Science.gov

Sample records for complex object processing

  1. Reducing the complexity of the software design process with object-oriented design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, M. P.

    1991-01-01

    Designing software is a complex process. How object-oriented design (OOD), coupled with formalized documentation and tailored object diagraming techniques, can reduce the complexity of the software design process is described and illustrated. The described OOD methodology uses a hierarchical decomposition approach in which parent objects are decomposed into layers of lower level child objects. A method of tracking the assignment of requirements to design components is also included. Increases in the reusability, portability, and maintainability of the resulting products are also discussed. This method was built on a combination of existing technology, teaching experience, consulting experience, and feedback from design method users. The discussed concepts are applicable to hierarchal OOD processes in general. Emphasis is placed on improving the design process by documenting the details of the procedures involved and incorporating improvements into those procedures as they are developed.

  2. The Human Medial Temporal Lobe Processes Online Representations of Complex Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barense, Morgan D.; Gaffan, David; Graham, Kim S.

    2007-01-01

    There has been considerable debate as to whether structures in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) support both memory and perception, in particular whether the perirhinal cortex may be involved in the perceptual discrimination of complex objects with a large number of overlapping features. Similar experiments testing the discrimination of blended…

  3. The Human Medial Temporal Lobe Processes Online Representations of Complex Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barense, Morgan D.; Gaffan, David; Graham, Kim S.

    2007-01-01

    There has been considerable debate as to whether structures in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) support both memory and perception, in particular whether the perirhinal cortex may be involved in the perceptual discrimination of complex objects with a large number of overlapping features. Similar experiments testing the discrimination of blended…

  4. A flexible object-based software framework for modeling complex systems with interacting natural and societal processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, J. H.

    2000-06-15

    The Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) is a flexible, extensible, object-based framework for developing and maintaining complex multidisciplinary simulations. The DIAS infrastructure makes it feasible to build and manipulate complex simulation scenarios in which many thousands of objects can interact via dozens to hundreds of concurrent dynamic processes. The flexibility and extensibility of the DIAS software infrastructure stem mainly from (1) the abstraction of object behaviors, (2) the encapsulation and formalization of model functionality, and (3) the mutability of domain object contents. DIAS simulation objects are inherently capable of highly flexible and heterogeneous spatial realizations. Geospatial graphical representation of DIAS simulation objects is addressed via the GeoViewer, an object-based GIS toolkit application developed at ANL. DIAS simulation capabilities have been extended by inclusion of societal process models generated by the Framework for Addressing Cooperative Extended Transactions (FACET), another object-based framework developed at Argonne National Laboratory. By using FACET models to implement societal behaviors of individuals and organizations within larger DIAS-based natural systems simulations, it has become possible to conveniently address a broad range of issues involving interaction and feedback among natural and societal processes. Example DIAS application areas discussed in this paper include a dynamic virtual oceanic environment, detailed simulation of clinical, physiological, and logistical aspects of health care delivery, and studies of agricultural sustainability of urban centers under environmental stress in ancient Mesopotamia.

  5. Modelling and prediction of complex non-linear processes by using Pareto multi-objective genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, A.; Khaleghi, E.; Gholaminezhad, I.; Nariman-zadeh, N.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a new multi-objective genetic programming (GP) with a diversity preserving mechanism and a real number alteration operator is presented and successfully used for Pareto optimal modelling of some complex non-linear systems using some input-output data. In this study, two different input-output data-sets of a non-linear mathematical model and of an explosive cutting process are considered separately in three-objective optimisation processes. The pertinent conflicting objective functions that have been considered for such Pareto optimisations are namely, training error (TE), prediction error (PE), and the length of tree (complexity of the network) (TL) of the GP models. Such three-objective optimisation implementations leads to some non-dominated choices of GP-type models for both cases representing the trade-offs among those objective functions. Therefore, optimal Pareto fronts of such GP models exhibit the trade-off among the corresponding conflicting objectives and, thus, provide different non-dominated optimal choices of GP-type models. Moreover, the results show that no significant optimality in TE and PE may occur when the TL of the corresponding GP model exceeds some values.

  6. Controllability of Complex Dynamic Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalach, G. G.; Kazachek, N. A.; Morozov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Quality requirements for mobile robots intended for both specialized and everyday use are increasing in step with the complexity of the technological tasks assigned to the robots. Whether a mobile robot is for ground, aerial, or underwater use, the relevant quality characteristics can be summarized under the common concept of agility. This term denotes the object’s (the robot)’s ability to react quickly to control actions (change speed and direction), turn in a limited area, etc. When using this approach in integrated assessment of the quality characteristics of an object with the control system, it seems more constructive to use the term “degree of control”. This paper assesses the degree of control by an example of a mobile robot with the variable-geometry drive wheel axle. We show changes in the degree of control depending on the robot’s configuration, and results illustrated by calculation data, computer and practical experiments. We describe the prospects of using intelligent technology for efficient control of objects with a high degree of controllability.

  7. Graspable objects shape number processing.

    PubMed

    Ranzini, Mariagrazia; Lugli, Luisa; Anelli, Filomena; Carbone, Rossella; Nicoletti, Roberto; Borghi, Anna M

    2011-01-01

    The field of numerical cognition represents an interesting case for action-based theories of cognition, since number is a special kind of abstract concept. Several studies have shown that within the parietal lobes adjacent neural regions code numerical magnitude and grasping-related information. This anatomical proximity between brain areas involved in number and sensorimotor processes may account for interactions between numerical magnitude and action. In particular, recent studies have demonstrated a causal role of action perception on numerical magnitude processing. If objects are represented in terms of actions (affordances), the causal role of action on number processing should extend to the case of objects affordances. This study investigates the relationship between numbers and objects affordances in two experiments, without (Experiment 1) or with (Experiment 2) the requirement of an action (i.e., participants were asked to hold an object in their hands during the task). The task consisted in repeating aloud the odd or even digit within a pair depending on the type of the preceding or following object. Order of presentation (object-number vs. number-object), Object type (graspable vs. ungraspable), Object size (small vs. large), and Numerical magnitude (small vs. large) were manipulated for each experiment. Experiment 1 showed a facilitation - in terms of quicker responses - for graspable over ungraspable objects preceded by numbers, and an effect of numerical magnitude after the presentation of graspable objects. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the action execution enhanced overall the sensitivity to numerical magnitude, and that at the same time it interfered with the effects of objects affordances on number processing. Overall, these findings demonstrate that numbers and graspable objects are strongly interrelated, supporting the view that abstract concepts may be grounded in the motor experience.

  8. Graspable Objects Shape Number Processing

    PubMed Central

    Ranzini, Mariagrazia; Lugli, Luisa; Anelli, Filomena; Carbone, Rossella; Nicoletti, Roberto; Borghi, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    The field of numerical cognition represents an interesting case for action-based theories of cognition, since number is a special kind of abstract concept. Several studies have shown that within the parietal lobes adjacent neural regions code numerical magnitude and grasping-related information. This anatomical proximity between brain areas involved in number and sensorimotor processes may account for interactions between numerical magnitude and action. In particular, recent studies have demonstrated a causal role of action perception on numerical magnitude processing. If objects are represented in terms of actions (affordances), the causal role of action on number processing should extend to the case of objects affordances. This study investigates the relationship between numbers and objects affordances in two experiments, without (Experiment 1) or with (Experiment 2) the requirement of an action (i.e., participants were asked to hold an object in their hands during the task). The task consisted in repeating aloud the odd or even digit within a pair depending on the type of the preceding or following object. Order of presentation (object–number vs. number–object), Object type (graspable vs. ungraspable), Object size (small vs. large), and Numerical magnitude (small vs. large) were manipulated for each experiment. Experiment 1 showed a facilitation – in terms of quicker responses – for graspable over ungraspable objects preceded by numbers, and an effect of numerical magnitude after the presentation of graspable objects. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the action execution enhanced overall the sensitivity to numerical magnitude, and that at the same time it interfered with the effects of objects affordances on number processing. Overall, these findings demonstrate that numbers and graspable objects are strongly interrelated, supporting the view that abstract concepts may be grounded in the motor experience. PMID:22164141

  9. Recurrent Processing during Object Recognition

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Randall C.; Wyatte, Dean; Herd, Seth; Mingus, Brian; Jilk, David J.

    2013-01-01

    How does the brain learn to recognize objects visually, and perform this difficult feat robustly in the face of many sources of ambiguity and variability? We present a computational model based on the biology of the relevant visual pathways that learns to reliably recognize 100 different object categories in the face of naturally occurring variability in location, rotation, size, and lighting. The model exhibits robustness to highly ambiguous, partially occluded inputs. Both the unified, biologically plausible learning mechanism and the robustness to occlusion derive from the role that recurrent connectivity and recurrent processing mechanisms play in the model. Furthermore, this interaction of recurrent connectivity and learning predicts that high-level visual representations should be shaped by error signals from nearby, associated brain areas over the course of visual learning. Consistent with this prediction, we show how semantic knowledge about object categories changes the nature of their learned visual representations, as well as how this representational shift supports the mapping between perceptual and conceptual knowledge. Altogether, these findings support the potential importance of ongoing recurrent processing throughout the brain’s visual system and suggest ways in which object recognition can be understood in terms of interactions within and between processes over time. PMID:23554596

  10. Reduction of Subjective and Objective System Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Occam's razor is often used in science to define the minimum criteria to establish a physical or philosophical idea or relationship. Albert Einstein is attributed the saying "everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler". These heuristic ideas are based on a belief that there is a minimum state or set of states for a given system or phenomena. In looking at system complexity, these heuristics point us to an idea that complexity can be reduced to a minimum. How then, do we approach a reduction in complexity? Complexity has been described as a subjective concept and an objective measure of a system. Subjective complexity is based on human cognitive comprehension of the functions and inter relationships of a system. Subjective complexity is defined by the ability to fully comprehend the system. Simplifying complexity, in a subjective sense, is thus gaining a deeper understanding of the system. As Apple's Jonathon Ive has stated," It's not just minimalism or the absence of clutter. It involves digging through the depth of complexity. To be truly simple, you have to go really deep". Simplicity is not the absence of complexity but a deeper understanding of complexity. Subjective complexity, based on this human comprehension, cannot then be discerned from the sociological concept of ignorance. The inability to comprehend a system can be either a lack of knowledge, an inability to understand the intricacies of a system, or both. Reduction in this sense is based purely on a cognitive ability to understand the system and no system then may be truly complex. From this view, education and experience seem to be the keys to reduction or eliminating complexity. Objective complexity, is the measure of the systems functions and interrelationships which exist independent of human comprehension. Jonathon Ive's statement does not say that complexity is removed, only that the complexity is understood. From this standpoint, reduction of complexity can be approached

  11. Selective visual attention in object detection processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paletta, Lucas; Goyal, Anurag; Greindl, Christian

    2003-03-01

    Object detection is an enabling technology that plays a key role in many application areas, such as content based media retrieval. Attentive cognitive vision systems are here proposed where the focus of attention is directed towards the most relevant target. The most promising information is interpreted in a sequential process that dynamically makes use of knowledge and that enables spatial reasoning on the local object information. The presented work proposes an innovative application of attention mechanisms for object detection which is most general in its understanding of information and action selection. The attentive detection system uses a cascade of increasingly complex classifiers for the stepwise identification of regions of interest (ROIs) and recursively refined object hypotheses. While the most coarse classifiers are used to determine first approximations on a region of interest in the input image, more complex classifiers are used for more refined ROIs to give more confident estimates. Objects are modelled by local appearance based representations and in terms of posterior distributions of the object samples in eigenspace. The discrimination function to discern between objects is modeled by a radial basis functions (RBF) network that has been compared with alternative networks and been proved consistent and superior to other artifical neural networks for appearance based object recognition. The experiments were led for the automatic detection of brand objects in Formula One broadcasts within the European Commission's cognitive vision project DETECT.

  12. Modeling Electromagnetic Scattering From Complex Inhomogeneous Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar; Reddy, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    This software innovation is designed to develop a mathematical formulation to estimate the electromagnetic scattering characteristics of complex, inhomogeneous objects using the finite-element-method (FEM) and method-of-moments (MoM) concepts, as well as to develop a FORTRAN code called FEMOM3DS (Finite Element Method and Method of Moments for 3-Dimensional Scattering), which will implement the steps that are described in the mathematical formulation. Very complex objects can be easily modeled, and the operator of the code is not required to know the details of electromagnetic theory to study electromagnetic scattering.

  13. Building complex reference objects from dual sets

    PubMed Central

    Patson, Nikole D.; Warren, Tessa

    2011-01-01

    There has been considerable psycholinguistic investigation into the conditions that allow separately introduced individuals to be joined into a plural set and represented as a complex reference object (e.g., Eschenbach, et al., 1989; Garrod & Sanford, 1982; Koh & Clifton, 2002; Koh et al., 2008; Moxey et al., 2004; Sanford & Lockhart, 1990). The current paper reports three eye-tracking experiments that investigate the less-well understood question of what conditions allow pointers to be assigned to the individuals within a previously undifferentiated set, turning it into a complex reference object. The experiments made use of a methodology used in Patson and Ferreira (2009) to distinguish between complex reference objects and undifferentiated sets. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that assigning different properties to the members of an undifferentiated dual set via a conjoined modifier or a comparative modifier transformed it into a complex reference object. Experiment 3 indicated that assigning a property to only one member of an undifferentiated dual set introduced pointers to both members. These results demonstrate that pointers can be established to referents within a plural set without picking them out via anaphors; they set boundaries on the kinds of implicit contrasts between referents that establish pointers; and they illustrate that extremely subtle properties of the semantic and referential context can affect early parsing decisions. PMID:21666836

  14. Building Complex Reference Objects from Dual Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patson, Nikole D.; Warren, Tessa

    2011-01-01

    There has been considerable psycholinguistic investigation into the conditions that allow separately introduced individuals to be joined into a plural set and represented as a complex reference object (e.g., Eschenbach et al., 1989; Garrod & Sanford, 1982; Koh & Clifton, 2002; Koh et al., 2008; Moxey, Sanford, Sturt, & Morrow, 2004; Sanford &…

  15. Building Complex Reference Objects from Dual Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patson, Nikole D.; Warren, Tessa

    2011-01-01

    There has been considerable psycholinguistic investigation into the conditions that allow separately introduced individuals to be joined into a plural set and represented as a complex reference object (e.g., Eschenbach et al., 1989; Garrod & Sanford, 1982; Koh & Clifton, 2002; Koh et al., 2008; Moxey, Sanford, Sturt, & Morrow, 2004; Sanford &…

  16. Separating Processes in Object Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellman, Philip J.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses connections between infants' use of object knowledge in recognition to computational, psychophysical, and neurophysiological research on adult perceptual segmentation and grouping. Considers these connections through a framework of the tasks and information involved in adult object segregation, and interprets Needham's results in this…

  17. SYSTEMATIC PROCEDURE FOR DESIGNING PROCESSES WITH MULTIPLE ENVIRONMENTAL OBJECTIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of multiple objectives is very important in designing environmentally benign processes. It requires a systematic procedure for solving multiobjective decision-making problems, due to the complex nature of the problems, the need for complex assessments, and complicated ...

  18. SYSTEMATIC PROCEDURE FOR DESIGNING PROCESSES WITH MULTIPLE ENVIRONMENTAL OBJECTIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of multiple objectives is very important in designing environmentally benign processes. It requires a systematic procedure for solving multiobjective decision-making problems, due to the complex nature of the problems, the need for complex assessments, and complicated ...

  19. Visual conspicuity of objects in complex scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersema, Theo; Zwaga, Harm J. G.

    2000-06-01

    In many everyday situations people have to locate a particular object in a cluttered environment, for instance a routing sign among commercial signs in an airport terminal. The object's conspicuity determines the efficiency of the search. The literature on human visual search does not unequivocally answer the question how a cluttered environment affects target conspicuity. A method was developed and validated to measure target conspicuity and the effect of distractors, using the case of routing signs (blue with white lettering) and commercial signs (non-blue) in large public buildings as a vehicle. The stimulus fields are complex, computer-generated images, which mimic natural scenes in public buildings but have no apparent meaning. Target conspicuity is operationalized as the time a subject needs to locate the target; this search time is derived from the subject's eye movements. To avoid artifacts of perceptual learning, the number of trials per subject is limited. Experiments in which this method was used clearly demonstrated that conspicuity results from the combined action of the object's own physical properties in relation to those of its environment and of the observer's perceptual and cognitive properties and current intention. Thus, conspicuity never depends merely on the characteristics of the visual stimulus.

  20. A SYSTEMATIC PROCEDURE FOR DESIGNING PROCESSES WITH MULTIPLE ENVIRONMENTAL OBJECTIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation and analysis of multiple objectives are very important in designing environmentally benign processes. They require a systematic procedure for solving multi-objective decision-making problems due to the complex nature of the problems and the need for complex assessment....

  1. A SYSTEMATIC PROCEDURE FOR DESIGNING PROCESSES WITH MULTIPLE ENVIRONMENTAL OBJECTIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation and analysis of multiple objectives are very important in designing environmentally benign processes. They require a systematic procedure for solving multi-objective decision-making problems due to the complex nature of the problems and the need for complex assessment....

  2. Learning objects and training complex machines.

    PubMed

    Martins, Edgard

    2012-01-01

    There are situations in the operation of complex machinery which is significant pressure. In need of capturing, interpreting and processing information from instruments, often in seconds. This occurs in the middle where it operates the pilot and the aircraft will be established a set of operations that will culminate with a maneuver, consisting of a substantial and binding set of procedures performed for this driver. This has little time to evaluate and act, supported by aircraft instruments and external environmental signals captured by the senses, which will stimulate conditioned actions that, if executed without due accuracy, is reflected in a deadly mistake. These situations cause a state of tension and unpredictability, especially when there is bad weather and / or no visibility and bad wind conditions occur and are not supportive or even shrinkage, or even partial or total ability to operate the airplane happen..

  3. Emotion and Object Processing in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Henri; Gagne, Marie-Helene; Hess, Ursula; Pourcher, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    The neuropsychological literature on the processing of emotions in Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals conflicting evidence about the role of the basal ganglia in the recognition of facial emotions. Hence, the present study had two objectives. One was to determine the extent to which the visual processing of emotions and objects differs in PD. The…

  4. Emotion and Object Processing in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Henri; Gagne, Marie-Helene; Hess, Ursula; Pourcher, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    The neuropsychological literature on the processing of emotions in Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals conflicting evidence about the role of the basal ganglia in the recognition of facial emotions. Hence, the present study had two objectives. One was to determine the extent to which the visual processing of emotions and objects differs in PD. The…

  5. Remembering Complex Objects in Visual Working Memory: Do Capacity Limits Restrict Objects or Features?

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Kyle; Cowan, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Visual working memory stores stimuli from our environment as representations that can be accessed by high-level control processes. This study addresses a longstanding debate in the literature about whether storage limits in visual working memory include a limit to the complexity of discrete items. We examined the issue with a number of change-detection experiments that used complex stimuli which possessed multiple features per stimulus item. We manipulated the number of relevant features of the stimulus objects in order to vary feature load. In all of our experiments, we found that increased feature load led to a reduction in change-detection accuracy. However, we found that feature load alone could not account for the results, but that a consideration of the number of relevant objects was also required. This study supports capacity limits for both feature and object storage in visual working memory. PMID:25089739

  6. Integrating perception and problem solving to predict complex object behaviours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Damian M.; Chaudhry, Sirhan; Agica, Marius; Monaco, John Vincent

    2010-04-01

    One of the objectives of Cognitive Robotics is to construct robot systems that can be directed to achieve realworld goals by high-level directions rather than complex, low-level robot programming. Such a system must have the ability to represent, problem-solve and learn about its environment as well as communicate with other agents. In previous work, we have proposed ADAPT, a Cognitive Architecture that views perception as top-down and goaloriented and part of the problem solving process. Our approach is linked to a SOAR-based problem-solving and learning framework. In this paper, we present an architecture for the perceptive and world modelling components of ADAPT and report on experimental results using this architecture to predict complex object behaviour. A novel aspect of our approach is a 'mirror system' that ensures that the modelled background and foreground objects are synchronized with observations and task-based expectations. This is based on our prior work on comparing real and synthetic images. We show results for a moving object that collides and rebounds from its environment, hence showing that this perception-based problem solving approach has the potential to be used to predict complex object motions.

  7. Complex syndactyly: aesthetic and objective outcomes.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Charles A; Steffen, Jennifer A; Stutz, Christopher M

    2012-10-01

    Outcome data after the treatment of complex syndactyly are lacking. The purpose of this investigation was to critically analyze and report our results after surgical reconstruction of complex syndactyly. We included 13 patients and 21 hands (25 webspaces) in this retrospective call-back investigation. There were 17 middle/ring finger and 8 ring/little finger complex syndactylies, each with a defined, isolated osseous bridge between the distal phalanges. We excluded complicated and syndrome-associated syndactylies. Patients returned for clinical examination and subjective assessment at an average of 9 years (range, 2-27 y) after the most recent surgery. Of 21 hands, 6 had undergone a revision surgery. The Vancouver Scar Scale scores averaged 3 (range, 0-6), web creep averaged 1.5 (range, 0-3), and total active motion averaged 148° for the affected fingers. In the middle/ring finger syndactylies, the middle finger was most commonly supinated (average, 13°) and ulnarly deviated (average, 9°), and the ring finger was either supinated or pronated and radially deviated (average, 13°). In the ring/little finger syndactylies, the ring finger was most commonly supinated (average, 8°) without deviation, and the little finger was most commonly pronated (average, 8°) and radially deviated (average, 24°). There was a notable nail wall deformity in most fingers. Surgeon visual analog scale scores (range, 0-10, where lower scores are better) averaged 2.8 (range, 0.8-5.0). Patient visual analog scale scores were 0.4 (range, 0-3) for pain, 1.9 (range, 0-10) for appearance, and 1.1 (range, 0-3) for function. Complex syndactyly reconstruction is challenging, and common postsurgical findings include rotational and angular deformity and nail deformity. When deformity was present, the fingers typically rotated away from and deviated toward the site of the previous complex syndactyly. We describe how we have altered our approach based on these findings. Therapeutic IV. Copyright

  8. Dissociating verbal and nonverbal audiovisual object processing

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Julia; Price, Cathy J.

    2009-01-01

    This fMRI study investigates how audiovisual integration differs for verbal stimuli that can be matched at a phonological level and nonverbal stimuli that can be matched at a semantic level. Subjects were presented simultaneously with one visual and one auditory stimulus and were instructed to decide whether these stimuli referred to the same object or not. Verbal stimuli were simultaneously presented spoken and written object names, and nonverbal stimuli were photographs of objects simultaneously presented with naturally occurring object sounds. Stimulus differences were controlled by including two further conditions that paired photographs of objects with spoken words and object sounds with written words. Verbal matching, relative to all other conditions, increased activation in a region of the left superior temporal sulcus that has previously been associated with phonological processing. Nonverbal matching, relative to all other conditions, increased activation in a right fusiform region that has previously been associated with structural and conceptual object processing. Thus, we demonstrate how brain activation for audiovisual integration depends on the verbal content of the stimuli, even when stimulus and task processing differences are controlled. PMID:19101025

  9. Object-based neglect in number processing.

    PubMed

    Klein, Elise; Moeller, Korbinian; Zinsberger, Daniela; Zauner, Harald; Wood, Guilherme; Willmes, Klaus; Haider, Christine; Gassner, Alfred; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph

    2013-01-23

    Recent evidence suggests that neglect patients seem to have particular problems representing relatively smaller numbers corresponding to the left part of the mental number line. However, while this indicates space-based neglect for representational number space little is known about whether and --if so --how object-based neglect influences number processing.To evaluate influences of object-based neglect in numerical cognition, a group of neglect patients and two control groups had to compare two-digit numbers to an internally represented standard. Conceptualizing two-digit numbers as objects of which the left part (i.e., the tens digit should be specifically neglected) we were able to evaluate object-based neglect for number magnitude processing.Object-based neglect was indicated by a larger unit-decade compatibility effect actually reflecting impaired processing of the leftward tens digits. Additionally, faster processing of within- as compared to between-decade items provided further evidence suggesting particular difficulties in integrating tens and units into the place-value structure of the Arabic number system.In summary, the present study indicates that, in addition to the spatial representation of number magnitude, also the processing of place-value information of multi-digit numbers seems specifically impaired in neglect patients.

  10. Multiple object tracking and attentional processing.

    PubMed

    Sears, C R; Pylyshyn, Z W

    2000-03-01

    How are attentional priorities set when multiple stimuli compete for access to the limited-capacity visual attention system? According to Pylyshyn (1989) and Yantis and Johnson (1990), a small number of visual objects can be preattentively indexed or tagged and thereby accessed more rapidly by a subsequent attentional process (e.g., the traditional "spotlight of attention"). In the present study, we used the multiple object tracking methodology of Pylyshyn and Storm (1988) to investigate the relation between what we call "visual indexing" and attentional processing. Participants visually tracked a subset of a set of identical, independently randomly moving objects in a display (the targets), and made a speeded identification response when they noticed a target or a nontarget (distractor) object undergo a subtle form transformation. We found that target form changes were identified more rapidly than nontarget form changes, and that the speed of responding to target form changes was unaffected by the number of nontargets in the display when the form-changing targets were successfully tracked. We also found that this enhanced processing only applied to the targets themselves and not to nearby nontarget distractors, showing that the allocation of a broadened region of visual attention (as in the zoom-lens model of attentional allocation) could not account for these findings. These results confirm that visual indexing bestows a processing priority to a number of objects in the visual field.

  11. The viewpoint complexity of an object-recognition task.

    PubMed

    Tjan, B S; Legge, G E

    1998-08-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the nature of perceptual representation in human object recognition. Resolution of this debate has been hampered by the lack of a metric for assessing the representational requirements of a recognition task. To recognize a member of a given set of 3-D objects, how much detail must the objects' representations contain in order to achieve a specific accuracy criterion? From the performance of an ideal observer, we derived a quantity called the view complexity (VX) to measure the required granularity of representation. VX is an intrinsic property of the object-recognition task, taking into account both the object ensemble and the type of decision required of an observer. It does not depend on the visual representation or processing used by the observer. VX can be interpreted as the number of randomly selected 2-D images needed to represent the decision boundaries in the image space of a 3-D object-recognition task. A low VX means the task is inherently more viewpoint invariant and a high VX means it is inherently more viewpoint dependent. By measuring the VX of recognition tasks with different object sets, we show that the current confusion about the nature of human perceptual representation is partly due to a failure in distinguishing between human visual processing and the properties of a task and its stimuli. We find general correspondence between the VX of a recognition task and the published human data on viewpoint dependence. Exceptions in this relationship motivated us to propose the view-rate hypothesis: human visual performance is limited by the equivalent number of 2-D image views that can be processed per unit time.

  12. The Complex Information Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborsky, Edwina

    2000-09-01

    This paper examines the semiosic development of energy to information within a dyadic reality that operates within the contradictions of both classical and quantum physics. These two realities are examined within the three Peircean modal categories of Firstness, Secondness and Thirdness. The paper concludes that our world cannot operate within either of the two physical realities but instead filiates the two to permit a semiosis or information-generation of complex systems.

  13. Development of Three-Dimensional Completion of Complex Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soska, Kasey C.; Johnson, Scott P.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) object completion, the ability to perceive the backs of objects seen from a single viewpoint, emerges at around 6 months of age. Yet, only relatively simple 3D objects have been used in assessing its development. This study examined infants' 3D object completion when presented with more complex stimuli. Infants…

  14. Development of Three-Dimensional Completion of Complex Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soska, Kasey C.; Johnson, Scott P.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) object completion, the ability to perceive the backs of objects seen from a single viewpoint, emerges at around 6 months of age. Yet, only relatively simple 3D objects have been used in assessing its development. This study examined infants' 3D object completion when presented with more complex stimuli. Infants…

  15. Optical apparatus for laser scattering by objects having complex shapes

    DOEpatents

    Ellingson, William A.; Visher, Robert J.

    2006-11-14

    Apparatus for observing and measuring in realtime surface and subsurface characteristics of objects having complex shapes includes an optical fiber bundle having first and second opposed ends. The first end includes a linear array of fibers, where the ends of adjacent fibers are in contact and are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the object being studied. The second ends of some of the fibers are in the form of a polished ferrule forming a multi-fiber optical waveguide for receiving laser light. The second ends of the remaining fibers are formed into a linear array suitable for direct connection to a detector, such as a linear CMOS-based optical detector. The output data is analyzed using digital signal processing for the detection of anomalies such as cracks, voids, inclusions and other defects.

  16. Color Image Processing and Object Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimek, Robert B.; Wright, Ted W.; Sielken, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a personal computer based system for automatic and semiautomatic tracking of objects on film or video tape, developed to meet the needs of the Microgravity Combustion and Fluids Science Research Programs at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The system consists of individual hardware components working under computer control to achieve a high degree of automation. The most important hardware components include 16-mm and 35-mm film transports, a high resolution digital camera mounted on a x-y-z micro-positioning stage, an S-VHS tapedeck, an Hi8 tapedeck, video laserdisk, and a framegrabber. All of the image input devices are remotely controlled by a computer. Software was developed to integrate the overall operation of the system including device frame incrementation, grabbing of image frames, image processing of the object's neighborhood, locating the position of the object being tracked, and storing the coordinates in a file. This process is performed repeatedly until the last frame is reached. Several different tracking methods are supported. To illustrate the process, two representative applications of the system are described. These applications represent typical uses of the system and include tracking the propagation of a flame front and tracking the movement of a liquid-gas interface with extremely poor visibility.

  17. Phase-retrieval ghost imaging of complex-valued objects

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Wenlin; Han Shensheng

    2010-08-15

    An imaging approach, based on ghost imaging, is reported to recover a pure-phase object or a complex-valued object. Our analytical results, which are backed up by numerical simulations, demonstrate that both the complex-valued object and its amplitude-dependent part can be separately and nonlocally reconstructed using this approach. Both effects influencing the quality of reconstructed images and methods to further improve the imaging quality are also discussed.

  18. Object processing in the infant: lessons from neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Teresa; Biondi, Marisa

    2015-07-01

    Object identification is a fundamental cognitive capacity that forms the basis for complex thought and behavior. The adult cortex is organized into functionally distinct visual object-processing pathways that mediate this ability. Insights into the origin of these pathways have begun to emerge through the use of neuroimaging techniques with infant populations. The outcome of this work supports the view that, from the early days of life, object-processing pathways are organized in a way that resembles that of the adult. At the same time, theoretically important changes in patterns of cortical activation are observed during the first year. These findings lead to a new understanding of the cognitive and neural architecture in infants that supports their emerging object-processing capacities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Object Processing in the Infant: Lessons from Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Teresa; Biondi, Marisa

    2015-01-01

    Object identification is a fundamental cognitive capacity that forms the basis for more complex thought and behavior. The adult cortex is organized into functionally distinct visual object-processing pathways that mediate this ability. Insights into the origin of these pathways have begun to emerge through the use of neuroimaging techniques with infant populations. The outcome of this work supports the view that, from the early days of life, object-processing pathways are organized in a way that resembles that of the adult. At the same time, theoretically important changes in patterns of cortical activation are observed during the first year. These findings lead to a new understanding of the cognitive and neural architecture that supports infants’ emerging object-processing capacities. PMID:26008625

  20. Method and system for producing complex-shape objects

    DOEpatents

    Jeantette, Francisco P.; Keicher, David M.; Romero, Joseph A.; Schanwald, Lee P.

    2000-01-01

    A method and system are provided for producing complex, three-dimensional, net shape objects from a variety of powdered materials. The system includes unique components to ensure a uniform and continuous flow of powdered materials as well as to focus and locate the flow of powdered materials with respect to a laser beam which results in the melting of the powdered material. The system also includes a controller so that the flow of molten powdered materials can map out and form complex, three-dimensional, net-shape objects by layering the molten powdered material. Advantageously, such complex, three-dimensional net-shape objects can be produced having material densities varying from 90% of theoretical to fully dense, as well as a variety of controlled physical properties. Additionally, such complex, three-dimensional objects can be produced from two or more different materials so that the composition of the object can be transitioned from one material to another.

  1. Complex Fluids and Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, L. Gary

    1998-11-01

    Complex fluids, such as polymeric liquids, colloidal dispersions, surfactant solutions, immiscible fluid blends and fiber suspensions are the basis of many manufactured products. These fluids are distinct from common Newtonian liquids in that there is a strong coupling between flow and the microstructural state of the fluid. Thus, when processed in the liquid state, the macroscopic properties of the material may be changed. This can either be detrimental or it may offer an opportunity to tailor the processing flow to optimize the property of interest. In any case, there is a tremendous need and an opportunity for fluid mechanicians to develop a theoretical and experimental basis for understanding the fluid mechanics of complex fluids, including the coupling between flow and the microstructural state of the material. In the present talk, I discuss (a personal view of) the underlying basis of current fluid mechanics research on the dynamics of complex fluids. The general principles are then illustrated using the specific example of nematic liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs). At the theoretical model level, LCPs resemble a concentrated suspension of rod-like fibers with the addition of a so-called nematic potential energy that is minimized when the system is in a state of uniform alignment. The primary technological interest in LCPs is their potential for high modulus, low weight, structural materials. The one very successful example of a product which realizes this potential is the DuPont fiber known as Kevlar.® To date, however, no two- or three-dimensional object with comparable strength has been made successfully. The main problem is the tendency for the fluid to spontaneously degenerate into a polydomain structure in the shear-like flows that exist in injection molding a sea of small, well-oriented microdomains, each of which is oriented randomly relative to its neighbors. The predecessor to this polydomain state is the appearance in flow of orientational

  2. Color image processing and object tracking workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimek, Robert B.; Paulick, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    A system is described for automatic and semiautomatic tracking of objects on film or video tape which was developed to meet the needs of the microgravity combustion and fluid science experiments at NASA Lewis. The system consists of individual hardware parts working under computer control to achieve a high degree of automation. The most important hardware parts include 16 mm film projector, a lens system, a video camera, an S-VHS tapedeck, a frame grabber, and some storage and output devices. Both the projector and tapedeck have a computer interface enabling remote control. Tracking software was developed to control the overall operation. In the automatic mode, the main tracking program controls the projector or the tapedeck frame incrementation, grabs a frame, processes it, locates the edge of the objects being tracked, and stores the coordinates in a file. This process is performed repeatedly until the last frame is reached. Three representative applications are described. These applications represent typical uses and include tracking the propagation of a flame front, tracking the movement of a liquid-gas interface with extremely poor visibility, and characterizing a diffusion flame according to color and shape.

  3. Process Architecture for Managing Digital Object Identifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanchoo, L.; James, N.; Stolte, E.

    2014-12-01

    In 2010, NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project implemented a process for registering Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) for data products distributed by Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). For the first 3 years, ESDIS evolved the process involving the data provider community in the development of processes for creating and assigning DOIs, and guidelines for the landing page. To accomplish this, ESDIS established two DOI User Working Groups: one for reviewing the DOI process whose recommendations were submitted to ESDIS in February 2014; and the other recently tasked to review and further develop DOI landing page guidelines for ESDIS approval by end of 2014. ESDIS has recently upgraded the DOI system from a manually-driven system to one that largely automates the DOI process. The new automated feature include: a) reviewing the DOI metadata, b) assigning of opaque DOI name if data provider chooses, and c) reserving, registering, and updating the DOIs. The flexibility of reserving the DOI allows data providers to embed and test the DOI in the data product metadata before formally registering with EZID. The DOI update process allows the changing of any DOI metadata except the DOI name unless the name has not been registered. Currently, ESDIS has processed a total of 557 DOIs of which 379 DOIs are registered with EZID and 178 are reserved with ESDIS. The DOI incorporates several metadata elements that effectively identify the data product and the source of availability. Of these elements, the Uniform Resource Locator (URL) attribute has the very important function of identifying the landing page which describes the data product. ESDIS in consultation with data providers in the Earth Science community is currently developing landing page guidelines that specify the key data product descriptive elements to be included on each data product's landing page. This poster will describe in detail the unique automated process and

  4. MARSSIM: Data quality objectives (DQO) process

    SciTech Connect

    Doehnert, M.

    1996-06-01

    The Department of Defense, Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are developing joint Federal guidance for standardized and consistent approaches to accomplish structural and environmental radiation surveys. The guidance is being developed as a draft document titled the {open_quotes}Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM).{close_quotes} MARSSIM is using the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) Process, a series of planning steps based on the scientific method for establishing criteria for data quality and developing survey designs. The DQO Process is iterative; the outputs of one step may lead to reconsideration of prior steps. Planning radiation site surveys using the DQO Process can improve the effectiveness, efficiency, and defensibility of decisions in a resource-effective manner. It also can minimize expenditures related to data collection by eliminating unnecessary, duplicative, or overly precise data. Using the DQO Process assures that the type, quantity, and quality of environmental data used in decision making will be appropriate for the intended application.

  5. Objects and categories: feature statistics and object processing in the ventral stream.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Lorraine K; Chiu, Shannon; Zhuang, Jie; Randall, Billi; Devereux, Barry J; Wright, Paul; Clarke, Alex; Taylor, Kirsten I

    2013-10-01

    Recognizing an object involves more than just visual analyses; its meaning must also be decoded. Extensive research has shown that processing the visual properties of objects relies on a hierarchically organized stream in ventral occipitotemporal cortex, with increasingly more complex visual features being coded from posterior to anterior sites culminating in the perirhinal cortex (PRC) in the anteromedial temporal lobe (aMTL). The neurobiological principles of the conceptual analysis of objects remain more controversial. Much research has focused on two neural regions-the fusiform gyrus and aMTL, both of which show semantic category differences, but of different types. fMRI studies show category differentiation in the fusiform gyrus, based on clusters of semantically similar objects, whereas category-specific deficits, specifically for living things, are associated with damage to the aMTL. These category-specific deficits for living things have been attributed to problems in differentiating between highly similar objects, a process that involves the PRC. To determine whether the PRC and the fusiform gyri contribute to different aspects of an object's meaning, with differentiation between confusable objects in the PRC and categorization based on object similarity in the fusiform, we carried out an fMRI study of object processing based on a feature-based model that characterizes the degree of semantic similarity and difference between objects and object categories. Participants saw 388 objects for which feature statistic information was available and named the objects at the basic level while undergoing fMRI scanning. After controlling for the effects of visual information, we found that feature statistics that capture similarity between objects formed category clusters in fusiform gyri, such that objects with many shared features (typical of living things) were associated with activity in the lateral fusiform gyri whereas objects with fewer shared features (typical

  6. Computational complexity of object-based image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalz, Mark S.; Ritter, Gerhard X.

    2005-09-01

    Image compression via transform coding applied to small rectangular regions or encoding blocks appears to be approaching asymptotic rate-distortion performance. However, an emerging compression technology, called object-based compression (OBC) promises significantly improved performance via compression ratios ranging from 200:1 to as high as 2,500:1. OBC involves segmentation of image regions, followed by efficient encoding of each region's content and boundary. During decompression, such regions can be approximated by objects from a codebook, yielding a reconstructed image that is semantically equivalent to the corresponding source image, but has pixel- and featural-level differences. Semantic equivalence between the source and decompressed image facilitates fast decompression through efficient substitutions, albeit at the cost of codebook search in the compression step. Given small codebooks, OBC holds promise for information-push technologies where approximate context is sufficient, for example, transmission of surveillance images that provide the gist of a scene. However, OBC is not necessarily useful for applications requiring high accuracy, such as medical image processing, because substitution of source content can be inaccurate at small spatial scales. The cost of segmentation is a significant disadvantage in current OBC implementations. Several innovative techniques have been developed for region segmentation, as discussed in a previous paper [4]. Additionally, tradeoffs between representational fidelity, computational cost, and storage requirement occur, as with the vast majority of lossy compression algorithms. This paper analyzes the computational (time) and storage (space) complexities of several recent OBC algorithms applied to single-frame imagery. A time complexity model is proposed, which can be associated theoretically with a space complexity model that we have previously published [2]. The result, when combined with measurements of

  7. Stereo Vision Tracking of Multiple Objects in Complex Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Marrón-Romera, Marta; García, Juan C.; Sotelo, Miguel A.; Pizarro, Daniel; Mazo, Manuel; Cañas, José M.; Losada, Cristina; Marcos, Álvaro

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel system capable of solving the problem of tracking multiple targets in a crowded, complex and dynamic indoor environment, like those typical of mobile robot applications. The proposed solution is based on a stereo vision set in the acquisition step and a probabilistic algorithm in the obstacles position estimation process. The system obtains 3D position and speed information related to each object in the robot’s environment; then it achieves a classification between building elements (ceiling, walls, columns and so on) and the rest of items in robot surroundings. All objects in robot surroundings, both dynamic and static, are considered to be obstacles but the structure of the environment itself. A combination of a Bayesian algorithm and a deterministic clustering process is used in order to obtain a multimodal representation of speed and position of detected obstacles. Performance of the final system has been tested against state of the art proposals; test results validate the authors’ proposal. The designed algorithms and procedures provide a solution to those applications where similar multimodal data structures are found. PMID:22163385

  8. Stereo vision tracking of multiple objects in complex indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Marrón-Romera, Marta; García, Juan C; Sotelo, Miguel A; Pizarro, Daniel; Mazo, Manuel; Cañas, José M; Losada, Cristina; Marcos, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel system capable of solving the problem of tracking multiple targets in a crowded, complex and dynamic indoor environment, like those typical of mobile robot applications. The proposed solution is based on a stereo vision set in the acquisition step and a probabilistic algorithm in the obstacles position estimation process. The system obtains 3D position and speed information related to each object in the robot's environment; then it achieves a classification between building elements (ceiling, walls, columns and so on) and the rest of items in robot surroundings. All objects in robot surroundings, both dynamic and static, are considered to be obstacles but the structure of the environment itself. A combination of a Bayesian algorithm and a deterministic clustering process is used in order to obtain a multimodal representation of speed and position of detected obstacles. Performance of the final system has been tested against state of the art proposals; test results validate the authors' proposal. The designed algorithms and procedures provide a solution to those applications where similar multimodal data structures are found.

  9. Objects and categories: Feature statistics and object processing in the ventral stream

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Lorraine K.; Chiu, Shannon; Zhuang, Jie; Randall, Billi; Devereux, Barry J.; Wright, Paul; Clarke, Alex; Taylor, Kirsten I.

    2013-01-01

    Recognising an object involves more than just visual analyses; its meaning must also be decoded. Extensive research has shown that processing the visual properties of objects relies on a hierarchically organised stream in ventral occipitotemporal cortex, with increasingly more complex visual features being coded from posterior to anterior sites culminating in the perirhinal cortex (PRC) in the anteromedial temporal lobe (aMTL). The neurobiological principles of the conceptual analysis of objects remain more controversial. Much research has focussed on two neural regions - the fusiform gyrus and aMTL, both of which show semantic category differences, but of different types. fMRI studies show category differentiation in the fusiform gyrus, based on clusters of semantically similar objects, whereas category-specific deficits, specifically for living things, are associated with damage to the aMTL. These category-specific deficits for living things have been attributed to problems in differentiating between highly similar objects, a process which involves the PRC. To determine whether the PRC and the fusiform gyri contribute to different aspects of an object’s meaning, with differentiation between confusable objects in the PRC and categorisation based on object similarity in the fusiform, we carried out an fMRI study of object processing based on a feature-based model which characterises the degree of semantic similarity and difference between objects and object categories. Participants saw 388 objects for which feature statistic information was available, and named the objects at the basic-level while undergoing fMRI scanning. After controlling for the effects of visual information, we found that feature statistics that capture similarity between objects formed category clusters in fusiform gyri, such that objects with many shared features (typical of living things) were associated with activity in the lateral fusiform gyri while objects with fewer shared features

  10. Environmental Aspects, Objectives and Targets Identification Process

    SciTech Connect

    R. Green

    2002-07-29

    The purpose of this report is to document the environmental aspects and associated environmental impacts of the Bechtel SAIC Company (BSC) scope of work, evaluate the significance of those environmental aspects based on established criteria, and establish environmental objectives and targets for specific environmental aspects. This report is intended to be used by environmental staff in the evaluation of BSC work packages during the annual risk-based planning process. This report shall be fully reviewed and revised annually during the annual work planning process to reflect changes in BSC operations, facilities, and scope of work. Planned BSC work will be evaluated to determine if the work is covered by a previously defined activity, product or service (see Table 2); if work activities require redefinition or addition of a new activity; and if the significant evaluation for each environment aspect is still valid based on scope of planned work. New workscope initiated during the fiscal year through the Baseline Change Proposal process (i.e., not as part of the annual work plan) also will be reviewed for new environmental aspects and determination of whether the new workscope would change the significance rating of any environmental aspect. If a new environmental aspect is identified in a new work activity, product, or service but the aspect is not determined to be significant (see Section 4), then this report can be changed through an interim change notice (ICN). This report can be changed five times through an ICN before a full revision is required. However, if new workscope causes an environmental aspect to be graded as significant using the evaluation process in Section 4, this report shall be revised though a full review and revision.

  11. Visual Short-Term Memory Capacity for Simple and Complex Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luria, Roy; Sessa, Paola; Gotler, Alex; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Dell'Acqua, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Does the capacity of visual short-term memory (VSTM) depend on the complexity of the objects represented in memory? Although some previous findings indicated lower capacity for more complex stimuli, other results suggest that complexity effects arise during retrieval (due to errors in the comparison process with what is in memory) that is not…

  12. Visual Short-Term Memory Capacity for Simple and Complex Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luria, Roy; Sessa, Paola; Gotler, Alex; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Dell'Acqua, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Does the capacity of visual short-term memory (VSTM) depend on the complexity of the objects represented in memory? Although some previous findings indicated lower capacity for more complex stimuli, other results suggest that complexity effects arise during retrieval (due to errors in the comparison process with what is in memory) that is not…

  13. Sparsity assisted phase retrieval of complex valued objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Charu; Khare, Kedar

    2016-04-01

    Iterative phase retrieval of complex valued objects (phase objects) suffers from twin image problem due to the presence of features of image and its complex conjugate in the recovered solution. The twin-image problem becomes more severe when object support is centro-symmetric. In this paper, we demonstrate that by modifying standard Hybrid-Input output (HIO) algorithm using an adaptive sparsity enhancement step, the twin-image problem can be addressed successfully even when the object support is centro-symmetric. Adaptive sparsity enhanced algorithm and numerical simulation for binary as well as gray scale phase objects are presented. The high quality phase recovery results presented here show the effectiveness of adaptive sparsity enhanced algorithm.

  14. Complex object correspondence construction in two-dimensional animation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Liu, Dongquan; Tao, Dacheng; Seah, Hock Soon

    2011-11-01

    Correspondence construction of objects in key frames is the precondition for inbetweening and coloring in 2-D computer-assisted animation production. Since each frame of an animation consists of multiple layers, objects are complex in terms of shape and structure. Therefore, existing shape-matching algorithms specifically designed for simple structures such as a single closed contour cannot perform well on objects constructed by multiple contours with an open shape. This paper introduces a semisupervised patch alignment framework for complex object correspondence construction. In particular, the new framework constructs local patches for each point on an object and aligns these patches in a new feature space, in which correspondences between objects can be detected by the subsequent clustering. For local patch construction, pairwise constraints, which indicate the corresponding points (must link) or unfitting points (cannot link), are introduced by users to improve the performance of correspondence construction. This kind of input is convenient for animation software users via user-friendly interfaces. A dozen of experimental results on our cartoon data set that is built on industrial production suggest the effectiveness of the proposed framework for constructing correspondences of complex objects. As an extension of our framework, additional shape retrieval experiments on MPEG-7 data set show that its performance is comparable with that of a prominent algorithm published in T-PAMI 2009.

  15. Task context impacts visual object processing differentially across the cortex

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Assaf; Kravitz, Dwight J.; Baker, Chris I.

    2014-01-01

    Perception reflects an integration of “bottom-up” (sensory-driven) and “top-down” (internally generated) signals. Although models of visual processing often emphasize the central role of feed-forward hierarchical processing, less is known about the impact of top-down signals on complex visual representations. Here, we investigated whether and how the observer’s goals modulate object processing across the cortex. We examined responses elicited by a diverse set of objects under six distinct tasks, focusing on either physical (e.g., color) or conceptual properties (e.g., man-made). Critically, the same stimuli were presented in all tasks, allowing us to investigate how task impacts the neural representations of identical visual input. We found that task has an extensive and differential impact on object processing across the cortex. First, we found task-dependent representations in the ventral temporal and prefrontal cortex. In particular, although object identity could be decoded from the multivoxel response within task, there was a significant reduction in decoding across tasks. In contrast, the early visual cortex evidenced equivalent decoding within and across tasks, indicating task-independent representations. Second, task information was pervasive and present from the earliest stages of object processing. However, although the responses of the ventral temporal, prefrontal, and parietal cortex enabled decoding of both the type of task (physical/conceptual) and the specific task (e.g., color), the early visual cortex was not sensitive to type of task and could only be used to decode individual physical tasks. Thus, object processing is highly influenced by the behavioral goal of the observer, highlighting how top-down signals constrain and inform the formation of visual representations. PMID:24567402

  16. Task context impacts visual object processing differentially across the cortex.

    PubMed

    Harel, Assaf; Kravitz, Dwight J; Baker, Chris I

    2014-03-11

    Perception reflects an integration of "bottom-up" (sensory-driven) and "top-down" (internally generated) signals. Although models of visual processing often emphasize the central role of feed-forward hierarchical processing, less is known about the impact of top-down signals on complex visual representations. Here, we investigated whether and how the observer's goals modulate object processing across the cortex. We examined responses elicited by a diverse set of objects under six distinct tasks, focusing on either physical (e.g., color) or conceptual properties (e.g., man-made). Critically, the same stimuli were presented in all tasks, allowing us to investigate how task impacts the neural representations of identical visual input. We found that task has an extensive and differential impact on object processing across the cortex. First, we found task-dependent representations in the ventral temporal and prefrontal cortex. In particular, although object identity could be decoded from the multivoxel response within task, there was a significant reduction in decoding across tasks. In contrast, the early visual cortex evidenced equivalent decoding within and across tasks, indicating task-independent representations. Second, task information was pervasive and present from the earliest stages of object processing. However, although the responses of the ventral temporal, prefrontal, and parietal cortex enabled decoding of both the type of task (physical/conceptual) and the specific task (e.g., color), the early visual cortex was not sensitive to type of task and could only be used to decode individual physical tasks. Thus, object processing is highly influenced by the behavioral goal of the observer, highlighting how top-down signals constrain and inform the formation of visual representations.

  17. Complex molecule formation around massive young stellar objects.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Karin I; Fayolle, Edith C; Reiter, John B; Cyganowski, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar complex organic molecules were first identified in the hot inner regions of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), but have more recently been found in many colder sources, indicating that complex molecules can form at a range of temperatures. However, individually these observations provide limited constraints on how complex molecules form, and whether the same formation pathways dominate in cold, warm and hot environments. To address these questions, we use spatially resolved observations from the Submillimeter Array of three MYSOs together with mostly unresolved literature data to explore how molecular ratios depend on environmental parameters, especially temperature. Towards the three MYSOs, we find multiple complex organic emission peaks characterized by different molecular compositions and temperatures. In particular, CH3CCH and CH3CN seem to always trace a lukewarm (T = 60 K) and a hot (T > 100 K) complex chemistry, respectively. These spatial trends are consistent with abundance-temperature correlations of four representative complex organics--CH3CCH, CH3CN, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO--in a large sample of complex molecule hosts mined from the literature. Together, these results indicate a general chemical evolution with temperature, i.e. that new complex molecule formation pathways are activated as a MYSO heats up. This is qualitatively consistent with model predictions. Furthermore, these results suggest that ratios of complex molecules may be developed into a powerful probe of the evolutionary stage of a MYSO, and may provide information about its formation history.

  18. Integration of Complex Objects and Transitive Relationships for Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvelin, Kalervo; Niemi, Timo

    1999-01-01

    Shows that in advanced information-retrieval applications capabilities for data aggregation, transitive computation and non-first normal-form relational computation are often necessary at the same time. Topics include complex objects; advanced data models; query languages; query formulation; knowledge representation; and query-language syntax.…

  19. Epidemic processes in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Castellano, Claudio; Van Mieghem, Piet; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    In recent years the research community has accumulated overwhelming evidence for the emergence of complex and heterogeneous connectivity patterns in a wide range of biological and sociotechnical systems. The complex properties of real-world networks have a profound impact on the behavior of equilibrium and nonequilibrium phenomena occurring in various systems, and the study of epidemic spreading is central to our understanding of the unfolding of dynamical processes in complex networks. The theoretical analysis of epidemic spreading in heterogeneous networks requires the development of novel analytical frameworks, and it has produced results of conceptual and practical relevance. A coherent and comprehensive review of the vast research activity concerning epidemic processes is presented, detailing the successful theoretical approaches as well as making their limits and assumptions clear. Physicists, mathematicians, epidemiologists, computer, and social scientists share a common interest in studying epidemic spreading and rely on similar models for the description of the diffusion of pathogens, knowledge, and innovation. For this reason, while focusing on the main results and the paradigmatic models in infectious disease modeling, the major results concerning generalized social contagion processes are also presented. Finally, the research activity at the forefront in the study of epidemic spreading in coevolving, coupled, and time-varying networks is reported.

  20. Visual short-term memory capacity for simple and complex objects.

    PubMed

    Luria, Roy; Sessa, Paola; Gotler, Alex; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Dell'Acqua, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Does the capacity of visual short-term memory (VSTM) depend on the complexity of the objects represented in memory? Although some previous findings indicated lower capacity for more complex stimuli, other results suggest that complexity effects arise during retrieval (due to errors in the comparison process with what is in memory) that is not related to storage limitations of VSTM, per se. We used ERPs to track neuronal activity specifically related to retention in VSTM by measuring the sustained posterior contralateral negativity during a change detection task (which required detecting if an item was changed between a memory and a test array). The sustained posterior contralateral negativity, during the retention interval, was larger for complex objects than for simple objects, suggesting that neurons mediating VSTM needed to work harder to maintain more complex objects. This, in turn, is consistent with the view that VSTM capacity depends on complexity.

  1. Object-Oriented Parallel Processing with Mentat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    ogy, 1993. 10 R. Chin and S. Chanson , “Distributed Object-Based Programming Systems,” ACM Computing Surveys, pp. 91-127, vol. 23, no. 1, March., 1991...SCCS 42c, NPAC, Syracuse Uni- versity, Syracuse, NY. 15 A. S. Grimshaw, W. A. Wulf, J. C. French , A.C. Weaver, and Paul Reynolds Jr. “Legion: The Next

  2. Exploration of complex visual feature spaces for object perception

    PubMed Central

    Leeds, Daniel D.; Pyles, John A.; Tarr, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The mid- and high-level visual properties supporting object perception in the ventral visual pathway are poorly understood. In the absence of well-specified theory, many groups have adopted a data-driven approach in which they progressively interrogate neural units to establish each unit's selectivity. Such methods are challenging in that they require search through a wide space of feature models and stimuli using a limited number of samples. To more rapidly identify higher-level features underlying human cortical object perception, we implemented a novel functional magnetic resonance imaging method in which visual stimuli are selected in real-time based on BOLD responses to recently shown stimuli. This work was inspired by earlier primate physiology work, in which neural selectivity for mid-level features in IT was characterized using a simple parametric approach (Hung et al., 2012). To extend such work to human neuroimaging, we used natural and synthetic object stimuli embedded in feature spaces constructed on the basis of the complex visual properties of the objects themselves. During fMRI scanning, we employed a real-time search method to control continuous stimulus selection within each image space. This search was designed to maximize neural responses across a pre-determined 1 cm3 brain region within ventral cortex. To assess the value of this method for understanding object encoding, we examined both the behavior of the method itself and the complex visual properties the method identified as reliably activating selected brain regions. We observed: (1) Regions selective for both holistic and component object features and for a variety of surface properties; (2) Object stimulus pairs near one another in feature space that produce responses at the opposite extremes of the measured activity range. Together, these results suggest that real-time fMRI methods may yield more widely informative measures of selectivity within the broad classes of visual features

  3. Exploration of complex visual feature spaces for object perception.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Daniel D; Pyles, John A; Tarr, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The mid- and high-level visual properties supporting object perception in the ventral visual pathway are poorly understood. In the absence of well-specified theory, many groups have adopted a data-driven approach in which they progressively interrogate neural units to establish each unit's selectivity. Such methods are challenging in that they require search through a wide space of feature models and stimuli using a limited number of samples. To more rapidly identify higher-level features underlying human cortical object perception, we implemented a novel functional magnetic resonance imaging method in which visual stimuli are selected in real-time based on BOLD responses to recently shown stimuli. This work was inspired by earlier primate physiology work, in which neural selectivity for mid-level features in IT was characterized using a simple parametric approach (Hung et al., 2012). To extend such work to human neuroimaging, we used natural and synthetic object stimuli embedded in feature spaces constructed on the basis of the complex visual properties of the objects themselves. During fMRI scanning, we employed a real-time search method to control continuous stimulus selection within each image space. This search was designed to maximize neural responses across a pre-determined 1 cm(3) brain region within ventral cortex. To assess the value of this method for understanding object encoding, we examined both the behavior of the method itself and the complex visual properties the method identified as reliably activating selected brain regions. We observed: (1) Regions selective for both holistic and component object features and for a variety of surface properties; (2) Object stimulus pairs near one another in feature space that produce responses at the opposite extremes of the measured activity range. Together, these results suggest that real-time fMRI methods may yield more widely informative measures of selectivity within the broad classes of visual features

  4. Parallel Processing of Objects in a Naming Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Antje S.; Ouellet, Marc; Hacker, Christine

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated whether speakers who named several objects processed them sequentially or in parallel. Speakers named object triplets, arranged in a triangle, in the order left, right, and bottom object. The left object was easy or difficult to identify and name. During the saccade from the left to the right object, the right object shown…

  5. Parallel Processing of Objects in a Naming Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Antje S.; Ouellet, Marc; Hacker, Christine

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated whether speakers who named several objects processed them sequentially or in parallel. Speakers named object triplets, arranged in a triangle, in the order left, right, and bottom object. The left object was easy or difficult to identify and name. During the saccade from the left to the right object, the right object shown…

  6. A Survey of Complex Object Technologies for Digital Libraries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Argue, Brad; Efron, Miles; Denn, Sheila; Pattuelli, Maria Cristina

    2001-01-01

    Many early web-based digital libraries (DLs) had implicit assumptions reflected in their architecture that the unit of focus in the DL (frequently "reports" or "e-prints") would only be manifested in a single, or at most a few, common file formats such as PDF or PostScript. DLs have now matured to the point where their contents are commonly no longer simple files. Complex objects in DLs have emerged from in response to various requirements, including: simple aggregation of formats and supporting files, bundling additional information to aid digital preservation, creating opaque digital objects for e-commerce applications, and the incorporation of dynamic services with the traditional data files. We examine a representative (but not necessarily exhaustive) number of current and recent historical web-based complex object technologies and projects that are applicable to DLs: Aurora, Buckets, ComMentor, Cryptolopes, Digibox, Document Management Alliance, FEDORA, Kahn-Wilensky Framework Digital Objects, Metadata Encoding & Transmission Standard, Multivalent Documents, Open eBooks, VERS Encapsulated Objects, and the Warwick Framework.

  7. Autonomous space object tracking and azimuth determination using star tracker technique under complex space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Zhou, Fuqiang

    2015-07-01

    Autonomous space object tracking under complex space environment is a popular topic in space engineering research. However, it is a challenging task for measurement equipment, implementing navigation under complex environment, and tracking object with unknown trajectory. An algorithm for space object tracking and azimuth determination using star tracker technology is the first time proposed in this paper. It includes two major steps, star tracking and object tracking. In star tracking stage, a motion-vector algorithm is the first time exploring to track stars in sequence images, which can track stars under complex space environment. With the tracked stars, the star tracker's attitude can be updated in real-time. In object tracking stage, with the obtained attitude of the star tracker, the Kalman filter (KF) model is built to predict the object state. It takes the measured azimuth as observations rather than the object coordinates in CCD plane, which can avoid the computational complexity due to matrix derivations compared to traditional Extend-Kalman filter, and its convergence rate of the filter is improved consequently. The azimuth and the velocity of the object can be updated by the KF prediction process. In addition, different levels of background noise were added to simulate the complex space environment, and an artificial object is also added in frame with non-linear trajectory in CCD plane. The feasibility of the proposed methods is validated using synthesized sequence images which contain object motions. The simulated results show that the algorithm proposed can track stars and object successfully.

  8. Processible Polyaniline Copolymers and Complexes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yun-Hsin

    1995-01-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) is an intractable polymer due to the difficulty of melt processing or dissolving it in common solvents. The purpose of the present investigation was to prepare a new class of conducting polyanilines with better solubility both in base and dope forms by (1) adding external salt to break aggregated chains, (2) introducing ring substituted units onto the backbone without disturbing the coplanar structure, and (3) complexing with polymeric dopants to form a soluble polymer complex. Aggregation of PANI chains in dilute solution was investigated in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) by light scattering, gel permeation chromatography, and viscosity measurements. The aggregation of chains resulted in a negative second virial coefficient in light scattering measurement, a bimodal molecular weight distribution in gel permeation chromatography, and concave reduced viscosity curves. The aggregates can be broken by adding external salt, which resulting in a higher reduced viscosity. The driving force for aggregation is assumed to be a combination of hydrogen bonding between the imine and amine groups, and the rigidity of backbone. The aggregation was modeled to occur via side-on packing of PANI chains. The ring substituted PANI copolymers, poly(aniline -co-phenetidine) were synthesized by chemical oxidation copolymerization using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant. The degree of copolymerization declined with an increasing feed of o-phenetidine in the reaction mixture. The o-phenetidine had a higher reactivity than aniline in copolymerization resulting in a higher content of o-phenetidine in copolymers. The resulting copolymers can be readily dissolved in NMP up to 20% (w/w), and other common solvents, and solutions possess a longer gelation time. The highly soluble copolymer with 20 mole % o-phenetidine in the backbone has same order of conductivity as the unsubstituted PANI after it is doped by HCl. Complexation of PANI and polymeric dopant, poly

  9. Using Perspective to Model Complex Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, R.L.; Bisset, K.R.

    1999-04-04

    The notion of perspective, when supported in an object-based knowledge representation, can facilitate better abstractions of reality for modeling and simulation. The object modeling of complex physical and chemical processes is made more difficult in part due to the poor abstractions of state and phase changes available in these models. The notion of perspective can be used to create different views to represent the different states of matter in a process. These techniques can lead to a more understandable model. Additionally, the ability to record the progress of a process from start to finish is problematic. It is desirable to have a historic record of the entire process, not just the end result of the process. A historic record should facilitate backtracking and re-start of a process at different points in time. The same representation structures and techniques can be used to create a sequence of process markers to represent a historic record. By using perspective, the sequence of markers can have multiple and varying views tailored for a particular user's context of interest.

  10. Rhythmic Manipulation of Objects with Complex Dynamics: Predictability over Chaos

    PubMed Central

    Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Hasson, Christopher J.; Sternad, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    The study of object manipulation has been largely confined to discrete tasks, where accuracy, mechanical effort, or smoothness were examined to explain subjects' preferred movements. This study investigated a rhythmic manipulation task, which involved continuous interaction with a nonlinear object that led to unpredictable object behavior. Using a simplified virtual version of the task of carrying a cup of coffee, we studied how this unpredictable object behavior affected the selected strategies. The experiment was conducted in a virtual set-up, where subjects moved a cup with a ball inside, modeled by cart-and-pendulum dynamics. Inverse dynamics calculations of the system showed that performing the task with different amplitudes and relative phases required different force profiles and rendered the object's dynamics with different degrees of predictability (quantified by Mutual Information between the applied force and the cup kinematics and its sensitivity). Subjects (n = 8) oscillated the virtual cup between two targets via a robotic manipulandum, paced by a metronome at 1 Hz for 50 trials, each lasting 45 s. They were free to choose their movement amplitude and relative phase between the ball and cup. Experimental results showed that subjects increased their movement amplitudes, which rendered the interactions with the object more predictable and with lower sensitivity to the execution variables. These solutions were associated with higher average exerted force and lower object smoothness, contradicting common expectations from studies on discrete object manipulation and unrestrained movements. Instead, the findings showed that humans selected strategies with higher predictability of interaction dynamics. This finding expressed that humans seek movement strategies where force and kinematics synchronize to repeatable patterns that may require less sensorimotor information processing. PMID:25340581

  11. A Digital Preservation Ingest Parsing Agent for Complex Data Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, Don F.

    2006-01-05

    Digital preservation systems are being researched and studied in academia and government-funded efforts all over the world. However, the actual release of a proven production system is still yet to happen. Some efforts have broken ground and present great potential, but major roadblocks still exist. One such obstacle is the complex data object, similar to what is produced by the DOE2000 Electronic Laboratory Notebook (ELN). This research effort will focus on determining a methodology for extracting a complex data object from the ELN, and transforming that into a standard digital preservation ingest file. This standard file type will be based on the Library of Congress Metadata Encoding & Transmission Standard (METS) . A METS file serves as a Submission Information Package (SIP) as defined by the Open Archive Information System (OAIS). In addition to the content information, a complete set of Preservation Description Information (PDI) for the content conformation needs to be collected as well in order to create an Archival Information Package (AIP) which will be used for preservation.

  12. An object-oriented description method of EPMM process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zuo; Yang, Fan

    2017-06-01

    In order to use the object-oriented mature tools and language in software process model, make the software process model more accord with the industrial standard, it’s necessary to study the object-oriented modelling of software process. Based on the formal process definition in EPMM, considering the characteristics that Petri net is mainly formal modelling tool and combining the Petri net modelling with the object-oriented modelling idea, this paper provides this implementation method to convert EPMM based on Petri net into object models based on object-oriented description.

  13. 33 CFR 279.6 - Overview of objective setting process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overview of objective setting..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE RESOURCE USE: ESTABLISHMENT OF OBJECTIVES § 279.6 Overview of objective setting process... three main sets of data. Figure 1 presents an overview of this process. EC31OC91.024...

  14. 33 CFR 279.6 - Overview of objective setting process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Overview of objective setting..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE RESOURCE USE: ESTABLISHMENT OF OBJECTIVES § 279.6 Overview of objective setting process... three main sets of data. Figure 1 presents an overview of this process. EC31OC91.024...

  15. 33 CFR 279.6 - Overview of objective setting process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Overview of objective setting..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE RESOURCE USE: ESTABLISHMENT OF OBJECTIVES § 279.6 Overview of objective setting process... three main sets of data. Figure 1 presents an overview of this process. EC31OC91.024...

  16. 33 CFR 279.6 - Overview of objective setting process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Overview of objective setting..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE RESOURCE USE: ESTABLISHMENT OF OBJECTIVES § 279.6 Overview of objective setting process... three main sets of data. Figure 1 presents an overview of this process. EC31OC91.024...

  17. 33 CFR 279.6 - Overview of objective setting process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Overview of objective setting..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE RESOURCE USE: ESTABLISHMENT OF OBJECTIVES § 279.6 Overview of objective setting process... three main sets of data. Figure 1 presents an overview of this process. EC31OC91.024...

  18. Echo-acoustic flow shapes object representation in spatially complex acoustic scenes.

    PubMed

    Greiter, Wolfgang; Firzlaff, Uwe

    2017-03-08

    Echolocating bats use echoes of their sonar emissions to determine the position and distance of objects or prey. Target distance is represented as a map of echo delay in the auditory cortex (AC) of bats. During a bat's flight through a natural complex environment, echo streams are reflected from multiple objects along its flight path. Separating such complex streams of echoes or other sounds is a challenge for the auditory system of bats as well as other animals. We investigated the representation of multiple echo streams in the AC of anaesthetized bats (Phyllostomus discolor) and tested the hypothesis, if neurons can lock on echoes from specific objects in a complex echo-acoustic pattern while the representation of surrounding objects is suppressed. We combined naturalistic pulse/echo sequences simulating a bat's flight through a virtual acoustic space with extracellular recordings. Neurons could selectively lock on echoes from one object in complex echo streams originating from two different objects along a virtual flight path. The objects were processed sequentially in the order in which they were approached. Object selection depended on sequential changes of echo delay and amplitude but not on absolute values. Furthermore, the detailed representation of the object echo delays in the cortical target range map was not fixed but could be dynamically adapted depending on the temporal pattern of sonar emission during target approach within a simulated flight sequence.

  19. Object-oriented process dose modeling for glovebox operations

    SciTech Connect

    Boerigter, S.T.; Fasel, J.H.; Kornreich, D.E.

    1999-06-01

    The Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory supports several defense and nondefense-related missions for the country by performing fabrication, surveillance, and research and development for materials and components that contain plutonium. Most operations occur in rooms with one or more arrays of gloveboxes connected to each other via trolley gloveboxes. Minimizing the effective dose equivalent (EDE) is a growing concern as a result of steadily declining allowable dose limits being imposed and a growing general awareness of safety in the workplace. In general, the authors discriminate three components of a worker`s total EDE: the primary EDE, the secondary EDE, and background EDE. A particular background source of interest is the nuclear materials vault. The distinction between sources inside and outside of a particular room is arbitrary with the underlying assumption that building walls and floors provide significant shielding to justify including sources in other rooms in the background category. Los Alamos has developed the Process Modeling System (ProMoS) primarily for performing process analyses of nuclear operations. ProMoS is an object-oriented, discrete-event simulation package that has been used to analyze operations at Los Alamos and proposed facilities such as the new fabrication facilities for the Complex-21 effort. In the past, crude estimates of the process dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred), room dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred in a given room), and facility dose (the EDE received when a particular process occurred in the facility) were used to obtain an integrated EDE for a given process. Modifications to the ProMoS package were made to utilize secondary dose information to use dose modeling to enhance the process modeling efforts.

  20. Towards a unified theory of health-disease: I. Health as a complex model-object.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Filho, Naomar

    2013-06-01

    Theory building is one of the most crucial challenges faced by basic, clinical and population research, which form the scientific foundations of health practices in contemporary societies. The objective of the study is to propose a Unified Theory of Health-Disease as a conceptual tool for modeling health-disease-care in the light of complexity approaches. With this aim, the epistemological basis of theoretical work in the health field and concepts related to complexity theory as concerned to health problems are discussed. Secondly, the concepts of model-object, multi-planes of occurrence, modes of health and disease-illness-sickness complex are introduced and integrated into a unified theoretical framework. Finally, in the light of recent epistemological developments, the concept of Health-Disease-Care Integrals is updated as a complex reference object fit for modeling health-related processes and phenomena.

  1. Teacher Trainees as Learning Object Designers: Problems and Issues in Learning Object Development Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guler, Cetin; Altun, Arif

    2010-01-01

    Learning objects (LOs) can be defined as resources that are reusable, digital with the aim of fulfilling learning objectives (or expectations). Educators, both at the individual and institutional levels, are cautioned about the fact that LOs are to be processed through a proper development process. Who should be involved in the LO development…

  2. Functional Activation of the Infant Cortex during Object Processing

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Teresa; Stubbs, Jessica; Hirshkowitz, Amy; Boas, David A.

    2012-01-01

    A great deal is known about the functional organization of the neural structures that mediate visual object processing in the adult observer. These findings have contributed significantly to our conceptual models of object recognition and identification and provided unique insight into the nature of object representations extracted from visual input. In contrast, little is known about the neural basis of object processing in the infant. The current research used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a neuroimaging tool to investigate functional activation of the infant cortex during an object processing task that has been used extensively with infants. The neuroimaging data revealed that the infant cortex is functionally specialized for object processing (i.e., individuation-by-feature) early in the first year but that patterns of activation also change between 3 and 12 months. These changes may reflect functional reorganization of the immature cortex or age-related differences in the cognitive processes engaged during the task. PMID:22634218

  3. Distinct cognitive mechanisms involved in the processing of single objects and object ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Cant, Jonathan S.; Sun, Sol Z.; Xu, Yaoda

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral research has demonstrated that the shape and texture of single objects can be processed independently. Similarly, neuroimaging results have shown that an object's shape and texture are processed in distinct brain regions with shape in the lateral occipital area and texture in parahippocampal cortex. Meanwhile, objects are not always seen in isolation and are often grouped together as an ensemble. We recently showed that the processing of ensembles also involves parahippocampal cortex and that the shape and texture of ensemble elements are processed together within this region. These neural data suggest that the independence seen between shape and texture in single-object perception would not be observed in object-ensemble perception. Here we tested this prediction by examining whether observers could attend to the shape of ensemble elements while ignoring changes in an unattended texture feature and vice versa. Across six behavioral experiments, we replicated previous findings of independence between shape and texture in single-object perception. In contrast, we observed that changes in an unattended ensemble feature negatively impacted the processing of an attended ensemble feature only when ensemble features were attended globally. When they were attended locally, thereby making ensemble processing similar to single-object processing, interference was abolished. Overall, these findings confirm previous neuroimaging results and suggest that distinct cognitive mechanisms may be involved in single-object and object-ensemble perception. Additionally, they show that the scope of visual attention plays a critical role in determining which type of object processing (ensemble or single object) is engaged by the visual system. PMID:26360156

  4. Data Quality Objectives Process for Designation of K Basins Debris

    SciTech Connect

    WESTCOTT, J.L.

    2000-05-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy has developed a schedule and approach for the removal of spent fuels, sludge, and debris from the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins, located in the 100 Area at the Hanford Site. The project that is the subject of this data quality objective (DQO) process is focused on the removal of debris from the K Basins and onsite disposal of the debris at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). This material previously has been dispositioned at the Hanford Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBGs) or Central Waste Complex (CWC). The goal of this DQO process and the resulting Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) is to provide the strategy for characterizing and designating the K-Basin debris to determine if it meets the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), Revision 3 (BHI 1998). A critical part of the DQO process is to agree on regulatory and WAC interpretation, to support preparation of the DQO workbook and SAP.

  5. Objective high Resolution Analysis over Complex Terrain with VERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, D.; Steinacker, R.; Steiner, A.

    2012-04-01

    VERA (Vienna Enhanced Resolution Analysis) is a model independent, high resolution objective analysis of meteorological fields over complex terrain. This system consists of a special developed quality control procedure and a combination of an interpolation and a downscaling technique. Whereas the so called VERA-QC is presented at this conference in the contribution titled "VERA-QC, an approved Data Quality Control based on Self-Consistency" by Andrea Steiner, this presentation will focus on the method and the characteristics of the VERA interpolation scheme which enables one to compute grid point values of a meteorological field based on irregularly distributed observations and topography related aprior knowledge. Over a complex topography meteorological fields are not smooth in general. The roughness which is induced by the topography can be explained physically. The knowledge about this behavior is used to define the so called Fingerprints (e.g. a thermal Fingerprint reproducing heating or cooling over mountainous terrain or a dynamical Fingerprint reproducing positive pressure perturbation on the windward side of a ridge) under idealized conditions. If the VERA algorithm recognizes patterns of one or more Fingerprints at a few observation points, the corresponding patterns are used to downscale the meteorological information in a greater surrounding. This technique allows to achieve an analysis with a resolution much higher than the one of the observational network. The interpolation of irregularly distributed stations to a regular grid (in space and time) is based on a variational principle applied to first and second order spatial and temporal derivatives. Mathematically, this can be formulated as a cost function that is equivalent to the penalty function of a thin plate smoothing spline. After the analysis field has been divided into the Fingerprint components and the unexplained part respectively, the requirement of a smooth distribution is applied to the

  6. Real-time tracking of multiple objects using adaptive correlation filters with complex constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Ramirez, Victor H.; Contreras, Viridiana; Kober, Vitaly; Picos, Kenia

    2013-11-01

    A real-time system for classification and tracking of multiple moving objects is proposed. The system employs a bank of composite correlation filters with complex constraints implemented in parallel on a graphics processing unit. When a scene frame is captured, the system splits the frame into several fragments on the base of a modeling kinematic prediction of target's locations. The fragments are processed with a bank of adaptive filters. The filters are synthesized with the help of an iterative algorithm, which optimizes discrimination capability for each target. Using complex constraints in the filter design, multiple objects in the input frame can be detected and classified by analyzing the intensity and phase distributions on the output complex correlation plane for each fragment. The performance of the proposed system in terms of tracking accuracy, classification efficiency and time expenses is tested and discussed with synthetic and real input-scene sequences. The results are compared with those of common techniques based on correlation filtering.

  7. Modeling the simulation execution process with digital objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubert, Robert M.; Fishwick, Paul A.

    1999-06-01

    Object Oriented Physical Modeling (OOPM), formerly known as MOOSE, and its implementation of behavior multimodels provide an ability to manage arbitrarily complex patterns of behavioral abstraction in web-friendly simulation modeling. In an OOPM mode, one object stands as surrogate for another object, and these surrogates cognitively map to the real world. This `physical object' principle mitigates impact of incomplete knowledge and ambiguity because its real-world metaphors enable model authors to draw on intuition, facilitating reuse and integration, as well as consistency in collaborative efforts. A 3D interface for modeling and simulation visualization, under construction to augment the existing 2D GUI, obeys the physical object principle, providing a means to create, change, reuse, and integrate digital worlds made of digital objects. Implementation includes Distributed Simulation Executive, Digital object MultiModel Language, Digital Object Warehouse, and multimodel Translator. This approach is powerful and its capabilities have steadily grown; however, it has lacked a formal basis which we now provide: we define multimodels, represent digital objects as multimodels, transform multimodels to simulations, demonstrate the correctness of execution sequence of the simulations, and closure under coupling of digital objects. These theoretical results complement and enhance the practical aspects of physical multimodeling.

  8. The role of local feature processing in object perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Hyejean

    One of the outstanding questions in the study of human visual perception of objects is how local feature processing affects object perception. In this thesis, we addressed this fundamental question by examining human perceptual performance on images containing whole objects or partial images of objects (containing one, two or three features) for two perceptual tasks: detection ("something" vs. random dot noise) and classification (perception of the object category, e.g., car vs. other objects). Images were embedded in visual noise and we measured human subjects' performance in a range of noise levels close to subjects' perceptual threshold. First, we found that human detection performance increases when more object area (A) is revealed and when the noise variance (N) decreases. The contribution of these factors can be characterized as a function of Ln(A/N), which we will refer to as the Area-to-Noise ratio (ANR). When the ANR was equated in the subsequent experiments, comparison of detection performance on partial vs. whole images of objects revealed the dynamic role of local feature processing in object detection: (i) detection based on a single useful feature was better than detection based on a whole object suggesting the effectiveness of local feature processing, (ii) however, detection of a whole object did not require detection of its features and (iii) detection performance varied across features; useful features (such as eyes for faces and wheels for cars) yielded better performance than suboptimal features (such as nose and mouth for faces). This pattern of results did not significantly vary across two methods we used to select features (features based on semantic judgments and a computer algorithm), and two object categories (faces and cars). For classification, results were largely similar, except that in low ANR levels (below the level sufficient for successful detection of a whole object) classification performance was better on a single useful feature

  9. Nonrational Processes and Ethical Complexities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogerson, Mark D.; Gottlieb, Michael C.; Handelsman, Mitchell M.; Knapp, Samuel; Younggren, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Responds to the comments by Pomerantz and Sisti and Baum-Baicker on the current authors' original article, "Nonrational processes in ethical decision making". Pomerantz (2012) further explicated one interpersonal and contextual factor--the perceived characteristics of the recipient of any act. He cited evidence that these characteristics affect…

  10. Nonrational Processes and Ethical Complexities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogerson, Mark D.; Gottlieb, Michael C.; Handelsman, Mitchell M.; Knapp, Samuel; Younggren, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Responds to the comments by Pomerantz and Sisti and Baum-Baicker on the current authors' original article, "Nonrational processes in ethical decision making". Pomerantz (2012) further explicated one interpersonal and contextual factor--the perceived characteristics of the recipient of any act. He cited evidence that these characteristics affect…

  11. Saloplastics: processing compact polyelectrolyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Pierre; Schlenoff, Joseph B

    2015-04-17

    Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) are prepared by mixing solutions of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. These diffuse, amorphous precipitates may be compacted into dense materials, CoPECs, by ultracentrifugation (ucPECs) or extrusion (exPECs). The presence of salt water is essential in plasticizing PECs to allow them to be reformed and fused. When hydrated, CoPECs are versatile, rugged, biocompatible, elastic materials with applications including bioinspired materials, supports for enzymes and (nano)composites. In this review, various methods for making CoPECs are described, as well as fundamental responses of CoPEC mechanical properties to salt concentration. Possible applications as synthetic cartilage, enzymatically active biocomposites, self-healing materials, and magnetic nanocomposites are presented.

  12. Discourse accessibility constraints in children's processing of object relative clauses.

    PubMed

    Haendler, Yair; Kliegl, Reinhold; Adani, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Children's poor performance on object relative clauses has been explained in terms of intervention locality. This approach predicts that object relatives with a full DP head and an embedded pronominal subject are easier than object relatives in which both the head noun and the embedded subject are full DPs. This prediction is shared by other accounts formulated to explain processing mechanisms. We conducted a visual-world study designed to test the off-line comprehension and on-line processing of object relatives in German-speaking 5-year-olds. Children were tested on three types of object relatives, all having a full DP head noun and differing with respect to the type of nominal phrase that appeared in the embedded subject position: another full DP, a 1st- or a 3rd-person pronoun. Grammatical skills and memory capacity were also assessed in order to see whether and how they affect children's performance. Most accurately processed were object relatives with 1st-person pronoun, independently of children's language and memory skills. Performance on object relatives with two full DPs was overall more accurate than on object relatives with 3rd-person pronoun. In the former condition, children with stronger grammatical skills accurately processed the structure and their memory abilities determined how fast they were; in the latter condition, children only processed accurately the structure if they were strong both in their grammatical skills and in their memory capacity. The results are discussed in the light of accounts that predict different pronoun effects like the ones we find, which depend on the referential properties of the pronouns. We then discuss which role language and memory abilities might have in processing object relatives with various embedded nominal phrases.

  13. Spontaneous Object Recognition Memory in Aged Rats: Complexity versus Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamiz, Fernando; Gallo, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Previous work on the effect of aging on spontaneous object recognition (SOR) memory tasks in rats has yielded controversial results. Although the results at long-retention intervals are consistent, conflicting results have been reported at shorter delays. We have assessed the potential relevance of the type of object used in the performance of…

  14. Spontaneous Object Recognition Memory in Aged Rats: Complexity versus Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamiz, Fernando; Gallo, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Previous work on the effect of aging on spontaneous object recognition (SOR) memory tasks in rats has yielded controversial results. Although the results at long-retention intervals are consistent, conflicting results have been reported at shorter delays. We have assessed the potential relevance of the type of object used in the performance of…

  15. Multi-Objective Optimization for Alumina Laser Sintering Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayed, E. M.; Elmesalamy, A. S.; Sobih, M.; Elshaer, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Selective laser sintering processes has become one of the most popular additive manufacturing processes due to its flexibility in creation of complex components. This process has many interacting parameters, which have a significant influence on the process output. In this work, high purity alumina is sintered through a pulsed Nd:YAG laser sintering process. The aim of this work is to understand the effect of relevant sintering process parameters (laser power and laser scanning speed) on the quality of the sintered layer (layer surface roughness, layer thickness and vector/line width, and density). Design of experiments and statistical modeling techniques are employed to optimize the process control factors and to establish a relationship between these factors and output responses. Model results have been verified through experimental work and show reasonable prediction of process responses within the limits of sintering parameters.

  16. 3-D Object Pose Determination Using Complex EGI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    IKEG1 ji = 0. . .. 12 4.1 Tesselated pentakis dodecahedron ..... ....................... 19 4.2 First composite object used for testing... dodecahedron (tesselated pentakis dodecahedron ) as shown in Fig. 4.1. The normal direction space is discretized into 240 cells as well. The CEGI weights are...deviation of the error distribution.) 18 Figure 4. 1: Tesselated pentakis dodecahedron Figure 4.2: First composite object used for testing 19 Figure

  17. The probability of object-scene co-occurrence influences object identification processes.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Geneviève; Harmand, Mariane; Vanni, Léa; Brodeur, Mathieu B

    2017-07-01

    Contextual information allows the human brain to make predictions about the identity of objects that might be seen and irregularities between an object and its background slow down perception and identification processes. Bar and colleagues modeled the mechanisms underlying this beneficial effect suggesting that the brain stocks information about the statistical regularities of object and scene co-occurrence. Their model suggests that these recurring regularities could be conceptualized along a continuum in which the probability of seeing an object within a given scene can be high (probable condition), moderate (improbable condition) or null (impossible condition). In the present experiment, we propose to disentangle the electrophysiological correlates of these context effects by directly comparing object-scene pairs found along this continuum. We recorded the event-related potentials of 30 healthy participants (18-34 years old) and analyzed their brain activity in three time windows associated with context effects. We observed anterior negativities between 250 and 500 ms after object onset for the improbable and impossible conditions (improbable more negative than impossible) compared to the probable condition as well as a parieto-occipital positivity (improbable more positive than impossible). The brain may use different processing pathways to identify objects depending on whether the probability of co-occurrence with the scene is moderate (rely more on top-down effects) or null (rely more on bottom-up influences). The posterior positivity could index error monitoring aimed to ensure that no false information is integrated into mental representations of the world.

  18. An assembly process model based on object-oriented hierarchical time Petri Nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiapeng; Liu, Shaoli; Liu, Jianhua; Du, Zenghui

    2017-04-01

    In order to improve the versatility, accuracy and integrity of the assembly process model of complex products, an assembly process model based on object-oriented hierarchical time Petri Nets is presented. A complete assembly process information model including assembly resources, assembly inspection, time, structure and flexible parts is established, and this model describes the static and dynamic data involved in the assembly process. Through the analysis of three-dimensional assembly process information, the assembly information is hierarchically divided from the whole, the local to the details and the subnet model of different levels of object-oriented Petri Nets is established. The communication problem between Petri subnets is solved by using message database, and it reduces the complexity of system modeling effectively. Finally, the modeling process is presented, and a five layer Petri Nets model is established based on the hoisting process of the engine compartment of a wheeled armored vehicle.

  19. Surrogate-based Multi-Objective Optimization and Uncertainty Quantification Methods for Large, Complex Geophysical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wei; Duan, Qingyun

    2016-04-01

    Parameterization scheme has significant influence to the simulation ability of large, complex dynamic geophysical models, such as distributed hydrological models, land surface models, weather and climate models, etc. with the growing knowledge of physical processes, the dynamic geophysical models include more and more processes and producing more output variables. Consequently the parameter optimization / uncertainty quantification algorithms should also be multi-objective compatible. Although such algorithms have long been available, they usually require a large number of model runs and are therefore computationally expensive for large, complex dynamic models. In this research, we have developed surrogate-based multi-objective optimization method (MO-ASMO) and Markov Chain Monte Carlo method (MC-ASMO) for uncertainty quantification for these expensive dynamic models. The aim of MO-ASMO and MC-ASMO is to reduce the total number of model runs with appropriate adaptive sampling strategy assisted by surrogate modeling. Moreover, we also developed a method that can steer the search process with the help of prior parameterization scheme derived from the physical processes involved, so that all of the objectives can be improved simultaneously. The proposed algorithms have been evaluated with test problems and a land surface model - the Common Land Model (CoLM). The results demonstrated their effectiveness and efficiency.

  20. Causality and complexity: the myth of objectivity in science.

    PubMed

    Mikulecky, Donald C

    2007-10-01

    Two distinctly different worldviews dominate today's thinking in science and in the world of ideas outside of science. Using the approach advocated by Robert M. Hutchins, it is possible to see a pattern of interaction between ideas in science and in other spheres such as philosophy, religion, and politics. Instead of compartmentalizing these intellectual activities, it is worthwhile to look for common threads of mutual influence. Robert Rosen has created an approach to scientific epistemology that might seem radical to some. However, it has characteristics that resemble ideas in other fields, in particular in the writings of George Lakoff, Leo Strauss, and George Soros. Historically, the atmosphere at the University of Chicago during Hutchins' presidency gave rise to Rashevsky's relational biology, which Rosen carried forward. Strauss was writing his political philosophy there at the same time. One idea is paramount in all this, and it is Lakoff who gives us the most insight into how the worldviews differ using this idea. The central difference has to do with causality, the fundamental concept that we use to build a worldview. Causal entailment has two distinct forms in Lakoff 's analysis: direct causality and complex causality. Rosen's writings on complexity create a picture of complex causality that is extremely useful in its detail, grounding in the ideas of Aristotle. Strauss asks for a return to the ancients to put philosophy back on track. Lakoff sees the weaknesses in Western philosophy in a similar way, and Rosen provides tools for dealing with the problem. This introduction to the relationships between the thinking of these authors is meant to stimulate further discourse on the role of complex causal entailment in all areas of thought, and how it brings them together in a holistic worldview. The worldview built on complex causality is clearly distinct from that built around simple, direct causality. One important difference is that the impoverished causal

  1. A novel multi-view object recognition in complex background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yongxin; Yu, Huapeng; Xu, Zhiyong; Fu, Chengyu; Gao, Chunming

    2015-02-01

    Recognizing objects from arbitrary aspects is always a highly challenging problem in computer vision, and most existing algorithms mainly focus on a specific viewpoint research. Hence, in this paper we present a novel recognizing framework based on hierarchical representation, part-based method and learning in order to recognize objects from different viewpoints. The learning evaluates the model's mistakes and feeds it back the detector to avid the same mistakes in the future. The principal idea is to extract intrinsic viewpoint invariant features from the unseen poses of object, and then to take advantage of these shared appearance features to support recognition combining with the improved multiple view model. Compared with other recognition models, the proposed approach can efficiently tackle multi-view problem and promote the recognition versatility of our system. For an quantitative valuation The novel algorithm has been tested on several benchmark datasets such as Caltech 101 and PASCAL VOC 2010. The experimental results validate that our approach can recognize objects more precisely and the performance outperforms others single view recognition methods.

  2. Constructing Mental Representations of Complex Three-Dimensional Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aust, Ronald

    This exploratory study investigated whether there are differences between males and females in the strategies used to construct mental representations from three-dimensional objects in a dimensional travel display. A Silicon Graphics IRIS computer was used to create the travel displays and mathematical models were created for each of the objects…

  3. Oil recovery process using polymer microemulsion complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Canter, N.H.; Robbins, M.L.

    1982-11-23

    A process for the enhanced recovery of oil from a subterranean formation using a polymer-microemulsion complex is disclosed. The polymer is polyethylene oxide or polyvinyl pyrrolidone which interacts with the surfactant of the microemulsion to form a physical association. The resulting complex is characterized by a complexation energy of at least 2 kcal/mole. Slugs containing the present polymer-microemulsion complexes are stable at high salinity, show reduced destabilization due to surfactant adsorption and retention by the formation, have low interfacial tensions and achieve an early banking, as well as increased displacement of crude oil.

  4. Research on recognition methods of aphid objects in complex backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Ji-Hong

    2009-07-01

    In order to improve the recognition accuracy among the kinds of aphids in the complex backgrounds, the recognition method among kinds of aphids based on Dual-Tree Complex Wavelet Transform (DT-CWT) and Support Vector Machine (Libsvm) is proposed. Firstly the image is pretreated; secondly the aphid images' texture feature of three crops are extracted by DT-CWT in order to get the training parameters of training model; finally the training model could recognize aphids among the three kinds of crops. By contrasting to Gabor wavelet transform and the traditional extracting texture's methods based on Gray-Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM), the experiment result shows that the method has a certain practicality and feasibility and provides basic for aphids' recognition between the identification among same kind aphid.

  5. Invariant visual object recognition and shape processing in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zoccolan, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Invariant visual object recognition is the ability to recognize visual objects despite the vastly different images that each object can project onto the retina during natural vision, depending on its position and size within the visual field, its orientation relative to the viewer, etc. Achieving invariant recognition represents such a formidable computational challenge that is often assumed to be a unique hallmark of primate vision. Historically, this has limited the invasive investigation of its neuronal underpinnings to monkey studies, in spite of the narrow range of experimental approaches that these animal models allow. Meanwhile, rodents have been largely neglected as models of object vision, because of the widespread belief that they are incapable of advanced visual processing. However, the powerful array of experimental tools that have been developed to dissect neuronal circuits in rodents has made these species very attractive to vision scientists too, promoting a new tide of studies that have started to systematically explore visual functions in rats and mice. Rats, in particular, have been the subjects of several behavioral studies, aimed at assessing how advanced object recognition and shape processing is in this species. Here, I review these recent investigations, as well as earlier studies of rat pattern vision, to provide an historical overview and a critical summary of the status of the knowledge about rat object vision. The picture emerging from this survey is very encouraging with regard to the possibility of using rats as complementary models to monkeys in the study of higher-level vision. PMID:25561421

  6. A case of complex regional pain syndrome with agnosia for object orientation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Gail; Cohen, Helen; Goebel, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    This systematic investigation of the neurocognitive correlates of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in a single case also reports agnosia for object orientation in the context of persistent CRPS. We report a patient (JW) with severe long-standing CRPS who had no difficulty identifying and naming line drawings of objects presented in 1 of 4 cardinal orientations. In contrast, he was extremely poor at reorienting these objects into the correct upright orientation and in judging whether an object was upright or not. Moreover, JW made orientation errors when copying drawings of objects, and he also showed features of mirror reversal in writing single words and reading single letters. The findings are discussed in relation to accounts of visual processing. Agnosia for object orientation is the term for impaired knowledge of an object's orientation despite good recognition and naming of the same misoriented object. This defect has previously only been reported in patients with major structural brain lesions. The neuroanatomical correlates are discussed. The patient had no structural brain lesion, raising the possibility that nonstructural reorganisation of cortical networks may be responsible for his deficits. Other patients with CRPS may have related neurocognitive defects.

  7. A Subjective and Objective Process for Athletic Training Student Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Jeremy R.; McLoda, Todd A.; Stanek, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Admission decisions are made annually concerning whom to accept into athletic training programs. Objective: To present an approach used to make admissions decisions at an undergraduate athletic training program and to corroborate this information by comparing each aspect to nursing program admission processes. Background: Annually,…

  8. A Subjective and Objective Process for Athletic Training Student Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Jeremy R.; McLoda, Todd A.; Stanek, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Admission decisions are made annually concerning whom to accept into athletic training programs. Objective: To present an approach used to make admissions decisions at an undergraduate athletic training program and to corroborate this information by comparing each aspect to nursing program admission processes. Background: Annually,…

  9. The COGs (context, object, and goals) in multisensory processing.

    PubMed

    ten Oever, Sanne; Romei, Vincenzo; van Atteveldt, Nienke; Soto-Faraco, Salvador; Murray, Micah M; Matusz, Pawel J

    2016-05-01

    Our understanding of how perception operates in real-world environments has been substantially advanced by studying both multisensory processes and "top-down" control processes influencing sensory processing via activity from higher-order brain areas, such as attention, memory, and expectations. As the two topics have been traditionally studied separately, the mechanisms orchestrating real-world multisensory processing remain unclear. Past work has revealed that the observer's goals gate the influence of many multisensory processes on brain and behavioural responses, whereas some other multisensory processes might occur independently of these goals. Consequently, other forms of top-down control beyond goal dependence are necessary to explain the full range of multisensory effects currently reported at the brain and the cognitive level. These forms of control include sensitivity to stimulus context as well as the detection of matches (or lack thereof) between a multisensory stimulus and categorical attributes of naturalistic objects (e.g. tools, animals). In this review we discuss and integrate the existing findings that demonstrate the importance of such goal-, object- and context-based top-down control over multisensory processing. We then put forward a few principles emerging from this literature review with respect to the mechanisms underlying multisensory processing and discuss their possible broader implications.

  10. Medial Temporal Lobe Activity During Complex Discrimination of Faces, Objects, and Scenes: Effects of Viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Barense, Morgan D.; Henson, Richard N.A.; Lee, Andy C.H.; Graham, Kim S.

    2010-01-01

    The medial temporal lobe (MTL), a set of heavily inter-connected structures including the hippocampus and underlying entorhinal, perirhinal and parahippocampal cortex, is traditionally believed to be part of a unitary system dedicated to declarative memory. Recent studies, however, demonstrated perceptual impairments in amnesic individuals with MTL damage, with hippocampal lesions causing scene discrimination deficits, and perirhinal lesions causing object and face discrimination deficits. The degree of impairment on these tasks was influenced by the need to process complex conjunctions of features: discriminations requiring the integration of multiple visual features caused deficits, whereas discriminations that could be solved on the basis of a single feature did not. Here, we address these issues with functional neuroimaging in healthy participants as they performed a version of the oddity discrimination task used previously in patients. Three different types of stimuli (faces, scenes, novel objects) were presented from either identical or different viewpoints. Consistent with studies in patients, we observed increased perirhinal activity when participants distinguished between faces and objects presented from different, compared to identical, viewpoints. The posterior hippocampus, by contrast, showed an effect of viewpoint for both faces and scenes. These findings provide convergent evidence that the MTL is involved in processes beyond long-term declarative memory and suggest a critical role for these structures in integrating complex features of faces, objects, and scenes into view-invariant, abstract representations. PMID:19499575

  11. Shape Recognition Of Complex Objects By Syntactical Primitives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenger, D.; Cipovic, H.

    1985-04-01

    The paper describes a pattern recognition method based on syntactic image analysis applicable in autonomous systems of robot vision for the purpose of pattern detection or classification. The discrimination of syntactic elements is realized by polygonal approximation of contours employing a very fast algorithm based upon coding, local pixel logic and methods of choice instead of numerical methods. Semantic information is derived from attributes calculated from the filtered shape vector. No a priori information on image objects is required, and the choice of starting point is determined by finding the significant directions on the shape vector. The radius of recognition sphere is minimum Euclidian distance, i.e. maximum similarity between the unknown model and each individual grammar created in the learning phase. By keeping information on derivations of individual syntactic elements, an alternative of parsing recognition is left. The analysis is very flexible, and permits the recognition of highly distorted or even partially visible objects. The output from syntactic analyzer is the measure of irregularity, and the method is thus applicable in any application where sample deformation is being examined.

  12. Temporal dynamics of object location processing in allocentric reference frame.

    PubMed

    Török, Ágoston; Kóbor, Andrea; Persa, György; Galambos, Péter; Baranyi, Péter; Csépe, Valéria; Honbolygó, Ferenc

    2017-09-01

    The spatial location of objects is processed in egocentric and allocentric reference frames, the early temporal dynamics of which have remained relatively unexplored. Previous experiments focused on ERP components related only to egocentric navigation. Thus, we designed a virtual reality experiment to see whether allocentric reference frame-related ERP modulations can also be registered. Participants collected reward objects at the end of the west and east alleys of a cross maze, and their ERPs to the feedback objects were measured. Participants made turn choices from either the south or the north alley randomly in each trial. In this way, we were able to discern place and response coding of object location. Behavioral results indicated a strong preference for using the allocentric reference frame and a preference for choosing the rewarded place in the next trial, suggesting that participants developed probabilistic expectations between places and rewards. We also found that the amplitude of the P1 was sensitive to the allocentric place of the reward object, independent of its value. We did not find evidence for egocentric response learning. These results show that early ERPs are sensitive to the location of objects during navigation in an allocentric reference frame. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  13. Electrophysiological Advances on Multiple Object Processing in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Veronica; Brignani, Debora

    2016-01-01

    EEG research conducted in the past 5 years on multiple object processing has begun to define how the aging brain tracks the numerosity of the objects presented in the visual field for different goals. We review the recent EEG findings in healthy older individuals (age range: 65–75 years approximately) on perceptual, attentional and memory mechanisms-reflected in the N1, N2pc and contralateral delayed activity (CDA) components of the EEG, respectively-during the execution of a variety of cognitive tasks requiring simultaneous processing of multiple elements. The findings point to multiple loci of neural changes in multi-object analysis, and suggest the involvement of early perceptual mechanisms, attentive individuation and working memory (WM) operations in the neural and cognitive modification due to aging. However, the findings do not simply reflect early impairments with a cascade effect over subsequent stages of stimulus processing, but in fact highlight interesting dissociations between the effects occurring at the various stages of stimulus processing. Finally, the results on older adults indicate the occurrence of neural overactivation in association to good levels of performance in easy perceptual contexts, thus providing some hints on the existence of compensatory phenomena that are associated with the functioning of early perceptual mechanisms. PMID:26973520

  14. The σ-Capricornids complex of near-Earth objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadzhanov, P. B.; Kokhirova, G. I.; Khamroev, U. Kh.

    2015-04-01

    The Earth-crossing asteroids 2008BO16, 2011EC41, and 2013CT36 have very similar orbits according to the Southworth and Hawkins DSH criterion. Their orbits are additionally classified as comet-like based on using the Tisserand parameter which is a standard tool used to distinction between asteroids and comets. The orbital evolution research shows that they cross the Earth's orbit four times over one cycle of the perihelion argument variations. Consequently, a meteoroid stream, possibly associated with them, may produce four meteor showers. Theoretic parameters of the predicted showers were calculated and identified with the observable nighttime σ-Capricornids and χ-Sagittariids, and daytime χ-Capricornids and Capricornids-Sagittariids meteor showers. The similar comet-like orbits and the linkage with the same meteoroid stream producing four active showers provide strong evidence that these asteroids have a common cometary origin. Earlier, it was demonstrated that the Earth-crossing asteroids (2101) Adonis and 1995CS, being a potentially hazardous asteroid (PHA), were recognized as dormant comets because of their linkage with the σ-Capricornids meteoroid stream. Thus, a conclusion was made, that either the considered objects are large pieces of the Adonis, or all five objects are extinct or dormant fragments of a larger comet that was the parent body of the σ-Capricornids meteoroid stream, and whose break-up occurred several tens of thousands years ago. During 2010-2011, three σ-Capricornids fireballs were captured by the Tajikistan fireball network. Taking into account the observations in Canada and the USA, the dynamic and physical properties of the σ-Capricornid meteoroids were identified. According to the estimated meteoroids bulk density a non-homogeneous compound of the σ-Capricornids shower comet-progenitor was suggested.

  15. Classification and identification of small objects in complex urban-forested LIDAR data using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basener, William F.; Basener, Abigail

    2017-05-01

    Classification in LIDAR data is the process of determining points on terrain types and objects, often with the goal of determining land use and/or building footprints. In this paper we endeavor to classify terrain types and objects at a high level of detail in a complex scene that includes buildings, forested areas, and steep hillsides. Our object classes include buildings, building rooftop structures, forest trees, landscape trees, landscape bushes, cars, light posts of varying sizes, fences, paved surfaces, and grass. Our classification method of choice is a Random Forest, but we also investigate other machine learning methods including K-Nearest Neightbors and Linear Discriminant Analysis. We evaluate the effectiveness of the algorithms for accuracy, required training sample size, and runtime.

  16. SEPARATION PROCESS USING COMPLEXING AND ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, J.H.; Ayers, J.A.

    1958-06-01

    An adsorption process is described for separating plutonium from a solution of neutron-irradiated uranium containing ions of a compound of plutonium and other cations. The method consists of forming a chelate complex compound with plutoniunn ions in the solution by adding a derivative of 8- hydroxyquinoline, which derivative contains a sulfonic acid group, and adsorbing the remaining cations from the solution on a cation exchange resin, while the complexed plutonium remains in the solution.

  17. Modeling of the formation of complex molecules in protostellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochina, O. V.; Wiebe, D. S.; Kalenskii, S. V.; Vasyunin, A. I.

    2013-11-01

    The results of molecular composition modeling are presented for the well studied low-mass star-forming region TMC-1 and the massive star-forming region DR21(OH), which is poorly studied from a chemical point of view. The column densities of dozens of molecules, ranging from simple diatomic to complex organic molecules, are reproduced to within an order of magnitude using a one-dimensional model for the physical and chemical structure of these regions. The chemical ages of the regions are approximately 105 years in both cases. The main desorption mechanisms that are usually included in chemical models (photodesorption, thermal desorption, and cosmic-ray-induced desorption) do not provide sufficient gasphase abundances of molecules that are synthesized in surface reactions; however, this shortcoming can be removed by introducing small amount of reactive desorption into the model. It is possible to reproduce the properties of the TMC-1 chemical composition in a standard model, without requiring additional assumptions about an anomalous C/O ratio or the recent accretion of matter enriched with atomic carbon, as has been proposed by some researchers.

  18. Invariant visual object recognition and shape processing in rats.

    PubMed

    Zoccolan, Davide

    2015-05-15

    Invariant visual object recognition is the ability to recognize visual objects despite the vastly different images that each object can project onto the retina during natural vision, depending on its position and size within the visual field, its orientation relative to the viewer, etc. Achieving invariant recognition represents such a formidable computational challenge that is often assumed to be a unique hallmark of primate vision. Historically, this has limited the invasive investigation of its neuronal underpinnings to monkey studies, in spite of the narrow range of experimental approaches that these animal models allow. Meanwhile, rodents have been largely neglected as models of object vision, because of the widespread belief that they are incapable of advanced visual processing. However, the powerful array of experimental tools that have been developed to dissect neuronal circuits in rodents has made these species very attractive to vision scientists too, promoting a new tide of studies that have started to systematically explore visual functions in rats and mice. Rats, in particular, have been the subjects of several behavioral studies, aimed at assessing how advanced object recognition and shape processing is in this species. Here, I review these recent investigations, as well as earlier studies of rat pattern vision, to provide an historical overview and a critical summary of the status of the knowledge about rat object vision. The picture emerging from this survey is very encouraging with regard to the possibility of using rats as complementary models to monkeys in the study of higher-level vision. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Process for coating an object with silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A process for coating a carbon or graphite object with silicon carbide by contacting it with silicon liquid and vapor over various lengths of contact time. In the process, a stream of silicon-containing precursor material in gaseous phase below the decomposition temperature of said gas and a co-reactant, carrier or diluent gas such as hydrogen is passed through a hole within a high emissivity, thin, insulating septum into a reaction chamber above the melting point of silicon. The thin septum has one face below the decomposition temperature of the gas and an opposite face exposed to the reaction chamber. The precursor gas is decomposed directly to silicon in the reaction chamber. A stream of any decomposition gas and any unreacted precursor gas from said reaction chamber is removed. The object within the reaction chamber is then contacted with silicon, and recovered after it has been coated with silicon carbide.

  20. Simple, Affordable and Sustainable Borehole Observatories for Complex Monitoring Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, A.; Hammerschmidt, S.; Davis, E.; Saffer, D.; Wheat, G.; LaBonte, A.; Meldrum, R.; Heesemann, M.; Villinger, H.; Freudenthal, T.; Ratmeyer, V.; Renken, J.; Bergenthal, M.; Wefer, G.

    2012-04-01

    Around 20 years ago, the scientific community started to use borehole observatories, so-called CORKs or Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kits, which are installed inside submarine boreholes, and which allow the re-establishment and monitoring of in situ conditions. From the first CORKs which allowed only rudimentary fluid pressure and temperature measurements, the instruments evolved to multi-functional and multi-level subseafloor laboratories, including, for example, long-term fluid sampling devices, in situ microbiological experiments or strainmeter. Nonetheless, most boreholes are still left uninstrumented, which is a major loss for the scientific community. In-stallation of CORKs usually requires a drillship and subsequent ROV assignments for data download and instru-ment maintenance, which is a major logistic and financial effort. Moreover, the increasing complexity of the CORK systems increased not only the expenses but led also to longer installation times and a higher sensitivity of the in-struments to environmental constraints. Here, we present three types of Mini-CORKs, which evolved back to more simple systems yet providing a wide range of possible in situ measurements. As a regional example the Nankai Trough is chosen, where repeated subduction thrust earthquakes with M8+ occurred. The area has been investigated by several drilling campaigns of the DSDP, ODP and IODP, where boreholes were already instrumented by different CORKs. Unfortunately, some of the more complex systems showed incomplete functionality, and moreover, the increased ship time forced IODP to rely on third party funds for the observatories. Consequently, the need for more affordable CORKs arose, which may be satisfied by the systems presented here. The first type, the so-called SmartPlug, provides two pressure transducers and four temperature sensors, and monitors a hydrostatic reference section and an isolated zone of interest. It was already installed at the Nankai Trough accretionary

  1. On the optimal viewing position for object processing.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Lotje; Vitu, Françoise

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have shown that a visually presented word is processed most easily when participants initially fixate just to the left of the word's center. Fixating on this optimal viewing position (OVP) results in shorter response times and a lower probability of making additional within-word refixations (OVP effects), but also longer initial-fixation durations (an inverted-OVP or I-OVP effect), as compared to initially fixating at the beginning or the end of the word. Thus, typical curves are u-shaped (or inverted-u-shaped), with a leftward bias. Most researchers explain the u-shape in terms of visual constraints, and the leftward bias in terms of language constraints. Previous studies have demonstrated that (I)-OVP effects are not specific to words, but generalize to object viewing. We further investigated this by comparing the strength and (a)symmetry of (I-)OVP effects for words and objects. To this purpose, we gave participants an object- versus word-naming task in which we manipulated the position at which they initially fixated the stimulus (i.e., a line drawing or the written name of an object). Our results showed that object viewing, just as word viewing, resulted in u-shaped (I-)OVP curves. However, the effect was weaker than for words. Furthermore, for words, the curves were biased to the left, whereas they were symmetrical for objects. This might indicate that part of the (I-)OVP effect for words is language specific, and that (I-)OVP effects for objects are a purer measure of the effect of visual constraints.

  2. A new standardized set of ecological pictures for experimental and clinical research on visual object processing.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, Maria Pia; Vannucci, Manila; Righi, Stefania

    2004-06-01

    A new set of 174 pictures in black-and-white, coloured and spatially filtered versions, taken from photographs of real objects belonging to different semantic categories, was realised for experimental and clinical research on visual object processing. Two samples, one of English speakers and one of Italian speakers, were tested in order to provide the normative data for each picture, in both black-and-white and coloured versions, in relation to familiarity, visual complexity and name agreement.

  3. Design and Use of a Learning Object for Finding Complex Polynomial Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benitez, Julio; Gimenez, Marcos H.; Hueso, Jose L.; Martinez, Eulalia; Riera, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Complex numbers are essential in many fields of engineering, but students often fail to have a natural insight of them. We present a learning object for the study of complex polynomials that graphically shows that any complex polynomials has a root and, furthermore, is useful to find the approximate roots of a complex polynomial. Moreover, we…

  4. Design and Use of a Learning Object for Finding Complex Polynomial Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benitez, Julio; Gimenez, Marcos H.; Hueso, Jose L.; Martinez, Eulalia; Riera, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Complex numbers are essential in many fields of engineering, but students often fail to have a natural insight of them. We present a learning object for the study of complex polynomials that graphically shows that any complex polynomials has a root and, furthermore, is useful to find the approximate roots of a complex polynomial. Moreover, we…

  5. ERPs Differentially Reflect Automatic and Deliberate Processing of the Functional Manipulability of Objects

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Christopher R.; Chen, Yvonne Y.; Singhal, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the functional properties of an object can interact with perceptual, cognitive, and motor processes. Previously we have found that a between-subjects manipulation of judgment instructions resulted in different manipulability-related memory biases in an incidental memory test. To better understand this effect we recorded electroencephalography (EEG) while participants made judgments about images of objects that were either high or low in functional manipulability (e.g., hammer vs. ladder). Using a between-subjects design, participants judged whether they had seen the object recently (Personal Experience), or could manipulate the object using their hand (Functionality). We focused on the P300 and slow-wave event-related potentials (ERPs) as reflections of attentional allocation. In both groups, we observed higher P300 and slow wave amplitudes for high-manipulability objects at electrodes Pz and C3. As P300 is thought to reflect bottom-up attentional processes, this may suggest that the processing of high-manipulability objects recruited more attentional resources. Additionally, the P300 effect was greater in the Functionality group. A more complex pattern was observed at electrode C3 during slow wave: processing the high-manipulability objects in the Functionality instruction evoked a more positive slow wave than in the other three conditions, likely related to motor simulation processes. These data provide neural evidence that effects of manipulability on stimulus processing are further mediated by automatic vs. deliberate motor-related processing. PMID:27536224

  6. The Pan-STARRS Moving Object Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denneau, Larry; Jedicke, Robert; Grav, Tommy; Granvik, Mikael; Kubica, Jeremy; Milani, Andrea; Vereš, Peter; Wainscoat, Richard; Chang, Daniel; Pierfederici, Francesco; Kaiser, N.; Chambers, K. C.; Heasley, J. N.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Price, P. A.; Myers, Jonathan; Kleyna, Jan; Hsieh, Henry; Farnocchia, Davide; Waters, Chris; Sweeney, W. H.; Green, Denver; Bolin, Bryce; Burgett, W. S.; Morgan, J. S.; Tonry, John L.; Hodapp, K. W.; Chastel, Serge; Chesley, Steve; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Holman, Matthew; Spahr, Tim; Tholen, David; Williams, Gareth V.; Abe, Shinsuke; Armstrong, J. D.; Bressi, Terry H.; Holmes, Robert; Lister, Tim; McMillan, Robert S.; Micheli, Marco; Ryan, Eileen V.; Ryan, William H.; Scotti, James V.

    2013-04-01

    We describe the Pan-STARRS Moving Object Processing System (MOPS), a modern software package that produces automatic asteroid discoveries and identifications from catalogs of transient detections from next-generation astronomical survey telescopes. MOPS achieves >99.5% efficiency in producing orbits from a synthetic but realistic population of asteroids whose measurements were simulated for a Pan-STARRS4-class telescope. Additionally, using a nonphysical grid population, we demonstrate that MOPS can detect populations of currently unknown objects such as interstellar asteroids. MOPS has been adapted successfully to the prototype Pan-STARRS1 telescope despite differences in expected false detection rates, fill-factor loss, and relatively sparse observing cadence compared to a hypothetical Pan-STARRS4 telescope and survey. MOPS remains highly efficient at detecting objects but drops to 80% efficiency at producing orbits. This loss is primarily due to configurable MOPS processing limits that are not yet tuned for the Pan-STARRS1 mission. The core MOPS software package is the product of more than 15 person-years of software development and incorporates countless additional years of effort in third-party software to perform lower-level functions such as spatial searching or orbit determination. We describe the high-level design of MOPS and essential subcomponents, the suitability of MOPS for other survey programs, and suggest a road map for future MOPS development.

  7. Nonturbulent dispersion processes in complex terrain

    Treesearch

    Michael A. Fosberg; Douglas G. Fox; E.A. Howard; Jack D. Cohen

    1976-01-01

    Mass divergence influences on plume dispersion modify classic Gaussian calculations by as much as a factor of two in complex terrain. The Gaussian plume was derived in flux form to include this process.Authors' response to comments and criticism received following this publication:

  8. Thematic Roles, Markedness Alignment and Processing Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yoonhyoung; Kwon, Youan; Gordon, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments used eye-tracking during reading to investigate the role of the consistency of the relative markedness alignment of noun phrases (NPs) in the processing of complex sentences in Korean. To do so, the animacy of the first NP was varied in both experiments to manipulate the relative markedness of NPs. In addition, case markings of the…

  9. The Process of Solving Complex Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Andreas; Greiff, Samuel; Funke, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    This article is about Complex Problem Solving (CPS), its history in a variety of research domains (e.g., human problem solving, expertise, decision making, and intelligence), a formal definition and a process theory of CPS applicable to the interdisciplinary field. CPS is portrayed as (a) knowledge acquisition and (b) knowledge application…

  10. Social ecological complexity and resilience processes.

    PubMed

    Ungar, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A social ecological model of resilience avoids the reductionism of simple explanations of the complex and multisystemic processes associated with well-being in contexts of adversity. There is evidence that when stressors are abnormally high, environmental factors account for more of an individual's resilience than do individual traits or cognitions. In this commentary, a social ecological model of resilience is discussed.

  11. Thematic Roles, Markedness Alignment and Processing Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yoonhyoung; Kwon, Youan; Gordon, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments used eye-tracking during reading to investigate the role of the consistency of the relative markedness alignment of noun phrases (NPs) in the processing of complex sentences in Korean. To do so, the animacy of the first NP was varied in both experiments to manipulate the relative markedness of NPs. In addition, case markings of the…

  12. Functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation reveals the cortical networks for processing grasp-relevant object properties.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Simona; Chen, Ying; Medendorp, W P; Crawford, J D; Fiehler, Katja; Henriques, Denise Y P

    2014-06-01

    Grasping behaviors require the selection of grasp-relevant object dimensions, independent of overall object size. Previous neuroimaging studies found that the intraparietal cortex processes object size, but it is unknown whether the graspable dimension (i.e., grasp axis between selected points on the object) or the overall size of objects triggers activation in that region. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation to investigate human brain areas involved in processing the grasp-relevant dimension of real 3-dimensional objects in grasping and viewing tasks. Trials consisted of 2 sequential stimuli in which the object's grasp-relevant dimension, its global size, or both were novel or repeated. We found that calcarine and extrastriate visual areas adapted to object size regardless of the grasp-relevant dimension during viewing tasks. In contrast, the superior parietal occipital cortex (SPOC) and lateral occipital complex of the left hemisphere adapted to the grasp-relevant dimension regardless of object size and task. Finally, the dorsal premotor cortex adapted to the grasp-relevant dimension in grasping, but not in viewing, tasks, suggesting that motor processing was complete at this stage. Taken together, our results provide a complete cortical circuit for progressive transformation of general object properties into grasp-related responses.

  13. Processing ser and estar to locate objects and events

    PubMed Central

    Dussias, Paola E.; Contemori, Carla; Román, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    In Spanish locative constructions, a different form of the copula is selected in relation to the semantic properties of the grammatical subject: sentences that locate objects require estar while those that locate events require ser (both translated in English as ‘to be’). In an ERP study, we examined whether second language (L2) speakers of Spanish are sensitive to the selectional restrictions that the different types of subjects impose on the choice of the two copulas. Twenty-four native speakers of Spanish and two groups of L2 Spanish speakers (24 beginners and 18 advanced speakers) were recruited to investigate the processing of ‘object/event + estar/ser’ permutations. Participants provided grammaticality judgments on correct (object + estar; event + ser) and incorrect (object + ser; event + estar) sentences while their brain activity was recorded. In line with previous studies (Leone-Fernández, Molinaro, Carreiras, & Barber, 2012; Sera, Gathje, & Pintado, 1999), the results of the grammaticality judgment for the native speakers showed that participants correctly accepted object + estar and event + ser constructions. In addition, while ‘object + ser’ constructions were considered grossly ungrammatical, ‘event + estar’ combinations were perceived as unacceptable to a lesser degree. For these same participants, ERP recording time-locked to the onset of the critical word ‘en’ showed a larger P600 for the ser predicates when the subject was an object than when it was an event (*La silla es en la cocina vs. La fiesta es en la cocina). This P600 effect is consistent with syntactic repair of the defining predicate when it does not fit with the adequate semantic properties of the subject. For estar predicates (La silla está en la cocina vs. *La fiesta está en la cocina), the findings showed a central-frontal negativity between 500–700 ms. Grammaticality judgment data for the L2 speakers of Spanish showed that beginners were significantly less

  14. Children use object-level category knowledge to detect changes in complex auditory scenes.

    PubMed

    Vanden Bosch der Nederlanden, Christina M; Snyder, Joel S; Hannon, Erin E

    2016-11-01

    Children interact with and learn about all types of sound sources, including dogs, bells, trains, and human beings. Although it is clear that knowledge of semantic categories for everyday sights and sounds develops during childhood, there are very few studies examining how children use this knowledge to make sense of auditory scenes. We used a change deafness paradigm and an object-encoding task to investigate how children (6, 8, and 10 years of age) and adults process auditory scenes composed of everyday sounds (e.g., human voices, animal calls, environmental sounds, and musical instruments). Results indicated that although change deafness was present and robust at all ages, listeners improved at detecting changes with age. All listeners were less sensitive to changes within the same semantic category than to small acoustic changes, suggesting that, regardless of age, listeners relied heavily on semantic category knowledge to detect changes. Furthermore, all listeners showed less change deafness when they correctly encoded change-relevant objects (i.e., when they remembered hearing the changing object during the task). Finally, we found that all listeners were better at encoding human voices and were more sensitive to detecting changes involving the human voice. Despite poorer overall performance compared with adults, children detect changes in complex auditory scenes much like adults, using high-level knowledge about auditory objects to guide processing, with special attention to the human voice. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. Transient perceptual neglect: visual working memory load affects conscious object processing.

    PubMed

    Emrich, Stephen M; Burianová, Hana; Ferber, Susanne

    2011-10-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) is a capacity-limited cognitive resource that plays an important role in complex cognitive behaviors. Recent studies indicate that regions subserving VWM may play a role in the perception and recognition of visual objects, suggesting that conscious object perception may depend on the same cognitive and neural architecture that supports the maintenance of visual object information. In the present study, we examined this question by testing object processing under a concurrent VWM load. Under a high VWM load, recognition was impaired for objects presented in the left visual field, in particular when two objects were presented simultaneously. Multivariate fMRI revealed that two independent but partially overlapping networks of brain regions contribute to object recognition. The first network consisted of regions involved in VWM encoding and maintenance. Importantly, these regions were also sensitive to object load. The second network comprised regions of the ventral temporal lobes traditionally associated with object recognition. Importantly, activation in both networks predicted object recognition performance. These results indicate that information processing in regions that mediate VWM may be critical to conscious visual perception. Moreover, the observation of a hemifield asymmetry in object recognition performance has important theoretical and clinical significance for the study of visual neglect.

  16. Safe Operations of Unmanned Systems for Reconnaissance in Complex Environments Army Technology Objective (SOURCE ATO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kott, Norbert J., III; Wellfare, Mike; van Lierop, Tracy K.; Mottern, Edward

    2011-05-01

    This paper examines the systems, hardware, and software engineering efforts required to overcome the challenges of operating autonomously around dynamic objects in complex environments. To detect these dynamic objects, the SOURCE ATO will utilize ARL/GDRS developed moving obstacle detection algorithms that will run on the Autonomous Navigation System (ANS) hardware.1 These algorithms use data from multiple sensors including laser detection and ranging (LADAR), Electro-optic, and Millimeter-Wave Radar (MMWR) to produce detections. This limits erroneous identifications that occur when using only one sensor. This paper describes co-development of Safe Operation Technologies between the SOURCE ATO and the ANS development program. This approach allows a more rapid development cycle, which will enable both current and future ground combat vehicle systems the flexibility to readily adopt emerging software, process hardware, and sensor technologies.

  17. Reentrant processing mediates object substitution masking: comment on Põder (2013).

    PubMed

    Di Lollo, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Object-substitution masking (OSM) occurs when a target stimulus and a surrounding mask are displayed briefly together, and the display then continues with the mask alone. Target identification is accurate when the stimuli co-terminate but is progressively impaired as the duration of the trailing mask is increased. In reentrant accounts, OSM is said to arise from iterative exchanges between brain regions connected by two-way pathways. In an alternative account, OSM is explained on the basis of exclusively feed-forward processes, without recourse to reentry. Here I show that the feed-forward account runs afoul of the extant phenomenological, behavioral, brain-imaging, and electrophysiological evidence. Further, the feed-forward assumption that masking occurs when attention finds a degraded target is shown to be entirely ad hoc. In contrast, the evidence is uniformly consistent with a reentrant-processing account of OSM.

  18. Interpolation processes in object perception: reply to Anderson (2007).

    PubMed

    Kellman, Philip J; Garrigan, Patrick; Shipley, Thomas F; Keane, Brian P

    2007-04-01

    P. J. Kellman, P. Garrigan, & T. F. Shipley presented a theory of 3-D interpolation in object perception. Along with results from many researchers, this work supports an emerging picture of how the visual system connects separate visible fragments to form objects. In his commentary, B. L. Anderson challenges parts of that view, especially the idea of a common underlying interpolation component in modal and amodal completion (the identity hypothesis). Here the authors analyze Anderson's evidence and argue that he neither provides any reason to abandon the identity hypothesis nor offers a viable alternative theory. The authors offer demonstrations and analyses indicating that interpolated contours can appear modally despite absence of the luminance relations, occlusion geometry, and surface attachment that Anderson claims to be necessary. The authors elaborate crossing interpolations as key cases in which modal and amodal appearance must be consequences of interpolation. Finally, the authors dispute Anderson's assertion that vision researchers are misguided in using objective performance methods, and they argue that his challenges to relatability fail because contour and surface processes, as well as local and global influences, have been distinguished experimentally. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. [Body image as a process or object and body satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Zarek, Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    This work focused on categorization of elements of body image viewed as an object or process, as well as on the relationship between body satisfaction and manner of perceiving the body. The study was carried out in 177 subjects aged 19 to 53 years (148 females and 29 males). Body image was measured with the Body Image Questionnaire based on the Body Cathexis Scale of P.F. Secord and S.J. Jourard. Participation was anonymous. The procedure of attributing an element of the body to the function scale or body parts scale was based on the method described by S. Franzoi. Elements of body image recognized as body parts were characterized in the context of appearance (static object), while elements of body image recognized as body functions were considered in the context of operation (dynamic process). This relationship, however, was not symmetrical as elements of the body not characterized as body functions could also be evaluated in the context of operation. The level of body satisfaction was associated with perception of an element of the body in the aspect of appearance or operation, whereas its perception as body part or body function was of lesser importance.

  20. Using the data quality objectives process in risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency`s Quality Assurance Management Staff has developed a systematic process, the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process, as an important tool for assisting project managers and planners in determining the type, quantity, and quality of environmental data sufficient for environmental decision-making. This information brief presents the basic concepts of, and information requirements for using the DQO process to plan the collection of the necessary environmental data, to support the performance of human health risk assessments under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. The goal of the DQO process is to identify the type, quality, and quantity of data required to support remedial action decisions which are based on risk assessment and its associated uncertainties. The DQO process consists of a number of discrete steps. These steps include a statement of the problem and the decision to be made, identifying inputs to the decision, developing a decision rule, and optimizing the design for data collection. In defining the data for input into the decision, a Site Conceptual Exposure Model should be developed to identify the existing or potential complete exposure pathways. To determine the data quality for use din the risk assessment, the DQO team must assist the decision-maker to define the acceptable level of uncertainty for making site-specific decisions. To determine the quantity of data needed, the DQO team utilizes the established target cleanup level, previously collected data and variability, and the acceptable errors. The results of the DQO process are qualitative and quantitative statements that define the scope of risk assessment data to be collected to support a defensible site risk management decision.

  1. Complexity constrained rate-distortion optimization of sign language video using an objective intelligibility metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciaramello, Frank M.; Hemami, Sheila S.

    2008-01-01

    Sign language users are eager for the freedom and convenience of video communication over cellular devices. Compression of sign language video in this setting offers unique challenges. The low bitrates available make encoding decisions extremely important, while the power constraints of the device limit the encoder complexity. The ultimate goal is to maximize the intelligibility of the conversation given the rate-constrained cellular channel and power constrained encoding device. This paper uses an objective measure of intelligibility, based on subjective testing with members of the Deaf community, for rate-distortion optimization of sign language video within the H.264 framework. Performance bounds are established by using the intelligibility metric in a Lagrangian cost function along with a trellis search to make optimal mode and quantizer decisions for each macroblock. The optimal QP values are analyzed and the unique structure of sign language is exploited in order to reduce complexity by three orders of magnitude relative to the trellis search technique with no loss in rate-distortion performance. Further reductions in complexity are made by eliminating rarely occuring modes in the encoding process. The low complexity SL optimization technique increases the measured intelligibility up to 3.5 dB, at fixed rates, and reduces rate by as much as 60% at fixed levels of intelligibility with respect to a rate control algorithm designed for aesthetic distortion as measured by MSE.

  2. A real-time fault diagnosis methodology of complex systems using object-oriented Bayesian networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Baoping; Liu, Hanlin; Xie, Min

    2016-12-01

    Bayesian network (BN) is a commonly used tool in probabilistic reasoning of uncertainty in industrial processes, but it requires modeling of large and complex systems, in situations such as fault diagnosis and reliability evaluation. Motivated by reduction of the overall complexities of BNs for fault diagnosis, and the reporting of faults that immediately occur, a real-time fault diagnosis methodology of complex systems with repetitive structures is proposed using object-oriented Bayesian networks (OOBNs). The modeling methodology consists of two main phases: an off-line OOBN construction phase and an on-line fault diagnosis phase. In the off-line phase, sensor historical data and expert knowledge are collected and processed to determine the faults and symptoms, and OOBN-based fault diagnosis models are developed subsequently. In the on-line phase, operator experience and sensor real-time data are placed in the OOBNs to perform the fault diagnosis. According to engineering experience, the judgment rules are defined to obtain the fault diagnosis results.

  3. Tracker: Image-Processing and Object-Tracking System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimek, Robert B.; Wright, Theodore W.

    1999-01-01

    Tracker is an object-tracking and image-processing program designed and developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to help with the analysis of images generated by microgravity combustion and fluid physics experiments. Experiments are often recorded on film or videotape for analysis later. Tracker automates the process of examining each frame of the recorded experiment, performing image-processing operations to bring out the desired detail, and recording the positions of the objects of interest. It can load sequences of images from disk files or acquire images (via a frame grabber) from film transports, videotape, laser disks, or a live camera. Tracker controls the image source to automatically advance to the next frame. It can employ a large array of image-processing operations to enhance the detail of the acquired images and can analyze an arbitrarily large number of objects simultaneously. Several different tracking algorithms are available, including conventional threshold and correlation-based techniques, and more esoteric procedures such as "snake" tracking and automated recognition of character data in the image. The Tracker software was written to be operated by researchers, thus every attempt was made to make the software as user friendly and self-explanatory as possible. Tracker is used by most of the microgravity combustion and fluid physics experiments performed by Lewis, and by visiting researchers. This includes experiments performed on the space shuttles, Mir, sounding rockets, zero-g research airplanes, drop towers, and ground-based laboratories. This software automates the analysis of the flame or liquid s physical parameters such as position, velocity, acceleration, size, shape, intensity characteristics, color, and centroid, as well as a number of other measurements. It can perform these operations on multiple objects simultaneously. Another key feature of Tracker is that it performs optical character recognition (OCR). This feature is useful in

  4. A reevaluation of the electrophysiological correlates of expert object processing.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lisa S; Tanaka, James W; Sheinberg, David L; Curran, Tim

    2006-09-01

    Subordinate-level object processing is regarded as a hallmark of perceptual expertise. However, the relative contribution of subordinate- and basic-level category experience in the acquisition of perceptual expertise has not been clearly delineated. In this study, participants learned to classify wading birds and owls at either the basic (e.g., wading bird, owl) or the subordinate (e.g., egret, snowy owl) level. After 6 days of training, behavioral results showed that subordinate-level but not basic-level training improved subordinate discrimination of trained exemplars, novel exemplars, and exemplars from novel species. Event-related potentials indicated that both basic- and subordinate-level training enhanced the early N170 component, but only subordinate-level training amplified the later N250 component. These results are consistent with models positing separate basic and subordinate learning mechanisms, and, contrary to perspectives attempting to explain visual expertise solely in terms of subordinate-level processing, suggest that expertise enhances neural responses of both basic and subordinate processing.

  5. Objective characterization of airway dimensions using image processing

    PubMed Central

    Pepper, Victoria K.; Francom, Christian; Best, Cameron A.; Onwuka, Ekene; King, Nakesha; Heuer, Eric; Mahler, Nathan; Grischkan, Jonathan; Breuer, Christopher K.; Chiang, Tendy

    2017-01-01

    Objectives With the evolution of medical and surgical management for pediatric airway disorders, the development of easily translated techniques of measuring airway dimensions can improve the quantification of outcomes of these interventions. We have developed a technique that improves the ability to characterize endoscopic airway dimensions using common bronchoscopic equipment and an open-source image-processing platform. Methods We validated our technique of Endoscopic Airway Measurement (EAM) using optical instruments in simulation tracheas. We then evaluated EAM in a large animal model (Ovis aries, n = 5), comparing tracheal dimensions obtained with EAM to measurements obtained via 3-D fluoroscopic reconstruction. The animal then underwent resection of the measured segment, and direct measurement of this segment was performed and compared to radiographic measurements and those obtained using EAM. Results The simulation tracheas had a direct measurement of 13.6, 18.5, and 24.2 mm in diameter. The mean difference of diameter in simulation tracheas between direct measurements and measurements obtained using EAM was 0.70 ± 0.57 mm. The excised ovine tracheas had an average diameter of 18.54 ± 0.68 mm. The percent difference in diameter obtained from EAM and from 3-D fluoroscopic reconstruction when compared to measurement of the excised tracheal segment was 4.98 ± 2.43% and 10.74 ± 4.07% respectively. Comparison of these three measurements (EAM, measurement of resected trachea, 3-D fluoroscopic reconstruction) with repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated no statistical significance. Conclusions Endoscopic airway measurement (EAM) provides equivalent measurements of the airway with the improved versatility of measuring non-circular and multi-level dimensions. Using optical bronchoscopic instruments and open-source image-processing software, our data supports preclinical and clinical translation of an accessible technique to provide objective quantification of

  6. Giordano Bruno, the June 1975 meteoroid storm, Encke, and other Taurid Complex objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, Jack B.

    1993-08-01

    The possibility that the Giordano Bruno and Tunguska events, and the June 1975 meteoroid storm all had a common source is explored. These events are argued to be part of a larger complex of objects that range in size from millimeters to kilometers in diameters. Smaller objects may be derived from Taurid Complex objects, but tend to lose their identity as their orbits change in response to forces related to the Poynting-Robertson effect, solar wind pressure, and other nongravitational effects. Objects which produce fireballs and airwaves in the earth's atmosphere, impact flashes on the moon, and most meteorite falls do not occur in late June and are, therefore, not members of the Taurid Complex. The Taurid Complex has been derived from low-strength and low-density objects, i.e., comets, but inclusions or crusts of higher density cannot be ruled out.

  7. Age-related impairment in a complex object discrimination task that engages perirhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, L.; Cardoza, J. A.; Barense, M. D.; Kawa, K. H.; Walletin-Flores, J.; Arnold, W. T.; Alexander, G. E.

    2014-01-01

    Previous lesion studies have shown compromised complex object discrimination in rats, monkeys and human patients with damage to the perirhinal cortical region (PRC) of the medial temporal lobe. These findings support the notion that the PRC is involved in object discrimination when pairs of objects have a high degree of overlapping features but not when object discrimination can be resolved on the basis of a single feature (e.g., size or color). Recent studies have demonstrated age-related functional changes to the PRC in animals (rats and monkeys) resulting in impaired complex object discrimination and object recognition. To date, no studies have compared younger and older humans using paradigms previously shown to engage the PRC. To investigate the influence of age on complex object discrimination in humans, the present study used an object matching paradigm for blob-like objects that have previously been shown to recruit the PRC. Difficulty was manipulated by varying the number of overlapping features between objects. Functional MRI data was acquired to determine the involvement of the PRC in the two groups during complex object discrimination. Results indicated that while young and older adults performed similarly on the easy version of the task, most older adults were impaired relative to young participants when the number of overlapping features increased. fMRI results suggest that older adults do not engage bilateral anterior PRC to the same extent as young adults. Specifically, complex object matching performance in older adults was predicted by the degree to which they engage left anterior PRC. These results provide evidence for human age-related changes in PRC function that impact complex object discrimination. PMID:22987676

  8. Age-related impairment in a complex object discrimination task that engages perirhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ryan, L; Cardoza, J A; Barense, M D; Kawa, K H; Wallentin-Flores, J; Arnold, W T; Alexander, G E

    2012-10-01

    Previous lesion studies have shown compromised complex object discrimination in rats, monkeys, and human patients with damage to the perirhinal cortical region (PRC) of the medial temporal lobe. These findings support the notion that the PRC is involved in object discrimination when pairs of objects have a high degree of overlapping features but not when object discrimination can be resolved on the basis of a single feature (e.g., size or color). Recent studies have demonstrated age-related functional changes to the PRC in animals (rats and monkeys) resulting in impaired complex object discrimination and object recognition. To date, no studies have compared younger and older humans using paradigms previously shown to engage the PRC. To investigate the influence of age on complex object discrimination in humans, the present study used an object matching paradigm for blob-like objects that have previously been shown to recruit the PRC. Difficulty was manipulated by varying the number of overlapping features between objects. Functional MRI data was acquired to determine the involvement of the PRC in the two groups during complex object discrimination. Results indicated that while young and older adults performed similarly on the easy version of the task, most older adults were impaired relative to young participants when the number of overlapping features increased. fMRI results suggest that older adults do not engage bilateral anterior PRC to the same extent as young adults. Specifically, complex object matching performance in older adults was predicted by the degree to which they engage left anterior PRC. These results provide evidence for human age-related changes in PRC function that impact complex object discrimination. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The effect of object state-changes on event processing: Do objects compete with themselves?

    PubMed Central

    Hindy, Nicholas C.; Altmann, Gerry T.M.; Kalenik, Emily; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    When an object is described as changing state during an event, do the representations of those states compete? The distinct states they represent cannot co-exist at any one moment in time, yet each representation must be retrievable at the cost of suppressing the other possible object states. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging of human participants to test whether such competition does occur, and whether this competition between object states recruits brain areas sensitive to other forms of conflict. In Experiment 1, the same object was changed either substantially or minimally by one of two actions. In Experiment 2, the same action either substantially or minimally changed one of two objects. On a subject-specific basis, we identified voxels most responsive to conflict in a Stroop color-word interference task. Voxels in left posterior ventrolateral prefrontal cortex most responsive to Stroop conflict were also responsive to our object state-change manipulation, and were not responsive to the imageability of the described action. In contrast, voxels in left middle frontal gyrus responsive to Stroop conflict were not responsive even to language, and voxels in left middle temporal gyrus that were responsive to language and imageability were not responsive to object state-change. Results suggest that, when representing object state-change, multiple incompatible representations of an object compete, and the greater the difference between the initial state and the end state of an object, the greater the conflict. PMID:22539841

  10. Active Monitoring Complex-Envelope Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, R.

    2011-12-01

    Pseudo-random 3-D signal transmission followed by quadrature signal processing significantly enhances seismic Active Monitoring (AM). The algorithm produces complex-envelope seismograms consisting of the dual time series of instantaneous amplitude and phase. Minimum-standard-deviation signal arrival detection and timing from coherent instantaneous-phase seismogram ensembles yields signal time errors inversely proportional to frequency and signal-to-noise ratio. In particular, application to piezo-electric acoustic cross well monitoring as in SAFOD experiments should result in nano-second multiple-signal detection and timing precision. The method is applicable to all types (seismic, EM, acoustic) of AM.

  11. Multisensory cortical processing of object shape and its relation to mental imagery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minming; Weisser, Valerie D; Stilla, Randall; Prather, S C; Sathian, K

    2004-06-01

    Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the multisensory processing of object shape in the human cerebral cortex and explored the role of mental imagery in such processing. Regions active bilaterally during both visual and haptic shape perception, relative to texture perception in the respective modality, included parts of the superior parietal gyrus, the anterior intraparietal sulcus, and the lateral occipital complex. Of these bimodal regions, the lateral occipital complexes preferred visual over haptic stimuli, whereas the parietal areas preferred haptic over visual stimuli. Whereas most subjects reported little haptic imagery during visual shape perception, experiences of visual imagery during haptic shape perception were common. Across subjects, ratings of the vividness of visual imagery strongly predicted the amount of haptic shape-selective activity in the right, but not in the left, lateral occipital complex. Thus, visual imagery appears to contribute to activation of some, but not all, visual cortical areas during haptic perception.

  12. 36 CFR 219.56 - Objection time periods and process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... notice of all objections in the applicable newspaper of record and post the notice online. (g) Response... to objections or to participate in discussions with the parties. The reviewing officer must notify...

  13. 36 CFR 219.56 - Objection time periods and process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... notice of all objections in the applicable newspaper of record and post the notice online. (g) Response... to objections or to participate in discussions with the parties. The reviewing officer must notify...

  14. 36 CFR 219.56 - Objection time periods and process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... notice of all objections in the applicable newspaper of record and post the notice online. (g) Response... to objections or to participate in discussions with the parties. The reviewing officer must notify...

  15. Knowledge Judgments and Object Memory Processes in Early Childhood: Support for the Dual Criterion Account of Object Nameability Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipowski, Stacy L.; Merriman, William E.

    2011-01-01

    According to the dual criterion account of early linguistic judgment (Merriman & Lipko, 2008), preschool-aged children who possess more efficient object memory processes should also be more accurate judges of whether various objects have known names. In support of this claim, both the accuracy of object recognition and the speed of object…

  16. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Filardo, G.

    1990-10-23

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70 C and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution. 1 fig.

  17. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Filardo, Giuseppe

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70.degree. C. and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution.

  18. Exploratory study of complexant concentrate waste processing

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, G.J.; Bray, L.A.; Kurath, D.E.; Morrey, J.R.; Swanson, J.L.; Wester, D.W.

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for Westinghouse Hanford Company, was to determine the effect of applying advanced chemical separations technologies to the processing and disposal of high-level wastes (HLW) stored in underground tanks. The major goals of this study were to determine (1) if the wastes can be partitioned into a small volume of HLW plus a large volume of low-level waste (LLW), and (2) if the activity in the LLW can be lowered enough to meet NRC Class LLW criteria. This report presents the results obtained in a brief scouting study of various processes for separating radionuclides from Hanford complexant concentrate (CC) waste.

  19. The neural basis of precise visual short-term memory for complex recognisable objects.

    PubMed

    Veldsman, Michele; Mitchell, Daniel J; Cusack, Rhodri

    2017-07-17

    Recent evidence suggests that visual short-term memory (VSTM) capacity estimated using simple objects, such as colours and oriented bars, may not generalise well to more naturalistic stimuli. More visual detail can be stored in VSTM when complex, recognisable objects are maintained compared to simple objects. It is not yet known if it is recognisability that enhances memory precision, nor whether maintenance of recognisable objects is achieved with the same network of brain regions supporting maintenance of simple objects. We used a novel stimulus generation method to parametrically warp photographic images along a continuum, allowing separate estimation of the precision of memory representations and the number of items retained. The stimulus generation method was also designed to create unrecognisable, though perceptually matched, stimuli, to investigate the impact of recognisability on VSTM. We adapted the widely-used change detection and continuous report paradigms for use with complex, photographic images. Across three functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments, we demonstrated greater precision for recognisable objects in VSTM compared to unrecognisable objects. This clear behavioural advantage was not the result of recruitment of additional brain regions, or of stronger mean activity within the core network. Representational similarity analysis revealed greater variability across item repetitions in the representations of recognisable, compared to unrecognisable complex objects. We therefore propose that a richer range of neural representations support VSTM for complex recognisable objects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Software Process Assurance for Complex Electronics (SPACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plastow, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Complex Electronics (CE) are now programmed to perform tasks that were previously handled in software, such as communication protocols. Many of the methods used to develop software bare a close resemblance to CE development. For instance, Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) can have over a million logic gates while system-on-chip (SOC) devices can combine a microprocessor, input and output channels, and sometimes an FPGA for programmability. With this increased intricacy, the possibility of software-like bugs such as incorrect design, logic, and unexpected interactions within the logic is great. Since CE devices are obscuring the hardware/software boundary, we propose that mature software methodologies may be utilized with slight modifications in the development of these devices. Software Process Assurance for Complex Electronics (SPACE) is a research project that looks at using standardized S/W Assurance/Engineering practices to provide an assurance framework for development activities. Tools such as checklists, best practices and techniques can be used to detect missing requirements and bugs earlier in the development cycle creating a development process for CE that will be more easily maintained, consistent and configurable based on the device used.

  1. Software Process Assurance for Complex Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plastow, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Complex Electronics (CE) now perform tasks that were previously handled in software, such as communication protocols. Many methods used to develop software bare a close resemblance to CE development. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) can have over a million logic gates while system-on-chip (SOC) devices can combine a microprocessor, input and output channels, and sometimes an FPGA for programmability. With this increased intricacy, the possibility of software-like bugs such as incorrect design, logic, and unexpected interactions within the logic is great. With CE devices obscuring the hardware/software boundary, we propose that mature software methodologies may be utilized with slight modifications in the development of these devices. Software Process Assurance for Complex Electronics (SPACE) is a research project that used standardized S/W Assurance/Engineering practices to provide an assurance framework for development activities. Tools such as checklists, best practices and techniques were used to detect missing requirements and bugs earlier in the development cycle creating a development process for CE that was more easily maintained, consistent and configurable based on the device used.

  2. Mirror-image sensitivity and invariance in object and scene processing pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dilks, Daniel D.; Julian, Joshua B.; Kubilius, Jonas; Spelke, Elizabeth S.; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Electrophysiological and behavioral studies in many species have demonstrated mirror-image confusion for objects, perhaps because many objects are vertically symmetric (e.g., a cup is the same cup when seen in left or right profile). In contrast, the navigability of a scene changes when it is mirror reversed, and behavioral studies reveal high sensitivity to this change. Thus, we predicted that representations in object-selective cortex will be unaffected by mirror reversals, whereas representations in scene-selective cortex will be sensitive to such reversals. To test this hypothesis, we ran an event-related functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) adaptation experiment in human adults. Consistent with our prediction, we found tolerance to mirror reversals in one object-selective region, the posterior fusiform sulcus (pFs), and a strong sensitivity to these reversals in two scene-selective regions, the transverse occipital sulcus (TOS) and the retrosplenial complex (RSC). However, a more posterior object-selective region, the lateral occipital sulcus (LO), showed sensitivity to mirror reversals, suggesting that the sense information that distinguishes mirror images is represented at earlier stages in the object processing hierarchy. Moreover, one scene-selective region (the parahippocampal place area – PPA) was tolerant to mirror reversals. The last finding challenges the hypothesis that the PPA is involved in navigation and reorientation, and suggests instead that scenes, like objects, are processed by distinct pathways guiding recognition and action. PMID:21813690

  3. Mirror-image sensitivity and invariance in object and scene processing pathways.

    PubMed

    Dilks, Daniel D; Julian, Joshua B; Kubilius, Jonas; Spelke, Elizabeth S; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2011-08-03

    Electrophysiological and behavioral studies in many species have demonstrated mirror-image confusion for objects, perhaps because many objects are vertically symmetric (e.g., a cup is the same cup when seen in left or right profile). In contrast, the navigability of a scene changes when it is mirror reversed, and behavioral studies reveal high sensitivity to this change. Thus, we predicted that representations in object-selective cortex will be unaffected by mirror reversals, whereas representations in scene-selective cortex will be sensitive to such reversals. To test this hypothesis, we ran an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation experiment in human adults. Consistent with our prediction, we found tolerance to mirror reversals in one object-selective region, the posterior fusiform sulcus, and a strong sensitivity to these reversals in two scene-selective regions, the transverse occipital sulcus and the retrosplenial complex. However, a more posterior object-selective region, the lateral occipital sulcus, showed sensitivity to mirror reversals, suggesting that the sense information that distinguishes mirror images is represented at earlier stages in the object-processing hierarchy. Moreover, one scene-selective region (the parahippocampal place area or PPA) was tolerant to mirror reversals. This last finding challenges the hypothesis that the PPA is involved in navigation and reorientation and suggests instead that scenes, like objects, are processed by distinct pathways guiding recognition and action.

  4. The influence of degree of expertise and objective task complexity on perceived task complexity and performance.

    PubMed

    Haerem, Thorvald; Rau, Devaki

    2007-09-01

    Research on expertise has shown that nonexperts may sometimes outperform experts. Some researchers have suggested that superior performance by experts depends on the match between the experts' cognition and the demands of the task. The authors explored this issue using a quasi-experiment set in an organization. They examined how 3 sets of similar tasks that differ in their type of complexity can lead to differences in task perceptions and performance among experts, intermediates, and novices. The results suggest that experts and novices pay attention to different aspects of a task and that this affects both their perceptions of task complexity (i.e., task analyzability and variability) and their performance on the task. (c) 2007 APA.

  5. Objective characterization of airway dimensions using image processing.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Victoria K; Francom, Christian; Best, Cameron A; Onwuka, Ekene; King, Nakesha; Heuer, Eric; Mahler, Nathan; Grischkan, Jonathan; Breuer, Christopher K; Chiang, Tendy

    2016-12-01

    With the evolution of medical and surgical management for pediatric airway disorders, the development of easily translated techniques of measuring airway dimensions can improve the quantification of outcomes of these interventions. We have developed a technique that improves the ability to characterize endoscopic airway dimensions using common bronchoscopic equipment and an open-source image-processing platform. We validated our technique of Endoscopic Airway Measurement (EAM) using optical instruments in simulation tracheas. We then evaluated EAM in a large animal model (Ovis aries, n = 5), comparing tracheal dimensions obtained with EAM to measurements obtained via 3-D fluoroscopic reconstruction. The animal then underwent resection of the measured segment, and direct measurement of this segment was performed and compared to radiographic measurements and those obtained using EAM. The simulation tracheas had a direct measurement of 13.6, 18.5, and 24.2 mm in diameter. The mean difference of diameter in simulation tracheas between direct measurements and measurements obtained using EAM was 0.70 ± 0.57 mm. The excised ovine tracheas had an average diameter of 18.54 ± 0.68 mm. The percent difference in diameter obtained from EAM and from 3-D fluoroscopic reconstruction when compared to measurement of the excised tracheal segment was 4.98 ± 2.43% and 10.74 ± 4.07% respectively. Comparison of these three measurements (EAM, measurement of resected trachea, 3-D fluoroscopic reconstruction) with repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated no statistical significance. Endoscopic airway measurement (EAM) provides equivalent measurements of the airway with the improved versatility of measuring non-circular and multi-level dimensions. Using optical bronchoscopic instruments and open-source image-processing software, our data supports preclinical and clinical translation of an accessible technique to provide objective quantification of airway diameter. Copyright

  6. Interpolation Processes in Object Perception: Reply to Anderson (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellman, Philip J.; Garrigan, Patrick; Shipley, Thomas F.; Keane, Brian P.

    2007-01-01

    P. J. Kellman, P. Garrigan, & T. F. Shipley presented a theory of 3-D interpolation in object perception. Along with results from many researchers, this work supports an emerging picture of how the visual system connects separate visible fragments to form objects. In his commentary, B. L. Anderson challenges parts of that view, especially the idea…

  7. Knowledge and Cognitive Process Dimensions of Technology Teachers' Lesson Objectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathumbu, David; Rauscher, Willem; Braun, Max

    2014-01-01

    A clearly stated lesson objective is considered an essential component of a well-planned lesson. Many teachers of Technology, a relatively new subject in South African schools, teach Technology with rather limited training both in content and methodological approaches. This study sought to investigate and classify lesson objectives framed or…

  8. On the existence of near-Earth-object meteoroid complexes producing meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodriguez, J.; Madiedo, J.; Williams, I.

    2014-07-01

    It is generally thought that meteorites are formed as a result of collisions within the main belt of asteroids [1]. They are delivered onto Earth-crossing orbits because of the effects of orbital resonances, primarily with Jupiter. About 15 meteorites are known where their passage through the atmosphere was observed and recorded, allowing the parameters of the pre-encounter orbit to be derived [2]. The cosmic-ray-exposure ages (CREAs) are suggesting that most meteorites have been exposed to cosmic rays for tens of millions of years (Myrs) [3], re-enforcing the belief that the process of modifying the orbit from being near-circular in the main belt to highly elliptical as an Earth-crossing orbit was a gradual process like the effects of resonance. However, there is growing evidence that some meteorite could originate directly from the near-Earth-object (NEO) population. A good example of this is the recent discovery of rare primitive groups in the Antarctic, an example being Elephant Moraine (EET) 96026: a C4/5 carbonaceous chondrite with a measured cosmic ray exposure age of only 0.28 Ma [4]. Here, we focus on recent dynamic links that have been established between meteorite-dropping bolides and NEOs that support the idea of short-life meteoroid streams that can generate meteoroids on Earth. The fact that such streams can exist allows rocky material from potentially-hazardous asteroids (PHA) to be sampled and investigated in the laboratory. The existence of meteoroid streams capable of producing meteorites has been proposed following the determination of accurate meteoroid orbits of fireballs obtained by the Canadian Meteorite Observation and Recovery Project (MORP) [5]. Some asteroids in the Earth's vicinity are undergoing both dynamical and collisional evolution on very short timescales [6]. Many of these objects are crumbly bodies that originated from the collisions between main-belt asteroids during their life-time. An obvious method of forming these complexes

  9. Faster than the speed of rejection: Object identification processes during visual search for multiple targets

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, Hayward J.; Walenchok, Stephen C.; Houpt, Joseph W.; Hout, Michael C.; Goldinger, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    When engaged in a visual search for two targets, participants are slower and less accurate in their responses, relative to their performance when searching for singular targets. Previous work on this “dual-target cost” has primarily focused on the breakdown of attention guidance when looking for two items. Here, we investigated how object identification processes are affected by dual-target search. Our goal was to chart the speed at which distractors could be rejected, in order to assess whether dual-target search impairs object identification. To do so, we examined the capacity coefficient, which measures the speed at which decisions can be made, and provides a baseline of parallel performance against which to compare. We found that participants could search at or above this baseline, suggesting that dual-target search does not impair object identification abilities. We also found substantial differences in performance when participants were asked to search for simple versus complex images. Somewhat paradoxically, participants were able to reject complex images more rapidly than simple images. We suggest that this reflects the greater number of features that can be used to identify complex images, a finding that has important consequences for understanding object identification in visual search more generally. PMID:25938253

  10. Aridity and decomposition processes in complex landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Alessandro; Nyman, Petter

    2015-04-01

    Decomposition of organic matter is a key biogeochemical process contributing to nutrient cycles, carbon fluxes and soil development. The activity of decomposers depends on microclimate, with temperature and rainfall being major drivers. In complex terrain the fine-scale variation in microclimate (and hence water availability) as a result of slope orientation is caused by differences in incoming radiation and surface temperature. Aridity, measured as the long-term balance between net radiation and rainfall, is a metric that can be used to represent variations in water availability within the landscape. Since aridity metrics can be obtained at fine spatial scales, they could theoretically be used to investigate how decomposition processes vary across complex landscapes. In this study, four research sites were selected in tall open sclerophyll forest along a aridity gradient (Budyko dryness index ranging from 1.56 -2.22) where microclimate, litter moisture and soil moisture were monitored continuously for one year. Litter bags were packed to estimate decomposition rates (k) using leaves of a tree species not present in the study area (Eucalyptus globulus) in order to avoid home-field advantage effects. Litter mass loss was measured to assess the activity of macro-decomposers (6mm litter bag mesh size), meso-decomposers (1 mm mesh), microbes above-ground (0.2 mm mesh) and microbes below-ground (2 cm depth, 0.2 mm mesh). Four replicates for each set of bags were installed at each site and bags were collected at 1, 2, 4, 7 and 12 months since installation. We first tested whether differences in microclimate due to slope orientation have significant effects on decomposition processes. Then the dryness index was related to decomposition rates to evaluate if small-scale variation in decomposition can be predicted using readily available information on rainfall and radiation. Decomposition rates (k), calculated fitting single pool negative exponential models, generally

  11. Sequential processes in image generation: An objective measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosslyn, S. M.; Cave, C. B.; Provost, D. A.

    1985-10-01

    Are visual mental images of objects created a part at a time? This paper reports an new objective technique that was developed to answer questions such as this one. The results of using this technique indicated that images of upper case letters are formed segment by segment, in roughly the order in which most people draw the letters. These results were shown not to be artifact of how people scan over images once they are formed, and could not have been due to experimenter-expectancy effects. In addition, the results indicated that subjective estimates of mental image generation time are quite close to those obtained using objective measures.

  12. Digital image processing in the SECURE concealed-object detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven W.

    1993-04-01

    A new technology has been developed for detecting explosives and other dangerous objects concealed under persons' clothing. The 'Subambient Exposure, Computer Utilized Reflected Energy' (SECURE) method uses a very low level of back-scattered x-rays in conjunction with digital image processing to produce an image of the person and any concealed objects. Image processing algorithms, used in the system are directed at presenting information to a human operator in the best possible manner for foreign object detection. These algorithms are viewed as being near optimum, and additional development is probably not justified. Algorithm development is needed in the area of automatic threat detection. This has the potential of reducing the invasion of privacy associated with having a security operator view each image. It also has the potential of reducing the serious problem of operator complacency. In one approach, the new algorithm must (1) recognize and isolate objects in the image, (2) discriminate between concealed objects and human anatomy, and (3) discriminate between dangerous and benign concealed objects. The images produced with the SECURE technology are extremely noisy due to the low levels of radiation used. Any algorithm developed must perform well in this noisy environment. Execution of the algorithm must be accomplished in less than a few seconds. Hardware to implement the algorithm must be of a complexity and cost compatible with the commercial SECURE system.

  13. Improved multi-objective ant colony optimization algorithm and its application in complex reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinqing; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Dong; Zhu, Huijie; Zhang, Qing

    2013-09-01

    The problem of fault reasoning has aroused great concern in scientific and engineering fields. However, fault investigation and reasoning of complex system is not a simple reasoning decision-making problem. It has become a typical multi-constraint and multi-objective reticulate optimization decision-making problem under many influencing factors and constraints. So far, little research has been carried out in this field. This paper transforms the fault reasoning problem of complex system into a paths-searching problem starting from known symptoms to fault causes. Three optimization objectives are considered simultaneously: maximum probability of average fault, maximum average importance, and minimum average complexity of test. Under the constraints of both known symptoms and the causal relationship among different components, a multi-objective optimization mathematical model is set up, taking minimizing cost of fault reasoning as the target function. Since the problem is non-deterministic polynomial-hard(NP-hard), a modified multi-objective ant colony algorithm is proposed, in which a reachability matrix is set up to constrain the feasible search nodes of the ants and a new pseudo-random-proportional rule and a pheromone adjustment mechinism are constructed to balance conflicts between the optimization objectives. At last, a Pareto optimal set is acquired. Evaluation functions based on validity and tendency of reasoning paths are defined to optimize noninferior set, through which the final fault causes can be identified according to decision-making demands, thus realize fault reasoning of the multi-constraint and multi-objective complex system. Reasoning results demonstrate that the improved multi-objective ant colony optimization(IMACO) can realize reasoning and locating fault positions precisely by solving the multi-objective fault diagnosis model, which provides a new method to solve the problem of multi-constraint and multi-objective fault diagnosis and

  14. The perception of odor objects in everyday life: a review on the processing of odor mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Danguin, Thierry; Sinding, Charlotte; Romagny, Sébastien; El Mountassir, Fouzia; Atanasova, Boriana; Le Berre, Elodie; Le Bon, Anne-Marie; Coureaud, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Smelling monomolecular odors hardly ever occurs in everyday life, and the daily functioning of the sense of smell relies primarily on the processing of complex mixtures of volatiles that are present in the environment (e.g., emanating from food or conspecifics). Such processing allows for the instantaneous recognition and categorization of smells and also for the discrimination of odors among others to extract relevant information and to adapt efficiently in different contexts. The neurophysiological mechanisms underpinning this highly efficient analysis of complex mixtures of odorants is beginning to be unraveled and support the idea that olfaction, as vision and audition, relies on odor-objects encoding. This configural processing of odor mixtures, which is empirically subject to important applications in our societies (e.g., the art of perfumers, flavorists, and wine makers), has been scientifically studied only during the last decades. This processing depends on many individual factors, among which are the developmental stage, lifestyle, physiological and mood state, and cognitive skills; this processing also presents striking similarities between species. The present review gathers the recent findings, as observed in animals, healthy subjects, and/or individuals with affective disorders, supporting the perception of complex odor stimuli as odor objects. It also discusses peripheral to central processing, and cognitive and behavioral significance. Finally, this review highlights that the study of odor mixtures is an original window allowing for the investigation of daily olfaction and emphasizes the need for knowledge about the underlying biological processes, which appear to be crucial for our representation and adaptation to the chemical environment. PMID:24917831

  15. 36 CFR 218.10 - Objection time periods and process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Hazardous Fuel Reduction Projects Authorized by the Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 § 218.10... calendar day (11:59 p.m. in the time zone of the receiving office) for objections filed by electronic means...

  16. A Process for Transitioning to Object-Oriented Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-08-01

    A-1 vii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The use of object-oriented technology (OOT) to develop software is becoming...for future potential projects, and the risks inherent in evaluating any new technology are isolated. The primary audience for this document is software ...Transition to Enterprise-Based Use (A44) ES-2 1. INTRODUCTION 0 1.1 PURPOSE The use of object-oriented technology (OOT) in software development has become

  17. Fast processing of microscopic images using object-based extended depth of field.

    PubMed

    Intarapanich, Apichart; Kaewkamnerd, Saowaluck; Pannarut, Montri; Shaw, Philip J; Tongsima, Sissades

    2016-12-22

    Microscopic analysis requires that foreground objects of interest, e.g. cells, are in focus. In a typical microscopic specimen, the foreground objects may lie on different depths of field necessitating capture of multiple images taken at different focal planes. The extended depth of field (EDoF) technique is a computational method for merging images from different depths of field into a composite image with all foreground objects in focus. Composite images generated by EDoF can be applied in automated image processing and pattern recognition systems. However, current algorithms for EDoF are computationally intensive and impractical, especially for applications such as medical diagnosis where rapid sample turnaround is important. Since foreground objects typically constitute a minor part of an image, the EDoF technique could be made to work much faster if only foreground regions are processed to make the composite image. We propose a novel algorithm called object-based extended depths of field (OEDoF) to address this issue. The OEDoF algorithm consists of four major modules: 1) color conversion, 2) object region identification, 3) good contrast pixel identification and 4) detail merging. First, the algorithm employs color conversion to enhance contrast followed by identification of foreground pixels. A composite image is constructed using only these foreground pixels, which dramatically reduces the computational time. We used 250 images obtained from 45 specimens of confirmed malaria infections to test our proposed algorithm. The resulting composite images with all in-focus objects were produced using the proposed OEDoF algorithm. We measured the performance of OEDoF in terms of image clarity (quality) and processing time. The features of interest selected by the OEDoF algorithm are comparable in quality with equivalent regions in images processed by the state-of-the-art complex wavelet EDoF algorithm; however, OEDoF required four times less processing time. This

  18. The Effects of Visual Degradation on Attended Objects and the Ability to Process Unattended Objects within the Visual Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    objects, while other times attention may be devoted to a particular object, or even just a component within a particular object. This reflects the...appear distracting and can, at times , result in capturing attention . This suggests that visual processing occurs throughout the visual array, but it...events in the environment when they correspond to where their attention is focused (Wickens & Hollands, 2000). It appears that at any given time

  19. No Evidence for a Fixed Object Limit in Working Memory: Spatial Ensemble Representations Inflate Estimates of Working Memory Capacity for Complex Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Timothy F.; Alvarez, George A.

    2015-01-01

    A central question for models of visual working memory is whether the number of objects people can remember depends on object complexity. Some influential "slot" models of working memory capacity suggest that people always represent 3-4 objects and that only the fidelity with which these objects are represented is affected by object…

  20. No Evidence for a Fixed Object Limit in Working Memory: Spatial Ensemble Representations Inflate Estimates of Working Memory Capacity for Complex Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Timothy F.; Alvarez, George A.

    2015-01-01

    A central question for models of visual working memory is whether the number of objects people can remember depends on object complexity. Some influential "slot" models of working memory capacity suggest that people always represent 3-4 objects and that only the fidelity with which these objects are represented is affected by object…

  1. Random walk-based similarity measure method for patterns in complex object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shihu; Chen, Xiaozhou

    2017-04-01

    This paper discusses the similarity of the patterns in complex objects. The complex object is composed both of the attribute information of patterns and the relational information between patterns. Bearing in mind the specificity of complex object, a random walk-based similarity measurement method for patterns is constructed. In this method, the reachability of any two patterns with respect to the relational information is fully studied, and in the case of similarity of patterns with respect to the relational information can be calculated. On this bases, an integrated similarity measurement method is proposed, and algorithms 1 and 2 show the performed calculation procedure. One can find that this method makes full use of the attribute information and relational information. Finally, a synthetic example shows that our proposed similarity measurement method is validated.

  2. Dual tree complex wavelet transform based shadow detection and removal from moving objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Manish; Srivastava, Rajneesh K.; Khare, Ashish

    2014-02-01

    Presence of shadow degrades performance of any computer vision system as a number of shadow points are always misclassified as object points. Various algorithms for shadow detection and removal exist for still images but very few algorithms have been developed for moving objects. This paper introduces a new method for shadow detection and removal from moving object which is based on Dual tree complex wavelet transform. We have chosen Dual tree complex wavelet transform as it is shift invariant and have a better edge detection property as compared to real valued wavelet transform. In the present work, shadow detection and removal has been done by thresholding wavelet coefficients of Dual tree complex wavelet transform of difference of reference frame and the current frame. Standard deviation of wavelet coefficients is used as an optimal threshold. Results after visual and quantitative performance metrics computation shows that the proposed method for shadow detection and removal is better than other state-of-theart methods.

  3. Eye Movements and Processing Difficulty in Object Relative Clauses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staub, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that sentences containing object-extracted relative clauses (e.g., "The reporter that the senator attacked admitted the error") are more difficult to comprehend than sentences containing subject-extracted relative clauses (e.g., "The reporter that attacked the senator admitted the error"). Two major accounts of this phenomenon…

  4. Plastic modifications induced by object recognition memory processing

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Julia Rosauro; Cammarota, Martín; Gruart, Agnès; Izquierdo, Iván; Delgado-García, José María

    2010-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) phenomenon is widely accepted as a cellular model of memory consolidation. Object recognition (OR) is a particularly useful way of studying declarative memory in rodents because it makes use of their innate preference for novel over familiar objects. In this study, mice had electrodes implanted in the hippocampal Schaffer collaterals–pyramidal CA1 pathway and were trained for OR. Field EPSPs evoked at the CA3-CA1 synapse were recorded at the moment of training and at different times thereafter. LTP-like synaptic enhancement was found 6 h posttraining. A testing session was conducted 24 h after training, in the presence of one familiar and one novel object. Hippocampal synaptic facilitation was observed during exploration of familiar and novel objects. A short depotentiation period was observed early after the test and was followed by a later phase of synaptic efficacy enhancement. Here, we show that OR memory consolidation is accompanied by transient potentiation in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses, while reconsolidation of this memory requires a short-lasting phase of depotentiation that could account for its well described vulnerability. The late synaptic enhancement phase, on the other hand, would be a consequence of memory restabilization. PMID:20133798

  5. Eye Movements and Processing Difficulty in Object Relative Clauses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staub, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that sentences containing object-extracted relative clauses (e.g., "The reporter that the senator attacked admitted the error") are more difficult to comprehend than sentences containing subject-extracted relative clauses (e.g., "The reporter that attacked the senator admitted the error"). Two major accounts of this phenomenon…

  6. Distinct Visual Processing of Real Objects and Pictures of Those Objects in 7- to 9-month-old Infants.

    PubMed

    Gerhard, Theresa M; Culham, Jody C; Schwarzer, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined 7- and 9-month-old infants' visual habituation to real objects and pictures of the same objects and their preferences between real and pictorial versions of the same objects following habituation. Different hypotheses would predict that infants may habituate faster to pictures than real objects (based on proposed theoretical links between behavioral habituation in infants and neuroimaging adaptation in adults) or to real objects vs. pictures (based on past infant electrophysiology data). Sixty-one 7-month-old infants and fifty-nine 9-month-old infants were habituated to either a real object or a picture of the same object and afterward preference tested with the habituation object paired with either the novel real object or its picture counterpart. Infants of both age groups showed basic information-processing advantages for real objects. Specifically, during the initial presentations, 9-month-old infants looked longer at stimuli in both formats than the 7-month olds but more importantly both age groups looked longer at real objects than pictures, though with repeated presentations, they habituated faster for real objects such that at the end of habituation, they looked equally at both types of stimuli. Surprisingly, even after habituation, infants preferred to look at the real objects, regardless of whether they had habituated to photos or real objects. Our findings suggest that from as early as 7-months of age, infants show strong preferences for real objects, perhaps because real objects are visually richer and/or enable the potential for genuine interactions.

  7. Distinct Visual Processing of Real Objects and Pictures of Those Objects in 7- to 9-month-old Infants

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, Theresa M.; Culham, Jody C.; Schwarzer, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined 7- and 9-month-old infants’ visual habituation to real objects and pictures of the same objects and their preferences between real and pictorial versions of the same objects following habituation. Different hypotheses would predict that infants may habituate faster to pictures than real objects (based on proposed theoretical links between behavioral habituation in infants and neuroimaging adaptation in adults) or to real objects vs. pictures (based on past infant electrophysiology data). Sixty-one 7-month-old infants and fifty-nine 9-month-old infants were habituated to either a real object or a picture of the same object and afterward preference tested with the habituation object paired with either the novel real object or its picture counterpart. Infants of both age groups showed basic information-processing advantages for real objects. Specifically, during the initial presentations, 9-month-old infants looked longer at stimuli in both formats than the 7-month olds but more importantly both age groups looked longer at real objects than pictures, though with repeated presentations, they habituated faster for real objects such that at the end of habituation, they looked equally at both types of stimuli. Surprisingly, even after habituation, infants preferred to look at the real objects, regardless of whether they had habituated to photos or real objects. Our findings suggest that from as early as 7-months of age, infants show strong preferences for real objects, perhaps because real objects are visually richer and/or enable the potential for genuine interactions. PMID:27378962

  8. Distinct brain activity in processing negative pictures of animals and objects - the role of human contexts.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhijun; Zhao, Yanbing; Tan, Tengteng; Chen, Gang; Ning, Xueling; Zhan, Lexia; Yang, Jiongjiong

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the amygdala is important in processing not only animate entities but also social information. It remains to be determined to what extent the factors of category and social context interact to modulate the activities of the amygdala and cortical regions. In this study, pictures depicting animals and inanimate objects in negative and neutral levels were presented. The contexts of the pictures differed in whether they included human/human parts. The factors of valence, arousal, familiarity and complexity of pictures were controlled across categories. The results showed that the amygdala activity was modulated by category and contextual information. Under the nonhuman context condition, the amygdala responded more to animals than objects for both negative and neutral pictures. In contrast, under the human context condition, the amygdala showed stronger activity for negative objects than animals. In addition to cortical regions related to object action, functional and effective connectivity analyses showed that the anterior prefrontal cortex interacted more with the amygdala for negative objects (vs. animals) in the human context condition, by a top-down modulation of the anterior prefrontal cortex to the amygdala. These results highlighted the effects of category and human contexts on modulating brain activity in emotional processing. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Distinct brain activity in processing negative pictures of animals and objects --- the role of human contexts

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhijun; Zhao, Yanbing; Tan, Tengteng; Chen, Gang; Ning, Xueling; Zhan, Lexia; Yang, Jiongjiong

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the amygdala is important in processing not only animate entities but also social information. It remains to be determined to what extent the factors of category and social context interact to modulate the activities of the amygdala and cortical regions. In this study, pictures depicting animals and inanimate objects in negative and neutral levels were presented. The contexts of the pictures differed in whether they included human/human parts. The factors of valence, arousal, familiarity and complexity of pictures were controlled across categories. The results showed that the amygdala activity was modulated by category and contextual information. Under the nonhuman context condition, the amygdala responded more to animals than objects for both negative and neutral pictures. In contrast, under the human context condition, the amygdala showed stronger activity for negative objects than animals. In addition to cortical regions related to object action, functional and effective connectivity analyses showed that the anterior prefrontal cortex interacted with the amygdala more for negative objects (vs. animals) in the human context condition, by a top-down modulation of the anterior prefrontal cortex to the amygdala. These results highlighted the effects of category and human contexts on modulating brain activity in emotional processing. PMID:24099847

  10. Learning Objects: A User-Centered Design Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branon, Rovy F., III

    2011-01-01

    Design research systematically creates or improves processes, products, and programs through an iterative progression connecting practice and theory (Reinking, 2008; van den Akker, 2006). Developing a new instructional systems design (ISD) processes through design research is necessary when new technologies emerge that challenge existing practices…

  11. Cognitive Process Modeling of Spatial Ability: The Assembling Objects Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Jennifer L.; Embretson, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial ability tasks appear on many intelligence and aptitude tests. Although the construct validity of spatial ability tests has often been studied through traditional correlational methods, such as factor analysis, less is known about the cognitive processes involved in solving test items. This study examines the cognitive processes involved in…

  12. Learning Objects: A User-Centered Design Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branon, Rovy F., III

    2011-01-01

    Design research systematically creates or improves processes, products, and programs through an iterative progression connecting practice and theory (Reinking, 2008; van den Akker, 2006). Developing a new instructional systems design (ISD) processes through design research is necessary when new technologies emerge that challenge existing practices…

  13. Cognitive Process Modeling of Spatial Ability: The Assembling Objects Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Jennifer L.; Embretson, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial ability tasks appear on many intelligence and aptitude tests. Although the construct validity of spatial ability tests has often been studied through traditional correlational methods, such as factor analysis, less is known about the cognitive processes involved in solving test items. This study examines the cognitive processes involved in…

  14. Auditory scene analysis and sonified visual images. Does consonance negatively impact on object formation when using complex sonified stimuli?

    PubMed

    Brown, David J; Simpson, Andrew J R; Proulx, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    A critical task for the brain is the sensory representation and identification of perceptual objects in the world. When the visual sense is impaired, hearing and touch must take primary roles and in recent times compensatory techniques have been developed that employ the tactile or auditory system as a substitute for the visual system. Visual-to-auditory sonifications provide a complex, feature-based auditory representation that must be decoded and integrated into an object-based representation by the listener. However, we don't yet know what role the auditory system plays in the object integration stage and whether the principles of auditory scene analysis apply. Here we used coarse sonified images in a two-tone discrimination task to test whether auditory feature-based representations of visual objects would be confounded when their features conflicted with the principles of auditory consonance. We found that listeners (N = 36) performed worse in an object recognition task when the auditory feature-based representation was harmonically consonant. We also found that this conflict was not negated with the provision of congruent audio-visual information. The findings suggest that early auditory processes of harmonic grouping dominate the object formation process and that the complexity of the signal, and additional sensory information have limited effect on this.

  15. Auditory scene analysis and sonified visual images. Does consonance negatively impact on object formation when using complex sonified stimuli?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David J.; Simpson, Andrew J. R.; Proulx, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    A critical task for the brain is the sensory representation and identification of perceptual objects in the world. When the visual sense is impaired, hearing and touch must take primary roles and in recent times compensatory techniques have been developed that employ the tactile or auditory system as a substitute for the visual system. Visual-to-auditory sonifications provide a complex, feature-based auditory representation that must be decoded and integrated into an object-based representation by the listener. However, we don’t yet know what role the auditory system plays in the object integration stage and whether the principles of auditory scene analysis apply. Here we used coarse sonified images in a two-tone discrimination task to test whether auditory feature-based representations of visual objects would be confounded when their features conflicted with the principles of auditory consonance. We found that listeners (N = 36) performed worse in an object recognition task when the auditory feature-based representation was harmonically consonant. We also found that this conflict was not negated with the provision of congruent audio–visual information. The findings suggest that early auditory processes of harmonic grouping dominate the object formation process and that the complexity of the signal, and additional sensory information have limited effect on this. PMID:26528202

  16. Objects and processes: Two notions for understanding biological information.

    PubMed

    Mercado-Reyes, Agustín; Padilla-Longoria, Pablo; Arroyo-Santos, Alfonso

    2015-09-07

    In spite of being ubiquitous in life sciences, the concept of information is harshly criticized. Uses of the concept other than those derived from Shannon׳s theory are denounced as metaphoric. We perform a computational experiment to explore whether Shannon׳s information is adequate to describe the uses of said concept in commonplace scientific practice. Our results show that semantic sequences do not have unique complexity values different from the value of meaningless sequences. This result suggests that quantitative theoretical frameworks do not account fully for the complex phenomenon that the term "information" refers to. We propose a restructuring of the concept into two related, but independent notions, and conclude that a complete theory of biological information must account completely not only for both notions, but also for the relationship between them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Complex object wave direct extraction method in off-axis digital holography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daesuk; Magnusson, Robert; Jin, Moonseob; Lee, Jaejong; Chegal, Won

    2013-02-11

    Off-axis digital holography generally uses a 2D-FFT based spatial filtering method to extract the complex object wave from an off-axis hologram. In this paper, we describe a novel single exposure complex object wave extraction method which can provide a faster solution than the FFT based spatial filtering approach while maintaining the reconstructed phase image quality. And also, we show that the proposed direct filtering scheme can provide more robust filtering capability to the off-axis spatial carrier frequency variation than the spatial filtering method.

  18. Improvement of the F-Perceptory Approach Through Management of Fuzzy Complex Geographic Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalfi, B.; de Runz, C.; Faiz, S.; Akdag, H.

    2015-08-01

    In the real world, data is imperfect and in various ways such as imprecision, vagueness, uncertainty, ambiguity and inconsistency. For geographic data, the fuzzy aspect is mainly manifested in time, space and the function of objects and is due to a lack of precision. Therefore, the researchers in the domain emphasize the importance of modeling data structures in GIS but also their lack of adaptation to fuzzy data. The F-Perceptory approachh manages the modeling of imperfect geographic information with UML. This management is essential to maintain faithfulness to reality and to better guide the user in his decision-making. However, this approach does not manage fuzzy complex geographic objects. The latter presents a multiple object with similar or different geographic shapes. So, in this paper, we propose to improve the F-Perceptory approach by proposing to handle fuzzy complex geographic objects modeling. In a second step, we propose its transformation to the UML modeling.

  19. Diffusive capture process on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungmin; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Yup

    2006-10-01

    We study the dynamical properties of a diffusing lamb captured by a diffusing lion on the complex networks with various sizes of N . We find that the lifetime ⟨T⟩ of a lamb scales as ⟨T⟩˜N and the survival probability S(N→∞,t) becomes finite on scale-free networks with degree exponent γ>3 . However, S(N,t) for γ<3 has a long-living tail on tree-structured scale-free networks and decays exponentially on looped scale-free networks. This suggests that the second moment of degree distribution ⟨k2⟩ is the relevant factor for the dynamical properties in the diffusive capture process. We numerically find that the normalized number of capture events at a node with degree k , n(k) , decreases as n(k)˜k-σ . When γ<3 , n(k) still increases anomalously for k≈kmax , where kmax is the maximum value of k of given networks with size N . We analytically show that n(k) satisfies the relation n(k)˜k2P(k) for any degree distribution P(k) and the total number of capture events Ntot is proportional to ⟨k2⟩ , which causes the γ -dependent behavior of S(N,t) and ⟨T⟩ .

  20. Nematodes ultrastructure: complex systems and processes.

    PubMed

    Basyoni, Maha M A; Rizk, Enas M A

    2016-12-01

    Nematode worms are among the most ubiquitous organisms on earth. They include free-living forms as well as parasites of plants, insects, humans and other animals. Recently, there has been an explosion of interest in nematode biology, including the area of nematode ultrastructure. Nematodes are round with a body cavity. They have one way guts with a mouth at one end and an anus at the other. They have a pseudocoelom that is lined on one side with mesoderm and on the other side with endoderm. It appears that the cuticle is a very complex and evolutionarily plastic feature with important functions involving protection, body movement and maintaining shape. They only have longitudinal muscles so; they seem to thrash back and forth. While nematodes have digestive, reproductive, nervous and excretory systems, they do not have discrete circulatory or respiratory systems. Nematodes use chemosensory and mechanosensory neurons embedded in the cuticle to orient and respond to a wide range of environmental stimuli. Adults are made up of roughly 1000 somatic cells and hundreds of those cells are typically associated with the reproductive systems. Nematodes ultrastructure seeks to provide studies which enable their use as models for diverse biological processes including; human diseases, immunity, host-parasitic interactions and the expression of phylogenomics. The latter has, however, not been brought into a single inclusive entity. Consequently, in the current review we tried to provide a comprehensive approach to the current knowledge available for nematodes ultrastructures.

  1. Model estimation and identification of manual controller objectives in complex tracking tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. K.; Yuan, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology is presented for estimating the parameters in an optimal control structural model of the manual controller from experimental data on complex, multiinput/multioutput tracking tasks. Special attention is devoted to estimating the appropriate objective function for the task, as this is considered key in understanding the objectives and strategy of the manual controller. The technique is applied to data from single input/single output as well as multi input/multi outpuut experiments, and results discussed.

  2. Application of Complex Fluids in Lignocellulose Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo Lugo, Carlos A.

    Complex fluids such as emulsions, microemulsions and foams, have been used for different applications due to the multiplicity of properties they possess. In the present work, such fluids are introduced as effective media for processing lignocellulosic biomass. A demonstration of the generic benefits of complex fluids is presented to enhance biomass impregnation, to facilitate pretreatment for fiber deconstruction and to make compatible cellulose fibrils with hydrophobic polymers during composite manufacture. An improved impregnation of woody biomass was accomplished by application of water-continuous microemulsions. Microemulsions with high water content, > 85%, were formulated and wood samples were impregnated by wicking and capillary flooding at atmospheric pressure and temperature. Formulations were designed to effectively impregnate different wood species during shorter times and to a larger extent compared to the single components of the microemulsions (water, oil or surfactant solutions). The viscosity of the microemulsions and their interactions with cell wall constituents in fibers were critical to define the extent of impregnation and solubilization. The relation between composition and formulation variables and the extent of microemulsion penetration in different woody substrates was studied. Formulation variables such as salinity content of the aqueous phase and type of surfactant were elucidated. Likewise, composition variables such as the water-to-oil ratio and surfactant concentration were investigated. These variables affected the characteristics of the microemulsion and determined their effectiveness in wood treatment. Also, the interactions between the surfactant and the substrate had an important contribution in defining microemulsion penetration in the capillary structure of wood. Microemulsions as an alternative pretreatment for the manufacture of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) was also studied. Microemulsions were applied to pretreat lignin

  3. Modeling the electric image produced by objects with complex impedance in weakly electric fish.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kazuhisa; Kashimori, Yoshiki

    2010-08-01

    Weakly electric fish generate an electric field around their body by electric organ discharge (EOD). By measuring the modulation of the electric field produced by an object in the field these fish are able to accurately locate an object. Theoretical and experimental studies have focused on the amplitude modulations of EODs produced by resistive objects. However, little is known about the phase modulations produced by objects with complex impedance. The fish must be able to detect changes in object impedance to discriminate between food and nonfood objects. To investigate the features of electric images produced by objects with complex impedance, we developed a model that can be used to map the electric field around the fish body. The present model allows us to calculate the spatial distribution of the amplitude and phase shift in an electric image. This is the first study to investigate the changes in amplitude and phase shift of electric images induced by objects with complex impedance in wave-type fish. Using the model, we show that the amplitude of the electric image exhibits a sigmoidal change as the capacitance and resistance of an object are increased. Similarly, the phase shift exhibits a significant change within the object capacitance range of 0.1-100 nF. We also show that the spatial distribution of the amplitude and phase shifts of the electric image resembles a "Mexican hat" in shape for varying object distances and sizes. The spatial distribution of the phase shift and the amplitude was dependent on the object distance and size. Changes in the skin capacitance were associated with a tradeoff relationship between the magnitude of the amplitude and phase shift of the electric image. The specific range of skin capacitance (1-100 nF) allows the receptor afferents to extract object features that are relevant to electrolocation. These results provide a useful basis for the study of the neural mechanisms by which weakly electric fish recognize object features

  4. [Objective Assessment of Emotion Processing. Forensic Case Report].

    PubMed

    Reyes, Ana Calzada; Gutiérrez Manso, Ana Teresa; González, Mariloly Acosta

    2014-03-01

    The main objective of the emotions is to ensure the homeostasis, the survival and the well-being of the organism. To demonstrate the usefulness of performing neurophysiological and neuropsychological assessments in patients, in order to demonstrate the significant role of the emotions in the execution of certain behaviours. A forensic psychiatric interview was conducted. EEG in vigil state was registered, the generators of current density to theta band were calculated, and the emotions recognition test was performed. The results of the psychiatric interview demonstrated that fear was an important element in acting impulsively, and lack of foresight of the accused. A substantial decrease was demonstrated in the ability to understand the scope of the acts and the direction of the behaviour during the time the crime occurred. The EEG showed alterations in frontal regions, and the generators of current density were located in frontal-temporal regions and occipital associative areas. It is recommended to associate these studies with the forensic psychiatric assessment, in order to increase the objectivity of the diagnoses formulated by medical experts. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Computational issues in complex water-energy optimization problems: Time scales, parameterizations, objectives and algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstratiadis, Andreas; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Kossieris, Panayiotis; Karavokiros, George; Christofides, Antonis; Siskos, Alexandros; Mamassis, Nikos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2015-04-01

    Modelling of large-scale hybrid renewable energy systems (HRES) is a challenging task, for which several open computational issues exist. HRES comprise typical components of hydrosystems (reservoirs, boreholes, conveyance networks, hydropower stations, pumps, water demand nodes, etc.), which are dynamically linked with renewables (e.g., wind turbines, solar parks) and energy demand nodes. In such systems, apart from the well-known shortcomings of water resources modelling (nonlinear dynamics, unknown future inflows, large number of variables and constraints, conflicting criteria, etc.), additional complexities and uncertainties arise due to the introduction of energy components and associated fluxes. A major difficulty is the need for coupling two different temporal scales, given that in hydrosystem modeling, monthly simulation steps are typically adopted, yet for a faithful representation of the energy balance (i.e. energy production vs. demand) a much finer resolution (e.g. hourly) is required. Another drawback is the increase of control variables, constraints and objectives, due to the simultaneous modelling of the two parallel fluxes (i.e. water and energy) and their interactions. Finally, since the driving hydrometeorological processes of the integrated system are inherently uncertain, it is often essential to use synthetically generated input time series of large length, in order to assess the system performance in terms of reliability and risk, with satisfactory accuracy. To address these issues, we propose an effective and efficient modeling framework, key objectives of which are: (a) the substantial reduction of control variables, through parsimonious yet consistent parameterizations; (b) the substantial decrease of computational burden of simulation, by linearizing the combined water and energy allocation problem of each individual time step, and solve each local sub-problem through very fast linear network programming algorithms, and (c) the substantial

  6. Examining Complexity across Domains: Relating Subjective and Objective Measures of Affective Environmental Scenes, Paintings and Music

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Manuela M.; Leder, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Subjective complexity has been found to be related to hedonic measures of preference, pleasantness and beauty, but there is no consensus about the nature of this relationship in the visual and musical domains. Moreover, the affective content of stimuli has been largely neglected so far in the study of complexity but is crucial in many everyday contexts and in aesthetic experiences. We thus propose a cross-domain approach that acknowledges the multidimensional nature of complexity and that uses a wide range of objective complexity measures combined with subjective ratings. In four experiments, we employed pictures of affective environmental scenes, representational paintings, and Romantic solo and chamber music excerpts. Stimuli were pre-selected to vary in emotional content (pleasantness and arousal) and complexity (low versus high number of elements). For each set of stimuli, in a between-subjects design, ratings of familiarity, complexity, pleasantness and arousal were obtained for a presentation time of 25 s from 152 participants. In line with Berlyne’s collative-motivation model, statistical analyses controlling for familiarity revealed a positive relationship between subjective complexity and arousal, and the highest correlations were observed for musical stimuli. Evidence for a mediating role of arousal in the complexity-pleasantness relationship was demonstrated in all experiments, but was only significant for females with regard to music. The direction and strength of the linear relationship between complexity and pleasantness depended on the stimulus type and gender. For environmental scenes, the root mean square contrast measures and measures of compressed file size correlated best with subjective complexity, whereas only edge detection based on phase congruency yielded equivalent results for representational paintings. Measures of compressed file size and event density also showed positive correlations with complexity and arousal in music, which is

  7. Examining complexity across domains: relating subjective and objective measures of affective environmental scenes, paintings and music.

    PubMed

    Marin, Manuela M; Leder, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Subjective complexity has been found to be related to hedonic measures of preference, pleasantness and beauty, but there is no consensus about the nature of this relationship in the visual and musical domains. Moreover, the affective content of stimuli has been largely neglected so far in the study of complexity but is crucial in many everyday contexts and in aesthetic experiences. We thus propose a cross-domain approach that acknowledges the multidimensional nature of complexity and that uses a wide range of objective complexity measures combined with subjective ratings. In four experiments, we employed pictures of affective environmental scenes, representational paintings, and Romantic solo and chamber music excerpts. Stimuli were pre-selected to vary in emotional content (pleasantness and arousal) and complexity (low versus high number of elements). For each set of stimuli, in a between-subjects design, ratings of familiarity, complexity, pleasantness and arousal were obtained for a presentation time of 25 s from 152 participants. In line with Berlyne's collative-motivation model, statistical analyses controlling for familiarity revealed a positive relationship between subjective complexity and arousal, and the highest correlations were observed for musical stimuli. Evidence for a mediating role of arousal in the complexity-pleasantness relationship was demonstrated in all experiments, but was only significant for females with regard to music. The direction and strength of the linear relationship between complexity and pleasantness depended on the stimulus type and gender. For environmental scenes, the root mean square contrast measures and measures of compressed file size correlated best with subjective complexity, whereas only edge detection based on phase congruency yielded equivalent results for representational paintings. Measures of compressed file size and event density also showed positive correlations with complexity and arousal in music, which is

  8. A Pedagogical Approach to the Design of Learning Objects for Complex Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busetti, Emanuela; Dettori, Giuliana; Forcheri, Paola; Ierardi, Maria Grazia

    2007-01-01

    In this article we describe an approach to the design of learning objects (LOs) suitable to support learning in complex domains. We briefly discuss, from an educational point of view, the methodological choices underlying the design of LOs to be used as didactical materials in a distributed Web-based environment, presently under development,…

  9. The Perception of Concurrent Sound Objects in Harmonic Complexes Impairs Gap Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Ada W. S.; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Vachon, Francois; Alain, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Since the introduction of the concept of auditory scene analysis, there has been a paucity of work focusing on the theoretical explanation of how attention is allocated within a complex auditory scene. Here we examined signal detection in situations that promote either the fusion of tonal elements into a single sound object or the segregation of a…

  10. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-04-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas-phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm ( ≳ 30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas-phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthesized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairly well the observations towards L1544. It also explains, in a natural way, the observed correlation between DME and MF. We conclude that gas-phase reactions are major actors in the formation of MF, DME and methoxy in cold gas. This challenges the exclusive role of grain-surface chemistry and favours a combined grain-gas chemistry.

  11. Salient object detection using coarse-to-fine processing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Weidong; Liu, Xianhui; Chen, Yufei; Wang, Zhicheng

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a salient object detection algorithm that considers both background and foreground cues. It integrates both coarse salient region extraction and a top-down background weight map measure via boundary label propagation into a unified optimization framework to acquire a refined salient map. The coarse saliency map is additionally fused by three prior components: a local contrast map with greater alignment to physiological law, a global focus prior map, and a global color prior map. During the formation of the background weight map, we first construct an affinity matrix and select nodes existing on the border as labels to represent the background. Then we perform a propagation to generate the regional background weight map. Our proposed model was verified on four benchmark datasets, and the experimental results demonstrate that our method has excellent performance.

  12. Method and system for nanoscale plasma processing of objects

    DOEpatents

    Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Hua, Xuefeng; Stolz, Christian

    2008-12-30

    A plasma processing system includes a source of plasma, a substrate and a shutter positioned in close proximity to the substrate. The substrate/shutter relative disposition is changed for precise control of substrate/plasma interaction. This way, the substrate interacts only with a fully established, stable plasma for short times required for nanoscale processing of materials. The shutter includes an opening of a predetermined width, and preferably is patterned to form an array of slits with dimensions that are smaller than the Debye screening length. This enables control of the substrate/plasma interaction time while avoiding the ion bombardment of the substrate in an undesirable fashion. The relative disposition between the shutter and the substrate can be made either by moving the shutter or by moving the substrate.

  13. Visual Information Processing in the Perception of Features and Objects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-22

    display containing two other types of bars that differ from them in color or size or orientaton. The target group is shifted either as a whole, preserving...of the target group . The results so far suggest that both color and orientation can provide an input to the matching process that determines apparent...were larger than the background. When the target group was defined by a value intermediate between two types of distractors (medium-sized against large

  14. Interaction of compass sensing and object-motion detection in the locust central complex.

    PubMed

    Bockhorst, Tobias; Homberg, Uwe

    2017-07-01

    Goal-directed behavior is often complicated by unpredictable events, such as the appearance of a predator during directed locomotion. This situation requires adaptive responses like evasive maneuvers followed by subsequent reorientation and course correction. Here we study the possible neural underpinnings of such a situation in an insect, the desert locust. As in other insects, its sense of spatial orientation strongly relies on the central complex, a group of midline brain neuropils. The central complex houses sky compass cells that signal the polarization plane of skylight and thus indicate the animal's steering direction relative to the sun. Most of these cells additionally respond to small moving objects that drive fast sensory-motor circuits for escape. Here we investigate how the presentation of a moving object influences activity of the neurons during compass signaling. Cells responded in one of two ways: in some neurons, responses to the moving object were simply added to the compass response that had adapted during continuous stimulation by stationary polarized light. By contrast, other neurons disadapted, i.e., regained their full compass response to polarized light, when a moving object was presented. We propose that the latter case could help to prepare for reorientation of the animal after escape. A neuronal network based on central-complex architecture can explain both responses by slight changes in the dynamics and amplitudes of adaptation to polarized light in CL columnar input neurons of the system.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Neurons of the central complex in several insects signal compass directions through sensitivity to the sky polarization pattern. In locusts, these neurons also respond to moving objects. We show here that during polarized-light presentation, responses to moving objects override their compass signaling or restore adapted inhibitory as well as excitatory compass responses. A network model is presented to explain the variations of these

  15. IFR fuel cycle process equipment design environment and objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Rigg, R.H.

    1993-03-01

    Argonne National laboratory (ANL) is refurbishing the hot cell facility originally constructed with the EBR-II reactor. When refurbishment is complete, the facility win demonstrate the complete fuel cycle for current generation high burnup metallic fuel elements. These are sodium bonded, stainless steel clad fuel pins of U-Zr or U-Pu-Zr composition typical of the fuel type proposed for a future Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) design. To the extent possible, the process equipment is being built at full commercial scale, and the facility is being modified to incorporate current DOE facility design requirements and modem remote maintenance principles. The current regulatory and safety environment has affected the design of the fuel fabrication equipment, most of which will be described in greater detail in subsequent papers in this session.

  16. IFR fuel cycle process equipment design environment and objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Rigg, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    Argonne National laboratory (ANL) is refurbishing the hot cell facility originally constructed with the EBR-II reactor. When refurbishment is complete, the facility win demonstrate the complete fuel cycle for current generation high burnup metallic fuel elements. These are sodium bonded, stainless steel clad fuel pins of U-Zr or U-Pu-Zr composition typical of the fuel type proposed for a future Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) design. To the extent possible, the process equipment is being built at full commercial scale, and the facility is being modified to incorporate current DOE facility design requirements and modem remote maintenance principles. The current regulatory and safety environment has affected the design of the fuel fabrication equipment, most of which will be described in greater detail in subsequent papers in this session.

  17. The number of objects determines visual working memory capacity allocation for complex items.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Halely; Luria, Roy

    2015-10-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine whether visual working memory (WM) capacity allocation is determined solely by complexity, with the number of objects being redundant, as suggested by flexible resource models. Participants performed the change detection task with random polygons as stimuli, while we monitored the contralateral delay activity (CDA), an electrophysiological marker whose amplitude rises as WM load increases. In Experiment 1, we compared the WM maintenance of one whole polygon to a single half of the polygon, equating the number of items but varying the complexity level. Additionally, we compared the whole polygon to two halves of a polygon, thus roughly equating perceptual complexity but manipulating the number of items. The results suggested that only the number of objects determined WM capacity allocation: the CDA was identical when comparing one whole polygon to one polygon half, even though these conditions differed in complexity. Furthermore, the CDA amplitude was lower in the whole polygon condition relative to the two halves condition, even though both contained roughly the same amount of information. Experiment 2 extended these results by showing that two polygon halves that moved separately but then met and moved together were gradually integrated to consume similar WM capacity as one polygon half. Additionally, in both experiments we found an object benefit in accuracy, corroborating the important role of objects in WM. Our results demonstrate that WM capacity allocation cannot be explained by complexity alone. Instead, it is highly sensitive to objecthood, as suggested by discrete slot models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. When a Dog Has a Pen for a Tail: The Time Course of Creative Object Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Botao; Duan, Haijun; Qi, Senqing; Hu, Weiping; Zhang, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Creative objects differ from ordinary objects in that they are created by human beings to contain novel, creative information. Previous research has demonstrated that ordinary object processing involves both a perceptual process for analyzing different features of the visual input and a higher-order process for evaluating the relevance of this…

  19. When a Dog Has a Pen for a Tail: The Time Course of Creative Object Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Botao; Duan, Haijun; Qi, Senqing; Hu, Weiping; Zhang, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Creative objects differ from ordinary objects in that they are created by human beings to contain novel, creative information. Previous research has demonstrated that ordinary object processing involves both a perceptual process for analyzing different features of the visual input and a higher-order process for evaluating the relevance of this…

  20. Many Objective Robust Decision Making for Complex Environmental Systems Undergoing Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzyk, J. R.; Nataraj, S.; Reed, P. M.; Lempert, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Water resources planning has traditionally used historical data within benefit-maximizing frameworks for system design. The validity of this approach is threatened by environmental change and population growth, which create deep uncertainties that modify the distributions of data that characterize the system. Furthermore, solutions from the traditional benefit-maximizing approaches may prove inferior when multiple, complex objectives are introduced (e.g., maximizing reliable performance or environmental quality). To address these issues, this presentation introduces a framework termed many objective robust decision making (MORDM), which combines many objective evolutionary optimization, robust decision making (RDM), and interactive visual analytics to facilitate the management of complex environmental systems. Many objective evolutionary search enables the discovery of the key tradeoffs in complex planning problems. Subsequently RDM is used to determine the robustness of the component solutions within the many objective tradeoffs to deeply uncertain future conditions. Each solution is tested under the ensemble of future extreme states of the world (SOW). Interactive visual analytics are used to explore whether solutions of interest are robust to a wide range of plausible future conditions (i.e., assessment of their Pareto satisficing behavior in alternative SOW). Scenario discovery methods that use statistical data mining algorithms are then used to identify what assumptions and system conditions strongly control the cost-effectiveness, efficiency, and reliability of the robust alternatives. The framework is demonstrated using a case study that examines a single city's water supply in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) in Texas, USA. Results suggest that including robustness as a decision criterion can dramatically change the formulation of complex environmental management problems as well as the negotiated selection of candidate alternatives to implement. MORDM

  1. Intercalation processes of copper complexes in DNA.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; García-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Cheatham, Thomas E; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando

    2015-06-23

    The family of anticancer complexes that include the transition metal copper known as Casiopeínas® shows promising results. Two of these complexes are currently in clinical trials. The interaction of these compounds with DNA has been observed experimentally and several hypotheses regarding the mechanism of action have been developed, and these include the generation of reactive oxygen species, phosphate hydrolysis and/or base-pair intercalation. To advance in the understanding on how these ligands interact with DNA, we present a molecular dynamics study of 21 Casiopeínas with a DNA dodecamer using 10 μs of simulation time for each compound. All the complexes were manually inserted into the minor groove as the starting point of the simulations. The binding energy of each complex and the observed representative type of interaction between the ligand and the DNA is reported. With this extended sampling time, we found that four of the compounds spontaneously flipped open a base pair and moved inside the resulting cavity and four compounds formed stacking interactions with the terminal base pairs. The complexes that formed the intercalation pocket led to more stable interactions.

  2. Intercalation processes of copper complexes in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; García-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The family of anticancer complexes that include the transition metal copper known as Casiopeínas® shows promising results. Two of these complexes are currently in clinical trials. The interaction of these compounds with DNA has been observed experimentally and several hypotheses regarding the mechanism of action have been developed, and these include the generation of reactive oxygen species, phosphate hydrolysis and/or base-pair intercalation. To advance in the understanding on how these ligands interact with DNA, we present a molecular dynamics study of 21 Casiopeínas with a DNA dodecamer using 10 μs of simulation time for each compound. All the complexes were manually inserted into the minor groove as the starting point of the simulations. The binding energy of each complex and the observed representative type of interaction between the ligand and the DNA is reported. With this extended sampling time, we found that four of the compounds spontaneously flipped open a base pair and moved inside the resulting cavity and four compounds formed stacking interactions with the terminal base pairs. The complexes that formed the intercalation pocket led to more stable interactions. PMID:25958394

  3. RNA assemblages orchestrate complex cellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Heidi Theil

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs are monocistronic, and therefore mechanisms exist that coordinate the synthesis of multiprotein complexes in order to obtain proper stoichiometry at the appropriate intracellular locations. RNA‐binding proteins containing low‐complexity sequences are prone to generate liquid droplets via liquid‐liquid phase separation, and in this way create cytoplasmic assemblages of functionally related mRNAs. In a recent iCLIP study, we showed that the Drosophila RNA‐binding protein Imp, which exhibits a C‐terminal low‐complexity sequence, increases the formation of F‐actin by binding to 3′ untranslated regions of mRNAs encoding components participating in F‐actin biogenesis. We hypothesize that phase transition is a mechanism the cell employs to increase the local mRNA concentration considerably, and in this way synchronize protein production in cytoplasmic territories, as discussed in the present review. PMID:27172226

  4. Decontamination processes for low level radioactive waste metal objects

    SciTech Connect

    Longnecker, E.F.; Ichikawa, Sekigo; Kanamori, Osamu

    1996-12-31

    Disposal and safe storage of contaminated nuclear waste is a problem of international scope. Although the greatest volume of such waste is concentrated in the USA and former Soviet Union, Western Europe and Japan have contaminated nuclear waste requiring attention. Japan`s radioactive nuclear waste is principally generated at nuclear power plants since it has no nuclear weapons production. However, their waste reduction, storage and disposal problems may be comparable to that of the USA on an inhabited area basis when consideration is given to population density where Japan`s population, half that of the USA, lives in an area slightly smaller than that of California`s. If everyone`s backyard was in California, the USA might have insoluble radioactive waste reduction, storage and disposal problems. Viewing Japan`s contaminated nuclear waste as a national problem requiring solutions, as well as an economic opportunity, Morikawa began research and development for decontaminating low level radioactive nuclear waste seven years ago. As engineers and manufacturers of special machinery for many years Morikawa brings special electro/mechanical/pneumatic Skills and knowledge to solving these unique problems. Genden Engineering Services and Construction Company (GESC), an affiliate of Japan Atomic Power Company, recently joined with Morikawa in this R&D effort to decontaminate low level radioactive nuclear waste (LLW) and to substantially reduce the volume of such nuclear waste requiring long term storage. This paper will present equipment with both mechanical and chemical processes developed over these several years by Morikawa and most recently in cooperation with GESC.

  5. Atypical face processing in children with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Jeste, Shafali Spurling; Hirsch, Suzanna; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Norona, Amanda; Navalta, Mary-Clare; Gregas, Matt C; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Sahin, Mustafa; Nelson, Charles A

    2013-12-01

    There is a high incidence of autism in tuberous sclerosis complex. Given the evidence of impaired face processing in autism, the authors sought to investigate electrophysiological markers of face processing in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. The authors studied 19 children with tuberous sclerosis complex under age 4, and 20 age-matched controls, using a familiar-unfamiliar faces paradigm. Of the children, 6 with tuberous sclerosis complex (32%) had autism. Children with tuberous sclerosis complex showed a longer N290 latency than controls (276 ms vs 259 ms, P = .05) and also failed to show the expected hemispheric differences in face processing. The longest N290 latency was seen in (1) children with autism and tuberous sclerosis complex and (2) children with temporal lobe tubers. This study is the first to quantify atypical face processing in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. This functional impairment may provide insight into a mechanism underlying a pathway to autism in tuberous sclerosis complex.

  6. Atypical Face Processing in Children With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Jeste, Shafali Spurling; Hirsch, Suzanna; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Norona, Amanda; Navalta, Mary-Clare; Gregas, Matt C.; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Sahin, Mustafa; Nelson, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a high incidence of autism in tuberous sclerosis complex. Given the evidence of impaired face processing in autism, the authors sought to investigate electrophysiological markers of face processing in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. The authors studied 19 children with tuberous sclerosis complex under age 4, and 20 age-matched controls, using a familiar–unfamiliar faces paradigm. Of the children, 6 with tuberous sclerosis complex (32%) had autism. Children with tuberous sclerosis complex showed a longer N290 latency than controls (276 ms vs 259 ms, P = .05) and also failed to show the expected hemispheric differences in face processing. The longest N290 latency was seen in (1) children with autism and tuberous sclerosis complex and (2) children with temporal lobe tubers. This study is the first to quantify atypical face processing in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. This functional impairment may provide insight into a mechanism underlying a pathway to autism in tuberous sclerosis complex. PMID:23143725

  7. An analysis of packaging formats for complex digtal objects: review of principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, Jeroen L.; Hochstenbach, Patrick; De Kooning, Emiel; Van de Walle, Rik

    2003-11-01

    During recent years, the number of organizations making digital information available has massively increased. This evolution encouraged the development of standards for packaging and encoding digital representations of complex objects (such as a digital music albums or digitized books and photograph albums). The primary goal of this article is to offer a method to compare these packaging standards and best practices tailored to the needs of the digital library community and the rising digital preservation programs. The contribution of this paper is the definition of an integrated reference model, based on both the OAIS framework and some additional significant properties that affect the quality, usability, encoding and behavior of the digital objects.

  8. Complex Network Clustering by a Multi-objective Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Decomposition and Membrane Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Ying; Zhang, Songming; Ding, Ningxiang; Zeng, Xiangxiang; Zhang, Xingyi

    2016-09-01

    The field of complex network clustering is gaining considerable attention in recent years. In this study, a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm based on membranes is proposed to solve the network clustering problem. Population are divided into different membrane structures on average. The evolutionary algorithm is carried out in the membrane structures. The population are eliminated by the vector of membranes. In the proposed method, two evaluation objectives termed as Kernel J-means and Ratio Cut are to be minimized. Extensive experimental studies comparison with state-of-the-art algorithms proves that the proposed algorithm is effective and promising.

  9. Complex Network Clustering by a Multi-objective Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Decomposition and Membrane Structure

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Ying; Zhang, Songming; Ding, Ningxiang; Zeng, Xiangxiang; Zhang, Xingyi

    2016-01-01

    The field of complex network clustering is gaining considerable attention in recent years. In this study, a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm based on membranes is proposed to solve the network clustering problem. Population are divided into different membrane structures on average. The evolutionary algorithm is carried out in the membrane structures. The population are eliminated by the vector of membranes. In the proposed method, two evaluation objectives termed as Kernel J-means and Ratio Cut are to be minimized. Extensive experimental studies comparison with state-of-the-art algorithms proves that the proposed algorithm is effective and promising. PMID:27670156

  10. TOR and ageing: a complex pathway for a complex process.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Mark A; Tsai, Shih-Yin; Kennedy, Brian K

    2011-01-12

    Studies in invertebrate model organisms have led to a wealth of knowledge concerning the ageing process. But which of these discoveries will apply to ageing in humans? Recently, an assessment of the degree of conservation of ageing pathways between two of the leading invertebrate model organisms, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans, was completed. The results (i) quantitatively indicated that pathways were conserved between evolutionarily disparate invertebrate species and (ii) emphasized the importance of the TOR kinase pathway in ageing. With recent findings that deletion of the mTOR substrate S6K1 or exposure of mice to the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin result in lifespan extension, mTOR signalling has become a major focus of ageing research. Here, we address downstream targets of mTOR signalling and their possible links to ageing. We also briefly cover other ageing genes identified by comparing worms and yeast, addressing the likelihood that their mammalian counterparts will affect longevity.

  11. Phonemic Awareness: A Complex Developmental Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Janet A.; Hoffman, Paul R.

    2002-01-01

    This article uses a developmental model of language (Situational- Discourse-Semantics or SDS), along with a constellation or neuro-network model, to describe the developmental emergence of phonemic awareness. Ten sources of phonemic awareness are profiled along with developmental continuum, providing an integrated view of this complex development.…

  12. Mixing and Processing of Complex Biological Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Microfabricated Microneedles ," Technical Proceedings of the 2002 International Conference on Computational Nanoscienceand Nanotechnology, and Technical...France, 12-14 Oct. 2000, 311-15. Zahn, J.D. and Liepmann, D. (2000) "Complex Biological Fluid Flow Through Microfabricated Microneedles ," Proceedings

  13. Fast laser systems for measuring the geometry of complex-shaped objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiulin, Ravil M.; Galiulin, Rishat M.; Bakirov, J. M.; Vorontsov, A. V.; Ponomarenko, I. V.

    1999-01-01

    The technical characteristics, advantages and applications of an automated optoelectronic measuring system designed by 'Optel' company, State Aviation University of Ufa, are presented in this paper. The measuring apparatus can be applied for industrial development and research, for example, in rapid prototyping, and for obtaining geometrical parameters in medicine and criminalistics. It essentially is a non-contact and rapid scanning system, allowing measurements of complex shaped objects like metal and plastic workpieces or parts of human body.

  14. Auditory Processing of Complex Sounds Across Frequency Channels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-26

    towards gaining an understanding how the auditory system processes complex sounds . "The results of binaural psychophysical experiments in human subjects...SUBJECT TERMS lConeinlie on reuerse if necesary and identify by block numberi FIELD GROUP SU. GPR. auditory processing, hearing, complex sounds ...suggest (1) that spectrally synthetic binaural processing is the rule when the number of components in the tone complex are relatively few (less than

  15. Framework for dynamic background modeling and shadow suppression for moving object segmentation in complex wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Alok Kumar Singh; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2015-09-01

    Moving object segmentation using change detection in wavelet domain under continuous variations of lighting condition is a challenging problem in video surveillance systems. There are several methods proposed in the literature for change detection in wavelet domain for moving object segmentation having static backgrounds, but it has not been addressed effectively for dynamic background changes. The methods proposed in the literature suffer from various problems, such as ghostlike appearance, object shadows, and noise. To deal with these issues, a framework for dynamic background modeling and shadow suppression under rapidly changing illumination conditions for moving object segmentation in complex wavelet domain is proposed. The proposed method consists of eight steps applied on given video frames, which include wavelet decomposition of frame using complex wavelet transform; use of change detection on detail coefficients (LH, HL, and HH), use of improved Gaussian mixture-based dynamic background modeling on approximate coefficient (LL subband); cast shadow suppression; use of soft thresholding for noise removal; strong edge detection; inverse wavelet transformation for reconstruction; and finally using closing morphology operator. A comparative analysis of the proposed method is presented both qualitatively and quantitatively with other standard methods available in the literature for six datasets in terms of various performance measures. Experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method.

  16. Moving objects extraction method in H.264/advanced video coding bit stream of a complex scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingsheng, Chen; Mingxin, Qin; Guangming, Liang; Jixiang, Sun; Xu, Ning

    2013-08-01

    For the purpose of extracting moving objects from H.264/advanced video coding (AVC) bit stream of a complex scene, an algorithm based on maximum a posteriori Markov random field (MRF) framework to extract moving objects directly from H.264 compressed video is proposed in this paper. It mainly involves encoding information of motion vectors (MVs) and block partition modes in H.264/AVC bit stream and utilizes temporal continuity and spatial consistency of moving object's pieces. First, it retrieves MVs and block partition modes of identical 4×4 pixel blocks in P frames and establishes Gaussian mixture model (GMM) of the phase of MVs as a reference background, and then creates MRF model based on MVs, block partition modes, the GMM of the background, spatial, and temporal consistency. The moving objects are retrieved by solving the MRF model. The experimental results show that it can perform robustly in a complex environment and the precision and recall have been improved over the existing algorithm.

  17. Holo-graphics: A Framework for Synthesizing Hologram of Complex Object Scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Peter Wai Ming

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a novel concept known as "Holo-graphics", a term that is an amalgamation of "hologram" and "computer graphics". The idea is to explore a method whereby traditional computer graphic techniques can be applied in synthesizing holograms of complicated object scenes. The need of such a technology, apparently, is to reduce the heavy computation that is required to generate a hologram directly from a three dimensional (3-D) image. In the proposed method, a hologram is back projected onto a hypothetical plane known as the Virtual Diffraction Plane (VDP) that is located at close proximity to the object space. Groups of diffraction fringes, each corresponding to an item represented by the hologram, are extracted to form the HG models. Subsequently, HG models obtained from one or more holograms are modified, and integrated onto a VDP canvas to synthesize a targeted object scene. The resulting complex image on the VDP canvas is then converted to a hologram.

  18. Process consistency in models: The importance of system signatures, expert knowledge, and process complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrachowitz, M.; Fovet, O.; Ruiz, L.; Euser, T.; Gharari, S.; Nijzink, R.; Freer, J.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Gascuel-Odoux, C.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrological models frequently suffer from limited predictive power despite adequate calibration performances. This can indicate insufficient representations of the underlying processes. Thus, ways are sought to increase model consistency while satisfying the contrasting priorities of increased model complexity and limited equifinality. In this study, the value of a systematic use of hydrological signatures and expert knowledge for increasing model consistency was tested. It was found that a simple conceptual model, constrained by four calibration objective functions, was able to adequately reproduce the hydrograph in the calibration period. The model, however, could not reproduce a suite of hydrological signatures, indicating a lack of model consistency. Subsequently, testing 11 models, model complexity was increased in a stepwise way and counter-balanced by "prior constraints," inferred from expert knowledge to ensure a model which behaves well with respect to the modeler's perception of the system. We showed that, in spite of unchanged calibration performance, the most complex model setup exhibited increased performance in the independent test period and skill to better reproduce all tested signatures, indicating a better system representation. The results suggest that a model may be inadequate despite good performance with respect to multiple calibration objectives and that increasing model complexity, if counter-balanced by prior constraints, can significantly increase predictive performance of a model and its skill to reproduce hydrological signatures. The results strongly illustrate the need to balance automated model calibration with a more expert-knowledge-driven strategy of constraining models.

  19. The open source, object- and process oriented simulation system OpenGeoSys - concepts, development, community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S.; Li, D.; Beyer, C.; Wang, W.; Bilke, L.; Graupner, B.

    2011-12-01

    Many geoscientific problems, such as underground waste disposal, nuclear waste disposal, CO2 sequestration, geothermal energy, etc., require for prediction of ongoing processes as well as risk and safety assessment a numerical simulation system. The governing processes are thermal heat transfer (T), hydraulic flow in multi-phase systems (H), mechanical deformation (M) and geochemical reactions (C), which interact in a complex way (THMC). The development of suitable simulation systems requires a large amount of effort for code development, verification and applications. OpenGeoSys (OGS) is an open source scientific initiative for the simulation of these THMC processes in porous media. A flexible numerical framework based on the Finite Element Method is provided and applied to the governing process equations. Due to the object- and process-oriented character of the code, functionality enhancement and code coupling with external simulators can be performed reasonably effectively. This structure also allows for a distributed development, with developers at different locations contributing to the common code. The code is platform independent, accessible via internet for development and application, and checked by an automated benchmarking system regularly.

  20. Verbal Labels Modulate Perceptual Object Processing in 1-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gliga, Teodora; Volein, Agnes; Csibra, Gergely

    2010-01-01

    Whether verbal labels help infants visually process and categorize objects is a contentious issue. Using electroencephalography, we investigated whether possessing familiar or novel labels for objects directly enhances 1-year-old children's neural processes underlying the perception of those objects. We found enhanced gamma-band (20-60 Hz)…

  1. Verbal Labels Modulate Perceptual Object Processing in 1-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gliga, Teodora; Volein, Agnes; Csibra, Gergely

    2010-01-01

    Whether verbal labels help infants visually process and categorize objects is a contentious issue. Using electroencephalography, we investigated whether possessing familiar or novel labels for objects directly enhances 1-year-old children's neural processes underlying the perception of those objects. We found enhanced gamma-band (20-60 Hz)…

  2. 75 FR 28777 - Information Collection; Pre-Decisional Objection Process for Hazardous Fuel Reduction Projects...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; Pre-Decisional Objection Process for Hazardous Fuel Reduction... revision, of a currently approved information collection, OMB 0596-0172--Pre-Decisional Objection Process... Standard time, Monday through Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Pre-Decisional Objection...

  3. Sensory Processing Relates to Attachment to Childhood Comfort Objects of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalpidou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The author tested the hypothesis that attachment to comfort objects is based on the sensory processing characteristics of the individual. Fifty-two undergraduate students with and without a childhood comfort object reported sensory responses and performed a tactile threshold task. Those with a comfort object described their object and rated their…

  4. Sensory Processing Relates to Attachment to Childhood Comfort Objects of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalpidou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The author tested the hypothesis that attachment to comfort objects is based on the sensory processing characteristics of the individual. Fifty-two undergraduate students with and without a childhood comfort object reported sensory responses and performed a tactile threshold task. Those with a comfort object described their object and rated their…

  5. Curcumin complexation with cyclodextrins by the autoclave process: Method development and characterization of complex formation.

    PubMed

    Hagbani, Turki Al; Nazzal, Sami

    2017-03-30

    One approach to enhance curcumin (CUR) aqueous solubility is to use cyclodextrins (CDs) to form inclusion complexes where CUR is encapsulated as a guest molecule within the internal cavity of the water-soluble CD. Several methods have been reported for the complexation of CUR with CDs. Limited information, however, is available on the use of the autoclave process (AU) in complex formation. The aims of this work were therefore to (1) investigate and evaluate the AU cycle as a complex formation method to enhance CUR solubility; (2) compare the efficacy of the AU process with the freeze-drying (FD) and evaporation (EV) processes in complex formation; and (3) confirm CUR stability by characterizing CUR:CD complexes by NMR, Raman spectroscopy, DSC, and XRD. Significant differences were found in the saturation solubility of CUR from its complexes with CD when prepared by the three complexation methods. The AU yielded a complex with expected chemical and physical fingerprints for a CUR:CD inclusion complex that maintained the chemical integrity and stability of CUR and provided the highest solubility of CUR in water. Physical and chemical characterizations of the AU complexes confirmed the encapsulated of CUR inside the CD cavity and the transformation of the crystalline CUR:CD inclusion complex to an amorphous form. It was concluded that the autoclave process with its short processing time could be used as an alternate and efficient methods for drug:CD complexation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A new young stellar object in the S 187 complex: Photometry and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavagno, A.; Deharveng, L.; Caplan, J.

    1994-01-01

    We report the discovery in the S 187 complex of a young stellar object with an optical counterpart. High resolution spectroscopy in the red and near infrared indicates that this object is a pre-main-sequence star. In the red, the spectrumis dominated by a very bright H-alpha line with a total width (wing to wing) greater than 1000 km/s. This line exhibits a special type of P Cygni profile (Beal's Type III). The object's near infrared spectrum is dominated by the Ca II triplet emission at 8498 A, 8542 A, and 8662 A; these lines are broad and optically thick. Numerous Fe I and Fe II emission lines are observed also, B, V, R, I, H, K, and L magnitudes of the object, as well as its H-alpha luminosity, indicate that it is probably a Herbig late Be or early Ae star. It presents many characteristics of the 'outflow group' of Herbig stars identified by Hamann & Persson (1992B); it is very similar, both in luminosity and geometry, to the well-known young stellar objects V645 Cyh and R Mon.

  7. Meshing complex macro-scale objects into self-assembling bricks

    PubMed Central

    Hacohen, Adar; Hanniel, Iddo; Nikulshin, Yasha; Wolfus, Shuki; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly provides an information-economical route to the fabrication of objects at virtually all scales. However, there is no known algorithm to program self-assembly in macro-scale, solid, complex 3D objects. Here such an algorithm is described, which is inspired by the molecular assembly of DNA, and based on bricks designed by tetrahedral meshing of arbitrary objects. Assembly rules are encoded by topographic cues imprinted on brick faces while attraction between bricks is provided by embedded magnets. The bricks can then be mixed in a container and agitated, leading to properly assembled objects at high yields and zero errors. The system and its assembly dynamics were characterized by video and audio analysis, enabling the precise time- and space-resolved characterization of its performance and accuracy. Improved designs inspired by our system could lead to successful implementation of self-assembly at the macro-scale, allowing rapid, on-demand fabrication of objects without the need for assembly lines. PMID:26226488

  8. Strategising as a Complex Responsive Leadership Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groot, Nol; Homan, Thijs H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper, based on a narrative of one of the authors, explores management reality where a chosen strategy developed into a different direction than expected. The authors offer an insight in a manager's daily struggle, where power, gossip and conflict can influence the strategising process. The plans and strategic ambitions chosen at the outset…

  9. Strategising as a Complex Responsive Leadership Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groot, Nol; Homan, Thijs H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper, based on a narrative of one of the authors, explores management reality where a chosen strategy developed into a different direction than expected. The authors offer an insight in a manager's daily struggle, where power, gossip and conflict can influence the strategising process. The plans and strategic ambitions chosen at the outset…

  10. Separate channels for processing form, texture, and color: evidence from FMRI adaptation and visual object agnosia.

    PubMed

    Cavina-Pratesi, C; Kentridge, R W; Heywood, C A; Milner, A D

    2010-10-01

    Previous neuroimaging research suggests that although object shape is analyzed in the lateral occipital cortex, surface properties of objects, such as color and texture, are dealt with in more medial areas, close to the collateral sulcus (CoS). The present study sought to determine whether there is a single medial region concerned with surface properties in general or whether instead there are multiple foci independently extracting different surface properties. We used stimuli varying in their shape, texture, or color, and tested healthy participants and 2 object-agnosic patients, in both a discrimination task and a functional MR adaptation paradigm. We found a double dissociation between medial and lateral occipitotemporal cortices in processing surface (texture or color) versus geometric (shape) properties, respectively. In Experiment 2, we found that the medial occipitotemporal cortex houses separate foci for color (within anterior CoS and lingual gyrus) and texture (caudally within posterior CoS). In addition, we found that areas selective for shape, texture, and color individually were quite distinct from those that respond to all of these features together (shape and texture and color). These latter areas appear to correspond to those associated with the perception of complex stimuli such as faces and places.

  11. Applications of the COG multiparticle Monte Carlo transport code to simulated imaging of complex objects

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, R M; Hall, J M

    1999-06-01

    COG is a major multiparticle simulation code in the LLNL Monte Carlo radiation transport toolkit. It was designed to solve deep-penetration radiation shielding problems in arbitrarily complex 3D geometries, involving coupled transport of photons, neutrons, and electrons. COG was written to provide as much accuracy as the underlying cross-sections will allow, and has a number of variance-reduction features to speed computations. Recently COG has been applied to the simulation of high- resolution radiographs of complex objects and the evaluation of contraband detection schemes. In this paper we will give a brief description of the capabilities of the COG transport code and show several examples of neutron and gamma-ray imaging simulations. Keywords: Monte Carlo, radiation transport, simulated radiography, nonintrusive inspection, neutron imaging.

  12. An fMRI analysis of object priming and workload in the precuneus complex.

    PubMed

    Korsnes, Maria Stylianou; Wright, Anthony A; Gabrieli, John D E

    2008-04-01

    Drawings depicting familiar objects and unreal structures were presented twice, and participants (N=16) determined whether line drawings were real (familiar) or unreal (unfamiliar). The second presentation (repetition) of a drawing was typically responded to faster and more accurately than the first presentation and was accompanied by reduced activation in occipitotemporal (fusiform) and lateral precuneus regions, and increased activation in medial precuneus regions. The behavioral effects and reduced activations (e.g., lateral precuneus) on the second presentation were less pronounced for unreal objects than for real objects. Activation changes in the medial precuneus - increased activation on repetition and reduced activation for novel unreal objects - was further supported by the increased activation in this area during rest and reduced activation when workload was increased (i.e., processing novel unreal objects). The results from the present study in conjunction with those from several previous studies converge on the conclusion that the occipitotemporal and lateral regions of the precuneus are primarily involved in object priming, whereas the medial portion of precuneus primarily activates and deactivates as a function of workload.

  13. Object-oriented Bayesian networks for complex forensic DNA profiling problems.

    PubMed

    Dawid, A P; Mortera, J; Vicard, P

    2007-07-04

    We describe a flexible computational toolkit, based on object-oriented Bayesian networks, that can be used to model and solve a wide variety of complex problems of relationship testing using DNA profiles. In particular this can account for such complicating features as missing individuals, mutation and null alleles. We illustrate the use of this toolkit with several examples, including disputed paternity with missing or additional measurements, and criminal identification. We investigate the effects on likelihood ratios of introducing mutation and/or null alleles, and show that this can be substantial even when the underlying perturbations are small.

  14. Complexity analysis of dual-channel game model with different managers' business objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Ma, Junhai

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers dual-channel game model with bounded rationality, using the theory of bifurcations of dynamical system. The business objectives of retailers are assumed to be different, which is closer to reality than previous studies. We study the local stable region of Nash equilibrium point and find that business objectives can expand the stable region and play an important role in price strategy. One interesting finding is that a fiercer competition tends to stabilize the Nash equilibrium. Simulation shows the complex behavior of two dimensional dynamic system, we find period doubling bifurcation and chaos phenomenon. We measure performances of the model in different period by using the index of average profit. The results show that unstable behavior in economic system is often an unfavorable outcome. So this paper discusses the application of adaptive adjustment mechanism when the model exhibits chaotic behavior and then allows the retailers to eliminate the negative effects.

  15. What Is Actually Affected by the Scrambling of Objects When Localizing the Lateral Occipital Complex?

    PubMed

    Margalit, Eshed; Biederman, Irving; Tjan, Bosco S; Shah, Manan P

    2017-09-01

    The lateral occipital complex (LOC), the cortical region critical for shape perception, is localized with fMRI by its greater BOLD activity when viewing intact objects compared with their scrambled versions (resembling texture). Despite hundreds of studies investigating LOC, what the LOC localizer accomplishes-beyond distinguishing shape from texture-has never been resolved. By independently scattering the intact parts of objects, the axis structure defining the relations between parts was no longer defined. This led to a diminished BOLD response, despite the increase in the number of independent entities (the parts) produced by the scattering, thus indicating that LOC specifies interpart relations, in addition to specifying the shape of the parts themselves. LOC's sensitivity to relations is not confined to those between parts but is also readily apparent between objects, rendering it-and not subsequent "place" areas-as the critical region for the representation of scenes. Moreover, that these effects are witnessed with novel as well as familiar intact objects and scenes suggests that the relations are computed on the fly, rather than being retrieved from memory.

  16. Processing Motion Signals in Complex Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verghese, Preeti

    2000-01-01

    Motion information is critical for human locomotion and scene segmentation. Currently we have excellent neurophysiological models that are able to predict human detection and discrimination of local signals. Local motion signals are insufficient by themselves to guide human locomotion and to provide information about depth, object boundaries and surface structure. My research is aimed at understanding the mechanisms underlying the combination of motion signals across space and time. A target moving on an extended trajectory amidst noise dots in Brownian motion is much more detectable than the sum of signals generated by independent motion energy units responding to the trajectory segments. This result suggests that facilitation occurs between motion units tuned to similar directions, lying along the trajectory path. We investigated whether the interaction between local motion units along the motion direction is mediated by contrast. One possibility is that contrast-driven signals from motion units early in the trajectory sequence are added to signals in subsequent units. If this were the case, then units later in the sequence would have a larger signal than those earlier in the sequence. To test this possibility, we compared contrast discrimination thresholds for the first and third patches of a triplet of sequentially presented Gabor patches, aligned along the motion direction. According to this simple additive model, contrast increment thresholds for the third patch should be higher than thresholds for the first patch.The lack of a measurable effect on contrast thresholds for these various manipulations suggests that the pooling of signals along a trajectory is not mediated by contrast-driven signals. Instead, these results are consistent with models that propose that the facilitation of trajectory signals is achieved by a second-level network that chooses the strongest local motion signals and combines them if they occur in a spatio-temporal sequence consistent

  17. Processing Motion Signals in Complex Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verghese, Preeti

    2000-01-01

    Motion information is critical for human locomotion and scene segmentation. Currently we have excellent neurophysiological models that are able to predict human detection and discrimination of local signals. Local motion signals are insufficient by themselves to guide human locomotion and to provide information about depth, object boundaries and surface structure. My research is aimed at understanding the mechanisms underlying the combination of motion signals across space and time. A target moving on an extended trajectory amidst noise dots in Brownian motion is much more detectable than the sum of signals generated by independent motion energy units responding to the trajectory segments. This result suggests that facilitation occurs between motion units tuned to similar directions, lying along the trajectory path. We investigated whether the interaction between local motion units along the motion direction is mediated by contrast. One possibility is that contrast-driven signals from motion units early in the trajectory sequence are added to signals in subsequent units. If this were the case, then units later in the sequence would have a larger signal than those earlier in the sequence. To test this possibility, we compared contrast discrimination thresholds for the first and third patches of a triplet of sequentially presented Gabor patches, aligned along the motion direction. According to this simple additive model, contrast increment thresholds for the third patch should be higher than thresholds for the first patch.The lack of a measurable effect on contrast thresholds for these various manipulations suggests that the pooling of signals along a trajectory is not mediated by contrast-driven signals. Instead, these results are consistent with models that propose that the facilitation of trajectory signals is achieved by a second-level network that chooses the strongest local motion signals and combines them if they occur in a spatio-temporal sequence consistent

  18. Dynamics of ranking processes in complex systems.

    PubMed

    Blumm, Nicholas; Ghoshal, Gourab; Forró, Zalán; Schich, Maximilian; Bianconi, Ginestra; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Barabási, Albert-László

    2012-09-21

    The world is addicted to ranking: everything, from the reputation of scientists, journals, and universities to purchasing decisions is driven by measured or perceived differences between them. Here, we analyze empirical data capturing real time ranking in a number of systems, helping to identify the universal characteristics of ranking dynamics. We develop a continuum theory that not only predicts the stability of the ranking process, but shows that a noise-induced phase transition is at the heart of the observed differences in ranking regimes. The key parameters of the continuum theory can be explicitly measured from data, allowing us to predict and experimentally document the existence of three phases that govern ranking stability.

  19. Dynamics of Ranking Processes in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumm, Nicholas; Ghoshal, Gourab; Forró, Zalán; Schich, Maximilian; Bianconi, Ginestra; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Barabási, Albert-László

    2012-09-01

    The world is addicted to ranking: everything, from the reputation of scientists, journals, and universities to purchasing decisions is driven by measured or perceived differences between them. Here, we analyze empirical data capturing real time ranking in a number of systems, helping to identify the universal characteristics of ranking dynamics. We develop a continuum theory that not only predicts the stability of the ranking process, but shows that a noise-induced phase transition is at the heart of the observed differences in ranking regimes. The key parameters of the continuum theory can be explicitly measured from data, allowing us to predict and experimentally document the existence of three phases that govern ranking stability.

  20. Widespread sensitivity to looming stimuli and small moving objects in the central complex of an insect brain.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Ronny; Homberg, Uwe

    2013-05-08

    In many situations animals are confronted with approaching objects. Depending on whether the approach represents a potential threat or is intended during a goal-oriented approach, the adequate behavioral strategies differ. In all of these cases the visual system experiences an expanding or looming shape. The neuronal machinery mediating looming elicited behavioral responses has been studied most comprehensively in insects but is still far from being fully understood. It is particularly unknown how insects adjust their behavior to objects approaching from different directions. A brain structure that is thought to play an important role in spatial orientation in insects is the central complex (CC). We investigated whether CC neurons process information about approaching objects on a collision course. We recorded intracellularly from CC neurons in the locust Schistocerca gregaria during visual stimulation via lateral LCD screens. Many neurons in the locust CC, including columnar and tangential neurons, were sensitive to looming stimuli. Some of the neurons also responded to small moving targets. Several cell types showed binocular responses to looming objects, and some neurons were excited or inhibited depending on which eye was stimulated. These neurons may, therefore, detect the gross azimuthal direction of approaching objects and may mediate directional components of escape or steering movements.

  1. Fingerprints of Learned Object Recognition Seen in the fMRI Activation Patterns of Lateral Occipital Complex.

    PubMed

    Roth, Zvi N; Zohary, Ehud

    2015-09-01

    One feature of visual processing in the ventral stream is that cortical responses gradually depart from the physical aspects of the visual stimulus and become correlated with perceptual experience. Thus, unlike early retinotopic areas, the responses in the object-related lateral occipital complex (LOC) are typically immune to parameter changes (e.g., contrast, location, etc.) when these do not affect recognition. Here, we use a complementary approach to highlight changes in brain activity following a shift in the perceptual state (in the absence of any alteration in the physical image). Specifically, we focus on LOC and early visual cortex (EVC) and compare their functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to degraded object images, before and after fast perceptual learning that renders initially unrecognized objects identifiable. Using 3 complementary analyses, we find that, in LOC, unlike EVC, learned recognition is associated with a change in the multivoxel response pattern to degraded object images, such that the response becomes significantly more correlated with that evoked by the intact version of the same image. This provides further evidence that the coding in LOC reflects the recognition of visual objects.

  2. Design and Implementation of a Multimedia DBMS: Complex Query Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    IMPLEMENTATION OF A MULTIMEDIA DBMS: COMPLEX QUERY PROCESSING by Huseyin Aygun September 1991 Thesis Advisor Vincent Y. Lum Approved for public release...type "trace in <function name>. 31 IV. DESIGN OF COMPLEX QUERY PROCESSING In Chapter II of this thesis the general architecture of the MDBMS...data to display. More detailed information about the modification can be found in the next chapter of this thesis . Because the design for the process

  3. Deconvolution of Complex 1D NMR Spectra Using Objective Model Selection.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Travis S; Wilson, Henry D; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Kojetin, Douglas J

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine (19F) NMR has emerged as a useful tool for characterization of slow dynamics in 19F-labeled proteins. One-dimensional (1D) 19F NMR spectra of proteins can be broad, irregular and complex, due to exchange of probe nuclei between distinct electrostatic environments; and therefore cannot be deconvoluted and analyzed in an objective way using currently available software. We have developed a Python-based deconvolution program, decon1d, which uses Bayesian information criteria (BIC) to objectively determine which model (number of peaks) would most likely produce the experimentally obtained data. The method also allows for fitting of intermediate exchange spectra, which is not supported by current software in the absence of a specific kinetic model. In current methods, determination of the deconvolution model best supported by the data is done manually through comparison of residual error values, which can be time consuming and requires model selection by the user. In contrast, the BIC method used by decond1d provides a quantitative method for model comparison that penalizes for model complexity helping to prevent over-fitting of the data and allows identification of the most parsimonious model. The decon1d program is freely available as a downloadable Python script at the project website (https://github.com/hughests/decon1d/).

  4. Minimized state complexity of quantum-encoded cryptic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Paul M.; Mahoney, John R.; Aghamohammadi, Cina; Crutchfield, James P.

    2016-05-01

    The predictive information required for proper trajectory sampling of a stochastic process can be more efficiently transmitted via a quantum channel than a classical one. This recent discovery allows quantum information processing to drastically reduce the memory necessary to simulate complex classical stochastic processes. It also points to a new perspective on the intrinsic complexity that nature must employ in generating the processes we observe. The quantum advantage increases with codeword length: the length of process sequences used in constructing the quantum communication scheme. In analogy with the classical complexity measure, statistical complexity, we use this reduced communication cost as an entropic measure of state complexity in the quantum representation. Previously difficult to compute, the quantum advantage is expressed here in closed form using spectral decomposition. This allows for efficient numerical computation of the quantum-reduced state complexity at all encoding lengths, including infinite. Additionally, it makes clear how finite-codeword reduction in state complexity is controlled by the classical process's cryptic order, and it allows asymptotic analysis of infinite-cryptic-order processes.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of Processing Time for the Synchronization of XML-Based Business Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameling, Michael; Wolf, Bernhard; Springer, Thomas; Schill, Alexander

    Business objects (BOs) are data containers for complex data structures used in business applications such as Supply Chain Management and Customer Relationship Management. Due to the replication of application logic, multiple copies of BOs are created which have to be synchronized and updated. This is a complex and time consuming task because BOs rigorously vary in their structure according to the distribution, number and size of elements. Since BOs are internally represented as XML documents, the parsing of XML is one major cost factor which has to be considered for minimizing the processing time during synchronization. The prediction of the parsing time for BOs is an significant property for the selection of an efficient synchronization mechanism. In this paper, we present a method to evaluate the influence of the structure of BOs on their parsing time. The results of our experimental evaluation incorporating four different XML parsers examine the dependencies between the distribution of elements and the parsing time. Finally, a general cost model will be validated and simplified according to the results of the experimental setup.

  6. Dynamical process of complex systems and fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Hiroaki; Tamura, Yoshiyasu

    2013-10-01

    Behavior of dynamical process of complex systems is investigated. Specifically we analyse two types of ideal complex systems. For analysing the ideal complex systems, we define the response functions describing the internal states to an external force. The internal states are obtained as a relaxation process showing a "power law" distribution, such as scale free behaviors observed in actual measurements. By introducing a hybrid system, the logarithmic time, and double logarithmic time, we show how the "slow relaxation" (SR) process and "super slow relaxation" (SSR) process occur. Regarding the irregular variations of the internal states as an activation process, we calculate the response function to the external force. The behaviors are classified into "power", "exponential", and "stretched exponential" type. Finally we construct a fractional differential equation (FDE) describing the time evolution of these complex systems. In our theory, the exponent of the FDE or that of the power law distribution is expressed in terms of the parameters characterizing the structure of the system.

  7. Effects of Local and Global Context on Processing Sentences with Subject and Object Relative Clauses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Fang; Mo, Lun; Louwerse, Max M.

    2013-01-01

    An eye tracking study investigated the effects of local and global discourse context on the processing of subject and object relative clauses, whereby the contexts favored either a subject relative clause interpretation or an object relative clause interpretation. The fixation data replicated previous studies showing that object relative clause…

  8. Simulation and fitting of complex reaction network TPR: The key is the objective function

    SciTech Connect

    Savara, Aditya Ashi

    2016-07-07

    In this research, a method has been developed for finding improved fits during simulation and fitting of data from complex reaction network temperature programmed reactions (CRN-TPR). It was found that simulation and fitting of CRN-TPR presents additional challenges relative to simulation and fitting of simpler TPR systems. The method used here can enable checking the plausibility of proposed chemical mechanisms and kinetic models. The most important finding was that when choosing an objective function, use of an objective function that is based on integrated production provides more utility in finding improved fits when compared to an objective function based on the rate of production. The response surface produced by using the integrated production is monotonic, suppresses effects from experimental noise, requires fewer points to capture the response behavior, and can be simulated numerically with smaller errors. For CRN-TPR, there is increased importance (relative to simple reaction network TPR) in resolving of peaks prior to fitting, as well as from weighting of experimental data points. Using an implicit ordinary differential equation solver was found to be inadequate for simulating CRN-TPR. Lastly, the method employed here was capable of attaining improved fits in simulation and fitting of CRN-TPR when starting with a postulated mechanism and physically realistic initial guesses for the kinetic parameters.

  9. Simulation and fitting of complex reaction network TPR: The key is the objective function

    DOE PAGES

    Savara, Aditya Ashi

    2016-07-07

    In this research, a method has been developed for finding improved fits during simulation and fitting of data from complex reaction network temperature programmed reactions (CRN-TPR). It was found that simulation and fitting of CRN-TPR presents additional challenges relative to simulation and fitting of simpler TPR systems. The method used here can enable checking the plausibility of proposed chemical mechanisms and kinetic models. The most important finding was that when choosing an objective function, use of an objective function that is based on integrated production provides more utility in finding improved fits when compared to an objective function based onmore » the rate of production. The response surface produced by using the integrated production is monotonic, suppresses effects from experimental noise, requires fewer points to capture the response behavior, and can be simulated numerically with smaller errors. For CRN-TPR, there is increased importance (relative to simple reaction network TPR) in resolving of peaks prior to fitting, as well as from weighting of experimental data points. Using an implicit ordinary differential equation solver was found to be inadequate for simulating CRN-TPR. Lastly, the method employed here was capable of attaining improved fits in simulation and fitting of CRN-TPR when starting with a postulated mechanism and physically realistic initial guesses for the kinetic parameters.« less

  10. Simulation and fitting of complex reaction network TPR: The key is the objective function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savara, Aditya

    2016-11-01

    A method has been developed for finding improved fits during simulation and fitting of data from complex reaction network temperature programmed reactions (CRN-TPR). It was found that simulation and fitting of CRN-TPR presents additional challenges relative to simulation and fitting of simpler TPR systems. The method used here can enable checking the plausibility of proposed chemical mechanisms and kinetic models. The most important finding was that when choosing an objective function, use of an objective function that is based on integrated production provides more utility in finding improved fits when compared to an objective function based on the rate of production. The response surface produced by using the integrated production is monotonic, suppresses effects from experimental noise, requires fewer points to capture the response behavior, and can be simulated numerically with smaller errors. For CRN-TPR, there is increased importance (relative to simple reaction network TPR) in resolving of peaks prior to fitting, as well as from weighting of experimental data points. Using an implicit ordinary differential equation solver was found to be inadequate for simulating CRN-TPR. The method employed here was capable of attaining improved fits in simulation and fitting of CRN-TPR when starting with a postulated mechanism and physically realistic initial guesses for the kinetic parameters.

  11. Simulation and fitting of complex reaction network TPR: The key is the objective function

    SciTech Connect

    Savara, Aditya Ashi

    2016-07-07

    In this research, a method has been developed for finding improved fits during simulation and fitting of data from complex reaction network temperature programmed reactions (CRN-TPR). It was found that simulation and fitting of CRN-TPR presents additional challenges relative to simulation and fitting of simpler TPR systems. The method used here can enable checking the plausibility of proposed chemical mechanisms and kinetic models. The most important finding was that when choosing an objective function, use of an objective function that is based on integrated production provides more utility in finding improved fits when compared to an objective function based on the rate of production. The response surface produced by using the integrated production is monotonic, suppresses effects from experimental noise, requires fewer points to capture the response behavior, and can be simulated numerically with smaller errors. For CRN-TPR, there is increased importance (relative to simple reaction network TPR) in resolving of peaks prior to fitting, as well as from weighting of experimental data points. Using an implicit ordinary differential equation solver was found to be inadequate for simulating CRN-TPR. Lastly, the method employed here was capable of attaining improved fits in simulation and fitting of CRN-TPR when starting with a postulated mechanism and physically realistic initial guesses for the kinetic parameters.

  12. The Lateral Occipital Complex shows no net response to object familiarity

    PubMed Central

    Margalit, Eshed; Shah, Manan P.; Tjan, Bosco S.; Biederman, Irving; Keller, Brenton; Brenner, Rorry

    2016-01-01

    In 1995, Malach et al. discovered an area whose fMRI BOLD response was greater when viewing intact, familiar objects than when viewing their scrambled versions (resembling texture). Since then hundreds of studies have explored this late visual region termed the Lateral Occipital Complex (LOC), which is now known to be critical for shape perception (James, Culham, Humphrey, Milner, & Goodale, 2003). Malach et al. (1995) discounted a role of familiarity by showing that “abstract” Henry Moore sculptures, unfamiliar to the subjects, also activated this region. This characterization of LOC as a region that responds to shape independently of familiarity has been accepted but never tested with control of the same low-level features. We assessed LOC's response to objects that had identical parts in two different arrangements, one familiar and the other novel. Malach was correct: There is no net effect of familiarity in LOC. However, a multivoxel correlation analysis showed that LOC does distinguish familiar from novel objects. PMID:27599373

  13. Is complex signal processing for bone conduction hearing aids useful?

    PubMed

    Kompis, Martin; Kurz, Anja; Pfiffner, Flurin; Senn, Pascal; Arnold, Andreas; Caversaccio, Marco

    2014-05-01

    To establish whether complex signal processing is beneficial for users of bone anchored hearing aids. Review and analysis of two studies from our own group, each comparing a speech processor with basic digital signal processing (either Baha Divino or Baha Intenso) and a processor with complex digital signal processing (either Baha BP100 or Baha BP110 power). The main differences between basic and complex signal processing are the number of audiologist accessible frequency channels and the availability and complexity of the directional multi-microphone noise reduction and loudness compression systems. Both studies show a small, statistically non-significant improvement of speech understanding in quiet with the complex digital signal processing. The average improvement for speech in noise is +0.9 dB, if speech and noise are emitted both from the front of the listener. If noise is emitted from the rear and speech from the front of the listener, the advantage of the devices with complex digital signal processing as opposed to those with basic signal processing increases, on average, to +3.2 dB (range +2.3 … +5.1 dB, p ≤ 0.0032). Complex digital signal processing does indeed improve speech understanding, especially in noise coming from the rear. This finding has been supported by another study, which has been published recently by a different research group. When compared to basic digital signal processing, complex digital signal processing can increase speech understanding of users of bone anchored hearing aids. The benefit is most significant for speech understanding in noise.

  14. A Case for Inhibition: Visual Attention Suppresses the Processing of Irrelevant Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wuhr, Peter; Frings, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated the ability to inhibit the processing of an irrelevant visual object while processing a relevant one. Participants were presented with 2 overlapping shapes (e.g., circle and square) in different colors. The task was to name the color of the relevant object designated by shape. Congruent or incongruent color words…

  15. Functional Dissociations within the Ventral Object Processing Pathway: Cognitive Modules or a Hierarchical Continuum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowell, Rosemary A.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Saksida, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the organization and function of the ventral object processing pathway. The prevailing theoretical approach in this field holds that the ventral object processing stream has a modular organization, in which visual perception is carried out in posterior regions and visual memory is carried out, independently, in the anterior temporal…

  16. Functional Dissociations within the Ventral Object Processing Pathway: Cognitive Modules or a Hierarchical Continuum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowell, Rosemary A.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Saksida, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the organization and function of the ventral object processing pathway. The prevailing theoretical approach in this field holds that the ventral object processing stream has a modular organization, in which visual perception is carried out in posterior regions and visual memory is carried out, independently, in the anterior temporal…

  17. Understanding the Complexity of Social Issues through Process Drama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mara, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    Attempts to capture the process of understanding and questioning deforestation through process drama (in which students and teacher work both in and out of role to explore a problem, situation, or theme). Notes that moving topics such as the destruction of a rainforest into process drama introduces complexity into social issues. Considers how…

  18. Inclusive Education as Complex Process and Challenge for School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Khamisy, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Education may be considered as a number of processes, actions and effects affecting human being, as the state or level of the results of these processes or as the modification of the functions, institutions and social practices roles, which in the result of inclusion become new, integrated system. Thus this is very complex process. Nowadays the…

  19. Understanding the Complexity of Social Issues through Process Drama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mara, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    Attempts to capture the process of understanding and questioning deforestation through process drama (in which students and teacher work both in and out of role to explore a problem, situation, or theme). Notes that moving topics such as the destruction of a rainforest into process drama introduces complexity into social issues. Considers how…

  20. Inclusive Education as Complex Process and Challenge for School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Khamisy, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Education may be considered as a number of processes, actions and effects affecting human being, as the state or level of the results of these processes or as the modification of the functions, institutions and social practices roles, which in the result of inclusion become new, integrated system. Thus this is very complex process. Nowadays the…

  1. Dynamic information processing states revealed through neurocognitive models of object semantics.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Alex

    2015-04-21

    Recognising objects relies on highly dynamic, interactive brain networks to process multiple aspects of object information. To fully understand how different forms of information about objects are represented and processed in the brain requires a neurocognitive account of visual object recognition that combines a detailed cognitive model of semantic knowledge with a neurobiological model of visual object processing. Here we ask how specific cognitive factors are instantiated in our mental processes and how they dynamically evolve over time. We suggest that coarse semantic information, based on generic shared semantic knowledge, is rapidly extracted from visual inputs and is sufficient to drive rapid category decisions. Subsequent recurrent neural activity between the anterior temporal lobe and posterior fusiform supports the formation of object-specific semantic representations - a conjunctive process primarily driven by the perirhinal cortex. These object-specific representations require the integration of shared and distinguishing object properties and support the unique recognition of objects. We conclude that a valuable way of understanding the cognitive activity of the brain is though testing the relationship between specific cognitive measures and dynamic neural activity. This kind of approach allows us to move towards uncovering the information processing states of the brain and how they evolve over time.

  2. Dynamic information processing states revealed through neurocognitive models of object semantics

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Recognising objects relies on highly dynamic, interactive brain networks to process multiple aspects of object information. To fully understand how different forms of information about objects are represented and processed in the brain requires a neurocognitive account of visual object recognition that combines a detailed cognitive model of semantic knowledge with a neurobiological model of visual object processing. Here we ask how specific cognitive factors are instantiated in our mental processes and how they dynamically evolve over time. We suggest that coarse semantic information, based on generic shared semantic knowledge, is rapidly extracted from visual inputs and is sufficient to drive rapid category decisions. Subsequent recurrent neural activity between the anterior temporal lobe and posterior fusiform supports the formation of object-specific semantic representations – a conjunctive process primarily driven by the perirhinal cortex. These object-specific representations require the integration of shared and distinguishing object properties and support the unique recognition of objects. We conclude that a valuable way of understanding the cognitive activity of the brain is though testing the relationship between specific cognitive measures and dynamic neural activity. This kind of approach allows us to move towards uncovering the information processing states of the brain and how they evolve over time. PMID:25745632

  3. FACET: an object-oriented software framework for modeling complex social behavior patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Dolph, J. E.; Christiansen, J. H.; Sydelko, P. J.

    2000-06-30

    The Framework for Addressing Cooperative Extended Transactions (FACET) is a flexible, object-oriented architecture for implementing models of dynamic behavior of multiple individuals, or agents, in a simulation. These agents can be human (individuals or organizations) or animal and may exhibit any type of organized social behavior that can be logically articulated. FACET was developed by Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL) Decision and Information Sciences Division (DIS) out of the need to integrate societal processes into natural system simulations. The FACET architecture includes generic software components that provide the agents with various mechanisms for interaction, such as step sequencing and logic, resource management, conflict resolution, and preemptive event handling. FACET components provide a rich environment within which patterns of behavior can be captured in a highly expressive manner. Interactions among agents in FACET are represented by Course of Action (COA) object-based models. Each COA contains a directed graph of individual actions, which represents any known pattern of social behavior. The agents' behavior in a FACET COA, in turn, influences the natural landscape objects in a simulation (i.e., vegetation, soil, and habitat) by updating their states. The modular design of the FACET architecture provides the flexibility to create multiple and varied simulation scenarios by changing social behavior patterns, without disrupting the natural process models. This paper describes the FACET architecture and presents several examples of FACET models that have been developed to assess the effects of anthropogenic influences on the dynamics of the natural environment.

  4. Unraveling the complexity of mitochondrial complex I assembly: A dynamic process.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Caballero, Laura; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Nijtmans, Leo

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian complex I is composed of 44 different subunits and its assembly requires at least 13 specific assembly factors. Proper function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme is of crucial importance for cell survival due to its major participation in energy production and cell signaling. Complex I assembly depends on the coordination of several crucial processes that need to be tightly interconnected and orchestrated by a number of assembly factors. The understanding of complex I assembly evolved from simple sequential concept to the more sophisticated modular assembly model describing a convoluted process. According to this model, the different modules assemble independently and associate afterwards with each other to form the final enzyme. In this review, we aim to unravel the complexity of complex I assembly and provide the latest insights in this fundamental and fascinating process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  5. Complexity, Methodology and Method: Crafting a Critical Process of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhadeff-Jones, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This paper defines a theoretical framework aiming to support the actions and reflections of researchers looking for a "method" in order to critically conceive the complexity of a scientific process of research. First, it starts with a brief overview of the core assumptions framing Morin's "paradigm of complexity" and Le…

  6. Cognitive Complexity as a Determinant of Information Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewin, L.; Anderson, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    Relationships between cognitive complexity as defined by the ITI [Interpersonal Topical Inventory (Tuckman, 1966) and the CST [Conceptual Systems Test (Harvey, 1967)] and a number of other information processing variables were examined using 107 grade eleven students. (Editor)

  7. Electromagnetic Scattering by a Morphologically Complex Object: Fundamental Concepts and Common Misconceptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mischenko, Michael I.; Travis, Larry D.; Cairns, Brian; Tishkovets, Victor P.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Rosenbush, Vera K.; Kiselev, Nikolai N.

    2011-01-01

    Following Keller(Proc Symp Appl Math 1962;13:227:46), we classify all theoretical treatments of electromagnetic scattering by a morphologically complex object into first- principle (or "honest" in Keller s terminology) and phenomenological (or "dishonest") categories. This helps us identify, analyze, and dispel several profound misconceptions widespread in the discipline of electromagnetic scattering by solitary particles and discrete random media. Our goal is not to call for a complete renunciation of phenomenological approaches but rather to encourage a critical and careful evaluation of their actual origin, virtues, and limitations. In other words, we do not intend to deter creative thinking in terms of phenomenological short-cuts, but we do want to raise awareness when we stray (often for practical reasons) from the fundamentals. The main results and conclusions are illustrated by numerically-exact data based on direct numerical solutions of the macroscopic Maxwell equations.

  8. Determining the complex index of refraction of an unknown object using turbulence-degraded polarimetric imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Milo W., IV

    2010-12-01

    A novel index-of-refraction material-characterization technique using passive polarimetric imagery degraded by atmospheric turbulence is presented. The method uses a variant of the LeMaster and Cain [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 25(9), 2170-2176 (2008)] blind-deconvolution algorithm to recover the true object (i.e., the first Stokes parameter), the degree of linear polarization, and the polarimetric-image point spread functions. Nonlinear least squares is then used to find the value of the complex index of refraction that best fits the theoretical degree of linear polarization, derived using a polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function, to the turbulence-corrected degree of linear polarization. To verify the proposed material-characterization technique, experimental results of two painted metal samples are provided and analyzed.

  9. Transcranial magnetic stimulation to the transverse occipital sulcus affects scene but not object processing.

    PubMed

    Ganaden, Rachel E; Mullin, Caitlin R; Steeves, Jennifer K E

    2013-06-01

    Traditionally, it has been theorized that the human visual system identifies and classifies scenes in an object-centered approach, such that scene recognition can only occur once key objects within a scene are identified. Recent research points toward an alternative approach, suggesting that the global image features of a scene are sufficient for the recognition and categorization of a scene. We have previously shown that disrupting object processing with repetitive TMS to object-selective cortex enhances scene processing possibly through a release of inhibitory mechanisms between object and scene pathways [Mullin, C. R., & Steeves, J. K. E. TMS to the lateral occipital cortex disrupts object processing but facilitates scene processing. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 23, 4174-4184, 2011]. Here we show the effects of TMS to the transverse occipital sulcus (TOS), an area implicated in scene perception, on scene and object processing. TMS was delivered to the TOS or the vertex (control site) while participants performed an object and scene natural/nonnatural categorization task. Transiently interrupting the TOS resulted in significantly lower accuracies for scene categorization compared with control conditions. This demonstrates a causal role of the TOS in scene processing and indicates its importance, in addition to the parahippocampal place area and retrosplenial cortex, in the scene processing network. Unlike TMS to object-selective cortex, which facilitates scene categorization, disrupting scene processing through stimulation of the TOS did not affect object categorization. Further analysis revealed a higher proportion of errors for nonnatural scenes that led us to speculate that the TOS may be involved in processing the higher spatial frequency content of a scene. This supports a nonhierarchical model of scene recognition.

  10. Effects of local and global context on processing sentences with subject and object relative clauses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Mo, Lun; Louwerse, Max M

    2013-06-01

    An eye tracking study investigated the effects of local and global discourse context on the processing of subject and object relative clauses, whereby the contexts favored either a subject relative clause interpretation or an object relative clause interpretation. The fixation data replicated previous studies showing that object relative clause sentences were more difficult to process than subject relative sentences. Crucially, however, the reading difficulty asymmetry between subject and object relative clause sentences disappeared when the sentences were presented with a local or a global discourse context that favored the objects in the object relative clauses. These findings demonstrate that the evidence for a syntax-based account of sentence processing is found when sentences are presented in isolation. However, if sentences are placed more naturally, in context, discourse factors outweigh the initial structural assignment.

  11. Single trial analysis of neurophysiological correlates of the recognition of complex objects and facial expressions of emotion.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Ioannides, A A; Streit, M

    1999-01-01

    In an earlier experiment, we have used the BTi twin MAGNES system (2 x 37 channels) to record the evoked magnetic field from five healthy right-handed male volunteers using two tasks: visual recognition of complex objects including faces and facial expressions of emotion. We have repeated the experiment with one of the five subjects using the BTi whole head system (148 channels). Magnetic field tomography (MFT) was used to extract 3D estimates of brain activity millisecond by millisecond from the recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals. Results from the MFT analysis of the average signals of the five subjects have been reported elsewhere (Streit et al. 1997; Streit et al. 1999). In this paper, we present results of the detailed single trial analysis for the subject recorded from the whole head system. We found activations in areas extending from the occipital pole to anterior areas. Regions of interest (ROIs) were defined entirely on functional criteria and confirmed independently by the location of the maximum activity on the MRI. Activation curves for each ROI were computed and objective statistical measures (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test) were then used to identify time segments for which the ROI activity showed significant differences both within the same and across different object/emotion categories. Emphasis is placed on the quantification of the activity from two ROIs, fusiform gyrus (FG) and amygdala (AM), which have been best studied in the context of processing of faces and facial expressions of emotion, respectively. We found no face-specific area as such, but instead areas like the FG was activated by all complex objects at roughly similar latencies and varying strengths. The amygdala activity was significantly different between 150 and 180 ms for fearful expression, and even earlier for happy expression.

  12. A neuroanatomical model of space-based and object-centered processing in spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Pedrazzini, Elena; Schnider, Armin; Ptak, Radek

    2017-04-05

    Visual attention can be deployed in space-based or object-centered reference frames. Right-hemisphere damage may lead to distinct deficits of space- or object-based processing, and such dissociations are thought to underlie the heterogeneous nature of spatial neglect. Previous studies have suggested that object-centered processing deficits (such as in copying, reading or line bisection) result from damage to retro-rolandic regions while impaired spatial exploration reflects damage to more anterior regions. However, this evidence is based on small samples and heterogeneous tasks. Here, we tested a theoretical model of neglect that takes in account the space- and object-based processing and relates them to neuroanatomical predictors. One hundred and one right-hemisphere-damaged patients were examined with classic neuropsychological tests and structural brain imaging. Relations between neglect measures and damage to the temporal-parietal junction, intraparietal cortex, insula and middle frontal gyrus were examined with two structural equation models by assuming that object-centered processing (involved in line bisection and single-word reading) and space-based processing (involved in cancelation tasks) either represented a unique latent variable or two distinct variables. Of these two models the latter had better explanatory power. Damage to the intraparietal sulcus was a significant predictor of object-centered, but not space-based processing, while damage to the temporal-parietal junction predicted space-based, but not object-centered processing. Space-based processing and object-centered processing were strongly intercorrelated, indicating that they rely on similar, albeit partly dissociated processes. These findings indicate that object-centered and space-based deficits in neglect are partly independent and result from superior parietal and inferior parietal damage, respectively.

  13. Objective evaluation of the effect of noise on the performance of a complex laparoscopic task.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, K; Munz, Y; Undre, S; Darzi, A

    2004-07-01

    Noise in operating rooms has been found to be much higher than the recommended level of 45 dB. The aim of this study was to objectively evaluate the effect of noise and music on the performance of a complex surgical task. Twelve surgeons with varying experience in laparoscopic suturing undertook 3 sutures in a laparoscopic trainer under 3 conditions: quiet, noise at 80 to 85 dB, and music. Other than the test conditions, all other conditions were standardized. A validated motion analysis system was used to assess performance. The tasks were recorded by video and played back to 2 blinded observers who rated the surgeons' performance on a global rating scale by observing the tasks for accuracy, knot quality, and number of nonpurposeful movements. Time taken for the tasks (P=.78), total number of movements (P=.78), total path length (P=.47), global score (P=.54), accuracy, and knot quality remained unchanged across the 3 conditions. The main study measures had a high test-retest reliability and internal consistency. No learning effect was seen across the 3 conditions. Surgeons can effectively "block out" noise and music. This is probably due to the high levels of concentration required for the performance of a complex surgical task. Future research should focus on the effect of these conditions on communication in the operating room.

  14. Early information processing contributions to object individuation revealed by perception of illusory figures.

    PubMed

    Naughtin, Claire K; Mattingley, Jason B; Dux, Paul E

    2016-12-01

    To isolate multiple coherent objects from their surrounds, each object must be represented as a stable perceptual entity across both time and space. Recent theoretical and empirical work has proposed that this process of object individuation is a mid-level operation that emerges around 200-300 ms after stimulus onset. However, this hypothesis is based on paradigms that have potentially obscured earlier effects. Furthermore, no study to date has directly assessed whether object individuation occurs for task-irrelevant objects. In the present study we used electroencephalography (EEG) to measure the time course of individuation, for stimuli both within and outside the focus of attention, to assess the information processing stage at which object individuation arises for both types of objects. We developed a novel paradigm involving items defined by illusory contours, which allowed us to vary the number of to-be-individuated objects while holding the physical elements of the display constant (a design characteristic not present in earlier work). As early as 100 ms after stimulus onset, event-related potentials tracked the number of objects in the attended hemifield, but not those in the unattended hemifield. By contrast, both attended and unattended objects could be individuated at a later stage. Our findings challenge recent conceptualizations of the time course of object individuation and suggest that this process arises earlier for attended than unattended items, implying that voluntary spatial attention influences the time course of this operation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. A modeling process to understand complex system architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Santiago Balestrini

    2009-12-01

    In recent decades, several tools have been developed by the armed forces, and their contractors, to test the capability of a force. These campaign level analysis tools, often times characterized as constructive simulations are generally expensive to create and execute, and at best they are extremely difficult to verify and validate. This central observation, that the analysts are relying more and more on constructive simulations to predict the performance of future networks of systems, leads to the two central objectives of this thesis: (1) to enable the quantitative comparison of architectures in terms of their ability to satisfy a capability without resorting to constructive simulations, and (2) when constructive simulations must be created, to quantitatively determine how to spend the modeling effort amongst the different system classes. The first objective led to Hypothesis A, the first main hypotheses, which states that by studying the relationships between the entities that compose an architecture, one can infer how well it will perform a given capability. The method used to test the hypothesis is based on two assumptions: (1) the capability can be defined as a cycle of functions, and that it (2) must be possible to estimate the probability that a function-based relationship occurs between any two types of entities. If these two requirements are met, then by creating random functional networks, different architectures can be compared in terms of their ability to satisfy a capability. In order to test this hypothesis, a novel process for creating representative functional networks of large-scale system architectures was developed. The process, named the Digraph Modeling for Architectures (DiMA), was tested by comparing its results to those of complex constructive simulations. Results indicate that if the inputs assigned to DiMA are correct (in the tests they were based on time-averaged data obtained from the ABM), DiMA is able to identify which of any two

  16. Anthropogenic and technogenic factors of operational risk at hazardous industrial objects of fuel-power complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magid, S. I.; Arkhipova, E. N.; Kulichikhin, V. V.; Zagretdinov, I. Sh.

    2016-12-01

    Technogenic and anthropogenic accidence at hazardous industrial objects (HIO) in the Russian Federation has been considered. The accidence level at HIO, including power plants and network enterprises, is determined by anthropogenic reasons, so-called "human factor", in 70% of all cases. The analysis of incidents caused by personnel has shown that errors occur most often during accidental situations, launches, holdups, routine switches, and other effects on equipment controls. It has been demonstrated that skills needed to perform type and routine switches can be learned, to certain limits, on real operating equipment, while combating emergency and accidental situations can be learned only with the help of modern training simulators developed based on information technologies. Problems arising during the following processes have been considered: development of mathematical and software support of modern training equipment associated, in one way or another, with adequate power-generating object modeling in accordance with human operator specifics; modeling and/or simulation of the corresponding control and management systems; organization of the education system (functional supply of the instructor, education and methodological resources (EMR)); organization of the program-technical, scalable and adaptable, platform for modeling of the main and secondary functions of the training simulator. It has been concluded that the systemic approach principle on the necessity and sufficiency in the applied methodology allows to reproduce all technological characteristics of the equipment, its topological completeness, as well as to achieve the acceptable counting rate. The initial "rough" models of processes in the equipment are based on the normative techniques and equation coefficients taken from the normative materials as well. Then, the synthesis of "fine" models has been carried out following the global practice in modeling and training simulator building, i

  17. The Effects of Syntactic Complexity on Processing Sentences in Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Rebecca; Ruigendijk, Esther

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the influence of stationary (non-fluctuating) noise on processing and understanding of sentences, which vary in their syntactic complexity (with the factors canonicity, embedding, ambiguity). It presents data from two RT-studies with 44 participants testing processing of German sentences in silence and in noise. Results show a…

  18. The Complexity of Developmental Predictions from Dual Process Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanovich, Keith E.; West, Richard F.; Toplak, Maggie E.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing developmental predictions from dual-process theories is more complex than is commonly realized. Overly simplified predictions drawn from such models may lead to premature rejection of the dual process approach as one of many tools for understanding cognitive development. Misleading predictions can be avoided by paying attention to several…

  19. The Effects of Syntactic Complexity on Processing Sentences in Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Rebecca; Ruigendijk, Esther

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the influence of stationary (non-fluctuating) noise on processing and understanding of sentences, which vary in their syntactic complexity (with the factors canonicity, embedding, ambiguity). It presents data from two RT-studies with 44 participants testing processing of German sentences in silence and in noise. Results show a…

  20. Optimization of multi-objective integrated process planning and scheduling problem using a priority based optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausaf, Muhammad Farhan; Gao, Liang; Li, Xinyu

    2015-12-01

    For increasing the overall performance of modern manufacturing systems, effective integration of process planning and scheduling functions has been an important area of consideration among researchers. Owing to the complexity of handling process planning and scheduling simultaneously, most of the research work has been limited to solving the integrated process planning and scheduling (IPPS) problem for a single objective function. As there are many conflicting objectives when dealing with process planning and scheduling, real world problems cannot be fully captured considering only a single objective for optimization. Therefore considering multi-objective IPPS (MOIPPS) problem is inevitable. Unfortunately, only a handful of research papers are available on solving MOIPPS problem. In this paper, an optimization algorithm for solving MOIPPS problem is presented. The proposed algorithm uses a set of dispatching rules coupled with priority assignment to optimize the IPPS problem for various objectives like makespan, total machine load, total tardiness, etc. A fixed sized external archive coupled with a crowding distance mechanism is used to store and maintain the non-dominated solutions. To compare the results with other algorithms, a C-matric based method has been used. Instances from four recent papers have been solved to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. The experimental results show that the proposed method is an efficient approach for solving the MOIPPS problem.

  1. Beyond Faces and Expertise: Facelike Holistic Processing of Nonface Objects in the Absence of Expertise.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mintao; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Bülthoff, Isabelle

    2016-02-01

    Holistic processing-the tendency to perceive objects as indecomposable wholes-has long been viewed as a process specific to faces or objects of expertise. Although current theories differ in what causes holistic processing, they share a fundamental constraint for its generalization: Nonface objects cannot elicit facelike holistic processing in the absence of expertise. Contrary to this prevailing view, here we show that line patterns with salient Gestalt information (i.e., connectedness, closure, and continuity between parts) can be processed as holistically as faces without any training. Moreover, weakening the saliency of Gestalt information in these patterns reduced holistic processing of them, which indicates that Gestalt information plays a crucial role in holistic processing. Therefore, holistic processing can be achieved not only via a top-down route based on expertise, but also via a bottom-up route relying merely on object-based information. The finding that facelike holistic processing can extend beyond the domains of faces and objects of expertise poses a challenge to current dominant theories.

  2. A functional neuroimaging study of the variables that generate category-specific object processing differences.

    PubMed

    Moore, C J; Price, C J

    1999-05-01

    Brain damage can cause remarkably selective deficits in processing specific categories of objects, indicating the high degree of functional segregation within the brain. The neuroimaging study presented here investigates differences in the neural activity associated with two categories of natural objects (animals and fruit) and two categories of man-made objects (vehicles and tools). Stimuli were outline drawings and the tasks were naming and word-picture matching. For man-made objects, the only category-specific effect was in the left posterior middle temporal cortex, which was most active for drawings of tools, as previously reported. For natural objects, drawings of animals and fruit (relative to drawings of man-made objects) enhanced activity in bilateral anterior temporal and right posterior middle temporal cortices. Critically, these effects with natural objects were not observed when the stimuli were coloured appropriately to facilitate identification. Furthermore, activation in the same right hemisphere areas was also observed for viewing and matching unfamiliar non-objects relative to naming and matching man-made objects. These results indicate that, in the right hemisphere, differences between processing natural relative to man-made objects overlap with the effects of increasing demands on object identification. In the left hemisphere, the effects are more consistent with functional specialization within the semantic system. We discuss (i) how category-specific differences can emerge for multiple reasons and (ii) the implications of these effects on the interpretation of functional imaging data and patients with category-specific deficits.

  3. Design and implementation of a distributed Complex Event Processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Shang, Yanlei

    2017-01-01

    Making use of the massive events from event sources such as sensors and bank transactions and extract valuable information is of significant importance. Complex Event Processing (CEP), a method of detecting complex events from simple events stream, provides a solution of processing data in real time fast and efficiently. However, a single node CEP system can't satisfy requirements of processing massive event streams from multitudinous event sources. Therefore, this article designs a distributed CEP system, which combine Siddhi, a CEP engine, and Storm, a distributed real time computation architecture. This system can construct topology automatically based on the event streams and execution plans provided by users and process the event streams parallel. Compared with single node complex event system, the distributed system can achieve better performance.

  4. Process Consistency in Models: the Importance of System Signatures, Expert Knowledge and Process Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrachowitz, Markus; Fovet, Ophelie; Ruiz, Laurent; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Savenije, Hubert

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological models are frequently characterized by what is often considered to be adequate calibration performances. In many cases, however, these models experience a substantial uncertainty and performance decrease in validation periods, thus resulting in poor predictive power. Besides the likely presence of data errors, this observation can point towards wrong or insufficient representations of the underlying processes and their heterogeneity. In other words, right results are generated for the wrong reasons. Thus ways are sought to increase model consistency and to thereby satisfy the contrasting priorities of the need a) to increase model complexity and b) to limit model equifinality. In this study a stepwise model development approach is chosen to test the value of an exhaustive and systematic combined use of hydrological signatures, expert knowledge and readily available, yet anecdotal and rarely exploited, hydrological information for increasing model consistency towards generating the right answer for the right reasons. A simple 3-box, 7 parameter, conceptual HBV-type model, constrained by 4 calibration objective functions was able to adequately reproduce the hydrograph with comparatively high values for the 4 objective functions in the 5-year calibration period. However, closer inspection of the results showed a dramatic decrease of model performance in the 5-year validation period. In addition, assessing the model's skill to reproduce a range of 20 hydrological signatures including, amongst others, the flow duration curve, the autocorrelation function and the rising limb density, showed that it could not adequately reproduce the vast majority of these signatures, indicating a lack of model consistency. Subsequently model complexity was increased in a stepwise way to allow for more process heterogeneity. To limit model equifinality, increase in complexity was counter-balanced by a stepwise application of "realism constraints", inferred from expert

  5. HOP: (Hardware Viewed as Objects and Processes). A Process Model for Synchronous Hardware Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    that was based on an abstract data type view of hardware systems into a new, simple, and deterministic process model that we have invented. Our process ... model is inspired by the works of Mil82, Mil83, and Hoa85. Secondly it is believed that not only should an HSL be founded in mathematical principles

  6. Developing Goals and Objectives for a Process-Based Technology Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicklein, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    An 11-member DACUM team identified necessary instructional elements and student outcomes for process-based secondary technology education. A panel of 43 exemplary teachers then validated goals and objectives, resulting in a curriculum framework. (SK)

  7. Top-down modulation of visual processing and knowledge after 250 ms supports object constancy of category decisions

    PubMed Central

    Schendan, Haline E.; Ganis, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    People categorize objects more slowly when visual input is highly impoverished instead of optimal. While bottom-up models may explain a decision with optimal input, perceptual hypothesis testing (PHT) theories implicate top-down processes with impoverished input. Brain mechanisms and the time course of PHT are largely unknown. This event-related potential study used a neuroimaging paradigm that implicated prefrontal cortex in top-down modulation of occipitotemporal cortex. Subjects categorized more impoverished and less impoverished real and pseudo objects. PHT theories predict larger impoverishment effects for real than pseudo objects because top-down processes modulate knowledge only for real objects, but different PHT variants predict different timing. Consistent with parietal-prefrontal PHT variants, around 250 ms, the earliest impoverished real object interaction started on an N3 complex, which reflects interactive cortical activity for object cognition. N3 impoverishment effects localized to both prefrontal and occipitotemporal cortex for real objects only. The N3 also showed knowledge effects by 230 ms that localized to occipitotemporal cortex. Later effects reflected (a) word meaning in temporal cortex during the N400, (b) internal evaluation of prior decision and memory processes and secondary higher-order memory involving anterotemporal parts of a default mode network during posterior positivity (P600), and (c) response related activity in posterior cingulate during an anterior slow wave (SW) after 700 ms. Finally, response activity in supplementary motor area during a posterior SW after 900 ms showed impoverishment effects that correlated with RTs. Convergent evidence from studies of vision, memory, and mental imagery which reflects purely top-down inputs, indicates that the N3 reflects the critical top-down processes of PHT. A hybrid multiple-state interactive, PHT and decision theory best explains the visual constancy of object cognition. PMID:26441701

  8. Top-down modulation of visual processing and knowledge after 250 ms supports object constancy of category decisions.

    PubMed

    Schendan, Haline E; Ganis, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    People categorize objects more slowly when visual input is highly impoverished instead of optimal. While bottom-up models may explain a decision with optimal input, perceptual hypothesis testing (PHT) theories implicate top-down processes with impoverished input. Brain mechanisms and the time course of PHT are largely unknown. This event-related potential study used a neuroimaging paradigm that implicated prefrontal cortex in top-down modulation of occipitotemporal cortex. Subjects categorized more impoverished and less impoverished real and pseudo objects. PHT theories predict larger impoverishment effects for real than pseudo objects because top-down processes modulate knowledge only for real objects, but different PHT variants predict different timing. Consistent with parietal-prefrontal PHT variants, around 250 ms, the earliest impoverished real object interaction started on an N3 complex, which reflects interactive cortical activity for object cognition. N3 impoverishment effects localized to both prefrontal and occipitotemporal cortex for real objects only. The N3 also showed knowledge effects by 230 ms that localized to occipitotemporal cortex. Later effects reflected (a) word meaning in temporal cortex during the N400, (b) internal evaluation of prior decision and memory processes and secondary higher-order memory involving anterotemporal parts of a default mode network during posterior positivity (P600), and (c) response related activity in posterior cingulate during an anterior slow wave (SW) after 700 ms. Finally, response activity in supplementary motor area during a posterior SW after 900 ms showed impoverishment effects that correlated with RTs. Convergent evidence from studies of vision, memory, and mental imagery which reflects purely top-down inputs, indicates that the N3 reflects the critical top-down processes of PHT. A hybrid multiple-state interactive, PHT and decision theory best explains the visual constancy of object cognition.

  9. The Effects of Directional Processing on Objective and Subjective Listening Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picou, Erin M.; Moore, Travis M.; Ricketts, Todd A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this investigation were (a) to evaluate the effects of hearing aid directional processing on subjective and objective listening effort and (b) to investigate the potential relationships between subjective and objective measures of effort. Method: Sixteen adults with mild to severe hearing loss were tested with study…

  10. Mirror-Image Confusions: Implications for Representation and Processing of Object Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Emma; McCloskey, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Perceiving the orientation of objects is important for interacting with the world, yet little is known about the mental representation or processing of object orientation information. The tendency of humans and other species to confuse mirror images provides a potential clue. However, the appropriate characterization of this phenomenon is not…

  11. The Effects of Directional Processing on Objective and Subjective Listening Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picou, Erin M.; Moore, Travis M.; Ricketts, Todd A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this investigation were (a) to evaluate the effects of hearing aid directional processing on subjective and objective listening effort and (b) to investigate the potential relationships between subjective and objective measures of effort. Method: Sixteen adults with mild to severe hearing loss were tested with study…

  12. Mirror-Image Confusions: Implications for Representation and Processing of Object Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Emma; McCloskey, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Perceiving the orientation of objects is important for interacting with the world, yet little is known about the mental representation or processing of object orientation information. The tendency of humans and other species to confuse mirror images provides a potential clue. However, the appropriate characterization of this phenomenon is not…

  13. Stimulus size mediates Gestalt processes in object perception - evidence from simultanagnosia.

    PubMed

    Rennig, Johannes; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2016-08-01

    Simultanagnosia caused by posterior temporo-parietal brain damage is characterized through an inability to recognize a global Gestalt from an arrangement of single objects while perception of single objects appears widely intact. We asked whether recognition of single objects in simultanagnosia is still intact if objects are really large, i.e. if they exceed the size of a usual computer screen. Single objects were presented in three different sizes: 'regular', 'medium', and 'large'. Simultanagnosia patients demonstrated a decrease of recognition performance with increasing object size; recognition of 'large' objects was significantly impaired while perception of 'regular' sized objects was unaffected. The results argue against the traditional view of preserved recognition of single objects in simultanagnosia. They provide evidence for a more general perceptual impairment that emerges irrespective of presenting single or multiple objects, but whenever the visual system has to assemble information over larger spatial distances or other demanding viewing conditions. It appears that perception of large single objects requires intact abilities of dorsal Gestalt processing, in addition to regular functions of ventral object recognition.

  14. Interaction between Scene and Object Processing Revealed by Human fMRI and MEG Decoding.

    PubMed

    Brandman, Talia; Peelen, Marius V

    2017-08-09

    Scenes strongly facilitate object recognition, such as when we make out the shape of a distant boat on the water. Yet, although known to interact in perception, neuroimaging research has primarily provided evidence for separate scene- and object-selective cortical pathways. This raises the question of how these pathways interact to support context-based perception. Here we used a novel approach in human fMRI and MEG studies to reveal supra-additive scene-object interactions. Participants (men and women) viewed degraded objects that were hard to recognize when presented in isolation but easy to recognize within their original scene context, in which no other associated objects were present. fMRI decoding showed that the multivariate representation of the objects' category (animate/inanimate) in object-selective cortex was strongly enhanced by the presence of scene context, even though the scenes alone did not evoke category-selective response patterns. This effect in object-selective cortex was correlated with concurrent activity in scene-selective regions. MEG decoding results revealed that scene-based facilitation of object processing peaked at 320 ms after stimulus onset, 100 ms later than peak decoding of intact objects. Together, results suggest that expectations derived from scene information, processed in scene-selective cortex, feed back to shape object representations in visual cortex. These findings characterize, in space and time, functional interactions between scene- and object-processing pathways.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although scenes and objects are known to contextually interact in visual perception, the study of high-level vision has mostly focused on the dissociation between their selective neural pathways. The current findings are the first to reveal direct facilitation of object recognition and neural representation by scene background, even in the absence of contextually associated objects. Using a multivariate approach to both fMRI and MEG, we

  15. Discourse accessibility constraints in children’s processing of object relative clauses

    PubMed Central

    Haendler, Yair; Kliegl, Reinhold; Adani, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Children’s poor performance on object relative clauses has been explained in terms of intervention locality. This approach predicts that object relatives with a full DP head and an embedded pronominal subject are easier than object relatives in which both the head noun and the embedded subject are full DPs. This prediction is shared by other accounts formulated to explain processing mechanisms. We conducted a visual-world study designed to test the off-line comprehension and on-line processing of object relatives in German-speaking 5-year-olds. Children were tested on three types of object relatives, all having a full DP head noun and differing with respect to the type of nominal phrase that appeared in the embedded subject position: another full DP, a 1st- or a 3rd-person pronoun. Grammatical skills and memory capacity were also assessed in order to see whether and how they affect children’s performance. Most accurately processed were object relatives with 1st-person pronoun, independently of children’s language and memory skills. Performance on object relatives with two full DPs was overall more accurate than on object relatives with 3rd-person pronoun. In the former condition, children with stronger grammatical skills accurately processed the structure and their memory abilities determined how fast they were; in the latter condition, children only processed accurately the structure if they were strong both in their grammatical skills and in their memory capacity. The results are discussed in the light of accounts that predict different pronoun effects like the ones we find, which depend on the referential properties of the pronouns. We then discuss which role language and memory abilities might have in processing object relatives with various embedded nominal phrases. PMID:26157410

  16. Habitat Complexity in Aquatic Microcosms Affects Processes Driven by Detritivores.

    PubMed

    Flores, Lorea; Bailey, R A; Elosegi, Arturo; Larrañaga, Aitor; Reiss, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Habitat complexity can influence predation rates (e.g. by providing refuge) but other ecosystem processes and species interactions might also be modulated by the properties of habitat structure. Here, we focussed on how complexity of artificial habitat (plastic plants), in microcosms, influenced short-term processes driven by three aquatic detritivores. The effects of habitat complexity on leaf decomposition, production of fine organic matter and pH levels were explored by measuring complexity in three ways: 1. as the presence vs. absence of habitat structure; 2. as the amount of structure (3 or 4.5 g of plastic plants); and 3. as the spatial configuration of structures (measured as fractal dimension). The experiment also addressed potential interactions among the consumers by running all possible species combinations. In the experimental microcosms, habitat complexity influenced how species performed, especially when comparing structure present vs. structure absent. Treatments with structure showed higher fine particulate matter production and lower pH compared to treatments without structures and this was probably due to higher digestion and respiration when structures were present. When we explored the effects of the different complexity levels, we found that the amount of structure added explained more than the fractal dimension of the structures. We give a detailed overview of the experimental design, statistical models and R codes, because our statistical analysis can be applied to other study systems (and disciplines such as restoration ecology). We further make suggestions of how to optimise statistical power when artificially assembling, and analysing, 'habitat complexity' by not confounding complexity with the amount of structure added. In summary, this study highlights the importance of habitat complexity for energy flow and the maintenance of ecosystem processes in aquatic ecosystems.

  17. The MRB1 complex functions in kinetoplastid RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Acestor, Nathalie; Panigrahi, Aswini K.; Carnes, Jason; Zíková, Alena; Stuart, Kenneth D.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) gene expression in Trypanosoma brucei entails multiple types of RNA processing, including polycistronic transcript cleavage, mRNA editing, gRNA oligouridylation, and mRNA polyadenylation, which are catalyzed by various multiprotein complexes. We examined the novel mitochondrial RNA-binding 1 (MRB1) complex that has 16 associated proteins, four of which have motifs suggesting RNA interaction. RNase treatment or the lack of kDNA in mutants resulted in lower MRB1 complex sedimentation in gradients, indicating that MRB1 complex associates with kDNA transcripts. RNAi knockdowns of expression of the Tb10.406.0050 (TbRGGm, RGG motif), Tb927.6.1680 (C2H2 zinc finger), and Tb11.02.5390 (no known motif) MRB1 proteins each inhibited in vitro growth of procyclic form parasites and resulted in cells with abnormal numbers of nuclei. Knockdown of TbRGGm, but not the other two proteins, disrupted the MRB1 complex, indicating that it, but perhaps not the other two, is required for complex assembly and/or stability. The knockdowns resulted in similar but nonidentical patterns of altered in vivo abundances of edited, pre-edited, and preprocessed mt mRNAs, but did not appreciably affect the abundances of mRNAs that do not get edited. These results indicate that MRB1 complex is critical to the processing of mt RNAs, and although its specific function is unknown, it appears essential to parasite viability. PMID:19096045

  18. Multispectral illumination and image processing techniques for active millimeter-wave concealed object detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixiao; Stiens, Johan; Elhawil, Amna; Vounckx, Roger

    2008-12-01

    Active millimeter-wave imaging systems for concealed object detection offer the possibility of much higher image contrast than passive systems, especially in indoor applications. By studying active millimeter-wave images of different test objects derived in the W band, we show that multispectral illumination is critical to the detectability of targets. We also propose to use image change detection techniques, including image differencing, normalized difference vegetation index, and principle component analysis to process the multispectral millimeter-wave images. The results demonstrate that multispectral illumination can significantly reveal the object features hidden by image artifacts and improve the appearance of the objects.

  19. Laser diffraction process and apparatus for width measurement of elongated objects

    DOEpatents

    Naqwi, Amir A.; Fandrey, Christopher W.

    2006-07-04

    Size distribution of elongated objects is measured by forward scattering radiation from the objects at a range of scatter angles. The scattered radiation is refracted to locations on a scatter detector based on the scatter angles and independent of the location of the objects along the radiation axis. The intensity of radiation is sensed at each position on the scatter detector, and signals representative of the intensities at the positions are processed and compared to masks to identify a size distribution. The scatter detector may include individual radiation detectors arranged to receive refracted radiation representing respective ranges of scatter angles to thereby compensate for lower radiation intensities scattered from smaller objects.

  20. Categorical and coordinate processing in object recognition depends on different spatial frequencies.

    PubMed

    Saneyoshi, Ayako; Michimata, Chikashi

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that processing categorical spatial relations requires high spatial frequency (HSF) information, while coordinate spatial relations require low spatial frequency (LSF) information. The aim of the present study was to determine whether spatial frequency influences categorical and coordinate processing in object recognition. Participants performed two object-matching tasks for novel, non-nameable objects consisting of "geons" (c.f. Brain Cogn 71:181-186, 2009). For each original stimulus, categorical and coordinate transformations were applied to create comparison stimuli. These stimuli were high-pass/low-cut-filtered or low-pass/high-cut-filtered by a filter with a 2D Gaussian envelope. The categorical task consisted of the original and categorical-transformed objects. The coordinate task consisted of the original and coordinate-transformed objects. The non-filtered object image was presented on a CRT monitor, followed by a comparison object (non-filtered, high-pass-filtered, and low-pass-filtered stimuli). The results showed that the removal of HSF information from the object image produced longer reaction times (RTs) in the categorical task, while removal of LSF information produced longer RTs in the coordinate task. These results support spatial frequency processing theory, specifically Kosslyn's hypothesis and the double filtering frequency model.

  1. Close interpersonal proximity modulates visuomotor processing of object affordances in shared, social space.

    PubMed

    Saccone, Elizabeth J; Szpak, Ancret; Churches, Owen; Nicholls, Michael E R

    2017-09-01

    Research suggests that the human brain codes manipulable objects as possibilities for action, or affordances, particularly objects close to the body. Near-body space is not only a zone for body-environment interaction but also is socially relevant, as we are driven to preserve our near-body, personal space from others. The current, novel study investigated how close proximity of a stranger modulates visuomotor processing of object affordances in shared, social space. Participants performed a behavioural object recognition task both alone and with a human confederate. All object images were in participants' reachable space but appeared relatively closer to the participant or the confederate. Results revealed when participants were alone, objects in both locations produced an affordance congruency effect but when the confederate was present, only objects nearer the participant elicited the effect. Findings suggest space is divided between strangers to preserve independent near-body space boundaries, and in turn this process influences motor coding for stimuli within that social space. To demonstrate that this visuomotor modulation represents a social phenomenon, rather than a general, attentional effect, two subsequent experiments employed nonhuman joint conditions. Neither a small, Japanese, waving cat statue (Experiment 2) nor a metronome (Experiment 3) modulated the affordance effect as in Experiment 1. These findings suggest a truly social explanation of the key interaction from Experiment 1. This study represents an important step toward understanding object affordance processing in real-world, social contexts and has implications broadly across fields of social action and cognition, and body space representation.

  2. Rethinking infant knowledge: toward an adaptive process account of successes and failures in object permanence tasks.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Y; McClelland, J L; Johnson, M H; Siegler, R S

    1997-10-01

    Infants seem sensitive to hidden objects in habituation tasks at 3.5 months but fail to retrieve hidden objects until 8 months. The authors first consider principle-based accounts of these successes and failures, in which early successes imply knowledge of principles and failures are attributed to ancillary deficits. One account is that infants younger than 8 months have the object permanence principle but lack means-ends abilities. To test this, 7-month-olds were trained on means-ends behaviors and were tested on retrieval of visible and occluded toys. Means-ends demands were the same, yet infants made more toy-guided retrievals in the visible case. The authors offer an adaptive process account in which knowledge is graded and embedded in specific behavioral processes. Simulation models that learn gradually to represent occluded objects show how this approach can account for success and failure in object permanence tasks without assuming principles and ancillary deficits.

  3. Object shape and orientation do not routinely influence performance during language processing.

    PubMed

    Rommers, Joost; Meyer, Antje S; Huettig, Falk

    2013-11-01

    The role of visual representations during language processing remains unclear: They could be activated as a necessary part of the comprehension process, or they could be less crucial and influence performance in a task-dependent manner. In the present experiments, participants read sentences about an object. The sentences implied that the object had a specific shape or orientation. They then either named a picture of that object (Experiments 1 and 3) or decided whether the object had been mentioned in the sentence (Experiment 2). Orientation information did not reliably influence performance in any of the experiments. Shape representations influenced performance most strongly when participants were asked to compare a sentence with a picture or when they were explicitly asked to use mental imagery while reading the sentences. Thus, in contrast to previous claims, implied visual information often does not contribute substantially to the comprehension process during normal reading.

  4. Spatial versus object feature processing in human auditory cortex: a magnetoencephalographic study.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Christoph S; Senkowski, Daniel; Maess, Burkhard; Friederici, Angela D

    2002-12-06

    The human visual system is divided into two pathways specialized for the processing of either objects or spatial locations. Neuroanatomical studies in monkeys have suggested that a similar specialization may also divide auditory cortex into two such pathways. We used the identical stimulus material in two experimental sessions in which subjects had to either identify auditory objects or their location. Magnetoencephalograms were recorded and M100 dipoles were fitted into individual brain models. In the right hemisphere, the processing of auditory spatial information lead to more lateral activations within the temporal plane while object identification lead to more medial activations. These findings suggest that the human auditory system processes object features and spatial features in distinct areas.

  5. Mid-fusiform activation during object discrimination reflects the process of differentiating structural descriptions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xun; Steinmetz, Nicholas A; Farley, Alison B; Smith, Charles D; Joseph, Jane E

    2008-09-01

    The present study explored constraints on mid-fusiform activation during object discrimination. In three experiments, participants performed a matching task on simple line configurations, nameable objects, three dimensional (3-D) shapes, and colors. Significant bilateral mid-fusiform activation emerged when participants matched objects and 3-D shapes, as compared to when they matched two-dimensional (2-D) line configurations and colors, indicating that the mid-fusiform is engaged more strongly for processing structural descriptions (e.g., comparing 3-D volumetric shape) than perceptual descriptions (e.g., comparing 2-D or color information). In two of the experiments, the same mid-fusiform regions were also modulated by the degree of structural similarity between stimuli, implicating a role for the mid-fusiform in fine differentiation of similar visual object representations. Importantly, however, this process of fine differentiation occurred at the level of structural, but not perceptual, descriptions. Moreover, mid-fusiform activity was more robust when participants matched shape compared to color information using the identical stimuli, indicating that activity in the mid-fusiform gyrus is not driven by specific stimulus properties, but rather by the process of distinguishing stimuli based on shape information. Taken together, these findings further clarify the nature of object processing in the mid-fusiform gyrus. This region is engaged specifically in structural differentiation, a critical component process of object recognition and categorization.

  6. Possible Overlapping Time Frames of Acquisition and Consolidation Phases in Object Memory Processes: A Pharmacological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkerman, Sven; Blokland, Arjan; Prickaerts, Jos

    2016-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE-Is) are able to improve object memory by enhancing acquisition processes. On the other hand, only PDE-Is improve consolidation processes. Here we show that the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil also improves memory performance when…

  7. Prioritization criteria of objective index for disaster management by satellite image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poursaber, Mohammad R.; Ariki, Yasuo; Safi, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    The outputs obtained from satellite image processing generally presents various information based on the interpretation technique, selected objects for object based processing, precision of processing, the number and time of images used for this process. This issue should be managed well during a disaster management process based on satellite images. Very high resolution (VHR) optical satellite data are potential sources to provide detailed information on damage and geological changes for a large area in a short time. In this paper, we studied tsunami triggered area, which was caused on 11 March 2011 by Tohoku earthquake, using VHR data from GeoEye-1satellite images. A set of pre and post-earthquake images were used to perform visual change analysis through comparison of these data. These images include the data of the same area before the disaster in normal condition and after the disaster which caused changes and also some modification imposed to that area. Upon occurrence of a disaster, the images are used to estimate the extent of the damage. Then based on disaster management criteria and the needs for recovery and reconstruction, the priorities for object based classification indexes are defined. In post-disaster management, they are used for reconstruction and sustainable development activities. Finally a classified characteristic definition has been proposed which can be used as sample indexes prioritization criteria for disaster management based on satellite image processing. This prioritization criteria are based on an object based processing technique and can be further developed for other image processing methods.

  8. Possible Overlapping Time Frames of Acquisition and Consolidation Phases in Object Memory Processes: A Pharmacological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkerman, Sven; Blokland, Arjan; Prickaerts, Jos

    2016-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE-Is) are able to improve object memory by enhancing acquisition processes. On the other hand, only PDE-Is improve consolidation processes. Here we show that the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil also improves memory performance when…

  9. Habitat Complexity in Aquatic Microcosms Affects Processes Driven by Detritivores

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Lorea; Bailey, R. A.; Elosegi, Arturo; Larrañaga, Aitor; Reiss, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Habitat complexity can influence predation rates (e.g. by providing refuge) but other ecosystem processes and species interactions might also be modulated by the properties of habitat structure. Here, we focussed on how complexity of artificial habitat (plastic plants), in microcosms, influenced short-term processes driven by three aquatic detritivores. The effects of habitat complexity on leaf decomposition, production of fine organic matter and pH levels were explored by measuring complexity in three ways: 1. as the presence vs. absence of habitat structure; 2. as the amount of structure (3 or 4.5 g of plastic plants); and 3. as the spatial configuration of structures (measured as fractal dimension). The experiment also addressed potential interactions among the consumers by running all possible species combinations. In the experimental microcosms, habitat complexity influenced how species performed, especially when comparing structure present vs. structure absent. Treatments with structure showed higher fine particulate matter production and lower pH compared to treatments without structures and this was probably due to higher digestion and respiration when structures were present. When we explored the effects of the different complexity levels, we found that the amount of structure added explained more than the fractal dimension of the structures. We give a detailed overview of the experimental design, statistical models and R codes, because our statistical analysis can be applied to other study systems (and disciplines such as restoration ecology). We further make suggestions of how to optimise statistical power when artificially assembling, and analysing, ‘habitat complexity’ by not confounding complexity with the amount of structure added. In summary, this study highlights the importance of habitat complexity for energy flow and the maintenance of ecosystem processes in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:27802267

  10. Linking objects in the process of mourning for sons disappeared in war: Croatia 2001.

    PubMed

    Jurcević, Slavica; Urlić, Ivan

    2002-04-01

    Mothers use linking object to externalize the complex aspects of their relationship to the loss of their child. We analyzed the linking objects that mothers kept in memory of their sons who disappeared in the 1991-1995 war in Croatia or whose remains were uncovered and identified long time after they had gone missing. The case study of disturbed mourning included 26 mothers of Croatian soldiers from Croatian Osijek-Baranja County who went missing in war or whose remains were recovered and identified long after they had gone missing. The mothers were selected independently by the president of the Association of Families of Missing and Detained Croatian Soldiers and agreed to participate in the study in 2001. They were interviewed in their homes, their testimonies were recorded, and photographs of the linking objects taken. Linking objects were classified according to the Volkan's four-group classification. Out of four Volkan's groups of linking objects, we identified the objects belonging to the first three. Those were 1) objects that had been worn by the deceased (clothes, wrist-watch, ring, or glasses), (6/26); 2) objects that could be viewed in the psychoanalytic sense as an extension of the body of the disappeared or dead person, such as a camera (4/26); and 3) objects with realistic or symbolic resemblance to the deceased, usually a photograph (8/26). None of the examined objects belonged to the fourth Volkan's group (objects at hand when the news of the death came or objects present at the funeral, things that could be considered last-minute objects, ie, related to the moment when the deceased was last seen alive). However, 8/26 objects formed a new hitherto undescribed group. Mothers used such objects to create a memorial shrine to their sons. A photograph of the missing person or person whose remains were identified long after he had gone missing occupied a central place at the shrine, and was surrounded by other symbols of the Catholic iconography (Virgin

  11. Space-time finite-element objects: Efficiently modeling physically complex flows

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, G.A.

    1996-03-28

    Accurate modeling of high-explosive systems requires detailed consideration of many different physical properties and processes: These diverse processes generally occur in localized regions of the problem. Thus the very partial differential equations used to mathematically model the problem change from one region of space and time to another. The numerical algorithms generally used to solve these equations are frequently conceived in terms of data values for physical field variables u{sup i} defined at a number of spatial points indexed by multi-integer subscripts x{sub J}, resulting in a number of discrete state variables u{sup i}{sub J}. Instead of using as the fundamental object a physical field, which naturally maps to an array, the authors imagine a small piece of space modeled for a small amount of time, a space-time ``element``. Within it, various physical processes occur at various times. Self-contained, it gives account of what happens within its borders. It cooperates with a set of neighbors that organize into meshes, which organize into problems. The authors achieve in the software model a decoupling between the where and the how and the what, lack of which historically has been the source of a great deal of the software overhead of modelling continuum systems, and which is a necessary consequence of writing down u{sup i}{sub J}. An efficient implementation of this idea requires a reformulation of the discretization and solution of systems of conservation laws, and careful class design. A working prototype for systems in one space dimension using Mathematica and C++ is provided.

  12. Objective sensory evaluation of the spread of complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Edinger, Lara; Schwartzman, Robert J; Ahmad, Ayesha; Erwin, Kirsten; Alexander, Guillermo M

    2013-01-01

    The spread of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) has been well documented. Many severe refractory long-standing patients have total body pain (TBP) that evolved from a single extremity injury. The purpose of this study was to document by objective sensory threshold testing the extent of body area involvement in 20 long-standing patients with CRPS who have TBP. A comparison of sensory threshold testing parameters between 20 long-standing refractory patients with CRPS who have TBP versus 10 healthy participants. Twenty patients with CRPS who stated that they suffered from total body pain were chosen from the Drexel University College of Medicine CRPS database. They were compared to 10 healthy participants that were age and gender matched to the patients with CRPS. The sensory parameters tested were: skin temperature; static and mechanical allodynia; thermal allodynia; mechanical hyperalgesia; after sensations following all sensory tests. The sites chosen for testing in the patients with CRPS were the most painful area in each of 8 body regions that comprised the total body area. Five patients with CRPS had signs of CRPS over 100% of their body (20%). One patient had pain over 87% and another had pain over 90% of their body area. The average percentage of body involvement was 62% (range 37% - 100%). All patients with CRPS had at least one sensory parameter abnormality in all body regions. All patients with CRPS had lower pain thresholds for static allodynia in all body areas, while 50% demonstrated a lower threshold for dynamic allodynia in all body regions compared to the healthy participants. Cold allodynia had a higher median pain rating on the Likert pain scale in all body areas versus healthy participants except for the chest, abdomen, and back. Eighty-five percent of the patients with CRPS had a significantly lower pain threshold for mechanical hyperalgesia in all body areas compared to the healthy participants. After sensations occurred after all sensory

  13. The five elements process: designing optimal landscapes to meet bird conservation objectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Will, T.C.; Ruth, J.M.; Rosenberg, K.V.; Krueper, D.; Hahn, D.; Fitzgerald, J.; Dettmers, R.; Beardmore, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    In February 2004 at Port Aransas, Texas, Partners in Flight (PIF) and representatives from the other NABCI bird initiative met to discuss the process of stepping down PIF continental population objectives (Rich et al. 2004) to regional and local scales. Participants also discussed rolling up local population estimates and targets to assess the feasibility of the landscape changes necessary to meet continental objectives. Since the process of stepping-down/rolling-up population objectives shifts focus from identifying priority species to formulating quantitative estimates of how much habitat was needed, where, and by when the Port Aransas group called the stepping-down/rolling-up process a??stepping forward.a?? Participants agreed that stepping forward objectives was the beginning of an inevitably iterative dialog necessary to evaluate the assumptions of PIF population estimates and objectives as well as the methods used to monitor local implementation. To facilitate the translation of continental population objectives into biologically sound, measurable regional and local population-based habitat targets the Port Aransas group recommended a process no commonly referred to as the Five Elements Processa?|

  14. Petri net model for analysis of concurrently processed complex algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoughton, John W.; Mielke, Roland R.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a Petri-net model suitable for analyzing the concurrent processing of computationally complex algorithms. The decomposed operations are to be processed in a multiple processor, data driven architecture. Of particular interest is the application of the model to both the description of the data/control flow of a particular algorithm, and to the general specification of the data driven architecture. A candidate architecture is also presented.

  15. The Effects of Directional Processing on Objective and Subjective Listening Effort.

    PubMed

    Picou, Erin M; Moore, Travis M; Ricketts, Todd A

    2017-01-01

    The purposes of this investigation were (a) to evaluate the effects of hearing aid directional processing on subjective and objective listening effort and (b) to investigate the potential relationships between subjective and objective measures of effort. Sixteen adults with mild to severe hearing loss were tested with study hearing aids programmed with 3 settings: omnidirectional, fixed directional, and bilateral beamformer. A dual-task paradigm and subjective ratings were used to assess objective and subjective listening effort, respectively, in 2 signal-to-noise ratios. Testing occurred in rooms with either low or moderate reverberation. Directional processing improved subjective and objective listening effort, although benefit for objective effort was found only in moderate reverberation. Subjective reports of work and tiredness were more highly correlated with word recognition performance than objective listening effort. However, subjective ratings about control were significantly correlated with objective listening effort. Directional microphone technology in hearing aids has the potential to improve listening effort in moderately reverberant environments. In addition, subjective questions that probe a listener's desire to exercise control may be a viable method for eliciting ratings that are significantly related to objective listening effort.

  16. Processing complexity and sentence memory: evidence from amnesia.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L P; McNamara, P; Zurif, E; Lanzoni, S; Cermak, L

    1992-05-01

    This study examines sentence memory as a function of linguistic processing complexity in amnesic patients. Sentence length as well as lexical and syntactic complexity were manipulated in two sentence repetition experiments. It was found that the amnesic patients performed considerably worse than the control subjects and that performance decreased: (1) when sentence length was increased by the addition of adjuncts compared to arguments of the verb; (2) when the verb selected more thematic frames; and (3) when sentences involved "empty" argument positions that must be linked to antecedents, particularly across clausal boundaries. These data showed how linguistic complexity affects sentence memory and implied that the amnesic deficit did not involve a generalized difficulty for materials of similar length, rather, the deficit was specific to certain representational types and processing routines.

  17. Do aqueous ternary complexes influence the TALSPEAK process?

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, C. j.; Liu, G.; Jensen, M. P.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2010-01-01

    The aqueous speciation of trivalent lanthanide and actinide cations in solutions containing DTPA (diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N',N'-pentaacetic acid) and lactic acid were studied under conditions representative of the TALSPEAK process. Spectrophotometric titrations, fluorescence spectroscopy, and thermometric titrations were used to search for indications of ternary metal-DTPA-lactate complexes. The addition of lactate anions to metal-DTPA complexes was undetectable by any of these techniques, even at free lactate concentrations of 0.75 M. Although lactic acid is necessary for the optimal performance of the TALSPEAK process, we find that the fractions of aqueous ternary Ln3+/An3+-DTPA-lactate complexes are far too low to account for the observed acid dependence of TALSPEAK metal extraction.

  18. Assessing processes in uncertain, complex physical phenomena and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J. M.; Kerscher, W. J. III; Smith, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    PREDICT (Performance and Reliability Evaluation with Diverse Information Combination and Tracking) is a set of structured quantitative approaches for the evaluation of system performance based on multiple information sources. The methodology integrates diverse types and sources of information, and their associated uncertainties, to develop full distributions for performance metrics, such as reliability. The successful application of PREDICT has involved system performance assessment in automotive product development, aging nuclear weapons, and fatigued turbine jet engines. In each of these applications, complex physical, mechanical and materials processes affect performance, safety and reliability assessments. Processes also include the physical actions taken during manufacturing, quality control, inspections, assembly, etc. and the steps involved in product design, development and certification. In this paper, we will examine the various types of processes involved in the decision making leading to production in an automotive system reliability example. Analysis of these processes includes not only understanding their impact on performance and reliability, but also the uncertainties associated with them. The automotive example demonstrates some of the tools used in tackling the complex problem of understanding processes. While some tools and methods exist for understanding processes (man made and natural) and the uncertainties associated with them, many of the complex issues discussed are open for continued research efforts.

  19. Cueing Complex Animations: Does Direction of Attention Foster Learning Processes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Richard; Boucheix, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    The time course of learners' processing of a complex animation was studied using a dynamic diagram of a piano mechanism. Over successive repetitions of the material, two forms of cueing (standard colour cueing and anti-cueing) were administered either before or during the animated segment of the presentation. An uncued group and two other control…

  20. MTR AND ETR COMPLEXES. CAMERA FACING EASTERLY TOWARD CHEMICAL PROCESSING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR AND ETR COMPLEXES. CAMERA FACING EASTERLY TOWARD CHEMICAL PROCESSING PLANT. MTR AND ITS ATTACHMENTS IN FOREGROUND. ETR BEYOND TO RIGHT. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-4100. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Cueing Complex Animations: Does Direction of Attention Foster Learning Processes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Richard; Boucheix, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    The time course of learners' processing of a complex animation was studied using a dynamic diagram of a piano mechanism. Over successive repetitions of the material, two forms of cueing (standard colour cueing and anti-cueing) were administered either before or during the animated segment of the presentation. An uncued group and two other control…

  2. Modeling Cognitive Strategies during Complex Task Performing Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazman, Sacide Guzin; Altun, Arif

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine individuals' computer based complex task performing processes and strategies in order to determine the reasons of failure by cognitive task analysis method and cued retrospective think aloud with eye movement data. Study group was five senior students from Computer Education and Instructional Technologies…

  3. Visual Short-Term Memory for Complex Objects in 6- and 8-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Mee-Kyoung; Luck, Steven J.; Oakes, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Infants' visual short-term memory (VSTM) for simple objects undergoes dramatic development: Six-month-old infants can store in VSTM information about only a simple object presented in isolation, whereas 8-month-old infants can store information about simple objects presented in multiple-item arrays. This study extended this work to examine…

  4. Visual Short-Term Memory for Complex Objects in 6- and 8-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Mee-Kyoung; Luck, Steven J.; Oakes, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Infants' visual short-term memory (VSTM) for simple objects undergoes dramatic development: Six-month-old infants can store in VSTM information about only a simple object presented in isolation, whereas 8-month-old infants can store information about simple objects presented in multiple-item arrays. This study extended this work to examine…

  5. Identifying positioning-based attacks against 3D printed objects and the 3D printing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    Zeltmann, et al. demonstrated that structural integrity and other quality damage to objects can be caused by changing its position on a 3D printer's build plate. On some printers, for example, object surfaces and support members may be stronger when oriented parallel to the X or Y axis. The challenge presented by the need to assure 3D printed object orientation is that this can be altered in numerous places throughout the system. This paper considers attack scenarios and discusses where attacks that change printing orientation can occur in the process. An imaging-based solution to combat this problem is presented.

  6. Tracking of Maneuvering Complex Extended Object with Coupled Motion Kinematics and Extension Dynamics Using Range Extent Measurements.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lifan; Ji, Baofeng; Lan, Jian; He, Zishu; Pu, Jiexin

    2017-09-22

    The key to successful maneuvering complex extended object tracking (MCEOT) using range extent measurements provided by high resolution sensors lies in accurate and effective modeling of both the extension dynamics and the centroid kinematics. During object maneuvers, the extension dynamics of an object with a complex shape is highly coupled with the centroid kinematics. However, this difficult but important problem is rarely considered and solved explicitly. In view of this, this paper proposes a general approach to modeling a maneuvering complex extended object based on Minkowski sum, so that the coupled turn maneuvers in both the centroid states and extensions can be described accurately. The new model has a concise and unified form, in which the complex extension dynamics can be simply and jointly characterized by multiple simple sub-objects' extension dynamics based on Minkowski sum. The proposed maneuvering model fits range extent measurements very well due to its favorable properties. Based on this model, an MCEOT algorithm dealing with motion and extension maneuvers is also derived. Two different cases of the turn maneuvers with known/unknown turn rates are specifically considered. The proposed algorithm which jointly estimates the kinematic state and the object extension can also be easily implemented. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modeling and tracking approaches.

  7. Neural correlates of the object-recall process in semantic memory.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Michal; Calhoun, Vince D; Kuzu, Cheedem H; Kraut, Michael A; Rivkin, Paul R; Hart, John; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2006-10-30

    The recall of an object from features is a specific operation in semantic memory in which the thalamus and pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) are integrally involved. Other higher-order semantic cortices are also likely to be involved. We used the object-recall-from-features paradigm, with more sensitive scanning techniques and larger sample size, to replicate and extend our previous results. Eighteen right-handed healthy participants performed an object-recall task and an association semantic task, while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. During object-recall, subjects determined whether words pairs describing object features combined to recall an object; during the association task they decided if two words were related. Of brain areas specifically involved in object recall, in addition to the thalamus and pre-SMA, other regions included the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, inferior parietal lobule, and middle temporal gyrus, and bilateral rostral anterior cingulate and inferior frontal gyri. These regions are involved in semantic processing, verbal working memory and response-conflict detection and monitoring. The thalamus likely helps to coordinate activity of these different brain areas. Understanding the circuit that normally mediates this process is relevant for schizophrenia, where many regions in this circuit are functionally abnormal and semantic memory is impaired.

  8. Contributions of low and high spatial frequency processing to impaired object recognition circuitry in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Calderone, Daniel J; Hoptman, Matthew J; Martínez, Antígona; Nair-Collins, Sangeeta; Mauro, Cristina J; Bar, Moshe; Javitt, Daniel C; Butler, Pamela D

    2013-08-01

    Patients with schizophrenia exhibit cognitive and sensory impairment, and object recognition deficits have been linked to sensory deficits. The "frame and fill" model of object recognition posits that low spatial frequency (LSF) information rapidly reaches the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and creates a general shape of an object that feeds back to the ventral temporal cortex to assist object recognition. Visual dysfunction findings in schizophrenia suggest a preferential loss of LSF information. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) to investigate the contribution of visual deficits to impaired object "framing" circuitry in schizophrenia. Participants were shown object stimuli that were intact or contained only LSF or high spatial frequency (HSF) information. For controls, fMRI revealed preferential activation to LSF information in precuneus, superior temporal, and medial and dorsolateral PFC areas, whereas patients showed a preference for HSF information or no preference. RSFC revealed a lack of connectivity between early visual areas and PFC for patients. These results demonstrate impaired processing of LSF information during object recognition in schizophrenia, with patients instead displaying increased processing of HSF information. This is consistent with findings of a preference for local over global visual information in schizophrenia.

  9. P3b, consciousness, and complex unconscious processing.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Brian H; Snodgrass, Michael; Shevrin, Howard; Kushwaha, Ramesh

    2015-12-01

    How can perceptual consciousness be indexed in humans? Recent work with ERPs suggests that P3b, a relatively late component, may be a neural correlate of consciousness (NCC). This proposal dovetails with currently prevailing cognitive theory regarding the nature of conscious versus unconscious processes, which holds that the latter are simple and very brief, whereas consciousness is ostensibly required for more durable, complex cognitive processing. Using a P3b oddball paradigm, we instead show that P3b and even later, related slow wave activity occur under rigorously subliminal conditions. Additional principal component analysis (PCA) further differentiated the presence of both P3a and P3b components, demonstrating that the latter indeed occurred subliminally. Collectively, our results suggest that complex, sustained cognitive processing can occur unconsciously and that P3b is not an NCC after all. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bim Automation: Advanced Modeling Generative Process for Complex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfi, F.; Fai, S.; Brumana, R.

    2017-08-01

    The new paradigm of the complexity of modern and historic structures, which are characterised by complex forms, morphological and typological variables, is one of the greatest challenges for building information modelling (BIM). Generation of complex parametric models needs new scientific knowledge concerning new digital technologies. These elements are helpful to store a vast quantity of information during the life cycle of buildings (LCB). The latest developments of parametric applications do not provide advanced tools, resulting in time-consuming work for the generation of models. This paper presents a method capable of processing and creating complex parametric Building Information Models (BIM) with Non-Uniform to NURBS) with multiple levels of details (Mixed and ReverseLoD) based on accurate 3D photogrammetric and laser scanning surveys. Complex 3D elements are converted into parametric BIM software and finite element applications (BIM to FEA) using specific exchange formats and new modelling tools. The proposed approach has been applied to different case studies: the BIM of modern structure for the courtyard of West Block on Parliament Hill in Ottawa (Ontario) and the BIM of Masegra Castel in Sondrio (Italy), encouraging the dissemination and interaction of scientific results without losing information during the generative process.

  11. Retrieval and reconsolidation of object recognition memory are independent processes in the perirhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Balderas, I; Rodriguez-Ortiz, C J; Bermudez-Rattoni, F

    2013-12-03

    Reconsolidation refers to the destabilization/re-stabilization process upon memory reactivation. However, the parameters needed to induce reconsolidation remain unclear. Here we evaluated the capacity of memory retrieval to induce reconsolidation of object recognition memory in rats. To assess whether retrieval is indispensable to trigger reconsolidation, we injected muscimol in the perirhinal cortex to block retrieval, and anisomycin (ani) to impede reconsolidation. We observed that ani impaired reconsolidation in the absence of retrieval. Therefore, stored memory underwent reconsolidation even though it was not recalled. These results indicate that retrieval and reconsolidation of object recognition memory are independent processes.

  12. A chromatin remodelling complex involved in transcription and DNA processing.

    PubMed

    Shen, X; Mizuguchi, G; Hamiche, A; Wu, C

    2000-08-03

    The packaging of the eukaryotic genome in chromatin presents barriers that restrict the access of enzymes that process DNA. To overcome these barriers, cells possess a number of multi-protein, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling complexes, each containing an ATPase subunit from the SNF2/SWI2 superfamily. Chromatin remodelling complexes function by increasing nucleosome mobility and are clearly implicated in transcription. Here we have analysed SNF2/SWI2- and ISWI-related proteins to identify remodelling complexes that potentially assist other DNA transactions. We purified a complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that contains the Ino80 ATPase. The INO80 complex contains about 12 polypeptides including two proteins related to the bacterial RuvB DNA helicase, which catalyses branch migration of Holliday junctions. The purified complex remodels chromatin, facilitates transcription in vitro and displays 3' to 5' DNA helicase activity. Mutants of ino80 show hypersensitivity to agents that cause DNA damage, in addition to defects in transcription. These results indicate that chromatin remodelling driven by the Ino80 ATPase may be connected to transcription as well as DNA damage repair.

  13. Unconscious Processing of Negative Animals and Objects: Role of the Amygdala Revealed by fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhiyong; Li, Han; Chen, Gang; Yang, JiongJiong

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that emotional stimuli can be processed through the amygdala without conscious awareness. The amygdala is also involved in processing animate and social information. However, it is unclear whether different categories of pictures (e.g., animals, objects) elicit different activity in the amygdale and other regions without conscious awareness. The objective of this study was to explore whether the factors of category, emotion and picture context modulate brain activation for unconscious processing. Pictures denoting different nonhuman animals and objects in negative and neutral emotional valences were presented using a sandwich-masking paradigm. Half of them were presented with human-related information in the contexts, and half were not. Our results showed significant interaction among category, emotion and context in the amygdala and subcortical regions. Specifically, negative animals elicited stronger activation in these regions than negative objects, especially with human contexts. In addition, there were different correlation patterns between the amygdala and cortical regions according to whether they included human context. There were limited activations in cortical category-related networks. These results suggest that the amygdala and subcortical regions dominantly process negative animals, and contextual information modulates their activities, making threatening stimuli that are most relevant to human survival preferentially processed without conscious awareness. PMID:27092067

  14. Intermediary objects in the workspace design process: means of experience transfer in the offshore sector.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Carolina; Silva, Gislaine; Broberg, Ole; Duarte, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the use of intermediary objects in the workspace design process of offshore accommodations module. The integration of ergonomics in the design process can lead to better work conditions, more effectiveness in the work process and less health and safety issues. Moreover, it is more efficient in terms of cost if ergonomics is considered from the initial phases of the project, as the potential costs of the redesign, the possible losses and the down-time in the operation of the platform would be more increased. The goal, then, is to discuss the integration of ergonomics and users involvement in the design process of accommodations modules, focusing on the transfer of information from reference situations by the use of intermediary objects during the process. In this paper we will present two tools developed to be used as intermediary object(s) aiming at transferring the experience from the use to the design in the specific field of offshore accommodations module.

  15. Optical derotator alignment using image-processing algorithm for tracking laser vibrometer measurements of rotating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Hossam; Kim, Dongkyu; Jo, Youngjoon; Park, Kyihwan

    2017-06-01

    An optical component called a Dove prism is used to rotate the laser beam of a laser-scanning vibrometer (LSV). This is called a derotator and is used for measuring the vibration of rotating objects. The main advantage of a derotator is that it works independently from an LSV. However, this device requires very specific alignment, in which the axis of the Dove prism must coincide with the rotational axis of the object. If the derotator is misaligned with the rotating object, the results of the vibration measurement are imprecise, owing to the alteration of the laser beam on the surface of the rotating object. In this study, a method is proposed for aligning a derotator with a rotating object through an image-processing algorithm that obtains the trajectory of a landmark attached to the object. After the trajectory of the landmark is mathematically modeled, the amount of derotator misalignment with respect to the object is calculated. The accuracy of the proposed method for aligning the derotator with the rotating object is experimentally tested.

  16. Simulations of one- and two-dimensional complex plasmas using a modular, object-oriented code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferson, R. A.; Cianciosa, M.; Thomas, E.

    2010-11-01

    In a complex plasma, charged microparticles ("dust") are added to a background of ions, electrons, and neutral particles. This dust fully interacts with the surrounding plasma and self-consistently alters the plasma environment leading to the emergence of new plasma behavior. Numerical tools that complement experimental investigations can provide important insights into the properties of complex plasmas. This paper discusses a newly developed code, named DEMON (dynamic exploration of microparticle clouds optimized numerically), for simulating a complex plasma. The DEMON code models the behavior of the charged particle component of a complex plasma in a uniform plasma background. The key feature of the DEMON code is the use of a modular force model that allows a wide variety of experimental configurations to be studied without varying the core code infrastructure. Examples of the flexibility of this modular approach are presented using examples of one- and two-dimensional complex plasmas.

  17. EEG complexity and attentional processes related to dissociative states.

    PubMed

    Bob, Peter; Golla, Megan; Epstein, Phillip; Konopka, Lukasz

    2011-07-01

    Reported findings indicate that attentional narrowing is related to decreased complexity and increased inhibition of neural assemblies. These findings suggest that analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) complexity could present a useful method for research of attentional changes related to dissociation. To examine this model we used a case study to test the two hypotheses: (1) that successful anticonvulsant medication would result in dissociative symptom alleviation, improvement of inhibitory neural functions, and decreased EEG complexity, and (2) that cognitive conflict, related to aversive events in the patient's past experience, during reliving of a dissociative state would lead to greater allocation of attention and decreased EEG complexity. Three EEG studies recorded in the eyes closed non-drowsy state were performed: (1) at baseline, (2) post-induction of dissociative state, and (3) post-anticonvulsant medication following induction of dissociative state. A dissociative state was achieved following an interview regarding the patient's aversive past experiences through use of the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ). The patient's level of dissociation was measured using the Dissociative Experiences Scale-II (DES-II). The PDEQ interview and DES-II assessment were also used one hour following the oral consumption of an anticonvulsant medication (clonazepam 2mg). Analysis of the data revealed that complexity values (PD2) are significantly lower following the oral consumption of clonazepam (2mg) in the majority of EEG channels. Additionally, complexity during the reliving of a dissociative state was statistically significantly lower than both the baseline and post-medication conditions in all but two EEG channels. Results of the case study suggest that changes in attentional processes linked to dissociation are related to: (1) decreased complexity when attention is extremely focused because of attentional narrowing to the disturbing past

  18. Do discrimination tasks discourage multi-dimensional stimulus processing? Evidence from a cross-modal object discrimination in rats.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Kathryn J

    2007-11-02

    Neurobiologists are becoming increasingly interested in how complex cognitive representations are formed by the integration of sensory stimuli. To this end, discrimination tasks are frequently used to assess perceptual and cognitive processes in animals, because they are easy to administer and score, and the ability of an animal to make a particular discrimination establishes beyond doubt that the necessary perceptual/cognitive processes are present. It does not, however, follow that absence of discrimination means the animal cannot make a particular perceptual judgement; it may simply mean that the animal did not manage to discover the relevant discriminative stimulus when trying to learn the task. Here, it is shown that rats did not learn a cross-modal object discrimination (requiring association of each object's visual appearance with its odour) when trained on the complete task from the beginning. However, they could eventually make the discrimination when trained on the component parts step by step, showing that they were able to do the necessary cross-modal integration in the right circumstances. This finding adds to growing evidence that discrimination tasks tend to encourage feature-based discrimination, perhaps by engaging automatic, habit-based brain systems. Thus, they may not be the best way to assess the formation of multi-dimensional stimulus representations of the kind needed in more complex cognitive processes such as declarative memory. Instead, more natural tasks such as spontaneous exploration may be preferable.

  19. Functional Activation in the Ventral Object Processing Pathway during the First Year

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Teresa; Biondi, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Infants' capacity to represent objects in visual working memory changes substantially during the first year of life. There is a growing body of research focused on identifying neural mechanisms that support this emerging capacity, and the extent to which visual object processing elicits different patterns of cortical activation in the infant as compared to the adult. Recent studies have identified areas in temporal and occipital cortex that mediate infants' developing capacity to track objects on the basis of their featural properties. The current research (Experiments 1 and 2) assessed patterns of activation in posterior temporal cortex and occipital cortex using fNIRS in infants 3–13 months of age as they viewed occlusion events. In the occlusion events, either the same object or featurally distinct objects emerged to each side of a screen. The outcome of these studies, combined, revealed that in infants 3–6 months, posterior temporal cortex was activated to all events, regardless of the featural properties of the objects and whether the event involved one object or two (featurally distinct) objects. Infants 7–8 infants months showed a waning posterior temporal response and by 10–13 months this response was negligible. Additional analysis showed that the age groups did not differ in their visual attention to the events and that changes in HbO were better explained by age in days than head circumference. In contrast to posterior temporal cortex, robust activation was obtained in occipital cortex across all ages tested. One interpretation of these results is that they reflect pruning of the visual object-processing network during the first year. The functional contribution of occipital and posterior temporal cortex, along with higher-level temporal areas, to infants' capacity to keep track of distinct entities in visual working memory is discussed. PMID:26778979

  20. Flying triangulation - A motion-robust optical 3D sensor for the real-time shape acquisition of complex objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willomitzer, Florian; Ettl, Svenja; Arold, Oliver; Häusler, Gerd

    2013-05-01

    The three-dimensional shape acquisition of objects has become more and more important in the last years. Up to now, there are several well-established methods which already yield impressive results. However, even under quite common conditions like object movement or a complex shaping, most methods become unsatisfying. Thus, the 3D shape acquisition is still a difficult and non-trivial task. We present our measurement principle "Flying Triangulation" which enables a motion-robust 3D acquisition of complex-shaped object surfaces by a freely movable handheld sensor. Since "Flying Triangulation" is scalable, a whole sensor-zoo for different object sizes is presented. Concluding, an overview of current and future fields of investigation is given.

  1. A cultural side effect: learning to read interferes with identity processing of familiar objects

    PubMed Central

    Kolinsky, Régine; Fernandes, Tânia

    2014-01-01

    Based on the neuronal recycling hypothesis (Dehaene and Cohen, 2007), we examined whether reading acquisition has a cost for the recognition of non-linguistic visual materials. More specifically, we checked whether the ability to discriminate between mirror images, which develops through literacy acquisition, interferes with object identity judgments, and whether interference strength varies as a function of the nature of the non-linguistic material. To these aims we presented illiterate, late literate (who learned to read at adult age), and early literate adults with an orientation-independent, identity-based same-different comparison task in which they had to respond “same” to both physically identical and mirrored or plane-rotated images of pictures of familiar objects (Experiment 1) or of geometric shapes (Experiment 2). Interference from irrelevant orientation variations was stronger with plane rotations than with mirror images, and stronger with geometric shapes than with objects. Illiterates were the only participants almost immune to mirror variations, but only for familiar objects. Thus, the process of unlearning mirror-image generalization, necessary to acquire literacy in the Latin alphabet, has a cost for a basic function of the visual ventral object recognition stream, i.e., identification of familiar objects. This demonstrates that neural recycling is not just an adaptation to multi-use but a process of at least partial exaptation. PMID:25400605

  2. The Processing of Subject-Object Ambiguities in Native and Near-Native Mexican Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jegerski, Jill

    2012-01-01

    This self-paced reading study first tested the prediction that the garden path effect previously observed during the processing of subject-object ambiguities in native English would not obtain in a null subject language like Spanish. The investigation then further explored whether the effect would be evident among near-native readers of Spanish…

  3. Analyzing Preschoolers' Overgeneralizations of Object Labeling in the Process of Mother-Tongue Acquisition in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabadayi, Abdulkadir

    2006-01-01

    Language, as is known, is acquired under certain conditions: rapid and sequential brain maturation and cognitive development, the need to exchange information and to control others' actions, and an exposure to appropriate speech input. This research aims at analyzing preschoolers' overgeneralizations of the object labeling process in different…

  4. The Benefits of Sensorimotor Knowledge: Body-Object Interaction Facilitates Semantic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siakaluk, Paul D.; Pexman, Penny M.; Sears, Christopher R.; Wilson, Kim; Locheed, Keri; Owen, William J.

    2008-01-01

    This article examined the effects of body-object interaction (BOI) on semantic processing. BOI measures perceptions of the ease with which a human body can physically interact with a word's referent. In Experiment 1, BOI effects were examined in 2 semantic categorization tasks (SCT) in which participants decided if words are easily imageable.…

  5. An ERP Study of the Processing of Subject and Object Relative Clauses in Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ueno, Mieko; Garnsey, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    Using reading times and event-related brain potentials (ERPs), we investigated the processing of Japanese subject and object relative clauses (SRs/ORs). Previous research on English relative clauses shows that ORs take longer to read (King & Just, 1991) and elicit anterior negativity between fillers and gaps (King & Kutas, 1995), which is…

  6. Improved object segmentation using Markov random fields, artificial neural networks, and parallel processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulkes, Stephen B.; Booth, David M.

    1997-07-01

    Object segmentation is the process by which a mask is generated which identifies the area of an image which is occupied by an object. Many object recognition techniques depend on the quality of such masks for shape and underlying brightness information, however, segmentation remains notoriously unreliable. This paper considers how the image restoration technique of Geman and Geman can be applied to the improvement of object segmentations generated by a locally adaptive background subtraction technique. Also presented is how an artificial neural network hybrid, consisting of a single layer Kohonen network with each of its nodes connected to a different multi-layer perceptron, can be used to approximate the image restoration process. It is shown that the restoration techniques are very well suited for parallel processing and in particular the artificial neural network hybrid has the potential for near real time image processing. Results are presented for the detection of ships in SPOT panchromatic imagery and the detection of vehicles in infrared linescan images, these being a fair representation of the wider class of problem.

  7. Integration of a three-dimensional process-based hydrological model into the Object Modeling System

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The integration of a spatial process model into an environmental modelling framework can enhance the model’s capabilities. We present the integration of the GEOtop model into the Object Modeling System (OMS) version 3.0 and illustrate its application in a small watershed. GEOtop is a physically base...

  8. Analyzing Preschoolers' Overgeneralizations of Object Labeling in the Process of Mother-Tongue Acquisition in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabadayi, Abdulkadir

    2006-01-01

    Language, as is known, is acquired under certain conditions: rapid and sequential brain maturation and cognitive development, the need to exchange information and to control others' actions, and an exposure to appropriate speech input. This research aims at analyzing preschoolers' overgeneralizations of the object labeling process in different…

  9. The Benefits of Sensorimotor Knowledge: Body-Object Interaction Facilitates Semantic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siakaluk, Paul D.; Pexman, Penny M.; Sears, Christopher R.; Wilson, Kim; Locheed, Keri; Owen, William J.

    2008-01-01

    This article examined the effects of body-object interaction (BOI) on semantic processing. BOI measures perceptions of the ease with which a human body can physically interact with a word's referent. In Experiment 1, BOI effects were examined in 2 semantic categorization tasks (SCT) in which participants decided if words are easily imageable.…

  10. Frequency Affects Object Relative Clause Processing: Some Evidence in Favor of Usage-Based Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reali, Florencia

    2014-01-01

    The processing difficulty of nested grammatical structure has been explained by different psycholinguistic theories. Here I provide corpus and behavioral evidence in favor of usage-based models, focusing on the case of object relative clauses in Spanish as a first language. A corpus analysis of spoken Spanish reveals that, as in English, the…

  11. Frequency Affects Object Relative Clause Processing: Some Evidence in Favor of Usage-Based Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reali, Florencia

    2014-01-01

    The processing difficulty of nested grammatical structure has been explained by different psycholinguistic theories. Here I provide corpus and behavioral evidence in favor of usage-based models, focusing on the case of object relative clauses in Spanish as a first language. A corpus analysis of spoken Spanish reveals that, as in English, the…

  12. An ERP Study of the Processing of Subject and Object Relative Clauses in Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ueno, Mieko; Garnsey, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    Using reading times and event-related brain potentials (ERPs), we investigated the processing of Japanese subject and object relative clauses (SRs/ORs). Previous research on English relative clauses shows that ORs take longer to read (King & Just, 1991) and elicit anterior negativity between fillers and gaps (King & Kutas, 1995), which is…

  13. The Processing of Subject-Object Ambiguities in Native and Near-Native Mexican Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jegerski, Jill

    2012-01-01

    This self-paced reading study first tested the prediction that the garden path effect previously observed during the processing of subject-object ambiguities in native English would not obtain in a null subject language like Spanish. The investigation then further explored whether the effect would be evident among near-native readers of Spanish…

  14. Energetic Processing of Interstellar Ices: A Route to Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Marla H.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2009-01-01

    More than 140 gas-phase molecules have been detected in the interstellar (IS) medium or in circumstellar environments including inorganics, organics, ions, and radicals. The significant abundance of large, complex organic molecules, and families of isomers in these regions makes the origin and formation history of these species the subject of debate. Observationally determined condensed-phase species are H2O, CO, CO2, NH3 and CH30H, with CH4, HCOOH, OCS, OCN-, H2CO and NH4(+) present at trace levels. These ices can undergo energetic processing with cosmic rays or far-UV photons to form larger complex organics with abundance levels that make them undetectable in icy mantles. Once warmed, however, it is likely that these complex species would enter the gas-phase where they might be detected by Herschel or Alma. Understanding the role of radiation chemistry and thermal processing of ices and identifying new products are the goals of our laboratory research. In the Cosmic lee Laboratory at NASA Goddard Space Plight Center, we can study both the photo-and radiation chemistries of ices from 8 -- 300 K. Using dear- and mid-IR spectroscopy we can follow the destruction of primary molecules and the formation of radicals and secondary products as a function of energetic processing. During warming we can monitor the trapping of species and the results of any thermal chemistry. An overview of recent and past work will focus on complex secondary radiation products from small condensed-phase IS species. Likely reactions include dimerization, isomerization, H-addition and H-elimination. Another focus of our work is the development of reaction schemes for the formation of complex molecules and the use of such schemes to predict new molecules awaiting detection by Herschel and Alma.

  15. Cortical plasticity for visuospatial processing and object recognition in deaf and hearing signers.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Jill; Koo, Daniel S; Crain, Kelly L; Eden, Guinevere F

    2012-03-01

    Experience-dependent plasticity in deaf participants has been shown in a variety of studies focused on either the dorsal or ventral aspects of the visual system, but both systems have never been investigated in concert. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated functional plasticity for spatial processing (a dorsal visual pathway function) and for object processing (a ventral visual pathway function) concurrently, in the context of differing sensory (auditory deprivation) and language (use of a signed language) experience. During scanning, deaf native users of American Sign Language (ASL), hearing native ASL users, and hearing participants without ASL experience attended to either the spatial arrangement of frames containing objects or the identity of the objects themselves. These two tasks revealed the expected dorsal/ventral dichotomy for spatial versus object processing in all groups. In addition, the object identity matching task contained both face and house stimuli, allowing us to examine category-selectivity in the ventral pathway in all three participant groups. When contrasting the groups we found that deaf signers differed from the two hearing groups in dorsal pathway parietal regions involved in spatial cognition, suggesting sensory experience-driven plasticity. Group differences in the object processing system indicated that responses in the face-selective right lateral fusiform gyrus and anterior superior temporal cortex were sensitive to a combination of altered sensory and language experience, whereas responses in the amygdala were more closely tied to sensory experience. By selectively engaging the dorsal and ventral visual pathways within participants in groups with different sensory and language experiences, we have demonstrated that these experiences affect the function of both of these systems, and that certain changes are more closely tied to sensory experience, while others are driven by the combination of sensory and

  16. Category and Word Search: Generalizing Search Principles to Complex Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    complex processing (e.g., LaBerge & Samels, 1974; Shiffrin & Schneider, 1977). In the present paper we examine how well the major phenomena in simple visual...subjects are searching for novel characters ( LaBerge , 1973). The relatively large and rapid CH practice effects for word and category search are analogous...1974) demonstrated interference effects of irrelevant flanking letters. Shaffer and Laberge (1979) showed a similar effect with words and semantic

  17. Ferric and cobaltous hydroacid complexes for forward osmosis (FO) processes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qingchun; Fu, Fengjiang; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2014-07-01

    Cupric and ferric hydroacid complexes have proven their advantages as draw solutes in forward osmosis in terms of high water fluxes, negligible reverse solute fluxes and easy recovery (Ge and Chung, 2013. Hydroacid complexes: A new class of draw solutes to promote forward osmosis (FO) processes. Chemical Communications 49, 8471-8473.). In this study, cobaltous hydroacid complexes were explored as draw solutes and compared with the ferric hydroacid complex to study the factors influencing their FO performance. The solutions of the cobaltous complexes produce high osmotic pressures due to the presence of abundant hydrophilic groups. These solutes are able to dissociate and form a multi-charged anion and Na(+) cations in water. In addition, these complexes have expanded structures which lead to negligible reverse solute fluxes and provide relatively easy approaches in regeneration. These characteristics make the newly synthesized cobaltous complexes appropriate as draw solutes. The FO performance of the cobaltous and ferric-citric acid (Fe-CA) complexes were evaluated respectively through cellulose acetate membranes, thin-film composite membranes fabricated on polyethersulfone supports (referred as TFC-PES), and polybenzimidazole and PES dual-layer (referred as PBI/PES) hollow fiber membranes. Under the conditions of DI water as the feed and facing the support layer of TFC-PES FO membranes (PRO mode), draw solutions at 2.0 M produced relatively high water fluxes of 39-48 LMH (L m(-2) hr(-1)) with negligible reverse solute fluxes. A water flux of 17.4 LMH was achieved when model seawater of 3.5 wt.% NaCl replaced DI water as the feed and 2.0 M Fe-CA as the draw solution under the same conditions. The performance of these hydroacid complexes surpasses those of the synthetic draw solutes developed in recent years. This observation, along with the relatively easy regeneration, makes these complexes very promising as a novel class of draw solutes. Copyright © 2014

  18. The relation between crawling and 9-month-old infants' visual prediction abilities in spatial object processing.

    PubMed

    Kubicek, Claudia; Jovanovic, Bianca; Schwarzer, Gudrun

    2017-06-01

    We examined whether 9-month-old infants' visual prediction abilities in the context of spatial object processing are related to their crawling ability. A total of 33 9-month-olds were tested; half of them crawled for 7.6weeks on average. A new visual prediction paradigm was developed during which a three-dimensional three-object array was presented in a live setting. During familiarization, the object array rotated back and forth along the vertical axis. While the array was moving, two target objects of it were briefly occluded from view and uncovered again as the array changed its direction of motion. During the test phase, the entire array was rotated around 90° and then rotated back and forth along the horizontal axis. The targets remained at the same position or were moved to a modified placement. We recorded infants' eye movements directed at the dynamically covered and uncovered target locations and analyzed infants' prediction rates. All infants showed higher prediction rates at test and when the targets' placement was modified. Most importantly, the results demonstrated that crawlers had higher prediction rates during test trials as compared with non-crawlers. Our study supports the assumption that crawling experience might enhance 9-month-old infants' ability to correctly predict complex object movement.

  19. Secure complex event processing in a heterogeneous and dynamic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddhika, Thilina; Ray, Indrakshi; Linderman, Mark; Jayasumana, Anura

    2014-06-01

    Battlefield monitoring involves collecting streaming data from different sources, transmitting the data over a heterogeneous network, and processing queries in real-time in order to respond to events in a timely manner. Nodes in these networks differ with respect to their trustworthiness, processing, storage, and communication capabilities. Links in the network differ with respect to their communication bandwidth. The topology of the network itself is subject to change, as the nodes and links may become unavailable. Continuous queries executed in such environments must also meet some quality of service (QoS) requirements, such as, response time and throughput. Data streams generated from the various nodes in the network belong to different security levels; consequently, these must be processed in a secure manner without causing unauthorized leakage or modification. Towards this end, we demonstrate how an existing complex event processing system can be extended to execute queries and events in a secure manner in such a dynamic and heterogeneous environment.

  20. Increasing process understanding by analyzing complex interactions in experimental data.

    PubMed

    Naelapää, Kaisa; Allesø, Morten; Kristensen, Henning G; Bro, Rasmus; Rantanen, Jukka; Bertelsen, Poul

    2009-05-01

    There is a recognized need for new approaches to understand unit operations with pharmaceutical relevance. A method for analyzing complex interactions in experimental data is introduced. Higher-order interactions do exist between process parameters, which complicate the interpretation of experimental results. In this study, experiments based on mixed factorial design of coating process were performed. Drug release was analyzed by traditional analysis of variance (ANOVA) and generalized multiplicative ANOVA (GEMANOVA). GEMANOVA modeling is introduced in this study as a new tool for increased understanding of a coating process. It was possible to model the response, that is, the amount of drug released, using both mentioned techniques. However, the ANOVA model was difficult to interpret as several interactions between process parameters existed. In contrast to ANOVA, GEMANOVA is especially suited for modeling complex interactions and making easily understandable models of these. GEMANOVA modeling allowed a simple visualization of the entire experimental space. Furthermore, information was obtained on how relative changes in the settings of process parameters influence the film quality and thereby drug release.

  1. Complex Processes from Dynamical Architectures with Time-Scale Hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    The idea that complex motor, perceptual, and cognitive behaviors are composed of smaller units, which are somehow brought into a meaningful relation, permeates the biological and life sciences. However, no principled framework defining the constituent elementary processes has been developed to this date. Consequently, functional configurations (or architectures) relating elementary processes and external influences are mostly piecemeal formulations suitable to particular instances only. Here, we develop a general dynamical framework for distinct functional architectures characterized by the time-scale separation of their constituents and evaluate their efficiency. Thereto, we build on the (phase) flow of a system, which prescribes the temporal evolution of its state variables. The phase flow topology allows for the unambiguous classification of qualitatively distinct processes, which we consider to represent the functional units or modes within the dynamical architecture. Using the example of a composite movement we illustrate how different architectures can be characterized by their degree of time scale separation between the internal elements of the architecture (i.e. the functional modes) and external interventions. We reveal a tradeoff of the interactions between internal and external influences, which offers a theoretical justification for the efficient composition of complex processes out of non-trivial elementary processes or functional modes. PMID:21347363

  2. Complex processes from dynamical architectures with time-scale hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor

    2011-02-10

    The idea that complex motor, perceptual, and cognitive behaviors are composed of smaller units, which are somehow brought into a meaningful relation, permeates the biological and life sciences. However, no principled framework defining the constituent elementary processes has been developed to this date. Consequently, functional configurations (or architectures) relating elementary processes and external influences are mostly piecemeal formulations suitable to particular instances only. Here, we develop a general dynamical framework for distinct functional architectures characterized by the time-scale separation of their constituents and evaluate their efficiency. Thereto, we build on the (phase) flow of a system, which prescribes the temporal evolution of its state variables. The phase flow topology allows for the unambiguous classification of qualitatively distinct processes, which we consider to represent the functional units or modes within the dynamical architecture. Using the example of a composite movement we illustrate how different architectures can be characterized by their degree of time scale separation between the internal elements of the architecture (i.e. the functional modes) and external interventions. We reveal a tradeoff of the interactions between internal and external influences, which offers a theoretical justification for the efficient composition of complex processes out of non-trivial elementary processes or functional modes.

  3. A formulation of metamodel implementation processes for complex systems design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daberkow, Debora Daniela

    Complex systems design poses an interesting as well as demanding information management problem for system level integration and design. The high interconnectivity of disciplines combined with the specific knowledge and expertise in each of these calls for a system level view that is broad, as in spanning across all disciplines, while at the same time detailed enough to do the disciplinary knowledge justice. The treatment of this requires highly evolved information management and decision approaches, which result in design methodologies that can handle this high degree of complexity. The solution is to create models within the design process, which predict meaningful metrics representative of the various disciplinary analyses that can be quickly evaluated and thus serve in system level decision making and optimization. Such models approximate the physics-based analysis codes used in each of the disciplines and are called metamodels since effectively, they model the (physics-based) models on which the disciplinary analysis codes are based. The thesis formulates a new metamodel implementation process to be used in complex systems design, utilizing a Gaussian Process prediction method. It is based on a Bayesian probability and inference approach and as such returns a variance prediction along with the most likely value, thus giving an estimate also for the confidence in the prediction. Within this thesis, the applicability and appropriateness at the theoretical as well as practical level are investigated, and proof-of-concept implementations at the disciplinary and system levels are provided.

  4. A Single-Rate Context-Dependent Learning Process Underlies Rapid Adaptation to Familiar Object Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, James N.; Howard, Ian S.; Flanagan, J. Randall; Wolpert, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    Motor learning has been extensively studied using dynamic (force-field) perturbations. These induce movement errors that result in adaptive changes to the motor commands. Several state-space models have been developed to explain how trial-by-trial errors drive the progressive adaptation observed in such studies. These models have been applied to adaptation involving novel dynamics, which typically occurs over tens to hundreds of trials, and which appears to be mediated by a dual-rate adaptation process. In contrast, when manipulating objects with familiar dynamics, subjects adapt rapidly within a few trials. Here, we apply state-space models to familiar dynamics, asking whether adaptation is mediated by a single-rate or dual-rate process. Previously, we reported a task in which subjects rotate an object with known dynamics. By presenting the object at different visual orientations, adaptation was shown to be context-specific, with limited generalization to novel orientations. Here we show that a multiple-context state-space model, with a generalization function tuned to visual object orientation, can reproduce the time-course of adaptation and de-adaptation as well as the observed context-dependent behavior. In contrast to the dual-rate process associated with novel dynamics, we show that a single-rate process mediates adaptation to familiar object dynamics. The model predicts that during exposure to the object across multiple orientations, there will be a degree of independence for adaptation and de-adaptation within each context, and that the states associated with all contexts will slowly de-adapt during exposure in one particular context. We confirm these predictions in two new experiments. Results of the current study thus highlight similarities and differences in the processes engaged during exposure to novel versus familiar dynamics. In both cases, adaptation is mediated by multiple context-specific representations. In the case of familiar object dynamics

  5. Evidence of Deficient Central Speech Processing in Children with Specific Language Impairment: the T-Complex

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Valerie L.; Schwartz, Richard G.; Martin, Brett

    2010-01-01

    Objective This paper examined neurophysiological correlates of speech in children with language impairment (LI) and typical language development (TLD) across four experiments using different speech stimuli and tasks. Method The T-complex event-related potential (ERP) components and other ERP components (e.g., mismatch negativity [MMN]; N400) were examined. A subset of the children participated in more than one of the experiments. Results 73% of the children with LI had poor T-complex measures compared to only 13% of children with TLD. The T-complex measures were more comparable, in terms of indicating typical versus deviant processing, to neurophysiological measures of language processing, such as lexical discrimination, than to other measures of auditory and speech processing, such as the MMN. Only one LI child showed no poor measures and 64% showed three or more poor neurophyisological measures. However, 50% of children with TLD showed no poor neurophysiological measures, and 82% of the TLD children showed no more than two poor measures. Conclusion These results suggest that poor auditory processing, as measured by the T-complex, is a marker for LI and that multiple deficits serve to mark LI. Significance The T-complex measures, indexing secondary auditory cortex, reflect an important aspect of processing in speech and language development. PMID:21147550

  6. A split-optimization approach for obtaining multiple solutions in single-objective process parameter optimization.

    PubMed

    Rajora, Manik; Zou, Pan; Yang, Yao Guang; Fan, Zhi Wen; Chen, Hung Yi; Wu, Wen Chieh; Li, Beizhi; Liang, Steven Y

    2016-01-01

    It can be observed from the experimental data of different processes that different process parameter combinations can lead to the same performance indicators, but during the optimization of process parameters, using current techniques, only one of these combinations can be found when a given objective function is specified. The combination of process parameters obtained after optimization may not always be applicable in actual production or may lead to undesired experimental conditions. In this paper, a split-optimization approach is proposed for obtaining multiple solutions in a single-objective process parameter optimization problem. This is accomplished by splitting the original search space into smaller sub-search spaces and using GA in each sub-search space to optimize the process parameters. Two different methods, i.e., cluster centers and hill and valley splitting strategy, were used to split the original search space, and their efficiency was measured against a method in which the original search space is split into equal smaller sub-search spaces. The proposed approach was used to obtain multiple optimal process parameter combinations for electrochemical micro-machining. The result obtained from the case study showed that the cluster centers and hill and valley splitting strategies were more efficient in splitting the original search space than the method in which the original search space is divided into smaller equal sub-search spaces.

  7. Electric relaxation processes in chemodynamics of aqueous metal complexes: from simple ligands to soft nanoparticulate complexants.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Herman P; Buffle, Jacques; Town, Raewyn M

    2012-01-10

    The chemodynamics of metal complexes with nanoparticulate complexants can differ significantly from that for simple ligands. The spatial confinement of charged sites and binding sites to the nanoparticulate body impacts on the time scales of various steps in the overall complex formation process. The greater the charge carried by the nanoparticle, the longer it takes to set up the counterion distribution equilibrium with the medium. A z+ metal ion (z > 1) in a 1:1 background electrolyte will accumulate in the counterionic atmosphere around negatively charged simple ions, as well as within/around the body of a soft nanoparticle with negative structural charge. The rate of accumulation is often governed by diffusion and proceeds until Boltzmann partition equilibrium between the charged entity and the ions in the medium is attained. The electrostatic accumulation proceeds simultaneously with outer-sphere and inner-sphere complex formation. The rate of the eventual inner-sphere complex formation is generally controlled by the rate constant of dehydration of the metal ion, k(w). For common transition metal ions with moderate to fast dehydration rates, e.g., Cu(2+), Pb(2+), and Cd(2+), it is shown that the ionic equilibration with the medium may be the slower step and thus rate-limiting in their overall complexation with nanoparticles.

  8. How low can you go? Changing the resolution of novel complex objects in visual working memory according to task demands.

    PubMed

    Allon, Ayala S; Balaban, Halely; Luria, Roy

    2014-01-01

    In three experiments we manipulated the resolution of novel complex objects in visual working memory (WM) by changing task demands. Previous studies that investigated the trade-off between quantity and resolution in visual WM yielded mixed results for simple familiar stimuli. We used the contralateral delay activity as an electrophysiological marker to directly track the deployment of visual WM resources while participants preformed a change-detection task. Across three experiments we presented the same novel complex items but changed the task demands. In Experiment 1 we induced a medium resolution task by using change trials in which a random polygon changed to a different type of polygon and replicated previous findings showing that novel complex objects are represented with higher resolution relative to simple familiar objects. In Experiment 2 we induced a low resolution task that required distinguishing between polygons and other types of stimulus categories, but we failed in finding a corresponding decrease in the resolution of the represented item. Finally, in Experiment 3 we induced a high resolution task that required discriminating between highly similar polygons with somewhat different contours. This time, we observed an increase in the item's resolution. Our findings indicate that the resolution for novel complex objects can be increased but not decreased according to task demands, suggesting that minimal resolution is required in order to maintain these items in visual WM. These findings support studies claiming that capacity and resolution in visual WM reflect different mechanisms.

  9. Integrating technology into complex intervention trial processes: a case study.

    PubMed

    Drew, Cheney J G; Poile, Vincent; Trubey, Rob; Watson, Gareth; Kelson, Mark; Townson, Julia; Rosser, Anne; Hood, Kerenza; Quinn, Lori; Busse, Monica

    2016-11-17

    Trials of complex interventions are associated with high costs and burdens in terms of paperwork, management, data collection, validation, and intervention fidelity assessment occurring across multiple sites. Traditional data collection methods rely on paper-based forms, where processing can be time-consuming and error rates high. Electronic source data collection can potentially address many of these inefficiencies, but has not routinely been used in complex intervention trials. Here we present the use of an on-line system for managing all aspects of data handling and for the monitoring of trial processes in a multicentre trial of a complex intervention. We custom built a web-accessible software application for the delivery of ENGAGE-HD, a multicentre trial of a complex physical therapy intervention. The software incorporated functionality for participant randomisation, data collection and assessment of intervention fidelity. It was accessible to multiple users with differing levels of access depending on required usage or to maintain blinding. Each site was supplied with a 4G-enabled iPad for accessing the system. The impact of this system was quantified through review of data quality and collation of feedback from site coordinators and assessors through structured process interviews. The custom-built system was an efficient tool for collecting data and managing trial processes. Although the set-up time required was significant, using the system resulted in an overall data completion rate of 98.5% with a data query rate of 0.1%, the majority of which were resolved in under a week. Feedback from research staff indicated that the system was highly acceptable for use in a research environment. This was a reflection of the portability and accessibility of the system when using the iPad and its usefulness in aiding accurate data collection, intervention fidelity and general administration. A combination of commercially available hardware and a bespoke online database

  10. Multifeatural shape processing in rats engaged in invariant visual object recognition.

    PubMed

    Alemi-Neissi, Alireza; Rosselli, Federica Bianca; Zoccolan, Davide

    2013-04-03

    The ability to recognize objects despite substantial variation in their appearance (e.g., because of position or size changes) represents such a formidable computational feat that it is widely assumed to be unique to primates. Such an assumption has restricted the investigation of its neuronal underpinnings to primate studies, which allow only a limited range of experimental approaches. In recent years, the increasingly powerful array of optical and molecular tools that has become available in rodents has spurred a renewed interest for rodent models of visual functions. However, evidence of primate-like visual object processing in rodents is still very limited and controversial. Here we show that rats are capable of an advanced recognition strategy, which relies on extracting the most informative object features across the variety of viewing conditions the animals may face. Rat visual strategy was uncovered by applying an image masking method that revealed the features used by the animals to discriminate two objects across a range of sizes, positions, in-depth, and in-plane rotations. Noticeably, rat recognition relied on a combination of multiple features that were mostly preserved across the transformations the objects underwent, and largely overlapped with the features that a simulated ideal observer deemed optimal to accomplish the discrimination task. These results indicate that rats are able to process and efficiently use shape information, in a way that is largely tolerant to variation in object appearance. This suggests that their visual system may serve as a powerful model to study the neuronal substrates of object recognition.

  11. Stochastic Process Underlying Emergent Recognition of Visual Objects Hidden in Degraded Images

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Tsutomu; Hamada, Takashi; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Tanifuji, Manabu; Yanagida, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    When a degraded two-tone image such as a “Mooney” image is seen for the first time, it is unrecognizable in the initial seconds. The recognition of such an image is facilitated by giving prior information on the object, which is known as top-down facilitation and has been intensively studied. Even in the absence of any prior information, however, we experience sudden perception of the emergence of a salient object after continued observation of the image, whose processes remain poorly understood. This emergent recognition is characterized by a comparatively long reaction time ranging from seconds to tens of seconds. In this study, to explore this time-consuming process of emergent recognition, we investigated the properties of the reaction times for recognition of degraded images of various objects. The results show that the time-consuming component of the reaction times follows a specific exponential function related to levels of image degradation and subject's capability. Because generally an exponential time is required for multiple stochastic events to co-occur, we constructed a descriptive mathematical model inspired by the neurophysiological idea of combination coding of visual objects. Our model assumed that the coincidence of stochastic events complement the information loss of a degraded image leading to the recognition of its hidden object, which could successfully explain the experimental results. Furthermore, to see whether the present results are specific to the task of emergent recognition, we also conducted a comparison experiment with the task of perceptual decision making of degraded images, which is well known to be modeled by the stochastic diffusion process. The results indicate that the exponential dependence on the level of image degradation is specific to emergent recognition. The present study suggests that emergent recognition is caused by the underlying stochastic process which is based on the coincidence of multiple stochastic events

  12. Stochastic process underlying emergent recognition of visual objects hidden in degraded images.

    PubMed

    Murata, Tsutomu; Hamada, Takashi; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Tanifuji, Manabu; Yanagida, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    When a degraded two-tone image such as a "Mooney" image is seen for the first time, it is unrecognizable in the initial seconds. The recognition of such an image is facilitated by giving prior information on the object, which is known as top-down facilitation and has been intensively studied. Even in the absence of any prior information, however, we experience sudden perception of the emergence of a salient object after continued observation of the image, whose processes remain poorly understood. This emergent recognition is characterized by a comparatively long reaction time ranging from seconds to tens of seconds. In this study, to explore this time-consuming process of emergent recognition, we investigated the properties of the reaction times for recognition of degraded images of various objects. The results show that the time-consuming component of the reaction times follows a specific exponential function related to levels of image degradation and subject's capability. Because generally an exponential time is required for multiple stochastic events to co-occur, we constructed a descriptive mathematical model inspired by the neurophysiological idea of combination coding of visual objects. Our model assumed that the coincidence of stochastic events complement the information loss of a degraded image leading to the recognition of its hidden object, which could successfully explain the experimental results. Furthermore, to see whether the present results are specific to the task of emergent recognition, we also conducted a comparison experiment with the task of perceptual decision making of degraded images, which is well known to be modeled by the stochastic diffusion process. The results indicate that the exponential dependence on the level of image degradation is specific to emergent recognition. The present study suggests that emergent recognition is caused by the underlying stochastic process which is based on the coincidence of multiple stochastic events.

  13. Processing multidimensional optical signals of video surveillance for speed measurement of extensional objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diyazitdinov, Rinat R.; Vasin, Nikolay N.; Shaporin, Andrey A.

    2017-04-01

    This article has been described some features of processing multidimensional optical signals, which have been taken in real condition video surveillance of the railway carriages. Exactly: there are the choice region of image for speed measuring, the restore missed measurements, compensation of the camera vibration. The result is speed measurement algorithm of the extensional objects (the object does not contain in video frame fully), which is used for simplify operator working: control carriages braking on hump yard, making consignor list, control conditions of carriages detention.

  14. New image processing software for analyzing object size-frequency distributions, geometry, orientation, and spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggan, Ciarán; Hamilton, Christopher W.

    2010-04-01

    Geological Image Analysis Software (GIAS) combines basic tools for calculating object area, abundance, radius, perimeter, eccentricity, orientation, and centroid location, with the first automated method for characterizing the aerial distribution of objects using sample-size-dependent nearest neighbor (NN) statistics. The NN analyses include tests for (1) Poisson, (2) Normalized Poisson, (3) Scavenged k=1, and (4) Scavenged k=2 NN distributions. GIAS is implemented in MATLAB with a Graphical User Interface (GUI) that is available as pre-parsed pseudocode for use with MATLAB, or as a stand-alone application that runs on Windows and Unix systems. GIAS can process raster data (e.g., satellite imagery, photomicrographs, etc.) and tables of object coordinates to characterize the size, geometry, orientation, and spatial organization of a wide range of geological features. This information expedites quantitative measurements of 2D object properties, provides criteria for validating the use of stereology to transform 2D object sections into 3D models, and establishes a standardized NN methodology that can be used to compare the results of different geospatial studies and identify objects using non-morphological parameters.

  15. Attentional spreading to task-irrelevant object features: experimental support and a 3-step model of attention for object-based selection and feature-based processing modulation.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Detlef; Galashan, Fingal Orlando; Aurich, Maike Kathrin; Kreiter, Andreas Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Directing attention to a specific feature of an object has been linked to different forms of attentional modulation. Object-based attention theory founds on the finding that even task-irrelevant features at the selected object are subject to attentional modulation, while feature-based attention theory proposes a global processing benefit for the selected feature even at other objects. Most studies investigated either the one or the other form of attention, leaving open the possibility that both object- and feature-specific attentional effects do occur at the same time and may just represent two sides of a single attention system. We here investigate this issue by testing attentional spreading within and across objects, using reaction time (RT) measurements to changes of attended and unattended features on both attended and unattended objects. We asked subjects to report color and speed changes occurring on one of two overlapping random dot patterns (RDPs), presented at the center of gaze. The key property of the stimulation was that only one of the features (e.g., motion direction) was unique for each object, whereas the other feature (e.g., color) was shared by both. The results of two experiments show that co-selection of unattended features even occurs when those features have no means for selecting the object. At the same time, they demonstrate that this processing benefit is not restricted to the selected object but spreads to the task-irrelevant one. We conceptualize these findings by a 3-step model of attention that assumes a task-dependent top-down gain, object-specific feature selection based on task- and binding characteristics, and a global feature-specific processing enhancement. The model allows for the unification of a vast amount of experimental results into a single model, and makes various experimentally testable predictions for the interaction of object- and feature-specific processes.

  16. Complex collaborative problem-solving processes in mission control.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Stephen M; Wiltshire, Travis J; Oglesby, James M; O'Keefe, William S; Salas, Eduardo

    2014-04-01

    NASA's Mission Control Center (MCC) is responsible for control of the International Space Station (ISS), which includes responding to problems that obstruct the functioning of the ISS and that may pose a threat to the health and well-being of the flight crew. These problems are often complex, requiring individuals, teams, and multiteam systems, to work collaboratively. Research is warranted to examine individual and collaborative problem-solving processes in this context. Specifically, focus is placed on how Mission Control personnel-each with their own skills and responsibilities-exchange information to gain a shared understanding of the problem. The Macrocognition in Teams Model describes the processes that individuals and teams undertake in order to solve problems and may be applicable to Mission Control teams. Semistructured interviews centering on a recent complex problem were conducted with seven MCC professionals. In order to assess collaborative problem-solving processes in MCC with those predicted by the Macrocognition in Teams Model, a coding scheme was developed to analyze the interview transcriptions. Findings are supported with excerpts from participant transcriptions and suggest that team knowledge-building processes accounted for approximately 50% of all coded data and are essential for successful collaborative problem solving in mission control. Support for the internalized and externalized team knowledge was also found (19% and 20%, respectively). The Macrocognition in Teams Model was shown to be a useful depiction of collaborative problem solving in mission control and further research with this as a guiding framework is warranted.

  17. Memory for Complex Visual Objects but Not for Allocentric Locations during the First Year of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupierrix, Eve; Hillairet de Boisferon, Anne; Barbeau, Emmanuel; Pascalis, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Although human infants demonstrate early competence to retain visual information, memory capacities during infancy remain largely undocumented. In three experiments, we used a Visual Paired Comparison (VPC) task to examine abilities to encode identity (Experiment 1) and spatial properties (Experiments 2a and 2b) of unfamiliar complex visual…

  18. Memory for Complex Visual Objects but Not for Allocentric Locations during the First Year of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupierrix, Eve; Hillairet de Boisferon, Anne; Barbeau, Emmanuel; Pascalis, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Although human infants demonstrate early competence to retain visual information, memory capacities during infancy remain largely undocumented. In three experiments, we used a Visual Paired Comparison (VPC) task to examine abilities to encode identity (Experiment 1) and spatial properties (Experiments 2a and 2b) of unfamiliar complex visual…

  19. Spectral transformation in the SOFI complex for processing photographic images on the ES computer, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debabov, A. S.; Usikov, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of three programs catalogued in the form of object modules in the library of a system for processing photographic images computer. PFT is the subprogram of the multi-dimensional BPF of real-valued information, in the operative computer memory. INRECO is a subprogram-interface between the real and complex formats for representing two-dimensional spectra and images. FFT2 is a subprogram for calculating the correlation functions of the image using the previous subprograms.

  20. Information processing using a single dynamical node as complex system

    PubMed Central

    Appeltant, L.; Soriano, M.C.; Van der Sande, G.; Danckaert, J.; Massar, S.; Dambre, J.; Schrauwen, B.; Mirasso, C.R.; Fischer, I.

    2011-01-01

    Novel methods for information processing are highly desired in our information-driven society. Inspired by the brain's ability to process information, the recently introduced paradigm known as 'reservoir computing' shows that complex networks can efficiently perform computation. Here we introduce a novel architecture that reduces the usually required large number of elements to a single nonlinear node with delayed feedback. Through an electronic implementation, we experimentally and numerically demonstrate excellent performance in a speech recognition benchmark. Complementary numerical studies also show excellent performance for a time series prediction benchmark. These results prove that delay-dynamical systems, even in their simplest manifestation, can perform efficient information processing. This finding paves the way to feasible and resource-efficient technological implementations of reservoir computing. PMID:21915110

  1. Numerical simulation and optimization of casting process for complex pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueqin; Dong, Anping; Wang, Donghong; Lu, Yanling; Zhu, Guoliang

    2017-09-01

    The complex shape of the casting pump body has large complicated structure and uniform wall thickness, which easy give rise to casting defects. The numerical simulation software ProCAST is used to simulate the initial top gating process, after analysis of the material and structure characteristics of the high-pressure pump. The filling process was overall smooth, not there the water shortage phenomenon. But the circular shrinkage defects appear at the bottom of casting during solidification process. Then, the casting parameters were optimized and adding cold iron in the bottom. The shrinkage weight was reduced from 0.00167g to 0.0005g. The porosity volume was reduced from 1.39cm3 to 0.41cm3. The optimization scheme is simulated and actual experimented. The defect has been significantly improved.

  2. QA Objectives for Nondestructive Assay at the Waste Receiving & Processing (WRAP) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    CANTALOUB, M.G.

    2000-08-01

    The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility, located on the Word Site in southeast Washington, is a key link in the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Waste characterization is one of the vital functions performed at WRAP, and nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of TRU waste containers is one of two required methods used for waste characterization. The Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, DOE/WIPP-069 (WIPP-WAC) delineates the quality assurance objectives which have been established for NDA measurement systems. Sites must demonstrate that the quality assurance objectives can be achieved for each radioassay system over the applicable ranges of measurement. This report summarizes the validation of the WRAP NDA systems against the radioassay quality assurance objectives or QAOs. A brief description of the each test and significant conclusions are included. Variables that may have affected test outcomes and system response are also addressed.

  3. Occipital alpha activity during stimulus processing gates the information flow to object-selective cortex.

    PubMed

    Zumer, Johanna M; Scheeringa, René; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs; Norris, David G; Jensen, Ole

    2014-10-01

    Given the limited processing capabilities of the sensory system, it is essential that attended information is gated to downstream areas, whereas unattended information is blocked. While it has been proposed that alpha band (8-13 Hz) activity serves to route information to downstream regions by inhibiting neuronal processing in task-irrelevant regions, this hypothesis remains untested. Here we investigate how neuronal oscillations detected by electroencephalography in visual areas during working memory encoding serve to gate information reflected in the simultaneously recorded blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signals recorded by functional magnetic resonance imaging in downstream ventral regions. We used a paradigm in which 16 participants were presented with faces and landscapes in the right and left hemifields; one hemifield was attended and the other unattended. We observed that decreased alpha power contralateral to the attended object predicted the BOLD signal representing the attended object in ventral object-selective regions. Furthermore, increased alpha power ipsilateral to the attended object predicted a decrease in the BOLD signal representing the unattended object. We also found that the BOLD signal in the dorsal attention network inversely correlated with visual alpha power. This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, that oscillations in the alpha band are implicated in the gating of information from the visual cortex to the ventral stream, as reflected in the representationally specific BOLD signal. This link of sensory alpha to downstream activity provides a neurophysiological substrate for the mechanism of selective attention during stimulus processing, which not only boosts the attended information but also suppresses distraction. Although previous studies have shown a relation between the BOLD signal from the dorsal attention network and the alpha band at rest, we demonstrate such a relation during a visuospatial task, indicating

  4. Modeling Stochastic Complexity in Complex Adaptive Systems: Non-Kolmogorov Probability and the Process Algebra Approach.

    PubMed

    Sulis, William H

    2017-10-01

    Walter Freeman III pioneered the application of nonlinear dynamical systems theories and methodologies in his work on mesoscopic brain dynamics.Sadly, mainstream psychology and psychiatry still cling to linear correlation based data analysis techniques, which threaten to subvert the process of experimentation and theory building. In order to progress, it is necessary to develop tools capable of managing the stochastic complexity of complex biopsychosocial systems, which includes multilevel feedback relationships, nonlinear interactions, chaotic dynamics and adaptability. In addition, however, these systems exhibit intrinsic randomness, non-Gaussian probability distributions, non-stationarity, contextuality, and non-Kolmogorov probabilities, as well as the absence of mean and/or variance and conditional probabilities. These properties and their implications for statistical analysis are discussed. An alternative approach, the Process Algebra approach, is described. It is a generative model, capable of generating non-Kolmogorov probabilities. It has proven useful in addressing fundamental problems in quantum mechanics and in the modeling of developing psychosocial systems.

  5. Bi-Objective Flexible Job-Shop Scheduling Problem Considering Energy Consumption under Stochastic Processing Times.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Zeng, Zhenxiang; Wang, Ruidong; Sun, Xueshan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method on the optimization of bi-objective Flexible Job-shop Scheduling Problem (FJSP) under stochastic processing times. The robust counterpart model and the Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II) are used to solve the bi-objective FJSP with consideration of the completion time and the total energy consumption under stochastic processing times. The case study on GM Corporation verifies that the NSGA-II used in this paper is effective and has advantages to solve the proposed model comparing with HPSO and PSO+SA. The idea and method of the paper can be generalized widely in the manufacturing industry, because it can reduce the energy consumption of the energy-intensive manufacturing enterprise with less investment when the new approach is applied in existing systems.

  6. Bi-Objective Flexible Job-Shop Scheduling Problem Considering Energy Consumption under Stochastic Processing Times

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhenxiang; Wang, Ruidong; Sun, Xueshan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method on the optimization of bi-objective Flexible Job-shop Scheduling Problem (FJSP) under stochastic processing times. The robust counterpart model and the Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II) are used to solve the bi-objective FJSP with consideration of the completion time and the total energy consumption under stochastic processing times. The case study on GM Corporation verifies that the NSGA-II used in this paper is effective and has advantages to solve the proposed model comparing with HPSO and PSO+SA. The idea and method of the paper can be generalized widely in the manufacturing industry, because it can reduce the energy consumption of the energy-intensive manufacturing enterprise with less investment when the new approach is applied in existing systems. PMID:27907163

  7. Nuclear processing - a simple cost equation or a complex problem?

    SciTech Connect

    Banfield, Z.; Banford, A.W.; Hanson, B.C.; Scully, P.J.

    2007-07-01

    BNFL has extensive experience of nuclear processing plant from concept through to decommissioning, at all stages of the fuel cycle. Nexia Solutions (formerly BNFL's R and D Division) has always supported BNFL in development of concept plant, including the development of costed plant designs for the purpose of economic evaluation and technology selection. Having undertaken such studies over a number of years, this has enabled Nexia Solutions to develop a portfolio of costed plant designs for a broad range of nuclear processes, throughputs and technologies. This work has led to an extensive understanding of the relationship of the cost of nuclear processing plant, and how this can be impacted by scale of process, and the selection of design philosophy. The relationship has been seen to be non linear and so simplistic equations do not apply, the relationship is complex due to the variety of contributory factors. This is particularly evident when considering the scale of a process, for example how step changes in design occurs with increasing scale, how the applicability of technology options can vary with scale etc... This paper will explore the contributory factor of scale to nuclear processing plant costs. (authors)

  8. Transpersonal processes: a bridge between object relations and attachment theory in normal and psychopathological development.

    PubMed

    Muir, R C

    1995-09-01

    This paper has three aims: (a) to present the further development of the concept of transpersonal processes and the bimodal theory of relational cognition; (b) to show how the bimodal concept illuminates developmental theory and facilitates the move from object relations theory toward a relational systems model; and (c) to show how the attachment paradigm and the notions of internal working models (Bowlby, 1973) and self-reflective capacity (Fonagy, 1991) are both congruent and synergistic with the transpersonal and bimodal concepts.

  9. Prediction processes during multiple object tracking (MOT): involvement of dorsal and ventral premotor cortices

    PubMed Central

    Atmaca, Silke; Stadler, Waltraud; Keitel, Anne; Ott, Derek V M; Lepsien, Jöran; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background The multiple object tracking (MOT) paradigm is a cognitive task that requires parallel tracking of several identical, moving objects following nongoal-directed, arbitrary motion trajectories. Aims The current study aimed to investigate the employment of prediction processes during MOT. As an indicator for the involvement of prediction processes, we targeted the human premotor cortex (PM). The PM has been repeatedly implicated to serve the internal modeling of future actions and action effects, as well as purely perceptual events, by means of predictive feedforward functions. Materials and methods Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), BOLD activations recorded during MOT were contrasted with those recorded during the execution of a cognitive control task that used an identical stimulus display and demanded similar attentional load. A particular effort was made to identify and exclude previously found activation in the PM-adjacent frontal eye fields (FEF). Results We replicated prior results, revealing occipitotemporal, parietal, and frontal areas to be engaged in MOT. Discussion The activation in frontal areas is interpreted to originate from dorsal and ventral premotor cortices. The results are discussed in light of our assumption that MOT engages prediction processes. Conclusion We propose that our results provide first clues that MOT does not only involve visuospatial perception and attention processes, but prediction processes as well. PMID:24363971

  10. Simultaneous object perception deficits are related to reduced visual processing speed in amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Rizzo, Adriana L; Bublak, Peter; Redel, Petra; Grimmer, Timo; Müller, Hermann J; Sorg, Christian; Finke, Kathrin

    2017-07-01

    Simultanagnosia, an impairment in simultaneous object perception, has been attributed to deficits in visual attention and, specifically, to processing speed. Increasing visual attention deficits manifest over the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), where the first changes are present already in its symptomatic predementia phase: amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). In this study, we examined whether patients with aMCI due to AD show simultaneous object perception deficits and whether and how these deficits relate to visual attention. Sixteen AD patients with aMCI and 16 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy controls were assessed with a simultaneous perception task, with shapes presented in an adjacent, embedded, or overlapping manner, under free viewing without temporal constraints. We used a parametric assessment of visual attention based on the Theory of Visual Attention. Results show that patients make significantly more errors than controls when identifying overlapping shapes, which correlate with reduced processing speed. Our findings suggest simultaneous object perception deficits in very early AD, and a visual processing speed reduction underlying these deficits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Breastfeeding interventions in Kansas: a qualitative process evaluation of program goals and objectives.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Lisette T; Wetta, Ruth

    2014-10-01

    Across the state of Kansas, eighteen public health departments received funding through the 2011 Breastfeeding Grant Initiative to start a breastfeeding intervention. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the progress toward program goals and objectives. This study was a process evaluation. Qualitative data were collected from recipient health departments at two time-points during the program year. Structured, open-ended questions were asked through telephone interviews. This study examined: (1) progress toward program goals and objectives, (2) problems encountered during implementation, and (3) evaluation measures employed to assess program impact. All health departments reported making significant progress toward program goals and objectives and reported successful collaboration with other healthcare providers. The use of breast pumps, educational classes, and professional training of staff were reported as providing the best outcome in the promotion of breastfeeding. The majority of respondents did not measure program impact. From a public health perspective, it is important that infants receive breast milk for the first six months of life. It appears that goals and objectives set a priori guided health departments with the administration of their breastfeeding program. Results may be used to enhance and sustain delivery of breastfeeding support programs in Kansas communities.

  12. A Representational Similarity Analysis of the Dynamics of Object Processing Using Single-Trial EEG Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, Blair; Perreau Guimaraes, Marcos; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of object categories is effortlessly accomplished in everyday life, yet its neural underpinnings remain not fully understood. In this electroencephalography (EEG) study, we used single-trial classification to perform a Representational Similarity Analysis (RSA) of categorical representation of objects in human visual cortex. Brain responses were recorded while participants viewed a set of 72 photographs of objects with a planned category structure. The Representational Dissimilarity Matrix (RDM) used for RSA was derived from confusions of a linear classifier operating on single EEG trials. In contrast to past studies, which used pairwise correlation or classification to derive the RDM, we used confusion matrices from multi-class classifications, which provided novel self-similarity measures that were used to derive the overall size of the representational space. We additionally performed classifications on subsets of the brain response in order to identify spatial and temporal EEG components that best discriminated object categories and exemplars. Results from category-level classifications revealed that brain responses to images of human faces formed the most distinct category, while responses to images from the two inanimate categories formed a single category cluster. Exemplar-level classifications produced a broadly similar category structure, as well as sub-clusters corresponding to natural language categories. Spatiotemporal components of the brain response that differentiated exemplars within a category were found to differ from those implicated in differentiating between categories. Our results show that a classification approach can be successfully applied to single-trial scalp-recorded EEG to recover fine-grained object category structure, as well as to identify interpretable spatiotemporal components underlying object processing. Finally, object category can be decoded from purely temporal information recorded at single electrodes. PMID

  13. A Representational Similarity Analysis of the Dynamics of Object Processing Using Single-Trial EEG Classification.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Blair; Perreau Guimaraes, Marcos; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Norcia, Anthony M; Suppes, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of object categories is effortlessly accomplished in everyday life, yet its neural underpinnings remain not fully understood. In this electroencephalography (EEG) study, we used single-trial classification to perform a Representational Similarity Analysis (RSA) of categorical representation of objects in human visual cortex. Brain responses were recorded while participants viewed a set of 72 photographs of objects with a planned category structure. The Representational Dissimilarity Matrix (RDM) used for RSA was derived from confusions of a linear classifier operating on single EEG trials. In contrast to past studies, which used pairwise correlation or classification to derive the RDM, we used confusion matrices from multi-class classifications, which provided novel self-similarity measures that were used to derive the overall size of the representational space. We additionally performed classifications on subsets of the brain response in order to identify spatial and temporal EEG components that best discriminated object categories and exemplars. Results from category-level classifications revealed that brain responses to images of human faces formed the most distinct category, while responses to images from the two inanimate categories formed a single category cluster. Exemplar-level classifications produced a broadly similar category structure, as well as sub-clusters corresponding to natural language categories. Spatiotemporal components of the brain response that differentiated exemplars within a category were found to differ from those implicated in differentiating between categories. Our results show that a classification approach can be successfully applied to single-trial scalp-recorded EEG to recover fine-grained object category structure, as well as to identify interpretable spatiotemporal components underlying object processing. Finally, object category can be decoded from purely temporal information recorded at single electrodes.

  14. Clinical vocabulary as a boundary object in multidisciplinary care management of multiple chemical sensitivity, a complex and chronic condition.

    PubMed

    Sampalli, Tara; Shepherd, Michael; Duffy, Jack

    2011-04-14

    Research has shown that accurate and timely communication between multidisciplinary clinicians involved in the care of complex and chronic health conditions is often challenging. The domain knowledge for these conditions is heterogeneous, with poorly categorized, unstructured, and inconsistent clinical vocabulary. The potential of boundary object as a technique to bridge communication gaps is explored in this study. A standardized and controlled clinical vocabulary was developed as a boundary object in the domain of a complex and chronic health condition, namely, multiple chemical sensitivity, to improve communication among multidisciplinary clinicians. A convenience sample of 100 patients with a diagnosis of multiple chemical sensitivity, nine multidisciplinary clinicians involved in the care of patients with multiple chemical sensitivity, and 36 clinicians in the community participated in the study. Eighty-two percent of the multidisciplinary and inconsistent vocabulary was standardized using the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine - Clinical Terms (SNOMED(®) CT as a reference terminology. Over 80% of the multidisciplinary clinicians agreed on the overall usefulness of having a controlled vocabulary as a boundary object. Over 65% of clinicians in the community agreed on the overall usefulness of the vocabulary. The results from this study are promising and will be further evaluated in the domain of another complex chronic condition, ie, chronic pain. The study was conducted as a preliminary analysis for developing a boundary object in a heterogeneous domain of knowledge.

  15. Clinical vocabulary as a boundary object in multidisciplinary care management of multiple chemical sensitivity, a complex and chronic condition

    PubMed Central

    Sampalli, Tara; Shepherd, Michael; Duffy, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research has shown that accurate and timely communication between multidisciplinary clinicians involved in the care of complex and chronic health conditions is often challenging. The domain knowledge for these conditions is heterogeneous, with poorly categorized, unstructured, and inconsistent clinical vocabulary. The potential of boundary object as a technique to bridge communication gaps is explored in this study. Methods: A standardized and controlled clinical vocabulary was developed as a boundary object in the domain of a complex and chronic health condition, namely, multiple chemical sensitivity, to improve communication among multidisciplinary clinicians. A convenience sample of 100 patients with a diagnosis of multiple chemical sensitivity, nine multidisciplinary clinicians involved in the care of patients with multiple chemical sensitivity, and 36 clinicians in the community participated in the study. Results: Eighty-two percent of the multidisciplinary and inconsistent vocabulary was standardized using the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine – Clinical Terms (SNOMED® CT as a reference terminology. Over 80% of the multidisciplinary clinicians agreed on the overall usefulness of having a controlled vocabulary as a boundary object. Over 65% of clinicians in the community agreed on the overall usefulness of the vocabulary. Conclusion: The results from this study are promising and will be further evaluated in the domain of another complex chronic condition, ie, chronic pain. The study was conducted as a preliminary analysis for developing a boundary object in a heterogeneous domain of knowledge. PMID:21594060

  16. On having complex representations of things: preschoolers use multiple words for objects and people.

    PubMed

    Deák, G O; Maratsos, M

    1998-03-01

    Applying several names to an entity (polynomy) reflects the ability to categorize entities in different ways. Two experiments demonstrate preschoolers' abilities to apply multiple labels to representational objects and to people. In Experiment 1, 3- and 4-year-olds labeled representational objects and verified labels for story characters. In both tasks children reliably produced or accepted several words per entity and accepted a high percentage of both class-inclusive and overlapping word pairs. These results were replicated in Experiment 2; 3- to 5-year-olds also completed appearance-reality and receptive vocabulary tests. The mean number of words produced in the labeling task was significantly related to receptive vocabulary, but not to appearance-reality performance. The results indicate that preschoolers represent an entity as belonging to multiple categories (e.g., dinosaur and crayon). Implications for cognitive and language development, particularly the appearance-reality distinction and the mutual exclusivity bias, are discussed.

  17. Image Processing Strategies Based on a Visual Saliency Model for Object Recognition Under Simulated Prosthetic Vision.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Li, Heng; Fu, Weizhen; Chen, Yao; Li, Liming; Lyu, Qing; Han, Tingting; Chai, Xinyu

    2016-01-01

    Retinal prostheses have the potential to restore partial vision. Object recognition in scenes of daily life is one of the essential tasks for implant wearers. Still limited by the low-resolution visual percepts provided by retinal prostheses, it is important to investigate and apply image processing methods to convey more useful visual information to the wearers. We proposed two image processing strategies based on Itti's visual saliency map, region of interest (ROI) extraction, and image segmentation. Itti's saliency model generated a saliency map from the original image, in which salient regions were grouped into ROI by the fuzzy c-means clustering. Then Grabcut generated a proto-object from the ROI labeled image which was recombined with background and enhanced in two ways--8-4 separated pixelization (8-4 SP) and background edge extraction (BEE). Results showed that both 8-4 SP and BEE had significantly higher recognition accuracy in comparison with direct pixelization (DP). Each saliency-based image processing strategy was subject to the performance of image segmentation. Under good and perfect segmentation conditions, BEE and 8-4 SP obtained noticeably higher recognition accuracy than DP, and under bad segmentation condition, only BEE boosted the performance. The application of saliency-based image processing strategies was verified to be beneficial to object recognition in daily scenes under simulated prosthetic vision. They are hoped to help the development of the image processing module for future retinal prostheses, and thus provide more benefit for the patients. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Flying triangulation--an optical 3D sensor for the motion-robust acquisition of complex objects.

    PubMed

    Ettl, Svenja; Arold, Oliver; Yang, Zheng; Häusler, Gerd

    2012-01-10

    Three-dimensional (3D) shape acquisition is difficult if an all-around measurement of an object is desired or if a relative motion between object and sensor is unavoidable. An optical sensor principle is presented-we call it "flying triangulation"-that enables a motion-robust acquisition of 3D surface topography. It combines a simple handheld sensor with sophisticated registration algorithms. An easy acquisition of complex objects is possible-just by freely hand-guiding the sensor around the object. Real-time feedback of the sequential measurement results enables a comfortable handling for the user. No tracking is necessary. In contrast to most other eligible sensors, the presented sensor generates 3D data from each single camera image.

  19. Structured Descriptions of Complex Curved Objects for Recognition and Visual Memory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    its constituent parts. Global descriptors depend on relations among larger number of parts; eg the detection of bilateral symmetry in an object...Coplananty: All constituent limb axes are coplanar. Programs for computing the joint descriptors follow the above definitions directly. However...34semantic" properties are represented in it. by ’he choice of descriptors used for the constituent pieces, the joints and their relationships, and the

  20. Using object-based analysis to derive surface complexity information for improved filtering of airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Menglong; Blaschke, Thomas; Tang, Hongzhao; Xiao, Chenchao; Sun, Xian; Zhang, Daobing; Fu, Kun

    2017-03-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a technique used to obtain Digital Surface Models (DSM) and Digital Terrain Models (DTM) efficiently, and filtering is the key procedure used to derive DTM from point clouds. Generating seed points is an initial step for most filtering algorithms, whereas existing algorithms usually define a regular window size to generate seed points. This may lead to an inadequate density of seed points, and further introduce error type I, especially in steep terrain and forested areas. In this study, we propose the use of objectbased analysis to derive surface complexity information from ALS datasets, which can then be used to improve seed point generation.We assume that an area is complex if it is composed of many small objects, with no buildings within the area. Using these assumptions, we propose and implement a new segmentation algorithm based on a grid index, which we call the Edge and Slope Restricted Region Growing (ESRGG) algorithm. Surface complexity information is obtained by statistical analysis of the number of objects derived by segmentation in each area. Then, for complex areas, a smaller window size is defined to generate seed points. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm could greatly improve the filtering results in complex areas, especially in steep terrain and forested areas.

  1. An advanced object-based software framework for complex ecosystem modeling and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sydelko, P. J.; Dolph, J. E.; Majerus, K. A.; Taxon, T. N.

    2000-06-29

    Military land managers and decision makers face an ever increasing challenge to balance maximum flexibility for the mission with a diverse set of multiple land use, social, political, and economic goals. In addition, these goals encompass environmental requirements for maintaining ecosystem health and sustainability over the long term. Spatiotemporal modeling and simulation in support of adaptive ecosystem management can be best accomplished through a dynamic, integrated, and flexible approach that incorporates scientific and technological components into a comprehensive ecosystem modeling framework. The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) integrates ecological models and decision support techniques through a geographic information system (GIS)-based backbone. Recently, an object-oriented (OO) architectural framework was developed for IDLAMS (OO-IDLAMS). This OO-IDLAMS Prototype was built upon and leverages from the Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) developed by Argonne National Laboratory. DIAS is an object-based architectural framework that affords a more integrated, dynamic, and flexible approach to comprehensive ecosystem modeling than was possible with the GIS-based integration approach of the original IDLAMS. The flexibility, dynamics, and interoperability demonstrated through this case study of an object-oriented approach have the potential to provide key technology solutions for many of the military's multiple-use goals and needs for integrated natural resource planning and ecosystem management.

  2. Ruby-Helix: an implementation of helical image processing based on object-oriented scripting language.

    PubMed

    Metlagel, Zoltan; Kikkawa, Yayoi S; Kikkawa, Masahide

    2007-01-01

    Helical image analysis in combination with electron microscopy has been used to study three-dimensional structures of various biological filaments or tubes, such as microtubules, actin filaments, and bacterial flagella. A number of packages have been developed to carry out helical image analysis. Some biological specimens, however, have a symmetry break (seam) in their three-dimensional structure, even though their subunits are mostly arranged in a helical manner. We refer to these objects as "asymmetric helices". All the existing packages are designed for helically symmetric specimens, and do not allow analysis of asymmetric helical objects, such as microtubules with seams. Here, we describe Ruby-Helix, a new set of programs for the analysis of "helical" objects with or without a seam. Ruby-Helix is built on top of the Ruby programming language and is the first implementation of asymmetric helical reconstruction for practical image analysis. It also allows easier and semi-automated analysis, performing iterative unbending and accurate determination of the repeat length. As a result, Ruby-Helix enables us to analyze motor-microtubule complexes with higher throughput to higher resolution.

  3. Simulation and Processing Seismic Data in Complex Geological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri da Gama Rodrigues, S.; Moreira Lupinacci, W.; Martins de Assis, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic simulations in complex geological models are interesting to verify some limitations of seismic data. In this project, different geological models were designed to analyze some difficulties encountered in the interpretation of seismic data. Another idea is these data become available for LENEP/UENF students to test new tools to assist in seismic data processing. The geological models were created considering some characteristics found in oil exploration. We simulated geological medium with volcanic intrusions, salt domes, fault, pinch out and layers more distante from surface (Kanao, 2012). We used the software Tesseral Pro to simulate the seismic acquisitions. The acquisition geometries simulated were of the type common offset, end-on and split-spread. (Figure 1) Data acquired with constant offset require less processing routines. The processing flow used with tools available in Seismic Unix package (for more details, see Pennington et al., 2005) was geometric spreading correction, deconvolution, attenuation correction and post-stack depth migration. In processing of the data acquired with end-on and split-spread geometries, we included velocity analysis and NMO correction routines. Although we analyze synthetic data and carefully applied each processing routine, we can observe some limitations of the seismic reflection in imaging thin layers, great surface depth layers, layers with low impedance contrast and faults.

  4. Possible overlapping time frames of acquisition and consolidation phases in object memory processes: a pharmacological approach

    PubMed Central

    Akkerman, Sven; Blokland, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE-Is) are able to improve object memory by enhancing acquisition processes. On the other hand, only PDE-Is improve consolidation processes. Here we show that the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil also improves memory performance when administered within 2 min after the acquisition trial. Likewise, both PDE5-I and PDE4-I reversed the scopolamine deficit model when administered within 2 min after the learning trial. PDE5-I was effective up to 45 min after the acquisition trial and PDE4-I was effective when administered between 3 and 5.5 h after the acquisition trial. Taken together, our study suggests that acetylcholine, cGMP, and cAMP are all involved in acquisition processes and that cGMP and cAMP are also involved in early and late consolidation processes, respectively. Most important, these pharmacological studies suggest that acquisition processes continue for some time after the learning trial where they share a short common time frame with early consolidation processes. Additional brain concentration measurements of the drugs suggest that these acquisition processes can continue up to 4–6 min after learning. PMID:26670184

  5. Radiation Products in Processed Ices Relevant to Edgeworth-Kuiper-Belt Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. H.; Hudson, R. L.; Ferrante, R. F.

    2003-06-01

    Near the inner edge of the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt (EKB) are Pluto and Charon, which are known to have N2- and H2O-dominated surface ices, respectively. Such non-polar and polar ices, and perhaps mixtures of them, also may be present on other trans-Neptunian objects. Pluto, Charon, and all EKB objects reside in a weak, but constant UV-photon and energetic ion radiation environment that drives chemical reactions in their surface ices. Effects of photon and ion processing include changes in ice composition, volatility, spectra, and albedo, and these have been studied in a number of laboratories. This paper focuses on ice processing by ion irradiation and is aimed at understanding the volatiles, ions, and residues that may exist on outer solar system objects. We summarize radiation chemical products of N2-rich and H2O-rich ices containing CO or CH4, including possible volatiles such as alcohols, acids, and bases. Less-volatile products that could accumulate on EKB objects are observed to form in the laboratory from acid-base reactions, reactions promoted by warming, or reactions due to radiation processing of a relatively pure ice (e.g., CO --> C3O2). New IR spectra are reported for the 1-5 mu;m region, along with band strengths for the stronger features of carbon suboxide, carbonic acid, the ammonium and cyanate ions, polyoxymethylene, and ethylene glycol. These six materials are possible contributors to EKB surfaces, and will be of interest to observers and future missions.

  6. On the design and implementation of a parallel, object-oriented, image processing toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Baldwin, C; Fodor, I; Tang, N A

    2000-06-22

    Advanced in technology have enabled us to collect data from observations, experiments, and simulations at an ever increasing pace. As these data sets approach the terabyte and petabyte range, scientists are increasingly using semi-automated techniques from data mining and pattern recognition to find useful information in the data. In order for data mining to be successful, the raw data must first be processed into a form suitable for the detection of patterns. When the data is in the form of images, this can involve a substantial amount of processing on very large data sets. To help make this task more efficient, they are designing and implementing an object-oriented image processing toolkit that specifically targets massively-parallel, distributed-memory architectures. They first show that it is possible to use object-oriented technology to effectively address the diverse needs of image applications. Next, they describe how we abstract out the similarities in image processing algorithms to enable re-use in the software. They will also discuss the difficulties encountered in parallelizing image algorithms on massively parallel machines as well as the bottlenecks to high performance. They will demonstrate the work using images from an astronomical data set, and illustrate how techniques such as filters and denoising through the thresholding of wavelet coefficients can be applied when a large image is distributed across several processors.

  7. An exploration of student midwives' experiences of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination assessment process.

    PubMed

    Barry, Maebh; Noonan, Maria; Bradshaw, Carmel; Murphy-Tighe, Sylvia

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative descriptive study that explored student midwives' experiences of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination assessment process for obstetric emergencies within a university setting. The development of fundamental clinical skills is an important component in preparing students to meet the responsibilities of a midwife. There is an international concern that the transfer of midwifery education into universities may impact on the development of midwifery clinical skills. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) have the potential to promote integration and consolidation of skills prior to clinical placement. Twenty six students (n=36) from two midwifery programmes (BSc and Higher Diploma) participated in four focus groups and Burnard's (2006) framework was used for data analysis. Three main themes emerged following analysis: preparation for the OSCE assessment, the OSCE process and learning through simulating practice. Preparation for the OSCE's which included lectures, demonstrations, and practice of OSCE's facilitated by lecturers and by the students themselves, was considered central to the process. Learning via OSCEs was perceived to be more effective in comparison to other forms of assessment and prepared students for clinical practice. Positive aspects of the process and areas for improvement were identified. Using OSCE's increased the depth of learning for the students with the steps taken in preparation for the OSCE's proving to be a valuable learning tool. This study adds to the evidence on the use of OSCE's in midwifery education.

  8. Industrial processing of complex fluids: Formulation and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Scovel, J.C.; Bleasdale, S.; Forest, G.M.; Bechtel, S.

    1997-08-01

    The production of many important commercial materials involves the evolution of a complex fluid through a cooling phase into a hardened product. Textile fibers, high-strength fibers(KEVLAR, VECTRAN), plastics, chopped-fiber compounds, and fiber optical cable are such materials. Industry desires to replace experiments with on-line, real time models of these processes. Solutions to the problems are not just a matter of technology transfer, but require a fundamental description and simulation of the processes. Goals of the project are to develop models that can be used to optimize macroscopic properties of the solid product, to identify sources of undesirable defects, and to seek boundary-temperature and flow-and-material controls to optimize desired properties.

  9. Multiple-predators-based capture process on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramiz Sharafat, Rajput; Pu, Cunlai; Li, Jie; Chen, Rongbin; Xu, Zhongqi

    2017-03-01

    The predator/prey (capture) problem is a prototype of many network-related applications. We study the capture process on complex networks by considering multiple predators from multiple sources. In our model, some lions start from multiple sources simultaneously to capture the lamb by biased random walks, which are controlled with a free parameter $\\alpha$. We derive the distribution of the lamb's lifetime and the expected lifetime $\\left\\langle T\\right\\rangle $. Through simulation, we find that the expected lifetime drops substantially with the increasing number of lions. We also study how the underlying topological structure affects the capture process, and obtain that locating on small-degree nodes is better than large-degree nodes to prolong the lifetime of the lamb. Moreover, dense or homogeneous network structures are against the survival of the lamb.

  10. Object-Based Integration of Photogrammetric and LiDAR Data for Automated Generation of Complex Polyhedral Building Models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changjae; Habib, Ayman

    2009-01-01

    This research is concerned with a methodology for automated generation of polyhedral building models for complex structures, whose rooftops are bounded by straight lines. The process starts by utilizing LiDAR data for building hypothesis generation and derivation of individual planar patches constituting building rooftops. Initial boundaries of these patches are then refined through the integration of LiDAR and photogrammetric data and hierarchical processing of the planar patches. Building models for complex structures are finally produced using the refined boundaries. The performance of the developed methodology is evaluated through qualitative and quantitative analysis of the generated building models from real data. PMID:22346722

  11. The structure and proteolytic processing of Cbln1 complexes.

    PubMed

    Bao, Dashi; Pang, Zhen; Morgan, James I

    2005-11-01

    The hexadecapeptide cerebellin is present in the brains of many vertebrate species and is derived from a larger protein, Cbln1 (cerebellin 1 precursor protein). Although cerebellin has features of a neuropeptide, Cbln1 belongs to the C1q/tumor necrosis factor superfamily of secreted proteins, suggesting that it is the biologically active molecule and the proteolytic events that generate cerebellin serve another function. Therefore, we assessed whether Cbln1 undergoes proteolytic processing and determined what consequences the cleavage events necessary to produce cerebellin have on the structure of Cbln1. Substantial degradation of Cbln1 was evident in the synaptic compartment of cerebellum and lysates of cultured cerebellar neurons and cells transfected with Cbln1 expression vectors. However, only uncleaved Cbln1 containing the cerebellin motif was released and assembled into hexameric complexes. Using yeast two hybrid and mammalian expression systems we show that the cleavages required to produce cerebellin influence the subunit stoichiometry of Cbln1 complexes. Cleavage at the N-terminus of the cerebellin sequence in Cbln1 yields trimeric complexes by separating the trimer-mediating C-terminal C1q domain from conserved N-terminal cysteine residues that mediate higher order oligomerization. Cleavage at the C-terminus of the cerebellin motif disrupts the C1q domain and abolishes subunit interactions. Functional implications of these data are discussed.

  12. Hybridization of phase retrieval and off-axis digital holography for high resolution imaging of complex shape objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengpeng; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin; Zhao, Jie

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a hybrid method of phase retrieval and off-axis digital holography is proposed for imaging of the complex shape objects. Off-axis digital hologram and in-line hologram are recorded. The approximate phase distributions in the recording plane and object plane are obtained by constrained optimization approach from the off-axis hologram, and they are used as the initial value and the constraints in the phase retrieval for eliminating the twin image of in-line holography. Numerical simulations and optical experiments were carried out to validate the proposed method.

  13. Different Gestalt processing for different actions? Comparing object-directed reaching and looking time measures.

    PubMed

    Vishton, Peter M; Ware, Elizabeth A; Badger, Amy N

    2005-02-01

    Six experiments compared the Gestalt processing that mediates infant reaching and looking behaviors. Experiment 1 demonstrated that the positioning and timing of 8- and 9-month-olds' reaching was influenced by remembered relative motion. Experiment 2 suggested that a visible gap, without this relative motion, was not sufficient to produce these effects. Experiment 3 found that 6- and 7-month-olds required both remembered relative motion and a continuously visible gap to affect reaching; when two separate objects were placed adjacent to one another, they were treated as though they were connected. Experiments 4 and 5, using a looking time measure, identified a dissociation between looking and reaching performance. In Experiment 6, 6- and 7-month-olds' reaching was influenced when display parts differed in shape and color. In these experiments, Gestalt processing for looking was more influenced by remembered information than was Gestalt processing for reaching. For reaching, a low weighting of separation cues was also apparent.

  14. Object-oriented design: Deriving conceptual solutions to large-scale information processing problems

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, M.A.

    1990-05-01

    The Vertical Integration of Science, Technology, and Applications (VISTA) Project is a long-term effort conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) directed toward accelerating the process of making research results (data, models, advanced concepts) usable and available to R D applications. The initial goal of the program is to develop a software-based information system to guide the assessment and remediation process for hazardous waste sites at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The information system will link users (DOE, laboratories, and remediation contractors) to computer models and technical data available at PNL, to speed up the remediation process, while decreasing costs and accelerating the deployment of new technologies. This report describes a methodology used to design components of the VISTA information system based on an object-oriented computing model. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Multi-objective optimization of gear forging process based on adaptive surrogate meta-models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanjuan; Labergere, Carl; Lafon, Pascal; Daniel, Laurent

    2013-05-01

    In forging industry, net shape or near net shape forging of gears has been the subject of considerable research effort in the last few decades. So in this paper, a multi-objective optimization methodology of net shape gear forging process design has been discussed. The study is mainly done in four parts: building parametric CAD geometry model, simulating the forging process, fitting surrogate meta-models and optimizing the process by using an advanced algorithm. In order to maximally appropriate meta-models of the real response, an adaptive meta-model based design strategy has been applied. This is a continuous process: first, bui Id a preliminary version of the meta-models after the initial simulated calculations; second, improve the accuracy and update the meta-models by adding some new representative samplings. By using this iterative strategy, the number of the initial sample points for real numerical simulations is greatly decreased and the time for the forged gear design is significantly shortened. Finally, an optimal design for an industrial application of a 27-teeth gear forging process was introduced, which includes three optimization variables and two objective functions. A 3D FE nu merical simulation model is used to realize the process and an advanced thermo-elasto-visco-plastic constitutive equation is considered to represent the material behavior. The meta-model applied for this example is kriging and the optimization algorithm is NSGA-II. At last, a relatively better Pareto optimal front (POF) is gotten with gradually improving the obtained surrogate meta-models.

  16. Approximate Methods for Obtaining the Complex Natural Electromagnetic Oscillations of an Object.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    studying Prony’s method r for other scatterers and looking also for solutions to the problems inherent in the Prony process . E.M. Kennaugh suggested the...The search procedure is time consuming in machine computing. ILE 3. The search procedure cannot be used to process measured scattering data. 0. POLES...of the extracted poles as P. E. of real part = IReal part (Poleext.Poletrue)l , (3-11) SIPol I-oL etrue P. E. of imaginary part = IImag . part(Poleext

  17. Dissociable intrinsic functional networks support noun-object and verb-action processing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huichao; Lin, Qixiang; Han, Zaizhu; Li, Hongyu; Song, Luping; Chen, Lingjuan; He, Yong; Bi, Yanchao

    2017-09-16

    The processing mechanism of verbs-actions and nouns-objects is a central topic of language research, with robust evidence for behavioral dissociation. The neural basis for these two major word and/or conceptual classes, however, remains controversial. Two experiments were conducted to study this question from the network perspective. Experiment 1 found that nodes of the same class, obtained through task-evoked brain imaging meta-analyses, were more strongly connected with each other than nodes of different classes during resting-state, forming segregated network modules. Experiment 2 examined the behavioral relevance of these intrinsic networks using data from 88 brain-damaged patients, finding that across patients the relative strength of functional connectivity of the two networks significantly correlated with the noun-object vs. verb-action relative behavioral performances. In summary, we found that verbs-actions and nouns-objects are supported by separable intrinsic functional networks and that the integrity of such networks accounts for the relative noun-object- and verb-action-selective deficits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Multi-objective optimization of glycopeptide antibiotic production in batch and fed batch processes.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Soumen K; Lantz, Anna Eliasson; Bhushan, Mani; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2011-07-01

    Fermentation optimization involves potentially conflicting multiple objectives such as product concentration and production media cost. Simultaneous optimization of these objectives would result in a multiobjective optimization problem, which is characterized by a set of multiple solutions, knows as pareto optimal solutions. These solutions gives flexibility in evaluating the trade-offs and selecting the most suitable operating policy. Here, ε-constraint approach was used to generate the pareto solutions for two objectives: product concentration and product per unit cost of media, for batch and fed batch operations using process model for Amycolatopsis balhimycina, a glycopeptide antibiotic producer. This resulted in a set of several pareto optimal solutions with the two objectives ranging from (0.75 g l(-1), 3.97 g $(-1)) to (0.44 g l(-1), 5.19 g $(-1)) for batch and from (1.5 g l(-1), 5.46 g $(-1)) to (1.1 g l(-1), 6.34 g $(-1)) for fed batch operations. One pareto solution each for batch and for fed batch mode was experimentally validated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Processing of Own Hand Visual Feedback during Object Grasping in Ventral Premotor Mirror Neurons.

    PubMed

    Maranesi, Monica; Livi, Alessandro; Bonini, Luca

    2015-08-26

    Mirror neurons (MNs) discharge during action execution as well as during observation of others' actions. Our own actions are those that we have the opportunity to observe more frequently, but no study thus far to our knowledge has addressed the issue of whether, and to what extent, MNs can code own hand visual feedback (HVF) during object grasping. Here, we show that MNs of the ventral premotor area F5 of macaque monkeys are particularly sensitive to HVF relative to non-MNs simultaneously recorded in the same penetrations. Importantly, the HVF effect is more evident on MN activity during hand-object interaction than during the hand-shaping phase. Furthermore, the increase of MN activity induced by HVF and others' actions observed from a subjective perspective were positively correlated. These findings indicate that at least part of ventral premotor MNs can process the visual information coming from own hand interacting with objects, likely playing a role in self-action monitoring. We show that mirror neurons (MNs) of area F5 of the macaque, in addition to encoding others' observed actions, are particularly sensitive, relative to simultaneously recorded non-MNs, to the sight of the monkey's own hand during object grasping, likely playing a role in self-action monitoring. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3511824-06$15.00/0.

  20. Indicator system for a process plant control complex

    DOEpatents

    Scarola, Kenneth; Jamison, David S.; Manazir, Richard M.; Rescorl, Robert L.; Harmon, Daryl L.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  1. Multi-Objective Markov Decision Processes for Data-Driven Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Lizotte, Daniel J.; Laber, Eric B.

    2016-01-01

    We present new methodology based on Multi-Objective Markov Decision Processes for developing sequential decision support systems from data. Our approach uses sequential decision-making data to provide support that is useful to many different decision-makers, each with different, potentially time-varying preference. To accomplish this, we develop an extension of fitted-Q iteration for multiple objectives that computes policies for all scalarization functions, i.e. preference functions, simultaneously from continuous-state, finite-horizon data. We identify and address several conceptual and computational challenges along the way, and we introduce a new solution concept that is appropriate when different actions have similar expected outcomes. Finally, we demonstrate an application of our method using data from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness and show that our approach offers decision-makers increased choice by a larger class of optimal policies. PMID:28018133

  2. Utilization of Expert Knowledge in a Multi-Objective Hydrologic Model Automatic Calibration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quebbeman, J.; Park, G. H.; Carney, S.; Day, G. N.; Micheletty, P. D.

    2016-12-01

    Spatially distributed continuous simulation hydrologic models have a large number of parameters for potential adjustment during the calibration process. Traditional manual calibration approaches of such a modeling system is extremely laborious, which has historically motivated the use of automatic calibration procedures. With a large selection of model parameters, achieving high degrees of objective space fitness - measured with typical metrics such as Nash-Sutcliffe, Kling-Gupta, RMSE, etc. - can easily be achieved using a range of evolutionary algorithms. A concern with this approach is the high degree of compensatory calibration, with many similarly performing solutions, and yet grossly varying parameter set solutions. To help alleviate this concern, and mimic manual calibration processes, expert knowledge is proposed for inclusion within the multi-objective functions, which evaluates the parameter decision space. As a result, Pareto solutions are identified with high degrees of fitness, but also create parameter sets that maintain and utilize available expert knowledge resulting in more realistic and consistent solutions. This process was tested using the joint SNOW-17 and Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting method (SAC-SMA) within the Animas River basin in Colorado. Three different elevation zones, each with a range of parameters, resulted in over 35 model parameters simultaneously calibrated. As a result, high degrees of fitness were achieved, in addition to the development of more realistic and consistent parameter sets such as those typically achieved during manual calibration procedures.

  3. Postoperative speech processing in temporal lobe epilepsy: functional relationship between object naming, semantics and phonology.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Michael; Pauli, Elisabeth

    2009-12-01

    Deficits in confrontation naming ability can occur after epilepsy surgery in the left temporal lobe. This study addresses the functional relationship between postoperative object naming and semantic and phonological speech processing in patients with epilepsy. Fifty-eight consecutive patients with temporal lobe epilepsy from our epilepsy surgery program (24 patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy, 34 patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy) were investigated using the Boston Naming Test and comprehensive semantic and phonological speech testing. Language dominance was evaluated in all patients with the preoperative intracarotid sodium amytal test. Naming decline was observed exclusively in patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy. Regression analysis with semantic processing and phonological input/output processing as independent variables, and naming change in the Boston Naming Test (preoperative-postoperative score) as a dependent variable, revealed a significant association between postoperative naming decline and impaired semantic functions. Accordingly, patients exhibited deficits in the category-related differentiation of objects. It is hypothesized that naming deficits arise from the functional specialization of the left temporal lobe for semantic interpretation of visual input.

  4. Using neural modeling and functional neuroimaging to study the neural basis of auditory object processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, Barry; Husain, Fatima T.

    2003-04-01

    The neural basis of auditory object processing in the human cerebral cortex was investigated by combining neural modeling and functional neuroimaging. We developed a large-scale, neurobiologically realistic network model of auditory pattern recognition that relates neuronal dynamics of cortical auditory processing of frequency-modulated (FM) sweeps to functional neuroimaging data obtained using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). FM sweeps are ubiquitous in animal communication. Areas included in the model extend from primary auditory to prefrontal cortex. The electrical activities of the model neuronal units were constrained to agree with data from the neurophysiological literature regarding FM sweep perception. A fMRI experiment using stimuli and tasks similar to those used in our simulations was performed. The regional integrated synaptic activities of the model were used to determine simulated regional fMRI activities, and generally agreed with the experimentally observed fMRI data. Our results demonstrate that the model is capable of exhibiting the salient features of both electrophysiological neuronal activities and fMRI values that are in agreement with empirically observed data. These findings provide support for our hypotheses concerning how auditory objects are processed by primate neocortex. This type of approach offers the potential for understanding the neural basis of human speech perception.

  5. Imaging-based optical caliper for objects in hot manufacturing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Howard

    2013-04-03

    OG Technologies, Inc. (OGT), in conjunction with its industrial and academic partners, proposes to develop an Imaging-Based Optical Caliper (hereafter referred to as OC) for Objects in Hot Manufacturing Processes. The goal is to develop and demonstrate the OC with the synergy of OGT's current technological pool and other innovations to provide a light weight, robust, safe and accurate portable dimensional measurement device for hot objects with integrated wireless communication capacity to enable real time process control. The technical areas of interest in this project are the combination of advanced imaging, Sensor Fusion, and process control. OGT believes that the synergistic interactions between its current set of technologies and other innovations could deliver products that are viable and have high impact in the hot manufacture processes, such as steel making, steel rolling, open die forging, and glass industries, resulting in a new energy efficient control paradigm in the operations through improved yield, prolonged tool life and improved quality. In-line dimension measurement and control is of interest to the steel makers, yet current industry focus is on the final product dimension only instead of whole process due to the limit of man power, system cost and operator safety concerns. As sensor technologies advances, the industry started to see the need to enforce better dimensional control throughout the process, but lack the proper tools to do so. OGT along with its industrial partners represent the indigenous effort of technological development to serve the US steel industry. The immediate market that can use and get benefited from the proposed OC is the Steel Industry. The deployment of the OC has the potential to provide benefits in reduction of energy waste, CO2 emission, waste water amount, toxic waste, and so forth. The potential market after further expended function includes Hot Forging and Freight Industries. The OC prototypes were fabricated, and

  6. Temperature and heat flux datasets of a complex object in a fire plume for the validation of fire and thermal response codes.

    SciTech Connect

    Jernigan, Dann A.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2010-09-01

    It is necessary to improve understanding and develop temporally- and spatially-resolved integral scale validation data of the heat flux incident to a complex object in addition to measuring the thermal response of said object located within the fire plume for the validation of the SIERRA/FUEGO/SYRINX fire and SIERRA/CALORE codes. To meet this objective, a complex calorimeter with sufficient instrumentation to allow validation of the coupling between FUEGO/SYRINX/CALORE has been designed, fabricated, and tested in the Fire Laboratory for Accreditation of Models and Experiments (FLAME) facility. Validation experiments are specifically designed for direct comparison with the computational predictions. Making meaningful comparison between the computational and experimental results requires careful characterization and control of the experimental features or parameters used as inputs into the computational model. Validation experiments must be designed to capture the essential physical phenomena, including all relevant initial and boundary conditions. This report presents the data validation steps and processes, the results of the penlight radiant heat experiments (for the purpose of validating the CALORE heat transfer modeling of the complex calorimeter), and the results of the fire tests in FLAME.

  7. Complexity of line-seru conversion for different scheduling rules and two improved exact algorithms for the multi-objective optimization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Wang, Sihan; Tang, Jiafu; Kaku, Ikou; Sun, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Productivity can be greatly improved by converting the traditional assembly line to a seru system, especially in the business environment with short product life cycles, uncertain product types and fluctuating production volumes. Line-seru conversion includes two decision processes, i.e., seru formation and seru load. For simplicity, however, previous studies focus on the seru formation with a given scheduling rule in seru load. We select ten scheduling rules usually used in seru load to investigate the influence of different scheduling rules on the performance of line-seru conversion. Moreover, we clarify the complexities of line-seru conversion for ten different scheduling rules from the theoretical perspective. In addition, multi-objective decisions are often used in line-seru conversion. To obtain Pareto-optimal solutions of multi-objective line-seru conversion, we develop two improved exact algorithms based on reducing time complexity and space complexity respectively. Compared with the enumeration based on non-dominated sorting to solve multi-objective problem, the two improved exact algorithms saves computation time greatly. Several numerical simulation experiments are performed to show the performance improvement brought by the two proposed exact algorithms.

  8. Complex Leaching Process of Scheelite in Hydrochloric and Phosphoric Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liang; Xue, Jilai; Liu, Kang; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Zengjie

    2016-09-01

    The complex leaching process of synthetic scheelite and scheelite concentrate in hydrochloric and phosphoric solutions has been investigated for improving process efficiency. A higher leaching rate, compared with the classic acid leaching process, can be obtained through the synergy of HCl and H3PO4 with appropriate W/P mole ratio, temperature, and acid concentration. For synthetic scheelite, the optimum leaching conditions were W/P mole ratio 7:1, temperature 50°C, HCl 0.72 mol/L, and stirring speed 600 rpm; for scheelite concentrate, W/P mole ratio 7:1, temperature 80°C, HCl 2.16 mol/L, and stirring speed 1000 rpm. The leaching rates under the optimized conditions can reach up to 98% or even higher. FTIR spectra analysis confirmed that the leachate composition remained as H3[PW12O40] in the range of varying W/P mole ratios, so the PO4 3- in acidic solution and phosphorus content in the leaching product could be better controlled. The function 1 - (1 - X)1/3 against leaching time was applied to fit the experimental data, and the apparent activation energy, E a, was calculated as 60.65 kJ/mol. The results would be valuable for effectively using scheelite as a raw material resource for sustainable tungsten production.

  9. Polarization processes in rocks: 2. Complex Dielectric Permittivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitskaya, Tsylya M.; Sternberg, Ben K.

    1996-07-01

    This is the second part of a review of research performed in the former USSR. Experimental data were used from several regions of the USSR, including Russia, Ukraine, and Georgia. Many of the publications are available in U.S. libraries. Some of them are translated into English. This part considers results of studying rocks with the Complex Electrical Resistivity method, primarily in the frequency range from 0.01 Hz to 50 MHz. Results of studying polarization processes in sedimentary rocks of different lithology and porosity with different types of saturation (salt solutions of various salinity and hydrocarbons) are described. Laboratory studies of ore-mineral containing rocks are also considered. Describing the measurement methods, we have placed primary emphasis on means for avoiding or reducing the electrode polarization effects. It is shown that wet rocks may have two polarization processes: one at low frequencies, below 1 Hz, and one at high frequencies, above 10 kHz. The mechanisms of these processes are discussed based on experimental results.

  10. Methods for simulating the dynamics of complex biological processes.

    PubMed

    Schilstra, Maria J; Martin, Stephen R; Keating, Sarah M

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, we provide the basic information required to understand the central concepts in the modeling and simulation of complex biochemical processes. We underline the fact that most biochemical processes involve sequences of interactions between distinct entities (molecules, molecular assemblies), and also stress that models must adhere to the laws of thermodynamics. Therefore, we discuss the principles of mass-action reaction kinetics, the dynamics of equilibrium and steady state, and enzyme kinetics, and explain how to assess transition probabilities and reactant lifetime distributions for first-order reactions. Stochastic simulation of reaction systems in well-stirred containers is introduced using a relatively simple, phenomenological model of microtubule dynamic instability in vitro. We demonstrate that deterministic simulation [by numerical integration of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODE)] produces trajectories that would be observed if the results of many rounds of stochastic simulation of the same system were averaged. In Section V, we highlight several practical issues with regard to the assessment of parameter values. We draw some attention to the development of a standard format for model storage and exchange, and provide a list of selected software tools that may facilitate the model building process, and can be used to simulate the modeled systems.

  11. A method for subdividing clinical guidelines into process modules with associated triggers and objectives to facilitate implementation.

    PubMed

    Luckmann, Roger S; Boxwala, Aziz A; Greenes, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    Representation of multi-step clinical guidelines (CG) and their implementation in computerized decision support (DS) systems are complex and logistically challenging tasks. However, many simple rules based on CGs (e.g., medical logic modules), have been successfully implemented through a few popular DS models (e.g., prevention reminders, order entry systems). To facilitate mapping of CGs to practical DS models, we propose an empirical method for sub-dividing CGs into modules according to the locus in a clinical process flow model where implementation would be most effective (e.g., post-encounter provider order entry). We further propose a classification of triggers and objectives for CG modules that provides a framework for a DS system to implement the module Successful application of the method to ten diverse CGs in the outpatient setting is described.

  12. A Method for Subdividing Clinical Guidelines into Process Modules with Associated Triggers and Objectives to Facilitate Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Luckmann, Roger; Boxwala, Aziz A.; Greenes, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Representation of multi-step clinical guidelines (CG) and their implementation in computerized decision support (DS) systems are complex and logistically challenging tasks. However, many simple rules based on CGs (e.g., medical logic modules), have been successfully implemented through a few popular DS models (e.g., prevention reminders, order entry systems). To facilitate mapping of CGs to practical DS models, we propose an empirical method for subdividing CGs into modules according to the locus in a clinical process flow model where implementation would be most effective (e.g., post-encounter provider order entry). We further propose a classification of triggers and objectives for CG modules that provides a framework for a DS system to implement the module Successful application of the method to ten diverse CGs in the outpatient setting is described. PMID:14728424

  13. Objectively identifying landmark use and predicting flight trajectories of the homing pigeon using Gaussian processes

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Richard; Freeman, Robin; Osborne, Michael; Garnett, Roman; Armstrong, Chris; Meade, Jessica; Biro, Dora; Guilford, Tim; Roberts, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Pigeons home along idiosyncratic habitual routes from familiar locations. It has been suggested that memorized visual landmarks underpin this route learning. However, the inability to experimentally alter the landscape on large scales has hindered the discovery of the particular features to which birds attend. Here, we present a method for objectively classifying the most informative regions of animal paths. We apply this method to flight trajectories from homing pigeons to identify probable locations of salient visual landmarks. We construct and apply a Gaussian process model of flight trajectory generation for pigeons trained to home from specific release sites. The model shows increasing predictive power as the birds become familiar with the sites, mirroring the animal's learning process. We subsequently find that the most informative elements of the flight trajectories coincide with landscape features that have previously been suggested as important components of the homing task. PMID:20656739

  14. Usefulness of surgical complexity classification index in cataract surgery process.

    PubMed

    Salazar Méndez, R; Cuesta García, M; Llaneza Velasco, M E; Rodríguez Villa, S; Cubillas Martín, M; Alonso Álvarez, C M

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of surgical complexity classification index (SCCI) to predict the degree of surgical difficulty in cataract surgery. This retrospective study includes data collected between January 2013 and December 2014 from patients who underwent cataract extraction by phacoemulsification at our hospital. A sample size of 159 patients was obtained by simple random sampling (P=.5, 10% accuracy, 95% confidence). The main variables were: recording and value of SCCI in electronic medical record (EMR), presence of exfoliation syndrome (XFS), criteria for inclusion in surgical waiting list (SWL), and functional results. SCCI was classified into 7 categories (range: 1-4) according to predictors of technical difficulty, which was indirectly estimated in terms of surgical time (ST). All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS v15.0 statistical software. Prevalence of XFS was 18.2% (95%CI: 11.9-24.5). In terms of quality indicators in the cataract surgery process, 96.8% of patients met at least one of the criteria to be included in SWL, and 98.1% gained ≥2 Snellen lines. The SCCI was recorded in EMR of 98.1% patients, and it was grouped for study into 2 categories: High and low surgical complexity. Statistically significant differences in the distribution of ST were found depending on the assigned SCCI (P<.005) and the presence of XFS (P<.005). The SCCI enables to estimate the degree of surgical complexity in terms of ST in cataract surgery, which is especially useful in those areas with high prevalence of XFS, because of the higher theoretical risk of surgical complications. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Processing of complex auditory patterns in musicians and nonmusicians.

    PubMed

    Boh, Bastiaan; Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Pantev, Christo

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the capacity of the memory store underlying the mismatch negativity (MMN) response in musicians and nonmusicians for complex tone patterns. While previous studies have focused either on the kind of information that can be encoded or on the decay of the memory trace over time, we studied capacity in terms of the length of tone sequences, i.e., the number of individual tones that can be fully encoded and maintained. By means of magnetoencephalography (MEG) we recorded MMN responses to deviant tones that could occur at any position of standard tone patterns composed of four, six or eight tones during passive, distracted listening. Whereas there was a reliable MMN response to deviant tones in the four-tone pattern in both musicians and nonmusicians, only some individuals showed MMN responses to the longer patterns. This finding of a reliable capacity of the short-term auditory store underlying the MMN response is in line with estimates of a three to five item capacity of the short-term memory trace from behavioural studies, although pitch and contour complexity covaried with sequence length, which might have led to an understatement of the reported capacity. Whereas there was a tendency for an enhancement of the pattern MMN in musicians compared to nonmusicians, a strong advantage for musicians could be shown in an accompanying behavioural task of detecting the deviants while attending to the stimuli for all pattern lengths, indicating that long-term musical training differentially affects the memory capacity of auditory short-term memory for complex tone patterns with and without attention. Also, a left-hemispheric lateralization of MMN responses in the six-tone pattern suggests that additional networks that help structuring the patterns in the temporal domain might be recruited for demanding auditory processing in the pitch domain.

  16. Rapid Pattern Recognition of Three Dimensional Objects Using Parallel Processing Within a Hierarchy of Hexagonal Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Haojun

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes using parallel processing within a hierarchy of hexagonal grids to achieve rapid recognition of patterns. A seven-pixel basic hexagonal neighborhood, a sixty-one-pixel superneighborhood and pyramids of a 2-to-4 area ratio are employed. The hexagonal network achieves improved accuracy over the square network for object boundaries. The hexagonal grid with less directional sensitivity is a better approximation of the human vision grid, is more suited to natural scenes than the square grid and avoids the 4-neighbor/8-neighbor problem. Parallel processing in image analysis saves considerable time versus the traditional line-by-line method. Hexagonal parallel processing combines the optimum hexagonal geometry with the parallel structure. Our work has surveyed behavior and internal properties to construct the image on the different level of hexagonal pixel grids in a parallel computation scheme. A computer code has been developed to detect edges of digital images of real objects taken with a CCD camera within a hexagonal grid at any level. The algorithm uses the differences of the local gray level and those of its six neighbors, and is able to determine the boundary of a digital image in parallel. Also a series of algorithms and techniques have been built up to manage edge linking, feature extraction, etc. The digital images obtained from the improved CRS digital image processing system are a good approximation to the images which would be obtained with a real physical hexagonal grid. We envision that our work done within this little-known area will have some important applications in real-time machine vision. A parallel two-layer hexagonal-array retina has been designed to do pattern recognition using simple operations such as differencing, rationing, thresholding, etc. which may occur in the human retina and other biological vision systems.

  17. Microfluidic-SANS: flow processing of complex fluids

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Carlos G.; Watanabe, Takaichi; Martel, Anne; Porcar, Lionel; Cabral, João T.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and engineering the flow-response of complex and non-Newtonian fluids at a molecular level is a key challenge for their practical utilisation. Here we demonstrate the coupling of microfluidics with small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Microdevices with high neutron transmission (up to 98%), low scattering background (), broad solvent compatibility and high pressure tolerance (≈3–15 bar) are rapidly prototyped via frontal photo polymerisation. Scattering from single microchannels of widths down to 60 μm, with beam footprint of 500 μm diameter, was successfully obtained in the scattering vector range 0.01–0.3 Å−1, corresponding to real space dimensions of . We demonstrate our approach by investigating the molecular re-orientation and alignment underpinning the flow response of two model complex fluids, namely cetyl trimethylammonium chloride/pentanol/D2O and sodium lauryl sulfate/octanol/brine lamellar systems. Finally, we assess the applicability and outlook of microfluidic-SANS for high-throughput and flow processing studies, with emphasis of soft matter. PMID:25578326

  18. Microfluidic-SANS: flow processing of complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Carlos G.; Watanabe, Takaichi; Martel, Anne; Porcar, Lionel; Cabral, João T.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and engineering the flow-response of complex and non-Newtonian fluids at a molecular level is a key challenge for their practical utilisation. Here we demonstrate the coupling of microfluidics with small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Microdevices with high neutron transmission (up to 98%), low scattering background (), broad solvent compatibility and high pressure tolerance (~3-15 bar) are rapidly prototyped via frontal photo polymerisation. Scattering from single microchannels of widths down to 60 μm, with beam footprint of 500 μm diameter, was successfully obtained in the scattering vector range 0.01-0.3 Å-1, corresponding to real space dimensions of . We demonstrate our approach by investigating the molecular re-orientation and alignment underpinning the flow response of two model complex fluids, namely cetyl trimethylammonium chloride/pentanol/D2O and sodium lauryl sulfate/octanol/brine lamellar systems. Finally, we assess the applicability and outlook of microfluidic-SANS for high-throughput and flow processing studies, with emphasis of soft matter.

  19. Road-safety education: spatial decentering and subjective or objective picture processing.

    PubMed

    Guercin, F

    2007-10-01

    The current study examined children's ability to analyse pictures of a risky situation, both in relation to the characteristics of the pictures and in relation to the centering/decentering process of cognitive development. Sixty children aged 6, 9 or 11 years were given an objective or subjective version of a story about a risky situation involving road crossing and were asked to reconstruct it by putting six pictures in chronological order. The type of picture series, objective or subjective, had a different effect on the children's understanding and performance, according to the age. The older children were better at ordering the pictures, but on the subjective version only. The picture-version effect on planning time decreased with age; only the younger children took more time to start touching the pictures. On one hand, it is concluded that for the youngest children, objective representations are essential to analysing pictures showing a risk, whereas the oldest children will profit more from a subjective view. On the other hand, subjective representations, which give a more realistic view, provide an excellent tool for testing children's abilities. Subjective representations can be used to detect potentially risky behaviour in virtual situations (static pictures, or multimedia tools), since it permits one to predict at-risk behaviour in the street and to assess the effectiveness of remedial measures.

  20. Polarization processes in rocks: 1. Complex Dielectric Permittivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitskaya, Tsylya M.; Sternberg, Ben K.

    1996-07-01

    This is the first part of a review of research performed in the former USSR. Experimental data were used from several regions of the USSR, including Russia, Ukraine, and Georgia. Many of the publications are available in U.S. libraries. Some of them are translated into English. This part contains results from applying the Complex Dielectric Permittivity method (Dielectric Spectroscopy) for studying the electrical response of rocks in alternating fields with frequencies from 100 Hz to 100 MHz. Data on dielectric properties of sedimentary rocks of different lithology and with various porosities, salinities of saturating solution, and hydrocarbon content are reviewed here. Measurement methods, including means for avoiding or reducing the electrode polarization, are also considered. It is shown that wet rocks exhibit a Maxwell-Wagner polarization process at frequencies 105-107 Hz, caused by charge accumulation on the pore boundaries.

  1. Detecting link failures in complex network processes using remote monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhal, R.; Abad Torres, J.; Roy, S.

    2015-11-01

    We study whether local structural changes in a complex network can be distinguished from passive remote time-course measurements of the network's dynamics. Specifically the detection of link failures in a network synchronization process from noisy measurements at a single network component is considered. By phrasing the detection task as a Maximum A Posteriori Probability hypothesis testing problem, we are able to obtain conditions under which the detection is (1) improved over the a priori and (2) asymptotically perfect, in terms of the network spectrum and graph. We find that, in the case where the detector has knowledge of the network's state, perfect detection is possible under general connectivity conditions regardless of the measurement location. When the detector does not have state knowledge, a remote signature permits improved but not perfect detection, under the same connectivity conditions. At its essence, detectability is achieved because of the close connection between a network's topology, its eigenvalues and local response characteristics.

  2. WONKA: objective novel complex analysis for ensembles of protein-ligand structures.

    PubMed

    Bradley, A R; Wall, I D; von Delft, F; Green, D V S; Deane, C M; Marsden, B D

    2015-10-01

    WONKA is a tool for the systematic analysis of an ensemble of protein-ligand structures. It makes the identification of conserved and unusual features within such an ensemble straightforward. WONKA uses an intuitive workflow to process structural co-ordinates. Ligand and protein features are summarised and then presented within an interactive web application. WONKA's power in consolidating and summarising large amounts of data is described through the analysis of three bromodomain datasets. Furthermore, and in contrast to many current methods, WONKA relates analysis to individual ligands, from which we find unusual and erroneous binding modes. Finally the use of WONKA as an annotation tool to share observations about structures is demonstrated. WONKA is freely available to download and install locally or can be used online at http://wonka.sgc.ox.ac.uk.

  3. WONKA: objective novel complex analysis for ensembles of protein-ligand structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. R.; Wall, I. D.; von Delft, F.; Green, D. V. S.; Deane, C. M.; Marsden, B. D.

    2015-10-01

    WONKA is a tool for the systematic analysis of an ensemble of protein-ligand structures. It makes the identification of conserved and unusual features within such an ensemble straightforward. WONKA uses an intuitive workflow to process structural co-ordinates. Ligand and protein features are summarised and then presented within an interactive web application. WONKA's power in consolidating and summarising large amounts of data is described through the analysis of three bromodomain datasets. Furthermore, and in contrast to many current methods, WONKA relates analysis to individual ligands, from which we find unusual and erroneous binding modes. Finally the use of WONKA as an annotation tool to share observations about structures is demonstrated. WONKA is freely available to download and install locally or can be used online at http://wonka.sgc.ox.ac.uk.

  4. Bio-objects and the media: the role of communication in bio-objectification processes

    PubMed Central

    Maeseele, Pieter; Allgaier, Joachim; Martinelli, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    The representation of biological innovations in and through communication and media practices is vital for understanding the nature of “bio-objects” and the process we call “bio-objectification.” This paper discusses two ideal-typical analytical approaches based on different underlying communication models, ie, the traditional (science- and media-centered) and media sociological (a multi-layered process involving various social actors in defining the meanings of scientific and technological developments) approach. In this analysis, the latter is not only found to be the most promising approach for understanding the circulation, (re)production, and (re)configuration of meanings of bio-objects, but also to interpret the relationship between media and science. On the basis of a few selected examples, this paper highlights how media function as a primary arena for the (re)production and (re)configuration of scientific and biomedical information with regards to bio-objects in the public sphere in general, and toward decision-makers, interest groups, and the public in specific. PMID:23771763

  5. The Aerosol Modeling Testbed: A community tool to objectively evaluate aerosol process modules

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Easter, Richard C.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Grell, Georg; Barth, Mary

    2011-03-02

    This study describes a new modeling paradigm that significantly advances how the third activity is conducted while also fully exploiting data and findings from the first two activities. The Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) is a computational framework for the atmospheric sciences community that streamlines the process of testing and evaluating aerosol process modules over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The AMT consists of a fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of aerosol process modules via comparison with a wide range of field measurements. The philosophy of the AMT is to systematically and objectively evaluate aerosol process modules over local to regional spatial scales that are compatible with most field campaigns measurement strategies. The performance of new treatments can then be quantified and compared to existing treatments before they are incorporated into regional and global climate models. Since the AMT is a community tool, it also provides a means of enhancing collaboration and coordination among aerosol modelers.

  6. The application of multi-objective optimization method for activated sludge process: a review.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hongliang; Chen, Wenliang; Lu, Xiwu

    2016-01-01

    The activated sludge process (ASP) is the most generally applied biological wastewater treatment approach. Depending on the design and specific application, activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) can achieve biological nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) removal, besides the removal of organic carbon substances. However, the effluent N and P limits are getting tighter because of increased emphasis on environmental protection, and the needs for energy conservation as well as the operational reliability. Therefore, the balance between treatment performance and cost becomes a critical issue for the operations of WWTPs, which necessitates a multi-objective optimization (MOO). Recent studies in this field have shown promise in utilizing MOO to address the multiple conflicting criteria (i.e. effluent quality, operation cost, operation stability), including studying the ASP models that are primarily responsible for the process, and developing the method of MOO in the wastewater treatment process, which facilitates better optimization of process performance. Based on a better understanding of the application of MOO for ASP, a comprehensive review is conducted to offer a clear vision of the advances, and potential areas for future research are also proposed in the field.

  7. Transfer after process-based object-location memory training in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Kathrin; von Bastian, Claudia C; Röcke, Christina; Martin, Mike; Eschen, Anne

    2016-11-01

    A substantial part of age-related episodic memory decline has been attributed to the decreasing ability of older adults to encode and retrieve associations among simultaneously processed information units from long-term memory. In addition, this ability seems to share unique variance with reasoning. In this study, we therefore examined whether process-based training of the ability to learn and remember associations has the potential to induce transfer effects to untrained episodic memory and reasoning tasks in healthy older adults (60-75 years). For this purpose, the experimental group (n = 36) completed 30 sessions of process-based object-location memory training, while the active control group (n = 31) practiced visual perception on the same material. Near (spatial episodic memory), intermediate (verbal episodic memory), and far transfer effects (reasoning) were each assessed with multiple tasks at four measurements (before, midway through, immediately after, and 4 months after training). Linear mixed-effects models revealed transfer effects on spatial episodic memory and reasoning that were still observed 4 months after training. These results provide first empirical evidence that process-based training can enhance healthy older adults' associative memory performance and positively affect untrained episodic memory and reasoning abilities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Men and women exhibit a differential bias for processing movement versus objects.

    PubMed

    McGivern, Robert F; Adams, Brian; Handa, Robert J; Pineda, Jaime A

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in many spatial and verbal tasks appear to reflect an inherent low-level processing bias for movement in males and objects in females. We explored this potential movement/object bias in men and women using a computer task that measured targeting performance and/or color recognition. The targeting task showed a ball moving vertically towards a horizontal line. Before reaching the line, the ball disappeared behind a masking screen, requiring the participant to imagine the movement vector and identify the intersection point. For the color recognition task, the ball briefly changed color before disappearing beneath the mask and participants were required only to identify the color shade. Results showed that targeting accuracy for slow and fast moving balls was significantly better in males compared to females. No sex difference was observed for color shade recognition. We also studied a third, dual attention task comprised of the first two, where the moving ball briefly changed color randomly just before passing beneath the masking screen. When the ball changed color, participants were required only to identify the color shade. If the ball didn't change color, participants estimated the intersection point. Participants in this dual attention condition were first tested with the targeting and color tasks alone and showed results that were similar to the previous groups tested on a single task. However, under the dual attention condition, male accuracy in targeting, as well as color shade recognition, declined significantly compared to their performance when the tasks were tested alone. No significant changes were found in female performance. Finally, reaction times for targeting and color choices in both sexes correlated highly with ball speed, but not accuracy. Overall, these results provide evidence of a sex-related bias in processing objects versus movement, which may reflect sex differences in bottom up versus top-down analytical strategies.

  9. Men and Women Exhibit a Differential Bias for Processing Movement versus Objects

    PubMed Central

    McGivern, Robert F.; Adams, Brian; Handa, Robert J.; Pineda, Jaime A.

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in many spatial and verbal tasks appear to reflect an inherent low-level processing bias for movement in males and objects in females. We explored this potential movement/object bias in men and women using a computer task that measured targeting performance and/or color recognition. The targeting task showed a ball moving vertically towards a horizontal line. Before reaching the line, the ball disappeared behind a masking screen, requiring the participant to imagine the movement vector and identify the intersection point. For the color recognition task, the ball briefly changed color before disappearing beneath the mask and participants were required only to identify the color shade. Results showed that targeting accuracy for slow and fast moving balls was significantly better in males compared to females. No sex difference was observed for color shade recognition. We also studied a third, dual attention task comprised of the first two, where the moving ball briefly changed color randomly just before passing beneath the masking screen. When the ball changed color, participants were required only to identify the color shade. If the ball didn't change color, participants estimated the intersection point. Participants in this dual attention condition were first tested with the targeting and color tasks alone and showed results that were similar to the previous groups tested on a single task. However, under the dual attention condition, male accuracy in targeting, as well as color shade recognition, declined significantly compared to their performance when the tasks were tested alone. No significant changes were found in female performance. Finally, reaction times for targeting and color choices in both sexes correlated highly with ball speed, but not accuracy. Overall, these results provide evidence of a sex-related bias in processing objects versus movement, which may reflect sex differences in bottom up versus top-down analytical strategies. PMID

  10. Spectroscopic Characterization of Metal-Based Complexes and Metal-Based Complex Oxidation Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuaid, Michael James

    The entrainment in carbon monoxide of metal (M) vaporized from an oven based source was used to create M(CO)_{rm x} complexes. The optical signatures associated with their oxidation to form chemiluminescing reaction products were analyzed to evaluate the nature of the M(CO)_{rm x } adducts and study MOcdotCO solvation complexes. The study was facilitated by comparing the optical signatures for the chemiluminescent oxidation of rare gas entrained metal atoms. Oxidation processes involving vanadium, chromium, and aluminum complexes were studied. In the case of vanadium, transitions associated with two previously unreported states of vanadium monoxide (VO) were observed and characterized. Transitions which may be associated with a VOcdotCO complex were also observed. For the case of chromium, three previously unreported states of chromium monofluoride (CrF) were characterized. Two band systems, which are tentatively ascribed to Cr_2F, were also observed. For the case of aluminum, the differences in the AlO B state population distribution formed in the Al+CO+O_3 and Al+Ar+O_3 systems provided a means of evaluating the binding energy of the Al(CO)_2 complex. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) was used to probe the van der Waals complex AlAr formed in a free jet expansion. Based on rotationally resolved B^2Sigma ^{+} >=ts X^2 Pi_{1/2} electronic transitions, definitive interatomic potential parameters were developed for the AlAr B^2Sigma^{+ } state. AlAr X^2Pi_ {1/2} state interatomic potential parameter were developed assuming a Morse potential. Lambda doubling of the X^2Pi_ {1/2} state is evident, consistent with the presence of an unobserved repulsive AlAr A ^2Sigma^{+} state. Finally, the LIF excitation and emission spectra obtained for Fe/Ar and photolyzed Fe(CO)_5 /Ar matrices were compared. Previously unreported transitions associated with matrix-isolated Fe atoms were observed in the range from 500 to 1600 nm. Differences were observed in the spectra characterizing

  11. Identification of physical properties for the retrieval data quality objective process

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, C.M.; Beckette, M.R.

    1995-06-01

    This activity supports the retrieval data quality objective (DQO) process by identifying the material properties that are important to the design, development, and operation of retrieval equipment; the activity also provides justification for characterizing those properties. These properties, which control tank waste behavior during retrieval operations, are also critical to the development of valid physical simulants for designing retrieval equipment. The waste is to be retrieved in a series of four steps. First, a selected retrieval technology breaks up or dislodges the waste into subsequently smaller pieces. Then, the dislodged waste is conveyed out of the tank through the conveyance line. Next, the waste flows into a separator unit that separates the gaseous phase from the liquid and solid phases. Finally, a unit may be present to condition the slurried waste before transporting it to the treatment facility. This document describes the characterization needs for the proposed processes to accomplish waste retrieval. Baseline mobilization technologies include mixer pump technology, sluicing, and high-pressure water-jet cutting. Other processes that are discussed in this document include slurry formation, pneumatic conveyance, and slurry transport. Section 2.0 gives a background of the DQO process and the different retrieval technologies. Section 3.0 provides the mechanistic descriptions and material properties critical to the different technologies and processes. Supplemental information on specific technologies and processes is provided in the appendices. Appendix A contains a preliminary sluicing model, and Appendices B and C cover pneumatic transport and slurry transport, respectively, as prepared for this document. Appendix D contains sample calculations for various equations.

  12. Complexity and Dynamic Heterogeneity of the Process of Cancer Metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Ann

    2010-03-01

    Cancer metastasis -- the spread of cancer from a primary tumor to distant parts of the body -- is responsible for most cancer deaths. If cancer is detected early, before it has spread, it can often be treated with local therapies like surgery and radiation. If cancer is detected after it has already spread, it is much harder to treat successfully. Cancer cells may be distributed to many organs, may be present as tiny micrometastases that are hard to detect, and cancer cells can be in a dormant state that may be resistant to treatment that is directed against actively dividing cells. A better understanding of the process of metastasis thus is needed in order to improve survival from cancer. Cancer is not a static disease, but one that can undergo stepwise evolution and progression from early, treatable cancer to aggressive cancer that is harder to treat. Furthermore, cancers are made up of many cells, and there is considerable heterogeneity among the cells in a tumor. Thus, cancer is ``plastic,'' with heterogeneity among cancer cells and changes over time. Understanding this ``dynamic heterogeneity'' has proven to be difficult. Input from physical sciences disciplines may help to shed light on this complex aspect of cancer biology. Here the process of cancer metastasis will be discussed, and experimental models for imaging the process described. The concept of ``dynamic heterogeneity'' of the metastatic process will be discussed, and some of the questions that need to be addressed for better understanding of metastasis will be outlined. An evolving dialogue between cancer biologists and physical scientists may lead to new ways of studying and understanding this lethal aspect of cancer.

  13. FACET: A simulation software framework for modeling complex societal processes and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, J. H.

    2000-06-02

    FACET, the Framework for Addressing Cooperative Extended Transactions, was developed at Argonne National Laboratory to address the need for a simulation software architecture in the style of an agent-based approach, but with sufficient robustness, expressiveness, and flexibility to be able to deal with the levels of complexity seen in real-world social situations. FACET is an object-oriented software framework for building models of complex, cooperative behaviors of agents. It can be used to implement simulation models of societal processes such as the complex interplay of participating individuals and organizations engaged in multiple concurrent transactions in pursuit of their various goals. These transactions can be patterned on, for example, clinical guidelines and procedures, business practices, government and corporate policies, etc. FACET can also address other complex behaviors such as biological life cycles or manufacturing processes. To date, for example, FACET has been applied to such areas as land management, health care delivery, avian social behavior, and interactions between natural and social processes in ancient Mesopotamia.

  14. Full-matrix capture with phased shift migration for flaw detection in layered objects with complex geometry.

    PubMed

    Lukomski, Tomasz

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a method for an ultrasonic imaging with a phased array based on a wave migration algorithm. The method allows for imaging layered objects with lateral velocity variations such as objects with a complex geometry or layers that are not perpendicular to the array's axis. The full-matrix capture ensures that there is enough information to reconstruct an image even when the wave indication angle is large. The method is implemented in a omega-k domain. The proposed algorithm is first tested in a single simulation of a concave object with side drilled holes under the concave surface. For evaluating the algorithm's performance three experiments are presented: one with a tilted object (surface not perpendicular with respect to the array axis) with side drilled holes and two experiments of an object with concave surface and two artificial defects under it. The results presented in the paper verify that the proposed method reconstructs images from the data gathered with the phased array.

  15. The comparative effect of subjective and objective after-action reviews on team performance on a complex task.

    PubMed

    Villado, Anton J; Arthur, Winfred

    2013-05-01

    The after-action review (AAR; also known as the after-event review or debriefing) is an approach to training based on a review of trainees' performance on recently completed tasks or performance events. Used by the military for decades, nonmilitary organizations' use of AARs has increased dramatically in recent years. Despite the prevalence of AARs, empirical research investigating their effectiveness has been limited. This study sought to investigate the comparative effectiveness of objective AARs (reviews based on an objective recording and playback of trainees' recent performance) and subjective AARs (reviews based on a subjective, memory-based recall of trainees' recent performance). One hundred eighty-eight individuals, participating in 47 4-person teams, were assigned to 1 of 3 AAR conditions and practiced and tested on a cognitively complex performance task. Although there were no significant differences between objective and subjective AAR teams across the 5 training outcomes, AAR teams had higher levels of team performance, team efficacy, openness of communication, and cohesion than did non-AAR teams but no differences in their levels of team declarative knowledge. Our results suggest that AARs are effective at enhancing training outcomes. Furthermore, AARs may not be dependent on objective reviews and therefore may be a viable training intervention when objective reviews are not feasible or possible. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Switching industrial production processes from complex to defined media: method development and case study using the example of Penicillium chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Filamentous fungi are versatile cell factories and widely used for the production of antibiotics, organic acids, enzymes and other industrially relevant compounds at large scale. As a fact, industrial production processes employing filamentous fungi are commonly based on complex raw materials. However, considerable lot-to-lot variability of complex media ingredients not only demands for exhaustive incoming components inspection and quality control, but unavoidably affects process stability and performance. Thus, switching bioprocesses from complex to defined media is highly desirable. Results This study presents a strategy for strain characterization of filamentous fungi on partly complex media using redundant mass balancing techniques. Applying the suggested method, interdependencies between specific biomass and side-product formation rates, production of fructooligosaccharides, specific complex media component uptake rates and fungal strains were revealed. A 2-fold increase of the overall penicillin space time yield and a 3-fold increase in the maximum specific penicillin formation rate were reached in defined media compared to complex media. Conclusions The newly developed methodology enabled fast characterization of two different industrial Penicillium chrysogenum candidate strains on complex media based on specific complex media component uptake kinetics and identification of the most promising strain for switching the process from complex to defined conditions. Characterization at different complex/defined media ratios using only a limited number of analytical methods allowed maximizing the overall industrial objectives of increasing both, method throughput and the generation of scientific process understanding. PMID:22727013

  17. Developmental differences in visual and auditory processing of complex sentences.

    PubMed

    Booth, J R; MacWhinney, B; Harasaki, Y

    2000-01-01

    Children aged 8 through 11 (N = 250) were given a word-by-word sentence task in both the visual and auditory modes. The sentences included an object relative clause, a subject relative clause, or a conjoined verb phrase. Each sentence was followed by a true-false question, testing the subject of either the first or second verb. Participants were also given two memory span measures: digit span and reading span. High digit span children slowed down more at the transition from the main to the relative clause than did the low digit span children. The findings suggest the presence of a U-shaped learning pattern for on-line processing of restrictive relative clauses. Off-line accuracy scores showed different patterns for good comprehenders and poor comprehenders. Poor comprehenders answered the second verb questions at levels that were consistently below chance. Their answers were based on an incorrect local attachment strategy that treated the second noun as the subject of the second verb. For example, they often answered yes to the question "The girl chases the policeman" after the object relative sentence "The boy that the girl sees chases the policeman." Interestingly, low memory span poor comprehenders used the local attachment strategy less consistently than high memory span poor comprehenders, and all poor comprehenders used this strategy less consistently for harder than for easier sentences.

  18. Extension of RCC Topological Relations for 3d Complex Objects Components Extracted from 3d LIDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xu-Feng; Abolfazl Mostafavia, Mir; Wang, Chen

    2016-06-01

    Topological relations are fundamental for qualitative description, querying and analysis of a 3D scene. Although topological relations for 2D objects have been extensively studied and implemented in GIS applications, their direct extension to 3D is very challenging and they cannot be directly applied to represent relations between components of complex 3D objects represented by 3D B-Rep models in R3. Herein we present an extended Region Connection Calculus (RCC) model to express and formalize topological relations between planar regions for creating 3D model represented by Boundary Representation model in R3. We proposed a new dimension extended 9-Intersection model to represent the basic relations among components of a complex object, including disjoint, meet and intersect. The last element in 3*3 matrix records the details of connection through the common parts of two regions and the intersecting line of two planes. Additionally, this model can deal with the case of planar regions with holes. Finally, the geometric information is transformed into a list of strings consisting of topological relations between two planar regions and detailed connection information. The experiments show that the proposed approach helps to identify topological relations of planar segments of point cloud automatically.

  19. Generic design methodology for the development of three-dimensional structured-light sensory systems for measuring complex objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Veronica E.; Chang, Wei Hao Wayne; Nejat, Goldie

    2014-11-01

    Structured-light (SL) techniques are emerging as popular noncontact approaches for obtaining three-dimensional (3-D) measurements of complex objects for real-time applications in manufacturing, bioengineering, and robotics. The performance of SL systems is determined by the emitting (i.e., projector) and capturing (i.e., camera) hardware components and the triangulation configuration between them and an object of interest. A generic design methodology is presented to determine optimal triangulation configurations for SL systems. These optimal configurations are determined with respect to a set of performance metrics: (1) minimizing the 3-D reconstruction errors, (2) maximizing the pixel-to-pixel correspondence between the projector and camera, and (3) maximizing the dispersion of the measured 3-D points within a measurement volume, while satisfying design constraints based on hardware and user-defined specifications. The proposed methodology utilizes a 3-D geometric triangulation model based on ray-tracing geometry and pin-hole models for the projector and camera. Using the methodology, a set of optimal system configurations can be determined for a given set of hardware components. The design methodology was applied to a real-time SL system for surface profiling of complex objects. Experiments were conducted with an optimal sensor configuration and its performance verified with respect to a nonoptimal hardware configuration.

  20. Phase transitions in the quadratic contact process on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Chris; Durrett, Rick

    2013-06-01

    The quadratic contact process (QCP) is a natural extension of the well-studied linear contact process where infected (1) individuals infect susceptible (0) neighbors at rate λ and infected individuals recover (10) at rate 1. In the QCP, a combination of two 1's is required to effect a 01 change. We extend the study of the QCP, which so far has been limited to lattices, to complex networks. We define two versions of the QCP: vertex-centered (VQCP) and edge-centered (EQCP) with birth events 1-0-11-1-1 and 1-1-01-1-1, respectively, where “-” represents an edge. We investigate the effects of network topology by considering the QCP on random regular, Erdős-Rényi, and power-law random graphs. We perform mean-field calculations as well as simulations to find the steady-state fraction of occupied vertices as a function of the birth rate. We find that on the random regular and Erdős-Rényi graphs, there is a discontinuous phase transition with a region of bistability, whereas on the heavy-tailed power-law graph, the transition is continuous. The critical birth rate is found to be positive in the former but zero in the latter.

  1. Phase Transitions in the Quadratic Contact Process on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Chris; Durrett, Rick

    2013-03-01

    The quadratic contact process (QCP) is a natural extension of the well studied linear contact process where a single infected (1) individual can infect a susceptible (0) neighbor and infected individuals are allowed to recover (1 --> 0). In the QCP, a combination of two 1's is required to effect a 0 --> 1 change. We extend the study of the QCP, which so far has been limited to lattices, to complex networks as a model for the change in a population via sexual reproduction and death. We define two versions of the QCP - vertex centered (VQCP) and edge centered (EQCP) with birth events 1 - 0 - 1 --> 1 - 1 - 1 and 1 - 1 - 0 --> 1 - 1 - 1 respectively, where ` -' represents an edge. We investigate the effects of network topology by considering the QCP on regular, Erdős-Rényi and power law random graphs. We perform mean field calculations as well as simulations to find the steady state fraction of occupied vertices as a function of the birth rate. We find that on the homogeneous graphs (regular and Erdős-Rényi) there is a discontinuous phase transition with a region of bistability, whereas on the heavy tailed power law graph, the transition is continuous. The critical birth rate is found to be positive in the former but zero in the latter.

  2. Complex learning and information processing by pigeons: a critical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carter, David E.; Werner, Thomas J.

    1978-01-01

    Three models of conditional discrimination learning by pigeons are described: stimulus configuration learning, the multiple-rule model, and concept learning. A review of the literature reveals that true concept learning is not characteristic of the behavior of pigeons in matching-to-sample, oddity-from-sample, or symbolic matching studies. Instead, pigeons learn a set of sample-specific SD rules. Transfer of the discrimination to novel stimuli, at least along the hue dimension, is predicted by a “coding hypothesis”, which holds that pigeons make a unique, but usually unobserved response, R1, to each sample, and that the comparison stimulus chosen depends on which R1 was emitted in the presence of the sample. Convincing evidence is found that pigeons do code sample hues, but there is little evidence that allows one to infer that the “coding event” must have behavioral properties. Parameters of the conditional discrimination paradigm are identified, and it is shown that by appropriate parametric manipulation, a variety of analogous tasks may be generated for both human and animal subjects. The tasks make possible the comparative study of complex learning, attention, memory, and information processing, with the added advantage that behavior processes may be compared systematically across tasks. PMID:16812079

  3. Process for the reconstruction of three-dimensional images of an area of interest of an object comprising the combination of measurements over the entire object with measurements of an area of interest of said object, and appropriate installation

    DOEpatents

    Azevedo, Stephen; Grangeat, Pierre; Rizo, Philippe

    1995-01-01

    Process and installation making it possible to reconstitute precise images of an area of interest (2) of an object (1) by reducing the errors produced by the contribution of the compliment of the object. A first series of measurements is carried out, where a conical beam (10) only takes in the area of interest of the object (2) and this is followed by a second series of measurements in which the beam takes in the entire object. A combination of the measurements of the two series is carried out in order to make them compatible and obtain a more accurate image of the area of interest (2).

  4. Operation room tool handling and miscommunication scenarios: an object-process methodology conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Wachs, Juan P; Frenkel, Boaz; Dori, Dov

    2014-11-01

    Errors in the delivery of medical care are the principal cause of inpatient mortality and morbidity, accounting for around 98,000 deaths in the United States of America (USA) annually. Ineffective team communication, especially in the operation room (OR), is a major root of these errors. This miscommunication can be reduced by analyzing and constructing a conceptual model of communication and miscommunication in the OR. We introduce the principles underlying Object-Process Methodology (OPM)-based modeling of the intricate interactions between the surgeon and the surgical technician while handling surgical instruments in the OR. This model is a software- and hardware-independent description of the agents engaged in communication events, their physical activities, and their interactions. The model enables assessing whether the task-related objectives of the surgical procedure were achieved and completed successfully and what errors can occur during the communication. The facts used to construct the model were gathered from observations of various types of operations miscommunications in the operating room and its outcomes. The model takes advantage of the compact ontology of OPM, which is comprised of stateful objects - things that exist physically or informatically, and processes - things that transform objects by creating them, consuming them or changing their state. The modeled communication modalities are verbal and non-verbal, and errors are modeled as processes that deviate from the "sunny day" scenario. Using OPM refinement mechanism of in-zooming, key processes are drilled into and elaborated, along with the objects that are required as agents or instruments, or objects that these processes transform. The model was developed through an iterative process of observation, modeling, group discussions, and simplification. The model faithfully represents the processes related to tool handling that take place in an OR during an operation. The specification is at

  5. Attempts to Automate the Process of Generation of Orthoimages of Objects of Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markiewicz, J. S.; Podlasiak, P.; Zawieska, D.

    2015-02-01

    At present, digital documentation recorded in the form of raster or vector files is the obligatory way of inventorying historical objects. The orthoimage is a cartometric form of photographic presentation of information in the two-dimensional reference system. The paper will discuss the issue of automation of the orthoimage generation basing on the TLS data and digital images. At present attempts are made to apply modern technologies not only for the needs of surveys, but also during the data processing. This paper will present attempts aiming at utilisation of appropriate algorithms and the author's application for automatic generation of the projection plane, for the needs of acquisition of intensity orthoimages from the TLS data. Such planes are defined manually in the majority of popular TLS data processing applications. A separate issue related to the RGB image generation is the orientation of digital images in relation to scans. It is important, in particular in such cases when scans and photographs are not taken simultaneously. This paper will present experiments concerning the utilisation of the SIFT algorithm for automatic matching of intensity orthoimages of the intensity and digital (RGB) photographs. Satisfactory results of the process of automation, as well as in relation to the quality of resulting orthoimages have been obtained.

  6. Differential modulation of visual object processing in dorsal and ventral stream by stimulus visibility.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Karin; Sterzer, Philipp; Kathmann, Norbert; Hesselmann, Guido

    2016-10-01

    As a functional organization principle in cortical visual information processing, the influential 'two visual systems' hypothesis proposes a division of labor between a dorsal "vision-for-action" and a ventral "vision-for-perception" stream. A core assumption of this model is that the two visual streams are differentially involved in visual awareness: ventral stream processing is closely linked to awareness while dorsal stream processing is not. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study with human observers, we directly probed the stimulus-related information encoded in fMRI response patterns in both visual streams as a function of stimulus visibility. We parametrically modulated the visibility of face and tool stimuli by varying the contrasts of the masks in a continuous flash suppression (CFS) paradigm. We found that visibility - operationalized by objective and subjective measures - decreased proportionally with increasing log CFS mask contrast. Neuronally, this relationship was closely matched by ventral visual areas, showing a linear decrease of stimulus-related information with increasing mask contrast. Stimulus-related information in dorsal areas also showed a dependency on mask contrast, but the decrease rather followed a step function instead of a linear function. Together, our results suggest that both the ventral and the dorsal visual stream are linked to visual awareness, but neural activity in ventral areas more closely reflects graded differences in awareness compared to dorsal areas.

  7. Global and local visual processing in autism: An objective assessment approach.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Kritika; Voyles, Angela C; Kiorpes, Lynne; Di Martino, Adriana

    2017-08-01

    We examined global and local visual processing in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) via a match-to-sample task using Kanizsa illusory contours (KIC). School-aged children with ASD (n = 28) and age-matched typically developing controls (n = 22; 7-13 years) performed a sequential match-to-sample between a solid shape (sample) and two illusory alternatives. We tracked eye gaze and behavioral performance in two task conditions: one with and one without local interference from background noise elements. While analyses revealed lower accuracy and longer reaction time in ASD in the condition with local interference only, eye tracking robustly captured ASD-related global atypicalities across both conditions. Specifically, relative to controls, children with ASD showed decreased fixations to KIC centers, indicating reduced global perception. Notably, they did not differ from controls in regard to fixations to local elements or touch response location. These results indicate impaired global perception in the absence of heightened local processing in ASD. They also underscore the utility of eye-tracking measures as objective indices of global/local visual processing strategies in ASD. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1392-1404. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Electrophilicity of aromatic triflones in sigma-complexation processes.

    PubMed

    El Guesmi, Nizar; Boubaker, Taoufik; Goumont, Régis; Terrier, François

    2008-11-07

    The kinetics of sigma-complexation of 2,6-bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-4-nitroanisole (4) have been investigated over a large pH range of 2-15.68 in methanol. Two competitive processes have been identified with the initial addition of MeO(-) at the unsubstituted 3-position of 4 to give a 1,3-dimethoxy adduct (4b-Me) and a subsequent and slow conversion of this species into the 1,1-dimethoxy isomer (4a-Me). Both 4a-Me and 4b-Me are more stable than the related adducts of 2,6-dinitro-4-trifluromethanesulfonylanisole, i.e.5a-Me and 5b-Me, and 2,4,6-trinitroanisole, i.e.6a-Me and 6b-Me, the latter compound being a conventional reference aromatic electrophile in Meisenheimer complex chemistry. The high thermodynamic stability of 4a-Me (pK(a) = 10.48) and 4b-Me (pK(a) = 12.23) relative to 5a-Me (pK(a) = 10.68) and 6a-Me (pK(a) = 12.56) or 5b-Me (pK(a) = 15.38) and 6b-Me (pK(a) = 16.46), is shown to derive from an especially high capacity of a para or an ortho SO(2)CF(3) group to stabilize a negative charge through Fpi-type polarization effects. From the kinetic data, it appears that the contribution of a methanol pathway to the formation of 4a-Me is much weaker than that found to operate in the formation of the 1,1-complex 5a-Me of 2,6-dinitro-4-trifluromethanesulfonylanisole, the experimental evidence suggesting that the reactivity of 4 and 5 is located just beyond the region defining the boundary between super- and normal-electrophilicity in methanol. Comparison of our results with available literature data show that this boundary corresponds to a pK(MeOH)(a) value of approximately 10, in agreement with our previous finding of a very effective solvent contribution to the sigma-complexation of 1,3,5-tris(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)benzene (13; pK(MeOH)(a) = 9.12) in methanol. Taking advantage of our observation that pK(MeOH)(a) and pK(H(2)O)(a) values for sigma-complexation at unsubstituted ring positions are related by a nice linear correlation, an approximate ranking

  9. Biological processing of dinuclear ruthenium complexes in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Heimann, Kirsten; Dinh, Xuyen Thi; Keene, F Richard; Collins, J Grant

    2016-10-20

    The biological processing - mechanism of cellular uptake, effects on the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial membranes, intracellular sites of localisation and induction of reactive oxygen species - of two dinuclear polypyridylruthenium(ii) complexes has been examined in three eukaryotic cells lines. Flow cytometry was used to determine the uptake of [{Ru(phen)2}2{μ-bb12}](4+) (Rubb12) and [Ru(phen)2(μ-bb7)Ru(tpy)Cl](3+) {Rubb7-Cl, where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine and bbn = bis[4(4'-methyl-2,2'-bipyridyl)]-1,n-alkane} in baby hamster kidney (BHK), human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and liver carcinoma (HepG2) cell lines. The results demonstrated that the major uptake mechanism for Rubb12 and Rubb7-Cl was active transport, although with a significant contribution from carrier-assisted diffusion for Rubb12 and passive diffusion for Rubb7-Cl. Flow cytometry coupled with Annexin V/TO-PRO-3 double-staining was used to compare cell death by membrane damage or apoptosis. Rubb12 induced significant direct membrane damage, particularly with HepG2 cells, while Rubb7-Cl caused considerably less membrane damage but induced greater levels of apoptosis. Confocal microscopy, coupled with JC-1 assays, demonstrated that Rubb12 depolarises the mitochondrial membrane, whereas Rubb7-Cl had a much smaller affect. Cellular localisation experiments indicated that Rubb12 did not accumulate in the mitochondria, whereas significant mitochondrial accumulation was observed for Rubb7-Cl. The effect of Rubb12 and Rubb7-Cl on intracellular superoxide dismutase activity showed that the ruthenium complexes could induce cell death via a reactive oxygen species-mediated pathway. The results of this study demonstrate that Rubb12 predominantly kills eukaryotic cells by damaging the cytoplasmic membrane. As this dinuclear ruthenium complex has been previously shown to exhibit greater toxicity towards bacteria than eukaryotic cells, the results of the present study suggest that

  10. Seeing through walls at the nanoscale: Microwave microscopy of enclosed objects and processes in liquids

    DOE PAGES

    Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Kolmakov, Andrei; ...

    2016-02-11

    Here, noninvasive in situ nanoscale imaging in liquid environments is a current imperative in the analysis of delicate biomedical objects and electrochemical processes at reactive liquid–solid interfaces. Microwaves of a few gigahertz frequencies offer photons with energies of ≈10 μeV, which can affect neither electronic states nor chemical bonds in condensed matter. Here, we describe an implementation of scanning near-field microwave microscopy for imaging in liquids using ultrathin molecular impermeable membranes separating scanning probes from samples enclosed in environmental cells. We imaged a model electroplating reaction as well as individual live cells. Through a side-by-side comparison of the microwave imagingmore » with scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate the advantage of microwaves for artifact-free imaging.« less

  11. Seeing through walls at the nanoscale: Microwave microscopy of enclosed objects and processes in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Velmurugan, Jeyavel; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Kolmakov, Andrei; Tselev, Alexander; Ievlev, Anton V.

    2016-02-11

    Here, noninvasive in situ nanoscale imaging in liquid environments is a current imperative in the analysis of delicate biomedical objects and electrochemical processes at reactive liquid–solid interfaces. Microwaves of a few gigahertz frequencies offer photons with energies of ≈10 μeV, which can affect neither electronic states nor chemical bonds in condensed matter. Here, we describe an implementation of scanning near-field microwave microscopy for imaging in liquids using ultrathin molecular impermeable membranes separating scanning probes from samples enclosed in environmental cells. We imaged a model electroplating reaction as well as individual live cells. Through a side-by-side comparison of the microwave imaging with scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate the advantage of microwaves for artifact-free imaging.

  12. Image processing of standard grading scales for objective assessment of contact lens wear complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Cabre, Elisabet; Millan, Maria S.; Abril, Hector C.; Otxoa, E.

    2004-10-01

    Ocular complications in contact lens wearers are usually graded by specialists using visual inspection and comparing with established standards. The standard grading scales consist of either a set of illustrations or photographs ordered from a normal situation to a severe complication. In this work, an objective assessment of contact lens wear complications is intended by applying different image processing techniques to two standard grading scales (Efron and CCLRU grading scales). In particular, conjunctival hyperemia and papillary conjunctivitis are considered. Given a set of standard illustrations or pictures for each considered ocular disorder, image preprocessing is needed to compare equivalent areas. Histogram analysis allows segmenting vessel and background pixel populations, which are used to determine the most relevant features in the measurement of contact lens effects. Features such as color, total area of vessels and vessel length are used to evaluate bulbar and lid redness. The procedure to obtain an automatic grading method by digital image analysis of standard grading scales is described.

  13. Attachment and object relations in patients with narcissistic personality disorder: implications for therapeutic process and outcome.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Diana; Meehan, Kevin B

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a therapeutic approach for patients with severe personality disorders, transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP), a manualized evidence-based treatment, which integrates contemporary object relations theory with attachment theory and research. Case material is presented from a narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) patient in TFP whose primary presenting problems were in the arena of sexuality and love relations, and whose attachment state of mind showed evidence of oscillation between dismissing and preoccupied mechanisms. Clinical process material is presented to illustrate the tactics and techniques of TFP and how they have been refined for treatment of individuals with NPD. The ways in which conflicts around sexuality and love relations were lived out in the transference is delineated with a focus on the interpretation of devalued and idealized representations of self and others, both of which are key components of the compensatory grandiose self that defensively protects the individual from an underlying sense of vulnerability and imperfection.

  14. Data quality objectives process applied to characterization of Hanford tanks containing ferrocyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Pulsipher, B.A.; Anderson, C.M.; Buck, J.W.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.; Meacham, J.E.

    1994-08-01

    Since 1944, underground storage tanks located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, have stored approximately 277,000 m{sup 3} (60 Mgal) of highly radioactive and non-radioactive wastes. Recently, a number of safety issues have arisen concerning these tanks, with regard to worker and public health. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has made the resolution of these safety concerns its number one priority at the Hanford Site. The safety program of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) was developed to provide an integrated approach to resolution of these waste tank safety issues and safety concerns. The Characterization Program within TWRS is responsible for characterizing the wastes contained in the tanks. To ensure that characterization activities provide data that will be adequate to resolve safety concerns, the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process is being implemented.

  15. Head and Eye Movements Affect Object Processing in 4-Month-Old Infants More than an Artificial Orientation Cue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Sebastian; Michel, Christine; Pauen, Sabina; Hoehl, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of attention-guiding stimuli on 4-month-old infants' object processing. In the human head condition, infants saw a person turning her head and eye gaze towards or away from objects. When presented with the objects again, infants showed increased attention in terms of longer looking time measured by eye…

  16. Head and Eye Movements Affect Object Processing in 4-Month-Old Infants More than an Artificial Orientation Cue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Sebastian; Michel, Christine; Pauen, Sabina; Hoehl, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of attention-guiding stimuli on 4-month-old infants' object processing. In the human head condition, infants saw a person turning her head and eye gaze towards or away from objects. When presented with the objects again, infants showed increased attention in terms of longer looking time measured by eye…

  17. Connectivity-based constraints on category-specificity in the ventral object processing pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quanjing; Garcea, Frank E; Almeida, Jorge; Mahon, Bradford Z

    2016-11-19

    Recent efforts to characterize visual object representations in the ventral object processing pathway in the human brain have led to contrasting proposals about the causes of neural specificity for different categories. Here we use multivariate techniques in a novel way to relate patterns of functional connectivity to patterns of stimulus preferences. Stimulus preferences were measured throughout the ventral stream to tools, animals, faces and places; separately, we measured the strength of functional connectivity of each voxel in the ventral stream to category-preferring regions outside the ventral stream. Multivariate analyses were then performed over ventral stream voxels, relating 'category-preferences' to 'functional connectivity preferences'. We show that the relation of those two measures doubly dissociates 'tools' and 'places', within what is ostensibly 'place' selective cortex (parahippocampal gyrus). Specifically, in the parahippocampal gyrus, functional connectivity to the left inferior parietal lobule is selectively related to stimulus preferences for tools (and not places), while functional connectivity to retrosplenial cortex is selectively related to place preferences (and not tools preferences). These findings indicate that functional connectivity can be used to index representational content rather than just provide an understanding of 'which regions are talking to which regions'. We suggest that the connectivity of the brain is what drives category-specificity in the ventral stream, and that if this is correct, then understanding the connectivity of the ventral stream will be key to understanding the causes and function of category-specific neural organization.

  18. The Planning Process for Multi-Object Spectroscopy with the JWST Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Tracy L.; Karakla, D. M.; Shyrokov, A.; Pontoppidan, K.; Soderblom, D. R.; Valenti, J. A.; Kassin, S. A.; Gilbert, K.; Blair, W. P.; Muzerolle, J.; Tumlinson, J.; Keyes, C. D.; Pavlovsky, C. M.; LeBlanc, T.

    2014-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will have a powerful multi-object spectroscopy mode using four configurable Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs). The contiguous MSA shutters can be opened to form slits on astronomical targets, for simultaneous spectroscopy of up to 100 sources per exposure. The NIRSpec MSA shutters are in a fixed grid pattern, and careful analysis in the observation planning process will be crucial for optimal definition of science exposures. Our goal is to maximize the number of astronomical science sources observed in the fewest number of MSA slit configurations. We are developing algorithms in the NIRSpec MSA Planning Tool (MPT) to improve the quality of planned observations using several common science observing strategies as test use cases. For example, the needs for planning extremely deep exposures on a small number of JWST discovered z > 10 galaxy candidates will differ significantly from the requirements for planning spectral observations on a representative sample of stars from a galactic star cluster catalog. In this poster, we present a high level overview of our plans to develop and optimize the MPT for the JWST NIRSpec multi-object spectroscopy mode.

  19. Objective models of EMG signals for cyclic processes such as a human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babska, Luiza; Selegrat, Monika; Dusza, Jacek J.

    2016-09-01

    EMG signals are small potentials appearing at the surface of human skin during muscle work. They arise due to changes in the physiological state of cell membranes in the muscle fibers. They are characterized by a relatively low frequency range (500 Hz) and a low amplitude signal (of the order of μV), making it difficult to record. Raw EMG signal is inherently random shape. However we can distinguish certain features related to the activation of the muscles of a deterministic or quasi-deterministic associated with the movement and its parametric description. Objective models of EMG signals were created on the base of actual data obtained from the VICON system installed at the University of Physical Education in Warsaw. The object of research (healthy woman) moved repeatedly after a fixed track. On her body 35 reflective markers to record the gait kinematics and 8 electrodes to record EMG signals were placed. We obtained research data included more than 1,000 EMG signals synchronized with the phases of gait. Test result of the work is an algorithm for obtaining the average EMG signal received from the multiple registration gait cycles carried out in the same reproducible conditions. The method described in the article is essentially a pre-finding measurement data from the two quasi-synchronous signals at different sampling frequencies for further processing. This signal is characterized by a significant reduction of high frequency noise and emphasis on the specific characteristics of individual records found in muscle activity.

  20. Incorporating Deeply Uncertain Factors into the Many Objective Search Process: Improving Adaptation to Environmental Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzyk, J. R.; Watson, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Deep uncertainty refers to situations in which decision makers or stakeholders do not know, or cannot fully agree upon, the full suite of risk factors within a planning problem. This phenomenon is especially important when considering scenarios of future environmental change, since there exist multiple trajectories of environmental forcings (e.g., streamflow timing and magnitude) and socioeconomic factors (e.g., population growth). This presentation first briefly reviews robust optimization and scenario approaches that have been proposed to plan for systems under deep uncertainty. One recently introduced framework is Many Objective Robust Decision Making (MORDM). MORDM combines two techniques: evolutionary algorithm search is used to generate planning alternatives, and robust decision making methods are used to sample performance over a large range of plausible factors and, subsequently, choose a robust solution. Within MORDM, Pareto approximate tradeoff sets of solutions are used to balance objectives and examine alternatives. However, MORDM does not currently incorporate the deeply uncertain scenario information into the search process itself. In this presentation, we suggest several avenues for doing so, that are focused on modifying the suite of uncertain data that is selected within the search process. Visualizations that compare tradeoff sets across different sets of assumptions can be used to guide decision makers' learning and, ultimately, their selection of several candidate solutions for further planning. For example, the baseline assumptions about probability distributions can be compared to optimization results under severe events to determine adaptive management strategies. A case study of water planning in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) in Texas is used to demonstrate the approach. Our LRGV results compare baseline optimization with new solution sets that examine optimal management strategies under scenarios characterized by lower than average