetic variation was similar to that reported for other freshwater fishes. Management programs aimed at conserving the broader diversity and long-term sustainability of Muskellunge could benefit by considering the genetically distinct groups as independent fisheries, and individual spawning and nursery habitats could subsequently be protected to conserve the evolutionary potential of Muskellunge.

  17. Evolving Roles for Physicians and Genetic Counselors in Managing Complex Genetic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Celeste A; Whitcomb, David C

    2015-11-12

    Proponents of personalized medicine predict that genetic information will provide pivotal perspectives for the prevention and management of complex disorders. Personalized medicine differs from traditional Western medicine, in that it focuses on more complex disorders that require mechanistic disease modeling and outcome simulation by integrating genomic risk, environmental stressors, and biomarkers as indicators of disease state. This information could be useful to guide targeted therapy and prevent pathologic outcomes. However, gaps exist in the process of linking the pieces together; currently, genetic data are seldom used to assist physicians in clinical decision making. With rapid growth in genetic data and the requirements for new paradigms for complex disorders comes the need to train professionals to understand and manage the impact of genetic information on patients within these clinical settings. Here we describe the challenges, controversies, and opportunities for genetics and genetic counselors in managing complex disorders and discuss the rationale for modifications in genetic counselor training and function. We conclude that a major paradigm shift is underway and a compelling functional, ethical, and financial argument can be made for employing properly trained genetic counselors to be strategically positioned within the health-care industries that are responsible for managing complex disorders.

  18. Genetic structure of Argentinean hexaploid wheat germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Vanzetti, Leonardo S.; Yerkovich, Nadia; Chialvo, Eugenia; Lombardo, Lucio; Vaschetto, Luis; Helguera, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    The identification of genetically homogeneous groups of individuals is an ancient issue in population genetics and in the case of crops like wheat, it can be valuable information for breeding programs, genetic mapping and germplasm resources. In this work we determined the genetic structure of a set of 102 Argentinean bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) elite cultivars using 38 biochemical and molecular markers (functional, closely linked to genes and neutral ones) distributed throughout 18 wheat chromosomes. Genetic relationships among these lines were examined using model-based clustering methods. In the analysis three subpopulations were identified which correspond largely to the origin of the germplasm used by the main breeding programs in Argentina. PMID:24130447

  19. Introduction to Protein Structure through Genetic Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Tanya L.; Linton, Brian R.

    2008-01-01

    An illuminating way to learn about protein function is to explore high-resolution protein structures. Analysis of the proteins involved in genetic diseases has been used to introduce students to protein structure and the role that individual mutations can play in the onset of disease. Known mutations can be correlated to changes in protein…

  20. (Genetic structure of natural populations)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Our efforts in the first eight months were concentrated in obtaining a genomic clone of the copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Drosophila melanogaster and other Drosophila species. This we have now successfully accomplished. We seek to understand the role of SOD in radioresistance; how genetic variation in this enzyme is maintained in populations; and relevant aspects of its evolution that may contribute to these goals as well as to an understanding of molecular evolution in general. To accomplish these goals we are undertaking the following experiments: cloning and sequencing of (at least) one F allele, one S allele, and the null allele for SOD; cloning and sequencing SOD from species related to D. melanogaster; and cloning and sequencing the SOD gene from several independently sampled S and F alleles in D. melanogaster. We are also preparing to test the radioprotective effects of SOD. 67 refs.

  1. The structural diversity of artificial genetic polymers

    PubMed Central

    Anosova, Irina; Kowal, Ewa A.; Dunn, Matthew R.; Chaput, John C.; Van Horn, Wade D.; Egli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic genetics is a subdiscipline of synthetic biology that aims to develop artificial genetic polymers (also referred to as xeno-nucleic acids or XNAs) that can replicate in vitro and eventually in model cellular organisms. This field of science combines organic chemistry with polymerase engineering to create alternative forms of DNA that can store genetic information and evolve in response to external stimuli. Practitioners of synthetic genetics postulate that XNA could be used to safeguard synthetic biology organisms by storing genetic information in orthogonal chromosomes. XNA polymers are also under active investigation as a source of nuclease resistant affinity reagents (aptamers) and catalysts (xenozymes) with practical applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we provide a structural perspective on known antiparallel duplex structures in which at least one strand of the Watson–Crick duplex is composed entirely of XNA. Currently, only a handful of XNA structures have been archived in the Protein Data Bank as compared to the more than 100 000 structures that are now available. Given the growing interest in xenobiology projects, we chose to compare the structural features of XNA polymers and discuss their potential to access new regions of nucleic acid fold space. PMID:26673703

  2. Advances in the genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ombrello, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Monogenic diseases usually demonstrate Mendelian inheritance and are caused by highly penetrant genetic variants of a single gene. In contrast, genetically-complex diseases arise from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors. The concept of autoinflammation originally emerged from the identification of individual, activating lesions of the innate immune system as the molecular basis of the hereditary periodic fever syndromes. In addition to these rare, monogenic forms of autoinflammation, genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases like the periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), Behçet’s disease, and systemic arthritis also fulfill the definition of autoinflammatory diseases - namely the development of apparently unprovoked episodes of inflammation without identifiable exogenous triggers and in the absence of autoimmunity. Interestingly, investigations of these genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases have implicated both innate and adaptive immune abnormalities, blurring the line between autoinflammation and autoimmunity. This reinforces the paradigm of concerted innate and adaptive immune dysfunction leading to genetically-complex autoinflammatory phenotypes. PMID:26077134

  3. Multiple evolutionary processes drive the patterns of genetic differentiation in a forest tree species complex

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rebecca C; Steane, Dorothy A; Lavery, Martyn; Vaillancourt, René E; Potts, Brad M

    2013-01-01

    Forest trees frequently form species complexes, complicating taxonomic classification and gene pool management. This is certainly the case in Eucalyptus, and well exemplified by the Eucalyptus globulus complex. This ecologically and economically significant complex comprises four taxa (sspp. bicostata, globulus, maidenii, pseudoglobulus) that are geographically and morphologically distinct, but linked by extensive “intergrade” populations. To resolve their genetic affinities, nine microsatellites were used to genotype 1200 trees from throughout the natural range of the complex in Australia, representing 33 morphological core and intergrade populations. There was significant spatial genetic structure (FST = 0.10), but variation was continuous. High genetic diversity in southern ssp. maidenii indicates that this region is the center of origin. Genetic diversity decreases and population differentiation increases with distance from this area, suggesting that drift is a major evolutionary process. Many of the intergrade populations, along with other populations morphologically classified as ssp. pseudoglobulus or ssp. globulus, belong to a “cryptic genetic entity” that is genetically and geographically intermediate between core ssp. bicostata, ssp. maidenii, and ssp. globulus. Geography, rather than morphology, therefore, is the best predictor of overall genetic affinities within the complex and should be used to classify germplasm into management units for conservation and breeding purposes. PMID:23403692

  4. Genetics of human episodic memory: dealing with complexity.

    PubMed

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2011-09-01

    Episodic memory is a polygenic behavioral trait with substantial heritability estimates. Despite its complexity, recent empirical evidence supports the notion that behavioral genetic studies of episodic memory might successfully identify trait-associated molecules and pathways. The development of high-throughput genotyping methods, of elaborated statistical analyses and of phenotypic assessment methods at the neural systems level will facilitate the reliable identification of novel memory-related genes. Importantly, a necessary crosstalk between behavioral genetic studies and investigation of causality by molecular genetic studies will ultimately pave the way towards the identification of biologically important, and hopefully druggable, genes and molecular pathways related to human episodic memory.

  5. Structurally Complex Surface of Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is a composite of two images of Jupiter's icy moon Europa obtained from a range of 2119 miles (3410 kilometers) by the Galileo spacecraft during its fourth orbit around Jupiter and its first close pass of Europa. The mosaic spans 11 miles by 30 miles (17 km by 49 km) and shows features as small as 230 feet (70 meters) across. This mosaic is the first very high resolution image data obtained of Europa, and has a resolution more than 50 times better than the best Voyager coverage and 500 times better than Voyager coverage in this area. The mosaic shows the surface of Europa to be structurally complex. The sun illuminates the scene from the right, revealing complex overlapping ridges and fractures in the upper and lower portions of the mosaic, and rugged, more chaotic terrain in the center. Lateral faulting is revealed where ridges show offsets along their lengths (upper left of the picture). Missing ridge segments indicate obliteration of pre-existing materials and emplacement of new terrain (center of the mosaic). Only a small number of impact craters can be seen, indicating the surface is not geologically ancient.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the Galileo mission home page on the World Wide Web at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  6. Genetic structure of populations of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Selander, R K; McKinney, R M; Whittam, T S; Bibb, W F; Brenner, D J; Nolte, F S; Pattison, P E

    1985-01-01

    The genetic structure of populations of Legionella pneumophila was defined by an analysis of electrophoretically demonstrable allelic variation at structural genes encoding 22 enzymes in 292 isolates from clinical and environmental sources. Nineteen of the loci were polymorphic, and 62 distinctive electrophoretic types (ETs), representing multilocus genotypes, were identified. Principal coordinates and clustering analyses demonstrated that isolates received as L. pneumophila were a heterogeneous array of genotypes that included two previously undescribed species. For 50 ETs of L. pneumophila (strict sense), mean genetic diversity per locus was 0.312, and diversity was equivalent in ETs represented by isolates recovered from clinical sources and those collected from environmental sources. Cluster analysis revealed four major groups or lineages of ETs in L. pneumophila. Genetic diversity among ETs of the same serotype was, on average, 93% of that in the total sample of ETs. Isolates marked by particular patterns of reactivity to a panel of nine monoclonal antibodies were also genetically heterogeneous, mean diversity within patterns being about 75% of the total. Both Pontiac fever and the pneumonic form of legionellosis may be caused by isolates of the same ET. The genetic structure of L. pneumophila is clonal, and many clones apparently are worldwide in distribution. The fact that L. pneumophila is only 60% as variable as Escherichia coli raises the possibility that isolates recovered from clinical cases and man-made environments are a restricted subset of all clones in the species as a whole. PMID:4030689

  7. Teaching Genetic Counseling Skills: Incorporating a Genetic Counseling Adaptation Continuum Model to Address Psychosocial Complexity.

    PubMed

    Shugar, Andrea

    2016-11-28

    Genetic counselors are trained health care professionals who effectively integrate both psychosocial counseling and information-giving into their practice. Preparing genetic counseling students for clinical practice is a challenging task, particularly when helping them develop effective and active counseling skills. Resistance to incorporating these skills may stem from decreased confidence, fear of causing harm or a lack of clarity of psycho-social goals. The author reflects on the personal challenges experienced in teaching genetic counselling students to work with psychological and social complexity, and proposes a Genetic Counseling Adaptation Continuum model and methodology to guide students in the use of advanced counseling skills.

  8. Complexity and accountability: the witches' brew of psychiatric genetics.

    PubMed

    Arribas-Ayllon, Michael; Bartlett, Andrew; Featherstone, Katie

    2010-08-01

    This paper examines the role of complexity in descriptions of the aetiology of common psychiatric disorders. While scientists attest to the discovery of an underlying reality of complex inheritance--the so-called 'witches' brew' of genetic and non-genetic factors--we argue that 'complexity' also performs rhetorical work. In our analysis of scientific review papers (1999-2008), we find a relatively stable genre of accountability in which descriptions of complexity appear to neutralize past failures by incorporating different and sometimes competing methodological perspectives. We identify two temporal strategies: retrospective accounting, which reconstructs a history of psychiatric genetics that deals with the recent failures, citing earlier twin studies as proof of the heritability of common psychiatric disorders; and prospective accounting, which engages in the careful reconstruction of expectations by balancing methodological limitations with moderated optimism. Together, these strategies produce a simple-to-complex narrative that belies the ambivalent nature of complexity. We show that the rhetorical construction of complexity in scientific review papers is oriented to bridging disciplinary boundaries, marshalling new resources and reconstructing expectations that justify delays in gene discovery and risk prediction.

  9. Protein Complexes are Central in the Yeast Genetic Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Michaut, Magali; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Costanzo, Michael; Myers, Chad L.; Andrews, Brenda J.; Boone, Charles; Bader, Gary D.

    2011-01-01

    If perturbing two genes together has a stronger or weaker effect than expected, they are said to genetically interact. Genetic interactions are important because they help map gene function, and functionally related genes have similar genetic interaction patterns. Mapping quantitative (positive and negative) genetic interactions on a global scale has recently become possible. This data clearly shows groups of genes connected by predominantly positive or negative interactions, termed monochromatic groups. These groups often correspond to functional modules, like biological processes or complexes, or connections between modules. However it is not yet known how these patterns globally relate to known functional modules. Here we systematically study the monochromatic nature of known biological processes using the largest quantitative genetic interaction data set available, which includes fitness measurements for ∼5.4 million gene pairs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that only 10% of biological processes, as defined by Gene Ontology annotations, and less than 1% of inter-process connections are monochromatic. Further, we show that protein complexes are responsible for a surprisingly large fraction of these patterns. This suggests that complexes play a central role in shaping the monochromatic landscape of biological processes. Altogether this work shows that both positive and negative monochromatic patterns are found in known biological processes and in their connections and that protein complexes play an important role in these patterns. The monochromatic processes, complexes and connections we find chart a hierarchical and modular map of sensitive and redundant biological systems in the yeast cell that will be useful for gene function prediction and comparison across phenotypes and organisms. Furthermore the analysis methods we develop are applicable to other species for which genetic interactions will progressively become more available. PMID

  10. Genetic structure among Fijian island populations.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Gerhard P; Taylor, Diana A; Tyagi, Anand; Tiwari, Geetanjali; Redd, Alan J

    2015-02-01

    We examined nine Y chromosome short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable segment 1 region in the Fijian island populations of Viti Levu, Vanua Levu, Kadavu, the Lau islands and Rotuma. We found significant genetic structure among these populations for the Y-STRs, both with and without the Rotumans, but not for the mtDNA. We also found that all five populations exhibited the sex-biased admixture associated with areas settled by Austronesian-speaking people, with paternal lineages more strongly associated with Melanesian populations and maternal lineages more strongly associated with Polynesian populations. We also found that the Rotumans in the north and the Lau Islanders in the east were genetically more similar to Polynesian populations than were the other Fijians, but only for the mtDNA. For the Y-STRs, the Rotumans and the Lau Islanders were genetically as similar to Melanesian populations as were the other three populations. Of the five populations, the Rotumans were the most different in almost every regard. Although past genetic studies treated the Fijians as being genetically homogenous despite known geographic, phenotypic, cultural and linguistic variation, our findings show significant genetic variation and a need for a closer examination of individual island populations within Fiji, particularly the Rotumans, in order to better understand the process of the peopling of Fiji and of the surrounding regions.

  11. Enabling complex genetic circuits to respond to extrinsic environmental signals.

    PubMed

    Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Shopera, Tatenda; Hinman, Kristina; Creamer, John Philip; Moon, Tae Seok

    2017-03-06

    Genetic circuits have the potential to improve a broad range of metabolic engineering processes and address a variety of medical and environmental challenges. However, in order to engineer genetic circuits that can meet the needs of these real-world applications, genetic sensors that respond to relevant extrinsic and intrinsic signals must be implemented in complex genetic circuits. In this work, we construct the first AND and NAND gates that respond to temperature and pH, two signals that have relevance in a variety of real-world applications. A previously identified pH-responsive promoter and a temperature-responsive promoter were extracted from the E. coli genome, characterized, and modified to suit the needs of the genetic circuits. These promoters were combined with components of the type III secretion system in Salmonella typhimurium and used to construct a set of AND gates with up to 23-fold change. Next, an antisense RNA was integrated into the circuit architecture to invert the logic of the AND gate and generate a set of NAND gates with up to 1168-fold change. These circuits provide the first demonstration of complex pH- and temperature-responsive genetic circuits, and lay the groundwork for the use of similar circuits in real-world applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;9999: 1-6. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Design space for complex DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bryan; Dai, Mingjie; Myhrvold, Cameron; Ke, Yonggang; Jungmann, Ralf; Yin, Peng

    2013-12-04

    Nucleic acids have emerged as effective materials for assembling complex nanoscale structures. To tailor the structures to function optimally for particular applications, a broad structural design space is desired. Despite the many discrete and extended structures demonstrated in the past few decades, the design space remains to be fully explored. In particular, the complex finite-sized structures produced to date have been typically based on a small number of structural motifs. Here, we perform a comprehensive study of the design space for complex DNA structures, using more than 30 distinct motifs derived from single-stranded tiles. These motifs self-assemble to form structures with diverse strand weaving patterns and specific geometric properties, such as curvature and twist. We performed a systematic study to control and characterize the curvature of the structures, and constructed a flat structure with a corrugated strand pattern. The work here reveals the broadness of the design space for complex DNA nanostructures.

  13. Genetics of complex traits: prediction of phenotype, identification of causal polymorphisms and genetic architecture

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, M. E.; Kemper, K. E.; MacLeod, I. M.; Chamberlain, A. J.; Hayes, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    Complex or quantitative traits are important in medicine, agriculture and evolution, yet, until recently, few of the polymorphisms that cause variation in these traits were known. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS), based on the ability to assay thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), have revolutionized our understanding of the genetics of complex traits. We advocate the analysis of GWAS data by a statistical method that fits all SNP effects simultaneously, assuming that these effects are drawn from a prior distribution. We illustrate how this method can be used to predict future phenotypes, to map and identify the causal mutations, and to study the genetic architecture of complex traits. The genetic architecture of complex traits is even more complex than previously thought: in almost every trait studied there are thousands of polymorphisms that explain genetic variation. Methods of predicting future phenotypes, collectively known as genomic selection or genomic prediction, have been widely adopted in livestock and crop breeding, leading to increased rates of genetic improvement. PMID:27440663

  14. Identification of Complex Carbon Nanotube Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A variety of complex carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been observed experimentally. These include sharp bends, branches, tori, and helices. They are believed to be formed by using topological defects such as pentagons and heptagons to connect different CNT. The effects of type, number, and arrangement (separation and orientation) of defects on atomic structures and energetics of complex CNT are investigated using topology, quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations. Energetically stable models are derived for identification of observed complex CNT structures.

  15. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-09

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  16. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  17. Repression and activation by multiprotein complexes that alter chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Kingston, R E; Bunker, C A; Imbalzano, A N

    1996-04-15

    Recent studies have provided strong evidence that macromolecular complexes are used in the cell to remodel chromatin structure during activation and to create an inaccessible structure during repression, Although there is not yet any rigorous demonstration that modification of chromatin structure plays a direct, causal role in either activation or repression, there is sufficient smoke to indicate the presence of a blazing inferno nearby. It is clear that complexes that remodel chromatin are tractable in vitro; hopefully this will allow the establishment of systems that provide a direct analysis of the role that remodeling might play in activation. These studies indicate that establishment of functional systems to corroborate the elegant genetic studies on repression might also be tractable. As the mechanistic effects of these complexes are sorted out, it will become important to understand how the complexes are regulated. In many of the instances discussed above, the genes whose products make up these complexes were identified in genetic screens for effects on developmental processes. This implies a regulation of the activity of these complexes in response to developmental cues and further implies that the work to fully understand these complexes will occupy a generation of scientists.

  18. Genetic Structure of the Spanish Population

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genetic admixture is a common caveat for genetic association analysis. Therefore, it is important to characterize the genetic structure of the population under study to control for this kind of potential bias. Results In this study we have sampled over 800 unrelated individuals from the population of Spain, and have genotyped them with a genome-wide coverage. We have carried out linkage disequilibrium, haplotype, population structure and copy-number variation (CNV) analyses, and have compared these estimates of the Spanish population with existing data from similar efforts. Conclusions In general, the Spanish population is similar to the Western and Northern Europeans, but has a more diverse haplotypic structure. Moreover, the Spanish population is also largely homogeneous within itself, although patterns of micro-structure may be able to predict locations of origin from distant regions. Finally, we also present the first characterization of a CNV map of the Spanish population. These results and original data are made available to the scientific community. PMID:20500880

  19. Population Genetic and Admixture Analyses of Culex pipiens Complex (Diptera: Culicidae) Populations in California, United States

    PubMed Central

    Kothera, Linda; Nelms, Brittany M.; Reisen, William K.; Savage, Harry M.

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellite markers were used to genetically characterize 19 Culex pipiens complex populations from California. Two populations showed characteristics of earlier genetic bottlenecks. The overall FST value and a neighbor-joining tree suggested moderate amounts of genetic differentiation. Analyses using Structure indicated K = 4 genetic clusters: Cx. pipiens form pipiens L., Cx. quinquefasciatus Say, Cx. pipiens form molestus Forskäl, and a group of genetically similar individuals of hybrid origin. A Discriminant Analysis of Principal Components indicated that the latter group is a mixture of the other three taxa, with form pipiens and form molestus contributing somewhat more ancestry than Cx. quinquefasciatus. Characterization of 56 morphologically autogenous individuals classified most as Cx. pipiens form molestus, and none as Cx. pipiens form pipiens or Cx. quinquefasciatus. Comparison of California microsatellite data with those of Cx. pipiens pallens Coquillett from Japan indicated the latter does not contribute significantly to genotypes in California. PMID:23958909

  20. Complex and unexpected dynamics in simple genetic regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Yanika; Ullner, Ekkehard; Alagha, Afnan; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Nesbeth, Darren; Zaikin, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    One aim of synthetic biology is to construct increasingly complex genetic networks from interconnected simpler ones to address challenges in medicine and biotechnology. However, as systems increase in size and complexity, emergent properties lead to unexpected and complex dynamics due to nonlinear and nonequilibrium properties from component interactions. We focus on four different studies of biological systems which exhibit complex and unexpected dynamics. Using simple synthetic genetic networks, small and large populations of phase-coupled quorum sensing repressilators, Goodwin oscillators, and bistable switches, we review how coupled and stochastic components can result in clustering, chaos, noise-induced coherence and speed-dependent decision making. A system of repressilators exhibits oscillations, limit cycles, steady states or chaos depending on the nature and strength of the coupling mechanism. In large repressilator networks, rich dynamics can also be exhibited, such as clustering and chaos. In populations of Goodwin oscillators, noise can induce coherent oscillations. In bistable systems, the speed with which incoming external signals reach steady state can bias the network towards particular attractors. These studies showcase the range of dynamical behavior that simple synthetic genetic networks can exhibit. In addition, they demonstrate the ability of mathematical modeling to analyze nonlinearity and inhomogeneity within these systems.

  1. An integrated genetic-demographic model to unravel the origin of genetic structure in European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.)

    PubMed Central

    Andrello, Marco; Bevacqua, Daniele; Maes, Gregory E; De Leo, Giulio A

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary enlightened management of species with complex life cycles often requires the development of mathematical models integrating demographic and genetic data. The genetic structure of the endangered European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) has been thoroughly analyzed in several studies in the past years. However, the interpretation of the key demographic and biologic processes that determine the observed spatio-temporal genetic structure has been very challenging owing to the complex life cycle of this catadromous species. Here, we present the first integrated demographic-genetic model applied to the European eel that explicitly accounts for different levels of larval and adult mixing during oceanic migrations and allows us to explore alternative hypotheses on genetic differentiation. Our analyses show that (i) very low levels of mixing occurring during larval dispersal or adult migration are sufficient to erase entirely any genetic differences among sub-populations; (ii) small-scale temporal differentiation in recruitment can arise if the spawning stock is subdivided in distinct reproductive groups; and (iii) the geographic differentiation component might be overestimated if a limited number of temporal recruits are analyzed. Our study can inspire the scientific debate on the interpretation of genetic structure in other species characterized by complex life cycle and long-range migrations. PMID:25568002

  2. Evaluation of large-scale genetic structure in complex demographic and historical scenarios: the mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome pools of the Iberian Atlantic façade.

    PubMed

    Pardiñas, Antonio F; Roca, Agustín; García-Vazquez, Eva; López, Belén

    2014-04-01

    Genetic structural patterns of human populations are usually a combination of long-term evolutionary forces and short-term social, cultural, and demographic processes. Recently, using mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome loci, various studies in northern Spain have found evidence that the geographical distribution of Iron Age tribal peoples might have influenced current patterns of genetic structuring in several autochthonous populations. Using the wealth of data that are currently available from the whole territory of the Iberian Peninsula, we have evaluated its genetic structuring in the spatial scale of the Atlantic façade. Hierarchical tree modeling procedures, combined with a classic analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA), were used to model known sociocultural divisions from the third century BCE to the eighth century CE, contrasting them with uniparental marker data. Our results show that, while mountainous and abrupt areas of the Iberian North bear the signals of long-term isolation in their maternal and paternal gene pools, the makeup of the Atlantic façade as a whole can be related to tribal population groups that predate the Roman conquest of the Peninsula. The maintenance through time of such a structure can be related to the numerous geographic barriers of the Iberian mainland, which have historically conditioned its settlement patterns and the occurrence of genetic drift processes.

  3. Orthobunyaviruses: recent genetic and structural insights.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Richard M

    2014-10-01

    Orthobunyaviruses, which have small, tripartite, negative-sense RNA genomes and structurally simple virions composed of just four proteins, can have devastating effects on human health and well-being, either by causing disease in humans or by causing disease in livestock and crops. In this Review, I describe the recent genetic and structural advances that have revealed important insights into the composition of orthobunyavirus virions, viral transcription and replication and viral interactions with the host innate immune response. Lastly, I highlight outstanding questions and areas of future research.

  4. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  5. Structure of DNA-liposome complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lasic, D.D.; Strey, H.; Podgornik, R.; Stuart, M.C.A.; Frederik, P.M.

    1997-01-29

    Despite numerous studies and commericially available liposome kits, however, the structure of DNA-cationic liposome complexes is still not yet well understood. We have investigated the structure of these complexes using high-resolution cryo electron microscopy (EM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). 14 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Admixture and the organization of genetic diversity in a butterfly species complex revealed through common and rare genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Gompert, Zachariah; Lucas, Lauren K; Buerkle, C Alex; Forister, Matthew L; Fordyce, James A; Nice, Chris C

    2014-09-01

    Detailed information about the geographic distribution of genetic and genomic variation is necessary to better understand the organization and structure of biological diversity. In particular, spatial isolation within species and hybridization between them can blur species boundaries and create evolutionary relationships that are inconsistent with a strictly bifurcating tree model. Here, we analyse genome-wide DNA sequence and genetic ancestry variation in Lycaeides butterflies to quantify the effects of admixture and spatial isolation on how biological diversity is organized in this group. We document geographically widespread and pervasive historical admixture, with more restricted recent hybridization. This includes evidence supporting previously known and unknown instances of admixture. The genome composition of admixed individuals varies much more among than within populations, and tree- and genetic ancestry-based analyses indicate that multiple distinct admixed lineages or populations exist. We find that most genetic variants in Lycaeides are rare (minor allele frequency <0.5%). Because the spatial and taxonomic distributions of alleles reflect demographic and selective processes since mutation, rare alleles, which are presumably younger than common alleles, were spatially and taxonomically restricted compared with common variants. Thus, we show patterns of genetic variation in this group are multifaceted, and we argue that this complexity challenges simplistic notions concerning the organization of biological diversity into discrete, easily delineated and hierarchically structured entities.

  7. Genetic structure of Tribolium castaneum (Coleptera: Tenebrionidae) populations in mills

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is primarily found associated with human structures such as wheat and rice mills, which are spatially isolated resource patches with apparently limited immigration that could produce genetically structured populations. We investigated genetic diversity and...

  8. Lexical Structure and Parsing Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Suzanne; Merlo, Paolo

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on the consequences that the structural configuration of lexical knowledge has for the timecourse of parsing. Discusses reduced relative clauses and proposes a new lexical-structural analysis for manner of motion verbs. The article examines consequences for frequency-based models and all models whose difficulty derives from the ambiguity…

  9. TASI Lectures on Complex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denef, Frederik

    2012-11-01

    These lecture notes give an introduction to a number of ideas and methods that have been useful in the study of complex systems ranging from spin glasses to D-branes on Calabi-Yau manifolds. Topics include the replica formalism, Parisi's solution of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, overlap order parameters, supersymmetric quantum mechanics, D-brane landscapes and their black hole duals.

  10. Genetic Architecture Of Declarative Memory: Implications for Complex Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Bearden, Carrie E.; Karlsgodt, Katherine H.; Bachman, Peter; van Erp, Theo G.M.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Glahn, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Why do memory abilities vary so greatly across individuals and cognitive domains? Although memory functions are highly heritable, what exactly is being genetically transmitted? Here we review evidence for the contribution of both common and partially independent inheritance of distinct aspects of memory function. We begin by discussing the assessment of long-term memory and its underlying neural and molecular basis. We then consider evidence for both specialist and generalist genes underlying individual variability in memory, indicating that carving memory into distinct subcomponents may yield important information regarding its genetic architecture. And finally we review evidence from both complex and single-gene disorders, which provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the genetic basis of human memory function. PMID:21832260

  11. Genetically complex epilepsies, copy number variants and syndrome constellations.

    PubMed

    Mefford, Heather C; Mulley, John C

    2010-10-05

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders, with a prevalence of 1% and lifetime incidence of 3%. There are numerous epilepsy syndromes, most of which are considered to be genetic epilepsies. Despite the discovery of more than 20 genes for epilepsy to date, much of the genetic contribution to epilepsy is not yet known. Copy number variants have been established as an important source of mutation in other complex brain disorders, including intellectual disability, autism and schizophrenia. Recent advances in technology now facilitate genome-wide searches for copy number variants and are beginning to be applied to epilepsy. Here, we discuss what is currently known about the contribution of copy number variants to epilepsy, and how that knowledge is redefining classification of clinical and genetic syndromes.

  12. Behavioral Genetic Toolkits: Toward the Evolutionary Origins of Complex Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rittschof, C C; Robinson, G E

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of toolkit genes, which are highly conserved genes that consistently regulate the development of similar morphological phenotypes across diverse species, is one of the most well-known observations in the field of evolutionary developmental biology. Surprisingly, this phenomenon is also relevant for a wide array of behavioral phenotypes, despite the fact that these phenotypes are highly complex and regulated by many genes operating in diverse tissues. In this chapter, we review the use of the toolkit concept in the context of behavior, noting the challenges of comparing behaviors and genes across diverse species, but emphasizing the successes in identifying genetic toolkits for behavior; these successes are largely attributable to the creative research approaches fueled by advances in behavioral genomics. We have two general goals: (1) to acknowledge the groundbreaking progress in this field, which offers new approaches to the difficult but exciting challenge of understanding the evolutionary genetic basis of behaviors, some of the most complex phenotypes known, and (2) to provide a theoretical framework that encompasses the scope of behavioral genetic toolkit studies in order to clearly articulate the research questions relevant to the toolkit concept. We emphasize areas for growth and highlight the emerging approaches that are being used to drive the field forward. Behavioral genetic toolkit research has elevated the use of integrative and comparative approaches in the study of behavior, with potentially broad implications for evolutionary biologists and behavioral ecologists alike.

  13. Genetic Optimization of a Tensegrity Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jaime R.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is charged with developing advanced technologies for space telescopes. The next generation of space optics will be very large and lightweight. Tensegrity structures are built of compressive members (bars), and tensile members (strings). For most materials, the tensile strength of a longitudinal member is larger than its buckling strength; therefore a large stiffness to mass ratio can be achieved by increasing the use of tensile members. Tensegrities are the epitome of lightweight structures, since they take advantage of the larger tensile strength of materials. The compressive members of tensegrity structures are disjoint allowing compact storage of the structure. The structure has the potential to eliminate the requirement for assembly by man in space; it can be deployed by adjustments in its cable tension. A tensegrity structure can be more reliably modeled since none of the individual members experience bending moments. (Members that experience deformation in more than one dimension are much harder to model.) A. Keane and S. Brown designed a satellite boom truss system with an enhanced vibration performance. They started with a standard truss system, then used a genetic algorithm to alter the design, while optimizing the vibration performance. An improvement of over 20,000% in frequency-averaged energy levels was obtained using this approach. In this report an introduction to tensegrity structures is given, along with a description of how to generate the nodal coordinates and connectivity of a multiple stage cylindrical tensegrity structure. A description of how finite elements can be used to develop a stiffness and mass matrix so that the modes of vibration can be determined from the eigenvalue problem is shown. A brief description of a micro genetic algorithm is then presented.

  14. Computational complexity in electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, James Daniel; Love, Peter John; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-01-14

    In quantum chemistry, the price paid by all known efficient model chemistries is either the truncation of the Hilbert space or uncontrolled approximations. Theoretical computer science suggests that these restrictions are not mere shortcomings of the algorithm designers and programmers but could stem from the inherent difficulty of simulating quantum systems. Extensions of computer science and information processing exploiting quantum mechanics has led to new ways of understanding the ultimate limitations of computational power. Interestingly, this perspective helps us understand widely used model chemistries in a new light. In this article, the fundamentals of computational complexity will be reviewed and motivated from the vantage point of chemistry. Then recent results from the computational complexity literature regarding common model chemistries including Hartree-Fock and density functional theory are discussed.

  15. Structure-based characterization of multiprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Wiederstein, Markus; Gruber, Markus; Frank, Karl; Melo, Francisco; Sippl, Manfred J

    2014-07-08

    Multiprotein complexes govern virtually all cellular processes. Their 3D structures provide important clues to their biological roles, especially through structural correlations among protein molecules and complexes. The detection of such correlations generally requires comprehensive searches in databases of known protein structures by means of appropriate structure-matching techniques. Here, we present a high-speed structure search engine capable of instantly matching large protein oligomers against the complete and up-to-date database of biologically functional assemblies of protein molecules. We use this tool to reveal unseen structural correlations on the level of protein quaternary structure and demonstrate its general usefulness for efficiently exploring complex structural relationships among known protein assemblies.

  16. Isonymy and the genetic structure of Sicily.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Larralde, A; Pavesi, A; Scapoli, C; Conterio, F; Siri, G; Barrai, I

    1994-01-01

    The genetic structure of Sicily was analysed through the distribution of surnames of 758,793 users registered in the Italian Telephone Company, corresponding to 371 communes of the island. Estimates of the coefficient of consanguinity due to random isonymy, of Fisher's a, an indicator of abundance of surnames, and of Karlin-McGregor's v, an indicator of immigration rates, were obtained for each commune. Four different estimates of genetic distance between all possible pairs of communes within each province were also obtained, and their relationship with geographic distance was studied. The logarithmic transformation of Lasker's coefficient of relationship showed correlations with the log of geographic distance which range between -0.78 and -0.40; the strongest, for the province of Catania, was attributed to the presence of Mount Etna, and the weakest, for Palermo, to the high population density of this province.

  17. Complex ceramic structures. I. Weberites.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lu; Nino, Juan C

    2009-06-01

    The weberite structure (A2B2X7) is an anion-deficient fluorite-related superstructure. Compared with fluorites, the reduction in the number of anions leads to a decrease in the coordination number of the B cations (VI coordination) with respect to the A cations (VIII coordination), thus allowing the accommodation of diverse cations. As a result, weberite compounds have a broad range of chemical and physical properties and great technological potential. This article summarizes the structural features of weberite and describes the structure in several different ways. This is the first time that the stacking vector and stacking angle are used to represent the weberite structure. This paper also discusses the crystallographic relationship between weberite, fluorite and pyrochlore (another fluorite-related structure). The cation sublattices of weberite and pyrochlore are correlated by an axial transformation. It has been shown that the different coordination environment of anions is due to the alternating layering of the AB3 and A3B close-packed cation layers. A stability field of weberite oxides is proposed in terms of the ratio of ionic radius of cations and relative bond ionicity. In addition, a selection of weberite compounds with interesting properties is discussed.

  18. Novel gene complex structure determination

    SciTech Connect

    Gatewood, J.M.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LORD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. `Operative` chromatin containing exclusively the minor hasten variants was successfully isolated. Linker hasten H1 is quantitatively missing from operative chromatin. One of the aims of this proposal was to determine the proteins responsible for stabilizing operative chromatin. This chromatin is stabilized by microtubule proteins tar and tubulin. Another goal of this project was the structural characterization of operate chromatin nucleosomes. Using solution scattering, nucleosomes containing the minor variants were shown to be structurally distinct from major variant containing nucleosomes. The unusual structure and stabilization of operative chromatin by microtubule proteins provides a possible mechanism for direct interaction of transcription machinery with specific chromatin domains.

  19. Simple Phenotypic Sweeps Hide Complex Genetic Changes in Populations

    PubMed Central

    Maharjan, Ram P.; Liu, Bin; Feng, Lu; Ferenci, Thomas; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Changes in allele frequencies and the fixation of beneficial mutations are central to evolution. The precise relationship between mutational and phenotypic sweeps is poorly described however, especially when multiple alleles are involved. Here, we investigate these relationships in a bacterial population over 60 days in a glucose-limited chemostat in a large population. High coverage metagenomic analysis revealed a disconnection between smooth phenotypic sweeps and the complexity of genetic changes in the population. Phenotypic adaptation was due to convergent evolution and involved soft sweeps by 7–26 highly represented alleles of several genes in different combinations. Allele combinations spread from undetectably low baselines, indicating that minor subpopulations provide the basis of most innovations. A hard sweep was also observed, involving a single combination of rpoS, mglD, malE, sdhC, and malT mutations sweeping to greater than 95% of the population. Other mutant genes persisted but at lower abundance, including hfq, consistent with its demonstrated frequency-dependent fitness under glucose limitation. Other persistent, newly identified low-frequency mutations were in the aceF, galF, ribD and asm genes, in noncoding regulatory regions, three large indels and a tandem duplication; these were less affected by fluctuations involving more dominant mutations indicating separate evolutionary paths. Our results indicate a dynamic subpopulation structure with a minimum of 42 detectable mutations maintained over 60 days. We also conclude that the massive population-level mutation supply in combination with clonal interference leads to the soft sweeps observed, but not to the exclusion of an occasional hard sweep. PMID:25589261

  20. Genetic Structure of Loach Population in Yatsu Paddy Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Noriyuki; Takemura, Takeshi; Mori, Atsushi; Okushima, Shuji

    Using repeated sequences of microsatellite DNA, we investigated genetic variation and spatial structure of the loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus population in drainage canals including a main stream in the Shitada River basin composed of Yatsu paddy fields, Chiba Prefecture. Loach population samples of nine to 48 individuals were collected from 54 sampling sites in eight canals and the main stream, and genotype data in eight microsatellite loci were obtained for each sample in the genetic analysis. The average number of alleles per locus was 3.9 to 9.0, and the average observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.444-0.647 and 0.463-0.628, respectively, across samples. All samples seemed to be random mating, which conformed to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Values of the fixation index FST, were estimated to range between 0-0.161 among all samples, and a part of these values were significant. The pattern of genetic differentiation between samples with principal component analysis indicated that samples in three distinct canals appeared to differentiate, suggesting that the genetic spatial structure of the loach population in Yatsu paddy fields must be complex.

  1. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of complex hereditary spastic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Eleanna; Tucci, Arianna; Manzoni, Claudia; Lynch, David S.; Elpidorou, Marilena; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chelban, Viorica; Manole, Andreea; Hamed, Sherifa A.; Haridy, Nourelhoda A.; Federoff, Monica; Preza, Elisavet; Hughes, Deborah; Pittman, Alan; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Wiethoff, Sarah; Schottlaender, Lucia; Proukakis, Christos; Morris, Huw; Warner, Tom; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Korlipara, L.V. Prasad; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W.; Lewis, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias are a heterogeneous group of degenerative disorders that are clinically classified as either pure with predominant lower limb spasticity, or complex where spastic paraplegia is complicated with additional neurological features, and are inherited in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked patterns. Genetic defects have been identified in over 40 different genes, with more than 70 loci in total. Complex recessive spastic paraplegias have in the past been frequently associated with mutations in SPG11 (spatacsin), ZFYVE26/SPG15, SPG7 (paraplegin) and a handful of other rare genes, but many cases remain genetically undefined. The overlap with other neurodegenerative disorders has been implied in a small number of reports, but not in larger disease series. This deficiency has been largely due to the lack of suitable high throughput techniques to investigate the genetic basis of disease, but the recent availability of next generation sequencing can facilitate the identification of disease-causing mutations even in extremely heterogeneous disorders. We investigated a series of 97 index cases with complex spastic paraplegia referred to a tertiary referral neurology centre in London for diagnosis or management. The mean age of onset was 16 years (range 3 to 39). The SPG11 gene was first analysed, revealing homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in 30/97 (30.9%) of probands, the largest SPG11 series reported to date, and by far the most common cause of complex spastic paraplegia in the UK, with severe and progressive clinical features and other neurological manifestations, linked with magnetic resonance imaging defects. Given the high frequency of SPG11 mutations, we studied the autophagic response to starvation in eight affected SPG11 cases and control fibroblast cell lines, but in our restricted study we did not observe correlations between disease status and autophagic or lysosomal markers. In the remaining cases, next

  2. Complex chloroplast RNA metabolism: just debugging the genetic programme?

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Uwe G; Bozarth, Andrew; Funk, Helena T; Zauner, Stefan; Rensing, Stefan A; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian; Börner, Thomas; Tillich, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background The gene expression system of chloroplasts is far more complex than that of their cyanobacterial progenitor. This gain in complexity affects in particular RNA metabolism, specifically the transcription and maturation of RNA. Mature chloroplast RNA is generated by a plethora of nuclear-encoded proteins acquired or recruited during plant evolution, comprising additional RNA polymerases and sigma factors, and sequence-specific RNA maturation factors promoting RNA splicing, editing, end formation and translatability. Despite years of intensive research, we still lack a comprehensive explanation for this complexity. Results We inspected the available literature and genome databases for information on components of RNA metabolism in land plant chloroplasts. In particular, new inventions of chloroplast-specific mechanisms and the expansion of some gene/protein families detected in land plants lead us to suggest that the primary function of the additional nuclear-encoded components found in chloroplasts is the transgenomic suppression of point mutations, fixation of which occurred due to an enhanced genetic drift exhibited by chloroplast genomes. We further speculate that a fast evolution of transgenomic suppressors occurred after the water-to-land transition of plants. Conclusion Our inspections indicate that several chloroplast-specific mechanisms evolved in land plants to remedy point mutations that occurred after the water-to-land transition. Thus, the complexity of chloroplast gene expression evolved to guarantee the functionality of chloroplast genetic information and may not, with some exceptions, be involved in regulatory functions. PMID:18755031

  3. Conserved Genetic Interactions between Ciliopathy Complexes Cooperatively Support Ciliogenesis and Ciliary Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Rachel V.; Li, Chunmei; Kennedy, Julie K.; Ashrafi, Kaveh; Blacque, Oliver E.; Leroux, Michel R.; Reiter, Jeremy F.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding cilia proteins cause human ciliopathies, diverse disorders affecting many tissues. Individual genes can be linked to ciliopathies with dramatically different phenotypes, suggesting that genetic modifiers may participate in their pathogenesis. The ciliary transition zone contains two protein complexes affected in the ciliopathies Meckel syndrome (MKS) and nephronophthisis (NPHP). The BBSome is a third protein complex, affected in the ciliopathy Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS). We tested whether mutations in MKS, NPHP and BBS complex genes modify the phenotypic consequences of one another in both C. elegans and mice. To this end, we identified TCTN-1, the C. elegans ortholog of vertebrate MKS complex components called Tectonics, as an evolutionarily conserved transition zone protein. Neither disruption of TCTN-1 alone or together with MKS complex components abrogated ciliary structure in C. elegans. In contrast, disruption of TCTN-1 together with either of two NPHP complex components, NPHP-1 or NPHP-4, compromised ciliary structure. Similarly, disruption of an NPHP complex component and the BBS complex component BBS-5 individually did not compromise ciliary structure, but together did. As in nematodes, disrupting two components of the mouse MKS complex did not cause additive phenotypes compared to single mutants. However, disrupting both Tctn1 and either Nphp1 or Nphp4 exacerbated defects in ciliogenesis and cilia-associated developmental signaling, as did disrupting both Tctn1 and the BBSome component Bbs1. Thus, we demonstrate that ciliary complexes act in parallel to support ciliary function and suggest that human ciliopathy phenotypes are altered by genetic interactions between different ciliary biochemical complexes. PMID:26540106

  4. Genetic approaches for changing the heart and dissecting complex syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Moga, Michael-Alice; Nakamura, Tomoki; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    The genetic, biochemical and molecular bases of human cardiac disease have been the focus of extensive research efforts for many years. Early animal models of cardiovascular disease used pharmacologic or surgical interventions, or took advantage of naturally occurring genetic abnormalities and the data obtained were largely correlative. The inability to directly alter an organism’s genetic makeup and cellular protein content and accurately measure the results of that manipulation precluded rigorous examination of true cause-effect and structure-function relationships. Directed genetic manipulation in the mouse gave researchers the ability to modify and control the mammalian heart’s protein content, resulting in the rational design of models that could provide critical links between the mutated or absent protein and disease. Two techniques that have proven particularly useful are transgenesis, which involves the random insertion of ectopic genetic material of interest into a “host” genome, and gene targeting, which utilizes homologous recombination at a pre-selected locus. Initially, transgenesis and gene targeting were used to examine systemic loss-of-function and gain-of-function, respectively, but further refinements in both techniques have allowed for investigations of organ-specific, cell type-specific, developmental stage-sensitive and dose-dependent effects. Genetically engineered animal models of pediatric and adult cardiac disease have proven that, when used appropriately, these tools have the power to extend mere observation to the establishment of true causative proof. We illustrate the power of the general approach by showing how genetically engineered mouse models can define the precise signaling pathways that are affected by the gain-of-function mutation that underlies Noonan syndrome. Increasingly precise and modifiable animal models of human cardiac disease will allow researchers to determine not only pathogenesis, but also guide treatment

  5. The Genetic Structure of Marijuana and Hemp

    PubMed Central

    Sawler, Jason; Stout, Jake M.; Gardner, Kyle M.; Hudson, Darryl; Vidmar, John; Butler, Laura; Page, Jonathan E.; Myles, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Despite its cultivation as a source of food, fibre and medicine, and its global status as the most used illicit drug, the genus Cannabis has an inconclusive taxonomic organization and evolutionary history. Drug types of Cannabis (marijuana), which contain high amounts of the psychoactive cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), are used for medical purposes and as a recreational drug. Hemp types are grown for the production of seed and fibre, and contain low amounts of THC. Two species or gene pools (C. sativa and C. indica) are widely used in describing the pedigree or appearance of cultivated Cannabis plants. Using 14,031 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 81 marijuana and 43 hemp samples, we show that marijuana and hemp are significantly differentiated at a genome-wide level, demonstrating that the distinction between these populations is not limited to genes underlying THC production. We find a moderate correlation between the genetic structure of marijuana strains and their reported C. sativa and C. indica ancestry and show that marijuana strain names often do not reflect a meaningful genetic identity. We also provide evidence that hemp is genetically more similar to C. indica type marijuana than to C. sativa strains. PMID:26308334

  6. The Genetic Structure of Marijuana and Hemp.

    PubMed

    Sawler, Jason; Stout, Jake M; Gardner, Kyle M; Hudson, Darryl; Vidmar, John; Butler, Laura; Page, Jonathan E; Myles, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Despite its cultivation as a source of food, fibre and medicine, and its global status as the most used illicit drug, the genus Cannabis has an inconclusive taxonomic organization and evolutionary history. Drug types of Cannabis (marijuana), which contain high amounts of the psychoactive cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), are used for medical purposes and as a recreational drug. Hemp types are grown for the production of seed and fibre, and contain low amounts of THC. Two species or gene pools (C. sativa and C. indica) are widely used in describing the pedigree or appearance of cultivated Cannabis plants. Using 14,031 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 81 marijuana and 43 hemp samples, we show that marijuana and hemp are significantly differentiated at a genome-wide level, demonstrating that the distinction between these populations is not limited to genes underlying THC production. We find a moderate correlation between the genetic structure of marijuana strains and their reported C. sativa and C. indica ancestry and show that marijuana strain names often do not reflect a meaningful genetic identity. We also provide evidence that hemp is genetically more similar to C. indica type marijuana than to C. sativa strains.

  7. Measures of Complexity to quantify Bone Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saparin, Peter; Gowin, Wolfgang; Kurths, Jürgen; Felsenberg, Dieter

    1998-03-01

    We propose a technique to assess structure of the bone in its spatial distribution by describing and quantifying the structural architecture as a whole. The concept of measures of complexity based on symbolic dynamics is applied to computed tomography (CT) - images obtained from human lumbar vertebra. CT-images have been transformed into images consisting of 5 different symbols, whereby both statical and dynamical coding are included. Different aspects of the bone structure are quantified by several measures which have been introduced: index of global ensemble of elements composing the bone; complexity, homogeneity and dynamics within the bone architecture; complexity and inhomogeneity of the trabecular net. This leads to new insides to the understanding of bone's internal structure. The results give the first experimental and quantitative evidence of the theoretical prediction that complexity of bone structure declines rapidly with the increased disintegration of bone structures leading to the loss of bone mass and specify experimentally that bone structure is exponentially related to its density. Especially, osteoporotic vertebrae are less complex organized than normal ones. In addition, this method is significantly sensitive to changes in bone structure and provides improvements of diagnostic of pathological structural loss.

  8. Genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators: using genetics and molecular design to understand complex physiology.

    PubMed

    Kotlikoff, Michael I

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators (GECIs), with a focus on the use of these novel molecules in the context of understanding complex cell signalling in mammals, in vivo. The review focuses on the advantages and limitations of specific GECI design strategies and the results of experiments in which these molecules have been expressed in transgenic mice, concentrating particularly on recent experiments from our laboratory in which physiological signalling could be monitored in vivo. Finally, newer strategies for effective genetic specification of GECIs are briefly reviewed.

  9. Genomic approaches for understanding the genetics of complex disease

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, William L.; Reddy, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    There are thousands of known associations between genetic variants and complex human phenotypes, and the rate of novel discoveries is rapidly increasing. Translating those associations into knowledge of disease mechanisms remains a fundamental challenge because the associated variants are overwhelmingly in noncoding regions of the genome where we have few guiding principles to predict their function. Intersecting the compendium of identified genetic associations with maps of regulatory activity across the human genome has revealed that phenotype-associated variants are highly enriched in candidate regulatory elements. Allele-specific analyses of gene regulation can further prioritize variants that likely have a functional effect on disease mechanisms; and emerging high-throughput assays to quantify the activity of candidate regulatory elements are a promising next step in that direction. Together, these technologies have created the ability to systematically and empirically test hypotheses about the function of noncoding variants and haplotypes at the scale needed for comprehensive and systematic follow-up of genetic association studies. Major coordinated efforts to quantify regulatory mechanisms across genetically diverse populations in increasingly realistic cell models would be highly beneficial to realize that potential. PMID:26430153

  10. Variable Complexity Optimization of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.

    2002-01-01

    The use of several levels of modeling in design has been dubbed variable complexity modeling. The work under the grant focused on developing variable complexity modeling strategies with emphasis on response surface techniques. Applications included design of stiffened composite plates for improved damage tolerance, the use of response surfaces for fitting weights obtained by structural optimization, and design against uncertainty using response surface techniques.

  11. No evidence for a genetic blueprint: The case of the "complex" mammalian photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Kumaramanickavel, G; Denton, M J; Legge, M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the intensity of the search for genes causing inherited retinal degenerations over the past 3 decades, of the approximately 200 disease genes identified to date, all appear to be ordinary housekeeping genes specifying proteins playing basic structural and functional roles in the mature photoreceptor cells. No genes or genetic elements have been identified which can be construed as having a specific morphogenic role, directing the development of the cytoarchitecture of any particular retinal cell. The evidence suggests that the cytoarchitecture of the retinal photoreceptors, although enormously complex, arises from the self-organization of the cells constituents without any regulation or direction from an external genetic blueprint.

  12. "Good enough solutions" and the genetics of complex diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, James N; Karma, Alain; MacLellan, W Robb; Deng, Mario; Rau, Christoph D; Rees, Colin M; Wang, Jessica; Wisniewski, Nicholas; Eskin, Eleazar; Horvath, Steve; Qu, Zhilin; Wang, Yibin; Lusis, Aldons J

    2012-08-03

    In this Emerging Science Review, we discuss a systems genetics strategy, which we call gene module association study (GMAS), as a novel approach complementing genome-wide association studies (GWAS), to understand complex diseases by focusing on how genes work together in groups rather than singly. The first step is to characterize phenotypic differences among a genetically diverse population. The second step is to use gene expression microarray (or other high-throughput) data from the population to construct gene coexpression networks. Coexpression analysis typically groups 20 000 genes into 20 to 30 modules containing tens to hundreds of genes, whose aggregate behavior can be represented by the module's "eigengene." The third step is to correlate expression patterns with phenotype, as in GWAS, only applied to eigengenes instead of single nucleotide polymorphisms. The goal of the GMAS approach is to identify groups of coregulated genes that explain complex traits from a systems perspective. From an evolutionary standpoint, we hypothesize that variability in eigengene patterns reflects the "good enough solution" concept, that biological systems are sufficiently complex so that many possible combinations of the same elements (in this case eigengenes) can produce an equivalent output, that is, a "good enough solution" to accomplish normal biological functions. However, when faced with environmental stresses, some "good enough solutions" adapt better than others, explaining individual variability to disease and drug susceptibility. If validated, GMAS may imply that common polygenic diseases are related as much to group interactions between normal genes, as to multiple gene mutations.

  13. The variation game: Cracking complex genetic disorders with NGS and omics data.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongzhu; Dhroso, Andi; Johnson, Nathan; Korkin, Dmitry

    2015-06-01

    Tremendous advances in Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) and high-throughput omics methods have brought us one step closer towards mechanistic understanding of the complex disease at the molecular level. In this review, we discuss four basic regulatory mechanisms implicated in complex genetic diseases, such as cancer, neurological disorders, heart disease, diabetes, and many others. The mechanisms, including genetic variations, copy-number variations, posttranscriptional variations, and epigenetic variations, can be detected using a variety of NGS methods. We propose that malfunctions detected in these mechanisms are not necessarily independent, since these malfunctions are often found associated with the same disease and targeting the same gene, group of genes, or functional pathway. As an example, we discuss possible rewiring effects of the cancer-associated genetic, structural, and posttranscriptional variations on the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network centered around P53 protein. The review highlights multi-layered complexity of common genetic disorders and suggests that integration of NGS and omics data is a critical step in developing new computational methods capable of deciphering this complexity.

  14. Structure of mammalian respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), one of the largest membrane-bound enzymes in the cell, powers ATP synthesis in mammalian mitochondria by using the reducing potential of NADH to drive protons across the inner membrane. Mammalian complex I1 contains 45 subunits, comprising 14 core subunits that house the catalytic machinery and are conserved from bacteria to humans, and a mammalian-specific cohort of 31 supernumerary subunits1,2. Knowledge about the structures and functions of the supernumerary subunits is fragmentary. Here, we describe a 4.2 Å resolution single-particle cryoEM structure of complex I from Bos taurus. We locate and model all 45 subunits to provide the entire structure of the mammalian complex. Furthermore, computational sorting of the particles identified different structural classes, related by subtle domain movements, which reveal conformationally-dynamic regions and match biochemical descriptions of the ‘active-to-deactive’ enzyme transition that occurs during hypoxia3,4. Thus, our structures provide a foundation for understanding complex I assembly5 and the effects of mutations that cause clinically-relevant complex I dysfunctions6, insights into the structural and functional roles of the supernumerary subunits, and new information on the mechanism and regulation of catalysis. PMID:27509854

  15. Genomic and Genetic Diversity within the Pseudomonas fluorescens Complex

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Sanz, Daniel; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Göker, Markus; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas fluorescens complex includes Pseudomonas strains that have been taxonomically assigned to more than fifty different species, many of which have been described as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) with potential applications in biocontrol and biofertilization. So far the phylogeny of this complex has been analyzed according to phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA, MLSA and inferred by whole-genome analysis. However, since most of the type strains have not been fully sequenced and new species are frequently described, correlation between taxonomy and phylogenomic analysis is missing. In recent years, the genomes of a large number of strains have been sequenced, showing important genomic heterogeneity and providing information suitable for genomic studies that are important to understand the genomic and genetic diversity shown by strains of this complex. Based on MLSA and several whole-genome sequence-based analyses of 93 sequenced strains, we have divided the P. fluorescens complex into eight phylogenomic groups that agree with previous works based on type strains. Digital DDH (dDDH) identified 69 species and 75 subspecies within the 93 genomes. The eight groups corresponded to clustering with a threshold of 31.8% dDDH, in full agreement with our MLSA. The Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI) approach showed inconsistencies regarding the assignment to species and to the eight groups. The small core genome of 1,334 CDSs and the large pan-genome of 30,848 CDSs, show the large diversity and genetic heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens complex. However, a low number of strains were enough to explain most of the CDSs diversity at core and strain-specific genomic fractions. Finally, the identification and analysis of group-specific genome and the screening for distinctive characters revealed a phylogenomic distribution of traits among the groups that provided insights into biocontrol and bioremediation applications as well as their role as PGPR. PMID:26915094

  16. Genetic programming approach to evaluate complexity of texture images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocca, Gianluigi; Corchs, Silvia; Gasparini, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    We adopt genetic programming (GP) to define a measure that can predict complexity perception of texture images. We perform psychophysical experiments on three different datasets to collect data on the perceived complexity. The subjective data are used for training, validation, and test of the proposed measure. These data are also used to evaluate several possible candidate measures of texture complexity related to both low level and high level image features. We select four of them (namely roughness, number of regions, chroma variance, and memorability) to be combined in a GP framework. This approach allows a nonlinear combination of the measures and could give hints on how the related image features interact in complexity perception. The proposed complexity measure M exhibits Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.890 on the training set, 0.728 on the validation set, and 0.724 on the test set. M outperforms each of all the single measures considered. From the statistical analysis of different GP candidate solutions, we found that the roughness measure evaluated on the gray level image is the most dominant one, followed by the memorability, the number of regions, and finally the chroma variance.

  17. Structure of nucleosome-HMG complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Paton, A.E.

    1982-12-01

    This dissertation concentrates on the structure of HMG-nucleosome complexes, and how they differ from nucleosomes alone. The first chapter provides an introduction to chromatin and an overview of the field. The second and third chapters describe what kinds of nucleosome-HMG protein complexes form in solution, and where the HMG proteins may bind on the nucleosome. A model is proposed that locates the HMG binding sites on the nucleosome core particle. The fourth chapter describes the biophysical characterization of the complex. The methods include thermal denaturation, circular dichroism and sedimentation velocity, all done under variety of solvent conditions. These methods reveal a great deal of information on the stability and interactions of the complex. The fifth chapter describes conformational probes of the complex. These results reveal the structural transitions that occur when HMG protein binds to the nucleosome as well as the parts of the nucleosome essential for the binding reaction.

  18. Structural Studies of Protein-Surfactant Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chodankar, S. N.; Aswal, V. K.; Wagh, A. G.

    2008-03-17

    The structure of protein-surfactant complexes of two proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). It is observed that these two proteins form different complex structures with the surfactant. While BSA protein undergoes unfolding on addition of surfactant, lysozyme does not show any unfolding even up to very high surfactant concentrations. The unfolding of BSA protein is caused by micelle-like aggregation of surfactant molecules in the complex. On the other hand, for lysozyme protein there is only binding of individual surfactant molecules to protein. Lysozyme in presence of higher surfactant concentrations has protein-surfactant complex structure coexisting with pure surfactant micelles.

  19. Stochastic transport through complex comb structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zaburdaev, V. Yu.; Popov, P. V.; Romanov, A. S.; Chukbar, K. V.

    2008-05-15

    A unified rigorous approach is used to derive fractional differential equations describing subdiffusive transport through comb structures of various geometrical complexity. A general nontrivial effect of the initial particle distribution on the subsequent evolution is exposed. Solutions having qualitative features of practical importance are given for joined structures with widely different fractional exponents.

  20. Genetic aspect of Alzheimer disease: Results of complex segregation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sadonvick, A.D.; Lee, I.M.L.; Bailey-Wilson, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the possibility that a single major locus will explain the segregation of Alzheimer disease (AD). The data were from the population-based AD Genetic Database and consisted of 402 consecutive, unrelated probands, diagnosed to have either `probable` or `autopsy confirmed` AD and their 2,245 first-degree relatives. In this analysis, a relative was considered affected with AD only when there were sufficient medical/autopsy data to support diagnosis of AD being the most likely cause of the dementia. Transmission probability models allowing for a genotype-dependent and logistically distributed age-of-onset were used. The program REGTL in the S.A.G.E. computer program package was used for a complex segregation analysis. The models included correction for single ascertainment. Regressive familial effects were not estimated. The data were analyzed to test for single major locus (SML), random transmission and no transmission (environmental) hypotheses. The results of the complex segregation analysis showed that (1) the SML was the best fit, and (2) the non-genetic models could be rejected.

  1. PEComa: morphology and genetics of a complex tumor family.

    PubMed

    Thway, Khin; Fisher, Cyril

    2015-10-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumors, or PEComas, are mesenchymal neoplasms composed of histologically and immunohistochemically distinctive epithelioid or spindle cells, which are immunoreactive for both smooth muscle and melanocytic markers. The cells in PEComas are typically arranged around blood vessels and appear to form the vessel wall, often infiltrating the smooth muscle of small- to medium-sized vessels. Periluminal cells are usually epithelioid and the more peripheral cells are spindle shaped. The cells have small, round to oval nuclei, sometimes with focal nuclear atypia, and clear to eosinophilic cytoplasm, and no counterpart normal cell has been identified. The PEComa "family" now includes angiomyolipoma, pulmonary clear cell "sugar" tumor and lymphangioleiomyomatosis, primary extrapulmonary sugar tumor, clear cell myomelanocytic tumor of the falciform ligament/ligamentum teres, abdominopelvic sarcoma of perivascular epithelioid cells, and other tumors with similar features at various sites that are simply termed PEComa. Some PEComas occur in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and share the genetic abnormalities. There is a behavioral spectrum from benign to frankly malignant, and histologic criteria have been proposed for assessing malignant potential. The differential diagnosis can include carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, other clear cell neoplasms, and adipocytic tumors. PEComas constitute a genetically diverse group that includes neoplasms harboring TFE3 gene rearrangements and those with TSC2 mutations, indicating alternative tumorigenic pathways. Recent advances in therapy of malignant PEComas relate to increased knowledge of specific genetic changes and their effects on metabolic pathways that are susceptible to specific interventions. We review PEComas, emphasizing the diagnostic spectrum and recent immunohistochemical and genetic findings.

  2. Frequency and Complexity of De Novo Structural Mutation in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Brandler, William M.; Antaki, Danny; Gujral, Madhusudan; Noor, Amina; Rosanio, Gabriel; Chapman, Timothy R.; Barrera, Daniel J.; Lin, Guan Ning; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Watts, Amanda C.; Wong, Lawrence C.; Estabillo, Jasper A.; Gadomski, Therese E.; Hong, Oanh; Fajardo, Karin V. Fuentes; Bhandari, Abhishek; Owen, Renius; Baughn, Michael; Yuan, Jeffrey; Solomon, Terry; Moyzis, Alexandra G.; Maile, Michelle S.; Sanders, Stephan J.; Reiner, Gail E.; Vaux, Keith K.; Strom, Charles M.; Zhang, Kang; Muotri, Alysson R.; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Leal, Suzanne M.; Pierce, Karen; Courchesne, Eric; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Corsello, Christina; Sebat, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have established that de novo duplications and deletions contribute to risk. However, ascertainment of structural variants (SVs) has been restricted by the coarse resolution of current approaches. By applying a custom pipeline for SV discovery, genotyping, and de novo assembly to genome sequencing of 235 subjects (71 affected individuals, 26 healthy siblings, and their parents), we compiled an atlas of 29,719 SV loci (5,213/genome), comprising 11 different classes. We found a high diversity of de novo mutations, the majority of which were undetectable by previous methods. In addition, we observed complex mutation clusters where combinations of de novo SVs, nucleotide substitutions, and indels occurred as a single event. We estimate a high rate of structural mutation in humans (20%) and propose that genetic risk for ASD is attributable to an elevated frequency of gene-disrupting de novo SVs, but not an elevated rate of genome rearrangement. PMID:27018473

  3. Frequency and Complexity of De Novo Structural Mutation in Autism.

    PubMed

    Brandler, William M; Antaki, Danny; Gujral, Madhusudan; Noor, Amina; Rosanio, Gabriel; Chapman, Timothy R; Barrera, Daniel J; Lin, Guan Ning; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Watts, Amanda C; Wong, Lawrence C; Estabillo, Jasper A; Gadomski, Therese E; Hong, Oanh; Fajardo, Karin V Fuentes; Bhandari, Abhishek; Owen, Renius; Baughn, Michael; Yuan, Jeffrey; Solomon, Terry; Moyzis, Alexandra G; Maile, Michelle S; Sanders, Stephan J; Reiner, Gail E; Vaux, Keith K; Strom, Charles M; Zhang, Kang; Muotri, Alysson R; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Leal, Suzanne M; Pierce, Karen; Courchesne, Eric; Iakoucheva, Lilia M; Corsello, Christina; Sebat, Jonathan

    2016-04-07

    Genetic studies of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have established that de novo duplications and deletions contribute to risk. However, ascertainment of structural variants (SVs) has been restricted by the coarse resolution of current approaches. By applying a custom pipeline for SV discovery, genotyping, and de novo assembly to genome sequencing of 235 subjects (71 affected individuals, 26 healthy siblings, and their parents), we compiled an atlas of 29,719 SV loci (5,213/genome), comprising 11 different classes. We found a high diversity of de novo mutations, the majority of which were undetectable by previous methods. In addition, we observed complex mutation clusters where combinations of de novo SVs, nucleotide substitutions, and indels occurred as a single event. We estimate a high rate of structural mutation in humans (20%) and propose that genetic risk for ASD is attributable to an elevated frequency of gene-disrupting de novo SVs, but not an elevated rate of genome rearrangement.

  4. The complex evolutionary history of big-eared horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus macrotis complex): insights from genetic, morphological and acoustic data

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Keping; Kimball, Rebecca T.; Liu, Tong; Wei, Xuewen; Jin, Longru; Jiang, Tinglei; Lin, Aiqing; Feng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Palaeoclimatic oscillations and different landscapes frequently result in complex population-level structure or the evolution of cryptic species. Elucidating the potential mechanisms is vital to understanding speciation events. However, such complex evolutionary patterns have rarely been reported in bats. In China, the Rhinolophus macrotis complex contains a large form and a small form, suggesting the existence of a cryptic bat species. Our field surveys found these two sibling species have a continuous and widespread distribution with partial sympatry. However, their evolutionary history has received little attention. Here, we used extensive sampling, morphological and acoustic data, as well as different genetic markers to investigate their evolutionary history. Genetic analyses revealed discordance between the mitochondrial and nuclear data. Mitochondrial data identified three reciprocally monophyletic lineages: one representing all small forms from Southwest China, and the other two containing all large forms from Central and Southeast China, respectively. The large form showed paraphyly with respect to the small form. However, clustering analyses of microsatellite and Chd1 gene sequences support two divergent clusters separating the large form and the small form. Moreover, morphological and acoustic analyses were consistent with nuclear data. This unusual pattern in the R. macrotis complex might be accounted for by palaeoclimatic oscillations, shared ancestral polymorphism and/or interspecific hybridization. PMID:27748429

  5. What's in a name; Genetic structure in Solanum section Petota studied using population-genetic tools

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The taxonomy and systematic relationships among species of Solanum section Petota are complicated and the section seems overclassified. Many of the presumed (sub)species from South America are very similar and they are able to exchange genetic material. We applied a population genetic approach to evaluate support for subgroups within this material, using AFLP data. Our approach is based on the following assumptions: (i) accessions that may exchange genetic material can be analyzed as if they are part of one gene pool, and (ii) genetic differentiation among species is expected to be higher than within species. Results A dataset of 566 South-American accessions (encompassing 89 species and subspecies) was analyzed in two steps. First, with the program STRUCTURE 2.2 in an 'unsupervised' procedure, individual accessions were assigned to inferred clusters based on genetic similarity. The results showed that the South American members of section Petota could be arranged in 16 clusters of various size and composition. Next, the accessions within the clusters were grouped by maximizing the partitioning of genetic diversity among subgroups (i.e., maximizing Fst values) for all available individuals of the accessions (2767 genotypes). This two-step approach produced an optimal partitioning into 44 groups. Some of the species clustered as genetically distinct groups, either on their own, or combined with one or more other species. However, accessions of other species were distributed over more than one cluster, and did not form genetically distinct units. Conclusions We could not find any support for 43 species (almost half of our dataset). For 28 species some level of support could be found varying from good to weak. For 18 species no conclusions could be drawn as the number of accessions included in our dataset was too low. These molecular data should be combined with data from morphological surveys, with geographical distribution data, and with information from

  6. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  7. Structural genomic variation in childhood epilepsies with complex phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Ingo; Swinkels, Marielle E M; Aten, Emmelien; Caliebe, Almuth; van 't Slot, Ruben; Boor, Rainer; von Spiczak, Sarah; Muhle, Hiltrud; Jähn, Johanna A; van Binsbergen, Ellen; van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno; Jansen, Floor E; Braun, Kees P J; de Haan, Gerrit-Jan; Tommerup, Niels; Stephani, Ulrich; Hjalgrim, Helle; Poot, Martin; Lindhout, Dick; Brilstra, Eva H; Møller, Rikke S; Koeleman, Bobby PC

    2014-01-01

    A genetic contribution to a broad range of epilepsies has been postulated, and particularly copy number variations (CNVs) have emerged as significant genetic risk factors. However, the role of CNVs in patients with epilepsies with complex phenotypes is not known. Therefore, we investigated the role of CNVs in patients with unclassified epilepsies and complex phenotypes. A total of 222 patients from three European countries, including patients with structural lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), dysmorphic features, and multiple congenital anomalies, were clinically evaluated and screened for CNVs. MRI findings including acquired or developmental lesions and patient characteristics were subdivided and analyzed in subgroups. MRI data were available for 88.3% of patients, of whom 41.6% had abnormal MRI findings. Eighty-eight rare CNVs were discovered in 71 out of 222 patients (31.9%). Segregation of all identified variants could be assessed in 42 patients, 11 of which were de novo. The frequency of all structural variants and de novo variants was not statistically different between patients with or without MRI abnormalities or MRI subcategories. Patients with dysmorphic features were more likely to carry a rare CNV. Genome-wide screening methods for rare CNVs may provide clues for the genetic etiology in patients with a broader range of epilepsies than previously anticipated, including in patients with various brain anomalies detectable by MRI. Performing genome-wide screens for rare CNVs can be a valuable contribution to the routine diagnostic workup in patients with a broad range of childhood epilepsies. PMID:24281369

  8. Fine-scale human genetic structure in Western France

    PubMed Central

    Karakachoff, Matilde; Duforet-Frebourg, Nicolas; Simonet, Floriane; Le Scouarnec, Solena; Pellen, Nadine; Lecointe, Simon; Charpentier, Eric; Gros, Françoise; Cauchi, Stéphane; Froguel, Philippe; Copin, Nane; Balkau, B; Ducimetière, P; Eschwège;, E; Alhenc-Gelas, F; Girault, A; Fumeron, F; Marre, M; Roussel, R; Bonnet, F; Cauchi, S; Froguel, P; Cogneau, J; Born, C; Caces, E; Cailleau, M; Lantieri, O; Moreau, J G; Rakotozafy, F; Tichet, J; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Probst, Vincent; Le Marec, Hervé; Molinaro, Sabrina; Balkau, Beverley; Redon, Richard; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Blum, Michael GB; Dina, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The difficulties arising from association analysis with rare variants underline the importance of suitable reference population cohorts, which integrate detailed spatial information. We analyzed a sample of 1684 individuals from Western France, who were genotyped at genome-wide level, from two cohorts D.E.S.I.R and CavsGen. We found that fine-scale population structure occurs at the scale of Western France, with distinct admixture proportions for individuals originating from the Brittany Region and the Vendée Department. Genetic differentiation increases with distance at a high rate in these two parts of Northwestern France and linkage disequilibrium is higher in Brittany suggesting a lower effective population size. When looking for genomic regions informative about Breton origin, we found two prominent associated regions that include the lactase region and the HLA complex. For both the lactase and the HLA regions, there is a low differentiation between Bretons and Irish, and this is also found at the genome-wide level. At a more refined scale, and within the Pays de la Loire Region, we also found evidence of fine-scale population structure, although principal component analysis showed that individuals from different departments cannot be confidently discriminated. Because of the evidence for fine-scale genetic structure in Western France, we anticipate that rare and geographically localized variants will be identified in future full-sequence analyses. PMID:25182131

  9. Fine-scale human genetic structure in Western France.

    PubMed

    Karakachoff, Matilde; Duforet-Frebourg, Nicolas; Simonet, Floriane; Le Scouarnec, Solena; Pellen, Nadine; Lecointe, Simon; Charpentier, Eric; Gros, Françoise; Cauchi, Stéphane; Froguel, Philippe; Copin, Nane; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Probst, Vincent; Le Marec, Hervé; Molinaro, Sabrina; Balkau, Beverley; Redon, Richard; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Blum, Michael Gb; Dina, Christian

    2015-06-01

    The difficulties arising from association analysis with rare variants underline the importance of suitable reference population cohorts, which integrate detailed spatial information. We analyzed a sample of 1684 individuals from Western France, who were genotyped at genome-wide level, from two cohorts D.E.S.I.R and CavsGen. We found that fine-scale population structure occurs at the scale of Western France, with distinct admixture proportions for individuals originating from the Brittany Region and the Vendée Department. Genetic differentiation increases with distance at a high rate in these two parts of Northwestern France and linkage disequilibrium is higher in Brittany suggesting a lower effective population size. When looking for genomic regions informative about Breton origin, we found two prominent associated regions that include the lactase region and the HLA complex. For both the lactase and the HLA regions, there is a low differentiation between Bretons and Irish, and this is also found at the genome-wide level. At a more refined scale, and within the Pays de la Loire Region, we also found evidence of fine-scale population structure, although principal component analysis showed that individuals from different departments cannot be confidently discriminated. Because of the evidence for fine-scale genetic structure in Western France, we anticipate that rare and geographically localized variants will be identified in future full-sequence analyses.

  10. Structural Changes in the Antennapedia Complex of Drosophila Pseudoobscura

    PubMed Central

    Randazzo, F. M.; Seeger, M. A.; Huss, C. A.; Sweeney, M. A.; Cecil, J. K.; Kaufman, T. C.

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of the striking positional conservation between the Antennapedia and Bithorax homeotic gene complexes (ANT-C and BX-C) in Drosophila melanogaster and the murine Hox and human HOX clusters has had a substantial impact on our understanding of the evolution of development and its genetic regulation. Structural differences do exist among the mammalian Hox complexes and the ANT-C in D. melanogaster. To gain further insight into the evolutionary changes among these complexes, the ANT-C was cloned in the closely related species, Drosophila pseudoobscura. The overall structure of the ANT-C in D. pseudoobscura is highly similar to its D. melanogaster counterpart; however, two differences in the organization of the ANT-C have been identified. First, the z2 gene, a member of the ANT-C in D. melanogaster, is not present in the D. pseudoobscura ANT-C and is possibly absent from the D. pseudoobscura genome. Second, the orientation of the Deformed gene is inverted in D. pseudoobscura, providing it with a 5' to 3' direction of transcription identical to the remaining ANT-C homeobox genes with the exception of fushi tarazu. These differences demonstrate that subtle changes can occur in ANT-C structure during relatively short periods of evolutionary divergence, although the fundamental organization of the complex is conserved. These observations and others suggest that the complex is not absolutely rigid but that selective pressures have maintained this organization of genes for some functional reason that remains elusive. PMID:8099892

  11. Robustness and structure of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai

    This dissertation covers the two major parts of my PhD research on statistical physics and complex networks: i) modeling a new type of attack -- localized attack, and investigating robustness of complex networks under this type of attack; ii) discovering the clustering structure in complex networks and its influence on the robustness of coupled networks. Complex networks appear in every aspect of our daily life and are widely studied in Physics, Mathematics, Biology, and Computer Science. One important property of complex networks is their robustness under attacks, which depends crucially on the nature of attacks and the structure of the networks themselves. Previous studies have focused on two types of attack: random attack and targeted attack, which, however, are insufficient to describe many real-world damages. Here we propose a new type of attack -- localized attack, and study the robustness of complex networks under this type of attack, both analytically and via simulation. On the other hand, we also study the clustering structure in the network, and its influence on the robustness of a complex network system. In the first part, we propose a theoretical framework to study the robustness of complex networks under localized attack based on percolation theory and generating function method. We investigate the percolation properties, including the critical threshold of the phase transition pc and the size of the giant component Pinfinity. We compare localized attack with random attack and find that while random regular (RR) networks are more robust against localized attack, Erdoḧs-Renyi (ER) networks are equally robust under both types of attacks. As for scale-free (SF) networks, their robustness depends crucially on the degree exponent lambda. The simulation results show perfect agreement with theoretical predictions. We also test our model on two real-world networks: a peer-to-peer computer network and an airline network, and find that the real-world networks

  12. Impulse Response Operators for Structural Complexes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-12

    systems of the complex. The statistical energy analysis (SEA) is one such a device [ 13, 14]. The rendering of SEA from equation (21) and/or (25) lies...Propagation.] 13. L. Cremer, M. Heckl, and E.E. Ungar 1973 Structure-Borne Sound (Springer Verlag). 14. R. H. Lyon 1975 Statistical Energy Analysis of

  13. Structure of Complex Verb Forms in Meiteilon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Lourembam Surjit

    2016-01-01

    This piece of work proposes to descriptively investigate the structures of complex verbs in Meiteilon. The categorization of such verbs is based on the nature of semantic and syntactic functions of a lexeme or verbal lexeme. A lexeme or verbal lexeme in Meiteilon may have multifunctional properties in the nature of occurrence. Such lexical items…

  14. Tetralogy of Fallot and Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome – Complex Clinical Phenotypes Meet Complex Genetic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lahm, Harald; Schön, Patric; Doppler, Stefanie; Dreßen, Martina; Cleuziou, Julie; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Ewert, Peter; Lange, Rüdiger; Krane, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In many cases congenital heart disease (CHD) is represented by a complex phenotype and an array of several functional and morphological cardiac disorders. These malformations will be briefly summarized in the first part focusing on two severe CHD phenotypes, hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). In most cases of CHD the genetic origin remains largely unknown, though the complexity of the clinical picture strongly argues against a dysregulation which can be attributed to a single candidate gene but rather suggests a multifaceted polygenetic origin with elaborate interactions. Consistent with this idea, genome-wide approaches using whole exome sequencing, comparative sequence analysis of multiplex families to identify de novo mutations and global technologies to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms, copy number variants, dysregulation of the transcriptome and epigenetic variations have been conducted to obtain information about genetic alterations and potential predispositions possibly linked to the occurrence of a CHD phenotype. In the second part of this review we will summarize and discuss the available literature on identified genetic alterations linked to TOF and HLHS. PMID:26069455

  15. Structural Architecture of SNP Effects on Complex Traits

    PubMed Central

    Gamazon, Eric R.; Cox, Nancy J.; Davis, Lea K.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the discovery of copy-number variation (CNV) across the genome nearly 10 years ago, current SNP-based analysis methodologies continue to collapse the homozygous (i.e., A/A), hemizygous (i.e., A/0), and duplicative (i.e., A/A/A) genotype states, treating the genotype variable as irreducible or unaltered by other colocalizing forms of genetic (e.g., structural) variation. Our understanding of common, genome-wide CNVs suggests that the canonical genotype construct might belie the enormous complexity of the genome. Here we present multiple analyses of several phenotypes and provide methods supporting a conceptual shift that embraces the structural dimension of genotype. We comprehensively investigate the impact of the structural dimension of genotype on (1) GWAS methods, (2) interpretation of rare LOF variants, (3) characterization of genomic architecture, and (4) implications for mapping loci involved in complex disease. Taken together, these results argue for the inclusion of a structural dimension and suggest that some portion of the “missing” heritability might be recovered through integration of the structural dimension of SNP effects on complex traits. PMID:25307299

  16. COMPLEX STRUCTURE IN CLASS 0 PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Looney, Leslie W.; Chiang, Hsin-Fang

    2010-04-01

    We use archived Infrared Array Camera images from the Spitzer Space Telescope to show that many Class 0 protostars exhibit complex, irregular, and non-axisymmetric structure within their dusty envelopes. Our 8 {mu}m extinction maps probe some of the densest regions in these protostellar envelopes. Many of the systems are observed to have highly irregular and non-axisymmetric morphologies on scales {approx}>1000 AU, with a quarter of the sample exhibiting filamentary or flattened dense structures. Complex envelope structure is observed in regions spatially distinct from outflow cavities, and the densest structures often show no systematic alignment perpendicular to the cavities. These results indicate that mass ejection is not responsible for much of the irregular morphologies we detect; rather, we suggest that the observed envelope complexity is mostly the result of collapse from protostellar cores with initially non-equilibrium structures. The striking non-axisymmetry in many envelopes could provide favorable conditions for the formation of binary systems. We also note that protostars in the sample appear to be formed preferentially near the edges of clouds or bends in filaments, suggesting formation by gravitational focusing.

  17. New knowledge-based genetic algorithm for excavator boom structural optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Haiyan; Lin, Shuwen

    2014-03-01

    Due to the insufficiency of utilizing knowledge to guide the complex optimal searching, existing genetic algorithms fail to effectively solve excavator boom structural optimization problem. To improve the optimization efficiency and quality, a new knowledge-based real-coded genetic algorithm is proposed. A dual evolution mechanism combining knowledge evolution with genetic algorithm is established to extract, handle and utilize the shallow and deep implicit constraint knowledge to guide the optimal searching of genetic algorithm circularly. Based on this dual evolution mechanism, knowledge evolution and population evolution can be connected by knowledge influence operators to improve the configurability of knowledge and genetic operators. Then, the new knowledge-based selection operator, crossover operator and mutation operator are proposed to integrate the optimal process knowledge and domain culture to guide the excavator boom structural optimization. Eight kinds of testing algorithms, which include different genetic operators, are taken as examples to solve the structural optimization of a medium-sized excavator boom. By comparing the results of optimization, it is shown that the algorithm including all the new knowledge-based genetic operators can more remarkably improve the evolutionary rate and searching ability than other testing algorithms, which demonstrates the effectiveness of knowledge for guiding optimal searching. The proposed knowledge-based genetic algorithm by combining multi-level knowledge evolution with numerical optimization provides a new effective method for solving the complex engineering optimization problem.

  18. Complex structures of dense lithium: Electronic origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyareva, V. F.

    2016-11-01

    Lithium—the lightest alkali metal exhibits unexpected structures and electronic behavior at high pressures. Like the heavier alkali metals, Li is bcc at ambient pressure and transforms first to fcc (at 7.5 GPa). The post-fcc high-pressure form Li-cI 16 (at 40-60 GPa) is similar to Na-cI 16 and related to more complex structures of heavy alkalis Rb-oC52 and Cs- oC84. The other high pressure phases for Li (oC88, oC40, oC24) observed at pressures up to 130 GPa are found only in Li. The different route of Li high-pressure structures correlates with its special electronic configuration containing the only 3 electrons (at 1s and 2s levels). Crystal structures for Li are analyzed within the model of Fermi sphere-Brillouin zone interactions. Stability of post-fcc structures for Li are supported by the Hume-Rothery arguments when new diffraction plains appear close to the Fermi level producing pseudogaps near the Fermi level and decreasing the crystal energy. The filling of Brillouin-Jones zones by electron states for a given structure defines the physical properties as optical reflectivity, electrical resistivity and superconductivity. To understand the complexity of structural and physical properties of Li above 60 GPa it is necessary to assume the valence electron band overlap with the core electrons and increase the valence electron count under compression.

  19. Dilated cardiomyopathy: the complexity of a diverse genetic architecture.

    PubMed

    Hershberger, Ray E; Hedges, Dale J; Morales, Ana

    2013-09-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in understanding the genetic basis of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Rare variants in >30 genes, some also involved in other cardiomyopathies, muscular dystrophy, or syndromic disease, perturb a diverse set of important myocardial proteins to produce a final DCM phenotype. Large, publicly available datasets have provided the opportunity to evaluate previously identified DCM-causing mutations, and to examine the population frequency of sequence variants similar to those that have been observed to cause DCM. The frequency of these variants, whether associated with dilated or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, is greater than estimates of disease prevalence. This mismatch might be explained by one or more of the following possibilities: that the penetrance of DCM-causing mutations is lower than previously thought, that some variants are noncausal, that DCM prevalence is higher than previously estimated, or that other more-complex genomics underlie DCM. Reassessment of our assumptions about the complexity of the genomic and phenomic architecture of DCM is warranted. Much about the genomic basis of DCM remains to be investigated, which will require comprehensive genomic studies in much larger cohorts of rigorously phenotyped probands and family members than previously examined.

  20. Characterization of large structural genetic mosaicism in human autosomes.

    PubMed

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Zhou, Weiyin; Sampson, Joshua N; Dean, Michael C; Jacobs, Kevin B; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise A; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Cook, Linda S; Crous Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M; Gaudet, Mia M; Haiman, Christopher A; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiung, Chao A; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J; Jessop, Lea; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Robert; Kraft, Peter; Lan, Qing; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Risch, Harvey A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Seow, Adeline; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; VanDen Berg, David; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Yi-Long; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Abnet, Christian C; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Berndt, Sonja I; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Bracci, Paige M; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary A; Carreón, Tania; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chung, Charles C; Cook, Michael B; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G; Ding, Ti; Duell, Eric J; Epstein, Caroline G; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fuchs, Charles S; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M; Greene, Mark H; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Curtis C; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Nan; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C; LaCroix, Andrea; Landgren, Annelie; Landi, Maria Teresa; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Malats, Nuria; McGlynn, Katherine A; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Mirabello, Lisa; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark; Qiao, You-Lin; Rabe, Kari G; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X; Riboli, Elio; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Savage, Sharon A; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Silverman, Debra T; Spitz, Margaret R; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R; Teras, Lauren R; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Viswanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K; Wolpin, Brian M; Wu, Xifeng; Wunder, Jay S; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Ziegler, Regina G; de Andrade, Mariza; Barnes, Kathleen C; Beaty, Terri H; Bierut, Laura J; Desch, Karl C; Doheny, Kimberly F; Feenstra, Bjarke; Ginsburg, David; Heit, John A; Kang, Jae H; Laurie, Cecilia A; Li, Jun Z; Lowe, William L; Marazita, Mary L; Melbye, Mads; Mirel, Daniel B; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelson, Sarah C; Pasquale, Louis R; Rice, Kenneth; Wiggs, Janey L; Wise, Anastasia; Tucker, Margaret; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Laurie, Cathy C; Caporaso, Neil E; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J

    2015-03-05

    Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10(-31)) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population.

  1. Genetic evidence of peripheral isolation and low diversity in marginal populations of the Acropora hyacinthus complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Go; Keshavmurthy, Shashank; Hayashibara, Takeshi; Wallace, Carden C.; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Chen, Chaolun Allen; Fukami, Hironobu

    2016-12-01

    Zooxanthellate corals are found throughout the tropics, but also extend into subtropical and marginal locations due to the presence of warm ocean currents. The population history of corals in marginal locations is of great interest in relation to changing global climatic conditions, as species edge zones might play an important role in evolutionary innovation. Here, we examine the genetic structure of a widely distributed coral species complex, Acropora hyacinthus, from tropical to high subtropical regions along the Kuroshio Current in Taiwan and Japan. Population genetic analysis of 307 specimens from 18 locations (7 reefal and 11 marginal) identified at least four genetic lineages within the A. hyacinthus complex: HyaA, HyaB, HyaC (dominating reefal locations) and HyaD dominating marginal locations in mainland Japan and Taiwan, except the upper Penghu Islands, which were dominated by HyaC. Crossing experiments suggested semi-incompatibility and hybridization between HyaC and D from reefal locations, implying that the existence of hybridization partners enhances diversification and genetic diversity. An incomplete barrier between the HyaC and HyaD dominations was found along the two straits in the Ryukyu Islands, where Kuroshio Current flows constantly. Despite geographical distance, the genetic composition of populations in mainland Japan was comparable to that in mainland Taiwan, which may reflect a region-specific connectivity around the northern limit of A. hyacinthus in the Pacific. In contrast, populations in the Ryukyu Islands were not significantly different from those of Palau and the Great Barrier Reef. While the precise taxonomic nature of the lineages found around the Kuroshio Current remains to be elucidated, these results indicate that, despite the presence of four lineages in the Kuroshio triangle, low genetic diversity populations of the two main lines might be isolating and differentiating in the marginal region.

  2. Inter-annual maintenance of the fine-scale genetic structure in a biennial plant.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Javier; Gómez, José María; García, Cristina; Sharbel, Timothy F; Jiménez, María Noelia; Perfectti, Francisco

    2016-11-24

    Within plant populations, space-restricted gene movement, together with environmental heterogeneity, can result in a spatial variation in gene frequencies. In biennial plants, inter-annual flowering migrants can homogenize gene frequencies between consecutive cohorts. However, the actual impact of these migrants on spatial genetic variation remains unexplored. Here, we used 10 nuclear microsatellite and one plastid genetic marker to characterize the spatial genetic structure within two consecutive cohorts in a population of the biennial plant Erysimum mediohispanicum (Brassicaceae). We explored the maintenance of this structure between consecutive flowering cohorts at different levels of complexity, and investigated landscape effects on gene flow. We found that cohorts were not genetically differentiated and showed a spatial genetic structure defined by a negative genetic-spatial correlation at fine scale that varied in intensity with compass directions. This spatial genetic structure was maintained when comparing plants from different cohorts. Additionally, genotypes were consistently associated with environmental factors such as light availability and soil composition, but to a lesser extent compared with the spatial autocorrelation. We conclude that inter-annual migrants, in combination with limited seed dispersal and environmental heterogeneity, play a major role in shaping and maintaining the spatial genetic structure among cohorts in this biennial plant.

  3. Inter-annual maintenance of the fine-scale genetic structure in a biennial plant

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Javier; Gómez, José María; García, Cristina; Sharbel, Timothy F.; Jiménez, María Noelia; Perfectti, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Within plant populations, space-restricted gene movement, together with environmental heterogeneity, can result in a spatial variation in gene frequencies. In biennial plants, inter-annual flowering migrants can homogenize gene frequencies between consecutive cohorts. However, the actual impact of these migrants on spatial genetic variation remains unexplored. Here, we used 10 nuclear microsatellite and one plastid genetic marker to characterize the spatial genetic structure within two consecutive cohorts in a population of the biennial plant Erysimum mediohispanicum (Brassicaceae). We explored the maintenance of this structure between consecutive flowering cohorts at different levels of complexity, and investigated landscape effects on gene flow. We found that cohorts were not genetically differentiated and showed a spatial genetic structure defined by a negative genetic-spatial correlation at fine scale that varied in intensity with compass directions. This spatial genetic structure was maintained when comparing plants from different cohorts. Additionally, genotypes were consistently associated with environmental factors such as light availability and soil composition, but to a lesser extent compared with the spatial autocorrelation. We conclude that inter-annual migrants, in combination with limited seed dispersal and environmental heterogeneity, play a major role in shaping and maintaining the spatial genetic structure among cohorts in this biennial plant. PMID:27883087

  4. Genetic structure of Mesoamerican populations of Big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) inferred from microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Novick, Rachel Roth; Dick, Christopher W; Lemes, Maristerra R; Navarro, Carlos; Caccone, Adalgisa; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2003-11-01

    While microsatellites have been used to examine genetic structure in local populations of Neotropical trees, genetic studies based on such high-resolution markers have not been carried out for Mesoamerica as a whole. Here we assess the genetic structure of the Mesoamerican mahogany Swietenia macrophylla King (big-leaf mahogany), a Neotropical tree species recently listed as endangered in CITES which is commercially extinct through much of its native range. We used seven variable microsatellite loci to assess genetic diversity and population structure in eight naturally established mahogany populations from six Mesoamerican countries. Measures of genetic differentiation (FST and RST) indicated significant differences between most populations. Unrooted dendrograms based on genetic distances between populations provide evidence of strong phylogeographic structure in Mesoamerican mahogany. The two populations on the Pacific coasts of Costa Rica and Panama were genetically distant from all the others, and from one another. The remaining populations formed two clusters, one comprised of the northern populations of Mexico, Belize and Guatemala and the other containing the southern Atlantic populations of Nicaragua and Costa Rica. Significant correlation was found between geographical distance and all pairwise measures of genetic divergence, suggesting the importance of regional biogeography and isolation by distance in Mesoamerican mahogany. The results of this study demonstrate greater phylogeographic structure than has been found across Amazon basin S. macrophylla. Our findings suggest a relatively complex Mesoamerican biogeographic history and lead to the prediction that other Central American trees will show similar patterns of regional differentiation.

  5. The Knowledge Structure of Mendelian Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Angelo; Stewart, James H.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the content knowledge of genetics as it is organized for solving effect-to-cause problems. Reviews proposed reasons explaining why students find genetics difficult to learn. Explains dominant and codominant inheritance patterns, multiple alleles, and X-linkage. (RT)

  6. Genetic algorithms applied to nonlinear and complex domains

    SciTech Connect

    Barash, Danny

    1999-06-01

    The dissertation, titled ''Genetic Algorithms Applied to Nonlinear and Complex Domains'', describes and then applies a new class of powerful search algorithms (GAS) to certain domains. GAS are capable of solving complex and nonlinear problems where many parameters interact to produce a ''final'' result such as the optimization of the laser pulse in the interaction of an atom with an intense laser field. GAS can very efficiently locate the global maximum by searching parameter space in problems which are unsuitable for a search using traditional methods. In particular, the dissertation contains new scientific findings in two areas. First, the dissertation examines the interaction of an ultra-intense short laser pulse with atoms. GAS are used to find the optimal frequency for stabilizing atoms in the ionization process. This leads to a new theoretical formulation, to explain what is happening during the ionization process and how the electron is responding to finite (real-life) laser pulse shapes. It is shown that the dynamics of the process can be very sensitive to the ramp of the pulse at high frequencies. The new theory which is formulated, also uses a novel concept (known as the (t,t') method) to numerically solve the time-dependent Schrodinger equation Second, the dissertation also examines the use of GAS in modeling decision making problems. It compares GAS with traditional techniques to solve a class of problems known as Markov Decision Processes. The conclusion of the dissertation should give a clear idea of where GAS are applicable, especially in the physical sciences, in problems which are nonlinear and complex, i.e. difficult to analyze by other means.

  7. Genetic algorithms applied to nonlinear and complex domains

    SciTech Connect

    Barash, Danny

    1999-06-01

    The dissertation, titled ''Genetic Algorithms Applied to Nonlinear and Complex Domains'', describes and then applies a new class of powerful search algorithms (GAS) to certain domains. GAS are capable of solving complex and nonlinear problems where many parameters interact to produce a final result such as the optimization of the laser pulse in the interaction of an atom with an intense laser field. GAS can very efficiently locate the global maximum by searching parameter space in problems which are unsuitable for a search using traditional methods. In particular, the dissertation contains new scientific findings in two areas. First, the dissertation examines the interaction of an ultra-intense short laser pulse with atoms. GAS are used to find the optimal frequency for stabilizing atoms in the ionization process. This leads to a new theoretical formulation, to explain what is happening during the ionization process and how the electron is responding to finite (real-life) laser pulse shapes. It is shown that the dynamics of the process can be very sensitive to the ramp of the pulse at high frequencies. The new theory which is formulated, also uses a novel concept (known as the (t,t') method) to numerically solve the time-dependent Schrodinger equation Second, the dissertation also examines the use of GAS in modeling decision making problems. It compares GAS with traditional techniques to solve a class of problems known as Markov Decision Processes. The conclusion of the dissertation should give a clear idea of where GAS are applicable, especially in the physical sciences, in problems which are nonlinear and complex, i.e. difficult to analyze by other means.

  8. Ocean circulation model predicts high genetic structure observed in a long-lived pelagic developer.

    PubMed

    Sunday, J M; Popovic, I; Palen, W J; Foreman, M G G; Hart, M W

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the movement of genes and individuals across marine seascapes is a long-standing challenge in marine ecology and can inform our understanding of local adaptation, the persistence and movement of populations, and the spatial scale of effective management. Patterns of gene flow in the ocean are often inferred based on population genetic analyses coupled with knowledge of species' dispersive life histories. However, genetic structure is the result of time-integrated processes and may not capture present-day connectivity between populations. Here, we use a high-resolution oceanographic circulation model to predict larval dispersal along the complex coastline of western Canada that includes the transition between two well-studied zoogeographic provinces. We simulate dispersal in a benthic sea star with a 6-10 week pelagic larval phase and test predictions of this model against previously observed genetic structure including a strong phylogeographic break within the zoogeographical transition zone. We also test predictions with new genetic sampling in a site within the phylogeographic break. We find that the coupled genetic and circulation model predicts the high degree of genetic structure observed in this species, despite its long pelagic duration. High genetic structure on this complex coastline can thus be explained through ocean circulation patterns, which tend to retain passive larvae within 20-50 km of their parents, suggesting a necessity for close-knit design of Marine Protected Area networks.

  9. Structure of bacterial respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Berrisford, John M; Baradaran, Rozbeh; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2016-07-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) plays a central role in cellular energy production, coupling electron transfer between NADH and quinone to proton translocation. It is the largest protein assembly of respiratory chains and one of the most elaborate redox membrane proteins known. Bacterial enzyme is about half the size of mitochondrial and thus provides its important "minimal" model. Dysfunction of mitochondrial complex I is implicated in many human neurodegenerative diseases. The L-shaped complex consists of a hydrophilic arm, where electron transfer occurs, and a membrane arm, where proton translocation takes place. We have solved the crystal structures of the hydrophilic domain of complex I from Thermus thermophilus, the membrane domain from Escherichia coli and recently of the intact, entire complex I from T. thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 iron-sulphur clusters, 64 transmembrane helices). The 95Å long electron transfer pathway through the enzyme proceeds from the primary electron acceptor flavin mononucleotide through seven conserved Fe-S clusters to the unusual elongated quinone-binding site at the interface with the membrane domain. Four putative proton translocation channels are found in the membrane domain, all linked by the central flexible axis containing charged residues. The redox energy of electron transfer is coupled to proton translocation by the as yet undefined mechanism proposed to involve long-range conformational changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  10. Imaging beneath complex structure: a case history

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, B.; Larner, K.; Chambers, R.

    1983-08-01

    Migration is recognized as the essential step in converting seismic data into a representation of the earth's subsurface structure. Ironically, conventional migration often fails where migration is needed most - when the data are recorded over complex structures. In the Central American example, velocities increase nearly two-fold across an arched and thrust-faulted interface. Wave-front distortion introduced by this feature gives rise to distorted reflection from depth. Even with interval velocity known perfectly, no velocity is proper for time migrating the data here; time migration is the wrong process because it does not honor Snell's law. Depth migration of the stacked data, on the other hand, produces a reasonable image of the deeper section. The depth migration, however, leaves artifacts that could be attributed to problems that are common in structurally complicated areas: (1) departures of the stacked section from the ideal, a zero-offset section, (2) incorrect specification of velocities, and (3) loss of energy transmitted through the complex zone. For such an inhomogeneous velocity structure, shortcoming in CDP stacking are related directly to highly nonhyperbolic moveout. As with migration velocity, no proper stacking velocity can be developed for these data, even from the known interval-velocity model. Proper treatment of nonzero-offset reflection data could be accomplished by depth migration before stacking. Simple ray-theoretical correction of the complex moveouts, however, can produce a stack that is similar to the desired zero-offset section.

  11. Ethical and legal issues arising from complex genetic disorders. DOE final report

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Lori

    2002-10-09

    The project analyzed the challenges raised by complex genetic disorders in genetic counselling, for clinical practice, for public health, for quality assurance, and for protection against discrimination. The research found that, in some settings, solutions created in the context of single gene disorders are more difficult to apply to complex disorders. In other settings, the single gene solutions actually backfired and created additional problems when applied to complex genetic disorders. The literature of five common, complex genetic disorders--Alzheimer's, asthma, coronary heart disease, diabetes, and psychiatric illnesses--was evaluated in depth.

  12. Empirical Complexities in the Genetic Foundations of Lethal Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bull, James J.; Joyce, Paul; Gladstone, Eric; Molineux, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    From population genetics theory, elevating the mutation rate of a large population should progressively reduce average fitness. If the fitness decline is large enough, the population will go extinct in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. Lethal mutagenesis has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach to viral treatment, and several in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. Yet only one empirical study has tested the genetic models underlying lethal mutagenesis, and the theory failed on even a qualitative level. Here we provide a new level of analysis of lethal mutagenesis by developing and evaluating models specifically tailored to empirical systems that may be used to test the theory. We first quantify a bias in the estimation of a critical parameter and consider whether that bias underlies the previously observed lack of concordance between theory and experiment. We then consider a seemingly ideal protocol that avoids this bias—mutagenesis of virions—but find that it is hampered by other problems. Finally, results that reveal difficulties in the mere interpretation of mutations assayed from double-strand genomes are derived. Our analyses expose unanticipated complexities in testing the theory. Nevertheless, the previous failure of the theory to predict experimental outcomes appears to reside in evolutionary mechanisms neglected by the theory (e.g., beneficial mutations) rather than from a mismatch between the empirical setup and model assumptions. This interpretation raises the specter that naive attempts at lethal mutagenesis may augment adaptation rather than retard it. PMID:23934886

  13. Genetic and environmental influences on the longitudinal structure of neuroticism: a trait-state approach.

    PubMed

    Laceulle, Odilia M; Ormel, Johan; Aggen, Steven H; Neale, Michael C; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we sought to elucidate both stable and changing factors in the longitudinal structure of neuroticism using a behavioral genetic twin design. We tested whether this structure is best accounted for by a trait-state, a trait-only, or a state-only model. In line with classic views on personality, our results revealed substantial trait and state components. The contributions of genetic and environmental influences on the trait component were nearly equal, whereas environmental influences on the state component were much stronger than genetic influences. Although the overall findings were similar for older and younger twins, genetic influences on the trait component were stronger than environmental influences in younger twins, whereas the opposite was found for older twins. The current findings help to elucidate how the complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors contributes to both stability and change in neuroticism.

  14. Variable Complexity Structural Optimization of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Venkataraman, Satchi

    1999-01-01

    Structural designers today face both opportunities and challenges in a vast array of available analysis and optimization programs. Some programs such as NASTRAN, are very general, permitting the designer to model any structure, to any degree of accuracy, but often at a higher computational cost. Additionally, such general procedures often do not allow easy implementation of all constraints of interest to the designer. Other programs, based on algebraic expressions used by designers one generation ago, have limited applicability for general structures with modem materials. However, when applicable, they provide easy understanding of design decisions trade-off. Finally, designers can also use specialized programs suitable for designing efficiently a subset of structural problems. For example, PASCO and PANDA2 are panel design codes, which calculate response and estimate failure much more efficiently than general-purpose codes, but are narrowly applicable in terms of geometry and loading. Therefore, the problem of optimizing structures based on simultaneous use of several models and computer programs is a subject of considerable interest. The problem of using several levels of models in optimization has been dubbed variable complexity modeling. Work under NASA grant NAG1-2110 has been concerned with the development of variable complexity modeling strategies with special emphasis on response surface techniques. In addition, several modeling issues for the design of shells of revolution were studied.

  15. Variable Complexity Structural Optimization of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Venkataraman, Satchi

    1998-01-01

    Structural designers today face both opportunities and challenges in a vast array of available analysis and optimization programs. Some programs such as NASTRAN, are very general, permitting the designer to model any structure, to any degree of accuracy, but often at a higher computational cost. Additionally, such general procedures often do not allow easy implementation of all constraints of interest to the designer. Other programs, based on algebraic expressions used by designers one generation ago, have limited applicability for general structures with modem materials. However, when applicable, they provide easy understanding of design decisions trade-off. Finally, designers can also use specialized programs suitable for designing efficiently a subset of structural problems. For example, PASCO and PANDA2 are panel design codes, which calculate response and estimate failure much more efficiently than general-purpose codes, but are narrowly applicable in terms of geometry and loading. Therefore, the problem of optimizing structures based on simultaneous use of several models and computer programs is a subject of considerable interest. The problem of using several levels of models in optimization has been dubbed variable complexity modeling. Work under NASA grant NAG1-1808 has been concerned with the development of variable complexity modeling strategies with special emphasis on response surface techniques. In addition several modeling issues for the design of shells of revolution were studied.

  16. Extreme genetic structure in a social bird species despite high dispersal capacity.

    PubMed

    Morinha, Francisco; Dávila, José A; Bastos, Estela; Cabral, João A; Frías, Óscar; González, José L; Travassos, Paulo; Carvalho, Diogo; Milá, Borja; Blanco, Guillermo

    2017-02-21

    Social barriers have been shown to reduce gene flow and contribute to genetic structure among populations in species with high cognitive capacity and complex societies, such as cetaceans, apes and humans. In birds, high dispersal capacity is thought to prevent population divergence unless major geographical or habitat barriers induce isolation patterns by dispersal, colonization or adaptation limitation. We report that Iberian populations of the red-billed chough, a social, gregarious corvid with high dispersal capacity, show a striking degree of genetic structure composed of at least 15 distinct genetic units. Monitoring of marked individuals over 30 years revealed that long-distance movements over hundreds of kilometres are common, yet recruitment into breeding populations is infrequent and highly philopatric. Genetic differentiation is weakly related to geographical distance, and habitat types used are overall qualitatively similar among regions and regularly shared by individuals of different populations, so that genetic structure is unlikely to be due solely to isolation by distance or isolation by adaptation. Moreover, most population nuclei showed relatively high levels of genetic diversity, suggesting a limited role for genetic drift in significantly differentiating populations. We propose that social mechanisms may underlie this unprecedented level of genetic structure in birds through a pattern of isolation by social barriers not yet described, which may have driven this remarkable population divergence in the absence of geographical and environmental barriers.

  17. A genome wide survey of SNP variation reveals the genetic structure of sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Kijas, James W; Townley, David; Dalrymple, Brian P; Heaton, Michael P; Maddox, Jillian F; McGrath, Annette; Wilson, Peter; Ingersoll, Roxann G; McCulloch, Russell; McWilliam, Sean; Tang, Dave; McEwan, John; Cockett, Noelle; Oddy, V Hutton; Nicholas, Frank W; Raadsma, Herman

    2009-01-01

    The genetic structure of sheep reflects their domestication and subsequent formation into discrete breeds. Understanding genetic structure is essential for achieving genetic improvement through genome-wide association studies, genomic selection and the dissection of quantitative traits. After identifying the first genome-wide set of SNP for sheep, we report on levels of genetic variability both within and between a diverse sample of ovine populations. Then, using cluster analysis and the partitioning of genetic variation, we demonstrate sheep are characterised by weak phylogeographic structure, overlapping genetic similarity and generally low differentiation which is consistent with their short evolutionary history. The degree of population substructure was, however, sufficient to cluster individuals based on geographic origin and known breed history. Specifically, African and Asian populations clustered separately from breeds of European origin sampled from Australia, New Zealand, Europe and North America. Furthermore, we demonstrate the presence of stratification within some, but not all, ovine breeds. The results emphasize that careful documentation of genetic structure will be an essential prerequisite when mapping the genetic basis of complex traits. Furthermore, the identification of a subset of SNP able to assign individuals into broad groupings demonstrates even a small panel of markers may be suitable for applications such as traceability.

  18. Structural mapping: how to study the genetic architecture of a phenotypic trait through its formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chunfa; Shen, Lianying; Lv, Yafei; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Xiaoling; Feng, Sisi; Li, Xin; Sui, Yihan; Pang, Xiaoming; Wu, Rongling

    2014-01-01

    Traditional approaches for genetic mapping are to simply associate the genotypes of a quantitative trait locus (QTL) with the phenotypic variation of a complex trait. A more mechanistic strategy has emerged to dissect the trait phenotype into its structural components and map specific QTLs that control the mechanistic and structural formation of a complex trait. We describe and assess such a strategy, called structural mapping, by integrating the internal structural basis of trait formation into a QTL mapping framework. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been instrumental for describing the structural components of a phenotypic trait and their interactions. By building robust mathematical models on circuit EIS data and embedding these models within a mixture model-based likelihood for QTL mapping, structural mapping implements the EM algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of QTL genotype-specific EIS parameters. The uniqueness of structural mapping is to make it possible to test a number of hypotheses about the pattern of the genetic control of structural components. We validated structural mapping by analyzing an EIS data collected for QTL mapping of frost hardiness in a controlled cross of jujube trees. The statistical properties of parameter estimates were examined by simulation studies. Structural mapping can be a powerful alternative for genetic mapping of complex traits by taking account into the biological and physical mechanisms underlying their formation.

  19. Population genetic structure of Aedes albopictus in Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Zawani, M K N; Abu, H A; Sazaly, A B; Zary, S Y; Darlina, M N

    2014-10-07

    The mosquito Aedes albopictus is indigenous to Southeast Asian and is a vector for arbovirus diseases. Studies examining the population genetics structure of A. albopictus have been conducted worldwide; however, there are no documented reports on the population genetic structure of A. albopictus in Malaysia, particularly in Penang. We examined the population genetics of A. albopictus based on a 445-base pair segment of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase 1 gene among 77 individuals from 9 localities representing 4 regions (Seberang Perai Utara, Seberang Perai Tengah, Northeast, and Southwest) of Penang. A total of 37 haplotypes were detected, including 28 unique haplotypes. The other 9 haplotypes were shared among various populations. These shared haplotypes reflect the weak population genetic structure of A. albopictus. The phylogenetic tree showed a low bootstrap value with no genetic structure, which was supported by minimum spanning network analysis. Analysis of mismatch distribution showed poor fit of equilibrium distribution. The genetic distance showed low genetic variation, while pairwise FST values showed no significant difference between all regions in Penang except for some localities. High haplotype diversity and low nucleotide diversity was observed for cytochrome oxidase 1 mtDNA. We conclude that there is no population genetic structure of A. albopictus mosquitoes in the Penang area.

  20. Structure of the haptoglobin-haemoglobin complex.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Torvund-Jensen, Morten; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; de Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto; Hersleth, Hans-Petter; Andersen, Niels Højmark; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Andersen, Gregers Rom; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2012-09-20

    Red cell haemoglobin is the fundamental oxygen-transporting molecule in blood, but also a potentially tissue-damaging compound owing to its highly reactive haem groups. During intravascular haemolysis, such as in malaria and haemoglobinopathies, haemoglobin is released into the plasma, where it is captured by the protective acute-phase protein haptoglobin. This leads to formation of the haptoglobin-haemoglobin complex, which represents a virtually irreversible non-covalent protein-protein interaction. Here we present the crystal structure of the dimeric porcine haptoglobin-haemoglobin complex determined at 2.9 Å resolution. This structure reveals that haptoglobin molecules dimerize through an unexpected β-strand swap between two complement control protein (CCP) domains, defining a new fusion CCP domain structure. The haptoglobin serine protease domain forms extensive interactions with both the α- and β-subunits of haemoglobin, explaining the tight binding between haptoglobin and haemoglobin. The haemoglobin-interacting region in the αβ dimer is highly overlapping with the interface between the two αβ dimers that constitute the native haemoglobin tetramer. Several haemoglobin residues prone to oxidative modification after exposure to haem-induced reactive oxygen species are buried in the haptoglobin-haemoglobin interface, thus showing a direct protective role of haptoglobin. The haptoglobin loop previously shown to be essential for binding of haptoglobin-haemoglobin to the macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 (ref. 3) protrudes from the surface of the distal end of the complex, adjacent to the associated haemoglobin α-subunit. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements of human haptoglobin-haemoglobin bound to the ligand-binding fragment of CD163 confirm receptor binding in this area, and show that the rigid dimeric complex can bind two receptors. Such receptor cross-linkage may facilitate scavenging and explain the increased functional affinity of

  1. Genetic structure and extinction of the woolly mammoth, Mammuthus primigenius.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Ian; Shapiro, Beth; Lister, Adrian; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Sher, Andrei; Guthrie, Dale; Thomas, Mark G

    2007-06-19

    The interval since circa 50 Ka has been a period of significant species extinctions among the large mammal fauna. However, the relative roles of an increasing human presence and a synchronous series of complex environmental changes in these extinctions have yet to be fully resolved. Recent analyses of fossil material from Beringia have clarified our understanding of the spatiotemporal pattern of Late Pleistocene extinctions, identifying periods of population turnover well before the last glacial maximum (LGM: circa 21 Ka) or subsequent human expansion. To examine the role of pre-LGM population changes in shaping the genetic structure of an extinct species, we analyzed the mitochondrial DNA of woolly mammoths in western Beringia and across its range. We identify genetic signatures of a range expansion of mammoths, from eastern to western Beringia, after the last interglacial (circa 125 Ka), and then an extended period during which demographic inference indicates no population-size increase. The most marked change in diversity at this time is the loss of one of two major mitochondrial lineages.

  2. Structural alignment of RNA with complex pseudoknot structure.

    PubMed

    Wong, Thomas K F; Lam, T W; Sung, Wing-Kin; Cheung, Brenda W Y; Yiu, S M

    2011-01-01

    The secondary structure of an ncRNA molecule is known to play an important role in its biological functions. Aligning a known ncRNA to a target candidate to determine the sequence and structural similarity helps in identifying de novo ncRNA molecules that are in the same family of the known ncRNA. However, existing algorithms cannot handle complex pseudoknot structures which are found in nature. In this article, we propose algorithms to handle two types of complex pseudoknots: simple non-standard pseudoknots and recursive pseudoknots. Although our methods are not designed for general pseudoknots, it already covers all known ncRNAs in both Rfam and PseudoBase databases. An evaluation of our algorithms shows that it is useful to identify ncRNA molecules in other species which are in the same family of a known ncRNA.

  3. Higher-order genetic interactions and their contribution to complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Matthew B.; Ehrenreich, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of genetic interactions involving three or more loci to complex traits is poorly understood. Because these higher-order genetic interactions (HGIs) are difficult to detect in genetic mapping studies, very few examples of them have been described. However, the lack of data on HGIs should not be misconstrued as proof that this class of genetic effect is unimportant. To the contrary, evidence from model organisms suggests that HGIs frequently influence genetic studies and contribute to many complex traits. Here, we review the growing literature on HGIs and discuss the future of research on this topic. PMID:25284288

  4. Microsatellite variation reveals weak genetic structure and retention of genetic variability in threatened Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) within a Snake River watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neville, Helen; Issacs, Frank B.; Thurow, Russel; Dunham, J.B.; Rieman, B.

    2007-01-01

    Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) have been central to the development of management concepts associated with evolutionarily significant units (ESUs), yet there are still relatively few studies of genetic diversity within threatened and endangered ESUs for salmon or other species. We analyzed genetic variation at 10 microsatellite loci to evaluate spatial population structure and genetic variability in indigenous Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) across a large wilderness basin within a Snake River ESU. Despite dramatic 20th century declines in abundance, these populations retained robust levels of genetic variability. No significant genetic bottlenecks were found, although the bottleneck metric (M ratio) was significantly correlated with average population size and variability. Weak but significant genetic structure existed among tributaries despite evidence of high levels of gene flow, with the strongest genetic differentiation mirroring the physical segregation of fish from two sub-basins. Despite the more recent colonization of one sub-basin and differences between sub-basins in the natural level of fragmentation, gene diversity and genetic differentiation were similar between sub-basins. Various factors, such as the (unknown) genetic contribution of precocial males, genetic compensation, lack of hatchery influence, and high levels of current gene flow may have contributed to the persistence of genetic variability in this system in spite of historical declines. This unique study of indigenous Chinook salmon underscores the importance of maintaining natural populations in interconnected and complex habitats to minimize losses of genetic diversity within ESUs.

  5. Structure of a human translation termination complex

    PubMed Central

    Matheisl, Sarah; Berninghausen, Otto; Becker, Thomas; Beckmann, Roland

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to bacteria that have two release factors, RF1 and RF2, eukaryotes only possess one unrelated release factor eRF1, which recognizes all three stop codons of the mRNA and hydrolyses the peptidyl-tRNA bond. While the molecular basis for bacterial termination has been elucidated, high-resolution structures of eukaryotic termination complexes have been lacking. Here we present a 3.8 Å structure of a human translation termination complex with eRF1 decoding a UAA(A) stop codon. The complex was formed using the human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) stalling peptide, which perturbs the peptidyltransferase center (PTC) to silence the hydrolysis activity of eRF1. Moreover, unlike sense codons or bacterial stop codons, the UAA stop codon adopts a U-turn-like conformation within a pocket formed by eRF1 and the ribosome. Inducing the U-turn conformation for stop codon recognition rationalizes how decoding by eRF1 includes monitoring geometry in order to discriminate against sense codons. PMID:26384426

  6. Structurally robust control of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, Jose C.; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Robust control theory has been successfully applied to numerous real-world problems using a small set of devices called controllers. However, the real systems represented by networks contain unreliable components and modern robust control engineering has not addressed the problem of structural changes on complex networks including scale-free topologies. Here, we introduce the concept of structurally robust control of complex networks and provide a concrete example using an algorithmic framework that is widely applied in engineering. The developed analytical tools, computer simulations, and real network analyses lead herein to the discovery that robust control can be achieved in scale-free networks with exactly the same order of controllers required in a standard nonrobust configuration by adjusting only the minimum degree. The presented methodology also addresses the probabilistic failure of links in real systems, such as neural synaptic unreliability in Caenorhabditis elegans, and suggests a new direction to pursue in studies of complex networks in which control theory has a role.

  7. The Structure and Dynamics of Economic Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Cesar A.

    2011-03-01

    Can network science help us understand the structure and evolution of the global economy? In this talk I summarize recent research that uses networks and complexity science to describe and explain the evolution of the mix of products that countries, and cities, produce and export. First, I show how to use information on the network connecting industries to locations to measure the complexity of an economy. Using these measures I demonstrate that countries tend to approach a level of income that is dictated by the complexity of their economies. Next, I study the evolution of economic complexity by showing that it is constrained by a coordination problem that countries, and cities, deal with using three different channels: First, they move to products that are close by, in the Product Space, to the products that they already do. Second, they are more likely to develop a product if a geographical neighbor has already developed it. And third, they follow the nestedness of the network connecting industries to locations. Finally, I introduce a simple model to account for the stylized facts uncovered in the previous sections.

  8. Morphologically complex protostellar envelopes : structure and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.

    I present an in-depth study of protostars and their surrounding envelopes of dense gas and dust, using a multitude of observational methods to reveal new details of the star formation process. I use mid-infrared imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope, combined with photometry spanning the near-infrared to millimeter wavelengths, to construct a model of the L1527 protostellar system. I modeled both the spectral energy distribution and resolved scattered light images to determine physical properties of the protostellar system. The nature of the apparent central point source in the Spitzer images was uncertain until high-resolution L-band imaging from the Gemini observatory resolved the point source into a disk in scattered light, having a radius of 200 AU. Protostellar envelopes are also often found to cast shadows against the 8 micron Galactic background in Spitzer imaging, enabling direct probes of envelope structure. The shadow images show that the dense envelopes around twenty-two Class 0 protostars are generally morphologically complex from 0.1 pc scales down to ˜1000 AU; they are often filamentary, and frequently non-axisymmetric. The observed envelope structure indicates a likely origin in turbulent cloud structure rather than a quasi-static/equilibrium formation. The complex envelope structure also may indicate an increased likelihood of fragmentation during collapse, forming close binaries. To further characterize these envelopes, I have observed them in the dense molecular gas tracers nthp and nht, both of which closely follow the 8 micron extinction morphology. The magnitude of the velocity gradients and envelope complexity on ˜10000 AU scales indicates that the velocity structure may reflect large-scale infall in addition to the often assumed rotation. Comparisons with three-dimensional filamentary and symmetric rotating collapse models reinforce the interpretation of velocities reflecting large-scale infall, showing that the structure of the envelope

  9. Temporal Stability of Genetic Structure in a Mesopelagic Copepod.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Erica; Andrews, Kimberly R; Peijnenburg, Katja T C A; Portner, Elan; Norton, Emily L

    2015-01-01

    Although stochasticity in oceanographic conditions is known to be an important driver of temporal genetic change in many marine species, little is known about whether genetically distinct plankton populations can persist in open ocean habitats. A prior study demonstrated significant population genetic structure among oceanic gyres in the mesopelagic copepod Haloptilus longicornis in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and we hypothesized that populations within each gyre represent distinct gene pools that persist over time. We tested this expectation through basin-scale sampling across the Atlantic Ocean in 2010 and 2012. Using both mitochondrial (mtCOII) and microsatellite markers (7 loci), we show that the genetic composition of populations was stable across two years in both the northern and southern subtropical gyres. Genetic variation in this species was partitioned among ocean gyres (FCT = 0.285, P < 0.0001 for mtCOII, FCT = 0.013, P < 0.0001 for microsatellites), suggesting strong spatial population structure, but no significant partitioning was found among sampling years. This temporal persistence of population structure across a large geographic scale was coupled with chaotic genetic patchiness at smaller spatial scales, but the magnitude of genetic differentiation was an order of magnitude lower at these smaller scales. Our results demonstrate that genetically distinct plankton populations persist over time in highly-dispersive open ocean habitats, and this is the first study to rigorously test for temporal stability of large scale population structure in the plankton.

  10. Temporal Stability of Genetic Structure in a Mesopelagic Copepod

    PubMed Central

    Goetze, Erica; Andrews, Kimberly R.; Peijnenburg, Katja T. C. A.; Portner, Elan; Norton, Emily L.

    2015-01-01

    Although stochasticity in oceanographic conditions is known to be an important driver of temporal genetic change in many marine species, little is known about whether genetically distinct plankton populations can persist in open ocean habitats. A prior study demonstrated significant population genetic structure among oceanic gyres in the mesopelagic copepod Haloptilus longicornis in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and we hypothesized that populations within each gyre represent distinct gene pools that persist over time. We tested this expectation through basin-scale sampling across the Atlantic Ocean in 2010 and 2012. Using both mitochondrial (mtCOII) and microsatellite markers (7 loci), we show that the genetic composition of populations was stable across two years in both the northern and southern subtropical gyres. Genetic variation in this species was partitioned among ocean gyres (FCT = 0.285, P < 0.0001 for mtCOII, FCT = 0.013, P < 0.0001 for microsatellites), suggesting strong spatial population structure, but no significant partitioning was found among sampling years. This temporal persistence of population structure across a large geographic scale was coupled with chaotic genetic patchiness at smaller spatial scales, but the magnitude of genetic differentiation was an order of magnitude lower at these smaller scales. Our results demonstrate that genetically distinct plankton populations persist over time in highly-dispersive open ocean habitats, and this is the first study to rigorously test for temporal stability of large scale population structure in the plankton. PMID:26302332

  11. Genetic structure and differentiation in cultivated fig (Ficus carica L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One hundred ninety-four germplasm accessions of fig representing the four fig types, Common, Smyrna, San Pedro, and Caprifig were analyzed for genetic diversity, structure, and differentiation using genetic polymorphism at 17 microsatellite loci. The collection showed considerable polymorphism with ...

  12. Landscape-level spatial genetic structure in Quercus acutissima (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Chung, Mi Yoon; Nason, John; Chung, Myong Gi; Kim, Ki-Joong; Park, Chong-Wook; Sun, Byung-Yun; Pak, Jae-Hong

    2002-08-01

    Quercus acutissima (Fagaceae), a deciduous broad-leaved tree, is an important forest element in hillsides of South Korea. We used allozyme loci, Wright's F statistics, and multilocus spatial autocorrelation statistics to examine the distribution of genetic diversity within and among three local populations and the spatial genetic structure at a landscape scale (15 ha, 250 × 600 m) on Oenaro Island, South Korea. Levels of genetic diversity in Q. acutissima populations were comparable to mean values for other oak species. A moderate but significant deficit of heterozygotes (mean F(IS) = 0.069) was detected within local populations and low but significant differentiation was observed among populations (F(ST) = 0.010). Spatial autocorrelation analyses revealed little evidence of significant genetic structure at spatial scales of 100-120 m. The failure to detect genetic structure within populations may be due to intraspecific competition or random mortality among saplings, resulting in extensive thinning within maternal half-sib groups. Alternatively, low genetic differentiation at the landscape scale indicates substantial gene flow among local populations. Although wind-borne pollen may be the primary source of gene flow in Q. acutissima, these results suggest that acorn movement by animals may be more extensive than previously anticipated. Comparison of these genetic data for Oenaro Island with a disturbed isolated inland population suggests that population-to-population differences in internal genetic structure may be influenced by local variation in regeneration environment (e.g., disturbance).

  13. Refined Genetic Algorithms for Polypeptide Structure Prediction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    designing no v el proteins, in deco ding the information obtained from the Human Genome Pro ject (91), in designing new drugs, and in trying to...function that assigns tness v alues to p ossible solutions and an enco de/ deco de b et w een the algorithm and problem spaces. Al- though these metho ds...genetic algorithms: In tro duction and o v erview of curren t researc h. Parallel Genetic Algorithms, pages 5{35, 1993. 22. Bruce S. Duncan . P arallel ev

  14. Understanding macroalgal dispersal in a complex hydrodynamic environment: a combined population genetic and physical modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Georgina; Kregting, Louise; Beatty, Gemma E; Cole, Claudia; Elsäßer, Björn; Savidge, Graham; Provan, Jim

    2014-06-06

    Gene flow in macroalgal populations can be strongly influenced by spore or gamete dispersal. This, in turn, is influenced by a convolution of the effects of current flow and specific plant reproductive strategies. Although several studies have demonstrated genetic variability in macroalgal populations over a wide range of spatial scales, the associated current data have generally been poorly resolved spatially and temporally. In this study, we used a combination of population genetic analyses and high-resolution hydrodynamic modelling to investigate potential connectivity between populations of the kelp Laminaria digitata in the Strangford Narrows, a narrow channel characterized by strong currents linking the large semi-enclosed sea lough, Strangford Lough, to the Irish Sea. Levels of genetic structuring based on six microsatellite markers were very low, indicating high levels of gene flow and a pattern of isolation-by-distance, where populations are more likely to exchange migrants with geographically proximal populations, but with occasional long-distance dispersal. This was confirmed by the particle tracking model, which showed that, while the majority of spores settle near the release site, there is potential for dispersal over several kilometres. This combined population genetic and modelling approach suggests that the complex hydrodynamic environment at the entrance to Strangford Lough can facilitate dispersal on a scale exceeding that proposed for L. digitata in particular, and the majority of macroalgae in general. The study demonstrates the potential of integrated physical-biological approaches for the prediction of ecological changes resulting from factors such as anthropogenically induced coastal zone changes.

  15. An efficient genetic algorithm for structure prediction at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Lazauskas, Tomas; Sokol, Alexey A; Woodley, Scott M

    2017-03-17

    We have developed and implemented a new global optimization technique based on a Lamarckian genetic algorithm with the focus on structure diversity. The key process in the efficient search on a given complex energy landscape proves to be the removal of duplicates that is achieved using a topological analysis of candidate structures. The careful geometrical prescreening of newly formed structures and the introduction of new mutation move classes improve the rate of success further. The power of the developed technique, implemented in the Knowledge Led Master Code, or KLMC, is demonstrated by its ability to locate and explore a challenging double funnel landscape of a Lennard-Jones 38 atom system (LJ38). We apply the redeveloped KLMC to investigate three chemically different systems: ionic semiconductor (ZnO)1-32, metallic Ni13 and covalently bonded C60. All four systems have been systematically explored on the energy landscape defined using interatomic potentials. The new developments allowed us to successfully locate the double funnels of LJ38, find new local and global minima for ZnO clusters, extensively explore the Ni13 and C60 (the buckminsterfullerene, or buckyball) potential energy surfaces.

  16. Parallel Structural Evolution of Mitochondrial Ribosomes and OXPHOS Complexes.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Eli O; Bauerschmitt, Heike; Becker, Thomas; Mielke, Thorsten; Frauenfeld, Jens; Berninghausen, Otto; Neupert, Walter; Herrmann, Johannes M; Beckmann, Roland

    2015-04-09

    The five macromolecular complexes that jointly mediate oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in mitochondria consist of many more subunits than those of bacteria, yet, it remains unclear by which evolutionary mechanism(s) these novel subunits were recruited. Even less well understood is the structural evolution of mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes): while it was long thought that their exceptionally high protein content would physically compensate for their uniquely low amount of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), this hypothesis has been refuted by structural studies. Here, we present a cryo-electron microscopy structure of the 73S mitoribosome from Neurospora crassa, together with genomic and proteomic analyses of mitoribosome composition across the eukaryotic domain. Surprisingly, our findings reveal that both structurally and compositionally, mitoribosomes have evolved very similarly to mitochondrial OXPHOS complexes via two distinct phases: A constructive phase that mainly acted early in eukaryote evolution, resulting in the recruitment of altogether approximately 75 novel subunits, and a reductive phase that acted during metazoan evolution, resulting in gradual length-reduction of mitochondrially encoded rRNAs and OXPHOS proteins. Both phases can be well explained by the accumulation of (slightly) deleterious mutations and deletions, respectively, in mitochondrially encoded rRNAs and OXPHOS proteins. We argue that the main role of the newly recruited (nuclear encoded) ribosomal- and OXPHOS proteins is to provide structural compensation to the mutationally destabilized mitochondrially encoded components. While the newly recruited proteins probably provide a selective advantage owing to their compensatory nature, and while their presence may have opened evolutionary pathways toward novel mitochondrion-specific functions, we emphasize that the initial events that resulted in their recruitment was nonadaptive in nature. Our framework is supported by population genetic

  17. Structured analysis and modeling of complex systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strome, David R.; Dalrymple, Mathieu A.

    1992-01-01

    The Aircrew Evaluation Sustained Operations Performance (AESOP) facility at Brooks AFB, Texas, combines the realism of an operational environment with the control of a research laboratory. In recent studies we collected extensive data from the Airborne Warning and Control Systems (AWACS) Weapons Directors subjected to high and low workload Defensive Counter Air Scenarios. A critical and complex task in this environment involves committing a friendly fighter against a hostile fighter. Structured Analysis and Design techniques and computer modeling systems were applied to this task as tools for analyzing subject performance and workload. This technology is being transferred to the Man-Systems Division of NASA Johnson Space Center for application to complex mission related tasks, such as manipulating the Shuttle grappler arm.

  18. The Impact of Evolutionary Driving Forces on Human Complex Diseases: A Population Genetics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Saeb, Amr T. M.; Al-Naqeb, Dhekra

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the molecular evolution of human genome has paved the way to understand genetic adaptation of humans to the environmental changes and corresponding complex diseases. In this review, we discussed the historical origin of genetic diversity among human populations, the evolutionary driving forces that can affect genetic diversity among populations, and the effects of human movement into new environments and gene flow on population genetic diversity. Furthermore, we presented the role of natural selection on genetic diversity and complex diseases. Then we reviewed the disadvantageous consequences of historical selection events in modern time and their relation to the development of complex diseases. In addition, we discussed the effect of consanguinity on the incidence of complex diseases in human populations. Finally, we presented the latest information about the role of ancient genes acquired from interbreeding with ancient hominids in the development of complex diseases. PMID:27313952

  19. Simulating Vibrations in a Complex Loaded Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Tim T.

    2005-01-01

    The Dynamic Response Computation (DIRECT) computer program simulates vibrations induced in a complex structure by applied dynamic loads. Developed to enable rapid analysis of launch- and landing- induced vibrations and stresses in a space shuttle, DIRECT also can be used to analyze dynamic responses of other structures - for example, the response of a building to an earthquake, or the response of an oil-drilling platform and attached tanks to large ocean waves. For a space-shuttle simulation, the required input to DIRECT includes mathematical models of the space shuttle and its payloads, and a set of forcing functions that simulates launch and landing loads. DIRECT can accommodate multiple levels of payload attachment and substructure as well as nonlinear dynamic responses of structural interfaces. DIRECT combines the shuttle and payload models into a single structural model, to which the forcing functions are then applied. The resulting equations of motion are reduced to an optimum set and decoupled into a unique format for simulating dynamics. During the simulation, maximum vibrations, loads, and stresses are monitored and recorded for subsequent analysis to identify structural deficiencies in the shuttle and/or payloads.

  20. Phylogeography and Population Genetic Structure of the Ornate Dragon Lizard, Ctenophorus ornatus

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Esther; Kennington, W. Jason; Tomkins, Joseph L.; LeBas, Natasha R.

    2012-01-01

    Species inhabiting ancient, geologically stable landscapes that have been impacted by agriculture and urbanisation are expected to have complex patterns of genetic subdivision due to the influence of both historical and contemporary gene flow. Here, we investigate genetic differences among populations of the granite outcrop-dwelling lizard Ctenophorus ornatus, a phenotypically variable species with a wide geographical distribution across the south-west of Western Australia. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequence data revealed two distinct evolutionary lineages that have been isolated for more than four million years within the C. ornatus complex. This evolutionary split is associated with a change in dorsal colouration of the lizards from deep brown or black to reddish-pink. In addition, analysis of microsatellite data revealed high levels of genetic structuring within each lineage, as well as strong isolation by distance at multiple spatial scales. Among the 50 outcrop populations’ analysed, non-hierarchical Bayesian clustering analysis revealed the presence of 23 distinct genetic groups, with outcrop populations less than 4 km apart usually forming a single genetic group. When a hierarchical analysis was carried out, almost every outcrop was assigned to a different genetic group. Our results show there are multiple levels of genetic structuring in C. ornatus, reflecting the influence of both historical and contemporary evolutionary processes. They also highlight the need to recognise the presence of two evolutionarily distinct lineages when making conservation management decisions on this species. PMID:23049697

  1. Genetic Structure and Potential Environmental Determinants of Local Genetic Diversity in Japanese Honeybees (Apis cerana japonica)

    PubMed Central

    Nagamitsu, Teruyoshi; Yasuda, Mika; Saito-Morooka, Fuki; Inoue, Maki N.; Nishiyama, Mio; Goka, Koichi; Sugiura, Shinji; Maeto, Kaoru; Okabe, Kimiko; Taki, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    Declines in honeybee populations have been a recent concern. Although causes of the declines remain unclear, environmental factors may be responsible. We focused on the potential environmental determinants of local populations of wild honeybees, Apis cerana japonica, in Japan. This subspecies has little genetic variation in terms of its mitochondrial DNA sequences, and genetic variations at nuclear loci are as yet unknown. We estimated the genetic structure and environmental determinants of local genetic diversity in nuclear microsatellite genotypes of fathers and mothers, inferred from workers collected at 139 sites. The genotypes of fathers and mothers showed weak isolation by distance and negligible genetic structure. The local genetic diversity was high in central Japan, decreasing toward the peripheries, and depended on the climate and land use characteristics of the sites. The local genetic diversity decreased as the annual precipitation increased, and increased as the proportion of urban and paddy field areas increased. Positive effects of natural forest area, which have also been observed in terms of forager abundance in farms, were not detected with respect to the local genetic diversity. The findings suggest that A. cerana japonica forms a single population connected by gene flow in its main distributional range, and that climate and landscape properties potentially affect its local genetic diversity. PMID:27898704

  2. Genetic structure of the world's polar bear populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paetkau, David; Amstrup, Steven C.; Born, E.W.; Calvert, W.; Derocher, A.E.; Garner, G.W.; Messier, F.; Stirling, I.; Taylor, M.K.; Wiig, O.; Strobeck, C.

    1999-01-01

    We studied genetic structure in polar bear (Ursus maritimus) populations by typing a sample of 473 individuals spanning the species distribution at 16 highly variable microsatellite loci. No genetic discontinuities were found that would be consistent with evolutionarily significant periods of isolation between groups. Direct comparison of movement data and genetic data from the Canadian Arctic revealed a highly significant correlation. Genetic data generally supported existing population (management unit) designations, although there were two cases where genetic data failed to differentiate between pairs of populations previously resolved by movement data. A sharp contrast was found between the minimal genetic structure observed among populations surrounding the polar basin and the presence of several marked genetic discontinuities in the Canadian Arctic. The discontinuities in the Canadian Arctic caused the appearance of four genetic clusters of polar bear populations. These clusters vary in total estimated population size from 100 to over 10 000, and the smallest may merit a relatively conservative management strategy in consideration of its apparent isolation. We suggest that the observed pattern of genetic discontinuities has developed in response to differences in the seasonal distribution and pattern of sea ice habitat and the effects of these differences on the distribution and abundance of seals.

  3. Characterization of Large Structural Genetic Mosaicism in Human Autosomes

    PubMed Central

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Zhou, Weiyin; Sampson, Joshua N.; Dean, Michael C.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise A.; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Cook, Linda S.; Crous Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J.; Jessop, Lea; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Robert; Kraft, Peter; Lan, Qing; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Risch, Harvey A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Seow, Adeline; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; VanDen Berg, David; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Yi-Long; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Abnet, Christian C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Blot, William J.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Bracci, Paige M.; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary A.; Carreón, Tania; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chung, Charles C.; Cook, Michael B.; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G.; Ding, Ti; Duell, Eric J.; Epstein, Caroline G.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Greene, Mark H.; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Curtis C.; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hu, Nan; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C.; LaCroix, Andrea; Landgren, Annelie; Landi, Maria Teresa; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Malats, Nuria; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Mirabello, Lisa; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark; Qiao, You-Lin; Rabe, Kari G.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X.; Riboli, Elio; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Savage, Sharon A.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Silverman, Debra T.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R.; Teras, Lauren R.; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Viswanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wu, Xifeng; Wunder, Jay S.; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Ziegler, Regina G.; de Andrade, Mariza; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Beaty, Terri H.; Bierut, Laura J.; Desch, Karl C.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Ginsburg, David; Heit, John A.; Kang, Jae H.; Laurie, Cecilia A.; Li, Jun Z.; Lowe, William L.; Marazita, Mary L.; Melbye, Mads; Mirel, Daniel B.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nelson, Sarah C.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Rice, Kenneth; Wiggs, Janey L.; Wise, Anastasia; Tucker, Margaret; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10−31) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population. PMID:25748358

  4. A genetic algorithm approach in interface and surface structure optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    The thesis is divided into two parts. In the first part a global optimization method is developed for the interface and surface structures optimization. Two prototype systems are chosen to be studied. One is Si[001] symmetric tilted grain boundaries and the other is Ag/Au induced Si(111) surface. It is found that Genetic Algorithm is very efficient in finding lowest energy structures in both cases. Not only existing structures in the experiments can be reproduced, but also many new structures can be predicted using Genetic Algorithm. Thus it is shown that Genetic Algorithm is a extremely powerful tool for the material structures predictions. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the explanation of an experimental observation of thermal radiation from three-dimensional tungsten photonic crystal structures. The experimental results seems astounding and confusing, yet the theoretical models in the paper revealed the physics insight behind the phenomena and can well reproduced the experimental results.

  5. Dispersal and genetic structure in the American marten, Martes americana.

    PubMed

    Broquet, T; Johnson, C A; Petit, E; Thompson, I; Burel, F; Fryxell, J M

    2006-05-01

    Natal dispersal in a vagile carnivore, the American marten (Martes americana), was studied by comparing radio-tracking data and microsatellite genetic structure in two populations occupying contrasting habitats. The genetic differentiation determined among groups of individuals using F(ST) indices appeared to be weak in both landscapes, and showed no increase with geographical distance. Genetic structure investigated using pairwise genetic distances between individuals conversely showed a pattern of isolation by distance (IBD), but only in the population occurring in a homogeneous high-quality habitat, therefore showing the advantage of individual-based analyses in detecting within-population processes and local landscape effects. The telemetry study of juveniles revealed a leptokurtic distribution of dispersal distances in both populations, and estimates of the mean squared parent-offspring axial distance (sigma2) inferred both from the genetic pattern of IBD and from the radio-tracking survey showed that most juveniles make little contribution to gene flow.

  6. The Spectrum of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency: Clinical, Biochemical and Genetic Features in 371 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kavi P.; O'Brien, Thomas W.; Subramony, Sankarasubramon H.; Shuster, Jonathan; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Context Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) deficiency is a genetic mitochondrial disorder commonly associated with lactic acidosis, progressive neurological and neuromuscular degeneration and, usually, death during childhood. There has been no recent comprehensive analysis of the natural history and clinical course of this disease. Objective We reviewed 371 cases of PDC deficiency, published between 1970-2010, that involved defects in subunits E1α and E1β and components E1, E2, E3 and the E3 Binding Protein of the complex. Data Sources and Extraction English language peer-reviewed publications were identified, primarily by using PubMed and Google Scholar search engines. Results Neurodevelopmental delay and hypotonia were the commonest clinical signs of PDC deficiency. Structural brain abnormalities frequently included ventriculomegaly, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum and neuroimaging findings typical of Leigh syndrome. Neither gender nor any clinical or neuroimaging feature differentiated the various biochemical etiologies of the disease. Patients who died were younger, presented clinically earlier and had higher blood lactate levels and lower residual enzyme activities than subjects who were still alive at the time of reporting. Survival bore no relationship to the underlying biochemical or genetic abnormality or to gender. Conclusions Although the clinical spectrum of PDC deficiency is broad, the dominant clinical phenotype includes presentation during the first year of life; neurological and neuromuscular degeneration; structural lesions revealed by neuroimaging; lactic acidosis and a blood lactate:pyruvate ratio ≤20. PMID:22079328

  7. The spectrum of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency: Clinical, biochemical and genetic features in 371 patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kavi P.; O’Brien, Thomas W.; Subramony, Sankarasubramon H.; Shuster, Jonathan; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Context Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) deficiency is a genetic mitochondrial disorder commonly associated with lactic acidosis, progressive neurological and neuromuscular degeneration and, usually, death during childhood. There has been no recent comprehensive analysis of the natural history and clinical course of this disease. Objective We reviewed 371 cases of PDC deficiency, published between 1970 and 2010, that involved defects in subunits E1α and E1β and components E1, E2, E3 and the E3 binding protein of the complex. Data sources and extraction English language peer-reviewed publications were identified, primarily by using PubMed and Google Scholar search engines. Results Neurodevelopmental delay and hypotonia were the commonest clinical signs of PDC deficiency. Structural brain abnormalities frequently included ventriculomegaly, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum and neuroimaging findings typical of Leigh syndrome. Neither gender nor any clinical or neuroimaging feature differentiated the various biochemical etiologies of the disease. Patients who died were younger, presented clinically earlier and had higher blood lactate levels and lower residual enzyme activities than subjects who were still alive at the time of reporting. Survival bore no relationship to the underlying biochemical or genetic abnormality or to gender. Conclusions Although the clinical spectrum of PDC deficiency is broad, the dominant clinical phenotype includes presentation during the first year of life; neurological and neuromuscular degeneration; structural lesions revealed by neuroimaging; lactic acidosis and a blood lactate:pyruvate ratio≤20. PMID:22896851

  8. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Population Genetic Structure of Corylus mandshurica in China Using SSR Markers.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Tian-Tian; Ma, Qing-Hua; Liang, Li-Song; Wang, Gui-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Corylus mandshurica, also known as pilose hazelnut, is an economically and ecologically important species in China. In this study, ten polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were applied to evaluate the genetic diversity and population structure of 348 C. mandshurica individuals among 12 populations in China. The SSR markers expressed a relatively high level of genetic diversity (Na = 15.3, Ne = 5.6604, I = 1.8853, Ho = 0.6668, and He = 0.7777). According to the coefficient of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.1215), genetic variation within the populations (87.85%) were remarkably higher than among populations (12.15%). The average gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) significantly impacts the genetic structure of C. mandshurica populations. The relatively high gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) among wild C. mandshurica may be caused by wind-pollinated flowers, highly nutritious seeds and self-incompatible mating system. The UPGMA (unweighted pair group method of arithmetic averages) dendrogram was divided into two main clusters. Moreover, the results of STRUCTURE analysis suggested that C. mandshurica populations fell into two main clusters. Comparison of the UPGMA dendrogram and the Bayesian STRUCTURE analysis showed general agreement between the population subdivisions and the genetic relationships among populations of C. mandshurica. Group I accessions were located in Northeast China, while Group II accessions were in North China. It is worth noting that a number of genetically similar populations were located in the same geographic region. The results further showed that there was obvious genetic differentiation among populations from Northeast China to North China. Results from the Mantel test showed a weak but still significant positive correlation between Nei's genetic distance and geographic distance (km) among populations (r = 0.419, P = 0.005), suggesting that genetic differentiation in the 12 C. mandshurica populations might be related to geographic distance. These

  9. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Complex Biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi

    2005-03-01

    For over a century vitamin B12 and its enzyme cofactor derivates have persistently attracted research efforts for their vital biological role, unique Co-C bonding, rich red-ox chemistry, and recently their candidacies as drug delivery vehicles etc. However, our understanding of this complex metalorganic molecule's efficient enzyme activated catalytic power is still controversial. We have for the first time calculated the electronic structure, Mulliken effective charge and bonding of a whole Vitamin B12 molecule without any structural simplification by first- principles approaches based on density functional theory using structures determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction. A partial density of states analysis shows excellent agreement with X-ray absorption data and has been used successfully to interpret measured optical absorption spectra. Mulliken bonding analysis of B12 and its derivatives reveal noticeable correlations between the two axial ligands which could be exploited by the enzyme to control the catalytic process. Our calculated X-ray near edge structure of B12 and its derivates using Slater's transition state theory are also in good agreement with experiments. The same approach has been applied to other B12 derivatives, ferrocene peptides, and recently DNA molecules.

  10. Genetic structure of European sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Lawson Handley, L-J; Byrne, K; Santucci, F; Townsend, S; Taylor, M; Bruford, M W; Hewitt, G M

    2007-12-01

    Large-scale evaluations of genetic diversity in domestic livestock populations are necessary so that region-specific conservation measures can be implemented. We performed the first such survey in European sheep by analysing 820 individuals from 29 geographically and phenotypically diverse breeds and a closely related wild species at 23 microsatellite loci. In contrast to most other domestic species, we found evidence of widespread heterozygote deficit within breeds, even after removing loci with potentially high frequency of null alleles. This is most likely due to subdivision among flocks (Wahlund effect) and use of a small number of rams for breeding. Levels of heterozygosity were slightly higher in southern than in northern breeds, consistent with declining diversity with distance from the Near Eastern centre of domestication. Our results highlight the importance of isolation in terms of both geography and management in augmenting genetic differentiation through genetic drift, with isolated northern European breeds showing the greatest divergence and hence being obvious targets for conservation. Finally, using a Bayesian cluster analysis, we uncovered evidence of admixture between breeds, which has important implications for breed management.

  11. Discovering link communities in complex networks by an integer programming model and a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenping; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Liu, Hongwei; Zhang, Shihua

    2013-01-01

    Identification of communities in complex networks is an important topic and issue in many fields such as sociology, biology, and computer science. Communities are often defined as groups of related nodes or links that correspond to functional subunits in the corresponding complex systems. While most conventional approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, some recent studies start partitioning links to find overlapping communities straightforwardly. In this paper, we propose a new quantity function for link community identification in complex networks. Based on this quantity function we formulate the link community partition problem into an integer programming model which allows us to partition a complex network into overlapping communities. We further propose a genetic algorithm for link community detection which can partition a network into overlapping communities without knowing the number of communities. We test our model and algorithm on both artificial networks and real-world networks. The results demonstrate that the model and algorithm are efficient in detecting overlapping community structure in complex networks.

  12. Does the genetic type of collagen determine fibril structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eikenberry, E.; Brodsky, B.; Cassidy, K.

    1980-10-01

    A number of genetic types of collagen, all triple-helical but with significant variations in their amino acid sequences, have been found and the distribution of these genetic types is tissue specific. For example, tendon is composed only of type I collagen, while cartilage contains largely type II collagen. Skin contains a large amount of type I, but has a significant fraction, approx. 15%, of type III. Each of these types can form fibrils, but it is not known whether they form distinctive fibril structures that are important in determining tissue organization. We are using x-ray diffraction to analyze a variety of tissues with different collagen genetic types to compare the fibril structures and thus investigate whether genetic type is an important determinant of this structure.

  13. Functional Dissection of the NuA4 Histone Acetyltransferase Reveals Its Role as a Genetic Hub and that Eaf1 Is Essential for Complex Integrity▿

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Gerdes, Maria; Al-Madhoun, Ashraf S.; Skerjanc, Ilona S.; Figeys, Daniel; Baetz, Kristin

    2008-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complex catalyzes the acetylation of histone H4 and the histone variant Htz1 to regulate key cellular events, including transcription, DNA repair, and faithful chromosome segregation. To further investigate the cellular processes impacted by NuA4, we exploited the nonessential subunits of the complex to build an extensive NuA4 genetic-interaction network map. The map reveals that NuA4 is a genetic hub whose function buffers a diverse range of cellular processes, many not previously linked to the complex, including Golgi complex-to-vacuole vesicle-mediated transport. Further, we probe the role that nonessential subunits play in NuA4 complex integrity. We find that most nonessential subunits have little impact on NuA4 complex integrity and display between 12 and 42 genetic interactions. In contrast, the deletion of EAF1 causes the collapse of the NuA4 complex and displays 148 genetic interactions. Our study indicates that Eaf1 plays a crucial function in NuA4 complex integrity. Further, we determine that Eaf5 and Eaf7 form a subcomplex, which reflects their similar genetic interaction profiles and phenotypes. Our integrative study demonstrates that genetic interaction maps are valuable in dissecting complex structure and provides insight into why the human NuA4 complex, Tip60, has been associated with a diverse range of pathologies. PMID:18212056

  14. Genetic Diversity and Spatial Genetic Structure of the Grassland Perennial Saxifraga granulata along Two River Systems

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, Sascha; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Due to changes in land use, the natural habitats of an increasing number of plant species have become more and more fragmented. In landscapes that consist of patches of suitable habitat, the frequency and extent of long-distance seed dispersal can be expected to be an important factor determining local genetic diversity and regional population structure of the remaining populations. In plant species that are restricted to riparian habitats, rivers can be expected to have a strong impact on the dynamics and spatial genetic structure of populations as they may enable long-distance seed dispersal and thus maintain gene flow between fragmented populations. In this study, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of 28 populations of Saxifraga granulata along two rivers in central Belgium. We hypothesized that rivers might be essential for gene flow among increasingly isolated populations of this species. Genetic diversity was high (HS = 0.68), which to a certain extent can be explained by the octoploid nature of S. granulata in the study area. Populations along the Dijle and Demer rivers were also highly differentiated (G”ST = 0.269 and 0.164 and DEST = 0.190 and 0.124, respectively) and showed significant isolation-by-distance, indicating moderate levels of gene flow primarily between populations that are geographically close to each other. Along the river Demer population genetic diversity was higher upstream than downstream, suggesting that seed dispersal via the water was not the primary mode of dispersal. Overall, these results indicate that despite increasing fragmentation populations along both rivers were highly genetically diverse. The high ploidy level and longevity of S. granulata have most likely buffered negative effects of fragmentation on genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of populations in riparian grasslands. PMID:26079603

  15. Genetic Diversity and Spatial Genetic Structure of the Grassland Perennial Saxifraga granulata along Two River Systems.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Sascha; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Due to changes in land use, the natural habitats of an increasing number of plant species have become more and more fragmented. In landscapes that consist of patches of suitable habitat, the frequency and extent of long-distance seed dispersal can be expected to be an important factor determining local genetic diversity and regional population structure of the remaining populations. In plant species that are restricted to riparian habitats, rivers can be expected to have a strong impact on the dynamics and spatial genetic structure of populations as they may enable long-distance seed dispersal and thus maintain gene flow between fragmented populations. In this study, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of 28 populations of Saxifraga granulata along two rivers in central Belgium. We hypothesized that rivers might be essential for gene flow among increasingly isolated populations of this species. Genetic diversity was high (HS = 0.68), which to a certain extent can be explained by the octoploid nature of S. granulata in the study area. Populations along the Dijle and Demer rivers were also highly differentiated (G"ST = 0.269 and 0.164 and DEST = 0.190 and 0.124, respectively) and showed significant isolation-by-distance, indicating moderate levels of gene flow primarily between populations that are geographically close to each other. Along the river Demer population genetic diversity was higher upstream than downstream, suggesting that seed dispersal via the water was not the primary mode of dispersal. Overall, these results indicate that despite increasing fragmentation populations along both rivers were highly genetically diverse. The high ploidy level and longevity of S. granulata have most likely buffered negative effects of fragmentation on genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of populations in riparian grasslands.

  16. Intraspecific genetic admixture and the morphological diversification of an estuarine fish population complex.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Julian J; Bourret, Audrey; Barrette, Marie France; Turgeon, Julie; Daigle, Gaétan; Legault, Michel; Lecomte, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The North-east American Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) is composed of two glacial races first identified through the spatial distribution of two distinct mtDNA lineages. Contemporary breeding populations of smelt in the St. Lawrence estuary comprise contrasting mixtures of both lineages, suggesting that the two races came into secondary contact in this estuary. The overall objective of this study was to assess the role of intraspecific genetic admixture in the morphological diversification of the estuarine rainbow smelt population complex. The morphology of mixed-ancestry populations varied as a function of the relative contribution of the two races to estuarine populations, supporting the hypothesis of genetic admixture. Populations comprising both ancestral mtDNA races did not exhibit intermediate morphologies relative to pure populations but rather exhibited many traits that exceeded the parental trait values, consistent with the hypothesis of transgressive segregation. Evidence for genetic admixture at the level of the nuclear gene pool, however, provided only partial support for this hypothesis. Variation at nuclear AFLP markers revealed clear evidence of the two corresponding mtDNA glacial races. The admixture of the two races at the nuclear level is only pronounced in mixed-ancestry populations dominated by one of the mtDNA lineages, the same populations showing the greatest degree of morphological diversification and population structure. In contrast, mixed-ancestry populations dominated by the alternate mtDNA lineage showed little evidence of introgression of the nuclear genome, little morphological diversification and little contemporary population genetic structure. These results only partially support the hypothesis of transgressive segregation and may be the result of the differential effects of natural selection acting on admixed genomes from different sources.

  17. Intraspecific Genetic Admixture and the Morphological Diversification of an Estuarine Fish Population Complex

    PubMed Central

    Legault, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The North-east American Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) is composed of two glacial races first identified through the spatial distribution of two distinct mtDNA lineages. Contemporary breeding populations of smelt in the St. Lawrence estuary comprise contrasting mixtures of both lineages, suggesting that the two races came into secondary contact in this estuary. The overall objective of this study was to assess the role of intraspecific genetic admixture in the morphological diversification of the estuarine rainbow smelt population complex. The morphology of mixed-ancestry populations varied as a function of the relative contribution of the two races to estuarine populations, supporting the hypothesis of genetic admixture. Populations comprising both ancestral mtDNA races did not exhibit intermediate morphologies relative to pure populations but rather exhibited many traits that exceeded the parental trait values, consistent with the hypothesis of transgressive segregation. Evidence for genetic admixture at the level of the nuclear gene pool, however, provided only partial support for this hypothesis. Variation at nuclear AFLP markers revealed clear evidence of the two corresponding mtDNA glacial races. The admixture of the two races at the nuclear level is only pronounced in mixed-ancestry populations dominated by one of the mtDNA lineages, the same populations showing the greatest degree of morphological diversification and population structure. In contrast, mixed-ancestry populations dominated by the alternate mtDNA lineage showed little evidence of introgression of the nuclear genome, little morphological diversification and little contemporary population genetic structure. These results only partially support the hypothesis of transgressive segregation and may be the result of the differential effects of natural selection acting on admixed genomes from different sources. PMID:25856193

  18. Population genetic structure, genetic diversity, and natural history of the South American species of Nothofagus subgenus Lophozonia (Nothofagaceae) inferred from nuclear microsatellite data.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Rodrigo; Gitzendanner, Matthew A; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S

    2014-06-01

    The effect of glaciation on the levels and patterns of genetic variation has been well studied in the Northern Hemisphere. However, although glaciation has undoubtedly shaped the genetic structure of plants in the Southern Hemisphere, fewer studies have characterized the effect, and almost none of them using microsatellites. Particularly, complex patterns of genetic structure might be expected in areas such as the Andes, where both latitudinal and altitudinal glacial advance and retreat have molded modern plant communities. We therefore studied the population genetics of three closely related, hybridizing species of Nothofagus (N. obliqua, N. alpina, and N. glauca, all of subgenus Lophozonia; Nothofagaceae) from Chile. To estimate population genetic parameters and infer the influence of the last ice age on the spatial and genetic distribution of these species, we examined and analyzed genetic variability at seven polymorphic microsatellite DNA loci in 640 individuals from 40 populations covering most of the ranges of these species in Chile. Populations showed no significant inbreeding and exhibited relatively high levels of genetic diversity (H E = 0.502-0.662) and slight, but significant, genetic structure (R ST = 8.7-16.0%). However, in N. obliqua, the small amount of genetic structure was spatially organized into three well-defined latitudinal groups. Our data may also suggest some introgression of N. alpina genes into N. obliqua in the northern populations. These results allowed us to reconstruct the influence of the last ice age on the genetic structure of these species, suggesting several centers of genetic diversity for N. obliqua and N. alpina, in agreement with the multiple refugia hypothesis.

  19. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Teosinte

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Kenji; Hill, Jason; Vigouroux, Yves; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Sanchez G., Jesus; Liu, Kejun; Buckler, Edward S.; Doebley, John

    2005-01-01

    The teosintes, the closest wild relatives of maize, are important resources for the study of maize genetics and evolution and for plant breeding. We genotyped 237 individual teosinte plants for 93 microsatellites. Phylogenetic relationships among species and subspecific taxa were largely consistent with prior analyses for other types of molecular markers. Plants of all species formed monophyletic clades, although relationships among species were not fully resolved. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Mexican annual teosintes divide into two clusters that largely correspond to the previously defined subspecies, Z. mays ssp. parviglumis and ssp. mexicana, although there are a few samples that represent either evolutionary intermediates or hybrids between these two subspecies. The Mexican annual teosintes show genetic substructuring along geographic lines. Hybridization or introgression between some teosintes and maize occurs at a low level and appears most common with Z. mays ssp. mexicana. Phylogeographic and phylogenetic analyses of the Mexican annual teosintes indicated that ssp. parviglumis diversified in the eastern part of its distribution and spread from east to west and that ssp. mexicana diversified in the Central Plateau of Mexico and spread along multiple paths to the north and east. We defined core sets of collections of Z. mays ssp. mexicana and ssp. parviglumis that attempt to capture the maximum number of microsatellite alleles for given sample sizes. PMID:15687282

  20. Spatial and temporal determinants of genetic structure in Gentianella bohemica

    PubMed Central

    Königer, Julia; Rebernig, Carolin A; Brabec, Jiří; Kiehl, Kathrin; Greimler, Josef

    2012-01-01

    The biennial plant Gentianella bohemica is a subendemic of the Bohemian Massif, where it occurs in seminatural grasslands. It has become rare in recent decades as a result of profound changes in land use. Using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) fingerprint data, we investigated the genetic structure within and among populations of G. bohemica in Bavaria, the Czech Republic, and the Austrian border region. The aim of our study was (1) to analyze the genetic structure among populations and to discuss these findings in the context of present and historical patterns of connectivity and isolation of populations, (2) to analyze genetic structure among consecutive generations (cohorts of two consecutive years), and (3) to investigate relationships between intrapopulational diversity and effective population size (Ne) as well as plant traits. (1) The German populations were strongly isolated from each other (pairwise FST= 0.29–0.60) and from all other populations (FST= 0.24–0.49). We found a pattern of near panmixis among the latter (FST= 0.15–0.35) with geographical distance explaining only 8% of the genetic variance. These results were congruent with a principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and analysis using STRUCTURE to identify genetically coherent groups. These findings are in line with the strong physical barrier and historical constraints, resulting in separation of the German populations from the others. (2) We found pronounced genetic differences between consecutive cohorts of the German populations (pairwise FST= 0.23 and 0.31), which can be explained by local population history (land use, disturbance). (3) Genetic diversity within populations (Shannon index, HSh) was significantly correlated with Ne (RS= 0.733) and reflected a loss of diversity due to several demographic bottlenecks. Overall, we found that the genetic structure in G. bohemica is strongly influenced by historical periods of high connectivity and isolation as well as by marked

  1. Ecological factors influence population genetic structure of European grey wolves.

    PubMed

    Pilot, Malgorzata; Jedrzejewski, Wlodzimierz; Branicki, Wojciech; Sidorovich, Vadim E; Jedrzejewska, Bogumila; Stachura, Krystyna; Funk, Stephan M

    2006-12-01

    Although the mechanisms controlling gene flow among populations are particularly important for evolutionary processes, they are still poorly understood, especially in the case of large carnivoran mammals with extensive continuous distributions. We studied the question of factors affecting population genetic structure in the grey wolf, Canis lupus, one of the most mobile terrestrial carnivores. We analysed variability in mitochondrial DNA and 14 microsatellite loci for a sample of 643 individuals from 59 localities representing most of the continuous wolf range in Eastern Europe. We tested an array of geographical, historical and ecological factors to check whether they may explain genetic differentiation among local wolf populations. We showed that wolf populations in Eastern Europe displayed nonrandom spatial genetic structure in the absence of obvious physical barriers to movement. Neither topographic barriers nor past fragmentation could explain spatial genetic structure. However, we found that the genetic differentiation among local populations was correlated with climate, habitat types, and wolf diet composition. This result shows that ecological processes may strongly influence the amount of gene flow among populations. We suggest natal-habitat-biased dispersal as an underlying mechanism linking population ecology with population genetic structure.

  2. Fine-Scale Genetic Structure and Reproductive Biology of the Blueberry Pathogen Monilinia vaccinii-corymbosi.

    PubMed

    Burchhardt, Kathleen M; Miller, Megan E; Cline, William O; Cubeta, Marc A

    2017-02-01

    The fungus Monilinia vaccinii-corymbosi, a pathogen of Vaccinium spp., requires asexual and sexual spore production to complete its life cycle. A recent study found population structuring of M. vaccinii-corymbosi over a broad spatial scale in the United States. In this study, we examined fine-scale genetic structuring, temporal dynamics, and reproductive biology within a 125-by-132-m blueberry plot from 2010 to 2012. In total, 395 isolates of M. vaccinii-corymbosi were sampled from infected shoots and fruit to examine their multilocus haplotype (MLH) using microsatellite markers. The MLH of 190 single-ascospore isolates from 21 apothecia was also determined. Little to no genetic differentiation and unrestricted gene flow were detected among four sampled time points and between infected tissue types. Discriminant analysis of principal components suggested genetic structuring within the field, with at least K = 3 genetically distinct clusters maintained over four sampled time points. Single-ascospore progeny from eight apothecia had identical MLH and at least two distinct MLH were detected from 13 apothecia. Tests for linkage disequilibrium suggested that genetically diverse ascospore progeny were the product of recombination. This study supports the idea that the fine-scale dynamics of M. vaccinii-corymbosi may be complex, with genetic structuring, inbreeding, and outcrossing detected in the study area.

  3. Geomechanical numerical simulations of complex geologic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Arguello, J.G.; Stone, C.M.; Lorenz, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    Ability to predict mechanical response of rock in three dimensions over the spatial and time scales of geologic interest would give the oil and gas industry the ability to reduce risk on prospects, improve pre-project initial reserve estimates, and lower operating costs. A program has recently been initiated, under the auspices of the Advanced Computational Technology Initiative (ACTI), to achieve such a computational technology breakthrough by adapting the unique advanced quasistatic finite element technology developed by Sandia to the mechanics applications important to exploration and production activities within the oil and gas industry. As a precursor to that program, in an effort to evaluate the feasibility of the approach, several complex geologic structures of interest were analyzed with the existing two-dimensional quasistatic finite element code, SANTOS, developed at Sandia. Examples are presented and discussed.

  4. Identifying community structure in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Chenxi; Duan, Yubing

    2015-07-01

    A wide variety of applications could be formulated to resolve the problem of finding all communities from a given network, ranging from social and biological network analysis to web mining and searching. In this study, we propose the concept of virtual attractive strength between each pair of node in networks, and then give the definition of community structure based on the proposed attractive strength. Furthermore, we present a community detection method by moving vertices to the clusters that produce the largest attractive strengths to them until the division of network reaches unchanged. Experimental results on synthetic and real networks indicate that the proposed approach has favorite effectiveness and fast convergence speed, which provides an efficient method for exploring and analyzing complex systems.

  5. Genetic variability and relationships for populations of Cerastoderma edule and of the C. Glaucum complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, H.; Wolowicz, M.; Bogaards, R. H.

    Genetic variability and relationships of populations of the cockles Cerastoderma edule and of the C. glaucum complex in Europe were determined by means of isoenzyme electrophoresis. Distinct isoenzyme markers allowed a clear distinction between these two taxa. C edule showed a higher genetic intra-population variability than the other cockle species. The imbalance of the genotypes within popuulation and the inter-population differentiation of the C. glaucum complex are stronger than in C. edule. The genetic variability is related to the different habitats of the species, the members of the C. glaucum complex living in more isolated areas and having more limited gene flow.

  6. Electronic structures of ytterbocene-imine complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Da Re, R. E.; Kuehl, C. J.; John, K. D.; Morris, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    The electronic structures of complexes of the form [(C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb(L)]{sup +/0} (L = bipyridine, phenanthroline, terpyridine) have been probed using cyclic voltammetry and electronic spectroscopy. Remarkably, the voltammetric data reveal that the imine-based LUMO is stabilized and the redox-active metal f orbital is destabilized by ca. 1 V each upon formation of the ytterbocene-imine adduct, which is presumably responsible for the [(f){sup 13}({pi}*(L)){sup 1}] charge-transfer ground state characteristic of these complexes. The ca. 0.8 V separation between ligand-based oxidation and metal-based reduction waves for each ytterbocene adduct correlates with the energy of its optically promoted {pi}*(L)-f(Yb) charge transfer (LMCT) transition (ca. 5000 cm{sup -1}). The coupling between this LMCT excited state and the {sup 2}F{sub 7/2} ground and {sup 2}F{sub 5/2} excited states of Yb(III) leads to unusually large intensities ({var_epsilon} {approx} 1000) for the metal-localized f-f bands, which will be discussed in the context of an intensity borrowing mechanism that invokes exchange between the ligand-based {sup 2}S and metal-based {sup 2}F spin states.

  7. Multilocus sequence analysis reveals high genetic diversity in clinical isolates of Burkholderia cepacia complex from India.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Vikas; Patil, Prashant P; Kumar, Sunil; Midha, Samriti; Kaur, Mandeep; Kaur, Satinder; Singh, Meenu; Mali, Swapna; Shastri, Jayanthi; Arora, Anita; Ray, Pallab; Patil, Prabhu B

    2016-10-21

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a complex group of bacteria causing opportunistic infections in immunocompromised and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Herein, we report multilocus sequence typing and analysis of the 57 clinical isolates of Bcc collected over the period of seven years (2005-2012) from several hospitals across India. A total of 21 sequence types (ST) including two STs from cystic fibrosis patient's isolates and twelve novel STs were identified in the population reflecting the extent of genetic diversity. Multilocus sequence analysis revealed two lineages in population, a major lineage belonging to B. cenocepacia and a minor lineage belonging to B. cepacia. Split-decomposition analysis suggests absence of interspecies recombination and intraspecies recombination contributed in generating genotypic diversity amongst isolates. Further linkage disequilibrium analysis indicates that recombination takes place at a low frequency, which is not sufficient to break down the clonal relationship. This knowledge of the genetic structure of Bcc population from a rapidly developing country will be invaluable in the epidemiology, surveillance and understanding global diversity of this group of a pathogen.

  8. Multilocus sequence analysis reveals high genetic diversity in clinical isolates of Burkholderia cepacia complex from India

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Vikas; Patil, Prashant P.; Kumar, Sunil; Midha, Samriti; Kaur, Mandeep; Kaur, Satinder; Singh, Meenu; Mali, Swapna; Shastri, Jayanthi; Arora, Anita; Ray, Pallab; Patil, Prabhu B.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a complex group of bacteria causing opportunistic infections in immunocompromised and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Herein, we report multilocus sequence typing and analysis of the 57 clinical isolates of Bcc collected over the period of seven years (2005–2012) from several hospitals across India. A total of 21 sequence types (ST) including two STs from cystic fibrosis patient’s isolates and twelve novel STs were identified in the population reflecting the extent of genetic diversity. Multilocus sequence analysis revealed two lineages in population, a major lineage belonging to B. cenocepacia and a minor lineage belonging to B. cepacia. Split-decomposition analysis suggests absence of interspecies recombination and intraspecies recombination contributed in generating genotypic diversity amongst isolates. Further linkage disequilibrium analysis indicates that recombination takes place at a low frequency, which is not sufficient to break down the clonal relationship. This knowledge of the genetic structure of Bcc population from a rapidly developing country will be invaluable in the epidemiology, surveillance and understanding global diversity of this group of a pathogen. PMID:27767197

  9. The genetic structure of a relict population of wood frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scherer, Rick; Muths, Erin; Noon, Barry; Oyler-McCance, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and the associated reduction in connectivity between habitat patches are commonly cited causes of genetic differentiation and reduced genetic variation in animal populations. We used eight microsatellite markers to investigate genetic structure and levels of genetic diversity in a relict population of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvatica) in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, where recent disturbances have altered hydrologic processes and fragmented amphibian habitat. We also estimated migration rates among subpopulations, tested for a pattern of isolation-by-distance, and looked for evidence of a recent population bottleneck. The results from the clustering algorithm in Program STRUCTURE indicated the population is partitioned into two genetic clusters (subpopulations), and this result was further supported by factorial component analysis. In addition, an estimate of FST (FST = 0.0675, P value \\0.0001) supported the genetic differentiation of the two clusters. Estimates of migration rates among the two subpopulations were low, as were estimates of genetic variability. Conservation of the population of wood frogs may be improved by increasing the spatial distribution of the population and improving gene flow between the subpopulations. Construction or restoration of wetlands in the landscape between the clusters has the potential to address each of these objectives.

  10. Coherent structures in a supersonic complex nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magstadt, Andrew; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The jet flow from a complex supersonic nozzle is studied through experimental measurements. The nozzle's geometry is motivated by future engine designs for high-performance civilian and military aircraft. This rectangular jet has a single plane of symmetry, an additional shear layer (referred to as a wall jet), and an aft deck representative of airframe integration. The core flow operates at a Mach number of Mj , c = 1 . 6 , and the wall jet is choked (Mj , w = 1 . 0). This high Reynolds number jet flow is comprised of intense turbulence levels, an intricate shock structure, shear and boundary layers, and powerful corner vortices. In the present study, stereo PIV measurements are simultaneously sampled with high-speed pressure measurements, which are embedded in the aft deck, and far-field acoustics in the anechoic chamber at Syracuse University. Time-resolved schlieren measurements have indicated the existence of strong flow events at high frequencies, at a Strouhal number of St = 3 . 4 . These appear to result from von Kàrmàn vortex shedding within the nozzle and pervade the entire flow and acoustic domain. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied on the current data to identify coherent structures in the jet and study the influence of this vortex street. AFOSR Turbulence and Transition Program (Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0435) with program managers Dr. I. Leyva and Dr. R. Ponnappan.

  11. Characterizing the Community Structure of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lancichinetti, Andrea; Kivelä, Mikko; Saramäki, Jari; Fortunato, Santo

    2010-01-01

    Background Community structure is one of the key properties of complex networks and plays a crucial role in their topology and function. While an impressive amount of work has been done on the issue of community detection, very little attention has been so far devoted to the investigation of communities in real networks. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a systematic empirical analysis of the statistical properties of communities in large information, communication, technological, biological, and social networks. We find that the mesoscopic organization of networks of the same category is remarkably similar. This is reflected in several characteristics of community structure, which can be used as “fingerprints” of specific network categories. While community size distributions are always broad, certain categories of networks consist mainly of tree-like communities, while others have denser modules. Average path lengths within communities initially grow logarithmically with community size, but the growth saturates or slows down for communities larger than a characteristic size. This behaviour is related to the presence of hubs within communities, whose roles differ across categories. Also the community embeddedness of nodes, measured in terms of the fraction of links within their communities, has a characteristic distribution for each category. Conclusions/Significance Our findings, verified by the use of two fundamentally different community detection methods, allow for a classification of real networks and pave the way to a realistic modelling of networks' evolution. PMID:20711338

  12. Genetic covariance structure of incisor crown size in twins.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, P J; Townsend, G C; Martin, N G; Neale, M C

    1995-07-01

    Previous studies of tooth size in twins and their families have suggested a high degree of genetic control, although there have been difficulties separating the various genetic and environmental effects. A genetic analysis of variation in crown size of the permanent incisors of South Australian twins was carried out, with structural equation modeling used to determine the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors. Maximum mesiodistal crown dimensions of maxillary and mandibular permanent incisors were recorded from dental models of 298 pairs of twins, including 149 monozygous (MZ) and 149 dizygous (DZ) pairs. The analysis revealed that: (i) an adequate fit required additive genetic and unique environmental components; (ii) augmenting the model with non-additive genetic variation did not lead to a significant improvement in fit; (iii) there was evidence of shared environmental influences in the upper central incisors of males; (iv) the additive genetic component constituted a general factor loading on all eight teeth, with group factors loading on antimeric pairs of teeth; (v) unique environmental effects were mostly variable-specific; (vi) most factor loadings on antimeric tooth pairs could be constrained to be equal, indicating a symmetry of genetic and environmental influences between left and right sides; and (vii) estimated heritability of the incisor mesiodistal dimensions varied from 0.81 to 0.91.

  13. The psoriasis genetics as a model of complex disease.

    PubMed

    Giardina, Emiliano; Sinibaldi, Cecilia; Novelli, Giuseppe

    2004-06-01

    Psoriasis [OMIM*177900] is a common, chronic and papulosquamous inflammatory skin disease affecting approximately 2% of Caucasian. However, this disorder is rare among Japanese, Eskimos, West Africans and North American blacks and very uncommon in North American and South American natives. The causes for these variations are likely to be both genetic and environmental. Population-based studies and twin studies indicate that psoriasis is a heritable disease with a polygenic mode of inheritance with variable penetrance. Independent genome-wide scans have suggested the involvement of a large number of chromosomal regions (loci), and many candidate genes have been proposed. We discuss genetic approaches to the disease, results and interpretations of relevant studies, as well as future perspectives. Understanding the genetic basis of psoriasis will represent a major advance in our understanding of the disease and will reveal novel disease-specific biologic pathways.

  14. A Genome Wide Survey of SNP Variation Reveals the Genetic Structure of Sheep Breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic structure of sheep reflects their domestication and subsequent formation into discrete breeds. Understanding genetic structure is essential for achieving genetic improvement through genome-wide association studies, genomic selection and the dissection of quantitative traits. After identi...

  15. Genetic diversity and population structure of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Qi, Jianjian; Shi, Qiuxiang; Shen, Di; Zhang, Shengping; Shao, Guangjin; Li, Hang; Sun, Zhanyong; Weng, Yiqun; Shang, Yi; Gu, Xingfang; Li, Xixiang; Zhu, Xiaoguo; Zhang, Jinzhe; van Treuren, Robbert; van Dooijeweert, Willem; Zhang, Zhonghua; Huang, Sanwen

    2012-01-01

    Knowing the extent and structure of genetic variation in germplasm collections is essential for the conservation and utilization of biodiversity in cultivated plants. Cucumber is the fourth most important vegetable crop worldwide and is a model system for other Cucurbitaceae, a family that also includes melon, watermelon, pumpkin and squash. Previous isozyme studies revealed a low genetic diversity in cucumber, but detailed insights into the crop's genetic structure and diversity are largely missing. We have fingerprinted 3,342 accessions from the Chinese, Dutch and U.S. cucumber collections with 23 highly polymorphic Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers evenly distributed in the genome. The data reveal three distinct populations, largely corresponding to three geographic regions. Population 1 corresponds to germplasm from China, except for the unique semi-wild landraces found in Xishuangbanna in Southwest China and East Asia; population 2 to Europe, America, and Central and West Asia; and population 3 to India and Xishuangbanna. Admixtures were also detected, reflecting hybridization and migration events between the populations. The genetic background of the Indian germplasm is heterogeneous, indicating that the Indian cucumbers maintain a large proportion of the genetic diversity and that only a small fraction was introduced to other parts of the world. Subsequently, we defined a core collection consisting of 115 accessions and capturing over 77% of the SSR alleles. Insight into the genetic structure of cucumber will help developing appropriate conservation strategies and provides a basis for population-level genome sequencing in cucumber.

  16. Genetic Structuring across Marine Biogeographic Boundaries in Rocky Shore Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Villamor, Adriana; Costantini, Federica; Abbiati, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Biogeography investigates spatial patterns of species distribution. Discontinuities in species distribution are identified as boundaries between biogeographic areas. Do these boundaries affect genetic connectivity? To address this question, a multifactorial hierarchical sampling design, across three of the major marine biogeographic boundaries in the central Mediterranean Sea (Ligurian-Tyrrhenian, Tyrrhenian-Ionian and Ionian-Adriatic) was carried out. Mitochondrial COI sequence polymorphism of seven species of Mediterranean benthic invertebrates was analysed. Two species showed significant genetic structure across the Tyrrhenian-Ionian boundary, as well as two other species across the Ionian Sea, a previously unknown phylogeographic barrier. The hypothesized barrier in the Ligurian-Tyrrhenian cannot be detected in the genetic structure of the investigated species. Connectivity patterns across species at distances up to 800 km apart confirmed that estimates of pelagic larval dispersal were poor predictors of the genetic structure. The detected genetic discontinuities seem more related to the effect of past historical events, though maintained by present day oceanographic processes. Multivariate statistical tools were used to test the consistency of the patterns across species, providing a conceptual framework for across-species barrier locations and strengths. Additional sequences retrieved from public databases supported our findings. Heterogeneity of phylogeographic patterns shown by the 7 investigated species is relevant to the understanding of the genetic diversity, and carry implications for conservation biology. PMID:24983738

  17. Genetic structuring across marine biogeographic boundaries in rocky shore invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Villamor, Adriana; Costantini, Federica; Abbiati, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Biogeography investigates spatial patterns of species distribution. Discontinuities in species distribution are identified as boundaries between biogeographic areas. Do these boundaries affect genetic connectivity? To address this question, a multifactorial hierarchical sampling design, across three of the major marine biogeographic boundaries in the central Mediterranean Sea (Ligurian-Tyrrhenian, Tyrrhenian-Ionian and Ionian-Adriatic) was carried out. Mitochondrial COI sequence polymorphism of seven species of Mediterranean benthic invertebrates was analysed. Two species showed significant genetic structure across the Tyrrhenian-Ionian boundary, as well as two other species across the Ionian Sea, a previously unknown phylogeographic barrier. The hypothesized barrier in the Ligurian-Tyrrhenian cannot be detected in the genetic structure of the investigated species. Connectivity patterns across species at distances up to 800 km apart confirmed that estimates of pelagic larval dispersal were poor predictors of the genetic structure. The detected genetic discontinuities seem more related to the effect of past historical events, though maintained by present day oceanographic processes. Multivariate statistical tools were used to test the consistency of the patterns across species, providing a conceptual framework for across-species barrier locations and strengths. Additional sequences retrieved from public databases supported our findings. Heterogeneity of phylogeographic patterns shown by the 7 investigated species is relevant to the understanding of the genetic diversity, and carry implications for conservation biology.

  18. Capturing neutral and adaptive genetic diversity for conservation in a highly structured tree species.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Quilón, Isabel; Santos-Del-Blanco, Luis; Serra-Varela, María Jesús; Koskela, Jarkko; González-Martínez, Santiago C; Alía, Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    Preserving intraspecific genetic diversity is essential for long-term forest sustainability in a climate change scenario. Despite that, genetic information is largely neglected in conservation planning, and how conservation units should be defined is still heatedly debated. Here, we use maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), an outcrossing long-lived tree with a highly fragmented distribution in the Mediterranean biodiversity hotspot, to prove the importance of accounting for genetic variation, of both neutral molecular markers and quantitative traits, to define useful conservation units. Six gene pools associated to distinct evolutionary histories were identified within the species using 12 microsatellites and 266 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In addition, height and survival standing variation, their genetic control, and plasticity were assessed in a multisite clonal common garden experiment (16 544 trees). We found high levels of quantitative genetic differentiation within previously defined neutral gene pools. Subsequent cluster analysis and post hoc trait distribution comparisons allowed us to define 10 genetically homogeneous population groups with high evolutionary potential. They constitute the minimum number of units to be represented in a maritime pine dynamic conservation program. Our results uphold that the identification of conservation units below the species level should account for key neutral and adaptive components of genetic diversity, especially in species with strong population structure and complex evolutionary histories. The environmental zonation approach currently used by the pan-European genetic conservation strategy for forest trees would be largely improved by gradually integrating molecular and quantitative trait information, as data become available.

  19. Differential Regulation of Cryptic Genetic Variation Shapes the Genetic Interactome Underlying Complex Traits

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Anupama; Dhole, Kaustubh

    2016-01-01

    Cryptic genetic variation (CGV) refers to genetic variants whose effects are buffered in most conditions but manifest phenotypically upon specific genetic and environmental perturbations. Despite having a central role in adaptation, contribution of CGV to regulation of quantitative traits is unclear. Instead, a relatively simplistic architecture of additive genetic loci is known to regulate phenotypic variation in most traits. In this paper, we investigate the regulation of CGV and its implication on the genetic architecture of quantitative traits at a genome-wide level. We use a previously published dataset of biparental recombinant population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phenotyped in 34 diverse environments to perform single locus, two-locus, and covariance mapping. We identify loci that have independent additive effects as well as those which regulate the phenotypic manifestation of other genetic variants (variance QTL). We find that whereas additive genetic variance is predominant, a higher order genetic interaction network regulates variation in certain environments. Despite containing pleiotropic loci, with effects across environments, these genetic networks are highly environment specific. CGV is buffered under most allelic combinations of these networks and perturbed only in rare combinations resulting in high phenotypic variance. The presence of such environment specific genetic networks is the underlying cause of abundant gene–environment interactions. We demonstrate that overlaying identified molecular networks on such genetic networks can identify potential candidate genes and underlying mechanisms regulating phenotypic variation. Such an integrated approach applied to human disease datasets has the potential to improve the ability to predict disease predisposition and identify specific therapeutic targets. PMID:28172852

  20. Genetic Simulation Tools for Post-Genome Wide Association Studies of Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.; Bafna, Vineet; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Li, Chun; Liberles, David A.; McAllister, Kimberly; Moore, Jason H.; Paltoo, Dina N.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Peng, Bo; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Rosenfeld, Gabriel; Witte, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic simulation programs are used to model data under specified assumptions to facilitate the understanding and study of complex genetic systems. Standardized data sets generated using genetic simulation are essential for the development and application of novel analytical tools in genetic epidemiology studies. With continuing advances in high-throughput genomic technologies and generation and analysis of larger, more complex data sets, there is a need for updating current approaches in genetic simulation modeling. To provide a forum to address current and emerging challenges in this area, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a workshop, entitled “Genetic Simulation Tools for Post-Genome Wide Association Studies of Complex Diseases” at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland on March 11-12, 2014. The goals of the workshop were to: (i) identify opportunities, challenges and resource needs for the development and application of genetic simulation models; (ii) improve the integration of tools for modeling and analysis of simulated data; and (iii) foster collaborations to facilitate development and applications of genetic simulation. During the course of the meeting the group identified challenges and opportunities for the science of simulation, software and methods development, and collaboration. This paper summarizes key discussions at the meeting, and highlights important challenges and opportunities to advance the field of genetic simulation. PMID:25371374

  1. Evaluating empirical bounds on complex disease genetic architecture

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Vineeta; Flannick, Jason; Sunyaev, Shamil; Altshuler, David

    2014-01-01

    The genetic architecture of human diseases governs the success of genetic mapping and the future of personalized medicine. Although numerous studies have queried the genetic basis of common disease, contradictory hypotheses have been advocated about features of genetic architecture (e.g., the contribution of rare vs. common variants). We developed an integrated simulation framework, calibrated to empirical data, to enable systematic evaluation of such hypotheses. For type 2 diabetes (T2D), two simple parameters – (a) the target size for causal mutation and (b) the coupling between selection and phenotypic effect – define a broad space of architectures. While extreme models are excluded, many models remain consistent with epidemiology, linkage, and genome-wide association studies for T2D, including those where rare variants explain little (<25%) or most (>80%) of heritability. Ongoing sequencing and genotyping studies will further constrain architecture, but very large samples (e.g., >250K unselected individuals) will be required to localize most of the heritability underlying traits like T2D. PMID:24141362

  2. Understanding macroalgal dispersal in a complex hydrodynamic environment: a combined population genetic and physical modelling approach

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Georgina; Kregting, Louise; Beatty, Gemma E.; Cole, Claudia; Elsäßer, Björn; Savidge, Graham; Provan, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Gene flow in macroalgal populations can be strongly influenced by spore or gamete dispersal. This, in turn, is influenced by a convolution of the effects of current flow and specific plant reproductive strategies. Although several studies have demonstrated genetic variability in macroalgal populations over a wide range of spatial scales, the associated current data have generally been poorly resolved spatially and temporally. In this study, we used a combination of population genetic analyses and high-resolution hydrodynamic modelling to investigate potential connectivity between populations of the kelp Laminaria digitata in the Strangford Narrows, a narrow channel characterized by strong currents linking the large semi-enclosed sea lough, Strangford Lough, to the Irish Sea. Levels of genetic structuring based on six microsatellite markers were very low, indicating high levels of gene flow and a pattern of isolation-by-distance, where populations are more likely to exchange migrants with geographically proximal populations, but with occasional long-distance dispersal. This was confirmed by the particle tracking model, which showed that, while the majority of spores settle near the release site, there is potential for dispersal over several kilometres. This combined population genetic and modelling approach suggests that the complex hydrodynamic environment at the entrance to Strangford Lough can facilitate dispersal on a scale exceeding that proposed for L. digitata in particular, and the majority of macroalgae in general. The study demonstrates the potential of integrated physical–biological approaches for the prediction of ecological changes resulting from factors such as anthropogenically induced coastal zone changes. PMID:24671941

  3. Invasion genetics of the Ciona intestinalis species complex: from regional endemism to global homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Aibin; Macisaac, Hugh J; Cristescu, Melania E

    2010-11-01

    Determining the degree of population connectivity and investigating factors driving genetic exchange at various geographical scales are essential to understanding population dynamics and spread potential of invasive species. Here, we explore these issues in the highly invasive vase tunicate, Ciona intestinalis, a species whose invasion history has been obscured by its poorly understood taxonomy and population genetics. Recent phylogenetic and comparative genomic studies suggest that C. intestinalis is a cryptic species complex consisting of at least three species. We reconstructed phylogenies based on both mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 3--NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 region and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene) and nuclear (internal transcribed spacer 1) sequences, results of which support four major phylogroups corresponding to the previously reported spA, spB and Ciona spp. (spC) as well as an undescribed cryptic species (spD). While spC and spD remain restricted to their native ranges in the Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea, respectively, the highly invasive species (spA and spB) have disjunct global distributions. Despite extensive interspecific divergences, we identified low phylogeographical structure within these two invasive species. Haplotype network analyses revealed comparatively limited mutation steps among haplotypes within each species. Population genetic analyses based on two mtDNA fragments and eight unlinked microsatellites illustrated relatively low population differentiation and high population connectivity at both regional and continental scales in the two invasive species. Human-mediated dispersal coupled with a high potential for natural dispersal is probably responsible for the observed genetic homogeneity.

  4. Spatial and temporal genetic structure in a hybrid cordgrass invasion.

    PubMed

    Sloop, C M; Ayres, D R; Strong, D R

    2011-04-01

    Invasive hybrids and their spread dynamics pose unique opportunities to study evolutionary processes. Invasive hybrids of native Spartina foliosa and introduced S. alterniflora have expanded throughout San Francisco Bay intertidal habitats within the past 35 years by deliberate plantation and seeds floating on the tide. Our goals were to assess spatial and temporal scales of genetic structure in Spartina hybrid populations within the context of colonization history. We genotyped adult and seedling Spartina using 17 microsatellite loci and mapped their locations in three populations. All sampled seedlings were hybrids. Bayesian ordination analysis distinguished hybrid populations from parent species, clearly separated the population that originated by plantation from populations that originated naturally by seed and aligned most seedlings within each population. Population genetic structure estimated by analysis of molecular variance was substantial (F(ST)=0.21). Temporal genetic structure among age classes varied highly between populations. At one population, the divergence between adults and 2004 seedlings was low (F(ST)=0.02) whereas at another population this divergence was high (F(ST)=0.26). This latter result was consistent with local recruitment of self-fertilized seed produced by only a few parental plants. We found fine-scale spatial genetic structure at distances less than ∼200 m, further supporting local seed and/or pollen dispersal. We posit a few self-fertile plants dominating local recruitment created substantial spatial genetic structure despite initial long-distance, human dispersal of hybrid Spartina through San Francisco Bay. Fine-scale genetic structure may more strongly develop when local recruits are dominated by the offspring of a few self-fertile plants.

  5. Structure and genetics of circular bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    van Belkum, Marco J; Martin-Visscher, Leah A; Vederas, John C

    2011-08-01

    Circular bacteriocins are antimicrobial peptides produced by a variety of Gram-positive bacteria. They are part of a growing family of ribosomally synthesized peptides with a head-to-tail cyclization of their backbone that are found in mammals, plants, fungi and bacteria and are exceptionally stable. These bacteriocins permeabilize the membrane of sensitive bacteria, causing loss of ions and dissipation of the membrane potential. Most circular bacteriocins probably adopt a common 3D structure consisting of four or five α-helices encompassing a hydrophobic core. This review compares the various structures, as well as the gene clusters that encode circular bacteriocins, and discusses the biogenesis of this unique class of bacteriocins.

  6. Landscape genetics, adaptive diversity and population structure in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Monica; Rau, Domenico; Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Biagetti, Eleonora; Carboni, Andrea; Gepts, Paul; Nanni, Laura; Papa, Roberto; Attene, Giovanna

    2016-03-01

    Here we studied the organization of genetic variation of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in its centres of domestication. We used 131 single nucleotide polymorphisms to investigate 417 wild common bean accessions and a representative sample of 160 domesticated genotypes, including Mesoamerican and Andean genotypes, for a total of 577 accessions. By analysing the genetic spatial patterns of the wild common bean, we documented the existence of several genetic groups and the occurrence of variable degrees of diversity in Mesoamerica and the Andes. Moreover, using a landscape genetics approach, we demonstrated that both demographic processes and selection for adaptation were responsible for the observed genetic structure. We showed that the study of correlations between markers and ecological variables at a continental scale can help in identifying local adaptation genes. We also located putative areas of common bean domestication in Mesoamerica, in the Oaxaca Valley, and the Andes, in southern Bolivia-northern Argentina. These observations are of paramount importance for the conservation and exploitation of the genetic diversity preserved within this species and other plant genetic resources.

  7. Evolving complex dynamics in electronic models of genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Jonathan; Linsay, Paul S.; Collins, J. J.; Glass, Leon

    2004-09-01

    Ordinary differential equations are often used to model the dynamics and interactions in genetic networks. In one particularly simple class of models, the model genes control the production rates of products of other genes by a logical function, resulting in piecewise linear differential equations. In this article, we construct and analyze an electronic circuit that models this class of piecewise linear equations. This circuit combines CMOS logic and RC circuits to model the logical control of the increase and decay of protein concentrations in genetic networks. We use these electronic networks to study the evolution of limit cycle dynamics. By mutating the truth tables giving the logical functions for these networks, we evolve the networks to obtain limit cycle oscillations of desired period. We also investigate the fitness landscapes of our networks to determine the optimal mutation rate for evolution.

  8. A new conceptual framework for investigating complex genetic disease

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Shobbir

    2015-01-01

    Some common diseases are known to have an inherited component, however, their population- and familial-incidence patterns do not conform to any known monogenic Mendelian pattern of inheritance and instead they are currently much better explained if an underlying polygenic architecture is posited. Studies that have attempted to identify the causative genetic factors have been designed on this polygenic framework, but so far the yield has been largely unsatisfactory. Based on accumulating recent observations concerning the roles of somatic mosaicism in disease, in this article a second framework which posits a single gene-two hit model which can be modulated by a mutator/anti-mutator genetic background is suggested. I discuss whether such a model can be considered a viable alternative based on current knowledge, its advantages over the current polygenic framework, and describe practical routes via which the new framework can be investigated. PMID:26583033

  9. Genetic structure of whitefish (Coregonus maraena) in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Jens; Florin, Ann-Britt; Mo, Kerstin; Aho, Teija; Ryman, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Stocks of whitefish ( Coregonus maraena) in the northern part of the Baltic Sea have in many areas declined drastically during recent years. Causes for the decline are yet not fully understood, but knowledge on the genetic population structure of the species is pivotal for future conservation measures. In this study we analyse the genetic variation at seven microsatellite loci for whitefish from 18 different sites along the Swedish coast of the Baltic Sea. We found a strong dependence of isolation by distance ( R = 0.73), and a week but rather fine scaled genetic structure. In addition, there were differences between more northern and southern sites in the population genetic structure, where the degree of differentiation appears to be stronger in the north compared to the south. The results suggest that whitefish is a species suitable for local management with a regional context of the management strategy. In addition, the findings corroborate what is previously known for other coastal fish species in the Baltic Sea, such as perch and pike, suggesting that the majority of gene flow occurs between adjacent areas. Finally, our results highlight the potential for genetic subdivision even when the dependence of isolation by distance is strong.

  10. Population genetic analysis and sub-structuring in Babesia bovis.

    PubMed

    Simuunza, Martin; Bilgic, Huseyin; Karagenc, Tulin; Syakalima, Michelo; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Weir, William

    2011-06-01

    The tick-borne protozoan parasite, Babesia bovis is one of the causes of bovine babesiosis, an economically important disease of cattle in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Using the recently published genome sequence of the parasite, we developed a panel of eight mini- and micro-satellite markers and used these to investigate the role of genetic exchange in the population structure and diversity of the parasite using isolates from Zambia and Turkey. This population genetic analysis showed that genetic exchange occurs and that there are high levels of genetic diversity, with geographical sub-structuring quantified using Wright's F Index. Linkage disequilibrium was observed when isolates from both countries were treated as one population, but when isolates from Zambia were analysed separately linkage equilibrium was observed. The Turkish isolates were sub-structured, containing two genetically distinct sub-groups, both of which appeared to be in linkage equilibrium. The results of the Zambian study suggest that a sub-set of the parasite population is responsible for the westward spread of babesiosis into the previously disease-free central region of the country. The Zambian isolates had a significantly higher number of genotypes per sample than those from Turkey and age was found to be a significant predictor of the multiplicity of infection. The high levels of diversity seen in the Zambian and Turkish B. bovis populations have implications in the development of subunit vaccines against the disease and the spread of drug resistance.

  11. Genetic Networking of the Bemisia tabaci Cryptic Species Complex Reveals Pattern of Biological Invasions

    PubMed Central

    De Barro, Paul; Ahmed, Muhammad Z.

    2011-01-01

    Background A challenge within the context of cryptic species is the delimitation of individual species within the complex. Statistical parsimony network analytics offers the opportunity to explore limits in situations where there are insufficient species-specific morphological characters to separate taxa. The results also enable us to explore the spread in taxa that have invaded globally. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a 657 bp portion of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 from 352 unique haplotypes belonging to the Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex, the analysis revealed 28 networks plus 7 unconnected individual haplotypes. Of the networks, 24 corresponded to the putative species identified using the rule set devised by Dinsdale et al. (2010). Only two species proposed in Dinsdale et al. (2010) departed substantially from the structure suggested by the analysis. The analysis of the two invasive members of the complex, Mediterranean (MED) and Middle East – Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1), showed that in both cases only a small number of haplotypes represent the majority that have spread beyond the home range; one MEAM1 and three MED haplotypes account for >80% of the GenBank records. Israel is a possible source of the globally invasive MEAM1 whereas MED has two possible sources. The first is the eastern Mediterranean which has invaded only the USA, primarily Florida and to a lesser extent California. The second are western Mediterranean haplotypes that have spread to the USA, Asia and South America. The structure for MED supports two home range distributions, a Sub-Saharan range and a Mediterranean range. The MEAM1 network supports the Middle East - Asia Minor region. Conclusion/Significance The network analyses show a high level of congruence with the species identified in a previous phylogenetic analysis. The analysis of the two globally invasive members of the complex support the view that global invasion often involve very small portions of the available

  12. Comparative genomics reveals multiple genetic backgrounds of human pathogenicity in the Trypanosoma brucei complex.

    PubMed

    Sistrom, Mark; Evans, Benjamin; Bjornson, Robert; Gibson, Wendy; Balmer, Oliver; Mäser, Pascal; Aksoy, Serap; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2014-10-05

    The Trypanosoma brucei complex contains a number of subspecies with exceptionally variable life histories, including zoonotic subspecies, which are causative agents of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in sub-Saharan Africa. Paradoxically, genomic variation between taxa is extremely low. We analyzed the whole-genome sequences of 39 isolates across the T. brucei complex from diverse hosts and regions, identifying 608,501 single nucleotide polymorphisms that represent 2.33% of the nuclear genome. We show that human pathogenicity occurs across a wide range of parasite genotypes, and taxonomic designation does not reflect genetic variation across the group, as previous studies have suggested based on a small number of genes. This genome-wide study allowed the identification of significant host and geographic location associations. Strong purifying selection was detected in genomic regions associated with cytoskeleton structure, and regulatory genes associated with antigenic variation, suggesting conservation of these regions in African trypanosomes. In agreement with expectations drawn from meiotic reciprocal recombination, differences in average linkage disequilibrium between chromosomes in T. brucei correlate positively with chromosome size. In addition to insights into the life history of a diverse group of eukaryotic parasites, the documentation of genomic variation across the T. brucei complex and its association with specific hosts and geographic localities will aid in the development of comprehensive monitoring tools crucial to the proposed elimination of HAT by 2020, and on a shorter term, for monitoring the feared merger between the two human infective parasites, T. brucei rhodesiense and T. b. gambiense, in northern Uganda.

  13. The importance of structural complexity in coral reef ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, N. A. J.; Nash, K. L.

    2013-06-01

    The importance of structural complexity in coral reefs has come to the fore with the global degradation of reef condition; however, the limited scale and replication of many studies have restricted our understanding of the role of complexity in the ecosystem. We qualitatively and quantitatively (where sufficient standardised data were available) assess the literature regarding the role of structural complexity in coral reef ecosystems. A rapidly increasing number of publications have studied the role of complexity in reef ecosystems over the past four decades, with a concomitant increase in the diversity of methods used to quantify structure. Quantitative analyses of existing data indicate a strong negative relationship between structural complexity and algal cover, which may reflect the important role complexity plays in enhancing herbivory by reef fishes. The cover of total live coral and branching coral was positively correlated with structural complexity. These habitat attributes may be creating much of the structure, resulting in a collinear relationship; however, there is also evidence of enhanced coral recovery from disturbances where structural complexity is high. Urchin densities were negatively correlated with structural complexity; a relationship that may be driven by urchins eroding reef structure or by their gregarious behaviour when in open space. There was a strong positive relationship between structural complexity and fish density and biomass, likely mediated through density-dependent competition and refuge from predation. More variable responses were found when assessing individual fish families, with all families examined displaying a positive relationship to structural complexity, but only half of these relationships were significant. Although only corroborated with qualitative data, structural complexity also seems to have a positive effect on two ecosystem services: tourism and shoreline protection. Clearly, structural complexity is an

  14. Genetics, mental illness, and complex disease: development and distribution of an interactive CD-ROM for genetic counselors. Final report for period 15 August 2000 - 31 December 2002

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    2003-03-31

    "Genetics and Major Psychiatric Disorders: A Program for Genetic Counselors" provides an introduction to psychiatric genetics, with a focus on the genetics of common complex disease, for genetics professionals. The program is available as a CD-ROM and an online educational resource. The on-line version requires a direct internet connection. Each educational module begins with an interactive case study that raises significant issues addressed in each module. In addition, case studies provided throughout the educational materials support teaching of major concepts. Incorporated throughout the content are expert video clips, video clips from individuals affected by psychiatric illness, and optional "learn more" materials that offer greater depth about a particular topic. The structure of the CD-ROM permits self-navigation, but we have suggested a sequence that allows materials to build upon each other. At any point in the materials, users may pause and look up terms in the glossary or review the DSM-IV criteria for selected psychiatric disorders. A detailed site map is available for those who choose to self navigate through the content.

  15. A multi-agent genetic algorithm for community detection in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhangtao; Liu, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Complex networks are popularly used to represent a lot of practical systems in the domains of biology and sociology, and the structure of community is one of the most important network attributes which has received an enormous amount of attention. Community detection is the process of discovering the community structure hidden in complex networks, and modularity Q is one of the best known quality functions measuring the quality of communities of networks. In this paper, a multi-agent genetic algorithm, named as MAGA-Net, is proposed to optimize modularity value for the community detection. An agent, coded by a division of a network, represents a candidate solution. All agents live in a lattice-like environment, with each agent fixed on a lattice point. A series of operators are designed, namely split and merging based neighborhood competition operator, hybrid neighborhood crossover, adaptive mutation and self-learning operator, to increase modularity value. In the experiments, the performance of MAGA-Net is validated on both well-known real-world benchmark networks and large-scale synthetic LFR networks with 5000 nodes. The systematic comparisons with GA-Net and Meme-Net show that MAGA-Net outperforms these two algorithms, and can detect communities with high speed, accuracy and stability.

  16. Genetic Differentiation and Relationships of Populations in the Cycas balansae Complex (Cycadaceae) and its Conservation Implications

    PubMed Central

    XIAO, LONG-QIAN; GONG, XUN

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The Cycas balansae complex is arguably a controversial group with regard to species delineation. Some taxonomists recognize a single polymorphic species while others distinguish five narrowly defined ones. The unresolved taxonomy has the potential to bring about significant problems for species conservation. Thus, an investigation to examine the genetic diversity and differentiation in the C. balansae complex was performed to determine the relationship of populations and to test whether the morphologically defined segregations represent genetically distinct units. • Methods Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were employed to assess the genetic diversity in the C. balansae complex with a sample of 158 individuals from all extant populations in China. • Key Results ISSR markers revealed low genetic diversity in all populations studied (HE and HO averaged 0·0639 and 0·0798 at the population level, respectively). Phenetic analysis showed that the C. balansae complex grouped into five clusters closely corresponding to the narrowly defined C. balansae, C. parvula, C. shiwandashanica, C. tanqingii and C. simplicipinna. • Conclusions ISSR data suggest that the C. balansae complex has evolved into five genetically distinct units. These might be derived from a relatively widespread common ancestor through multiple vicariant events including geographical isolation resulting from the collision of the Indian plate with the Eurasian plate and from Pleistocene glaciations. In conservation, attention should be paid to each genetic unit. PMID:16517547

  17. Contrasting genetic architectures in different mouse reference populations used for studying complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Buchner, David A.; Nadeau, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are being used to study genetic networks, protein functions, and systems properties that underlie phenotypic variation and disease risk in humans, model organisms, agricultural species, and natural populations. The challenges are many, beginning with the seemingly simple tasks of mapping QTLs and identifying their underlying genetic determinants. Various specialized resources have been developed to study complex traits in many model organisms. In the mouse, remarkably different pictures of genetic architectures are emerging. Chromosome Substitution Strains (CSSs) reveal many QTLs, large phenotypic effects, pervasive epistasis, and readily identified genetic variants. In contrast, other resources as well as genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in humans and other species reveal genetic architectures dominated with a relatively modest number of QTLs that have small individual and combined phenotypic effects. These contrasting architectures are the result of intrinsic differences in the study designs underlying different resources. The CSSs examine context-dependent phenotypic effects independently among individual genotypes, whereas with GWAS and other mouse resources, the average effect of each QTL is assessed among many individuals with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds. We argue that variation of genetic architectures among individuals is as important as population averages. Each of these important resources has particular merits and specific applications for these individual and population perspectives. Collectively, these resources together with high-throughput genotyping, sequencing and genetic engineering technologies, and information repositories highlight the power of the mouse for genetic, functional, and systems studies of complex traits and disease models. PMID:25953951

  18. Mapping of Genetic Factors That Elicit Intermale Aggressive Behavior on Mouse Chromosome 15: Intruder Effects and the Complex Genetic Basis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Sugimoto, Hiroki; Kato, Shogo; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Koide, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Despite high estimates of the heritability of aggressiveness, the genetic basis for individual differences in aggression remains unclear. Previously, we showed that the wild-derived mouse strain MSM/Ms (MSM) exhibits highly aggressive behaviors, and identified chromosome 15 (Chr 15) as the location of one of the genetic factors behind this escalated aggression by using a panel of consomic strains of MSM in a C57BL/6J (B6) background. To understand the genetic effect of Chr 15 derived from MSM in detail, this study examined the aggressive behavior of a Chr 15 consomic strain towards different types of opponent. Our results showed that both resident and intruder animals had to have the same MSM Chr 15 genotype in order for attack bites to increase and attack latency to be reduced, whereas there was an intruder effect of MSM Chr 15 on tail rattle behavior. To narrow down the region that contains the genetic loci involved in the aggression-eliciting effects on Chr 15, we established a panel of subconsomic strains of MSM Chr 15. Analysis of these strains suggested the existence of multiple genes that enhance and suppress aggressive behavior on Chr 15, and these loci interact in a complex way. Regression analysis successfully identified four genetic loci on Chr 15 that influence attack latency, and one genetic locus that partially elicits aggressive behaviors was narrowed down to a 4.1-Mbp region (from 68.40 Mb to 72.50 Mb) on Chr 15. PMID:26389588

  19. Understanding the Etiology of Complex Traits: Symbiotic Relationships between Psychology and Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2007-01-01

    The present article offers comments on the infusion of methodologies, approaches, reasoning strategies, and findings from the fields of genetics and genomics into studies of complex human behaviors (hereafter, complex phenotypes). Specifically, I discuss issues of generality and specificity, causality, and replicability as they pertain to…

  20. Population genetic structure of a colonising, triploid weed, Hieracium lepidulum.

    PubMed

    Chapman, H; Robson, B; Pearson, M L

    2004-03-01

    Understanding the breeding system and population genetic structure of invasive weed species is important for biocontrol, and contributes to our understanding of the evolutionary processes associated with invasions. Hieracium lepidulum is an invasive weed in New Zealand, colonising a diverse range of habitats including native Nothofagus forest, pine plantations, scrubland and tussock grassland. It is competing with native subalpine and alpine grassland and herbfield vegetation. H. lepidulum is a triploid, diplosporous apomict, so theoretically all seed is clonal, and there is limited potential for the creation of variation through recombination. We used intersimple sequence repeats (ISSRs) to determine the population genetic structure of New Zealand populations of H. lepidulum. ISSR analysis of five populations from two regions in the South Island demonstrated high intrapopulation genotypic diversity, and high interpopulation genetic structuring; PhiST = 0.54 over all five populations. No private alleles were found in any of the five populations, and allelic differentiation was correlated to geographic distance. Cladistic compatibility analysis indicated that both recombination and mutation were important in the creation of genotypic diversity. Our data will contribute to any biocontrol program developed for H. lepidulum. It will also be a baseline data set for future comparisons of genetic structure during the course of H. lepidulum invasions.

  1. Population Genetic Structure of Aedes fluviatilis (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Multini, Laura Cristina; Suesdek, Lincoln; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2016-01-01

    Although Aedes fluviatilis is an anthropophilic mosquito found abundantly in urban environments, its biology, epidemiological potential and genetic characteristics are poorly understood. Climate change and urbanization processes that result in environmental modifications benefit certain anthropophilic mosquito species such as Ae. fluviatilis, greatly increasing their abundance in urban areas. To gain a better understanding of whether urbanization processes modulate the genetic structure of this species in the city of São Paulo, we used eight microsatellite loci to genetically characterize Ae. fluviatilis populations collected in nine urban parks in the city of São Paulo. Our results show that there is high gene flow among the populations of this species, heterozygosity deficiency and low genetic structure and that the species may have undergone a recent population expansion. There are two main hypotheses to explain these findings: (i) Ae. fluviatilis populations have undergone a population expansion as a result of urbanization; and (ii) as urbanization of the city of São Paulo occurred recently and was quite intense, the structuring of these populations cannot be observed yet, apart from in the populations of Ibirapuera and Piqueri parks, where the first signs of structuring have appeared. We believe that the expansion found in Ae. fluviatilis populations is probably correlated with the unplanned urbanization of the city of São Paulo, which transformed green areas into urbanized areas, as well as the increasing population density in the city. PMID:27598889

  2. Aging and Heterogeneity: Genetics, Social Structure, and Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, John M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that the heterogeneity of human personality characteristics increases with age. Examines reasons for this phenomenon in terms of individual differentiation, social structure/allocation, and behavioral genetics. Develops a model synthesizing various study designs that prevent variation and covariation errors from occurring in life course…

  3. Genetic relatedness among Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and M. avium complex.

    PubMed

    Labidi, A; Thoen, C O

    1989-01-01

    Total DNA was extracted from M. paratuberculosis (ATCC 19698) and from M. avium complex (ATCC 25291) cultivated on RVB-10 enriched liquid media. Restriction endonuclease analysis of total DNA was performed with 34 enzymes and DNA digestion profiles were compared. Fifteen enzymes revealed important differences between the two species. Two pairs of enzymes (EcoRII, BstNI) and (MboI, Sau3AI) provide evidence for the presence of dcmI and dam methylation in DNA of M. avium complex and M. paratuberculosis. The differences in DNA fragments of these two species could be of potential value in differentiating these clinically significant mycobacteria.

  4. Complex Convective Thermal Fluxes and Vorticity Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Tellez, Jackson; Sotillos, Laura; Lopez Gonzalez-Nieto, Pilar; Sanchez, Jesus M.; Furmanek, Petr; Diez, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Local Diffusion and the topological structure of vorticity and velocity fields is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of convective cooling and/or heating[1,2]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by an array of Thermoelectric devices (Peltier/Seebeck cells) these are controlled by thermal PID generating a buoyant heat flux [2]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine and fresh water in order to form density interfaces and low Prandtl number mixing with temperature gradients. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [3,4]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. Using ESS and selfsimilarity structures in the velocity and vorticity fieds and intermittency [3,5] that forms in the non-homogeneous flow is related to mixing and stiring. The evolution of the mixing fronts are compared and the topological characteristics of the merging of plumes and jets in different configurations presenting detailed comparison of the evolution of RM and RT, Jets and Plumes in overall mixing. The relation between structure functions, fractal analysis and spectral analysis can be very useful to determine the evolution of scales. Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or nonmixing front occurring at a density interface due to body forces [6]and gravitational acceleration are analyzed considering the fractal and spectral structure of the fronts like in removable plate experiments for Rayleigh-Taylor flows. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied

  5. Genetic structure of spatial and verbal working memory.

    PubMed

    Ando, J; Ono, Y; Wright, M J

    2001-11-01

    Working memory (WM) encompasses both short-term memory (storage) and executive functions that play an essential role in all forms of cognition. In this study, the genetic structure of storage and executive functions engaged in both a spatial and verbal WM span task is investigated using a twin sample. The sample consists of 143 monozygotic (MZ) and 93 dizygotic (DZ) Japanese twin pairs, ages 16 to 29 years. In 155 (87 MZ, 62 DZ) of these pairs, cognitive ability scores from the Kyodai Japanese IQ test are also obtained. The phenotypic relationship between WM and cognitive ability is confirmed (r = 0.26-0.44). Individual differences in WM storage and executive functions are found to be significantly influenced by genes, with heritability estimates all moderately high (43%-49%), and estimates for cognitive ability comparable to previous studies (65%). A large part of the genetic variance in storage and executive functions in both spatial and verbal modalities is due to a common genetic factor that accounts for 11% to 43% of the variance. In the reduced sample, this common genetic factor accounts for 64% and 26% of the variance in spatial and verbal cognitive ability, respectively. Additional genetic variance in WM (7%-30%) is due to modality specific factors (spatial and verbal) and a storage specific factor that may be particularly important for the verbal modality. None of the variance in cognitive ability is accounted for by the modality and storage genetic factors, suggesting these may be specific to WM.

  6. Fine-scaled human genetic structure revealed by SNP microarrays.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jinchuan; Watkins, W Scott; Witherspoon, David J; Zhang, Yuhua; Guthery, Stephen L; Thara, Rangaswamy; Mowry, Bryan J; Bulayeva, Kazima; Weiss, Robert B; Jorde, Lynn B

    2009-05-01

    We report an analysis of more than 240,000 loci genotyped using the Affymetrix SNP microarray in 554 individuals from 27 worldwide populations in Africa, Asia, and Europe. To provide a more extensive and complete sampling of human genetic variation, we have included caste and tribal samples from two states in South India, Daghestanis from eastern Europe, and the Iban from Malaysia. Consistent with observations made by Charles Darwin, our results highlight shared variation among human populations and demonstrate that much genetic variation is geographically continuous. At the same time, principal components analyses reveal discernible genetic differentiation among almost all identified populations in our sample, and in most cases, individuals can be clearly assigned to defined populations on the basis of SNP genotypes. All individuals are accurately classified into continental groups using a model-based clustering algorithm, but between closely related populations, genetic and self-classifications conflict for some individuals. The 250K data permitted high-level resolution of genetic variation among Indian caste and tribal populations and between highland and lowland Daghestani populations. In particular, upper-caste individuals from Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh form one defined group, lower-caste individuals from these two states form another, and the tribal Irula samples form a third. Our results emphasize the correlation of genetic and geographic distances and highlight other elements, including social factors that have contributed to population structure.

  7. Complexity of Infection and Genetic Diversity in Cambodian Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Lindsey R.; Popovici, Jean; Kim, Saorin; Dysoley, Lek; Zimmerman, Peter A.; Menard, Didier; Serre, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax is the most widely distributed human malaria parasite with 2.9 billion people living in endemic areas. Despite intensive malaria control efforts, the proportion of cases attributed to P. vivax is increasing in many countries. Genetic analyses of the parasite population and its dynamics could provide an assessment of the efficacy of control efforts, but, unfortunately, these studies are limited in P. vivax by the lack of informative markers and high-throughput genotyping methods. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a sequencing-based assay to simultaneously genotype more than 100 SNPs and applied this approach to ~500 P. vivax-infected individuals recruited across nine locations in Cambodia between 2004 and 2013. Our analyses showed that the vast majority of infections are polyclonal (92%) and that P. vivax displays high genetic diversity in Cambodia without apparent geographic stratification. Interestingly, our analyses also revealed that the proportion of monoclonal infections significantly increased between 2004 and 2013, possibly suggesting that malaria control strategies in Cambodia may be successfully affecting the parasite population. Conclusions/Significance Our findings demonstrate that this high-throughput genotyping assay is efficient in characterizing P. vivax diversity and can provide valuable insights to assess the efficacy of malaria elimination programs or to monitor the spread of specific parasites. PMID:27018585

  8. Finding friends and enemies in an enemies-only network: A graph diffusion kernel for predicting novel genetic interactions and co-complex membership from yeast genetic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yan; Suhail, Yasir; Lin, Yu-yi; Boeke, Jef D.; Bader, Joel S.

    2008-01-01

    The yeast synthetic lethal genetic interaction network contains rich information about underlying pathways and protein complexes as well as new genetic interactions yet to be discovered. We have developed a graph diffusion kernel as a unified framework for inferring complex/pathway membership analogous to “friends” and genetic interactions analogous to “enemies” from the genetic interaction network. When applied to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae synthetic lethal genetic interaction network, we can achieve a precision around 50% with 20% to 50% recall in the genome-wide prediction of new genetic interactions, supported by experimental validation. The kernels show significant improvement over previous best methods for predicting genetic interactions and protein co-complex membership from genetic interaction data. PMID:18832443

  9. Structure, dynamics, assembly, and evolution of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Joseph A; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of individual proteins into functional complexes is fundamental to nearly all biological processes. In recent decades, many thousands of homomeric and heteromeric protein complex structures have been determined, greatly improving our understanding of the fundamental principles that control symmetric and asymmetric quaternary structure organization. Furthermore, our conception of protein complexes has moved beyond static representations to include dynamic aspects of quaternary structure, including conformational changes upon binding, multistep ordered assembly pathways, and structural fluctuations occurring within fully assembled complexes. Finally, major advances have been made in our understanding of protein complex evolution, both in reconstructing evolutionary histories of specific complexes and in elucidating general mechanisms that explain how quaternary structure tends to evolve. The evolution of quaternary structure occurs via changes in self-assembly state or through the gain or loss of protein subunits, and these processes can be driven by both adaptive and nonadaptive influences.

  10. Functional significance of genetic variation underlying limb bone diaphyseal structure

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Ian J.; Middleton, Kevin M.; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Kelly, Scott A.; Judex, Stefan; Garland, Theodore; Demes, Brigitte

    2010-01-01

    Limb bone diaphyseal structure is frequently used to infer hominin activity levels from skeletal remains, an approach based on the well-documented ability of bone to adjust to its loading environment during life. However, diaphyseal structure is also determined in part by genetic factors. This study investigates the possibility that genetic variation underlying diaphyseal structure is influenced by the activity levels of ancestral populations and might also have functional significance in an evolutionary context. We adopted an experimental evolution approach and tested for differences in femoral diaphyseal structure in one-week-old mice from a line that had been artificially selected (45 generations) for high voluntary wheel running and unselected controls. As adults, selected mice are significantly more active on wheels and in home cages, and have thicker diaphyses. Structural differences at one week can be assumed to primarily reflect the effects of selective breeding rather than direct mechanical stimuli, given that the onset of locomotion in mice is shortly after day seven. We hypothesized that if genetically determined diaphyseal structure reflects the activity patterns of members of a lineage, then selected animals will have relatively larger diaphyseal dimensions at one week compared to controls. The results provide strong support for this hypothesis and suggest that limb bone cross sections may not always only reflect the activity levels of particular fossil individuals, but also convey an evolutionary signal providing information about hominin activity in the past. PMID:20310061

  11. Genetic Variation and Population Structure in Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sohini; Ray, Nicolas; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rojas, Winston; Parra, Maria V; Molina, Julio A; Gallo, Carla; Mazzotti, Guido; Poletti, Giovanni; Hill, Kim; Hurtado, Ana M; Labuda, Damian; Klitz, William; Barrantes, Ramiro; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Tsuneto, Luiza T; Llop, Elena; Rothhammer, Francisco; Excoffier, Laurent; Feldman, Marcus W; Rosenberg, Noah A; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2007-01-01

    We examined genetic diversity and population structure in the American landmass using 678 autosomal microsatellite markers genotyped in 422 individuals representing 24 Native American populations sampled from North, Central, and South America. These data were analyzed jointly with similar data available in 54 other indigenous populations worldwide, including an additional five Native American groups. The Native American populations have lower genetic diversity and greater differentiation than populations from other continental regions. We observe gradients both of decreasing genetic diversity as a function of geographic distance from the Bering Strait and of decreasing genetic similarity to Siberians—signals of the southward dispersal of human populations from the northwestern tip of the Americas. We also observe evidence of: (1) a higher level of diversity and lower level of population structure in western South America compared to eastern South America, (2) a relative lack of differentiation between Mesoamerican and Andean populations, (3) a scenario in which coastal routes were easier for migrating peoples to traverse in comparison with inland routes, and (4) a partial agreement on a local scale between genetic similarity and the linguistic classification of populations. These findings offer new insights into the process of population dispersal and differentiation during the peopling of the Americas. PMID:18039031

  12. The geography of malaria genetics in the Democratic Republic of Congo: A complex and fragmented landscape

    PubMed Central

    Carrel, Margaret; Patel, Jaymin; Taylor, Steve M.; Janko, Mark; Mwandagalirwa, Melchior Kashamuka; Tshefu, Antoinette K.; Escalante, Ananias A.; McCollum, Andrea; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Meshnick, Steven; Emch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how malaria parasites move between populations is important, particularly given the potential for malaria to be reintroduced into areas where it was previously eliminated. We examine the distribution of malaria genetics across seven sites within the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and two nearby countries, Ghana and Kenya, in order to understand how the relatedness of malaria parasites varies across space, and whether there are barriers to the flow of malaria parasites within the DRC or across borders. Parasite DNA was retrieved from dried blood spots from 7 Demographic and Health Survey sample clusters in the DRC. Malaria genetic characteristics of parasites from Ghana and Kenya were also obtained. For each of 9 geographic sites (7 DRC, 1 Ghana and 1 Kenya), a pair-wise RST statistic was calculated, indicating the genetic distance between malaria parasites found in those locations. Mapping genetics across the spatial extent of the study area indicates a complex genetic landscape, where relatedness between two proximal sites may be relatively high (RST > 0.64) or low (RST < 0.05), and where distal sites also exhibit both high and low genetic similarity. Mantel’s tests suggest that malaria genetics differ as geographic distances increase. Principal Coordinate Analysis suggests that genetically related samples are not co-located. Barrier analysis reveals no significant barriers to gene flow between locations. Malaria genetics in the DRC have a complex and fragmented landscape. Limited exchange of genes across space is reflected in greater genetic distance between malaria parasites isolated at greater geographic distances. There is, however, evidence for close genetic ties between distally located sample locations, indicating that movement of malaria parasites and flow of genes is being driven by factors other than distance decay. This research demonstrates the contributions that spatial disease ecology and landscape genetics can make to

  13. Molecular Population Genetic Structure in the Piping Plover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Mark P.; Haig, Susan M.; Gratto-Trevor, Cheri L.; Mullins, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    The Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus) is a migratory shorebird currently listed as Endangered in Canada and the U.S. Great Lakes, and threatened throughout the remainder of its U.S. breeding and winter range. In this study, we undertook the first comprehensive molecular genetic-based investigation of Piping Plovers. Our primary goals were to (1) address higher level subspecific taxonomic issues, (2) characterize population genetic structure, and (3) make inferences regarding past bottlenecks or population expansions that have occurred within this species. Our analyses included samples of individuals from 23 U.S. States and Canadian Provinces, and were based on mitochondrial DNA sequences (580 bp, n = 245 individuals) and eight nuclear microsatellite loci (n = 229 individuals). Our findings illustrate strong support for separate Atlantic and Interior Piping Plover subspecies (C. m. melodus and C. m. circumcinctus, respectively). Birds from the Great Lakes region were allied with the Interior subspecies group and should be taxonomically referred to as C. m. circumcinctus. Population genetic analyses suggested that genetic structure was stronger among Atlantic birds relative to the Interior group. This pattern indicates that natal and breeding site fidelity may be reduced among Interior birds. Furthermore, analyses suggested that Interior birds have previously experienced genetic bottlenecks, whereas no evidence for such patterns existed among the Atlantic subspecies. Likewise, genetic analyses indicated that the Great Lakes region has experienced a population expansion. This finding may be interpreted as population growth following a previous bottleneck event. No genetic evidence for population expansions was found for Atlantic, Prairie Canada, or U.S. Northern Great Plains individuals. We interpret our population history insights in light of 25 years of Piping Plover census data. Overall, differences observed between Interior and Atlantic birds may reflect

  14. Brain imaging genetics in ADHD and beyond - mapping pathways from gene to disorder at different levels of complexity.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marieke; Onnink, Marten; van Donkelaar, Marjolein; Wolfers, Thomas; Harich, Benjamin; Shi, Yan; Dammers, Janneke; Arias-Va Squez, Alejandro; Hoogman, Martine; Franke, Barbara

    2017-01-31

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and often persistent neurodevelopmental disorder. Beyond gene-finding, neurobiological parameters, such as brain structure, connectivity, and function, have been used to link genetic variation to ADHD symptomatology. We performed a systematic review of brain imaging genetics studies involving 62 ADHD candidate genes in childhood and adult ADHD cohorts. Fifty-one eligible research articles described studies of 13 ADHD candidate genes. Almost exclusively, single genetic variants were studied, mostly focussing on dopamine-related genes. While promising results have been reported, imaging genetics studies are thus far hampered by methodological differences in study design and analysis methodology, as well as limited sample sizes. Beyond reviewing imaging genetics studies, we also discuss the need for complementary approaches at multiple levels of biological complexity and emphasize the importance of combining and integrating findings across levels for a better understanding of biological pathways from gene to disease. These may include multi-modal imaging genetics studies, bioinformatic analyses, and functional analyses of cell and animal models.

  15. Genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex of the European brown hare (Lepus europaeus) across distinct phylogeographic areas.

    PubMed

    Koutsogiannouli, Evagelia A; Moutou, Katerina A; Stamatis, Costas; Walter, Lutz; Mamuris, Zissis

    2014-06-01

    The major histocompatibility complex is one of the best studied systems in vertebrates providing evidence for the long-term action of selection. Here, we examined the intra- and inter-population genetic diversity of the MHC class II DRB locus in European brown hare (Lepus europaeus) and correlated the results with genetic variability already estimated from the MHC DQA locus and from maternally (mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)) and biparentally (allozymes, microsatellites) inherited loci. L. europaeus showed remarkable genetic polymorphism in both DQA and DRB1 loci. The Anatolian populations exhibited the highest genetic polymorphism for both loci. Balancing selection has established increased variability in the European populations despite the founder effects after the last glaciation. Different evolutionary rates were traced for DRB1 and DQA loci, as evidenced by the higher number of common DRB1 than DQA alleles and the greater differences between DRB1 alleles with common origin in comparison with DQA alleles. The high number of rare alleles with low frequencies detected implies that frequency-dependent selection drives MHC evolution in the brown hare through the advantage of rare alleles. Both loci were under the influence of positive selection within the peptide-binding region. The functional polymorphism, recorded as amino acid substitutions within the binding pockets, fell also within distinct geographic patterns, yet it was much narrower than the genetic polymorphism. We hypothesize that certain structural and functional characteristics of the binding pockets set limitations to the actual shape of genetic polymorphism in MHC.

  16. Spatial genetic structure of a symbiotic beetle-fungal system: toward multi-taxa integrated landscape genetics.

    PubMed

    James, Patrick M A; Coltman, Dave W; Murray, Brent W; Hamelin, Richard C; Sperling, Felix A H

    2011-01-01

    Spatial patterns of genetic variation in interacting species can identify shared features that are important to gene flow and can elucidate co-evolutionary relationships. We assessed concordance in spatial genetic variation between the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and one of its fungal symbionts, Grosmanniaclavigera, in western Canada using neutral genetic markers. We examined how spatial heterogeneity affects genetic variation within beetles and fungi and developed a novel integrated landscape genetics approach to assess reciprocal genetic influences between species using constrained ordination. We also compared landscape genetic models built using Euclidean distances based on allele frequencies to traditional pair-wise Fst. Both beetles and fungi exhibited moderate levels of genetic structure over the total study area, low levels of structure in the south, and more pronounced fungal structure in the north. Beetle genetic variation was associated with geographic location while that of the fungus was not. Pinevolume and climate explained beetle genetic variation in the northern region of recent outbreak expansion. Reciprocal genetic relationships were only detectedin the south where there has been alonger history of beetle infestations. The Euclidean distance and Fst-based analyses resulted in similar models in the north and over the entire study area, but differences between methods in the south suggest that genetic distances measures should be selected based on ecological and evolutionary contexts. The integrated landscape genetics framework we present is powerful, general, and can be applied to other systems to quantify the biotic and abiotic determinants of spatial genetic variation within and among taxa.

  17. Spatial Genetic Structure of a Symbiotic Beetle-Fungal System: Toward Multi-Taxa Integrated Landscape Genetics

    PubMed Central

    James, Patrick M. A.; Coltman, Dave W.; Murray, Brent W.; Hamelin, Richard C.; Sperling, Felix A. H.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial patterns of genetic variation in interacting species can identify shared features that are important to gene flow and can elucidate co-evolutionary relationships. We assessed concordance in spatial genetic variation between the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and one of its fungal symbionts, Grosmanniaclavigera, in western Canada using neutral genetic markers. We examined how spatial heterogeneity affects genetic variation within beetles and fungi and developed a novel integrated landscape genetics approach to assess reciprocal genetic influences between species using constrained ordination. We also compared landscape genetic models built using Euclidean distances based on allele frequencies to traditional pair-wise Fst. Both beetles and fungi exhibited moderate levels of genetic structure over the total study area, low levels of structure in the south, and more pronounced fungal structure in the north. Beetle genetic variation was associated with geographic location while that of the fungus was not. Pinevolume and climate explained beetle genetic variation in the northern region of recent outbreak expansion. Reciprocal genetic relationships were only detectedin the south where there has been alonger history of beetle infestations. The Euclidean distance and Fst-based analyses resulted in similar models in the north and over the entire study area, but differences between methods in the south suggest that genetic distances measures should be selected based on ecological and evolutionary contexts. The integrated landscape genetics framework we present is powerful, general, and can be applied to other systems to quantify the biotic and abiotic determinants of spatial genetic variation within and among taxa. PMID:21991309

  18. Learned vocal variation is associated with abrupt cryptic genetic change in a parrot species complex.

    PubMed

    Ribot, Raoul F H; Buchanan, Katherine L; Endler, John A; Joseph, Leo; Bennett, Andrew T D; Berg, Mathew L

    2012-01-01

    Contact zones between subspecies or closely related species offer valuable insights into speciation processes. A typical feature of such zones is the presence of clinal variation in multiple traits. The nature of these traits and the concordance among clines are expected to influence whether and how quickly speciation will proceed. Learned signals, such as vocalizations in species having vocal learning (e.g. humans, many birds, bats and cetaceans), can exhibit rapid change and may accelerate reproductive isolation between populations. Therefore, particularly strong concordance among clines in learned signals and population genetic structure may be expected, even among continuous populations in the early stages of speciation. However, empirical evidence for this pattern is often limited because differences in vocalisations between populations are driven by habitat differences or have evolved in allopatry. We tested for this pattern in a unique system where we may be able to separate effects of habitat and evolutionary history. We studied geographic variation in the vocalizations of the crimson rosella (Platycercus elegans) parrot species complex. Parrots are well known for their life-long vocal learning and cognitive abilities. We analysed contact calls across a ca 1300 km transect encompassing populations that differed in neutral genetic markers and plumage colour. We found steep clinal changes in two acoustic variables (fundamental frequency and peak frequency position). The positions of the two clines in vocal traits were concordant with a steep cline in microsatellite-based genetic variation, but were discordant with the steep clines in mtDNA, plumage and habitat. Our study provides new evidence that vocal variation, in a species with vocal learning, can coincide with areas of restricted gene flow across geographically continuous populations. Our results suggest that traits that evolve culturally can be strongly associated with reduced gene flow between

  19. Precision genetics for complex objectives in animal agriculture.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkrug, S C; Blake, A; Carlson, D F; Doran, T; Van Eenennaam, A; Faber, D; Galli, C; Gao, Q; Hackett, P B; Li, N; Maga, E A; Muir, W M; Murray, J D; Shi, D; Stotish, R; Sullivan, E; Taylor, J F; Walton, M; Wheeler, M; Whitelaw, B; Glenn, B P

    2010-07-01

    Indirect modification of animal genomes by interspecific hybridization, cross-breeding, and selection has produced an enormous spectrum of phenotypic diversity over more than 10,000 yr of animal domestication. Using these established technologies, the farming community has successfully increased the yield and efficiency of production in most agricultural species while utilizing land resources that are often unsuitable for other agricultural purposes. Moving forward, animal well-being and agricultural sustainability are moral and economic priorities of consumers and producers alike. Therefore, these considerations will be included in any strategy designed to meet the challenges produced by global climate change and an expanding world population. Improvements in the efficiency and precision of genetic technologies will enable a timely response to meet the multifaceted food requirements of a rapidly increasing world population.

  20. [Genetic structure of the Pinzgauer breed in the Carpathian region].

    PubMed

    Glazko, V I; Stolpovskiĭ, Iu A; Tarasiuk, S I; Bukarov, N G; Popov, N A

    1996-05-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of groups of Pinzgauer cattle bred at lowland, highland, and alpine farms in the Carpathian Mountains were studied. A high variation of the cattle with respect to blood groups was revealed. It was found that the genetic structure of the highland group of Pinzagauer cattle was somewhat similar to that of Brown Carpathian cattle with respect to biochemical genetic systems, mainly transferrin and amylase-I loci. It is thought that the similarity found may be accounted for by close ecological and geographical breeding conditions of the groups of cattle studied.

  1. SHIPS: Spectral Hierarchical clustering for the Inference of Population Structure in genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Bouaziz, Matthieu; Paccard, Caroline; Guedj, Mickael; Ambroise, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Inferring the structure of populations has many applications for genetic research. In addition to providing information for evolutionary studies, it can be used to account for the bias induced by population stratification in association studies. To this end, many algorithms have been proposed to cluster individuals into genetically homogeneous sub-populations. The parametric algorithms, such as Structure, are very popular but their underlying complexity and their high computational cost led to the development of faster parametric alternatives such as Admixture. Alternatives to these methods are the non-parametric approaches. Among this category, AWclust has proven efficient but fails to properly identify population structure for complex datasets. We present in this article a new clustering algorithm called Spectral Hierarchical clustering for the Inference of Population Structure (SHIPS), based on a divisive hierarchical clustering strategy, allowing a progressive investigation of population structure. This method takes genetic data as input to cluster individuals into homogeneous sub-populations and with the use of the gap statistic estimates the optimal number of such sub-populations. SHIPS was applied to a set of simulated discrete and admixed datasets and to real SNP datasets, that are data from the HapMap and Pan-Asian SNP consortium. The programs Structure, Admixture, AWclust and PCAclust were also investigated in a comparison study. SHIPS and the parametric approach Structure were the most accurate when applied to simulated datasets both in terms of individual assignments and estimation of the correct number of clusters. The analysis of the results on the real datasets highlighted that the clusterings of SHIPS were the more consistent with the population labels or those produced by the Admixture program. The performances of SHIPS when applied to SNP data, along with its relatively low computational cost and its ease of use make this method a promising

  2. Population genetic structure of mussels from the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulnheim, H.-P.; Gosling, E.

    1988-03-01

    In a macrogeographic survey, the population genetic structure of mussels from various regions of the Baltic Sea, a large semi-enclosed brackish-water basin, was examined with reference to Mytilus edulis and M. galloprovincialis samples from the North Sea, Irish coast and southern Portugal. Electrophoretically detectable variation was analysed at 6 polymorphic enzyme loci ( Ap, Est-D, Lap-2, Odh, Pgi and Pgm). Evidence was provided of a remarkably large amount of biochemical genetic differentiation among ecologically and morphologically divergent mussel populations in the Baltic. Patterns of allele frequencies in low-salinity populations from the area of the Baltic Proper were demonstrated to be widely homogeneous but contrast strongly with those of the western Baltic, the latter resembling populations from marine habitats of the North Sea. Associated with a pronounced salinity gradient, the spatial heterogeneity in gene-pool structure is indicated by steep clines of allele frequency changes in the area of the eastern Danish isles. The adaptive significance of the observed allozymic variation is suggested. From genetic distance estimates, the subdivision of population structure is discussed in relation to the significant amount of differentiation detected within Mytilus populations to date and to the evolutionary time required for the divergence of Baltic mussel populations. The allozymic data provide evidence for the genetic distinctiveness of mussels from the low-salinity areas of the Baltic. Their position at the specific or subspecific level of classification requires further consideration.

  3. Genetic structure of North American wolverine (Gulo gulo) populations.

    PubMed

    Kyle, C J; Strobeck, C

    2001-02-01

    Wolverines (Gulo gulo) are found in low densities throughout their circumpolar distribution. They are also potentially susceptible to human-caused population fragmentation (development, recreation and fur harvesting). The combination of these factors has contributed to this species being listed as having either vulnerable or endangered status across much of its current range. The effects of inherently low densities and anthropogenic pressures on the genetic structure and variation of wolverine populations are, as yet, unknown. In this study, 461 individuals were typed at 12 microsatellite loci to investigate the population genetic structure of wolverines from north-western Alaska to eastern Manitoba. Levels of gene flow and population differentiation among the sampled regions were estimated via a genotype assignment test, pairwise F(ST), and two genetic distance measures. Our results suggest that wolverine populations from southernmost regions, in which anthropogenic factors are strongest, revealed more genetic structuring than did northern populations. Furthermore, these results suggest that reductions in this species' range may have led to population fragmentation in the extreme reaches of its southern distribution. The continued reduction of suitable habitat for this species may lead to more populations becoming isolated remnants of a larger distribution of northern wolverines, as documented in other North American carnivore species.

  4. Genetic differentiation in the Agave deserti (Agavaceae) complex of the Sonoran desert.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Quezada, A; González-Chauvet, R; Molina-Freaner, F; Eguiarte, L E

    2003-03-01

    The Agave deserti complex, comprising A. deserti, A. cerulata and A. subsimplex, represents a group of species and subspecies with a near allopatric distribution and clear differences in morphology. Genetic differentiation and taxonomic status with respect to spatial distribution of 14 populations of the complex were analyzed in an effort to understand the evolution and speciation process within the genus. Allelic frequencies, levels of genetic variation, expected heterozygosity (H(S)), proportion of polymorphic loci (P), and genetic differentiation (theta and Nei's genetic distance) were estimated using 41 putative RAPD loci. All three species show high levels of genetic variation (H(S)=0.12-0.29, P=63.4-95.1), and low genetic differentiation between populations and species (theta populations=0.14+/-0.02 (SE); G(st)=0.11+/-0.02). Accordingly, gene flow among populations was estimated as high by three different methods (N(m)=2.91-6.14). Nei's genetic distances between the three species were low compared to the values obtained from other Agavaceae, and there was no clear correlation with taxonomic divisions. In a UPGMA analysis, A. subsimplex and A. cerulata formed exclusive monospecific clusters, whereas the A. deserti populations appear in more than one cluster together with other species. The results were consistent with a pattern of genetic isolation by distance.

  5. Possible Genetic Origin of Limb-Body Wall Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gajzer, David C.; Hirzel, Alicia Cristina; Saigal, Gaurav; Rojas, Claudia Patricia; Rodriguez, Maria Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Limb body wall complex (LBWC) is characterized by multiple severe congenital malformations including an abdominal and/or thoracic wall defect covered by amnion, a short or absent umbilical cord with the placenta almost attached to the anterior fetal wall, intestinal malrotation, scoliosis, and lower extremity anomalies. There is no consensus about the etiology of LBWC and many cases with abnormal facial cleft do not meet the requirements for the true complex. We describe a series of four patients with LBWC and other malformations in an attempt to explain their etiology. There are several reports of fetuses with LBWC and absent gallbladder and one of our patients also had polysplenia. Absent gallbladder and polysplenia are associated with laterality genes including HOX, bFGF, transforming growth factor beta/activins/BMP4, WNT 1–8, and SHH. We postulate that this severe malformation may be due to abnormal genes involved in laterality and caudal development. PMID:26111189

  6. Ancestral genetic complexity of arachidonic acid metabolism in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongjuan; Zou, Qiuqiong; Yu, Ting; Song, Cuikai; Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Shangwu; Ren, Zhenghua; Xu, Anlong

    2014-09-01

    Eicosanoids play an important role in inducing complex and crucial physiological processes in animals. Eicosanoid biosynthesis in animals is widely reported; however, eicosanoid production in invertebrate tissue is remarkably different to vertebrates and in certain respects remains elusive. We, for the first time, compared the orthologs involved in arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in 14 species of invertebrates and 3 species of vertebrates. Based on parsimony, a complex AA-metabolic system may have existed in the common ancestor of the Metazoa, and then expanded and diversified through invertebrate lineages. A primary vertebrate-like AA-metabolic system via cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathways was further identified in the basal chordate, amphioxus. The expression profiling of AA-metabolic enzymes and lipidomic analysis of eicosanoid production in the tissues of amphioxus supported our supposition. Thus, we proposed that the ancestral complexity of AA-metabolic network diversified with the different lineages of invertebrates, adapting with the diversity of body plans and ecological opportunity, and arriving at the vertebrate-like pattern in the basal chordate, amphioxus.

  7. Molecular genetics of the R complex of maize. Final technical report DE-FG02-86ER13627

    SciTech Connect

    Dellaporta, Stephen

    2000-10-01

    A molecular genetic characterization of the maize R-r complex of maize was completed during the period of support. The complex was shown to consist of two main regions: the P region, containing the r-p gene which controlled pigmentation of plant parts, and the S subcomplex, containing two rl-s genes in head-to-head orientation and a nonfunctional component termed rl-q. By examining the DNA sequences at the junction of the rl genes, the complex was shown to be derived by a series of abortive transposition events. The transposable element involved in the gene duplication and rearrangements was characterized and called doppia. Meiotic instability of the R-r complex was also characterized. Loss of P or S function was associated with several structural changes including intrachromosomal recombination and excision of a novel transposable element that appears to show instability only during meiosis.

  8. Structurally simple complexes of CO2.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Luke J; Robertson, Katherine N; Kemp, Richard A; Tuononen, Heikki M; Clyburne, Jason A C

    2015-03-07

    The ability to bind CO2 through the formation of low-energy, easily-broken, bonds could prove invaluable in a variety of chemical contexts. For example, weak bonds to CO2 would greatly decrease the cost of the energy-intensive sorbent-regeneration step common to most carbon capture technologies. Furthermore, exploration of this field could lead to the discovery of novel CO2 chemistry. Reduction of complexed carbon dioxide might generate chemical feedstocks for the preparation of value-added products, particularly transportation fuels or fuel precursors. Implementation on a large scale could help to drastically reduce CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. However, literature examples of weakly bonded complexes of CO2 are relatively few and true coordination complexes to a 'naked' CO2 fragment are nearly unheard of. In this review article, a variety of complexes of CO2 featuring diverse binding modes and reactivity will be examined. Topics covered include: (A) inclusion complexes of CO2 in porous materials. (B) Zwitterionic carbamates produced from the reaction of CO2 with polyamines. (C) Carbamate salts produced from reaction of CO2 with two equivalents of an amine. (D) Insertion products of CO2 into acid-base adducts (e.g., metal complexes). (E) Lewis acid-base activated CO2, such as frustrated Lewis pair complexes. (F) Simple base-CO2 adducts, wherein the base-CO2 bond is the only interaction formed. Complexes in the last category are of particular interest, and include imidazol-2-carboxylates (N-heterocyclic carbene adducts of CO2) as well as a few other examples that lie outside NHC chemistry.

  9. Genetic Markers and Quantitative Genetic Variation in Medicago Truncatula (Leguminosae): A Comparative Analysis of Population Structure

    PubMed Central

    Bonnin, I.; Prosperi, J. M.; Olivieri, I.

    1996-01-01

    Two populations of the selfing annual Medicago truncatula Gaertn. (Leguminoseae), each subdivided into three subpopulations, were studied for both metric traits (quantitative characters) and genetic markers (random amplified polymorphic DNA and one morphological, single-locus marker). Hierarchical analyses of variance components show that (1) populations are more differentiated for quantitative characters than for marker loci, (2) the contribution of both within and among subpopulations components of variance to overall genetic variance of these characters is reduced as compared to markers, and (3) at the population level, within population structure is slightly but not significantly larger for markers than for quantitative traits. Under the hypothesis that most markers are neutral, such comparisons may be used to make hypotheses about the strength and heterogeneity of natural selection in the face of genetic drift and gene flow. We thus suggest that in these populations, quantitative characters are under strong divergent selection among populations, and that gene flow is restricted among populations and subpopulations. PMID:8844165

  10. Life history determines genetic structure and evolutionary potential of host–parasite interactions

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Luke G.; Thrall, Peter H.; Burdon, Jeremy J.; Linde, Celeste C.

    2009-01-01

    Measures of population genetic structure and diversity of disease-causing organisms are commonly used to draw inferences regarding their evolutionary history and potential to generate new variation in traits that determine interactions with their hosts. Parasite species exhibit a range of population structures and life-history strategies, including different transmission modes, life-cycle complexity, off-host survival mechanisms and dispersal ability. These are important determinants of the frequency and predictability of interactions with host species. Yet the complex causal relationships between spatial structure, life history and the evolutionary dynamics of parasite populations are not well understood. We demonstrate that a clear picture of the evolutionary potential of parasitic organisms and their demographic and evolutionary histories can only come from understanding the role of life history and spatial structure in influencing population dynamics and epidemiological patterns. PMID:18947899

  11. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats.

    PubMed

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H; Koller, Daniel L; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S; Aitman, Tim J; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating new genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relationship between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci, a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show that the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ substantially from those of inbred mice and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species.

  12. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D.; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H.; Koller, Daniel L.; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J.; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S.; Aitman, Tim J.; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E. Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming our understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating novel genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relation between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ significantly from those of inbred mice, and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species. PMID:23708188

  13. Ancient trade routes shaped the genetic structure of horses in eastern Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Warmuth, Vera M; Campana, Michael G; Eriksson, Anders; Bower, Mim; Barker, Graeme; Manica, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    Animal exchange networks have been shown to play an important role in determining gene flow among domestic animal populations. The Silk Road is one of the oldest continuous exchange networks in human history, yet its effectiveness in facilitating animal exchange across large geographical distances and topographically challenging landscapes has never been explicitly studied. Horses are known to have been traded along the Silk Roads; however, extensive movement of horses in connection with other human activities may have obscured the genetic signature of the Silk Roads. To investigate the role of the Silk Roads in shaping the genetic structure of horses in eastern Eurasia, we analysed microsatellite genotyping data from 455 village horses sampled from 17 locations. Using least-cost path methods, we compared the performance of models containing the Silk Roads as corridors for gene flow with models containing single landscape features. We also determined whether the recent isolation of former Soviet Union countries from the rest of Eurasia has affected the genetic structure of our samples. The overall level of genetic differentiation was low, consistent with historically high levels of gene flow across the study region. The spatial genetic structure was characterized by a significant, albeit weak, pattern of isolation by distance across the continent with no evidence for the presence of distinct genetic clusters. Incorporating landscape features considerably improved the fit of the data; however, when we controlled for geographical distance, only the correlation between genetic differentiation and the Silk Roads remained significant, supporting the effectiveness of this ancient trade network in facilitating gene flow across large geographical distances in a topographically complex landscape.

  14. Genetics objective structured clinical exams at the Maimonides Infants & Children's Hospital of Brooklyn, New York.

    PubMed

    Altshuler, Lisa; Kachur, Elizabeth; Krinshpun, Shifra; Sullivan, Deborah

    2008-11-01

    In 2003, the Maimonides Infants & Children's Hospital received a Title VII Residency Training in Primary Care grant to integrate genetic-specific competencies into postgraduate pediatrics education. As part of that endeavor, mandatory yearly genetics objective structured clinical exams (OSCEs) were instituted for third-year residents. This article reports on the first three years of experience with this innovative educational tool.After an overview of genetic concepts, dysmorphology, and communication styles, residents complete a five-station OSCE and receive feedback from standardized patients and from the faculty who observe them. After this clinical exercise, the residents participate in a small-group debriefing session to share strategies for effective communication and clinical case management and to discuss the ethical issues that arise with these genetic cases.In three years, 60 residents have completed the genetics OSCE program. Evaluation data demonstrate that the program has been effective in both introducing genetic-specific challenges and assessing residents' clinical skills. It has helped trainees self-identify both strengths and further training needs. Pre- and postsurveys among the trainees show increased comfort levels in performing 5 of 12 genetic-related clinical tasks.We conclude that genetics OSCEs are an enriching educational tool. Merely providing trainees and practicing physicians with the latest scientific information is unlikely to prepare them for counseling patients about complex genetic issues. Developing proficiency requires focused practice and effective feedback.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs.

  15. Did Genetic Drift Drive Increases in Genome Complexity?

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Kenneth D.; Garland, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the dramatic patterns of genome size variation across the tree of life remain mysterious. Effective population size (Ne) has been proposed as a major driver of genome size: selection is expected to efficiently weed out deleterious mutations increasing genome size in lineages with large (but not small) Ne. Strong support for this model was claimed from a comparative analysis of Neu and genome size for ≈30 phylogenetically diverse species ranging from bacteria to vertebrates, but analyses at that scale have so far failed to account for phylogenetic nonindependence of species. In our reanalysis, accounting for phylogenetic history substantially altered the perceived strength of the relationship between Neu and genomic attributes: there were no statistically significant associations between Neu and gene number, intron size, intron number, the half-life of gene duplicates, transposon number, transposons as a fraction of the genome, or overall genome size. We conclude that current datasets do not support the hypothesis of a mechanistic connection between Ne and these genomic attributes, and we suggest that further progress requires larger datasets, phylogenetic comparative methods, more robust estimators of genetic drift, and a multivariate approach that accounts for correlations between putative explanatory variables. PMID:20865118

  16. Population genetic structure of the German cockroach (Blattodea: Blattellidae) in apartment buildings.

    PubMed

    Crissman, Jonathan R; Booth, Warren; Santangelo, Richard G; Mukha, Dmitry V; Vargo, Edward L; Schal, Coby

    2010-07-01

    The German cockroach, Blattella germanica (L.) (Blattodea: Blattellidae), is a major residential pest with the potential to vector various pathogens and produce and disseminate household allergens. Understanding population genetic structure and differentiation of this important pest is critical to efforts to eradicate infestations, yet little is known in this regard. Using highly polymorphic microsatellite markers, we investigated patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation within and among 18 apartments from six apartment complexes located in Raleigh, NC. No departure from panmixia was found between rooms within apartments, indicating that active dispersal resulting in gene flow may occur among rooms within apartment units. Alternatively, aggregations within apartments may exist in relative isolation under a metapopulation framework, derived from a recent, common source. Thus, in the event of population control practices leading to incomplete cockroach eradication within an apartment, recolonization of shelters and rooms is likely to occur from a genetically similar aggregation. A pattern of isolation-by-distance across the six apartment complexes indicated that dispersal was more common within complexes than among them, and F statistics suggested greater genetic similarity between apartments in a single building than between separate buildings of an apartment complex. Similarly, neighbor-joining tree and Bayesian clustering analyses were able to cluster only those apartments that were within a single building, indicating higher dispersal with associated gene flow within buildings than between them. The lack of any broader connectivity, as indicated by significant F(ST) and G-tests suggests that human-mediated dispersal of B. germanica between buildings of an apartment complex or between complexes occurs infrequently enough to have negligible effects on gene flow.

  17. Complex spatial dynamics maintain northern leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) genetic diversity in a temporally varying landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mushet, David M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Chen, Yongjiu; Stockwell, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to most local amphibian populations, northeastern populations of the Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) have displayed uncharacteristically high levels of genetic diversity that have been attributed to large, stable populations. However, this widely distributed species also occurs in areas known for great climatic fluctuations that should be reflected in corresponding fluctuations in population sizes and reduced genetic diversity. To test our hypothesis that Northern Leopard Frog genetic diversity would be reduced in areas subjected to significant climate variability, we examined the genetic diversity of L. pipiens collected from 12 sites within the Prairie Pothole Region of North Dakota. Despite the region's fluctuating climate that includes periods of recurring drought and deluge, we found unexpectedly high levels of genetic diversity approaching that of northeastern populations. Further, genetic structure at a landscape scale was strikingly homogeneous; genetic differentiation estimates (Dest) averaged 0.10 (SD = 0.036) across the six microsatellite loci we studied, and two Bayesian assignment tests (STRUCTURE and BAPS) failed to reveal the development of significant population structure across the 68 km breadth of our study area. These results suggest that L. pipiens in the Prairie Pothole Region consists of a large, panmictic population capable of maintaining high genetic diversity in the face of marked climate variability.

  18. Genetically modified photosynthetic antenna complexes with blueshifted absorbance bands.

    PubMed

    Fowler, G J; Visschers, R W; Grief, G G; van Grondelle, R; Hunter, C N

    1992-02-27

    Light energy for photosynthesis is collected by the antenna system, creating an excited state which migrates energetically 'downhill'. To achieve efficient migration of energy the antenna is populated with a series of pigments absorbing at progressively redshifted wavelengths. This variety in absorbing species in vivo has been created in a biosynthetically economical fashion by modulating the absorbance behaviour of one kind of (bacterio)chlorophyll molecule. This modulation is poorly understood but has been ascribed to pigment-pigment and pigment-protein interactions. We have examined the relationship between aromatic residues in antenna polypeptides and pigment absorption, by studying the effects of site-directed mutagenesis on a bacterial antenna complex. A clear correlation was observed between the absorbance of bacteriochlorophyll a and the presence of two tyrosine residues, alpha Tyr44 and alpha Tyr45, in the alpha subunit of the peripheral light-harvesting complex of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, a purple photosynthetic bacterium that provides a well characterized system for site-specific mutagenesis. By constructing single (alpha Tyr44, alpha Tyr45----PheTyr) and then double (alpha Tyr44, alpha Tyr45----PheLeu) site-specific mutants, the absorbance of bacteriochlorophyll was blueshifted by 11 and 24 nm at 77 K, respectively. The results suggest that there is a close approach of tyrosine residues to bacteriochlorophyll, and that this proximity may promote redshifts in vivo.

  19. Genetics of tuberous sclerosis complex: implications for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Caban, Carolina; Khan, Nubaira; Hasbani, Daphne M; Crino, Peter B

    2017-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multisystem disorder that results from heterozygous mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2. The primary organ systems that are affected include the brain, skin, lung, kidney, and heart, all with variable frequency, penetrance, and severity. Neurological features include epilepsy, autism, and intellectual disability. There are more than 1,500 known pathogenic variants for TSC1 and TSC2, including deletion, nonsense, and missense mutations, and all pathogenic mutations are inactivating, leading to loss of function effects on the encoded proteins TSC1 and TSC2. These proteins form a complex to constitutively inhibit mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling cascade, and as a consequence, mTOR signaling is constitutively active within all TSC-associated lesions. The mTOR inhibitors rapamycin (sirolimus) and everolimus have been shown to reduce the size of renal and brain lesions and improve pulmonary function in TSC, and these compounds may also decrease seizure frequency. The clinical application of mTOR inhibitors in TSC has provided one of the first examples of precision medicine in a neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:28053551

  20. Population genetic structure of malaria vector Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Gakhar, S K; Sharma, Richa; Sharma, Arvind

    2013-04-01

    Malaria is a complex disease that afflicts human today. Malaria epidemiology is associated with drug resistance in parasite and differential distribution and insecticide resistance in vector. Efforts are being made to eradicate malaria but burden of malaria is still increasing. Vector control is essential for malaria prevention strategies. Knowledge of population genetic structure is pre-requisite for determining prevention strategies particularly using transgenic mosquitoes. Population genetic study can predict level of gene flow between different populations. Anopheles stephensi Liston is urban vector of malaria in Indo-Pakistan subcontinent. About 12% of malaria cases of malaria in India are contributed by A. stephensi. Studies conducted on population genetics of A. stephensi using various markers in different parts of the world are discussed in this communication.

  1. What Makes Reading Difficult: The Complexity of Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Eunice L.

    The original version of the "Helen Keller Story" and a linguistically more complex version of it were used to test the hypothesis that reading comprehension is affected by the complexity of linguistic structures. Complexity was measured by four readability measures, the mean number of words per T-unit, and the Schmidt-Kittrell Linguistic…

  2. Host genetics is associated with the gut microbial community membership rather than the structure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peihua; Irwin, David M; Dong, Dong

    2016-04-26

    The issue of what factors shape the gut microbiota has been studied for years. However, questions on the contribution of host genetics to the colonizing process of the gut microbiota and to the extent that host genetics affect the gut microbiota have not yet been clearly answered. Most recently published reports have concluded that host genetics make a smaller contribution than other factors, such as diet, in determining the gut microbiota. Here we have exploited the increasing amount of fecal 16S rRNA gene sequencing data that are becoming available to conduct an analysis to assess the influence of host genetics on the diversity of the gut microbiota. By re-analyzing data obtained from over 5000 stool samples, representing individuals living on five continents and ranging in age from 3 days to 87 years, we found that the strength of the various factors affecting the membership or structure of the gut microbiota are quite different, which leads us to a hypothesis that the presence or absence of taxa is largely controlled by host genetics, whereas non-genetic factors regulate the abundance of each taxon. This hypothesis is supported by the finding that the genome similarity positively correlates with the similarity of community membership. Finally, we showed that only severe perturbations are able to alter the gut microbial community membership. In summary, our work provides new insights into understanding the complexities of the gut microbial community and how it responds to changes imposed on it.

  3. Genetic structure in insular and mainland populations of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) and their hemosporidian parasites

    PubMed Central

    Bichet, Coraline; Moodley, Yoshan; Penn, Dustin J; Sorci, Gabriele; Garnier, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Small and isolated populations usually exhibit low levels of genetic variability, and thus, they are expected to have a lower capacity to adapt to changes in environmental conditions, such as exposure to pathogens and parasites. Comparing the genetic variability of selectively neutral versus functional loci allows one to assess the evolutionary history of populations and their future evolutionary potential. The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) control immune recognition of parasites, and their unusually high diversity is genes which is likely driven by parasite-mediated balancing selection. Here, we examined diversity and differentiation of neutral microsatellite loci and functional MHC class I genes in house sparrows (Passer domesticus), living in six insular and six mainland populations, and we aimed to determine whether their diversity or differentiation correlates with the diversity and the prevalence of infection of hemosporidian parasites. We found that island bird populations tended to have lower neutral genetic variability, whereas MHC variability gene was similar between island and mainland populations. Similarly, island populations tended to show greater genetic differentiation than mainland populations, especially at microsatellite markers. The maintenance of MHC genetic diversity and its less marked structure in the island populations could be attributed to balancing-selection. The greater MHC differentiation among populations was negatively correlated with similarity in blood parasites (prevalence and diversity of parasite strains) between populations. Even at low prevalence and small geographical scale, haemosporidian parasites might contribute to structure the variability of immune genes among populations of hosts. PMID:25937907

  4. Genetic epidemiology and nonsyndromic structural birth defects: from candidate genes to epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Charlotte A; Chowdhury, Shimul; Cleves, Mario A; Erickson, Stephen; MacLeod, Stewart L; Shaw, Gary M; Shete, Sanjay; Witte, John S; Tycko, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    Birth defects are a leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The vast majority of birth defects are nonsyndromic, and although their etiologies remain mostly unknown, evidence supports the hypothesis that they result from the complex interaction of genetic, epigenetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors. Since our last review published in 2002 describing the basic tools of genetic epidemiology used to study nonsyndromic structural birth defects, many new approaches have become available and have been used with varying success. Through rapid advances in genomic technologies, investigators are now able to investigate large portions of the genome at a fraction of previous costs. With next-generation sequencing, research has progressed from assessing a small percentage of single-nucleotide polymorphisms to assessing the entire human protein-coding repertoire (exome)-an approach that is starting to uncover rare but informative mutations associated with nonsyndromic birth defects. Herein, we report on the current state of the genetic epidemiology of birth defects and comment on future challenges and opportunities. We consider issues of study design, and we discuss common variant approaches, including candidate gene studies and genome-wide association studies. We also discuss the complexities embedded in exploring interactions between genes and the environment. We complete our review by describing new and promising next-generation sequencing technologies and examining how the study of epigenetic mechanisms could become the key to unraveling the complex etiologies of nonsyndromic structural birth defects.

  5. Evolution of genetic redundancy: the relevance of complexity in genotype-phenotype mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Nen; Ishihara, Shuji; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-06-01

    Despite its ubiquity among organisms, genetic redundancy is presumed to reduce total population fitness and is therefore unlikely to evolve. This study evaluates an evolutionary model with high-dimensional genotype-phenotype mapping (GPM) by applying a replica method to deal with quenched randomness. From the method, the dependence of fitness on genetic redundancy is analytically calculated. The results demonstrate that genetic redundancy can have higher population fitness under complex GPM, which tends to favor gene duplication in selection processes, further enhancing the potential for evolutionary innovations.

  6. Atomic structure of the Y complex of the nuclear pore.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Kotaro; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Kabachinski, Greg; Schwartz, Thomas U

    2015-05-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the principal gateway for transport into and out of the nucleus. Selectivity is achieved through the hydrogel-like core of the NPC. The structural integrity of the NPC depends on ~15 architectural proteins, which are organized in distinct subcomplexes to form the >40-MDa ring-like structure. Here we present the 4.1-Å crystal structure of a heterotetrameric core element ('hub') of the Y complex, the essential NPC building block, from Myceliophthora thermophila. Using the hub structure together with known Y-complex fragments, we built the entire ~0.5-MDa Y complex. Our data reveal that the conserved core of the Y complex has six rather than seven members. Evolutionarily distant Y-complex assemblies share a conserved core that is very similar in shape and dimension, thus suggesting that there are closely related architectural codes for constructing the NPC in all eukaryotes.

  7. Genetic Associations of Brain Structural Networks in Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Kanchana; Calhoun, Vince D.; Gelernter, Joel; Stevens, Michael C.; Liu, Jingyu; Bolognani, Federico; Windemuth, Andreas; Ruaño, Gualberto; Assaf, Michal; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is a complex genetic disorder, with multiple putative risk genes and many reports of reduced cortical gray matter. Identifying the genetic loci contributing to these structural alterations in schizophrenia (and likely also to normal structural gray matter patterns) could aid understanding of schizophrenia’s pathophysiology. We used structural parameters as potential intermediate illness markers to investigate genomic factors derived from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Method We used research quality structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) scans from European American subjects including 33 healthy control subjects and 18 schizophrenia patients. All subjects were genotyped for 367 SNPs. Linked sMRI and genetic (SNP) components were extracted to reveal relationships between brain structure and SNPs, using parallel independent component analysis, a novel multivariate approach that operates effectively in small sample sizes. Results We identified an sMRI component that significantly correlated with a genetic component (r = −.536, p < .00005); components also distinguished groups. In the sMRI component, schizophrenia gray matter deficits were in brain regions consistently implicated in previous reports, including frontal and temporal lobes and thalamus (p < .01). These deficits were related to SNPs from 16 genes, several previously associated with schizophrenia risk and/or involved in normal central nervous system development, including AKT, PI3K, SLC6A4, DRD2, CHRM2, and ADORA2A. Conclusions Despite the small sample size, this novel analysis method identified an sMRI component including brain areas previously reported to be abnormal in schizophrenia and an associated genetic component containing several putative schizophrenia risk genes. Thus, we identified multiple genes potentially underlying specific structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia. PMID:20691427

  8. The complex genetic and molecular basis of a model quantitative trait.

    PubMed

    Linder, Robert A; Seidl, Fabian; Ha, Kimberly; Ehrenreich, Ian M

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative traits are often influenced by many loci with small effects. Identifying most of these loci and resolving them to specific genes or genetic variants is challenging. Yet, achieving such a detailed understanding of quantitative traits is important, as it can improve our knowledge of the genetic and molecular basis of heritable phenotypic variation. In this study, we use a genetic mapping strategy that involves recurrent backcrossing with phenotypic selection to obtain new insights into an ecologically, industrially, and medically relevant quantitative trait-tolerance of oxidative stress, as measured based on resistance to hydrogen peroxide. We examine the genetic basis of hydrogen peroxide resistance in three related yeast crosses and detect 64 distinct genomic loci that likely influence the trait. By precisely resolving or cloning a number of these loci, we demonstrate that a broad spectrum of cellular processes contribute to hydrogen peroxide resistance, including DNA repair, scavenging of reactive oxygen species, stress-induced MAPK signaling, translation, and water transport. Consistent with the complex genetic and molecular basis of hydrogen peroxide resistance, we show two examples where multiple distinct causal genetic variants underlie what appears to be a single locus. Our results improve understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of a highly complex, model quantitative trait.

  9. (Studies of the genetic regulation of the Thermomonospora cellulase complex)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    The goals of this project are to determine the molecular mechanisms regulating cellulose synthesis in the soil bacterium Thermomonosporafusca and to determine the molecular mechanism by which T.fusca cellulases degrade crystalline cellulose. We have determined a structure for the T.fusca E{sub 2} catalytic subunit (E{sub 2}-30) by x-ray crystallography. This structure is quite similar to that of T.reesei CBHU but there are a number of differences. One is that the E{sub 2} active site is in a cleft while that of CBHII is in a tunnel. This is an expected result since E{sub 2} is an endocellulase. Large amounts of homogenous E{sub 5} catalytic subunit have been prepared and attempts to crystallize it are underway. Crystals of E{sub 2}-30 were soaked in cellobiose and modified crystals detracted well, however difference Fourier analysis showed many changes, so that we could not localize cellobiose in the 3-D structure of E{sub 2}-30. This implies that binding of cellobiose causes a significant change in the structure of E{sub 2}-30. The stereochemistry of the cleavage catalyzed by E{sub l}, E{sub 2} and E{sub 5} was determined in collaboration with Dr. Stephen Withers and E{sub 1} and 2 inverted the glycoside linkage while E{sub 5} does not. The entire E{sub l} and E{sub 4} genes have been induced into Streptomyces lividans where they are expressed at a high level and the E{sub l} and E{sub 4} are completely secreted into the medium. Studies on the synergism between the exocellulase E{sub 3} and the endocellulases E{sub 2} or E{sub 5} show that both exo and endocellulase activities are stimulated when they are assayed together.

  10. Genetic diversity, structure and differentiation in cultivated walnut (juglans regia l.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An analysis of genetic structure and differentiation in cultivated walnut (Juglans regia) using 15 microsatellite loci revealed a considerable amount of genetic variation with a mild genetic structure indicating five genetic groups corresponding to the centers of diversity within the home range of w...

  11. Gelled Complex Fluids: Combining Unique Structures with Mechanical Stability.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Gießelmann, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Gelled complex fluids are soft materials in which the microstructure of the complex fluid is combined with the mechanical stability of a gel. To obtain a gelled complex fluid one either adds a gelator to a complex fluid or replaces the solvent in a gel by a complex fluid. The most prominent example of a "natural" gelled complex fluid is the cell. There are various strategies by which one can form a gelled complex fluid; one such strategy is orthogonal self-assembly, that is, the independent but simultaneous formation of two coexisting self-assembled structures within one system. The aim of this Review is to describe the structure and potential applications of various man-made gelled complex fluids and to clarify whether or not the respective system is formed by orthogonal self-assembly.

  12. The genetic structure and mating system of Acrocomia aculeata (Arecaceae).

    PubMed

    Abreu, Aluana Gonçalves; Priolli, Regina Helena Geribello; Azevedo-Filho, Joaquim Adelino; Nucci, Stella Maris; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Coelho, Ricardo Marques; Colombo, Carlos Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Acrocomia aculeata is a perennial, fruit-producing palm tree, native to tropical forests. Its fruits have spurred interest because of their significant potential for use in the cosmetic industry and as feedstock for biofuel. In the present study, the genetic structure and mating system in Acrocomia aculeata were analyzed, using eight nuclear micro-satellite loci and samples from São Paulo and Minas Gerais states, Brazil. By means of Bayesian analysis, these populations were clustered into two or three groups. A high multilocus outcrossing rate suggests that outcrosses were predominant, although a certain degree of biparental inbreeding also occurred. Thus, although monoecious and self-compatible, there is every indication that A. aculeata bears a mixed reproductive system, with a predominance of outcrossing. Given the genetic structure revealed hereby, future conservation strategies and germplasm collecting should be focussed on sampling and preserving individuals from different clusters.

  13. The genetic structure and mating system of Acrocomia aculeata (Arecaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Aluana Gonçalves; Priolli, Regina Helena Geribello; Azevedo-Filho, Joaquim Adelino; Nucci, Stella Maris; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Coelho, Ricardo Marques; Colombo, Carlos Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Acrocomia aculeata is a perennial, fruit-producing palm tree, native to tropical forests. Its fruits have spurred interest because of their significant potential for use in the cosmetic industry and as feedstock for biofuel. In the present study, the genetic structure and mating system in Acrocomia aculeata were analyzed, using eight nuclear micro-satellite loci and samples from São Paulo and Minas Gerais states, Brazil. By means of Bayesian analysis, these populations were clustered into two or three groups. A high multilocus outcrossing rate suggests that outcrosses were predominant, although a certain degree of biparental inbreeding also occurred. Thus, although monoecious and self-compatible, there is every indication that A. aculeata bears a mixed reproductive system, with a predominance of outcrossing. Given the genetic structure revealed hereby, future conservation strategies and germplasm collecting should be focussed on sampling and preserving individuals from different clusters. PMID:22481883

  14. The genetic structure and history of Africans and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Tishkoff, Sarah A; Reed, Floyd A; Friedlaender, Françoise R; Ehret, Christopher; Ranciaro, Alessia; Froment, Alain; Hirbo, Jibril B; Awomoyi, Agnes A; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Doumbo, Ogobara; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Juma, Abdalla T; Kotze, Maritha J; Lema, Godfrey; Moore, Jason H; Mortensen, Holly; Nyambo, Thomas B; Omar, Sabah A; Powell, Kweli; Pretorius, Gideon S; Smith, Michael W; Thera, Mahamadou A; Wambebe, Charles; Weber, James L; Williams, Scott M

    2009-05-22

    Africa is the source of all modern humans, but characterization of genetic variation and of relationships among populations across the continent has been enigmatic. We studied 121 African populations, four African American populations, and 60 non-African populations for patterns of variation at 1327 nuclear microsatellite and insertion/deletion markers. We identified 14 ancestral population clusters in Africa that correlate with self-described ethnicity and shared cultural and/or linguistic properties. We observed high levels of mixed ancestry in most populations, reflecting historical migration events across the continent. Our data also provide evidence for shared ancestry among geographically diverse hunter-gatherer populations (Khoesan speakers and Pygmies). The ancestry of African Americans is predominantly from Niger-Kordofanian (approximately 71%), European (approximately 13%), and other African (approximately 8%) populations, although admixture levels varied considerably among individuals. This study helps tease apart the complex evolutionary history of Africans and African Americans, aiding both anthropological and genetic epidemiologic studies.

  15. The Integral Membrane Protein Snl1p Is Genetically Linked to Yeast Nuclear Pore Complex Function

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Albert K.; Raczniak, Gregory A.; Ives, Eric B.; Wente, Susan R.

    1998-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins are predicted to play key roles in the biogenesis and function of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Revealing how the transport apparatus is assembled will be critical for understanding the mechanism of nucleocytoplasmic transport. We observed that expression of the carboxyl-terminal 200 amino acids of the nucleoporin Nup116p had no effect on wild-type yeast cells, but it rendered the nup116 null strain inviable at all temperatures and coincidentally resulted in the formation of nuclear membrane herniations at 23°C. To identify factors related to NPC function, a genetic screen for high-copy suppressors of this lethal nup116-C phenotype was conducted. One gene (designated SNL1 for suppressor of nup116-C lethal) was identified whose expression was necessary and sufficient for rescuing growth. Snl1p has a predicted molecular mass of 18.3 kDa, a putative transmembrane domain, and limited sequence similarity to Pom152p, the only previously identified yeast NPC-associated integral membrane protein. By both indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation studies, Snl1p was localized to both the nuclear envelope and the endoplasmic reticulum. Membrane extraction and topology assays suggested that Snl1p was an integral membrane protein, with its carboxyl-terminal region exposed to the cytosol. With regard to genetic specificity, the nup116-C lethality was also suppressed by high-copy GLE2 and NIC96. Moreover, high-copy SNL1 suppressed the temperature sensitivity of gle2–1 and nic96-G3 mutant cells. The nic96-G3 allele was identified in a synthetic lethal genetic screen with a null allele of the closely related nucleoporin nup100. Gle2p physically associated with Nup116p in vitro, and the interaction required the N-terminal region of Nup116p. Therefore, genetic links between the role of Snl1p and at least three NPC-associated proteins were established. We suggest that Snl1p plays a stabilizing role in NPC structure and function

  16. Surface Appendages of Archaea: Structure, Function, Genetics and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jarrell, Ken F.; Ding, Yan; Nair, Divya B.; Siu, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Organisms representing diverse subgroupings of the Domain Archaea are known to possess unusual surface structures. These can include ones unique to Archaea such as cannulae and hami as well as archaella (archaeal flagella) and various types of pili that superficially resemble their namesakes in Bacteria, although with significant differences. Major advances have occurred particularly in the study of archaella and pili using model organisms with recently developed advanced genetic tools. There is common use of a type IV pili-model of assembly for several archaeal surface structures including archaella, certain pili and sugar binding structures termed bindosomes. In addition, there are widespread posttranslational modifications of archaellins and pilins with N-linked glycans, with some containing novel sugars. Archaeal surface structures are involved in such diverse functions as swimming, attachment to surfaces, cell to cell contact resulting in genetic transfer, biofilm formation, and possible intercellular communication. Sometimes functions are co-dependent on other surface structures. These structures and the regulation of their assembly are important features that allow various Archaea, including thermoacidophilic, hyperthermophilic, halophilic, and anaerobic ones, to survive and thrive in the extreme environments that are commonly inhabited by members of this domain. PMID:25371333

  17. Population structure and genetic diversity of moose in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jennifer I; Hundertmark, Kris J; Bowyer, R Terry; McCracken, Kevin G

    2009-01-01

    Moose (Alces alces) are highly mobile mammals that occur across arboreal regions of North America, Europe, and Asia. Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) range across much of Alaska and are primary herbivore consumers, exerting a prominent influence on ecosystem structure and functioning. Increased knowledge gained from population genetics provides insights into their population dynamics, history, and dispersal of these unique large herbivores and can aid in conservation efforts. We examined the genetic diversity and population structure of moose (n = 141) with 8 polymorphic microsatellites from 6 regions spanning much of Alaska. Expected heterozygosity was moderate (H(E) = 0.483-0.612), and private alleles ranged from 0 to 6. Both F(ST) and R(ST) indicated significant population structure (P < 0.001) with F(ST) < 0.109 and R(ST) < 0.125. Results of analyses from STRUCTURE indicated 2 prominent population groups, a mix of moose from the Yakutat and Tetlin regions versus all other moose, with slight substructure observed among the second population. Estimates of dispersal differed between analytical approaches, indicating a high level of historical or current gene flow. Mantel tests indicated that isolation-by-distance partially explained observed structure among moose populations (R(2) = 0.45, P < 0.01). Finally, there was no evidence of bottlenecks either at the population level or overall. We conclude that weak population structure occurs among moose in Alaska with population expansion from interior Alaska westward toward the coast.

  18. A Genetic Analysis of the Suppressor 2 of Zeste Complex of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C. T.; Howe, M.

    1995-01-01

    The zeste(1) (z(1)) mutation of Drosophila melanogaster produces a mutant yellow eye color instead of the wild-type red. Genetic and molecular data suggest that z(1) achieves this change by altering expression of the wild-type white gene in a manner that exhibits transvection effects. There exist suppressor and enhancer mutations that modify the z(1) eye color, and this paper summarizes our studies of those belonging to the Suppressor 2 of zeste complex [Su(z)2-C]. The Su(z)2-C consists of at least three subregions called Psc (Posterior sex combs), Su(z)2 and Su(z)2D (Distal). The products of these subregions are proposed to act at the level of chromatin. Complementation analyses predict that the products are functionally similar and interacting. The alleles of Psc define two overlapping phenotypic classes, the hopeful and hapless. The distinctions between these two classes and the intragenic complementation seen among some of the Psc alleles are consistent with a multidomain structure for the product of Psc. Psc is a member of the homeotic Polycomb group of genes. A general discussion of the Polycomb and trithorax group of genes, position-effect variegation, transvection, chromosome pairing and chromatin structure is presented. PMID:7635282

  19. Structure of complexes between aluminum chloride and other chlorides, 2: Alkali-(chloroaluminates). Gaseous complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargittai, M.

    1980-01-01

    The structural chemistry of complexes between aluminum chloride and other metal chlorides is important both for practice and theory. Condensed-phase as well as vapor-phase complexes are of interest. Structural information on such complexes is reviewed. The first emphasis is given to the molten state because of its practical importance. Aluminum chloride forms volatile complexes with other metal chlorides and these vapor-phase complexes are dealt with in the second part. Finally, the variations in molecular shape and geometrical parameters are summarized.

  20. Islands within an island: Population genetic structure of the endemic Sardinian newt, Euproctus platycephalus.

    PubMed

    Ball, Sarah E; Bovero, Stefano; Sotgiu, Giuseppe; Tessa, Giulia; Angelini, Claudio; Bielby, Jon; Durrant, Christopher; Favelli, Marco; Gazzaniga, Enrico; Garner, Trenton W J

    2017-02-01

    The identification of historic and contemporary barriers to dispersal is central to the conservation of endangered amphibians, but may be hindered by their complex life history and elusive nature. The complementary information generated by mitochondrial (mtDNA) and microsatellite markers generates a valuable tool in elucidating population structure and the impact of habitat fragmentation. We applied this approach to the study of an endangered montane newt, Euproctus platycephalus. Endemic to the Mediterranean island of Sardinia, it is threatened by anthropogenic activity, disease, and climate change. We have demonstrated a clear hierarchy of structure across genetically divergent and spatially distinct subpopulations. Divergence between three main mountain regions dominated genetic partitioning with both markers. Mitochondrial phylogeography revealed a deep division dating to ca. 1 million years ago (Mya), isolating the northern region, and further differentiation between the central and southern regions ca. 0.5 Mya, suggesting an association with Pleistocene severe glacial oscillations. Our findings are consistent with a model of southward range expansion during glacial periods, with postglacial range retraction to montane habitat and subsequent genetic isolation. Microsatellite markers revealed further strong population structure, demonstrating significant divergence within the central region, and partial differentiation within the south. The northern population showed reduced genetic diversity. Discordance between mitochondrial and microsatellite markers at this scale indicated a further complexity of population structure, in keeping with male-biased dispersal and female philopatry. Our study underscores the need to elucidate cryptic population structure in the ecology and conservation strategies for endangered island-restricted amphibians, especially in the context of disease and climate change.

  1. Calculus structure on the Lie conformal algebra complex and the variational complex

    SciTech Connect

    De Sole, Alberto; Hekmati, Pedram; Kac, Victor G.

    2011-05-15

    We construct a calculus structure on the Lie conformal algebra cochain complex. By restricting to degree one chains, we recover the structure of a g-complex introduced in [A. De Sole and V. G. Kac, Commun. Math. Phys. 292, 667 (2009)]. A special case of this construction is the variational calculus, for which we provide explicit formulas.

  2. What does population structure analysis reveal about the Pterostylis longifolia complex (Orchidaceae)?

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Jasmine K; Steane, Dorothy A; Vaillancourt, René E

    2012-01-01

    Morphologically similar groups of species are common and pose significant challenges for taxonomists. Differences in approaches to classifying unique species can result in some species being overlooked, whereas others are wrongly conserved. The genetic diversity and population structure of the Pterostylis longifolia complex (Orchidaceae) in Tasmania was investigated to determine if four species, and potential hybrids, could be distinguished through genomic AFLP and chloroplast restriction-fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) markers. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) results indicated that little genetic variation was present among taxa, whereas PCoA analyses revealed genetic variation at a regional scale irrespective of taxa. Population genetic structure analyses identified three clusters that correspond to regional genetic and single taxon-specific phenotypic variation. The results from this study suggest that “longifolia” species have persisted throughout the last glacial maximum in Tasmania and that the complex may be best treated as a single taxon with several morphotypes. These results could have serious evolutionary and conservation implications as taxonomic changes could result in the instatement of a single, widespread taxon in which rarer morphotypes are not protected. PMID:23170201

  3. Family Structure Instability, Genetic Sensitivity and Child Wellbeing

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Colter; McLanahan, Sara; Hobcraft, John; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Garfinkel, Irwin; Notterman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The association between family structure instability and children’s life chances is well documented, with children reared in stable, two-parent families experiencing more favorable outcomes than children reared in other family arrangements. This study extends prior research by distinguishing between father-entrances into and father-exits from the household, by distinguishing between the entrance of a biological father and a social-father, and by testing for interactions between family structure instability and children’s age, gender and genetic characteristics. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (n=2493) and focusing on changes in family structure between birth and age 9, we find that father-exits are associated with increases in children’s anti-social behavior, which is a strong predictor of health and wellbeing in adulthood. The pattern for father-entrances is more complicated, with biological father entrances being associated with lower anti-social behavior among boys, and social-father entrances being associated with higher anti-social behavior among boys with certain genetic variants. Child’s age at the time of family change does not moderate the association with children’s behavior. However, incorporating genetic information into our models sharpens the findings substantially, showing how such data can enrich our understanding of the intergenerational mobility process. PMID:26046228

  4. Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma: understanding the complexities of the genetic background.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Lauren; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2012-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PCC/PGL) are tumors derived from the adrenal medulla or extra-adrenal ganglia, respectively. They are rare and often benign tumors that are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to mass effect and high circulating catecholamines. Although most PCCs and PGLs are thought to be sporadic, over one third are associated with 10 known susceptibility genes. Mutations in three genes causing well characterized tumor syndromes are associated with an increased risk of developing PCCs and PGLs, including VHL (von Hippel-Lindau disease), NF1 (Neurofibromatosis Type 1), and RET (Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2). Mutations in any of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex subunit genes (SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD) can lead to PCCs and PGLs with variable penetrance, as can mutations in the subunit cofactor, SDHAF2. Recently, two additional genes have been identified, TMEM127 and MAX. Although these tumors are rare in the general population, occurring in two to eight per million people, they are more commonly associated with an inherited mutation than any other cancer type. This review summarizes the known germline and somatic mutations leading to the development of PCC and PGL, as well as biochemical profiling for PCCs/PGLs and screening of mutation carriers.

  5. Organizational Structure and Complex Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Selwyn W.; Baloff, Nicholas

    1969-01-01

    The problem-solving efficiency of different organization structures is discussed in relation to task requirements and the appropriate organizational behavior, to group adaptation to a task over time, and to various group characteristics. (LN)

  6. Clonal Complex 17 Group B Streptococcus strains causing invasive disease in neonates and adults originate from the same genetic pool

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; Ramoutar, Erin; McGeer, Allison; Li, Aimin; Melano, Roberto G.; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    A significant proportion of group B Streptococcus (GBS) neonatal disease, particularly late-onset disease, is associated with strains of serotype III, clonal complex (CC) 17. CC17 strains also cause invasive infections in adults. Little is known about the phylogenetic relationships of isolates recovered from neonatal and adult CC17 invasive infections. We performed whole-genome-based phylogenetic analysis of 93 temporally and geographically matched CC17 strains isolated from both neonatal and adult invasive infections in the metropolitan region of Toronto/Peel, Canada. We also mined the whole-genome data to reveal mobile genetic elements carrying antimicrobial resistance genes. We discovered that CC17 GBS strains causing neonatal and adult invasive disease are interspersed and cluster tightly in a phylogenetic tree, signifying that they are derived from the same genetic pool. We identified limited variation due to recombination in the core CC17 genome. We describe that loss of Pilus Island 1 and acquisition of different mobile genetic elements carrying determinants of antimicrobial resistance contribute to CC17 genetic diversity. Acquisition of some of these mobile genetic elements appears to correlate with clonal expansion of the strains that possess them. Our results provide a genome-wide portrait of the population structure and evolution of a major disease-causing clone of an opportunistic pathogen. PMID:26843175

  7. Genetic structure and domestication history of the grape

    PubMed Central

    Myles, Sean; Boyko, Adam R.; Owens, Christopher L.; Brown, Patrick J.; Grassi, Fabrizio; Aradhya, Mallikarjuna K.; Prins, Bernard; Reynolds, Andy; Chia, Jer-Ming; Ware, Doreen; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Buckler, Edward S.

    2011-01-01

    The grape is one of the earliest domesticated fruit crops and, since antiquity, it has been widely cultivated and prized for its fruit and wine. Here, we characterize genome-wide patterns of genetic variation in over 1,000 samples of the domesticated grape, Vitis vinifera subsp. vinifera, and its wild relative, V. vinifera subsp. sylvestris from the US Department of Agriculture grape germplasm collection. We find support for a Near East origin of vinifera and present evidence of introgression from local sylvestris as the grape moved into Europe. High levels of genetic diversity and rapid linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay have been maintained in vinifera, which is consistent with a weak domestication bottleneck followed by thousands of years of widespread vegetative propagation. The considerable genetic diversity within vinifera, however, is contained within a complex network of close pedigree relationships that has been generated by crosses among elite cultivars. We show that first-degree relationships are rare between wine and table grapes and among grapes from geographically distant regions. Our results suggest that although substantial genetic diversity has been maintained in the grape subsequent to domestication, there has been a limited exploration of this diversity. We propose that the adoption of vegetative propagation was a double-edged sword: Although it provided a benefit by ensuring true breeding cultivars, it also discouraged the generation of unique cultivars through crosses. The grape currently faces severe pathogen pressures, and the long-term sustainability of the grape and wine industries will rely on the exploitation of the grape's tremendous natural genetic diversity. PMID:21245334

  8. Genetic structure and domestication history of the grape.

    PubMed

    Myles, Sean; Boyko, Adam R; Owens, Christopher L; Brown, Patrick J; Grassi, Fabrizio; Aradhya, Mallikarjuna K; Prins, Bernard; Reynolds, Andy; Chia, Jer-Ming; Ware, Doreen; Bustamante, Carlos D; Buckler, Edward S

    2011-03-01

    The grape is one of the earliest domesticated fruit crops and, since antiquity, it has been widely cultivated and prized for its fruit and wine. Here, we characterize genome-wide patterns of genetic variation in over 1,000 samples of the domesticated grape, Vitis vinifera subsp. vinifera, and its wild relative, V. vinifera subsp. sylvestris from the US Department of Agriculture grape germplasm collection. We find support for a Near East origin of vinifera and present evidence of introgression from local sylvestris as the grape moved into Europe. High levels of genetic diversity and rapid linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay have been maintained in vinifera, which is consistent with a weak domestication bottleneck followed by thousands of years of widespread vegetative propagation. The considerable genetic diversity within vinifera, however, is contained within a complex network of close pedigree relationships that has been generated by crosses among elite cultivars. We show that first-degree relationships are rare between wine and table grapes and among grapes from geographically distant regions. Our results suggest that although substantial genetic diversity has been maintained in the grape subsequent to domestication, there has been a limited exploration of this diversity. We propose that the adoption of vegetative propagation was a double-edged sword: Although it provided a benefit by ensuring true breeding cultivars, it also discouraged the generation of unique cultivars through crosses. The grape currently faces severe pathogen pressures, and the long-term sustainability of the grape and wine industries will rely on the exploitation of the grape's tremendous natural genetic diversity.

  9. Comparing GWAS Results of Complex Traits Using Full Genetic Model and Additive Models for Revealing Genetic Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Monir, Md. Mamun; Zhu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Most of the genome-wide association studies (GWASs) for human complex diseases have ignored dominance, epistasis and ethnic interactions. We conducted comparative GWASs for total cholesterol using full model and additive models, which illustrate the impacts of the ignoring genetic variants on analysis results and demonstrate how genetic effects of multiple loci could differ across different ethnic groups. There were 15 quantitative trait loci with 13 individual loci and 3 pairs of epistasis loci identified by full model, whereas only 14 loci (9 common loci and 5 different loci) identified by multi-loci additive model. Again, 4 full model detected loci were not detected using multi-loci additive model. PLINK-analysis identified two loci and GCTA-analysis detected only one locus with genome-wide significance. Full model identified three previously reported genes as well as several new genes. Bioinformatics analysis showed some new genes are related with cholesterol related chemicals and/or diseases. Analyses of cholesterol data and simulation studies revealed that the full model performs were better than the additive-model performs in terms of detecting power and unbiased estimations of genetic variants of complex traits. PMID:28079101

  10. Detecting a hierarchical genetic population structure via Multi-InDel markers on the X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guang Yao; Ye, Yi; Hou, Yi Ping

    2016-01-01

    Detecting population structure and estimating individual biogeographical ancestry are very important in population genetics studies, biomedical research and forensics. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has long been considered to be a primary ancestry-informative marker (AIM), but it is constrained by complex and time-consuming genotyping protocols. Following up on our previous study, we propose that a multi-insertion-deletion polymorphism (Multi-InDel) with multiple haplotypes can be useful in ancestry inference and hierarchical genetic population structures. A validation study for the X chromosome Multi-InDel marker (X-Multi-InDel) as a novel AIM was conducted. Genetic polymorphisms and genetic distances among three Chinese populations and 14 worldwide populations obtained from the 1000 Genomes database were analyzed. A Bayesian clustering method (STRUCTURE) was used to discern the continental origins of Europe, East Asia, and Africa. A minimal panel of ten X-Multi-InDels was verified to be sufficient to distinguish human ancestries from three major continental regions with nearly the same efficiency of the earlier panel with 21 insertion-deletion AIMs. Along with the development of more X-Multi-InDels, an approach using this novel marker has the potential for broad applicability as a cost-effective tool toward more accurate determinations of individual biogeographical ancestry and population stratification. PMID:27535707

  11. MOLECULAR GENETICS OF THE SWINE MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX, THE SLA COMPLEX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) complex is one of the most gene-dense regions in the swine genome. It consists of three major gene clusters, the SLA class I, class III and class II regions, that span ~1.1, 0.7 and 0.5 Mb, respectively, making the swi...

  12. Rivers influence the population genetic structure of bonobos (Pan paniscus).

    PubMed

    Eriksson, J; Hohmann, G; Boesch, C; Vigilant, L

    2004-11-01

    Bonobos are large, highly mobile primates living in the relatively undisturbed, contiguous forest south of the Congo River. Accordingly, gene flow among populations is assumed to be extensive, but may be impeded by large, impassable rivers. We examined mitochondrial DNA control region sequence variation in individuals from five distinct localities separated by rivers in order to estimate relative levels of genetic diversity and assess the extent and pattern of population genetic structure in the bonobo. Diversity estimates for the bonobo exceed those for humans, but are less than those found for the chimpanzee. All regions sampled are significantly differentiated from one another, according to genetic distances estimated as pairwise FSTs, with the greatest differentiation existing between region East and each of the two Northern populations (N and NE) and the least differentiation between regions Central and South. The distribution of nucleotide diversity shows a clear signal of population structure, with some 30% of the variance occurring among geographical regions. However, a geographical patterning of the population structure is not obvious. Namely, mitochondrial haplotypes were shared among all regions excepting the most eastern locality and the phylogenetic analysis revealed a tree in which haplotypes were intermixed with little regard to geographical origin, with the notable exception of the close relationships among the haplotypes found in the east. Nonetheless, genetic distances correlated with geographical distances when the intervening distances were measured around rivers presenting effective current-day barriers, but not when straight-line distances were used, suggesting that rivers are indeed a hindrance to gene flow in this species.

  13. Geographic variation and genetic structure in Spotted Owls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haig, Susan M.; Wagner, R.S.; Forsman, E.D.; Mullins, Thomas D.

    2001-01-01

    We examined genetic variation, population structure, and definition of conservation units in Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis). Spotted Owls are mostly non-migratory, long-lived, socially monogamous birds that have decreased population viability due to their occupation of highly-fragmented late successional forests in western North America. To investigate potential effects of habitat fragmentation on population structure, we used random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) to examine genetic variation hierarchically among local breeding areas, subregional groups, regional groups, and subspecies via sampling of 21 breeding areas (276 individuals) among the three subspecies of Spotted Owls. Data from 11 variable bands suggest a significant relationship between geographic distance among local breeding groups and genetic distance (Mantel r = 0.53, P < 0.02) although multi-dimensional scaling of three significant axes did not identify significant grouping at any hierarchical level. Similarly, neighbor-joining clustering of Manhattan distances indicated geographic structure at all levels and identified Mexican Spotted Owls as a distinct clade. RAPD analyses did not clearly differentiate Northern Spotted Owls from California Spotted Owls. Among Northern Spotted Owls, estimates of population differentiation (FST) ranged from 0.27 among breeding areas to 0.11 among regions. Concordantly, within-group agreement values estimated via multi-response permutation procedures of Jaccarda??s distances ranged from 0.22 among local sites to 0.11 among regions. Pairwise comparisons of FST and geographic distance within regions suggested only the Klamath region was in equilibrium with respect to gene flow and genetic drift. Merging nuclear data with recent mitochondrial data provides support for designation of an Evolutionary Significant Unit for Mexican Spotted Owls and two overlapping Management Units for Northern and California Spotted Owls.

  14. Genetic diversity and population structure of Yucca filamentosa (Agavaceae).

    PubMed

    Massey, L; Hamrick, J

    1998-03-01

    Using 19 allozyme loci we studied genetic diversity in 18 populations of Yucca filamentosa (Agavaceae) from the southeastern United States. Of the 19 loci surveyed, 17 (89.5%) were polymorphic in at least one of the populations sampled. There was considerable variation among populations in the percentage of polymorphic loci (range = 31.6-84.2%, mean = 67.6%). Similar heterogeneity among populations was observed for mean number of alleles per polymorphic locus (range = 2.0-3.0; mean = 2.48) and mean expected heterozygosity (range = 0.113-0.288; mean = 0.213). On average, 83% of the total genetic diversity was found within populations. Duplications of three allozyme loci were detected in several populations. The life-history characteristics of Y. filamentosa (a long-lived, semiwoody, predominantly outcrossing monocot with a large geographical range) may contribute to the maintenance of such high levels of genetic diversity. These results contradict expectations of the genetic structure of Y. filamentosa based on observations of the dispersal and pollination behavior of its sole pollinator, Tegeticula yuccasella, the yucca moth.

  15. Genetic structure of Balearic honeybee populations based on microsatellite polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    De la Rúa, Pilar; Galián, José; Serrano, José; Moritz, Robin FA

    2003-01-01

    The genetic variation of honeybee colonies collected in 22 localities on the Balearic Islands (Spain) was analysed using eight polymorphic microsatellite loci. Previous studies have demonstrated that these colonies belong either to the African or west European evolutionary lineages. These populations display low variability estimated from both the number of alleles and heterozygosity values, as expected for the honeybee island populations. Although genetic differentiation within the islands is low, significant heterozygote deficiency is present, indicating a subpopulation genetic structure. According to the genetic differentiation test, the honeybee populations of the Balearic Islands cluster into two groups: Gimnesias (Mallorca and Menorca) and Pitiusas (Ibiza and Formentera), which agrees with the biogeography postulated for this archipelago. The phylogenetic analysis suggests an Iberian origin of the Balearic honeybees, thus confirming the postulated evolutionary scenario for Apis mellifera in the Mediterranean basin. The microsatellite data from Formentera, Ibiza and Menorca show that ancestral populations are threatened by queen importations, indicating that adequate conservation measures should be developed for protecting Balearic bees. PMID:12729553

  16. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    von Appen, Alexander; Kosinski, Jan; Sparks, Lenore; Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Determining their 110-megadalton structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Of approximately 30 nucleoporins (Nups), 15 are structured and form the Y and inner-ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ~60 nm in diameter. The scaffold is decorated with transport-channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here we combine cryo-electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modelling to generate, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive architectural model of the human nuclear pore complex to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y complexes and to inner-ring complex members. We show that the transport-channel Nup358 (also known as Ranbp2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport-channel Nups. We conclude that, similar to coated vesicles, several copies of the same structural building block--although compositionally identical--engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations.

  17. Effects of structural connectivity on fine scale population genetic structure of muskrat, Ondatra zibethicus.

    PubMed

    Laurence, Sophie; Smith, Matthew J; Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I

    2013-09-01

    In heterogeneous landscapes, physical barriers and loss of structural connectivity have been shown to reduce gene flow and therefore lead to population structuring. In this study, we assessed the influence of landscape features on population genetic structure and gene flow of a semiaquatic species, the muskrat. A total of 97 muskrats were sampled from three watersheds near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. We estimated population genetic structure using 11 microsatellite loci and identified a single genetic cluster and no genetic differences were found among the watersheds as a result of high levels of gene flow. At finer scales, we assessed the correlation between individual pairwise genetic distances and Euclidean distance as well as different models of least cost path (LCP). We used a range of cost values for the landscape types in order to build our LCP models. We found a positive relationship between genetic distance and least cost distance when we considered roads as corridors for movements. Open landscapes and urban areas seemed to restrict but not prevent gene flow within the study area. Our study underlines the high-dispersal ability of generalist species in their use of landscape and highlights how landscape features often considered barriers to animal movements are corridors for other species.

  18. Structural Determination of Certain Novel ER Complexes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    and Parker, T. M. (1992). Hydrophobicity-induced pK shifts in elastin protein-based polymers . Biopolymers 32, 373-379. Webb, P., Nguyen, P., and...between the aligned H12 from different complex struc- Chemicals, Materials, and Plasmids tures (OHT-ER and GW-ER) were calculated using a python script...buffer consisting of 1.5%-2% ethylene were used. 100 nM of GW7604 were added to the cells 18-24 hr imine polymer , 100 mM trisodium citrate (pH 5.6-5.7

  19. Relationships among Genetic, Structural, and Functional Properties of Rice Starch.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangli; Chen, Yaling; Zhu, Ping; Sui, Zhongquan; Corke, Harold; Bao, Jinsong

    2015-07-15

    We determined the relationships among the structural properties, in vitro digestibility, and genetic factors in starches of 14 rice cultivars. Weight-based chain-length distributions in amylopectin ranged from 18.07% to 24.71% (fa, DP 6-12), 45.01% to 55.67% (fb1, DP 13-24), 12.72% to 14.05% (fb2, DP 25-36), and 10.80 to 20.72% (fb3, DP > 36), respectively. The contents of rapidly digestible starch (RDS), slowly digestible starch (SDS), and resistant starch (RS) ranged from 78.5% to 87.5%, 1.2% to 6.0%, and 10.1% to 18.0%, respectively. AAC was negatively correlated with RDS content but positively correlated with RS content in rice starch. The proportion of short chains in amylopectin, i.e. the amount of fraction IIa (FrIIa) fractionated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), was positively correlated with RDS. Starch synthase IIa (SSIIa) gene controlled the degree of crystallinity, the amount of fa chains of amylopectin. SSIIIa gene controlled the amount of fb1 chains. Wx gene controlled the FrI, FrIIa, RDS, and RS. Starch debranching enzyme isoamylase II (ISA2) gene also controlled the RDS, which may suggest that RDS was also affected by amylopectin structure, although no correlation between them was found. This study indicated that genetics (i.e., starch biosynthesis related genes) controlled the structural properties of starch, and both amylose content and amylopectin fine structure determined functional properties of rice starch (i.e., the digestion), each in a different way. Understanding the "genetics-structure-function" relationships in rice starches will assist plant breeders and food processors in developing new rice varieties and functional foods.

  20. Progress and Promise of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Human Complex Trait Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Stranger, Barbara E.; Stahl, Eli A.; Raj, Towfique

    2011-01-01

    Enormous progress in mapping complex traits in humans has been made in the last 5 yr. There has been early success for prevalent diseases with complex phenotypes. These studies have demonstrated clearly that, while complex traits differ in their underlying genetic architectures, for many common disorders the predominant pattern is that of many loci, individually with small effects on phenotype. For some traits, loci of large effect have been identified. For almost all complex traits studied in humans, the sum of the identified genetic effects comprises only a portion, generally less than half, of the estimated trait heritability. A variety of hypotheses have been proposed to explain why this might be the case, including untested rare variants, and gene–gene and gene–environment interaction. Effort is currently being directed toward implementation of novel analytic approaches and testing rare variants for association with complex traits using imputed variants from the publicly available 1000 Genomes Project resequencing data and from direct resequencing of clinical samples. Through integration with annotations and functional genomic data as well as by in vitro and in vivo experimentation, mapping studies continue to characterize functional variants associated with complex traits and address fundamental issues such as epistasis and pleiotropy. This review focuses primarily on the ways in which genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revolutionized the field of human quantitative genetics. PMID:21115973

  1. Genetic diversity and evolutionary history of the Schizothorax species complex in the Lancang River (upper Mekong).

    PubMed

    Chen, Weitao; Shen, Yanjun; Gan, Xiaoni; Wang, Xuzhen; He, Shunping

    2016-09-01

    The genus Schizothorax (Cyprinidae), one of the most diverse genera of ichthyofauna of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP), is a good candidate for investigating patterns of genetic variation and evolutionary mechanisms. In this study, sequences from the mitochondrial control region, the cytochrome b gene, and two nuclear genes were used to re-examine the genetic diversity and investigate the evolutionary history of the Schizothorax species complex inhabiting the Lancang River. Three maternal clades were detected in the Schizothorax species complex, but frequent nuclear allele sharing also occurred among the three maternal clades. A discrepancy between topologies of mitochondrial and nuclear loci might result from introgression or/and incomplete lineage sorting. The divergence of the clades of the Schizothorax species complex was closely related to the Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene orogenesis of the QTP and Southwest Mountains of China. Demographic analyses indicated that the species complex subsequently persisted in situ with stable populations during Pleistocene glacial cycling, which suggested that Pleistocene climate changes did not exert a remarkable influence on the species complex. Our study provides a comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of the Schizothorax species complex in the Lancang River.

  2. Does Structural Complexity Necessarily Imply Processing Difficulty?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayraud, Frederique; Martinie, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Our goal is to establish a link between the time needed to plan a sentence containing an embedded clause and the structure of this sentence. Contrary to a traditional monolithic conception of subordination, three types of embeddings were considered, depending on their degree of syntactic integration: subcategorized, modifier and pseudo-embedded…

  3. A Genome-wide Combinatorial Strategy Dissects Complex Genetic Architecture of Seed Coat Color in Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Deepak; Das, Shouvik; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Ranjan, Rajeev; Badoni, Saurabh; Kumar, Vinod; Tripathi, Shailesh; Gowda, C. L. Laxmipathi; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2015-01-01

    The study identified 9045 high-quality SNPs employing both genome-wide GBS- and candidate gene-based SNP genotyping assays in 172, including 93 cultivated (desi and kabuli) and 79 wild chickpea accessions. The GWAS in a structured population of 93 sequenced accessions detected 15 major genomic loci exhibiting significant association with seed coat color. Five seed color-associated major genomic loci underlying robust QTLs mapped on a high-density intra-specific genetic linkage map were validated by QTL mapping. The integration of association and QTL mapping with gene haplotype-specific LD mapping and transcript profiling identified novel allelic variants (non-synonymous SNPs) and haplotypes in a MATE secondary transporter gene regulating light/yellow brown and beige seed coat color differentiation in chickpea. The down-regulation and decreased transcript expression of beige seed coat color-associated MATE gene haplotype was correlated with reduced proanthocyanidins accumulation in the mature seed coats of beige than light/yellow brown seed colored desi and kabuli accessions for their coloration/pigmentation. This seed color-regulating MATE gene revealed strong purifying selection pressure primarily in LB/YB seed colored desi and wild Cicer reticulatum accessions compared with the BE seed colored kabuli accessions. The functionally relevant molecular tags identified have potential to decipher the complex transcriptional regulatory gene function of seed coat coloration and for understanding the selective sweep-based seed color trait evolutionary pattern in cultivated and wild accessions during chickpea domestication. The genome-wide integrated approach employed will expedite marker-assisted genetic enhancement for developing cultivars with desirable seed coat color types in chickpea. PMID:26635822

  4. Nanoscale structure of protamine/DNA complexes for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Simona; Brocca, Paola; Del Favero, Elena; Rondelli, Valeria; Cantù, Laura; Amici, Augusto; Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2013-02-01

    Understanding the internal packing of gene carriers is a key-factor to realize both gene protection during transport and de-complexation at the delivery site. Here, we investigate the structure of complexes formed by DNA fragments and protamine, applied in gene delivery. We found that complexes are charge- and size-tunable aggregates, depending on the protamine/DNA ratio, hundred nanometers in size. Their compactness and fractal structure depend on the length of the DNA fragments. Accordingly, on the local scale, the sites of protamine/DNA complexation assume different morphologies, seemingly displaying clumping ability for the DNA network only for shorter DNA fragments.

  5. Structure, dynamics and function of nuclear pore complexes

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, M. A.; Hetzer, M. W.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are large aqueous channels that penetrate the nuclear envelope, connecting the nuclear interior with the cytoplasm. Until recently, these macromolecular complexes were viewed as static structures whose only function was to control the molecular trafficking between the two compartments. It has now become evident that this simplistic scenario is inaccurate and that nuclear pore complexes are highly dynamic multiprotein assemblies involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from the organization of the cytoskeleton to gene expression. In this review, we will discuss the most recent developments in the nuclear pore complex field, focusing in the assembly, disassembly, maintenance and function of this macromolecular structure. PMID:18786826

  6. Population genetic structure and conservation genetics of threatened Okaloosa darters (Etheostoma okaloosae).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, James D.; Jelks, Howard L.; Tate, Bill; Johnson, Aria R.; Jordan, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Imperiled Okaloosa darters (Etheostoma okaloosae) are small, benthic fish limited to six streams that flow into three bayous of Choctawhatchee Bay in northwest Florida, USA. We analyzed the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and 10 nuclear microsatellite loci for 255 and 273 Okaloosa darters, respectively. Bayesian clustering analyses and AMOVA reflect congruent population genetic structure in both mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA. This structure reveals historical isolation of Okaloosa darter streams nested within bayous. Most of the six streams appear to have exchanged migrants though they remain genetically distinct. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently reclassified Okaloosa darters from endangered to threatened status. Our genetic data support the reclassification of Okaloosa darter Evolutionary Significant Units (ESUs) in the larger Tom's, Turkey, and Rocky creeks from endangered to threatened status. However, the three smaller drainages (Mill, Swift, and Turkey Bolton creeks) remain at risk due to their small population sizes and anthropogenic pressures on remaining habitat. Natural resource managers now have the evolutionary information to guide recovery actions within and among drainages throughout the range of the Okaloosa darter.

  7. Historical and ecological determinants of genetic structure in arctic canids.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, L E; Krizan, J; Nagy, J A; Fuglei, E; Dumond, M; Johnson, D; Veitch, A; Berteaux, D; Strobeck, C

    2007-08-01

    Wolves (Canis lupus) and arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) are the only canid species found throughout the mainland tundra and arctic islands of North America. Contrasting evolutionary histories, and the contemporary ecology of each species, have combined to produce their divergent population genetic characteristics. Arctic foxes are more variable than wolves, and both island and mainland fox populations possess similarly high microsatellite variation. These differences result from larger effective population sizes in arctic foxes, and the fact that, unlike wolves, foxes were not isolated in discrete refugia during the Pleistocene. Despite the large physical distances and distinct ecotypes represented, a single, panmictic population of arctic foxes was found which spans the Svalbard Archipelago and the North American range of the species. This pattern likely reflects both the absence of historical population bottlenecks and current, high levels of gene flow following frequent long-distance foraging movements. In contrast, genetic structure in wolves correlates strongly to transitions in habitat type, and is probably determined by natal habitat-biased dispersal. Nonrandom dispersal may be cued by relative levels of vegetation cover between tundra and forest habitats, but especially by wolf prey specialization on ungulate species of familiar type and behaviour (sedentary or migratory). Results presented here suggest that, through its influence on sea ice, vegetation, prey dynamics and distribution, continued arctic climate change may have effects as dramatic as those of the Pleistocene on the genetic structure of arctic canid species.

  8. The system-resonance approach in modeling genetic structures.

    PubMed

    Petoukhov, Sergey V

    2016-01-01

    The founder of the theory of resonance in structural chemistry Linus Pauling established the importance of resonance patterns in organization of living systems. Any living organism is a great chorus of coordinated oscillatory processes. From the formal point of view, biological organism is an oscillatory system with a great number of degrees of freedom. Such systems are studied in the theory of oscillations using matrix mathematics of their resonance characteristics. This study is devoted to a new approach for modeling genetically inherited structures and processes in living organisms using mathematical tools of the theory of resonances. This approach reveals hidden relationships in a number of genetic phenomena and gives rise to a new class of bio-mathematical models, which contribute to a convergence of biology with physics and informatics. In addition some relationships of molecular-genetic ensembles with mathematics of noise-immunity coding of information in modern communications technology are shown. Perspectives of applications of the phenomena of vibrational mechanics for modeling in biology are discussed.

  9. Complexity and dynamics of topological and community structure in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berec, Vesna

    2017-01-01

    Complexity is highly susceptible to variations in the network dynamics, reflected on its underlying architecture where topological organization of cohesive subsets into clusters, system's modular structure and resulting hierarchical patterns, are cross-linked with functional dynamics of the system. Here we study connection between hierarchical topological scales of the simplicial complexes and the organization of functional clusters - communities in complex networks. The analysis reveals the full dynamics of different combinatorial structures of q-th-dimensional simplicial complexes and their Laplacian spectra, presenting spectral properties of resulting symmetric and positive semidefinite matrices. The emergence of system's collective behavior from inhomogeneous statistical distribution is induced by hierarchically ordered topological structure, which is mapped to simplicial complex where local interactions between the nodes clustered into subcomplexes generate flow of information that characterizes complexity and dynamics of the full system.

  10. Web-Based Analysis for Student-Generated Complex Genetic Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kass, David H.; LaRoe, Robert

    2007-01-01

    A simple, rapid method for generating complex genetic profiles using Alu-based markers was recently developed for students primarily at the undergraduate level to learn more about forensics and paternity analysis. On the basis of the Cold Spring Harbor Allele Server, which provides an excellent tool for analyzing a single Alu variant, we present a…

  11. Reinforcing Visual Grouping Cues to Communicate Complex Informational Structure.

    PubMed

    Bae, Juhee; Watson, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    In his book Multimedia Learning [7], Richard Mayer asserts that viewers learn best from imagery that provides them with cues to help them organize new information into the correct knowledge structures. Designers have long been exploiting the Gestalt laws of visual grouping to deliver viewers those cues using visual hierarchy, often communicating structures much more complex than the simple organizations studied in psychological research. Unfortunately, designers are largely practical in their work, and have not paused to build a complex theory of structural communication. If we are to build a tool to help novices create effective and well structured visuals, we need a better understanding of how to create them. Our work takes a first step toward addressing this lack, studying how five of the many grouping cues (proximity, color similarity, common region, connectivity, and alignment) can be effectively combined to communicate structured text and imagery from real world examples. To measure the effectiveness of this structural communication, we applied a digital version of card sorting, a method widely used in anthropology and cognitive science to extract cognitive structures. We then used tree edit distance to measure the difference between perceived and communicated structures. Our most significant findings are: 1) with careful design, complex structure can be communicated clearly; 2) communicating complex structure is best done with multiple reinforcing grouping cues; 3) common region (use of containers such as boxes) is particularly effective at communicating structure; and 4) alignment is a weak structural communicator.

  12. Genetic Variation of Major Histocompatibility Complex and Microsatellite Loci: A Comparison in Bighorn Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, W. M.; Hedrick, P. W.; Muggli-Cockett, N. E.; Kalinowski, S.; Penedo, MCT.; Ramey-II, R. R.

    1997-01-01

    Examining and comparing genetic variation for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and microsatellite (MS) loci in the same individuals provides an opportunity to understand the forces influencing genetic variation. We examined five MHC and three MS loci in 235 bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) from 14 populations and found that both types of loci were highly variable and were in Hardy-Weinberg proportions. Mean F(ST) values for both markers were very similar and MHC and MS genetic variability was predominantly distributed within rather than among populations. However, analyses of genetic distances and tree topologies revealed different spatial patterns of variation for the two types of loci. Collectively, these results indicated that neutral forces substantially influenced MS and MHC variation, and they provided limited evidence for selection acting on the MHC. PMID:9071595

  13. Genetic variation of major histocompatibility complex and microsatellite loci: a comparison in bighorn sheep.

    PubMed

    Boyce, W M; Hedrick, P W; Muggli-Cockett, N E; Kalinowski, S; Penedo, M C; Ramey, R R

    1997-02-01

    Examining and comparing genetic variation for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and micro-satellite (MS) loci in the same individuals provides an opportunity to understand the forces influencing genetic variation. We examined five MHC and three MS loci in 235 bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) from 14 populations and found that both types of loci were highly variable and were in Hardy-Weinberg proportions. Mean FST values for both markers were very similar and MHC and MS genetic variability was predominantly distributed within rather than among populations. However, analyses of genetic distances and tree topologies revealed different spatial patterns of variation for the two types of loci. Collectively, these results indicated that neutral forces substantially influenced MS and MHC variation, and they provided limited evidence for selection acting on the MHC.

  14. A Structurally Characterized Organometallic Plutonium(IV) Complex.

    PubMed

    Apostolidis, Christos; Walter, Olaf; Vogt, Jochen; Liebing, Phil; Maron, Laurent; Edelmann, Frank T

    2017-03-30

    The blood-red plutonocene complex Pu(1,3-COT'')(1,4-COT'') (4; COT''=η(8) -bis(trimethylsilyl)cyclooctatetraenyl) has been synthesized by oxidation of the anionic sandwich complex Li[Pu(1,4-COT'')2 ] (3) with anhydrous cobalt(II) chloride. The first crystal structure determination of an organoplutonium(IV) complex revealed an asymmetric sandwich structure for 4 where one COT'' ring is 1,3-substituted while the other retains the original 1,4-substitution pattern. The electronic structure of 4 has been elucidated by a computational study, revealing a probable cause for the unexpected silyl group migration.

  15. Toward structural elucidation of the gamma-secretase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Wolfe, M. S.; Selkoe, D. J.

    2009-03-11

    {gamma}-Secretase is an intramembrane protease complex that mediates the Notch signaling pathway and the production of amyloid {beta}-proteins. As such, this enzyme has emerged as an important target for development of novel therapeutics for Alzheimer disease and cancer. Great progress has been made in the identification and characterization of the membrane complex and its biological functions. One major challenge now is to illuminate the structure of this fascinating and important protease at atomic resolution. Here, we review recent progress on biochemical and biophysical probing of the structure of the four-component complex and discuss obstacles and potential pathways toward elucidating its detailed structure.

  16. Toward structural elucidation of the γ-secretase complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huilin; Wolfe, Michael S.; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2009-01-01

    γ-Secretase is an intramembrane protease complex that mediates the Notch signaling pathway and the production of amyloid β-proteins. As such, this enzyme has emerged as an important target for development of novel therapeutics for Alzheimer disease and cancer. Great progress has been made in the identification and characterization of the membrane complex and its biological functions. One major challenge now is to illuminate the structure of this fascinating and important protease at atomic resolution. Here, we review recent progress on biochemical and biophysical probing of the structure of the four-component complex and discuss barriers and potential pathways toward elucidating its detailed structure. PMID:19278647

  17. Structure and function of complex brain networks.

    PubMed

    Sporns, Olaf

    2013-09-01

    An increasing number of theoretical and empirical studies approach the function of the human brain from a network perspective. The analysis of brain networks is made feasible by the development of new imaging acquisition methods as well as new tools from graph theory and dynamical systems. This review surveys some of these methodological advances and summarizes recent findings on the architecture of structural and functional brain networks. Studies of the structural connectome reveal several modules or network communities that are interlinked by hub regions mediating communication processes between modules. Recent network analyses have shown that network hubs form a densely linked collective called a "rich club," centrally positioned for attracting and dispersing signal traffic. In parallel, recordings of resting and task-evoked neural activity have revealed distinct resting-state networks that contribute to functions in distinct cognitive domains. Network methods are increasingly applied in a clinical context, and their promise for elucidating neural substrates of brain and mental disorders is discussed.

  18. Genetic structure characterization of Chileans reflects historical immigration patterns

    PubMed Central

    Eyheramendy, Susana; Martinez, Felipe I.; Manevy, Federico; Vial, Cecilia; Repetto, Gabriela M.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the ancestral components of genomes of admixed individuals helps uncovering the genetic basis of diseases and understanding the demographic history of populations. We estimate local ancestry on 313 Chileans and assess the contribution from three continental populations. The distribution of ancestry block-length suggests an average admixing time around 10 generations ago. Sex-chromosome analyses confirm imbalanced contribution of European men and Native-American women. Previously known genes under selection contain SNPs showing large difference in allele frequencies. Furthermore, we show that assessing ancestry is harder at SNPs with higher recombination rates and easier at SNPs with large difference in allele frequencies at the ancestral populations. Two observations, that African ancestry proportions systematically decrease from North to South, and that European ancestry proportions are highest in central regions, show that the genetic structure of Chileans is under the influence of a diffusion process leading to an ancestry gradient related to geography. PMID:25778948

  19. Population genetic structure and conservation of marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friesen, V.L.; Birt, T.P.; Piatt, J.F.; Golightly, R.T.; Newman, S.H.; Hebert, P.N.; Congdon, B.C.; Gissing, G.

    2005-01-01

    Marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) are coastal seabirds that nest from California to the Aleutian Islands. They are declining and considered threatened in several regions. We compared variation in the mitochondrial control region, four nuclear introns and three microsatellite loci among 194 murrelets from throughout their range except Washington and Oregon. Significant population genetic structure was found: nine private control region haplotypes and three private intron alleles occurred at high frequency in the Aleutians and California; global estimates of FST or ??ST and most pairwise estimates involving the Aleutians and/or California were significant; and marked isolation-by-distance was found. Given the available samples, murrelets appear to comprise five genetic management units: (1) western Aleutian Islands, (2) central Aleutian Islands, (3) mainland Alaska and British Columbia, (4) northern California, and (5) central California.

  20. Genetic structure characterization of Chileans reflects historical immigration patterns.

    PubMed

    Eyheramendy, Susana; Martinez, Felipe I; Manevy, Federico; Vial, Cecilia; Repetto, Gabriela M

    2015-03-17

    Identifying the ancestral components of genomes of admixed individuals helps uncovering the genetic basis of diseases and understanding the demographic history of populations. We estimate local ancestry on 313 Chileans and assess the contribution from three continental populations. The distribution of ancestry block-length suggests an average admixing time around 10 generations ago. Sex-chromosome analyses confirm imbalanced contribution of European men and Native-American women. Previously known genes under selection contain SNPs showing large difference in allele frequencies. Furthermore, we show that assessing ancestry is harder at SNPs with higher recombination rates and easier at SNPs with large difference in allele frequencies at the ancestral populations. Two observations, that African ancestry proportions systematically decrease from North to South, and that European ancestry proportions are highest in central regions, show that the genetic structure of Chileans is under the influence of a diffusion process leading to an ancestry gradient related to geography.

  1. Statistical inference on genetic data reveals the complex demographic history of human populations in central Asia.

    PubMed

    Palstra, Friso P; Heyer, Evelyne; Austerlitz, Frédéric

    2015-06-01

    The demographic history of modern humans constitutes a combination of expansions, colonizations, contractions, and remigrations. The advent of large scale genetic data combined with statistically refined methods facilitates inference of this complex history. Here we study the demographic history of two genetically admixed ethnic groups in Central Asia, an area characterized by high levels of genetic diversity and a history of recurrent immigration. Using Approximate Bayesian Computation, we infer that the timing of admixture markedly differs between the two groups. Admixture in the traditionally agricultural Tajiks could be dated back to the onset of the Neolithic transition in the region, whereas admixture in Kyrgyz is more recent, and may have involved the westward movement of Turkic peoples. These results are confirmed by a coalescent method that fits an isolation-with-migration model to the genetic data, with both Central Asian groups having received gene flow from the extremities of Eurasia. Interestingly, our analyses also uncover signatures of gene flow from Eastern to Western Eurasia during Paleolithic times. In conclusion, the high genetic diversity currently observed in these two Central Asian peoples most likely reflects the effects of recurrent immigration that likely started before historical times. Conversely, conquests during historical times may have had a relatively limited genetic impact. These results emphasize the need for a better understanding of the genetic consequences of transmission of culture and technological innovations, as well as those of invasions and conquests.

  2. Multiple genetic variant association testing by collapsing and kernel methods with pedigree or population structured data.

    PubMed

    Schaid, Daniel J; McDonnell, Shannon K; Sinnwell, Jason P; Thibodeau, Stephen N

    2013-07-01

    Searching for rare genetic variants associated with complex diseases can be facilitated by enriching for diseased carriers of rare variants by sampling cases from pedigrees enriched for disease, possibly with related or unrelated controls. This strategy, however, complicates analyses because of shared genetic ancestry, as well as linkage disequilibrium among genetic markers. To overcome these problems, we developed broad classes of "burden" statistics and kernel statistics, extending commonly used methods for unrelated case-control data to allow for known pedigree relationships, for autosomes and the X chromosome. Furthermore, by replacing pedigree-based genetic correlation matrices with estimates of genetic relationships based on large-scale genomic data, our methods can be used to account for population-structured data. By simulations, we show that the type I error rates of our developed methods are near the asymptotic nominal levels, allowing rapid computation of P-values. Our simulations also show that a linear weighted kernel statistic is generally more powerful than a weighted "burden" statistic. Because the proposed statistics are rapid to compute, they can be readily used for large-scale screening of the association of genomic sequence data with disease status.

  3. Demographic spatial genetic structure of the Neotropical tree, Jacaranda copaia.

    PubMed

    Jones, F A; Hubbell, S P

    2006-10-01

    We used genotypes from six microsatellite loci and demographic data from a large mapped forest plot to study changes in spatial genetic structure across demographic stages, from seed rain to seedlings, juveniles, and adult diameter classes in the Neotropical tree, Jacaranda copaia. In pairwise comparisons of genetic differentiation among demographic classes, only seedlings were significantly differentiated from the other diameter classes; F(ST) values ranged from 0.006 to 0.009. Furthermore, only seedlings showed homozygote excess suggesting biparental inbreeding in the large diameter reproductive adults. We found very low levels of relatedness in the first distance class of trees, 1-26 cm diameter (F(ij) = 0.011). However, there was a 5- to 10-fold rise in relatedness in the smallest distance class, from the smallest to the largest tree diameter classes (F(ij) = 0.110 for individuals > 56 cm diameter). A variety of non-mutually exclusive mechanisms have been invoked perviously to explain such a pattern, including natural selection, history, or nonequilibrium population dynamics. The long-term demographic data available for this species allow us to evaluate these mechanisms. Jacaranda is a fast-growing, light-demanding species with low recruitment rates and high mortality rates in the smaller diameter classes. It successfully regenerates only in large light gaps, which occur infrequently and stochastically in space and time. These factors contribute to the nonequilibrium population dynamics and observed low genetic structure in the small size classes. We conclude that the pattern of spatial genetic transitions in Jacaranda is consistent with overlapping related generations and strong but infrequent periods of high recruitment, followed by long periods of population decline.

  4. How Obstacles Perturb Population Fronts and Alter Their Genetic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Möbius, Wolfram; Murray, Andrew W.; Nelson, David R.

    2015-01-01

    As populations spread into new territory, environmental heterogeneities can shape the population front and genetic composition. We focus here on the effects of an important building block of heterogeneous environments, isolated obstacles. With a combination of experiments, theory, and simulation, we show how isolated obstacles both create long-lived distortions of the front shape and amplify the effect of genetic drift. A system of bacteriophage T7 spreading on a spatially heterogeneous Escherichia coli lawn serves as an experimental model system to study population expansions. Using an inkjet printer, we create well-defined replicates of the lawn and quantitatively study the population expansion of phage T7. The transient perturbations of the population front found in the experiments are well described by a model in which the front moves with constant speed. Independent of the precise details of the expansion, we show that obstacles create a kink in the front that persists over large distances and is insensitive to the details of the obstacle’s shape. The small deviations between experimental findings and the predictions of the constant speed model can be understood with a more general reaction-diffusion model, which reduces to the constant speed model when the obstacle size is large compared to the front width. Using this framework, we demonstrate that frontier genotypes just grazing the side of an isolated obstacle increase in abundance, a phenomenon we call ‘geometry-enhanced genetic drift’, complementary to the founder effect associated with spatial bottlenecks. Bacterial range expansions around nutrient-poor barriers and stochastic simulations confirm this prediction. The effect of the obstacle on the genealogy of individuals at the front is characterized by simulations and rationalized using the constant speed model. Lastly, we consider the effect of two obstacles on front shape and genetic composition of the population illuminating the effects

  5. Strong incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on bacterial rrs and ITS genetic structures of cystic fibrosis sputa

    PubMed Central

    Pages-Monteiro, Laurence; Marti, Romain; Commun, Carine; Alliot, Nolwenn; Bardel, Claire; Meugnier, Helene; Perouse-de-Montclos, Michele; Reix, Philippe; Durieu, Isabelle; Durupt, Stephane; Vandenesch, Francois; Freney, Jean; Cournoyer, Benoit; Doleans-Jordheim, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs harbor a complex community of interacting microbes, including pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Meta-taxogenomic analysis based on V5-V6 rrs PCR products of 52 P. aeruginosa-positive (Pp) and 52 P. aeruginosa-negative (Pn) pooled DNA extracts from CF sputa suggested positive associations between P. aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas and Prevotella, but negative ones with Haemophilus, Neisseria and Burkholderia. Internal Transcribed Spacer analyses (RISA) from individual DNA extracts identified three significant genetic structures within the CF cohorts, and indicated an impact of P. aeruginosa. RISA clusters Ip and IIIp contained CF sputa with a P. aeruginosa prevalence above 93%, and of 24.2% in cluster IIp. Clusters Ip and IIIp showed lower RISA genetic diversity and richness than IIp. Highly similar cluster IIp RISA profiles were obtained from two patients harboring isolates of a same P. aeruginosa clone, suggesting convergent evolution in the structure of their microbiota. CF patients of cluster IIp had received significantly less antibiotics than patients of clusters Ip and IIIp but harbored the most resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Patients of cluster IIIp were older than those of Ip. The effects of P. aeruginosa on the RISA structures could not be fully dissociated from the above two confounding factors but several trends in these datasets support the conclusion of a strong incidence of P. aeruginosa on the genetic structure of CF lung microbiota. PMID:28282386

  6. Study of the structure and dynamics of complex biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, Areejit

    2008-12-01

    In this thesis, we have studied the large scale structure and system level dynamics of certain biological networks using tools from graph theory, computational biology and dynamical systems. We study the structure and dynamics of large scale metabolic networks inside three organisms, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Staphylococcus aureus. We also study the dynamics of the large scale genetic network controlling E. coli metabolism. We have tried to explain the observed system level dynamical properties of these networks in terms of their underlying structure. Our studies of the system level dynamics of these large scale biological networks provide a different perspective on their functioning compared to that obtained from purely structural studies. Our study also leads to some new insights on features such as robustness, fragility and modularity of these large scale biological networks. We also shed light on how different networks inside the cell such as metabolic networks and genetic networks are interrelated to each other.

  7. Structural and dynamical properties of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Gourab

    Recent years have witnessed a substantial amount of interest within the physics community in the properties of networks. Techniques from statistical physics coupled with the widespread availability of computing resources have facilitated studies ranging from large scale empirical analysis of the worldwide web, social networks, biological systems, to the development of theoretical models and tools to explore the various properties of these systems. Following these developments, in this dissertation, we present and solve for a diverse set of new problems, investigating the structural and dynamical properties of both model and real world networks. We start by defining a new metric to measure the stability of network structure to disruptions, and then using a combination of theory and simulation study its properties in detail on artificially generated networks; we then compare our results to a selection of networks from the real world and find good agreement in most cases. In the following chapter, we propose a mathematical model that mimics the structure of popular file-sharing websites such as Flickr and CiteULike and demonstrate that many of its properties can solved exactly in the limit of large network size. The remaining part of the dissertation primarily focuses on the dynamical properties of networks. We first formulate a model of a network that evolves under the addition and deletion of vertices and edges, and solve for the equilibrium degree distribution for a variety of cases of interest. We then consider networks whose structure can be manipulated by adjusting the rules by which vertices enter and leave the network. We focus in particular on degree distributions and show that, with some mild constraints, it is possible by a suitable choice of rules to arrange for the network to have any degree distribution we desire. In addition we define a simple local algorithm by which appropriate rules can be implemented in practice. Finally, we conclude our

  8. Exploring the role of asexual multiplication in poplar rust epidemics: impact on diversity and genetic structure.

    PubMed

    Barrès, Benoît; Dutech, Cyril; Andrieux, Axelle; Halkett, Fabien; Frey, Pascal

    2012-10-01

    Fungal plant pathogens, especially rust fungi (Pucciniales), are well known for their complex life cycles, which include phases of sexual and asexual reproduction. The effect of asexual multiplication on population genetic diversity has been investigated in the poplar rust fungus Melampsora larici-populina using a nested hierarchical sampling scheme. Four hierarchical levels were considered: leaf, twig, tree and site. Both cultivated and wild poplar stands were sampled at two time points at the start and end of rust epidemics. A total of 641 fungal isolates was analysed using nine microsatellite markers. This study revealed that the genetic signature of asexual multiplication in the wild poplar stand was seen only at lower hierarchical levels (leaf and twig). Moreover, we observed an erosion of clonal structure through time, with an increase in both gene and genotypic diversity. New genotypes contributed to host infection over time, which demonstrates the importance of allo-infection in the epidemic process in this host-pathogen system. Compared with the wild stands, the nearly lack of detection of clonal structure in the cultivated stands reflects the higher infection level on cultivated poplars. More generally, this genetic analysis illustrates the utility of population genetics approach for elucidating the proportion of asexual reproduction in the multiplication of isolates during an epidemic, and for proper quantification of asexual dispersal in plant pathogens.

  9. Genetic Multilocus Studies of Different Strains of Cryptococcus neoformans: Taxonomy and Genetic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Bertout, S.; Renaud, F.; Swinne, D.; Mallié, M.; Bastide, J.-M.

    1999-01-01

    The genotypes of 107 strains of Cryptococcus isolated from the environment or from patients from various geographical areas were determined by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). We analyzed the relationships between genotype structure and serotype and between genotype structure and strain origin. Twelve of the 14 enzyme-encoding loci studied were polymorphic, giving rise to 48 electrophoretic types. The genotypes of C. neoformans and C. laurentii were very similar. MLEE could not distinguish between these two pathogenic species. A correlation between the genetic multilocus structure and the origin of the sample (from the environment or patients) existed. A second analysis detected a correlation between genotype distribution and serotype. The second analysis considered three serotype groups (B, C, and A plus D plus A/D), proving that serotypes A, D, and A/D are closely related. MLEE is a useful epidemiological tool for improving our understanding of the biology of this fungus. PMID:9986838

  10. Genetic structure and differentiation in cultivated fig (Ficus carica L.)

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Ed; Velasco, Dianne; Koehmstedt, Anne

    2010-01-01

    One hundred ninety-four germplasm accessions of fig representing the four fig types, Common, Smyrna, San Pedro, and Caprifig were analyzed for genetic diversity, structure, and differentiation using genetic polymorphism at 15 microsatellite loci. The collection showed considerable polymorphism with observed number of alleles per locus ranging from four for five different loci, MFC4, LMFC14, LMFC22, LMFC31 and LMFC35 to nine for LMFC30 with an average of 4.9 alleles per locus. Seven of the 15 loci included in the genetic structure analyses exhibited significant deviation from panmixia, of which two showed excess and five showed deficiency of heterozygote. The cluster analysis (CA) revealed ten groups with 32 instances of synonymy among cultivars and groups differed significantly for frequency and composition of alleles for different loci. The principal components analysis (PCA) confirmed the results of CA with some groups more differentiated than the others. Further, the model based Bayesian approach clustering suggested a subtle population structure with mixed ancestry for most figs. The gene diversity analysis indicated that much of the total variation is found within groups (HG/HT = 0.853; 85.3%) and the among groups within total component (GGT = 0.147) accounted for the remaining 14.7%, of which ~64% accounted for among groups within clusters (GGC = 0.094) and ~36% among clusters (GCT = 0.053). The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed approximately similar results with nearly 87% of variation within groups and ~10% among groups within clusters, and ~3% among clusters. Overall, the gene pool of cultivated fig analyzed possesses substantial genetic polymorphism but exhibits narrow differentiation. It is evident that fig accessions from Turkmenistan are somewhat genetically different from the rest of the Mediterranean and the Caucasus figs. The long history of domestication and cultivation with widespread dispersal of cultivars with many synonyms

  11. Genetic structure and differentiation in cultivated fig (Ficus carica L.).

    PubMed

    Aradhya, Mallikarjuna K; Stover, Ed; Velasco, Dianne; Koehmstedt, Anne

    2010-06-01

    One hundred ninety-four germplasm accessions of fig representing the four fig types, Common, Smyrna, San Pedro, and Caprifig were analyzed for genetic diversity, structure, and differentiation using genetic polymorphism at 15 microsatellite loci. The collection showed considerable polymorphism with observed number of alleles per locus ranging from four for five different loci, MFC4, LMFC14, LMFC22, LMFC31 and LMFC35 to nine for LMFC30 with an average of 4.9 alleles per locus. Seven of the 15 loci included in the genetic structure analyses exhibited significant deviation from panmixia, of which two showed excess and five showed deficiency of heterozygote. The cluster analysis (CA) revealed ten groups with 32 instances of synonymy among cultivars and groups differed significantly for frequency and composition of alleles for different loci. The principal components analysis (PCA) confirmed the results of CA with some groups more differentiated than the others. Further, the model based Bayesian approach clustering suggested a subtle population structure with mixed ancestry for most figs. The gene diversity analysis indicated that much of the total variation is found within groups (H (G) /H (T) = 0.853; 85.3%) and the among groups within total component (G (GT) = 0.147) accounted for the remaining 14.7%, of which approximately 64% accounted for among groups within clusters (G (GC) = 0.094) and approximately 36% among clusters (G (CT) = 0.053). The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed approximately similar results with nearly 87% of variation within groups and approximately 10% among groups within clusters, and approximately 3% among clusters. Overall, the gene pool of cultivated fig analyzed possesses substantial genetic polymorphism but exhibits narrow differentiation. It is evident that fig accessions from Turkmenistan are somewhat genetically different from the rest of the Mediterranean and the Caucasus figs. The long history of domestication and cultivation

  12. Functional dissection of protein complexes involved in yeast chromosome biology using a genetic interaction map.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sean R; Miller, Kyle M; Maas, Nancy L; Roguev, Assen; Fillingham, Jeffrey; Chu, Clement S; Schuldiner, Maya; Gebbia, Marinella; Recht, Judith; Shales, Michael; Ding, Huiming; Xu, Hong; Han, Junhong; Ingvarsdottir, Kristin; Cheng, Benjamin; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Berger, Shelley L; Hieter, Phil; Zhang, Zhiguo; Brown, Grant W; Ingles, C James; Emili, Andrew; Allis, C David; Toczyski, David P; Weissman, Jonathan S; Greenblatt, Jack F; Krogan, Nevan J

    2007-04-12

    Defining the functional relationships between proteins is critical for understanding virtually all aspects of cell biology. Large-scale identification of protein complexes has provided one important step towards this goal; however, even knowledge of the stoichiometry, affinity and lifetime of every protein-protein interaction would not reveal the functional relationships between and within such complexes. Genetic interactions can provide functional information that is largely invisible to protein-protein interaction data sets. Here we present an epistatic miniarray profile (E-MAP) consisting of quantitative pairwise measurements of the genetic interactions between 743 Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in various aspects of chromosome biology (including DNA replication/repair, chromatid segregation and transcriptional regulation). This E-MAP reveals that physical interactions fall into two well-represented classes distinguished by whether or not the individual proteins act coherently to carry out a common function. Thus, genetic interaction data make it possible to dissect functionally multi-protein complexes, including Mediator, and to organize distinct protein complexes into pathways. In one pathway defined here, we show that Rtt109 is the founding member of a novel class of histone acetyltransferases responsible for Asf1-dependent acetylation of histone H3 on lysine 56. This modification, in turn, enables a ubiquitin ligase complex containing the cullin Rtt101 to ensure genomic integrity during DNA replication.

  13. Drosophila Protein Kinase CK2: Genetics, Regulatory Complexity and Emerging Roles during Development

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Mohna; Arbet, Scott; Bishop, Clifton P.; Bidwai, Ashok P.

    2016-01-01

    CK2 is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that is highly conserved amongst all eukaryotes. It is a well-known oncogenic kinase that regulates vital cell autonomous functions and animal development. Genetic studies in the fruit fly Drosophila are providing unique insights into the roles of CK2 in cell signaling, embryogenesis, organogenesis, neurogenesis, and the circadian clock, and are revealing hitherto unknown complexities in CK2 functions and regulation. Here, we review Drosophila CK2 with respect to its structure, subunit diversity, potential mechanisms of regulation, developmental abnormalities linked to mutations in the gene encoding CK2 subunits, and emerging roles in multiple aspects of eye development. We examine the Drosophila CK2 “interaction map” and the eye-specific “transcriptome” databases, which raise the prospect that this protein kinase has many additional targets in the developing eye. We discuss the possibility that CK2 functions during early retinal neurogenesis in Drosophila and mammals bear greater similarity than has been recognized, and that this conservation may extend to other developmental programs. Together, these studies underscore the immense power of the Drosophila model organism to provide new insights and avenues to further investigate developmentally relevant targets of this protein kinase. PMID:28036067

  14. Structure and function of complex brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Sporns, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of theoretical and empirical studies approach the function of the human brain from a network perspective. The analysis of brain networks is made feasible by the development of new imaging acquisition methods as well as new tools from graph theory and dynamical systems. This review surveys some of these methodological advances and summarizes recent findings on the architecture of structural and functional brain networks. Studies of the structural connectome reveal several modules or network communities that are interlinked by hub regions mediating communication processes between modules. Recent network analyses have shown that network hubs form a densely linked collective called a “rich club,” centrally positioned for attracting and dispersing signal traffic. In parallel, recordings of resting and task-evoked neural activity have revealed distinct resting-state networks that contribute to functions in distinct cognitive domains. Network methods are increasingly applied in a clinical context, and their promise for elucidating neural substrates of brain and mental disorders is discussed. PMID:24174898

  15. Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures

    PubMed Central

    Tisato, Nicola; Torriani, Stefano F. F.; Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Tavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia M.; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Helictites—an enigmatic type of mineral structure occurring in some caves—differ from classical speleothems as they develop with orientations that defy gravity. While theories for helictite formation have been forwarded, their genesis remains equivocal. Here, we show that a remarkable suite of helictites occurring in Asperge Cave (France) are formed by biologically-mediated processes, rather than abiotic processes as had hitherto been proposed. Morphological and petro-physical properties are inconsistent with mineral precipitation under purely physico-chemical control. Instead, microanalysis and molecular-biological investigation reveals the presence of a prokaryotic biofilm intimately associated with the mineral structures. We propose that microbially-influenced mineralization proceeds within a gliding biofilm which serves as a nucleation site for CaCO3, and where chemotaxis influences the trajectory of mineral growth, determining the macroscopic morphology of the speleothems. The influence of biofilms may explain the occurrence of similar speleothems in other caves worldwide, and sheds light on novel biomineralization processes. PMID:26510667

  16. When complex neuronal structures may not matter

    PubMed Central

    Otopalik, Adriane G; Sutton, Alexander C; Banghart, Matthew; Marder, Eve

    2017-01-01

    Much work has explored animal-to-animal variability and compensation in ion channel expression. Yet, little is known regarding the physiological consequences of morphological variability. We quantify animal-to-animal variability in cable lengths (CV = 0.4) and branching patterns in the Gastric Mill (GM) neuron, an identified neuron type with highly-conserved physiological properties in the crustacean stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of Cancer borealis. We examined passive GM electrotonic structure by measuring the amplitudes and apparent reversal potentials (Erevs) of inhibitory responses evoked with focal glutamate photo-uncaging in the presence of TTX. Apparent Erevs were relatively invariant across sites (mean CV ± SD = 0.04 ± 0.01; 7–20 sites in each of 10 neurons), which ranged between 100–800 µm from the somatic recording site. Thus, GM neurons are remarkably electrotonically compact (estimated λ > 1.5 mm). Electrotonically compact structures, in consort with graded transmission, provide an elegant solution to observed morphological variability in the STG. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23508.001 PMID:28165322

  17. Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures.

    PubMed

    Tisato, Nicola; Torriani, Stefano F F; Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Tavagna, Maria Luisa; D'Angeli, Ilenia M; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I; Bontognali, Tomaso R R

    2015-10-29

    Helictites--an enigmatic type of mineral structure occurring in some caves--differ from classical speleothems as they develop with orientations that defy gravity. While theories for helictite formation have been forwarded, their genesis remains equivocal. Here, we show that a remarkable suite of helictites occurring in Asperge Cave (France) are formed by biologically-mediated processes, rather than abiotic processes as had hitherto been proposed. Morphological and petro-physical properties are inconsistent with mineral precipitation under purely physico-chemical control. Instead, microanalysis and molecular-biological investigation reveals the presence of a prokaryotic biofilm intimately associated with the mineral structures. We propose that microbially-influenced mineralization proceeds within a gliding biofilm which serves as a nucleation site for CaCO3, and where chemotaxis influences the trajectory of mineral growth, determining the macroscopic morphology of the speleothems. The influence of biofilms may explain the occurrence of similar speleothems in other caves worldwide, and sheds light on novel biomineralization processes.

  18. Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Torriani, Stefano F. F.; Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; de Waele, Jo; Tavagna, Maria Luisa; D'Angeli, Ilenia M.; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.

    2015-10-01

    Helictites—an enigmatic type of mineral structure occurring in some caves—differ from classical speleothems as they develop with orientations that defy gravity. While theories for helictite formation have been forwarded, their genesis remains equivocal. Here, we show that a remarkable suite of helictites occurring in Asperge Cave (France) are formed by biologically-mediated processes, rather than abiotic processes as had hitherto been proposed. Morphological and petro-physical properties are inconsistent with mineral precipitation under purely physico-chemical control. Instead, microanalysis and molecular-biological investigation reveals the presence of a prokaryotic biofilm intimately associated with the mineral structures. We propose that microbially-influenced mineralization proceeds within a gliding biofilm which serves as a nucleation site for CaCO3, and where chemotaxis influences the trajectory of mineral growth, determining the macroscopic morphology of the speleothems. The influence of biofilms may explain the occurrence of similar speleothems in other caves worldwide, and sheds light on novel biomineralization processes.

  19. Genetic studies of plasma analytes identify novel potential biomarkers for several complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Deming, Yuetiva; Xia, Jian; Cai, Yefei; Lord, Jenny; Del-Aguila, Jorge L.; Fernandez, Maria Victoria; Carrell, David; Black, Kathleen; Budde, John; Ma, ShengMei; Saef, Benjamin; Howells, Bill; Bertelsen, Sarah; Bailey, Matthew; Ridge, Perry G.; Hefti, Franz; Fillit, Howard; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Carrillo, Maria; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Trncic, Nadira; Burke, Anna; Tariot, Pierre; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Beiden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Green, Robert C.; Marshall, Gad; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Snyder, Peter; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Ravdin, Lisa; Paul, Steven; Flashman, Laura A.; Seltzer, Marc; Hynes, Mary L.; Santulli, Robert B.; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Friedl, Karl; Murali Doraiswamy, P.; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; James, Olga; Wong, Terence; Coleman, Edward; Schwartz, Adam; Cellar, Janet S.; Levey, Allan L.; Lah, James J.; Behan, Kelly; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Fatica, Parianne; Farlow, Martin R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Shen, Li; Faber, Kelly; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Marie Hake, Ann; Matthews, Brandy R.; Brosch, Jared R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D’Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Bernstein, Matthew; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Chertkow, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Mintzer, Jacob; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Potter, William; Buckholtz, Neil; Hsiao, John; Kittur, Smita; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Johnson, Nancy; Chuang-Kuo; Kerwin, Diana; Bonakdarpour, Borna; Weintraub, Sandra; Grafman, Jordan; Lipowski, Kristine; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Silbert, Lisa; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Sadowsky, Carl; Khachaturian, Zaven; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Frank, Richard; Fleischman, Debra; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Shah, Raj C.; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Sorensen, Greg; Finger, Elizabeth; Pasternack, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Furst, Ansgar J.; Chad, Stevan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging-Yuek; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Fox, Nick; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Ekstam Smith, Karen; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Brooks, William M.; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Natelson Love, Marissa; DeCarli, Charles; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Maillard, Pauline; Fletcher, Evan; Nguyen, Dana; Preda, Andrian; Potkin, Steven; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; McAdams-Ortiz, Catherine; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Thompson, Paul; Donohue, Michael; Thomas, Ronald G.; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Balasubramanian, Archana B.; Mason, Jennifer; Sim, Iris; Aisen, Paul; Davis, Melissa; Morrison, Rosemary; Harvey, Danielle; Thal, Lean; Beckett, Laurel; Neylan, Thomas; Finley, Shannon; Weiner, Michael W.; Hayes, Jacqueline; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Perry, David; Massoglia, Dino; Brawman-Mentzer, Olga; Schuff, Norbert; Smith, Charles D.; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Koeppe, Robert A.; Lord, Joanne L.; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Clark, Christopher M.; Trojanowki, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Foster, Norm; Montine, Tom; Fruehling, J. Jay; Harding, Sandra; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Petrie, Eric C.; Peskind, Elaine; Li, Gail; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Smith, Amanda; Ashok Raj, Balebail; Fargher, Kristin; Kuller, Lew; Mathis, Chet; Ann Oakley, Mary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Simpson, Donna M.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Gordineer, Leslie; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Cairns, Nigel J.; Raichle, Marc; Morris, John C.; Householder, Erin; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Holtzman, David; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Creech, Mary L.; Franklin, Erin; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Varma, Pradeep; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Carson, Richard E.; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Davies, Peter; Holtzman, David; Morris, John C.; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Heitsch, Laura; Kauwe, John; Goate, Alison; Piccio, Laura; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of 146 plasma protein levels in 818 individuals revealed 56 genome-wide significant associations (28 novel) with 47 analytes. Loci associated with plasma levels of 39 proteins tested have been previously associated with various complex traits such as heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Type 2 diabetes, and multiple sclerosis. These data suggest that these plasma protein levels may constitute informative endophenotypes for these complex traits. We found three potential pleiotropic genes: ABO for plasma SELE and ACE levels, FUT2 for CA19-9 and CEA plasma levels, and APOE for ApoE and CRP levels. We also found multiple independent signals in loci associated with plasma levels of ApoH, CA19-9, FetuinA, IL6r, and LPa. Our study highlights the power of biological traits for genetic studies to identify genetic variants influencing clinically relevant traits, potential pleiotropic effects, and complex disease associations in the same locus.

  20. The spectrum of mutations controlling complex traits and the genetics of fitness in plants.

    PubMed

    Falke, K Christin; Glander, Shirin; He, Fei; Hu, Jinyong; de Meaux, Juliette; Schmitz, Gregor

    2013-12-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis of natural variation in complex traits is the key for their effective management in crops or natural systems. This review focuses on plant variation. It will first, show that genetic modifications causing major alterations in polygenic phenotypes often hit targets within an array of 'candidate genes', second, present new methods that include mutations of all effect sizes, and help exhaustively describe the molecular systems underlying complex traits, and third, discuss recent findings regarding the role of epigenetic variants, which in plants are often maintained through both mitosis and meiosis. Exploring the whole spectrum of mutations controlling complex traits is made possible by the combination of genetic, genomic and epigenomic approaches.

  1. Remarkable luminescence properties of lanthanide complexes with asymmetric dodecahedron structures.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Kohei; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Kawakami, Ryuhei; Kita, Yuki; Sugimoto, Katsufumi; Nakashima, Takuya; Harada, Takashi; Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2011-01-10

    The distorted coordination structures and luminescence properties of novel lanthanide complexes with oxo-linked bidentate phosphane oxide ligands--4,5-bis(diphenylphosphoryl)-9,9-dimethylxanthene (xantpo), 4,5-bis(di-tert-butylphosphoryl)-9,9-dimethylxanthene (tBu-xantpo), and bis[(2-diphenylphosphoryl)phenyl] ether (dpepo)--and low-vibrational frequency hexafluoroacetylacetonato (hfa) ligands are reported. The lanthanide complexes exhibit characteristic square antiprism and trigonal dodecahedron structures with eight-coordinated oxygen atoms. The luminescence properties of these complexes are characterized by their emission quantum yields, emission lifetimes, and their radiative and nonradiative rate constants. Lanthanide complexes with dodecahedron structures offer markedly high emission quantum yields (Eu: 55-72 %, Sm: 2.4-5.0 % in [D(6)]acetone) due to enhancement of the electric dipole transition and suppression of vibrational relaxation. These remarkable luminescence properties are elucidated in terms of their distorted coordination structures.

  2. Predictors for reproductive isolation in a ring species complex following genetic and ecological divergence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Reproductive isolation (RI) is widely accepted as an important "check point" in the diversification process, since it defines irreversible evolutionary trajectories. Much less consensus exists about the processes that might drive RI. Here, we employ a formal quantitative analysis of genetic interactions at several stages of divergence within the ring species complex Ensatina eschscholtzii in order to assess the relative contribution of genetic and ecological divergence for the development of RI. Results By augmenting previous genetic datasets and adding new ecological data, we quantify levels of genetic and ecological divergence between populations and test how they correlate with a restriction of genetic admixture upon secondary contact. Our results indicate that the isolated effect of ecological divergence between parental populations does not result in reproductively isolated taxa, even when genetic transitions between parental taxa are narrow. Instead, processes associated with overall genetic divergence are the best predictors of reproductive isolation, and when parental taxa diverge in nuclear markers we observe a complete cessation of hybridization, even to sympatric occurrence of distinct evolutionary lineages. Although every parental population has diverged in mitochondrial DNA, its degree of divergence does not predict the extent of RI. Conclusions These results show that in Ensatina, the evolutionary outcomes of ecological divergence differ from those of genetic divergence. While evident properties of taxa may emerge via ecological divergence, such as adaptation to local environment, RI is likely to be a byproduct of processes that contribute to overall genetic divergence, such as time in geographic isolation, rather than being a direct outcome of local adaptation. PMID:21733173

  3. Molecular markers for genetic diversity, gene flow and genetic population structure of freshwater mussel species.

    PubMed

    Choupina, A B; Martins, I M

    2014-08-01

    Freshwater mussel species are in global decline. Anthropogenic changes of river channels and the decrease of autochthonous fish population, the natural hosts of mussels larval stages (glochidia), are the main causes. Therefore, the conservation of mussel species depends not only on habitat conservation, but also on the availability of the fish host. In Portugal, information concerning most of the mussel species is remarkably scarce. One of the most known species, Unio pictorum is also in decline however, in the basins of the rivers Tua and Sabor (Northeast of Portugal), there is some indication of relatively large populations. The aforementioned rivers can be extremely important for this species conservation not only in Portugal, but also in the remaining Iberian Peninsula. Thus, it is important to obtain data concerning Unio pictorum bioecology (distribution, habitat requirements, population structure, genetic variability, reproductive cycle and recruitment rates), as well as the genetic variability and structure of the population. Concomitantly, information concerning fish population structure, the importance of the different fish species as "glochidia" hosts and their appropriate density to allow effective mussel recruitment, will also be assessed. The achieved data is crucial to obtain information to develop effective management measures in order to promote the conservation of this bivalve species, the conservation of autochthonous fish populations, and consequently the integrity of the river habitats.

  4. Toward understanding the structure of the vertebrate nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Beck, Martin; Glavy, Joseph S

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are large macromolecular assemblies that facilitate the nucleocytoplasmic exchange of macromolecules. Because of their intricate composition, membrane association, and sheer size, the integration of various, complementary structure determination approaches is a prerequisite for elucidating their structure. We have recently employed such an integrated strategy to analyze the scaffold structure of the cytoplasmic and nuclear rings of the human nuclear pore complex. In this extra view, we highlight two specific aspects of this work: the power of electron microscopy for bridging different resolution regimes and the importance of post-translational modifications for regulating nucleoporin interactions. We review recent technological developments and give a perspective toward future structure determination approaches.

  5. Origin, genetic diversity, and population structure of Chinese domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Yuan; Duan, Zi-Yuan; Sha, Tao; Xiangyu, Jinggong; Wu, Shi-Fang; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2006-07-19

    To characterize the origin, genetic diversity, and phylogeographic structure of Chinese domestic sheep, we here analyzed a 531-bp fragment of mtDNA control region of 449 Chinese autochthonous sheep from 19 breeds/populations from 13 geographic regions, together with previously reported 44 sequences from Chinese indigenous sheep. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all three previously defined lineages A, B, and C were found in all sampled Chinese sheep populations, except for the absence of lineage C in four populations. Network profiles revealed that the lineages B and C displayed a star-like phylogeny with the founder haplotype in the centre, and that two star-like subclades with two founder haplotypes were identified in lineage A. The pattern of genetic variation in lineage A, together with the divergence time between the two central founder haplotypes suggested that two independent domestication events have occurred in sheep lineage A. Considerable mitochondrial diversity was observed in Chinese sheep. Weak structuring was observed either among Chinese indigenous sheep populations or between Asian and European sheep and this can be attributable to long-term strong gene flow induced by historical human movements. The high levels of intra-population diversity in Chinese sheep and the weak phylogeographic structuring indicated three geographically independent domestication events have occurred and the domestication place was not only confined to the Near East, but also occurred in other regions.

  6. Characterizing the physical and genetic structure of the lodgepole pine × jack pine hybrid zone: mosaic structure and differential introgression

    PubMed Central

    Cullingham, Catherine I; James, Patrick M A; Cooke, Janice E K; Coltman, David W

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the physical and genetic structure of hybrid zones can illuminate factors affecting their formation and stability. In north-central Alberta, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb) form a complex and poorly defined hybrid zone. Better knowledge of this zone is relevant, given the recent host expansion of mountain pine beetle into jack pine. We characterized the zone by genotyping 1998 lodgepole, jack pine, and hybrids from British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, and Minnesota at 11 microsatellites. Using Bayesian algorithms, we calculated genetic ancestry and used this to model the relationship between species occurrence and environment. In addition, we analyzed the ancestry of hybrids to calculate the genetic contribution of lodgepole and jack pine. Finally, we measured the amount of gene flow between the pure species. We found the distribution of the pine classes is explained by environmental variables, and these distributions differ from classic distribution maps. Hybrid ancestry was biased toward lodgepole pine; however, gene flow between the two species was equal. The results of this study suggest that the hybrid zone is complex and influenced by environmental constraints. As a result of this analysis, range limits should be redefined. PMID:23346232

  7. Characterizing the physical and genetic structure of the lodgepole pine × jack pine hybrid zone: mosaic structure and differential introgression.

    PubMed

    Cullingham, Catherine I; James, Patrick M A; Cooke, Janice E K; Coltman, David W

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the physical and genetic structure of hybrid zones can illuminate factors affecting their formation and stability. In north-central Alberta, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb) form a complex and poorly defined hybrid zone. Better knowledge of this zone is relevant, given the recent host expansion of mountain pine beetle into jack pine. We characterized the zone by genotyping 1998 lodgepole, jack pine, and hybrids from British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, and Minnesota at 11 microsatellites. Using Bayesian algorithms, we calculated genetic ancestry and used this to model the relationship between species occurrence and environment. In addition, we analyzed the ancestry of hybrids to calculate the genetic contribution of lodgepole and jack pine. Finally, we measured the amount of gene flow between the pure species. We found the distribution of the pine classes is explained by environmental variables, and these distributions differ from classic distribution maps. Hybrid ancestry was biased toward lodgepole pine; however, gene flow between the two species was equal. The results of this study suggest that the hybrid zone is complex and influenced by environmental constraints. As a result of this analysis, range limits should be redefined.

  8. Structural deterioration of tendon collagen in genetic muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Stinson, R H

    1975-08-19

    The structure of gastrocnemius tendons from chickens with genetically induced muscular dystrophy has been studied by low-angle X-ray diffraction. Compared with normal samples there is poor alignment of collagen within the tendons. This difference is quite pronounced at eight weeks when the affected birds are still in comparatively good physical condition. Similar changes have been reported for birds with nutritionally induced muscular dystrophy (Bartlett, M. W., Egelstaff, P. A., Holden, T. M., Stinson, R. H. and Sweeny, P. R. (1973) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 328, 213-220).

  9. Genetic Structure of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) marajoara (Diptera: Culicidae) in Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    587GENETIC STRUCTURE OF ANOPHELES MARAJOARA IN COLOMBIA were sampled ( Figure 2 ). These populations were from Cáceres, Antioquia Department, 07°34...M5-71 (9; Meta), M5-71 (7; Norte de Santander), M1-31 and M10-1 (7 each; Magdalena), and M5-71 , M6-8 , and M7-1 (6 each; Antioquia ). In...2.07) and Antioquia (n A = 4.89 ± 1.27); Norte de Santander (n A = 5.33 ± 1.32) and Magdalena (n A = 5.53 ± 1.07) yielded intermediate values, and

  10. Environmentally induced changes in correlated responses to selection reveal variable pleiotropy across a complex genetic network.

    PubMed

    Sikkink, Kristin L; Reynolds, Rose M; Cresko, William A; Phillips, Patrick C

    2015-05-01

    Selection in novel environments can lead to a coordinated evolutionary response across a suite of characters. Environmental conditions can also potentially induce changes in the genetic architecture of complex traits, which in turn could alter the pattern of the multivariate response to selection. We describe a factorial selection experiment using the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei in which two different stress-related phenotypes (heat and oxidative stress resistance) were selected under three different environmental conditions. The pattern of covariation in the evolutionary response between phenotypes or across environments differed depending on the environment in which selection occurred, including asymmetrical responses to selection in some cases. These results indicate that variation in pleiotropy across the stress response network is highly sensitive to the external environment. Our findings highlight the complexity of the interaction between genes and environment that influences the ability of organisms to acclimate to novel environments. They also make clear the need to identify the underlying genetic basis of genetic correlations in order understand how patterns of pleiotropy are distributed across complex genetic networks.

  11. Local genetic structure in a white-bearded manakin population.

    PubMed

    Höglund, Jacob; Shorey, Lisa

    2003-09-01

    Local genetic structure was studied in lekking white-bearded manakins in a study area on northern Trinidad, West Indies. The study population consisted of nine leks, at which a total of 238 birds were caught. By genotyping the individuals at eight polymorphic microsatellite loci we inferred some males on leks to be related (r = 0.25) as we found an average number of 14.8 half-sib relationships and two full-sib relationships per lek. We found that the sampled birds belonged to one genetic population that was slightly inbred (FIS and FIT = 0.02). Kinship coefficients decreased with increasing geographical distance, indicating that related birds displayed at the same or nearby leks. However, leks did not consist of only one family group because the average genetic distance (aij) between males within leks was higher than when comparing males on leks within close proximity. These patterns suggest limited male dispersal, that some type of kin recognition process between individuals may exist in this species and that males on leks may be more likely to establish themselves as territory-holding birds if a relative is already present.

  12. Genetic structure of the human population in the Po delta

    PubMed Central

    Beretta, M.; Mazzetti, P.; Mamolini, E.; Gavina, R.; Barale, R.; Vullo, C.; Ravani, A.; Franze, A.; Sapigni, T.; Soracco, E.; Davi, D.; Ricci, N.; Cappello, N.; Rendine, S.; Piazza, A.; Barrai, I.

    1989-01-01

    The genetic structure of the population of Ferrara Province in the Po delta in Italy was investigated using χ2 analysis, kinship analysis, analysis of correspondences, and geographical mapping of principal components of gene frequencies, χ2 Analysis tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and for heterogeneity of gene and phenotype frequencies; kinship analysis tests for association between indicators of genetic and geographic proximity; analysis of correspondences relates localities and genetic systems in an eigenvectorial space; and geographic mapping displays the principal components of gene frequencies in the real space. In 1,364 adults in 26 residential units, seven presumably neutral isoenzyme systems were typed; ACP1 ESD, GLO I, GPT, PGD, PGM1 and PGP. It was found that average kinship for these neutral systems is correlated with geographic distance in this small area, but not as strongly as kinship for beta-thalassemia. A north-south gradient was observed for ESD. Analysis of correspondences indicated GPT, PGM1, and GLO I as the systems contributing most to differentiation within the province. The maps obtained from principal components of gene frequencies were consistent with the migrational history of the area. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:2741951

  13. Reconciling patterns of genetic variation with stream structure, earth history and biology in the Australian freshwater fish Craterocephalus stercusmuscarum (Atherinidae).

    PubMed

    McGlashan, D J; Hughes, J M

    2000-11-01

    We examined the consequences of barriers, stream architecture and putative dispersal capability on levels of genetic differentiation among populations of the freshwater fish Craterocephalus stercusmuscarum. Seven polymorphic allozyme loci and sequences of a 498-bp fragment of the ATPase 6 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene were used to assess patterns of genetic variation among 16 populations from upland and lowland streams of five drainages in northern Queensland, Australia. Concordant patterns at both genetic markers revealed that there were significant levels of genetic subdivision among all populations, while an analysis of molecular variation showed that the distribution of genetic diversity was not consistent with contemporary drainage structure. There were reciprocally monophyletic mtDNA clades and fixed or large frequency differences at allozyme loci either side of instream barriers such as waterfalls. This implied barriers were effective in restricting gene flow between upland and lowland populations separated by waterfalls. However, there were two genetically distinct groups in upland areas, even within the same subcatchment, as well as high levels of genetic subdivision among lowland populations, suggesting barriers alone do not explain the patterns of genetic diversity. The data revealed a complex phylogeographic pattern, which we interpreted to be the result of one or more invasion events of independent lineages to different sections of each drainage, possibly mediated by well documented geomorphological changes. Our results highlight the importance of earth structure and history in shaping population genetic structure in stream organisms where dispersal capability may be limited, and reveal that the contemporary structure of drainages is not necessarily a good indicator of genetic relationships among populations.

  14. Mesoscopic hydrothermodynamics of complex-structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcellos, Áurea R.; Silva, A. A. P.; Luzzi, Roberto; Casas-Vázquez, J.; Jou, David

    2013-10-01

    Some experimental results in the study of disordered systems, polymeric fluids, solutions of micelles and surfactants, ionic-glass conductors, and others show a hydrodynamic behavior labeled “anomalous” with properties described by some kind of fractional power laws in place of the standard ones. This is a consequence of the fractal-like structure that is present in these systems of which we do not have a detailed description, thus impairing the application of the conventional ensemble formalism of statistical mechanics. In order to obtain a physical picture of the phenomenon for making predictions which may help with technological and industrial decisions, one may resort to different styles (so-called nonconventional) in statistical mechanics. In that way can be introduced a theory for handling such impaired situations, a nonconventional mesoscopic hydrothermodynamics (MHT). We illustrate the question presenting an application in a contracted description of such nonconventional MHT, consisting in the use of the Renyi approach to derive a set of coupled nonstandard evolution equations, one for the density, a nonconventional Maxwell-Cattaneo equation, which in a limiting case goes over a non-Fickian diffusion equation, and other for the velocity in fluids under forced flow. For illustration the theory is applied to the study of the hydrodynamic motion in several soft-matter systems under several conditions such as streaming flow appearing in electrophoretic techniques and flow generated by harmonic forces arising in optical traps. The equivalence with Lévy processes is discussed and comparison with experiment is done.

  15. The Structure Inventory of the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Thomas U

    2016-05-22

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the principal gateway for molecular exchange between nucleus and cytoplasm across the nuclear envelope. Due to its sheer size of estimated 50-112MDa and its complex buildup from about 500-1000 individual proteins, it is a difficult object to study for structural biologists. Here, I review the extensive ensemble of high-resolution structures of the building blocks of the NPC. Concurrent with the increase in size and complexity, these latest, large structures and assemblies can now be used as the basis for hybrid approaches, primarily in combination with cryo-electron microscopic analysis, generating the first structure-based assembly models of the NPC. Going forward, the structures will be critically important for a detailed analysis of the NPC, including function, evolution, and assembly.

  16. Obesity and genomics: role of technology in unraveling the complex genetic architecture of obesity.

    PubMed

    Apalasamy, Yamunah Devi; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is a complex and multifactorial disease that occurs as a result of the interaction between "obesogenic" environmental factors and genetic components. Although the genetic component of obesity is clear from the heritability studies, the genetic basis remains largely elusive. Successes have been achieved in identifying the causal genes for monogenic obesity using animal models and linkage studies, but these approaches are not fruitful for polygenic obesity. The developments of genome-wide association approach have brought breakthrough discovery of genetic variants for polygenic obesity where tens of new susceptibility loci were identified. However, the common SNPs only accounted for a proportion of heritability. The arrival of NGS technologies and completion of 1000 Genomes Project have brought other new methods to dissect the genetic architecture of obesity, for example, the use of exome genotyping arrays and deep sequencing of candidate loci identified from GWAS to study rare variants. In this review, we summarize and discuss the developments of these genetic approaches in human obesity.

  17. Calculus structure on the Lie conformal algebra complex and the variational complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sole, Alberto; Hekmati, Pedram; Kac, Victor G.

    2011-05-01

    We construct a calculus structure on the Lie conformal algebra cochain complex. By restricting to degree one chains, we recover the structure of a {mathfrak g}-complex introduced in [A. De Sole and V. G. Kac, Commun. Math. Phys. 292, 667 (2009), 10.1007/s00220-009-0886-1]. A special case of this construction is the variational calculus, for which we provide explicit formulas.

  18. Photonic crystals, light manipulation, and imaging in complex nematic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravnik, Miha; Å timulak, Mitja; Mur, Urban; Čančula, Miha; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2016-03-01

    Three selected approaches for manipulation of light by complex nematic colloidal and non-colloidal structures are presented using different own custom developed theoretical and modelling approaches. Photonic crystals bands of distorted cholesteric liquid crystal helix and of nematic colloidal opals are presented, also revealing distinct photonic modes and density of states. Light propagation along half-integer nematic disclinations is shown with changes in the light polarization of various winding numbers. As third, simulated light transmission polarization micrographs of nematic torons are shown, offering a new insight into the complex structure characterization. Finally, this work is a contribution towards using complex soft matter in optics and photonics for advanced light manipulation.

  19. Landscape-scale evaluation of genetic structure among barrier-isolated populations of coastal cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guy, T.J.; Gresswell, R.E.; Banks, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Relationships among landscape structure, stochastic disturbance, and genetic diversity were assessed by examining interactions between watershed-scale environmental factors and genetic diversity of coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii) in 27 barrier-isolated watersheds from western Oregon, USA. Headwater populations of coastal cutthroat trout were genetically differentiated (mean FST = 0.33) using data from seven microsatellite loci (2232 individuals), but intrapopulation microsatellite genetic diversity (mean number of alleles per locus = 5, mean He = 0.60) was only moderate. Genetic diversity of coastal cutthroat trout was greater (P = 0.02) in the Coast Range ecoregion (mean alleles = 47) than in the Cascades ecoregion (mean alleles = 30), and differences coincided with indices of regional within-watershed complexity and connectivity. Furthermore, regional patterns of diversity evident from isolation-by-distance plots suggested that retention of within-population genetic diversity in the Coast Range ecoregion is higher than that in the Cascades, where genetic drift is the dominant factor influencing genetic patterns. Thus, it appears that physical landscape features have influenced genetic patterns in these populations isolated from short-term immigration. ?? 2008 NRC.

  20. A Comprehensive Genomic Analysis Reveals the Genetic Landscape of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Masakazu; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Kishita, Yoshihito; Nyuzuki, Hiromi; Moriyama, Yohsuke; Mizuno, Yosuke; Hirata, Tomoko; Yatsuka, Yukiko; Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Kato, Hidemasa; Okuda, Akihiko; Tamaru, Shunsuke; Borna, Nurun Nahar; Banshoya, Kengo; Aigaki, Toshiro; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Ohnuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagao, Asuteka; Maehata, Hazuki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nagasaki, Masao; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fushimi, Takuya; Shimura, Masaru; Kaiho-Ichimoto, Keiko; Harashima, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Taro; Mori, Masato; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders have the highest incidence among congenital metabolic disorders characterized by biochemical respiratory chain complex deficiencies. It occurs at a rate of 1 in 5,000 births, and has phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in about 1,500 nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins may cause mitochondrial dysfunction of energy production and mitochondrial disorders. More than 250 genes that cause mitochondrial disorders have been reported to date. However exact genetic diagnosis for patients still remained largely unknown. To reveal this heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive genomic analyses for 142 patients with childhood-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies. The approach includes whole mtDNA and exome analyses using high-throughput sequencing, and chromosomal aberration analyses using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We identified 37 novel mutations in known mitochondrial disease genes and 3 mitochondria-related genes (MRPS23, QRSL1, and PNPLA4) as novel causative genes. We also identified 2 genes known to cause monogenic diseases (MECP2 and TNNI3) and 3 chromosomal aberrations (6q24.3-q25.1, 17p12, and 22q11.21) as causes in this cohort. Our approaches enhance the ability to identify pathogenic gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies in clinical settings. They also underscore clinical and genetic heterogeneity and will improve patient care of this complex disorder.

  1. A Comprehensive Genomic Analysis Reveals the Genetic Landscape of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Nyuzuki, Hiromi; Moriyama, Yohsuke; Mizuno, Yosuke; Hirata, Tomoko; Yatsuka, Yukiko; Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Kato, Hidemasa; Okuda, Akihiko; Tamaru, Shunsuke; Borna, Nurun Nahar; Banshoya, Kengo; Aigaki, Toshiro; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Ohnuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagao, Asuteka; Maehata, Hazuki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nagasaki, Masao; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fushimi, Takuya; Shimura, Masaru; Kaiho-Ichimoto, Keiko; Harashima, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Taro; Mori, Masato; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders have the highest incidence among congenital metabolic disorders characterized by biochemical respiratory chain complex deficiencies. It occurs at a rate of 1 in 5,000 births, and has phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in about 1,500 nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins may cause mitochondrial dysfunction of energy production and mitochondrial disorders. More than 250 genes that cause mitochondrial disorders have been reported to date. However exact genetic diagnosis for patients still remained largely unknown. To reveal this heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive genomic analyses for 142 patients with childhood-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies. The approach includes whole mtDNA and exome analyses using high-throughput sequencing, and chromosomal aberration analyses using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We identified 37 novel mutations in known mitochondrial disease genes and 3 mitochondria-related genes (MRPS23, QRSL1, and PNPLA4) as novel causative genes. We also identified 2 genes known to cause monogenic diseases (MECP2 and TNNI3) and 3 chromosomal aberrations (6q24.3-q25.1, 17p12, and 22q11.21) as causes in this cohort. Our approaches enhance the ability to identify pathogenic gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies in clinical settings. They also underscore clinical and genetic heterogeneity and will improve patient care of this complex disorder. PMID:26741492

  2. Modeling of Protein Binary Complexes Using Structural Mass Spectrometry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Amisha Kamal,J.; Chance, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we describe a general approach to modeling the structure of binary protein complexes using structural mass spectrometry data combined with molecular docking. In the first step, hydroxyl radical mediated oxidative protein footprinting is used to identify residues that experience conformational reorganization due to binding or participate in the binding interface. In the second step, a three-dimensional atomic structure of the complex is derived by computational modeling. Homology modeling approaches are used to define the structures of the individual proteins if footprinting detects significant conformational reorganization as a function of complex formation. A three-dimensional model of the complex is constructed from these binary partners using the ClusPro program, which is composed of docking, energy filtering, and clustering steps. Footprinting data are used to incorporate constraints--positive and/or negative--in the docking step and are also used to decide the type of energy filter--electrostatics or desolvation--in the successive energy-filtering step. By using this approach, we examine the structure of a number of binary complexes of monomeric actin and compare the results to crystallographic data. Based on docking alone, a number of competing models with widely varying structures are observed, one of which is likely to agree with crystallographic data. When the docking steps are guided by footprinting data, accurate models emerge as top scoring. We demonstrate this method with the actin/gelsolin segment-1 complex. We also provide a structural model for the actin/cofilin complex using this approach which does not have a crystal or NMR structure.

  3. Preparation and Structural Properties of InIII–H Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sickerman, Nathaniel S.; Henry, Renée M.; Ziller, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    The use of the tripodal ligands tris[(N'-tert-butylureaylato)-N-ethyl]aminato ([H3buea]3−) and the sulfonamide-based N,N',N"-[2,2',2"-nitrilotris(ethane-2,1-diyl)]tris(2,4,6-trimethylbenzene-sulfonamidato) ([MST]3−) has led to the synthesis of two structurally distinct In(III)–OH complexes. The first example of a five-coordinate indium(III) complex with a terminal hydroxide ligand, K[InIIIH3buea(OH)], was prepared by addition of In(OAc)3 and water to a deprotonated solution of H6buea. X-ray diffraction analysis, as well as FTIR and 1H NMR spectroscopic methods, provided evidence for the formation of a monomeric In(III)–OH complex. The complex contains an intramolecular hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network involving the In(III)–OH unit and [H3buea]3− ligand, which aided in isolation of the complex. Isotope labeling studies verified the source of the hydroxo ligand as water. Treatment of the [InIIIMST] complex with a mixture of 15-crown-5 ether and NaOH led to isolation of the complex [15-crown-5⊃NaI-(μ-OH)-InIIIMST], whose solid-state structure was confirmed using X-ray diffraction methods. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies on this complex suggest it retains its heterobimetallic structure in solution. PMID:25309019

  4. On the complexity and the information content of cosmic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazza, F.

    2017-03-01

    The emergence of cosmic structure is commonly considered one of the most complex phenomena in nature. However, this complexity has never been defined nor measured in a quantitative and objective way. In this work, we propose a method to measure the information content of cosmic structure and to quantify the complexity that emerges from it, based on Information Theory. The emergence of complex evolutionary patterns is studied with a statistical symbolic analysis of the datastream produced by state-of-the-art cosmological simulations of forming galaxy clusters. This powerful approach allows us to measure how many bits of information is necessary to predict the evolution of energy fields in a statistical way, and it offers a simple way to quantify when, where and how the cosmic gas behaves in complex ways. The most complex behaviours are found in the peripheral regions of galaxy clusters, where supersonic flows drive shocks and large energy fluctuations over a few tens of million years. Describing the evolution of magnetic energy requires at least twice as large amount of bits as required for the other energy fields. When radiative cooling and feedback from galaxy formation are considered, the cosmic gas is overall found to double its degree of complexity. In the future, Cosmic Information Theory can significantly increase our understanding of the emergence of cosmic structure as it represents an innovative framework to design and analyse complex simulations of the Universe in a simple, yet powerful way.

  5. Structure and Dynamics of Antigenic Peptides in Complex with TAP

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Elisa; Tampé, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) selectively translocates antigenic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum. Loading onto major histocompatibility complex class I molecules and proofreading of these bound epitopes are orchestrated within the macromolecular peptide-loading complex, which assembles on TAP. This heterodimeric ABC-binding cassette (ABC) transport complex is therefore a major component in the adaptive immune response against virally or malignantly transformed cells. Its pivotal role predestines TAP as a target for infectious diseases and malignant disorders. The development of therapies or drugs therefore requires a detailed comprehension of structure and function of this ABC transporter, but our knowledge about various aspects is still insufficient. This review highlights recent achievements on the structure and dynamics of antigenic peptides in complex with TAP. Understanding the binding mode of antigenic peptides in the TAP complex will crucially impact rational design of inhibitors, drug development, or vaccination strategies. PMID:28194151

  6. Structural and evolutionary versatility in protein complexes with uneven stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Joseph A; Rees, Holly A; Ahnert, Sebastian E; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-03-16

    Proteins assemble into complexes with diverse quaternary structures. Although most heteromeric complexes of known structure have even stoichiometry, a significant minority have uneven stoichiometry--that is, differing numbers of each subunit type. To adopt this uneven stoichiometry, sequence-identical subunits must be asymmetric with respect to each other, forming different interactions within the complex. Here we first investigate the occurrence of uneven stoichiometry, demonstrating that it is common in vitro and is likely to be common in vivo. Next, we elucidate the structural determinants of uneven stoichiometry, identifying six different mechanisms by which it can be achieved. Finally, we study the frequency of uneven stoichiometry across evolution, observing a significant enrichment in bacteria compared with eukaryotes. We show that this arises due to a general increased tendency for bacterial proteins to self-assemble and form homomeric interactions, even within the context of a heteromeric complex.

  7. Genetic population structure in the yellow mongoose, Cynictis penicillata.

    PubMed

    Van Vuuren, B J; Robinson, T J

    1997-12-01

    Phylogeographic structure was determined for the yellow mongoose, Cynictis penicillata, using mtDNA RFLPs and control region sequences. The RFLP analysis revealed 13 haplotypes which showed weak geographical patterning consistent with a recent range expansion from a refugial population(s). An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed no correspondence between mtDNA phylogeography and subspecies delimitation, nor between matrilines and areas characterized by a high incidence of the viverrid-type rabies, of which the yellow mongoose is the principal vector. The lack of structure was also shown by control region sequences although four of the maternal lineages shared a near-perfect 81 bp repeat. We speculate that regional hot spots of the viverrid rabies biotype reflect population density differences in the yellow mongoose that are not underscored by genetic partitioning, at least at the level of resolution provided by our analyses.

  8. Temporal genetic structure of a drone congregation area of the giant Asian honeybee (Apis dorsata).

    PubMed

    Kraus, F B; Koeniger, N; Tingek, S; Moritz, R F A

    2005-12-01

    The giant Asian honeybee (Apis dorsata), like all other members of the genus Apis, has a complex mating system in which the queens and males (drones) mate at spatially defined drone congregation areas (DCAs). Here, we studied the temporal genetic structure of a DCA of A. dorsata over an 8-day time window by the genotyping of sampled drones with microsatellite markers. Analysis of the genotypic data revealed a significant genetic differentiation between 3 sampling days and indicated that the DCA was used by at least two subpopulations at all days in varying proportions. The estimation of the number of colonies which used the DCA ranged between 20 and 40 colonies per subpopulation, depending on the estimation procedure and population. The overall effective population size was estimated as high as N (e)=140. The DCA seems to counteract known tendencies of A. dorsata for inbreeding within colony aggregations by facilitating gene flow among subpopulations and increasing the effective population size.

  9. Temporal genetic structure of a drone congregation area of the giant Asian honeybee ( Apis dorsata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, F. B.; Koeniger, N.; Tingek, S.; Moritz, R. F. A.

    2005-12-01

    The giant Asian honeybee ( Apis dorsata), like all other members of the genus Apis, has a complex mating system in which the queens and males (drones) mate at spatially defined drone congregation areas (DCAs). Here, we studied the temporal genetic structure of a DCA of A. dorsata over an 8-day time window by the genotyping of sampled drones with microsatellite markers. Analysis of the genotypic data revealed a significant genetic differentiation between 3 sampling days and indicated that the DCA was used by at least two subpopulations at all days in varying proportions. The estimation of the number of colonies which used the DCA ranged between 20 and 40 colonies per subpopulation, depending on the estimation procedure and population. The overall effective population size was estimated as high as N e=140. The DCA seems to counteract known tendencies of A. dorsata for inbreeding within colony aggregations by facilitating gene flow among subpopulations and increasing the effective population size.

  10. Structural evaluation of crystalline ternary γ-cyclodextrin complex.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Kenjirou; Ideura, Saori; Waraya, Haruka; Moribe, Kunikazu; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2011-01-01

    The structure of a crystalline γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD) ternary complex containing salicylic acid (SA) and flurbiprofen (FBP) prepared by sealed heating was investigated. FBP/γ-CD inclusion complex was prepared by coprecipitation; its molar ratio was determined as 1/1. Powder X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the molecular packing of γ-CD changed from hexagonal to monoclinic columnar form by sealed heating of SA with dried FBP/γ-CD inclusion complex, indicating ternary complex formation. The stoichiometry of SA/FBP/γ-CD was estimated as 2/1/1. Solid-state transformation of γ-CD molecular packing upon water vapor adsorption and desorption was irreversible for this ternary complex, in contrast to the reversible transition for the FBP/γ-CD inclusion complex. The ternary complex contained one FBP molecule in the cavity of γ-CD and two SA molecules in the intermolecular space between neighboring γ-CD column stacks. Infrared and (13) C solid-state NMR spectroscopies revealed that the molecular states of SA and FBP changed upon ternary complex formation. In the complex, dimer FBP molecules were sandwiched between two γ-CD molecules whereas each monomer SA molecule was present in the intermolecular space of γ-CD. Ternary complex formation was also observed for other drug-guest systems using naproxen and ketoprofen. Thus, the complex can be used to formulate variety of drugs.

  11. Fine-scale genetic structuring on Manacus manacus leks.

    PubMed

    Shorey, L; Piertney, S; Stone, J; Höglund, J

    2000-11-16

    Leks have traditionally been considered as arenas where males compete to attract females and secure matings. Thus, direct fitness benefits mediated through competition between males to fertilize females have been considered to be the primary force driving the evolution of lekking behaviour. Inclusive fitness benefits mediated through kin selection may also be involved in lek formation and evolution, but to date this theory has been largely ignored. According to kin-selection theory, both reproducing and non-reproducing males may gain indirect inclusive fitness benefits. If females are attracted to larger leks, non-reproducing males add attractiveness to a lek, and therefore, in a genetically structured population, boost the reproductive success of kin. Theory predicts that the attractiveness of leks is plastic, and that males establish themselves on a lek in which the top male, in terms of reproductive success, is a close relative. Here we show that in white-bearded manakins (Manacus manacus), for which larger leks are more attractive to females and so secure the maximum number of matings, there is extraordinary fine-scale genetic structure, with leks being composed of clusters of related kin. We propose that males establish themselves where they find relatives to such an extent that they form groups within leks, and that such behaviour is consistent with kin-selection theory to maximize reproductive success of the group.

  12. Argentine Population Genetic Structure: Large Variance in Amerindian Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Michael F.; Tian, Chao; Shigeta, Russell; Scherbarth, Hugo R.; Silva, Gabriel; Belmont, John W.; Kittles, Rick; Gamron, Susana; Allevi, Alberto; Palatnik, Simon A.; Alvarellos, Alejandro; Paira, Sergio; Caprarulo, Cesar; Guillerón, Carolina; Catoggio, Luis J.; Prigione, Cristina; Berbotto, Guillermo A.; García, Mercedes A.; Perandones, Carlos E.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2011-01-01

    Argentine population genetic structure was examined using a set of 78 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to assess the contributions of European, Amerindian, and African ancestry in 94 individuals members of this population. Using the Bayesian clustering algorithm STRUCTURE, the mean European contribution was 78%, the Amerindian contribution was 19.4%, and the African contribution was 2.5%. Similar results were found using weighted least mean square method: European, 80.2%; Amerindian, 18.1%; and African, 1.7%. Consistent with previous studies the current results showed very few individuals (four of 94) with greater than 10% African admixture. Notably, when individual admixture was examined, the Amerindian and European admixture showed a very large variance and individual Amerindian contribution ranged from 1.5 to 84.5% in the 94 individual Argentine subjects. These results indicate that admixture must be considered when clinical epidemiology or case control genetic analyses are studied in this population. Moreover, the current study provides a set of informative SNPs that can be used to ascertain or control for this potentially hidden stratification. In addition, the large variance in admixture proportions in individual Argentine subjects shown by this study suggests that this population is appropriate for future admixture mapping studies. PMID:17177183

  13. The socio-genetics of a complex society: female gelada relatedness patterns mirror association patterns in a multilevel society.

    PubMed

    Snyder-Mackler, Noah; Alberts, Susan C; Bergman, Thore J

    2014-12-01

    Multilevel societies with fission-fusion dynamics--arguably the most complex animal societies--are defined by two or more nested levels of organization. The core of these societies are modular social units that regularly fission and fuse with one another. Despite convergent evolution in disparate taxa, we know strikingly little about how such societies form and how fitness benefits operate. Understanding the kinship structure of complex societies could inform us about the origins of the social structure as well as about the potential for individuals in these societies to accrue indirect fitness benefits. Here, we combined genetic and behavioural data on geladas (Theropithecus gelada), an Old World Monkey, to complete the most comprehensive socio-genetic analysis of a multilevel society to date. In geladas, individuals in the core social 'units', associate at different frequencies to form 'teams', 'bands' and, the largest aggregations, 'communities'. Units were composed of closely related females, and females remained with their close kin during permanent fissions of units. Interestingly, female-female relatedness also significantly predicted between-unit, between-team and between-band association patterns, while male-male relatedness did not. Thus, it is likely that the socio-genetic structure of gelada society results from females maintaining associations with their female relatives during successive unit fissions--possibly in an attempt to balance the direct and indirect fitness benefits of group living. Overall, the persistence of associations among related females across generations appears to drive the formation of higher levels of gelada society, suggesting that females seek kin for inclusive fitness benefits at multiple levels of gelada society.

  14. Genetic Variation in Human Vitamin C Transporter Genes in Common Complex Diseases123

    PubMed Central

    Shaghaghi, Mandana Amir; Kloss, Olena

    2016-01-01

    Adequate plasma, cellular, and tissue vitamin C concentrations are required for maintaining optimal health through suppression of oxidative stress and optimizing functions of certain enzymes that require vitamin C as a cofactor. Polymorphisms in the vitamin C transporter genes, compromising genes encoding sodium-dependent ascorbate transport proteins, and also genes encoding facilitative transporters of dehydroascorbic acid, are associated with plasma and tissue cellular ascorbate status and hence cellular redox balance. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the links between variations in vitamin C transporter genes and common chronic diseases. We conclude that emerging genetic knowledge has a good likelihood of defining future personalized dietary recommendations and interventions; however, further validations through biological studies as well as controlled dietary trials are required to identify predictive and actionable genetic biomarkers. We further advocate the need to consider genetic variation of vitamin C transporters in future clinical and epidemiologic studies on common complex diseases. PMID:26980812

  15. Complex Genetics of Behavior: BXDs in the Automated Home-Cage.

    PubMed

    Loos, Maarten; Verhage, Matthijs; Spijker, Sabine; Smit, August B

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes a use case for the genetic dissection and automated analysis of complex behavioral traits using the genetically diverse panel of BXD mouse recombinant inbred strains. Strains of the BXD resource differ widely in terms of gene and protein expression in the brain, as well as in their behavioral repertoire. A large mouse resource opens the possibility for gene finding studies underlying distinct behavioral phenotypes, however, such a resource poses a challenge in behavioral phenotyping. To address the specifics of large-scale screening we describe how to investigate: (1) how to assess mouse behavior systematically in addressing a large genetic cohort, (2) how to dissect automation-derived longitudinal mouse behavior into quantitative parameters, and (3) how to map these quantitative traits to the genome, deriving loci underlying aspects of behavior.

  16. Genetic Structure of Pacific Trout at the Extreme Southern End of Their Native Range

    PubMed Central

    Abadía-Cardoso, Alicia; Garza, John Carlos; Mayden, Richard L.; García de León, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Salmonid fishes are cold water piscivores with a native distribution spanning nearly the entire temperate and subarctic northern hemisphere. Trout in the genus Oncorhynchus are the most widespread salmonid fishes and are among the most important fish species in the world, due to their extensive use in aquaculture and valuable fisheries. Trout that inhabit northwestern Mexico are the southernmost native salmonid populations in the world, and the least studied in North America. They are unfortunately also facing threats to their continued existence. Previous work has described one endemic species, the Mexican golden trout (O. chrysogaster), and one endemic subspecies, Nelson’s trout (O. mykiss nelsoni), in Mexico, but previous work indicated that there is vastly more biodiversity in this group than formally described. Here we conducted a comprehensive genetic analysis of this important group of fishes using novel genetic markers and techniques to elucidate the biodiversity of trout inhabiting northwestern Mexico, examine genetic population structure of Mexican trout and their relationships to other species of Pacific trout, and measure introgression from non-native hatchery rainbow trout. We confirmed substantial genetic diversity and extremely strong genetic differentiation present in the Mexican trout complex, not only between basins but also between some locations within basins, with at least four species-level taxa present. We also revealed significant divergence between Mexican trout and other trout species and found that introgression from non-native rainbow trout is present but limited, and that the genetic integrity of native trout is still maintained in most locations. This information will help to guide effective conservation strategies for this important group of fishes. PMID:26509445

  17. Accurate inference of subtle population structure (and other genetic discontinuities) using principal coordinates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate inference of genetic discontinuities between populations is an essential component of intraspecific biodiversity and evolution studies, as well as associative genetics. The most widely used methods to infer population structure are model based, Bayesian MCMC procedures that minimize Hardy...

  18. Genetic structure and domestication of carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus)(Apiaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated domestication and genetic structure in wild and open pollinated cultivated carrots (Daucus carota L.) with 3481 SNPs developed from carrot transcriptome sequences. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a clear genetic separation between wild and cultivated carrot accessions. Among the wild ...

  19. How Complex, Probable, and Predictable is Genetically Driven Red Queen Chaos?

    PubMed

    Duarte, Jorge; Rodrigues, Carla; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno; Sardanyés, Josep

    2015-12-01

    Coevolution between two antagonistic species has been widely studied theoretically for both ecologically- and genetically-driven Red Queen dynamics. A typical outcome of these systems is an oscillatory behavior causing an endless series of one species adaptation and others counter-adaptation. More recently, a mathematical model combining a three-species food chain system with an adaptive dynamics approach revealed genetically driven chaotic Red Queen coevolution. In the present article, we analyze this mathematical model mainly focusing on the impact of species rates of evolution (mutation rates) in the dynamics. Firstly, we analytically proof the boundedness of the trajectories of the chaotic attractor. The complexity of the coupling between the dynamical variables is quantified using observability indices. By using symbolic dynamics theory, we quantify the complexity of genetically driven Red Queen chaos computing the topological entropy of existing one-dimensional iterated maps using Markov partitions. Co-dimensional two bifurcation diagrams are also built from the period ordering of the orbits of the maps. Then, we study the predictability of the Red Queen chaos, found in narrow regions of mutation rates. To extend the previous analyses, we also computed the likeliness of finding chaos in a given region of the parameter space varying other model parameters simultaneously. Such analyses allowed us to compute a mean predictability measure for the system in the explored region of the parameter space. We found that genetically driven Red Queen chaos, although being restricted to small regions of the analyzed parameter space, might be highly unpredictable.

  20. Crystal Structure of the Lactose Operon Repressor and Its Complexes with DNA and Inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Mitchell; Chang, Geoffrey; Horton, Nancy C.; Kercher, Michele A.; Pace, Helen C.; Schumacher, Maria A.; Brennan, Richard G.; Lu, Ponzy

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor, a product of the lacI gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-β-D-1-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21-base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in a stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quaternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites on the genomic DNA.

  1. Statistical energy analysis of complex structures, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trudell, R. W.; Yano, L. I.

    1980-01-01

    A method for estimating the structural vibration properties of complex systems in high frequency environments was investigated. The structure analyzed was the Materials Experiment Assembly, (MEA), which is a portion of the OST-2A payload for the space transportation system. Statistical energy analysis (SEA) techniques were used to model the structure and predict the structural element response to acoustic excitation. A comparison of the intial response predictions and measured acoustic test data is presented. The conclusions indicate that: the SEA predicted the response of primary structure to acoustic excitation over a wide range of frequencies; and the contribution of mechanically induced random vibration to the total MEA is not significant.

  2. Structural health monitoring feature design by genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Dustin Y.; Todd, Michael D.

    2014-09-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) systems provide real-time damage and performance information for civil, aerospace, and other high-capital or life-safety critical structures. Conventional data processing involves pre-processing and extraction of low-dimensional features from in situ time series measurements. The features are then input to a statistical pattern recognition algorithm to perform the relevant classification or regression task necessary to facilitate decisions by the SHM system. Traditional design of signal processing and feature extraction algorithms can be an expensive and time-consuming process requiring extensive system knowledge and domain expertise. Genetic programming, a heuristic program search method from evolutionary computation, was recently adapted by the authors to perform automated, data-driven design of signal processing and feature extraction algorithms for statistical pattern recognition applications. The proposed method, called Autofead, is particularly suitable to handle the challenges inherent in algorithm design for SHM problems where the manifestation of damage in structural response measurements is often unclear or unknown. Autofead mines a training database of response measurements to discover information-rich features specific to the problem at hand. This study provides experimental validation on three SHM applications including ultrasonic damage detection, bearing damage classification for rotating machinery, and vibration-based structural health monitoring. Performance comparisons with common feature choices for each problem area are provided demonstrating the versatility of Autofead to produce significant algorithm improvements on a wide range of problems.

  3. The Ccr4-Not Complex: Architecture and Structural Insights.

    PubMed

    Collart, Martine A; Panasenko, Olesya O

    2017-01-01

    The Ccr4-Not complex is an essential multi-subunit protein complex that plays a fundamental role in eukaryotic mRNA metabolism and has a multitude of different roles that impact eukaryotic gene expression . It has a conserved core of three Not proteins, the Ccr4 protein, and two Ccr4 associated factors, Caf1 and Caf40. A fourth Not protein, Not4, is conserved, but is only a stable subunit of the complex in yeast. Certain subunits have been duplicated during evolution, with functional divergence, such as Not3 in yeast, and Ccr4 or Caf1 in human. However the complex includes only one homolog for each protein. In addition, species-specific subunits are part of the complex, such as Caf130 in yeast or Not10 and Not11 in human. Two conserved catalytic functions are associated with the complex, deadenylation and ubiquitination . The complex adopts an L-shaped structure, in which different modules are bound to a large Not1 scaffold protein. In this chapter we will summarize our current knowledge of the architecture of the complex and of the structure of its constituents.

  4. Geometric modeling of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Kelin; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the structure, function, stability, and dynamics of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes have emerged as a leading interest in structural biology. Geometric modeling not only provides visualizations of shapes for large biomolecular complexes but also fills the gap between structural information and theoretical modeling, and enables the understanding of function, stability, and dynamics. This paper introduces a suite of computational tools for volumetric data processing, information extraction, surface mesh rendering, geometric measurement, and curvature estimation of biomolecular complexes. Particular emphasis is given to the modeling of cryo-electron microscopy data. Lagrangian-triangle meshes are employed for the surface presentation. On the basis of this representation, algorithms are developed for surface area and surface-enclosed volume calculation, and curvature estimation. Methods for volumetric meshing have also been presented. Because the technological development in computer science and mathematics has led to multiple choices at each stage of the geometric modeling, we discuss the rationales in the design and selection of various algorithms. Analytical models are designed to test the computational accuracy and convergence of proposed algorithms. Finally, we select a set of six cryo-electron microscopy data representing typical subcellular complexes to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed algorithms in handling biomolecular surfaces and explore their capability of geometric characterization of binding targets. This paper offers a comprehensive protocol for the geometric modeling of subcellular structures, organelles, and multiprotein complexes.

  5. Genetic structure in the coral, Montastraea cavernosa: assessing genetic differentiation among and within Mesophotic reefs.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, Daniel A; Lesser, Michael P; Slattery, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Mesophotic coral reefs (30-150 m) have recently received increased attention as a potential source of larvae (e.g., the refugia hypothesis) to repopulate a select subset of the shallow water (<30 m) coral fauna. To test the refugia hypothesis we used highly polymorphic Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers as a means to assess small-scale genetic heterogeneity between geographic locations and across depth clines in the Caribbean coral, Montastraea cavernosa. Zooxanthellae-free DNA extracts of coral samples (N = 105) were analyzed from four depths, shallow (3-10 m), medium (15-25 m), deep (30-50 m) and very deep (60-90 m) from Little Cayman Island (LCI), Lee Stocking Island (LSI), Bahamas and San Salvador (SS), Bahamas which range in distance from 170 to 1,600 km apart. Using AMOVA analysis there were significant differences in ΦST values in pair wise comparisons between LCI and LSI. Among depths at LCI, there was significant genetic differentiation between shallow and medium versus deep and very deep depths in contrast there were no significant differences in ΦST values among depths at LSI. The assignment program AFLPOP, however, correctly assigned 95.7% of the LCI and LSI samples to the depths from which they were collected, differentiating among populations as little as 10 to 20 m in depth from one another. Discriminant function analysis of the data showed significant differentiation among samples when categorized by collection site as well as collection depth. FST outlier analyses identified 2 loci under positive selection and 3 under balancing selection at LCI. At LSI 2 loci were identified, both showing balancing selection. This data shows that adult populations of M. cavernosa separated by depths of tens of meters exhibits significant genetic structure, indicative of low population connectivity among and within sites and are not supplying successful recruits to adjacent coral reefs less than 30 m in depth.

  6. Structural Neuroimaging Genetics Interactions in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Seok Woo; Dinov, Ivo D.; Kim, Jaebum; Zamanyan, Alen; Hobel, Sam; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates late-onset cognitive impairment using neuroimaging and genetics biomarkers for subjects participating in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Eight hundred and eight ADNI subjects were identified and divided into three groups: those with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and asymptomatic normal control (NC) group. Two hundred of the subjects qualified for AD diagnosis at the baseline; three hundred and eighty-three had MCI; and 225 were included in the NC group. The structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were parcellated using BrainParser, and the 80 most important neuroimaging biomarkers were extracted using the Global Shape Analysis (GSA) Pipeline workflow. We obtained 80 SNPs using Plink analysis via the Pipeline environment. In the AD cohort, rs2137962 was significantly associated with changes in left and right hippocampi and bilaterally in parahippocampal gyri, and rs1498853, rs288503, and rs288496 were significantly associated with hippocampi bilaterally, the right parahippocampal gyrus, and left inferior temporal gyrus. In the MCI cohort, rs17028008 and rs17027976 were significantly associated with right caudate and right fusiform gyrus, and rs2075650 (TOMM40) was significantly associated with right caudate, rs1334496 and rs4829605 were significantly associated with right inferior temporal gyrus. In the NC cohort, Chromosome 15 [rs734854 (STOML1), rs11072463 (PML), rs4886844 (PML) and rs1052242 (PML)] was significantly associated with the both hippocampi and both insular cortex and rs4899412 (RGS6) was significantly associated with caudate related biomarkers. We observed significant correlations between the SNPs and the neuroimaging phenotypes in the 808 subjects in terms of neuroimaging genetics. These results illustrate some of the neuroimaging-genetics associations between the AD, MCI and NC cohorts. PMID:26444770

  7. Genetic diversity and population structure of cottons (Gossypium spp.) of the New World assessed by SSR markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A global analysis of cotton (Gossypium spp.) genetic diversity is the first step to understand its geographical distribution, dissemination, genetic relatedness, and population structure. To assess the genetic diversity and population structure in Gossypium species, 111 cotton accessions representin...

  8. Genetic Structure and Inferences on Potential Source Areas for Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) Based on Mitochondrial and Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Kerdelhué, Carole; Ye, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) is mainly distributed in tropical and subtropical Asia and in the Pacific region. Despite its economic importance, very few studies have addressed the question of the wide genetic structure and potential source area of this species. This pilot study attempts to infer the native region of this pest and its colonization pathways in Asia. Combining mitochondrial and microsatellite markers, we evaluated the level of genetic diversity, genetic structure, and the gene flow among fly populations collected across Southeast Asia and China. A complex and significant genetic structure corresponding to the geographic pattern was found with both types of molecular markers. However, the genetic structure found was rather weak in both cases, and no pattern of isolation by distance was identified. Multiple long-distance dispersal events and miscellaneous host selection by this species may explain the results. These complex patterns may have been influenced by human-mediated transportation of the pest from one area to another and the complex topography of the study region. For both mitochondrial and microsatellite data, no signs of bottleneck or founder events could be identified. Nonetheless, maximal genetic diversity was observed in Myanmar, Vietnam and Guangdong (China) and asymmetric migration patterns were found. These results provide indirect evidence that the tropical regions of Southeast Asia and southern coast of China may be considered as the native range of the species and the population expansion is northward. Yunnan (China) is a contact zone that has been colonized from different sources. Regions along the southern coast of Vietnam and China probably served to colonize mainly the southern region of China. Southern coastal regions of China may also have colonized central parts of China and of central Yunnan. PMID:22615898

  9. Structural dependence of Mn complexation by siderophores: Donor group dependence on complex stability and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, James M.; Parker, Dorothy L.; Bargar, John R.; Jarzecki, Andrzej A.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Sposito, Garrison; Duckworth, Owen W.

    2012-07-01

    Siderophores traditionally have been viewed as solely being involved in the biogeochemical cycling of Fe(III). This paradigm, however, ignores the diverse roles siderophores may play in the cycling of other trace metals, such as Mn, Co, Mo, and V. Recent work has shown that siderophores form complexes with high stability constants with Mn(III), which are in some cases higher than that of the corresponding Fe(III) complex. Herein, we report on a structural analysis of the dissolved Fe(III)- and Mn(III)-siderophore complexes of rhizoferrin and two pyoverdin-type siderophores using X-ray spectroscopic techniques. Additionally, the stability constants of the Mn(III)-pyoverdinPaA and Mn(III)-rhizoferrin complexes have been quantified as log β111 = 47.5 ± 0.3 and log β110 = 29.8 ± 0.3, respectively. Comparisons of thermodynamic stability and solution structures of Fe(III)- and Mn(III)-complexes with a variety of siderophores demonstrate the relationship between donor group identity, siderophore structure, and strength of complex formation. Rhizoferrin and two mixed-moiety pyoverdins bind with a higher affinity for Mn(III) than Fe(III), possibly because of binding moiety composition which makes them better able to accommodate Jahn-Teller distortion. In contrast, Fe(III) forms complexes of higher relative stability with siderophores that contain hydroxamate and catecholate moieties, more rigid donor groups that form five-membered chelate rings.

  10. Duplication and population dynamics shape historic patterns of selection and genetic variation at the major histocompatibility complex in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Winternitz, Jamie C; Wares, John P

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is vitally important for wildlife populations to respond to pathogen threats. As natural populations can fluctuate greatly in size, a key issue concerns how population cycles and bottlenecks that could reduce genetic diversity will influence MHC genes. Using 454 sequencing, we characterized genetic diversity at the DRB Class II locus in montane voles (Microtus montanus), a North American rodent that regularly undergoes high-amplitude fluctuations in population size. We tested for evidence of historic balancing selection, recombination, and gene duplication to identify mechanisms maintaining allelic diversity. Counter to our expectations, we found strong evidence of purifying selection acting on the DRB locus in montane voles. We speculate that the interplay between population fluctuations and gene duplication might be responsible for the weak evidence of historic balancing selection and strong evidence of purifying selection detected. To further explore this idea, we conducted a phylogenetically controlled comparative analysis across 16 rodent species with varying demographic histories and MHC duplication events (based on the maximum number of alleles detected per individual). On the basis of phylogenetic generalized linear model-averaging, we found evidence that the estimated number of duplicated loci was positively related to allelic diversity and, surprisingly, to the strength of purifying selection at the DRB locus. Our analyses also revealed that species that had undergone population bottlenecks had lower allelic richness than stable species. This study highlights the need to consider demographic history and genetic structure alongside patterns of natural selection to understand resulting patterns of genetic variation at the MHC. PMID:23789067

  11. Surprise maximization reveals the community structure of complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Marín, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    How to determine the community structure of complex networks is an open question. It is critical to establish the best strategies for community detection in networks of unknown structure. Here, using standard synthetic benchmarks, we show that none of the algorithms hitherto developed for community structure characterization perform optimally. Significantly, evaluating the results according to their modularity, the most popular measure of the quality of a partition, systematically provides mistaken solutions. However, a novel quality function, called Surprise, can be used to elucidate which is the optimal division into communities. Consequently, we show that the best strategy to find the community structure of all the networks examined involves choosing among the solutions provided by multiple algorithms the one with the highest Surprise value. We conclude that Surprise maximization precisely reveals the community structure of complex networks. PMID:23320141

  12. Structure Reveals Mechanisms of Viral Suppressors that Intercept a CRISPR RNA-Guided Surveillance Complex.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Saikat; Carter, Joshua; Rollins, MaryClare F; Golden, Sarah M; Jackson, Ryan N; Hoffmann, Connor; Nosaka, Lyn'Al; Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Lander, Gabriel C; Wiedenheft, Blake

    2017-03-23

    Genetic conflict between viruses and their hosts drives evolution and genetic innovation. Prokaryotes evolved CRISPR-mediated adaptive immune systems for protection from viral infection, and viruses have evolved diverse anti-CRISPR (Acr) proteins that subvert these immune systems. The adaptive immune system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (type I-F) relies on a 350 kDa CRISPR RNA (crRNA)-guided surveillance complex (Csy complex) to bind foreign DNA and recruit a trans-acting nuclease for target degradation. Here, we report the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the Csy complex bound to two different Acr proteins, AcrF1 and AcrF2, at an average resolution of 3.4 Å. The structure explains the molecular mechanism for immune system suppression, and structure-guided mutations show that the Acr proteins bind to residues essential for crRNA-mediated detection of DNA. Collectively, these data provide a snapshot of an ongoing molecular arms race between viral suppressors and the immune system they target.

  13. Genetic structure of autochthonous populations of Meso-America: Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lisker, R; Ramírez, E; Babinsky, V

    1996-06-01

    We analyze the possible effect of gene flow on the genetic structure of present-day Mexicans. For this purpose we reviewed previous admixture estimates for various Indian and Mestizo groups. Several facts seem clear: (1) There are no pure Indian groups in Mexico, because all Indian groups show variable degrees of admixture, mostly with whites (range, 0.088 in the Huichol to 0.373 in the Huasteco); (2) the main ancestral contribution to the noncoastal lower middle class Mestizo populations is Indian (above 50%) so that from a genetic standpoint Indians and lower middle class Mestizos are not much different; and (3) black ancestry is quite high on the coasts, ranging from 0.127 to 0.405 on the east coast, and is present in other Mestizos, ranging in large urban centers from 0.027 in Oaxaca to 0.107 in Puebla and in smaller cities from 0.08 in Tlaxcala to 0.181 in Cuanalán.

  14. A Hypothesis for Using Pathway Genetic Load Analysis for Understanding Complex Outcomes in Bilirubin Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Sean M.; Bittel, Douglas C.; Le Pichon, Jean-Baptiste; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Watchko, Jon F.; Wennberg, Richard P.; Shapiro, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic-based susceptibility to bilirubin neurotoxicity and chronic bilirubin encephalopathy (kernicterus) is still poorly understood. Neonatal jaundice affects 60–80% of newborns, and considerable effort goes into preventing this relatively benign condition from escalating into the development of kernicterus making the incidence of this potentially devastating condition very rare in more developed countries. The current understanding of the genetic background of kernicterus is largely comprised of mutations related to alterations of bilirubin production, elimination, or both. Less is known about mutations that may predispose or protect against CNS bilirubin neurotoxicity. The lack of a monogenetic source for this risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity suggests that disease progression is dependent upon an overall decrease in the functionality of one or more essential genetically controlled metabolic pathways. In other words, a “load” is placed on key pathways in the form of multiple genetic variants that combine to create a vulnerable phenotype. The idea of epistatic interactions creating a pathway genetic load (PGL) that affects the response to a specific insult has been previously reported as a PGL score. We hypothesize that the PGL score can be used to investigate whether increased susceptibility to bilirubin-induced CNS damage in neonates is due to a mutational load being placed on key genetic pathways important to the central nervous system's response to bilirubin neurotoxicity. We propose a modification of the PGL score method that replaces the use of a canonical pathway with custom gene lists organized into three tiers with descending levels of evidence combined with the utilization of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) causality prediction methods. The PGL score has the potential to explain the genetic background of complex bilirubin induced neurological disorders (BIND) such as kernicterus and could be the key to understanding ranges of outcome severity

  15. A Hypothesis for Using Pathway Genetic Load Analysis for Understanding Complex Outcomes in Bilirubin Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Riordan, Sean M; Bittel, Douglas C; Le Pichon, Jean-Baptiste; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Watchko, Jon F; Wennberg, Richard P; Shapiro, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic-based susceptibility to bilirubin neurotoxicity and chronic bilirubin encephalopathy (kernicterus) is still poorly understood. Neonatal jaundice affects 60-80% of newborns, and considerable effort goes into preventing this relatively benign condition from escalating into the development of kernicterus making the incidence of this potentially devastating condition very rare in more developed countries. The current understanding of the genetic background of kernicterus is largely comprised of mutations related to alterations of bilirubin production, elimination, or both. Less is known about mutations that may predispose or protect against CNS bilirubin neurotoxicity. The lack of a monogenetic source for this risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity suggests that disease progression is dependent upon an overall decrease in the functionality of one or more essential genetically controlled metabolic pathways. In other words, a "load" is placed on key pathways in the form of multiple genetic variants that combine to create a vulnerable phenotype. The idea of epistatic interactions creating a pathway genetic load (PGL) that affects the response to a specific insult has been previously reported as a PGL score. We hypothesize that the PGL score can be used to investigate whether increased susceptibility to bilirubin-induced CNS damage in neonates is due to a mutational load being placed on key genetic pathways important to the central nervous system's response to bilirubin neurotoxicity. We propose a modification of the PGL score method that replaces the use of a canonical pathway with custom gene lists organized into three tiers with descending levels of evidence combined with the utilization of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) causality prediction methods. The PGL score has the potential to explain the genetic background of complex bilirubin induced neurological disorders (BIND) such as kernicterus and could be the key to understanding ranges of outcome severity in

  16. Temporal stability in patterns of genetic diversity and structure of a marine foundation species (Zostera marina).

    PubMed

    Reynolds, L K; Stachowicz, J J; Hughes, A R; Kamel, S J; Ort, B S; Grosberg, R K

    2017-04-01

    Genetic diversity and population structure reflect complex interactions among a diverse set of processes that may vary temporally, limiting their potential to predict ecological and evolutionary outcomes. Yet, the stability of these patterns is rarely tested. We resampled eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows from published studies to determine variability in genetic diversity and structure within and between meadows over 5-12 years. The meadows sampled (San Francisco, Tomales and Bodega Bays in California and the Virginia coastal bays) represent a range of life histories (annual vs perennial), age (well-established vs restored) and environments (rural vs urbanized). In all of these systems, neither diversity nor differentiation (FST) changed over time. Differences among tidal heights within Bodega Bay were also remarkably consistent, with the high intertidal being more diverse than the subtidal, and tidal height differentiation being modest but significant at both time points. Historical studies used only a few microsatellite loci; therefore, our temporal comparisons were based on 4-5 loci. However, analysis of the current data using a set of 12 loci show that 4-5 loci are sufficient to describe diversity and differentiation patterns in this system. This temporal consistency was not because of the resampling of large clones, underscoring the feasibility and relevance of understanding drivers of the differences. Because seagrasses are declining at rapid rates, restoration and conservation are increasingly a coastal management priority. Our results argue that surveys of eelgrass genetic structure and diversity at decadal scales can provide accurate depictions of populations, increasing the utility of published genetic data for restoration and designing networks of reserves.

  17. Navigation signal structure based on complex carrier modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying; Yuan, Hong

    2011-06-01

    Signal structure design is an important part of satellite navigation system research, which directly affects navigation performance. Signal performance parameters are analyzed and performances of BPSK modulated signals and BOC modulated signals are compared. Aiming at requirements of high navigation precision and high anti-jamming ability, a new navigation signal structure based on complex carrier modulation is proposed and performances of the signal are researched with different parameters. A synchronization algorithm is put forward according to the signal characteristics, and the synchronization performance is qualitatively analyzed. Next, the applications of the complex carrier modulated signal are discussed, which include anti-jamming, navigation enhancement, power combing and so on. Simulations and analysis show that the proposed navigation signal structure based on complex carrier modulation has good navigation capabilities and anti-jamming abilities, which deserves further study.

  18. Surfing in tortoises? Empirical signs of genetic structuring owing to range expansion.

    PubMed

    Graciá, Eva; Botella, Francisco; Anadón, José Daniel; Edelaar, Pim; Harris, D James; Giménez, Andrés

    2013-06-23

    Much of our current knowledge about the genetic dynamics in range expansions originates from models, simulations and microcosm experiments that need to be corroborated by field data. Here, we report a neutral genetic pattern that matches the predictions of the genetic surfing theory. Genetic surfing occurs when repeated founding events and genetic drift act on the wave of advance of an expanding population, promoting strong spatial structure. In the range expansion of the tortoise Testudo graeca from North Africa to southeastern Spain, we found several genetic signatures consistent with surfing: a decrease of genetic diversity with distance from the initial founder area, clinal patterns in allele frequencies, rare African alleles which have become common at distal sites in the Spanish range, and stronger spatial differentiation in the expanded range than in the original one. Our results provide support for the theory that genetic drift can be an important force in shaping the genetic structure of expanding populations.

  19. Stoichiometry and structure of a lantibiotic maturation complex

    PubMed Central

    Reiners, Jens; Abts, André; Clemens, Rebecca; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides secreted by mainly Gram-positive bacteria. Class 1 lantibiotics mature via two modification steps introduced by a modification LanBC complex. For the lantibiotic nisin, the dehydratase NisB catalyzes the dehydration of serine and threonine residues in the so-called core peptide. Second, five (methyl)-lanthionine rings are introduced in a regio- and stereospecific manner by the cyclase NisC. Here, we characterized the assembly of the NisBC complex in vitro, which is only formed in the presence of the substrate. The complex is composed of a NisB dimer, a monomer of NisC and one prenisin molecule. Interestingly, the presence of the last lanthionine ring prevented complex formation. This stoichiometry was verified by small-angle X-ray scattering measurements, which revealed the first structural glimpse of a LanBC complex in solution. PMID:28169337

  20. Exploring the structure of attitudes toward genetically modified food.

    PubMed

    Poortinga, Wouter; Pidgeon, Nick F

    2006-12-01

    Although it is often thought that the British public is opposed to genetically modified (GM) food, recent qualitative work suggests that most people are ambivalent about GM food and crops. In this article we explore the structure of attitudes in order to examine whether attitudinal ambivalence can be captured by more quantitative methods. Based on the finding that the perceived risks and benefits of GM food can be treated as independent dimensions, we propose a four-way typology of attitudes, consisting of a positive, negative, indifferent, and ambivalent group. This study showed that the differences between the four groups could best be described by three main dimensions: (1) a general evaluative dimension, (2) an involvement dimension, and (3) an attitudinal certainty dimension. While these different attitudinal dimensions have generally been studied in isolation, we argue that they should be studied collectively.

  1. Genetic Modifier Screens Reveal New Components that Interact with the Drosophila Dystroglycan-Dystrophin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Yatsenko, Andriy S.; Shcherbata, Halyna R.; Fischer, Karin A.; Maksymiv, Dariya V.; Chernyk, Yaroslava I.; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2008-01-01

    The Dystroglycan-Dystrophin (Dg-Dys) complex has a capacity to transmit information from the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton inside the cell. It is proposed that this interaction is under tight regulation; however the signaling/regulatory components of Dg-Dys complex remain elusive. Understanding the regulation of the complex is critical since defects in this complex cause muscular dystrophy in humans. To reveal new regulators of the Dg-Dys complex, we used a model organism Drosophila melanogaster and performed genetic interaction screens to identify modifiers of Dg and Dys mutants in Drosophila wing veins. These mutant screens revealed that the Dg-Dys complex interacts with genes involved in muscle function and components of Notch, TGF-β and EGFR signaling pathways. In addition, components of pathways that are required for cellular and/or axonal migration through cytoskeletal regulation, such as Semaphorin-Plexin, Frazzled-Netrin and Slit-Robo pathways show interactions with Dys and/or Dg. These data suggest that the Dg-Dys complex and the other pathways regulating extracellular information transfer to the cytoskeletal dynamics are more intercalated than previously thought. PMID:18545683

  2. Genome-wide detection of intervals of genetic heterogeneity associated with complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Llinares-López, Felipe; Grimm, Dominik G.; Bodenham, Dean A.; Gieraths, Udo; Sugiyama, Mahito; Rowan, Beth; Borgwardt, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Genetic heterogeneity, the fact that several sequence variants give rise to the same phenotype, is a phenomenon that is of the utmost interest in the analysis of complex phenotypes. Current approaches for finding regions in the genome that exhibit genetic heterogeneity suffer from at least one of two shortcomings: (i) they require the definition of an exact interval in the genome that is to be tested for genetic heterogeneity, potentially missing intervals of high relevance, or (ii) they suffer from an enormous multiple hypothesis testing problem due to the large number of potential candidate intervals being tested, which results in either many false positives or a lack of power to detect true intervals. Results: Here, we present an approach that overcomes both problems: it allows one to automatically find all contiguous sequences of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genome that are jointly associated with the phenotype. It also solves both the inherent computational efficiency problem and the statistical problem of multiple hypothesis testing, which are both caused by the huge number of candidate intervals. We demonstrate on Arabidopsis thaliana genome-wide association study data that our approach can discover regions that exhibit genetic heterogeneity and would be missed by single-locus mapping. Conclusions: Our novel approach can contribute to the genome-wide discovery of intervals that are involved in the genetic heterogeneity underlying complex phenotypes. Availability and implementation: The code can be obtained at: http://www.bsse.ethz.ch/mlcb/research/bioinformatics-and-computational-biology/sis.html. Contact: felipe.llinares@bsse.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26072488

  3. Genetic control of segmentation of axial structures in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Mglinets, V.A.

    1995-07-01

    The processes of segmentation of axial structures in vertebrates during early embryonic development are reviewed. These processes include the formation of neuromeres, somitomeres, cranial ganglia, and branchial arches in the head and of neuromeres, somites, spinal ganglia, and motor nerves in the body of the embryo. The class of vertebrate homeobox genes Hox is described with respect to the arrangement of these genes in four clusters, the structural and functional similarity of paralogues in gene subfamilies, and the type of Hox gene expression in the head and body. A hypothesis concerning the existence of a genetic Hox code, determining the fate of individual segments in neuroectodermal and mesenchymal derivatives, is discussed. In the context of this hypothesis, phenotypic expression of the mutant Hox genes, accompanied by the loss of their function and cases of excessive and ectopic expression of Hox genes, are analyzed. Only in such cases do mutant phenotypes demonstrate symptoms of actual homeotic transformation, in which specific segmental structures are substituted by their homologues, as has been described for homeotic mutations in Drosophila. 56 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-05-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity.

  5. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    PubMed Central

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity. PMID:27230125

  6. Multifaceted population structure and reproductive strategy in Leishmania donovani complex in one Sudanese village.

    PubMed

    Rougeron, Virginie; De Meeûs, Thierry; Hide, Mallorie; Le Falher, Georges; Bucheton, Bruno; Dereure, Jacques; El-Safi, Sayda H; Dessein, Alain; Bañuls, Anne-Laure

    2011-12-01

    Leishmania species of the subgenus Leishmania and especially L. donovani are responsible for a large proportion of visceral leishmaniasis cases. The debate on the mode of reproduction and population structure of Leishmania parasites remains opened. It has been suggested that Leishmania parasites could alternate different modes of reproduction, more particularly clonality and frequent recombinations either between related individuals (endogamy) or between unrelated individuals (outcrossing) within strongly isolated subpopulations. To determine whether this assumption is generalized to other species, a population genetics analysis within Leishmania donovani complex strains was conducted within a single village. The results suggest that a mixed-mating reproduction system exists, an important heterogeneity of subsamples and the coexistence of several genetic entities in Sudanese L. donovani. Indeed, results showed significant genetic differentiation between the three taxa (L. donovani, L. infantum and L. archibaldi) and between the human or canine strains of such taxa, suggesting that there may be different imbricated transmission cycles involving either dogs or humans. Results also are in agreement with an almost strict specificity of L. donovani stricto sensu to human hosts. This empirical study demonstrates the complexity of population structure in the genus Leishmania and the need to pursue such kind of analyses at the smallest possible spatio-temporal and ecological scales.

  7. Protein-