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Sample records for complex swift-hohenberg equation

  1. Nonlinear waves described by the generalized Swift-Hohenberg equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, P. N.; Kudryashov, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    We study the wave processes described by the generalized Swift-Hohenberg equation. We show that the traveling wave reduction of this equation does not pass the Kovalevskaya test. Some solitary wave solutions and kink solutions of the generalized Swift-Hohenberg equation are found. We use the pseudo-spectral algorithm to perform the numerical simulation of the wave processes described by the mixed boundary value problem for the generalized Swift-Hohenberg equation. This algorithm was tested on the obtained solutions. Some features of the nonlinear waves evolution described by the generalized Swift-Hohenberg equation are studied.

  2. Slow motion for the 1D Swift-Hohenberg equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayrapetyan, G.; Rinaldi, M.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the behavior of certain solutions to the Swift-Hohenberg equation on a one-dimensional torus T. Combining results from Γ-convergence and ODE theory, it is shown that solutions corresponding to initial data that is L1-close to a jump function v, remain close to v for large time. This can be achieved by regarding the equation as the L2-gradient flow of a second order energy functional, and obtaining asymptotic lower bounds on this energy in terms of the number of jumps of v.

  3. Nonvariational real Swift-Hohenberg equation for biological, chemical, and optical systems.

    PubMed

    Kozyreff, G; Tlidi, M

    2007-09-01

    We derive asymptotically an order parameter equation in the limit where nascent bistability and long-wavelength modulation instabilities coalesce. This equation is a variant of the Swift-Hohenberg equation that generally contains nonvariational terms of the form psinabla(2)psi and /nablapsi/(2). We briefly review some of the properties already derived for this equation and derive it on three examples taken from chemical, biological, and optical contexts. Finally, we derive the equation on a general class of partial differential systems.

  4. Multi-hump solutions with small oscillations at infinity for stationary Swift-Hohenberg equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shengfu; Sun, Shu-Ming

    2017-02-01

    The paper considers the stationary Swift-Hohenberg equation cw-(∂x2+k02)2w-w3=0, where c  >  0 is a constant, k02=\\sqrt{c}-μ , and μ >0 is a small parameter. In this case, the linear operator has a pair of real eigenvalues and a pair of purely imaginary eigenvalues. It can be proved that the equation has homoclinic (or single hump) solutions approaching to periodic solutions as |x|\\to +∞ (called single-hump generalized homoclinic solutions). This paper provides the first rigorous proof of existence of homoclinic solutions with two humps which tend to periodic solutions at infinity (or two-hump generalized homoclinic solutions) by pasting two appropriate single-hump generalized homoclinic solutions together. The dynamical system approach is used to reformulate the problem into a classical dynamical system problem and then the solution is decomposed into a decaying part and an oscillatory part at positive infinity. By adjusting some free constants and modifying the single-hump generalized homoclinic solution near negative infinity, it is shown that the solution is reversible with respect to a point near negative infinity. Therefore, the translational invariant and reversibility properties of the system yield a two-hump generalized homoclinic solution. The method may be applied to prove the existence of 2 k -hump solutions for any positive integer k.

  5. A new mechanochemical model: coupled Ginzburg-Landau and Swift-Hohenberg equations in biological patterns of marine animals.

    PubMed

    Morales, M A; Rojas, J F; Oliveros, J; Hernández S, A A

    2015-03-07

    In this work the skin coating of some vertebrate marine animals is modeled considering only dermis, epidermis and basal layers. The biological process takes into account: cellular diffusion of the epidermis, diffusion inhibition and long-range spatial interaction (nonlocal effect on diffusive dispersal) for cells of dermal tissue. The chemical and physical interactions between dermis and epidermis are represented by coupling quadratic terms and nonlinear terms additional. The model presents an interesting property associated with their gradient form: a connection between some physical, chemical and biological systems. The model equations proposed are solved with numerical methods to study the spatially stable emergent configurations. The spatiotemporal dynamic obtained of the numerical solution of these equations, present similarity with biological behaviors that have been found recently in the cellular movement of chromatophores (as contact-dependent depolarization and repulsion movement between melanophores, xanthophores and iridophores). The numerical solution of the model shows a great variety of beautiful patterns that are robust to changes of boundary condition. The resultant patterns are very similar to the pigmentation of some fish.

  6. L-Kuramoto-Sivashinsky SPDEs in one-to-three dimensions: L-KS kernel, sharp Hölder regularity, and Swift-Hohenberg law equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouba, Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Generalizing the L-Kuramoto-Sivashinsky (L-KS) kernel from our earlier work, we give a novel explicit-kernel formulation useful for a large class of fourth order deterministic, stochastic, linear, and nonlinear PDEs in multispatial dimensions. These include pattern formation equations like the Swift-Hohenberg and many other prominent and new PDEs. We first establish existence, uniqueness, and sharp dimension-dependent spatio-temporal Hölder regularity for the canonical (zero drift) L-KS SPDE, driven by white noise on R+ ×Rd d = 1 3 . The spatio-temporal Hölder exponents are exactly the same as the striking ones we proved for our recently introduced Brownian-time Brownian motion (BTBM) stochastic integral equation, associated with time-fractional PDEs. The challenge here is that, unlike the positive BTBM density, the L-KS kernel is the Gaussian average of a modified, highly oscillatory, and complex Schrödinger propagator. We use a combination of harmonic and delicate analysis to get the necessary estimates. Second, attaching order parameters ε1 to the L-KS spatial operator and ε2 to the noise term, we show that the dimension-dependent critical ratio ε2 /ε1d/8 controls the limiting behavior of the L-KS SPDE, as ε1 ,ε2 ↘ 0; and we compare this behavior to that of the less regular second order heat SPDEs. Finally, we give a change-of-measure equivalence between the canonical L-KS SPDE and nonlinear L-KS SPDEs. In particular, we prove uniqueness in law for the Swift-Hohenberg and the law equivalence-and hence the same Hölder regularity-of the Swift-Hohenberg SPDE and the canonical L-KS SPDE on compacts in one-to-three dimensions.

  7. Delay-induced depinning of localized structures in a spatially inhomogeneous Swift-Hohenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbert, Felix; Schelte, Christian; Tlidi, Mustapha; Gurevich, Svetlana V.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the dynamics of localized structures in an inhomogeneous Swift-Hohenberg model describing pattern formation in the transverse plane of an optical cavity. This real order parameter equation is valid close to the second-order critical point associated with bistability. The optical cavity is illuminated by an inhomogeneous spatial Gaussian pumping beam and subjected to time-delayed feedback. The Gaussian injection beam breaks the translational symmetry of the system by exerting an attracting force on the localized structure. We show that the localized structure can be pinned to the center of the inhomogeneity, suppressing the delay-induced drift bifurcation that has been reported in the particular case where the injection is homogeneous, assuming a continuous wave operation. Under an inhomogeneous spatial pumping beam, we perform the stability analysis of localized solutions to identify different instability regimes induced by time-delayed feedback. In particular, we predict the formation of two-arm spirals, as well as oscillating and depinning dynamics caused by the interplay of an attracting inhomogeneity and destabilizing time-delayed feedback. The transition from oscillating to depinning solutions is investigated by means of numerical continuation techniques. Analytically, we use an order parameter approach to derive a normal form of the delay-induced Hopf bifurcation leading to an oscillating solution. Additionally we model the interplay of an attracting inhomogeneity and destabilizing time delay by describing the localized solution as an overdamped particle in a potential well generated by the inhomogeneity. In this case, the time-delayed feedback acts as a driving force. Comparing results from the later approach with the full Swift-Hohenberg model, we show that the approach not only provides an instructive description of the depinning dynamics, but also is numerically accurate throughout most of the parameter regime.

  8. Spatio-temporal dynamics induced by competing instabilities in two asymmetrically coupled nonlinear evolution equations.

    PubMed

    Schüler, D; Alonso, S; Torcini, A; Bär, M

    2014-12-01

    Pattern formation often occurs in spatially extended physical, biological, and chemical systems due to an instability of the homogeneous steady state. The type of the instability usually prescribes the resulting spatio-temporal patterns and their characteristic length scales. However, patterns resulting from the simultaneous occurrence of instabilities cannot be expected to be simple superposition of the patterns associated with the considered instabilities. To address this issue, we design two simple models composed by two asymmetrically coupled equations of non-conserved (Swift-Hohenberg equations) or conserved (Cahn-Hilliard equations) order parameters with different characteristic wave lengths. The patterns arising in these systems range from coexisting static patterns of different wavelengths to traveling waves. A linear stability analysis allows to derive a two parameter phase diagram for the studied models, in particular, revealing for the Swift-Hohenberg equations, a co-dimension two bifurcation point of Turing and wave instability and a region of coexistence of stationary and traveling patterns. The nonlinear dynamics of the coupled evolution equations is investigated by performing accurate numerical simulations. These reveal more complex patterns, ranging from traveling waves with embedded Turing patterns domains to spatio-temporal chaos, and a wide hysteretic region, where waves or Turing patterns coexist. For the coupled Cahn-Hilliard equations the presence of a weak coupling is sufficient to arrest the coarsening process and to lead to the emergence of purely periodic patterns. The final states are characterized by domains with a characteristic length, which diverges logarithmically with the coupling amplitude.

  9. Spatio-temporal dynamics induced by competing instabilities in two asymmetrically coupled nonlinear evolution equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, D.; Alonso, S.; Torcini, A.; Bär, M.

    2014-12-01

    Pattern formation often occurs in spatially extended physical, biological, and chemical systems due to an instability of the homogeneous steady state. The type of the instability usually prescribes the resulting spatio-temporal patterns and their characteristic length scales. However, patterns resulting from the simultaneous occurrence of instabilities cannot be expected to be simple superposition of the patterns associated with the considered instabilities. To address this issue, we design two simple models composed by two asymmetrically coupled equations of non-conserved (Swift-Hohenberg equations) or conserved (Cahn-Hilliard equations) order parameters with different characteristic wave lengths. The patterns arising in these systems range from coexisting static patterns of different wavelengths to traveling waves. A linear stability analysis allows to derive a two parameter phase diagram for the studied models, in particular, revealing for the Swift-Hohenberg equations, a co-dimension two bifurcation point of Turing and wave instability and a region of coexistence of stationary and traveling patterns. The nonlinear dynamics of the coupled evolution equations is investigated by performing accurate numerical simulations. These reveal more complex patterns, ranging from traveling waves with embedded Turing patterns domains to spatio-temporal chaos, and a wide hysteretic region, where waves or Turing patterns coexist. For the coupled Cahn-Hilliard equations the presence of a weak coupling is sufficient to arrest the coarsening process and to lead to the emergence of purely periodic patterns. The final states are characterized by domains with a characteristic length, which diverges logarithmically with the coupling amplitude.

  10. Spatio-temporal dynamics induced by competing instabilities in two asymmetrically coupled nonlinear evolution equations

    SciTech Connect

    Schüler, D.; Alonso, S.; Bär, M.; Torcini, A.

    2014-12-15

    Pattern formation often occurs in spatially extended physical, biological, and chemical systems due to an instability of the homogeneous steady state. The type of the instability usually prescribes the resulting spatio-temporal patterns and their characteristic length scales. However, patterns resulting from the simultaneous occurrence of instabilities cannot be expected to be simple superposition of the patterns associated with the considered instabilities. To address this issue, we design two simple models composed by two asymmetrically coupled equations of non-conserved (Swift-Hohenberg equations) or conserved (Cahn-Hilliard equations) order parameters with different characteristic wave lengths. The patterns arising in these systems range from coexisting static patterns of different wavelengths to traveling waves. A linear stability analysis allows to derive a two parameter phase diagram for the studied models, in particular, revealing for the Swift-Hohenberg equations, a co-dimension two bifurcation point of Turing and wave instability and a region of coexistence of stationary and traveling patterns. The nonlinear dynamics of the coupled evolution equations is investigated by performing accurate numerical simulations. These reveal more complex patterns, ranging from traveling waves with embedded Turing patterns domains to spatio-temporal chaos, and a wide hysteretic region, where waves or Turing patterns coexist. For the coupled Cahn-Hilliard equations the presence of a weak coupling is sufficient to arrest the coarsening process and to lead to the emergence of purely periodic patterns. The final states are characterized by domains with a characteristic length, which diverges logarithmically with the coupling amplitude.

  11. Optimal Variational Asymptotic Method for Nonlinear Fractional Partial Differential Equations.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Vipul K; Pandey, Ram K; Singh, Om P

    2014-01-01

    We propose optimal variational asymptotic method to solve time fractional nonlinear partial differential equations. In the proposed method, an arbitrary number of auxiliary parameters γ 0, γ 1, γ 2,… and auxiliary functions H 0(x), H 1(x), H 2(x),… are introduced in the correction functional of the standard variational iteration method. The optimal values of these parameters are obtained by minimizing the square residual error. To test the method, we apply it to solve two important classes of nonlinear partial differential equations: (1) the fractional advection-diffusion equation with nonlinear source term and (2) the fractional Swift-Hohenberg equation. Only few iterations are required to achieve fairly accurate solutions of both the first and second problems.

  12. First and second order numerical methods based on a new convex splitting for phase-field crystal equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaemin; Lee, Hyun Geun; Lee, June-Yub

    2016-12-01

    The phase-field crystal equation derived from the Swift-Hohenberg energy functional is a sixth order nonlinear equation. We propose numerical methods based on a new convex splitting for the phase-field crystal equation. The first order convex splitting method based on the proposed splitting is unconditionally gradient stable, which means that the discrete energy is non-increasing for any time step. The second order scheme is unconditionally weakly energy stable, which means that the discrete energy is bounded by its initial value for any time step. We prove mass conservation, unique solvability, energy stability, and the order of truncation error for the proposed methods. Numerical experiments are presented to show the accuracy and stability of the proposed splitting methods compared to the existing other splitting methods. Numerical tests indicate that the proposed convex splitting is a good choice for numerical methods of the phase-field crystal equation.

  13. The complex chemical Langevin equation

    SciTech Connect

    Schnoerr, David; Sanguinetti, Guido; Grima, Ramon

    2014-07-14

    The chemical Langevin equation (CLE) is a popular simulation method to probe the stochastic dynamics of chemical systems. The CLE’s main disadvantage is its break down in finite time due to the problem of evaluating square roots of negative quantities whenever the molecule numbers become sufficiently small. We show that this issue is not a numerical integration problem, rather in many systems it is intrinsic to all representations of the CLE. Various methods of correcting the CLE have been proposed which avoid its break down. We show that these methods introduce undesirable artefacts in the CLE’s predictions. In particular, for unimolecular systems, these correction methods lead to CLE predictions for the mean concentrations and variance of fluctuations which disagree with those of the chemical master equation. We show that, by extending the domain of the CLE to complex space, break down is eliminated, and the CLE’s accuracy for unimolecular systems is restored. Although the molecule numbers are generally complex, we show that the “complex CLE” predicts real-valued quantities for the mean concentrations, the moments of intrinsic noise, power spectra, and first passage times, hence admitting a physical interpretation. It is also shown to provide a more accurate approximation of the chemical master equation of simple biochemical circuits involving bimolecular reactions than the various corrected forms of the real-valued CLE, the linear-noise approximation and a commonly used two moment-closure approximation.

  14. The complex chemical Langevin equation.

    PubMed

    Schnoerr, David; Sanguinetti, Guido; Grima, Ramon

    2014-07-14

    The chemical Langevin equation (CLE) is a popular simulation method to probe the stochastic dynamics of chemical systems. The CLE's main disadvantage is its break down in finite time due to the problem of evaluating square roots of negative quantities whenever the molecule numbers become sufficiently small. We show that this issue is not a numerical integration problem, rather in many systems it is intrinsic to all representations of the CLE. Various methods of correcting the CLE have been proposed which avoid its break down. We show that these methods introduce undesirable artefacts in the CLE's predictions. In particular, for unimolecular systems, these correction methods lead to CLE predictions for the mean concentrations and variance of fluctuations which disagree with those of the chemical master equation. We show that, by extending the domain of the CLE to complex space, break down is eliminated, and the CLE's accuracy for unimolecular systems is restored. Although the molecule numbers are generally complex, we show that the "complex CLE" predicts real-valued quantities for the mean concentrations, the moments of intrinsic noise, power spectra, and first passage times, hence admitting a physical interpretation. It is also shown to provide a more accurate approximation of the chemical master equation of simple biochemical circuits involving bimolecular reactions than the various corrected forms of the real-valued CLE, the linear-noise approximation and a commonly used two moment-closure approximation.

  15. The Complexity of One-Step Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of one-step equations from a cognitive load theory perspective uncovers variation within one-step equations. The complexity of one-step equations arises from the element interactivity across the operational and relational lines. The higher the number of operational and relational lines, the greater the complexity of the equations.…

  16. Evolution of Patterns in Rotating Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantz, M.; Friedrich, R.; Bestehorn, M.; Haken, H.

    We present an extension of the Swift-Hohenberg equation to the case of a high Prandtl number Bénard experiment in rotating fluid containers. For the case of circular containers we find complex spatio-temporal behaviour at Taylor numbers smaller than the critical one for the onset of the Küppers-Lortz instability. Furthermore, above the critical Taylor number the experimentally well-known time dependent and spatially disordered patterns in form of local patches of rolls are reproduced.

  17. Modified method of simplest equation: Powerful tool for obtaining exact and approximate traveling-wave solutions of nonlinear PDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanov, Nikolay K.

    2011-03-01

    We discuss the class of equations ∑i,j=0mAij(u){∂iu}/{∂ti}∂+∑k,l=0nBkl(u){∂ku}/{∂xk}∂=C(u) where Aij( u), Bkl( u) and C( u) are functions of u( x, t) as follows: (i) Aij, Bkl and C are polynomials of u; or (ii) Aij, Bkl and C can be reduced to polynomials of u by means of Taylor series for small values of u. For these two cases the above-mentioned class of equations consists of nonlinear PDEs with polynomial nonlinearities. We show that the modified method of simplest equation is powerful tool for obtaining exact traveling-wave solution of this class of equations. The balance equations for the sub-class of traveling-wave solutions of the investigated class of equations are obtained. We illustrate the method by obtaining exact traveling-wave solutions (i) of the Swift-Hohenberg equation and (ii) of the generalized Rayleigh equation for the cases when the extended tanh-equation or the equations of Bernoulli and Riccati are used as simplest equations.

  18. Complex PT-symmetric nonlinear Schrödinger equation and Burgers equation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenya

    2013-04-28

    The complex -symmetric nonlinear wave models have drawn much attention in recent years since the complex -symmetric extensions of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation were presented in 2007. In this review, we focus on the study of the complex -symmetric nonlinear Schrödinger equation and Burgers equation. First of all, we briefly introduce the basic property of complex symmetry. We then report on exact solutions of one- and two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equations (known as the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in Bose-Einstein condensates) with several complex -symmetric potentials. Finally, some complex -symmetric extension principles are used to generate some complex -symmetric nonlinear wave equations starting from both -symmetric (e.g. the KdV equation) and non- -symmetric (e.g. the Burgers equation) nonlinear wave equations. In particular, we discuss exact solutions of some representative ones of the complex -symmetric Burgers equation in detail.

  19. Entropy production for complex Langevin equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borlenghi, Simone; Iubini, Stefano; Lepri, Stefano; Fransson, Jonas

    2017-07-01

    We study irreversible processes for nonlinear oscillators networks described by complex-valued Langevin equations that account for coupling to different thermochemical baths. Dissipation is introduced via non-Hermitian terms in the Hamiltonian of the model. We apply the stochastic thermodynamics formalism to compute explicit expressions for the entropy production rates. We discuss in particular the nonequilibrium steady states of the network characterized by a constant production rate of entropy and flows of energy and particle currents. For two specific examples, a one-dimensional chain and a dimer, numerical calculations are presented. The role of asymmetric coupling among the oscillators on the entropy production is illustrated.

  20. On the Solutions of Some Linear Complex Quaternionic Equations

    PubMed Central

    İpek, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Some complex quaternionic equations in the type AX − XB = C are investigated. For convenience, these equations were called generalized Sylvester-quaternion equations, which include the Sylvester equation as special cases. By the real matrix representations of complex quaternions, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the solvability and the general expressions of the solutions are obtained. PMID:25101318

  1. Lattice Boltzmann model for the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianying; Yan, Guangwu

    2010-06-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model with complex distribution function for the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CGLE) is proposed. By using multiscale technique and the Chapman-Enskog expansion on complex variables, we obtain a series of complex partial differential equations. Then, complex equilibrium distribution function and its complex moments are obtained. Based on this model, the rotation and oscillation properties of stable spiral waves and the breaking-up behavior of unstable spiral waves in CGLE are investigated in detail.

  2. Coupled Riccati equations for complex plane constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Kristin M.; Sesak, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A new Linear Quadratic Gaussian design method is presented which provides prescribed imaginary axis pole placement for optimal control and estimation systems. This procedure contributes another degree of design freedom to flexible spacecraft control. Current design methods which interject modal damping into the system tend to have little affect on modal frequencies, i.e., they predictably shift open plant poles horizontally in the complex plane to form the closed loop controller or estimator pole constellation, but make little provision for vertical (imaginary axis) pole shifts. Imaginary axis shifts which reduce the closed loop model frequencies (the bandwidths) are desirable since they reduce the sensitivity of the system to noise disturbances. The new method drives the closed loop modal frequencies to predictable (specified) levels, frequencies as low as zero rad/sec (real axis pole placement) can be achieved. The design procedure works through rotational and translational destabilizations of the plant, and a coupling of two independently solved algebraic Riccati equations through a structured state weighting matrix. Two new concepts, gain transference and Q equivalency, are introduced and their use shown.

  3. A complex Noether approach for variational partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, R.; Mahomed, F. M.

    2015-10-01

    Scalar complex partial differential equations which admit variational formulations are studied. Such a complex partial differential equation, via a complex dependent variable, splits into a system of two real partial differential equations. The decomposition of the Lagrangian of the complex partial differential equation in the real domain is shown to yield two real Lagrangians for the split system. The complex Maxwellian distribution, transonic gas flow, Maxwellian tails, dissipative wave and Klein-Gordon equations are considered. The Noether symmetries and gauge terms of the split system that correspond to both the Lagrangians are constructed by the Noether approach. In the case of coupled split systems, the same Noether symmetries are obtained. The Noether symmetries for the uncoupled split systems are different. The conserved vectors of the split system which correspond to both the Lagrangians are compared to the split conserved vectors of the complex partial differential equation for the examples. The split conserved vectors of the complex partial differential equation are the same as the conserved vectors of the split system of real partial differential equations in the case of coupled systems. Moreover a Noether-like theorem for the split system is proved which provides the Noether-like conserved quantities of the split system from knowledge of the Noether-like operators. An interesting result on the split characteristics and the conservation laws is shown as well. The Noether symmetries and gauge terms of the Lagrangian of the split system with the split Noether-like operators and gauge terms of the Lagrangian of the given complex partial differential equation are compared. Folklore suggests that the split Noether-like operators of a Lagrangian of a complex Euler-Lagrange partial differential equation are symmetries of the Lagrangian of the split system of real partial differential equations. This is not the case. They are proved to be the same if the

  4. Graphical Solution of the Monic Quadratic Equation with Complex Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laine, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    There are many geometrical approaches to the solution of the quadratic equation with real coefficients. In this article it is shown that the monic quadratic equation with complex coefficients can also be solved graphically, by the intersection of two hyperbolas; one hyperbola being derived from the real part of the quadratic equation and one from…

  5. Graphical Solution of the Monic Quadratic Equation with Complex Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laine, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    There are many geometrical approaches to the solution of the quadratic equation with real coefficients. In this article it is shown that the monic quadratic equation with complex coefficients can also be solved graphically, by the intersection of two hyperbolas; one hyperbola being derived from the real part of the quadratic equation and one from…

  6. Considerations on the hyperbolic complex Klein-Gordon equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrych, S.

    2010-06-15

    This article summarizes and consolidates investigations on hyperbolic complex numbers with respect to the Klein-Gordon equation for fermions and bosons. The hyperbolic complex numbers are applied in the sense that complex extensions of groups and algebras are performed not with the complex unit, but with the product of complex and hyperbolic unit. The modified complexification is the key ingredient for the theory. The Klein-Gordon equation is represented in this framework in the form of the first invariant of the Poincare group, the mass operator, in order to emphasize its geometric origin. The possibility of new interactions arising from hyperbolic complex gauge transformations is discussed.

  7. An Energy Gap for Complex Yang-Mills Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Teng

    2017-08-01

    We use the energy gap result of pure Yang-Mills equation [Feehan P.M.N., Adv. Math. 312 (2017), 547-587] to prove another energy gap result of complex Yang-Mills equations [Gagliardo M., Uhlenbeck K., J. Fixed Point Theory Appl. 11 (2012), 185-198], when Riemannian manifold X of dimension n≥ 2 satisfies certain conditions.

  8. Stochastic analysis of complex reaction networks using binomial moment equations.

    PubMed

    Barzel, Baruch; Biham, Ofer

    2012-09-01

    The stochastic analysis of complex reaction networks is a difficult problem because the number of microscopic states in such systems increases exponentially with the number of reactive species. Direct integration of the master equation is thus infeasible and is most often replaced by Monte Carlo simulations. While Monte Carlo simulations are a highly effective tool, equation-based formulations are more amenable to analytical treatment and may provide deeper insight into the dynamics of the network. Here, we present a highly efficient equation-based method for the analysis of stochastic reaction networks. The method is based on the recently introduced binomial moment equations [Barzel and Biham, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 150602 (2011)]. The binomial moments are linear combinations of the ordinary moments of the probability distribution function of the population sizes of the interacting species. They capture the essential combinatorics of the reaction processes reflecting their stoichiometric structure. This leads to a simple and transparent form of the equations, and allows a highly efficient and surprisingly simple truncation scheme. Unlike ordinary moment equations, in which the inclusion of high order moments is prohibitively complicated, the binomial moment equations can be easily constructed up to any desired order. The result is a set of equations that enables the stochastic analysis of complex reaction networks under a broad range of conditions. The number of equations is dramatically reduced from the exponential proliferation of the master equation to a polynomial (and often quadratic) dependence on the number of reactive species in the binomial moment equations. The aim of this paper is twofold: to present a complete derivation of the binomial moment equations; to demonstrate the applicability of the moment equations for a representative set of example networks, in which stochastic effects play an important role.

  9. Statistical complexity, virial expansion, and van der Waals equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennini, F.; Plastino, A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the notion of LMC statistical complexity with regards to a real gas and in terms of the second virial coefficient. The ensuing results are applied to the van der Waals equation. Interestingly enough, one finds a complexity-interpretation for the associated phase transition.

  10. Out-of-Core Solutions of Complex Sparse Linear Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    ETCLIB is library of subroutines for obtaining out-of-core solutions of complex sparse linear equations. Routines apply to dense and sparse matrices too large to be stored in core. Useful for solving any set of linear equations, but particularly useful in cases where coefficient matrix has no special properties that guarantee convergence with any of interative processes. The only assumption made is that coefficient matrix is not singular.

  11. Exploiting sparsity and equation-free architectures in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, J. L.; Brunton, S. L.; Brunton, B. W.; Kutz, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    Complex systems exhibit dynamics that typically evolve on low-dimensional attractors and may have sparse representation in some optimal basis. Recently developed compressive sensing techniques exploit this sparsity for state reconstruction and/or categorical identification from limited measurements. We argue that data-driven dimensionality reduction methods integrate naturally with sparse sensing in the context of complex systems. This framework works equally well with a physical model or in an equation-free context, where data is available but the governing equations may be unknown. We demonstrate the advantages of combining these methods on three prototypical examples: classification of dynamical regimes, optimal sensor placement, and equation-free dynamic model reduction. These examples motivate the potentially transformative role that state-of-the-art data methods and machine learning can play in the analysis of complex systems.

  12. Visualising the Complex Roots of Quadratic Equations with Real Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2012-01-01

    The roots of the general quadratic equation y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c (real a, b, c) are known to occur in the following sets: (i) real and distinct; (ii) real and coincident; and (iii) a complex conjugate pair. Case (iii), which provides the focus for this investigation, can only occur when the values of the real coefficients a, b, and c are…

  13. Nonlinear Schrödinger equation with complex supersymmetric potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, D.; Roy, P.

    2017-03-01

    Using the concept of supersymmetry we obtain exact analytical solutions of nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a number of complex supersymmetric potentials and power law nonlinearity. Linear stability of these solutions for self-focusing as well as de-focusing nonlinearity has also been examined.

  14. Visualising the Complex Roots of Quadratic Equations with Real Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2012-01-01

    The roots of the general quadratic equation y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c (real a, b, c) are known to occur in the following sets: (i) real and distinct; (ii) real and coincident; and (iii) a complex conjugate pair. Case (iii), which provides the focus for this investigation, can only occur when the values of the real coefficients a, b, and c are…

  15. Stochastic Schroedinger equations with general complex Gaussian noises

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, Angelo

    2003-06-01

    Within the framework of non-Markovian stochastic Schroedinger equations, we generalize the results of [W. T. Strunz, Phys. Lett. A 224, 25 (1996)] to the case of general complex Gaussian noises; we analyze the two important cases of purely real and purely imaginary stochastic processes.

  16. Fitting Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Models with Complex Datasets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Sandra Jo; Polanin, Joshua R.; Lipsey, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    A modification of the first stage of the standard procedure for two-stage meta-analytic structural equation modeling for use with large complex datasets is presented. This modification addresses two common problems that arise in such meta-analyses: (a) primary studies that provide multiple measures of the same construct and (b) the correlation…

  17. Fitting Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Models with Complex Datasets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Sandra Jo; Polanin, Joshua R.; Lipsey, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    A modification of the first stage of the standard procedure for two-stage meta-analytic structural equation modeling for use with large complex datasets is presented. This modification addresses two common problems that arise in such meta-analyses: (a) primary studies that provide multiple measures of the same construct and (b) the correlation…

  18. Generalizing the Boltzmann equation in complex phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadehgol, Abed

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a generalized form of the BGK-Boltzmann equation is proposed, where the velocity, position, and time can be represented by real or complex variables. The real representation leads to the conventional BGK-Boltzmann equation, which can recover the continuity and Navier-Stokes equations. We show that the complex representation yields a different set of equations, and it can also recover the conservation and Navier-Stokes equations, at low Mach numbers, provided that the imaginary component of the macroscopic mass can be neglected. We briefly review the Constant Speed Kinetic Model (CSKM), which was introduced in Zadehgol and Ashrafizaadeh [J. Comp. Phys. 274, 803 (2014), 10.1016/j.jcp.2014.06.053] and Zadehgol [Phys. Rev. E 91, 063311 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.063311]. The CSKM is then used as a basis to show that the complex-valued equilibrium distribution function of the present model can be identified with a simple singularity in the complex phase space. The virtual particles, in the present work, are concentrated on virtual "branes" which surround the computational nodes. Employing the Cauchy integral formula, it is shown that certain variations of the "branes," in the complex phase space, do not affect the local kinetic states. This property of the new model, which is referred to as the "apparent jumps" in the present work, is used to construct new models. The theoretical findings have been tested by simulating three benchmark flows. The results of the present simulations are in excellent agreement with the previous results reported by others.

  19. Generalizing the Boltzmann equation in complex phase space.

    PubMed

    Zadehgol, Abed

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a generalized form of the BGK-Boltzmann equation is proposed, where the velocity, position, and time can be represented by real or complex variables. The real representation leads to the conventional BGK-Boltzmann equation, which can recover the continuity and Navier-Stokes equations. We show that the complex representation yields a different set of equations, and it can also recover the conservation and Navier-Stokes equations, at low Mach numbers, provided that the imaginary component of the macroscopic mass can be neglected. We briefly review the Constant Speed Kinetic Model (CSKM), which was introduced in Zadehgol and Ashrafizaadeh [J. Comp. Phys. 274, 803 (2014)JCTPAH0021-999110.1016/j.jcp.2014.06.053] and Zadehgol [Phys. Rev. E 91, 063311 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.91.063311]. The CSKM is then used as a basis to show that the complex-valued equilibrium distribution function of the present model can be identified with a simple singularity in the complex phase space. The virtual particles, in the present work, are concentrated on virtual "branes" which surround the computational nodes. Employing the Cauchy integral formula, it is shown that certain variations of the "branes," in the complex phase space, do not affect the local kinetic states. This property of the new model, which is referred to as the "apparent jumps" in the present work, is used to construct new models. The theoretical findings have been tested by simulating three benchmark flows. The results of the present simulations are in excellent agreement with the previous results reported by others.

  20. Complex oscillator and Painlevé IV equation

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández C, David J. González, J.C.

    2015-08-15

    Supersymmetric quantum mechanics is a powerful tool for generating exactly solvable potentials departing from a given initial one. In this article the first- and second-order supersymmetric transformations will be used to obtain new exactly solvable potentials departing from the complex oscillator. The corresponding Hamiltonians turn out to be ruled by polynomial Heisenberg algebras. By applying a mechanism to reduce to second the order of these algebras, the connection with the Painlevé IV equation is achieved, thus giving place to new solutions for the Painlevé IV equation.

  1. Computational complexities and storage requirements of some Riccati equation solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, Senol; Garba, John A.; Ramesh, A. V.

    1989-01-01

    The linear optimal control problem of an nth-order time-invariant dynamic system with a quadratic performance functional is usually solved by the Hamilton-Jacobi approach. This leads to the solution of the differential matrix Riccati equation with a terminal condition. The bulk of the computation for the optimal control problem is related to the solution of this equation. There are various algorithms in the literature for solving the matrix Riccati equation. However, computational complexities and storage requirements as a function of numbers of state variables, control variables, and sensors are not available for all these algorithms. In this work, the computational complexities and storage requirements for some of these algorithms are given. These expressions show the immensity of the computational requirements of the algorithms in solving the Riccati equation for large-order systems such as the control of highly flexible space structures. The expressions are also needed to compute the speedup and efficiency of any implementation of these algorithms on concurrent machines.

  2. Bounded Error Schemes for the Wave Equation on Complex Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abarbanel, Saul; Ditkowski, Adi; Yefet, Amir

    1998-01-01

    This paper considers the application of the method of boundary penalty terms ("SAT") to the numerical solution of the wave equation on complex shapes with Dirichlet boundary conditions. A theory is developed, in a semi-discrete setting, that allows the use of a Cartesian grid on complex geometries, yet maintains the order of accuracy with only a linear temporal error-bound. A numerical example, involving the solution of Maxwell's equations inside a 2-D circular wave-guide demonstrates the efficacy of this method in comparison to others (e.g. the staggered Yee scheme) - we achieve a decrease of two orders of magnitude in the level of the L2-error.

  3. Dynamical process of complex systems and fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Hiroaki; Tamura, Yoshiyasu

    2013-10-01

    Behavior of dynamical process of complex systems is investigated. Specifically we analyse two types of ideal complex systems. For analysing the ideal complex systems, we define the response functions describing the internal states to an external force. The internal states are obtained as a relaxation process showing a "power law" distribution, such as scale free behaviors observed in actual measurements. By introducing a hybrid system, the logarithmic time, and double logarithmic time, we show how the "slow relaxation" (SR) process and "super slow relaxation" (SSR) process occur. Regarding the irregular variations of the internal states as an activation process, we calculate the response function to the external force. The behaviors are classified into "power", "exponential", and "stretched exponential" type. Finally we construct a fractional differential equation (FDE) describing the time evolution of these complex systems. In our theory, the exponent of the FDE or that of the power law distribution is expressed in terms of the parameters characterizing the structure of the system.

  4. Oscillations and Chaos In The Periodically Forced, Complex Lorenz Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eccles, F. J. R.; Read, P. L.; Moroz, I. M.; Haine, T. W. N.

    A variety of numerical atmosphere-ocean models (both idealised and `realistic') have shown that cyclic forcing may have a strong influence on a number of oscillatory climatological phenomena over a range of timescales (e.g. ENSO and the annual cy- cle) with emerging features such as frequency entrainment, period doubling and phase locking. We study analogous phenomena on a laboratory scale by imposing cyclic forcing by varying the boundary conditions of a rotating differentially-heated annulus. Arguably the simplest possible representation of this system is a two layer model and Fowler et al. (1982) have shown that the quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity equa- tions governing this model reduce to the complex Lorenz equations in the weakly dis- persive, weakly dissipative case. As a complement to the laboratory work mentioned above, we will present a numerical analysis of the complex Lorenz equations. The work will include experiments both with and without the incorporation of a periodic forcing term on various timescales. Reference A.C. Fowler, J.D. Gibbon and M.J. McGuinness, Physica D, 7:139­163, 1982

  5. Bloch-Redfield equations for modeling light-harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Jeske, Jan; Ing, David J; Plenio, Martin B; Huelga, Susana F; Cole, Jared H

    2015-02-14

    We challenge the misconception that Bloch-Redfield equations are a less powerful tool than phenomenological Lindblad equations for modeling exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes. This view predominantly originates from an indiscriminate use of the secular approximation. We provide a detailed description of how to model both coherent oscillations and several types of noise, giving explicit examples. All issues with non-positivity are overcome by a consistent straightforward physical noise model. Herein also lies the strength of the Bloch-Redfield approach because it facilitates the analysis of noise-effects by linking them back to physical parameters of the noise environment. This includes temporal and spatial correlations and the strength and type of interaction between the noise and the system of interest. Finally, we analyze a prototypical dimer system as well as a 7-site Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex in regards to spatial correlation length of the noise, noise strength, temperature, and their connection to the transfer time and transfer probability.

  6. Unpacking the Complexity of Linear Equations from a Cognitive Load Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngu, Bing Hiong; Phan, Huy P.

    2016-01-01

    The degree of element interactivity determines the complexity and therefore the intrinsic cognitive load of linear equations. The unpacking of linear equations at the level of operational and relational lines allows the classification of linear equations in a hierarchical level of complexity. Mapping similar operational and relational lines across…

  7. Unpacking the Complexity of Linear Equations from a Cognitive Load Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngu, Bing Hiong; Phan, Huy P.

    2016-01-01

    The degree of element interactivity determines the complexity and therefore the intrinsic cognitive load of linear equations. The unpacking of linear equations at the level of operational and relational lines allows the classification of linear equations in a hierarchical level of complexity. Mapping similar operational and relational lines across…

  8. Analysis of Energy Eigenvalue in Complex Ginzburg-Landau Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ji-Hua; Xiao, Qi; Xie, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Xin-Xin; Yang, Hai-Tao

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the two-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CGLE) as the spatiotemporal model, and an expression of energy eigenvalue is derived by using the phase-amplitude representation and the basic ideas from quantum mechanics. By numerical simulation, we find the energy eigenvalue in the CGLE system can be divided into two parts, corresponding to spiral wave and bulk oscillation. The energy eigenvalue of spiral wave is positive, which shows that it propagates outwardly; while the energy eigenvalue of spiral wave is negative, which shows that it propagates inwardly. There is a necessary condition for generating a spiral wave that the energy eigenvalue of spiral wave is greater than bulk oscillation. A wave with larger energy eigenvalue dominates when it competes with another wave with smaller energy eigenvalue in the space of the CGLE system. At the end of this study, a tentative discussion of the relationship between wave propagation and energy transmission is given. Supported by the Basic Research Project of Shenzhen, China under Grant Nos. JCYJ 20140418181958489 and 20160422144751573

  9. Fitting meta-analytic structural equation models with complex datasets.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sandra Jo; Polanin, Joshua R; Lipsey, Mark W

    2016-06-01

    A modification of the first stage of the standard procedure for two-stage meta-analytic structural equation modeling for use with large complex datasets is presented. This modification addresses two common problems that arise in such meta-analyses: (a) primary studies that provide multiple measures of the same construct and (b) the correlation coefficients that exhibit substantial heterogeneity, some of which obscures the relationships between the constructs of interest or undermines the comparability of the correlations across the cells. One component of this approach is a three-level random effects model capable of synthesizing a pooled correlation matrix with dependent correlation coefficients. Another component is a meta-regression that can be used to generate covariate-adjusted correlation coefficients that reduce the influence of selected unevenly distributed moderator variables. A non-technical presentation of these techniques is given, along with an illustration of the procedures with a meta-analytic dataset. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Nuclear processing - a simple cost equation or a complex problem?

    SciTech Connect

    Banfield, Z.; Banford, A.W.; Hanson, B.C.; Scully, P.J.

    2007-07-01

    BNFL has extensive experience of nuclear processing plant from concept through to decommissioning, at all stages of the fuel cycle. Nexia Solutions (formerly BNFL's R and D Division) has always supported BNFL in development of concept plant, including the development of costed plant designs for the purpose of economic evaluation and technology selection. Having undertaken such studies over a number of years, this has enabled Nexia Solutions to develop a portfolio of costed plant designs for a broad range of nuclear processes, throughputs and technologies. This work has led to an extensive understanding of the relationship of the cost of nuclear processing plant, and how this can be impacted by scale of process, and the selection of design philosophy. The relationship has been seen to be non linear and so simplistic equations do not apply, the relationship is complex due to the variety of contributory factors. This is particularly evident when considering the scale of a process, for example how step changes in design occurs with increasing scale, how the applicability of technology options can vary with scale etc... This paper will explore the contributory factor of scale to nuclear processing plant costs. (authors)

  11. Finite dimensionality in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    SciTech Connect

    Doering, C.R.; Gibbon, J.D.; Holm, D.D.; Nicolaenko, B.

    1987-01-01

    Finite dimensionality is shown to exist in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation periodic on the interval (0,1). A cone condition is derived and explained which gives upper bounds on the number of Fourier modes required to span the universal attractor and hence upper bounds on the attractor dimension itself. In terms of the parameter R these bounds are not large. For instance, when vertical bar ..mu.. vertical bar less than or equal to ..sqrt..3, the Fourier spanning dimension is 0(R/sup 3/2/). Lower bounds are estimated from the number of unstable side-bands using ideas from work on the Eckhaus instability. Upper bounds on the dimension of the attractor itself are obtained by bounding (or, for vertical bar ..mu.. vertical bar less than or equal to ..sqrt..3, computing exactly) the Lyapunov dimension and invoking a recent theorem of Constantin and Foias, which asserts that the Lyapunov dimension, defined by the Kaplan-Yorke formula, is an upper bound on the Hausdorff dimension. 39 refs., 7 figs.

  12. A note on the Dirichlet problem for model complex partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Karaca, Bahriye

    2016-08-01

    Complex model partial differential equations of arbitrary order are considered. The uniqueness of the Dirichlet problem is studied. It is proved that the Dirichlet problem for higher order of complex partial differential equations with one complex variable has infinitely many solutions.

  13. Visualising the Roots of Quadratic Equations with Complex Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a natural extension of the root visualisation techniques first presented by Bardell (2012) for quadratic equations with real coefficients. Consideration is now given to the familiar quadratic equation "y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c" in which the coefficients "a," "b," "c" are generally…

  14. Unsplit complex frequency shifted perfectly matched layer for second-order wave equation using auxiliary differential equations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yingjie; Zhang, Jinhai; Yao, Zhenxing

    2015-12-01

    The complex frequency shifted perfectly matched layer (CFS-PML) can improve the absorbing performance of PML for nearly grazing incident waves. However, traditional PML and CFS-PML are based on first-order wave equations; thus, they are not suitable for second-order wave equation. In this paper, an implementation of CFS-PML for second-order wave equation is presented using auxiliary differential equations. This method is free of both convolution calculations and third-order temporal derivatives. As an unsplit CFS-PML, it can reduce the nearly grazing incidence. Numerical experiments show that it has better absorption than typical PML implementations based on second-order wave equation.

  15. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method.

  16. Soliton dynamics to the multi-component complex coupled integrable dispersionless equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zong-Wei; Yu, Guo-Fu; Zhu, Zuo-Nong

    2016-11-01

    The generalized coupled integrable dispersionless (CID) equation describes the current-fed string in a certain external magnetic field. In this paper, we propose a multi-component complex CID equation. The integrability of the multi-component complex equation is confirmed by constructing Lax pairs. One-soliton and two-soliton solutions are investigated to exhibit rich evolution properties. Especially, similar as the multi-component short pulse equation and the first negative AKNS equation, periodic interaction, parallel solitons, elastic and inelastic interaction, energy re-distribution happen between two solitons. Multi-soliton solutions are given in terms of Pfaffian expression by virtue of Hirota's bilinear method.

  17. Complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation with Bohmian trajectories: application to the photodissociation dynamics of NOCl.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2014-03-14

    The complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation-Bohmian trajectories (CQHJE-BT) method is introduced as a synthetic trajectory method for integrating the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the complex action function by propagating an ensemble of real-valued correlated Bohmian trajectories. Substituting the wave function expressed in exponential form in terms of the complex action into the time-dependent Schrödinger equation yields the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We transform this equation into the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian version with the grid velocity matching the flow velocity of the probability fluid. The resulting equation describing the rate of change in the complex action transported along Bohmian trajectories is simultaneously integrated with the guidance equation for Bohmian trajectories, and the time-dependent wave function is readily synthesized. The spatial derivatives of the complex action required for the integration scheme are obtained by solving one moving least squares matrix equation. In addition, the method is applied to the photodissociation of NOCl. The photodissociation dynamics of NOCl can be accurately described by propagating a small ensemble of trajectories. This study demonstrates that the CQHJE-BT method combines the considerable advantages of both the real and the complex quantum trajectory methods previously developed for wave packet dynamics.

  18. Complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation with Bohmian trajectories: Application to the photodissociation dynamics of NOCl

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2014-03-14

    The complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation-Bohmian trajectories (CQHJE-BT) method is introduced as a synthetic trajectory method for integrating the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the complex action function by propagating an ensemble of real-valued correlated Bohmian trajectories. Substituting the wave function expressed in exponential form in terms of the complex action into the time-dependent Schrödinger equation yields the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We transform this equation into the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian version with the grid velocity matching the flow velocity of the probability fluid. The resulting equation describing the rate of change in the complex action transported along Bohmian trajectories is simultaneously integrated with the guidance equation for Bohmian trajectories, and the time-dependent wave function is readily synthesized. The spatial derivatives of the complex action required for the integration scheme are obtained by solving one moving least squares matrix equation. In addition, the method is applied to the photodissociation of NOCl. The photodissociation dynamics of NOCl can be accurately described by propagating a small ensemble of trajectories. This study demonstrates that the CQHJE-BT method combines the considerable advantages of both the real and the complex quantum trajectory methods previously developed for wave packet dynamics.

  19. Childhood obesity: a simple equation with complex variables.

    PubMed

    Strock, Gregory A; Cottrell, Erika R; Abang, Anthony E; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Hannon, Tamara S

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity is rising rapidly, as are the associated medical complications, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. This has significant medical and socioeconomic implications. The definition of obesity in adults is based on body mass index (BMI), which has been correlated with morbidity and mortality. Similarly, the definition of childhood obesity is currently based on BMI; however, there are currently no data to relate morbidity and mortality to BMI values in children. The known and potential causes of childhood obesity are many, but they can be categorized as genetic, endocrine, prenatal/early life, physical activity, diet, and socioeconomic. These factors influence the basic equation: energy input = energy output. Imbalances in this equation can result in obesity. Here we present a review of recent literature and highlight the etiologies, certain complications, and potential prevention and treatment strategies of childhood obesity.

  20. The coquaternion algebra and complex partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimiev, Stancho; Konstantinov, Mihail; Todorov, Vladimir

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of differentiation of coquaternionic functions. Let us recall that coquaternions are elements of an associative non-commutative real algebra with zero divisor, introduced by James Cockle (1849) under the name of split-quaternions or coquaternions. Developing two type complex representations for Cockle algebra (complex and paracomplex ones) we present the problem in a non-commutative form of the δ¯-type holomorphy. We prove that corresponding differentiable coquaternionic functions, smooth and analytic, satisfy PDE of complex, and respectively of real variables. Applications for coquaternionic polynomials are sketched.

  1. Effects of inhomogeneities and drift on the dynamics of temporal solitons in fiber cavities and microresonators.

    PubMed

    Parra-Rivas, P; Gomila, D; Matías, M A; Colet, P; Gelens, L

    2014-12-15

    In [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 064103 (2013)], using the Swift-Hohenberg equation, we introduced a mechanism that allows to generate oscillatory and excitable soliton dynamics. This mechanism was based on a competition between a pinning force at inhomogeneities and a pulling force due to drift. Here, we study the effect of such inhomogeneities and drift on temporal solitons and Kerr frequency combs in fiber cavities and microresonators, described by the Lugiato-Lefever equation with periodic boundary conditions. We demonstrate that for low values of the frequency detuning the competition between inhomogeneities and drift leads to similar dynamics at the defect location, confirming the generality of the mechanism. The intrinsic periodic nature of ring cavities and microresonators introduces, however, some interesting differences in the final global states. For higher values of the detuning we observe that the dynamics is no longer described by the same mechanism and it is considerably more complex.

  2. Theory of Stochastic Schrödinger Equation in Complex Vector Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidhar, Kundeti

    2017-03-01

    A generalized Schrödinger equation containing correction terms to classical kinetic energy, has been derived in the complex vector space by considering an extended particle structure in stochastic electrodynamics with spin. The correction terms are obtained by considering the internal complex structure of the particle which is a consequence of stochastic average of particle oscillations in the zeropoint field. Hence, the generalised Schrödinger equation may be called stochastic Schrödinger equation. It is found that the second order correction terms are similar to corresponding relativistic corrections. When higher order correction terms are neglected, the stochastic Schrödinger equation reduces to normal Schrödinger equation. It is found that the Schrödinger equation contains an internal structure in disguise and that can be revealed in the form of internal kinetic energy. The internal kinetic energy is found to be equal to the quantum potential obtained in the Madelung fluid theory or Bohm statistical theory. In the rest frame of the particle, the stochastic Schrödinger equation reduces to a Dirac type equation and its Lorentz boost gives the Dirac equation. Finally, the relativistic Klein-Gordon equation is derived by squaring the stochastic Schrödinger equation. The theory elucidates a logical understanding of classical approach to quantum mechanical foundations.

  3. New complex and hyperbolic function solutions to the generalized double combined Sinh-Cosh-Gordon equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskonus, Haci Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we have applied the improved Bernoulli sub-equation function method to the generalized double combined Sinh-Cosh-Gordon equation. This method gives new analytical solutions such as complex and hyperbolic function solutions to the problem considered in this paper. Then, we plot the three and two dimensional surfaces of analytical solutions by using Wolfram Mathematica 9.

  4. Monge Ampère equations and generalized complex geometry— The two-dimensional case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banos, Bertrand

    2007-02-01

    We associate an integrable generalized complex structure with each two-dimensional symplectic Monge-Ampère equation of divergent type and, using the Gualtieri ∂¯ operator, we characterize the conservation laws and the generating functions of such an equation as generalized holomorphic objects.

  5. Solution of coupled integral equations for quantum scattering in the presence of complex potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, Jan

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, we present a method to compute solutions of coupled integral equations for quantum scattering problems in the presence of a complex potential. We show how the elastic and absorption cross sections can be obtained from the numerical solution of these equations in the asymptotic region at large radial distances.

  6. Solution of nonlinear flow equations for complex aerodynamic shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, M. Jahed

    1992-01-01

    Solution-adaptive CFD codes based on unstructured methods for 3-D complex geometries in subsonic to supersonic regimes were investigated, and the computed solution data were analyzed in conjunction with experimental data obtained from wind tunnel measurements in order to assess and validate the predictability of the code. Specifically, the FELISA code was assessed and improved in cooperation with NASA Langley and Imperial College, Swansea, U.K.

  7. Defocusing complex short-pulse equation and its multi-dark-soliton solution.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bao-Feng; Ling, Liming; Zhu, Zuonong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a complex short-pulse equation of both focusing and defocusing types, which governs the propagation of ultrashort pulses in nonlinear optical fibers. It can be viewed as an analog of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in the ultrashort-pulse regime. Furthermore, we construct the multi-dark-soliton solution for the defocusing complex short-pulse equation through the Darboux transformation and reciprocal (hodograph) transformation. One- and two-dark-soliton solutions are given explicitly, whose properties and dynamics are analyzed and illustrated.

  8. Defocusing complex short-pulse equation and its multi-dark-soliton solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bao-Feng; Ling, Liming; Zhu, Zuonong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a complex short-pulse equation of both focusing and defocusing types, which governs the propagation of ultrashort pulses in nonlinear optical fibers. It can be viewed as an analog of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in the ultrashort-pulse regime. Furthermore, we construct the multi-dark-soliton solution for the defocusing complex short-pulse equation through the Darboux transformation and reciprocal (hodograph) transformation. One- and two-dark-soliton solutions are given explicitly, whose properties and dynamics are analyzed and illustrated.

  9. Defect chaos and bursts: hexagonal rotating convection and the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

    PubMed

    Madruga, Santiago; Riecke, Hermann; Pesch, Werner

    2006-02-24

    We employ numerical computations of the full Navier-Stokes equations to investigate non-Boussinesq convection in a rotating system using water as the working fluid. We identify two regimes. For weak non-Boussinesq effects the Hopf bifurcation from steady to oscillating (whirling) hexagons is supercritical and typical states exhibit defect chaos that is systematically described by the cubic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. For stronger non-Boussinesq effects the Hopf bifurcation becomes subcritical and the oscillations exhibit localized chaotic bursting, which is modeled by a quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  10. Complex and singular solutions of KdV and MKdV equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buti, B.; Rao, N. N.; Khadkikar, S. B.

    1986-01-01

    The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and the modified Korteweg-de Vries (MKdV) equations are shown to have, besides the regular real solutions, exact regular complex as well as singular solutions. The singular solution for the KdV is real but for the MKdV it is pure imaginary. Implications of the complex solutions are discussed.

  11. Nonlinearly Activated Neural Network for Solving Time-Varying Complex Sylvester Equation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Li, Yangming

    2013-10-28

    The Sylvester equation is often encountered in mathematics and control theory. For the general time-invariant Sylvester equation problem, which is defined in the domain of complex numbers, the Bartels-Stewart algorithm and its extensions are effective and widely used with an O(n³) time complexity. When applied to solving the time-varying Sylvester equation, the computation burden increases intensively with the decrease of sampling period and cannot satisfy continuous realtime calculation requirements. For the special case of the general Sylvester equation problem defined in the domain of real numbers, gradient-based recurrent neural networks are able to solve the time-varying Sylvester equation in real time, but there always exists an estimation error while a recently proposed recurrent neural network by Zhang et al [this type of neural network is called Zhang neural network (ZNN)] converges to the solution ideally. The advancements in complex-valued neural networks cast light to extend the existing real-valued ZNN for solving the time-varying real-valued Sylvester equation to its counterpart in the domain of complex numbers. In this paper, a complex-valued ZNN for solving the complex-valued Sylvester equation problem is investigated and the global convergence of the neural network is proven with the proposed nonlinear complex-valued activation functions. Moreover, a special type of activation function with a core function, called sign-bi-power function, is proven to enable the ZNN to converge in finite time, which further enhances its advantage in online processing. In this case, the upper bound of the convergence time is also derived analytically. Simulations are performed to evaluate and compare the performance of the neural network with different parameters and activation functions. Both theoretical analysis and numerical simulations validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Complex averages of particle quantities and equations of balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouznetsov, Andrei

    We study a new complex continuum quantity Qth (t; x, z) and its applications for efficient particle system simulation. Function Qh (t; x, z) is constructed using both velocities and positions of particles. It carries more information than the standard quantities density, linear momentum, and kinetic energy, and, therefore, it can give better results in various applications. The standard quantities can be derived from Qth (t; x, z). The proposed quantity and its derivatives are bounded independently of the number of particles, and can be used for numerical modeling. Several 1D particle systems are studied using Qth (t; x, z), and an approximate closure is presented based on the examples. Research of Qth (t; x, z) can be continued on a 2D example presented in the last chapter. The model in the example describes a so called bistable material. Bistable material is represented by a two-dimensional triangular lattice made of bistable rods. Each rod has two equilibrium lengths, and thus its energy has two equal minima. A rod undergoes a phase transition when its elongation exceeds a critical value. The lattice is subject to a homogeneous strain and is periodic with a sufficiently large period. The effective strain of a periodic element is defined. After phase transitions, the lattice rods are in two different states and lattice strain is inhomogeneous, the Cauchy-Born rule is not applicable. We show that the lattice has a number of deformed still states that carry no stresses. These states densely cover a neutral region in the space of entries of effective strains. In this region, the minimal energy of the periodic lattice is asymptotically close to zero. The compatibility of the partially transited lattice is studied. We derive compatibility conditions for lattices and demonstrate a family of compatible lattices (strips) that densely covers the flat bottom region. Under an additional assumption of the small difference of two equilibrium lengths, we demonstrate that the

  13. Including inputs and control within equation-free architectures for complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Joshua L.; Brunton, Steven L.; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2016-11-01

    The increasing ubiquity of complex systems that require control is a challenge for existing methodologies in characterization and controller design when the system is high-dimensional, nonlinear, and without physics-based governing equations. We review standard model reduction techniques such as Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) with Galerkin projection and Balanced POD (BPOD). Further, we discuss the link between these equation-based methods and recently developed equation-free methods such as the Dynamic Mode Decomposition and Koopman operator theory. These data-driven methods can mitigate the challenge of not having a well-characterized set of governing equations. We illustrate that this equation-free approach that is being applied to measurement data from complex systems can be extended to include inputs and control. Three specific research examples are presented that extend current equation-free architectures toward the characterization and control of complex systems. These examples motivate a potentially revolutionary shift in the characterization of complex systems and subsequent design of objective-based controllers for data-driven models.

  14. A New Block Solver for Large, Full, Unsymmetric, Complex Systems of Linear Algebraic Equations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    THE COEFFICIENT C MATRIX IN THAT ORDER. ON OUTPUT, UTI CONTAINS THE SOLUTION C MATRIX. C C THE NASTRAN DMAP INSTRUCTIONS TO INTERFACE WITH ’OCSOLVE...developed. Although OCSOLVE was developed for use with the finite element program NASTRAN , it is designed t,) be easily adapted for other applications...solve such a system of 500 equations with complex- valued coefficients to about 5% of the time required by the equation solver in NASTRAN . The solver

  15. Distribution-valued initial data for the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    SciTech Connect

    Levermore, C.D.; Oliver, M.

    1997-11-01

    The generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau (CGL) equation with a nonlinearity of order 2{sigma} + 1 in d spatial dimensions has a unique local classical solution for distributional initial data in the Sobolev space H{sup q} provided that q > d/2 - 1/{sigma}. This result directly corresponds to a theorem for the nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS) equation which has been proved by Cazenave and Weissler in 1990. While the proof in the NLS case relies on Besov space techniques, it is shown here that for the CGL equation, the smoothing properties of the linear semigroup can be eased to obtain an almost optimal result by elementary means. 1 fig.

  16. Development of a One-Equation Eddy Viscosity Turbulence Model for Application to Complex Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, Timothy J.

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is routinely used in performance prediction and design of aircraft, turbomachinery, automobiles, and in many other industrial applications. Despite its wide range of use, deficiencies in its prediction accuracy still exist. One critical weakness is the accurate simulation of complex turbulent flows using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with a turbulence model. The goal of this research has been to develop an eddy viscosity type turbulence model to increase the accuracy of flow simulations for mildly separated flows, flows with rotation and curvature effects, and flows with surface roughness. It is accomplished by developing a new zonal one-equation turbulence model which relies heavily on the flow physics; it is now known in the literature as the Wray-Agarwal one-equation turbulence model. The effectiveness of the new model is demonstrated by comparing its results with those obtained by the industry standard one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model and two-equation Shear-Stress-Transport k - o model and experimental data. Results for subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows in and about complex geometries are presented. It is demonstrated that the Wray-Agarwal model can provide the industry and CFD researchers an accurate, efficient, and reliable turbulence model for the computation of a large class of complex turbulent flows.

  17. Equation-free modeling unravels the behavior of complex ecological systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeAngelis, Donald L.; Yurek, Simeon

    2015-01-01

    Ye et al. (1) address a critical problem confronting the management of natural ecosystems: How can we make forecasts of possible future changes in populations to help guide management actions? This problem is especially acute for marine and anadromous fisheries, where the large interannual fluctuations of populations, arising from complex nonlinear interactions among species and with varying environmental factors, have defied prediction over even short time scales. The empirical dynamic modeling (EDM) described in Ye et al.’s report, the latest in a series of papers by Sugihara and his colleagues, offers a promising quantitative approach to building models using time series to successfully project dynamics into the future. With the term “equation-free” in the article title, Ye et al. (1) are suggesting broader implications of their approach, considering the centrality of equations in modern science. From the 1700s on, nature has been increasingly described by mathematical equations, with differential or difference equations forming the basic framework for describing dynamics. The use of mathematical equations for ecological systems came much later, pioneered by Lotka and Volterra, who showed that population cycles might be described in terms of simple coupled nonlinear differential equations. It took decades for Lotka–Volterra-type models to become established, but the development of appropriate differential equations is now routine in modeling ecological dynamics. There is no question that the injection of mathematical equations, by forcing “clarity and precision into conjecture” (2), has led to increased understanding of population and community dynamics. As in science in general, in ecology equations are a key method of communication and of framing hypotheses. These equations serve as compact representations of an enormous amount of empirical data and can be analyzed by the powerful methods of mathematics.

  18. The Painlevé test for nonlinear system of differential equations with complex chaotic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsegel’nik, V.

    2017-01-01

    The Painlevé-analysis was performed for solutions of nonlinear third-order autonomous system of differential equations with quadratic nonlinearities on their right-hand sides. At certain values of two constant parameters incorporated into the system, the latter exhibits complex chaotic behavior. When the parameters attain the values corresponding to complex chaotic behavior, the system was found not to possess the Painlevé property.

  19. On complex roots of an equation arising in the oblique derivative problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostin, A. B.; Sherstyukov, V. B.

    2017-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the eigenvalue problem for the Laplace operator in a disc under the condition that the oblique derivative vanishes on the disc boundary. In a famous article by V.A. Il’in and E.I. Moiseev (Differential equations, 1994) it was found, in particular, that the root of any equation of the form with the Bessel function Jn (μ) determines the eigenvalue λ = μ 2 of the problem. In our work we correct the information about the location of eigenvalues. It is specified explicit view of the corner, containing all the eigenvalues. It is shown that all the nonzero roots of the equation are simple and given a refined description of the set of their localization on the complex plane. To prove these facts we use the partial differential equations methods and also methods of entire functions theory.

  20. Wave equation for generalized Zener model containing complex order fractional derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanacković, Teodor M.; Janev, Marko; Konjik, Sanja; Pilipović, Stevan

    2017-03-01

    We study waves in a viscoelastic rod whose constitutive equation is of generalized Zener type that contains fractional derivatives of complex order. The restrictions following from the Second Law of Thermodynamics are derived. The initial boundary value problem for such materials is formulated and solution is presented in the form of convolution. Two specific examples are analyzed.

  1. 1-Soliton solutions of complex modified KdV equation with time-dependent coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, H.; Chand, F.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we have obtained exact 1-soliton solutions of complex modified KdV equation with variable—coefficients using solitary wave ansatz. Restrictions on parameters of the soliton have been observed in course of the derivation of soliton solutions. Finally, a few numerical simulations of dark and bright solitons have been given.

  2. A Local Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Complex Modified KdV Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Wenting; Jiang Kun

    2010-09-30

    In this paper, we develop a local discontinuous Galerkin(LDG) method for solving complex modified KdV(CMKdV) equation. The LDG method has the flexibility for arbitrary h and p adaptivity. We prove the L{sup 2} stability for general solutions.

  3. An Assessment of Practical Solutions for Structural Equation Modeling with Complex Sample Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stapleton, Laura M.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses 5 approaches that secondary researchers might use to obtain robust estimates in structural equation modeling analyses when using data that come from large survey programs. These survey programs usually collect data using complex sampling designs and estimates obtained from conventional analyses that ignore the dependencies…

  4. Regularity of the Dirichlet problem for the complex Monge-Ampère equation.

    PubMed

    Moriyon, R

    1979-03-01

    Regularity up to the boundary of the solutions of a boundary value problem for a complex Monge-Ampère equation on perturbations of an annulus in C(n) is proven. The result can be applied to the classification of such domains.

  5. Regularity of the Dirichlet problem for the complex Monge-Ampère equation

    PubMed Central

    Moriyon, Roberto

    1979-01-01

    Regularity up to the boundary of the solutions of a boundary value problem for a complex Monge-Ampère equation on perturbations of an annulus in Cn is proven. The result can be applied to the classification of such domains. PMID:16592626

  6. Critical initial-slip scaling for the noisy complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weigang; Täuber, Uwe C.

    2016-10-01

    We employ the perturbative fieldtheoretic renormalization group method to investigate the universal critical behavior near the continuous non-equilibrium phase transition in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with additive white noise. This stochastic partial differential describes a remarkably wide range of physical systems: coupled nonlinear oscillators subject to external noise near a Hopf bifurcation instability; spontaneous structure formation in non-equilibrium systems, e.g., in cyclically competing populations; and driven-dissipative Bose-Einstein condensation, realized in open systems on the interface of quantum optics and many-body physics, such as cold atomic gases and exciton-polaritons in pumped semiconductor quantum wells in optical cavities. Our starting point is a noisy, dissipative Gross-Pitaevski or nonlinear Schrödinger equation, or equivalently purely relaxational kinetics originating from a complex-valued Landau-Ginzburg functional, which generalizes the standard equilibrium model A critical dynamics of a non-conserved complex order parameter field. We study the universal critical behavior of this system in the early stages of its relaxation from a Gaussian-weighted fully randomized initial state. In this critical aging regime, time translation invariance is broken, and the dynamics is characterized by the stationary static and dynamic critical exponents, as well as an independent ‘initial-slip’ exponent. We show that to first order in the dimensional expansion about the upper critical dimension, this initial-slip exponent in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is identical to its equilibrium model A counterpart. We furthermore employ the renormalization group flow equations as well as construct a suitable complex spherical model extension to argue that this conclusion likely remains true to all orders in the perturbation expansion.

  7. Exact Group Invariant Solutions and Conservation Laws of the Complex Modified Korteweg-de Vries Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnpillai, Andrew G.; Kara, Abdul H.; Biswas, Anjan

    2013-09-01

    We study the scalar complex modified Korteweg-de Vries (cmKdV) equation by analyzing a system of partial differential equations (PDEs) from the Lie symmetry point of view. These systems of PDEs are obtained by decomposing the underlying cmKdV equation into real and imaginary components. We derive the Lie point symmetry generators of the system of PDEs and classify them to get the optimal system of one-dimensional subalgebras of the Lie symmetry algebra of the system of PDEs. These subalgebras are then used to construct a number of symmetry reductions and exact group invariant solutions to the system of PDEs. Finally, using the Lie symmetry approach, a couple of new conservation laws are constructed. Subsequently, respective conserved quantities from their respective conserved densities are computed.

  8. A dynamic multiblock approach to solving the unsteady Euler equations about complex configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabshahi, Abdollah

    The objective is the development of a numerical method which can accurately and economically solve the unsteady Euler equations for three-dimensional flow fields around complex configurations, particularly a generic aircraft with a store in the captive and vertical launch position. A cell centered finite volume spatial discretization is applied to the three-dimensional, time-dependent, Euler equations written in general time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. Two algorithms are presented for solving the system of Euler equations. The first algorithm is based on flux-vector splitting while the second algorithm is based on flux-difference splitting using Roe averaged variables. For both algorithms, an implicit upwind biased approach is employed to integrate the spatially discretized equations in time. The multiblock technique utilizes the concept of decomposing the flow field between the surfaces of the configuration and some outer far field boundary into a set of blocks. Calculated results compared with experimental data indicate that the present Euler solver can calculate transonic flow fields efficiently and accurately over complex geometries. Furthermore, the results demonstrate how computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to accurately simulate steady and, for the first time, unsteady fluid flow over a complete wing-pylon-store configuration with the store in the captive and vertical launch positions.

  9. Birth and death master equation for the evolution of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Martínez, R.; Cocho, G.; Rodríguez, R. F.; Martínez-Mekler, G.

    2014-05-01

    Master equations for the evolution of complex networks with positive (birth) and negative (death) transition probabilities per unit time are analyzed. Explicit equations for the time evolution of the total number of nodes and for the relative node frequencies are given. It is shown that, in the continuous limit, the master equation reduces to a Fokker-Planck equation (FPE). The basic dynamical function for its stationary solution is the ratio between its drift and diffusion coefficients. When this ratio is approximated by partial fractions (Padé's approximants), a hierarchy of stationary solutions of the FPE is obtained analytically, which are expressed as an exponential times the product of powers of monomials and binomials. It is also shown that if the difference between birth and death transition probabilities goes asymptotically to zero, the exponential factor in the solution is absent. Fits to real complex network probability distribution functions are shown. Comparison with rank-ordered data shows that, in general, the value of this exponential factor is close to unity, evidencing crossovers among power-law scale invariant regimes which might be associated to an underlying criticality and are related to a generalization of the beta distribution. The time dependent solution is also obtained analytically in terms of hyper-geometric functions. It is also shown that the FPE has similarity solutions. The limitations of the approach here presented are also discussed.

  10. Comment on "Defocusing complex short-pulse equation and its multi-dark-soliton solution"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssoufa, Saliou; Kuetche, Victor K.; Kofane, Timoleon C.

    2017-08-01

    In their recent paper, Feng et al. [Phys. Rev. E 93, 052227 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.052227] proposed a complex short-pulse equation of both focusing and defocusing types. They studied in detail the defocusing case and derived its multi-dark-soliton solutions. Nonetheless, from a physical viewpoint in order to better and deeply understand their genuine implications, we find it useful to provide a real and proper background for the derivation of the previous evolution system while showing that the expression of the nonlinear electric polarization the above authors used in their scheme is not suitable for getting the defocusing complex short-pulse equation.

  11. Adjoint equations and analysis of complex systems: Application to virus infection modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchuk, G. I.; Shutyaev, V.; Bocharov, G.

    2005-12-01

    Recent development of applied mathematics is characterized by ever increasing attempts to apply the modelling and computational approaches across various areas of the life sciences. The need for a rigorous analysis of the complex system dynamics in immunology has been recognized since more than three decades ago. The aim of the present paper is to draw attention to the method of adjoint equations. The methodology enables to obtain information about physical processes and examine the sensitivity of complex dynamical systems. This provides a basis for a better understanding of the causal relationships between the immune system's performance and its parameters and helps to improve the experimental design in the solution of applied problems. We show how the adjoint equations can be used to explain the changes in hepatitis B virus infection dynamics between individual patients.

  12. Breathers and localized solutions of complex modified Korteweg-de Vries equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yue-Feng; Guo, Rui; Li, Hua

    2015-07-01

    Under investigation is the complex modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, which has many physical significance in fluid mechanics, plasma physics and so on. Via the Darboux transformation (DT) method, some breather and localized solutions are presented on two backgrounds: the continuous wave background u1 = kexp[i(Ax + Bt)] and the constant background u2 = a + ib. Some figures are plotted to illustrate the dynamical features of those solutions.

  13. The asymptotic limit of an integro-differential equation modelling complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianca, C.; Ferrara, M.; Guerrini, L.

    2014-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the asymptotic analysis of a mathematical framework that has recently been proposed for modelling complex systems in the applied sciences under the action of an external force field. This framework consists in an integro-differential kinetic equation coupled with a Gaussian isokinetic thermostat. The asymptotic limit obtained here using low-field scaling shows the emergence of diffusive behaviour on a macroscopic scale.

  14. Complex Ginzburg-Landau equation on networks and its non-uniform dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Hiroya

    2014-10-01

    Dynamics of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation describing networks of diffusively coupled limit-cycle oscillators near the Hopf bifurcation is reviewed. It is shown that the Benjamin-Feir instability destabilizes the uniformly synchronized state and leads to non-uniform pattern dynamics on general networks. Nonlinear dynamics on several network topologies, i.e., local, nonlocal, global, and random networks, are briefly illustrated by numerical simulations.

  15. Exact Lyapunov dimension of the universal attractor for the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    SciTech Connect

    Doering, C.R.; Gibbon, J.D.; Holm, D.D.; Nicolaenko, B.

    1987-12-28

    We present an exact analytic computation of the Lyapunov dimension of the universal attractor of the complex Ginzburg-Landau partial differential equation for a finite range of its parameter values. We obtain upper bounds on the attractor's dimension when the parameters do not permit an exact evaluation by our methods. The exact Lyapunov dimension agrees with an estimate of the number of degrees of freedom based on a simple linear stability analysis and mode-counting argument.

  16. Complex Singular Solutions of the 3-d Navier-Stokes Equations and Related Real Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrighini, Carlo; Li, Dong; Sinai, Yakov G.

    2017-02-01

    By applying methods of statistical physics Li and Sinai (J Eur Math Soc 10:267-313, 2008) proved that there are complex solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in the whole space R3 which blow up at a finite time. We present a review of the results obtained so far, by theoretical work and computer simulations, for the singular complex solutions, and compare with the behavior of related real solutions. We also discuss the possible application of the techniques introduced in (J Eur Math Soc 10:267-313, 2008) to the study of the real ones.

  17. Complex Singular Solutions of the 3-d Navier-Stokes Equations and Related Real Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrighini, Carlo; Li, Dong; Sinai, Yakov G.

    2017-04-01

    By applying methods of statistical physics Li and Sinai (J Eur Math Soc 10:267-313, 2008) proved that there are complex solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in the whole space R3 which blow up at a finite time. We present a review of the results obtained so far, by theoretical work and computer simulations, for the singular complex solutions, and compare with the behavior of related real solutions. We also discuss the possible application of the techniques introduced in (J Eur Math Soc 10:267-313, 2008) to the study of the real ones.

  18. A method for computing the kernel of the downwash integral equation for arbitrary complex frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, R. N.; Rowe, W. S.

    1984-01-01

    For the design of active controls to stabilize flight vehicles, which requires the use of unsteady aerodynamics that are valid for arbitrary complex frequencies, algorithms are derived for evaluating the nonelementary part of the kernel of the integral equation that relates unsteady pressure to downwash. This part of the kernel is separated into an infinite limit integral that is evaluated using Bessel and Struve functions and into a finite limit integral that is expanded in series and integrated termwise in closed form. The developed series expansions gave reliable answers for all complex reduced frequencies and executed faster than exponential approximations for many pressure stations.

  19. Iterative methods for the solution of very large complex symmetric linear systems of equations in electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, M.; Weiland, T.

    1996-12-31

    In the field of computational electrodynamics the discretization of Maxwell`s equations using the Finite Integration Theory (FIT) yields very large, sparse, complex symmetric linear systems of equations. For this class of complex non-Hermitian systems a number of conjugate gradient-type algorithms is considered. The complex version of the biconjugate gradient (BiCG) method by Jacobs can be extended to a whole class of methods for complex-symmetric algorithms SCBiCG(T, n), which only require one matrix vector multiplication per iteration step. In this class the well-known conjugate orthogonal conjugate gradient (COCG) method for complex-symmetric systems corresponds to the case n = 0. The case n = 1 yields the BiCGCR method which corresponds to the conjugate residual algorithm for the real-valued case. These methods in combination with a minimal residual smoothing process are applied separately to practical 3D electro-quasistatical and eddy-current problems in electrodynamics. The practical performance of the SCBiCG methods is compared with other methods such as QMR and TFQMR.

  20. An Improved Recurrent Neural Network for Complex-Valued Systems of Linear Equation and Its Application to Robotic Motion Tracking.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lei; Xiao, Lin; Liao, Bolin; Lu, Rongbo; Peng, Hua

    2017-01-01

    To obtain the online solution of complex-valued systems of linear equation in complex domain with higher precision and higher convergence rate, a new neural network based on Zhang neural network (ZNN) is investigated in this paper. First, this new neural network for complex-valued systems of linear equation in complex domain is proposed and theoretically proved to be convergent within finite time. Then, the illustrative results show that the new neural network model has the higher precision and the higher convergence rate, as compared with the gradient neural network (GNN) model and the ZNN model. Finally, the application for controlling the robot using the proposed method for the complex-valued systems of linear equation is realized, and the simulation results verify the effectiveness and superiorness of the new neural network for the complex-valued systems of linear equation.

  1. Generalized Equations for the Inertial Tensor of a Weakly Bound Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leopold, Kenneth R.

    2013-06-01

    A variety of methods have been employed for deriving intermolecular structural parameters from observed rotational constants of weakly bound complexes. Among these are methods that use formulas expressing the moments of inertia of the complex in terms of intermolecular coordinates and the known moments of inertia of the free monomers. While such formulas are available for a number of specific geometries, general forms have not been given. In this talk, equations are presented for the inertial tensor components of a weakly bound complex in terms of intermolecular coordinates and moments of inertia of the individual moieties. The result is a generalization of similar equations existing in the literature and allows for the use of up to three angles to specify the orientation of an asymmetric rotor within a complex. The angles used are well suited to treating the large amplitude motion characteristic of weakly bound systems and the resulting expressions should be useful in the analysis of the rotational constants of weakly bound systems with complicated geometries.

  2. A Tensor-Train accelerated solver for integral equations in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corona, Eduardo; Rahimian, Abtin; Zorin, Denis

    2017-04-01

    We present a framework using the Quantized Tensor Train (QTT) decomposition to accurately and efficiently solve volume and boundary integral equations in three dimensions. We describe how the QTT decomposition can be used as a hierarchical compression and inversion scheme for matrices arising from the discretization of integral equations. For a broad range of problems, computational and storage costs of the inversion scheme are extremely modest O (log ⁡ N) and once the inverse is computed, it can be applied in O (Nlog ⁡ N) . We analyze the QTT ranks for hierarchically low rank matrices and discuss its relationship to commonly used hierarchical compression techniques such as FMM and HSS. We prove that the QTT ranks are bounded for translation-invariant systems and argue that this behavior extends to non-translation invariant volume and boundary integrals. For volume integrals, the QTT decomposition provides an efficient direct solver requiring significantly less memory compared to other fast direct solvers. We present results demonstrating the remarkable performance of the QTT-based solver when applied to both translation and non-translation invariant volume integrals in 3D. For boundary integral equations, we demonstrate that using a QTT decomposition to construct preconditioners for a Krylov subspace method leads to an efficient and robust solver with a small memory footprint. We test the QTT preconditioners in the iterative solution of an exterior elliptic boundary value problem (Laplace) formulated as a boundary integral equation in complex, multiply connected geometries.

  3. Front and pulse solutions for the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with higher-order terms.

    PubMed

    Tian, Huiping; Li, Zhonghao; Tian, Jinping; Zhou, Guosheng

    2002-12-01

    We investigate one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with higher-order terms and discuss their influences on the multiplicity of solutions. An exact analytic front solution is presented. By stability analysis for the original partial differential equation, we derive its necessary stability condition for amplitude perturbations. This condition together with the exact front solution determine the region of parameter space where the uniformly translating front solution can exist. In addition, stable pulses, chaotic pulses, and attenuation pulses appear generally if the parameters are out of the range. Finally, applying these analysis into the optical transmission system numerically we find that the stable transmission of optical pulses can be achieved if the parameters are appropriately chosen.

  4. Generation of pulse trains in nonlinear optical fibers through the generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

    PubMed

    Latchio Tiofack, Camus G; Mohamadou, Alidou; Kofané, Timoléon C; Moubissi, Alain B

    2009-12-01

    We consider a higher-order complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, with the fourth-order dispersion and cubic-quintic nonlinear terms, which can describe the propagation of an ultrashort subpicosecond or femtosecond optical pulse in an optical fiber system. We investigate the modulational instability (MI) of continuous wave solution of this equation. Several types of modulational instability gains are shown to exist in both the anomalous and normal dispersion regimes. We find that depending on the sign of the fourth-order dispersion coefficient, the MI appears for normal and anomalous dispersion regime. Simulations of the full system demonstrate that the development of the MI leads to establishment of a regular or chaotic array of pulses, a chain of well-separated peaks with continuously growing or decaying amplitudes depending on the sign of the loss/gain coefficient and higher-order dispersions terms. Comparison of the calculations with reported numerical results shows a satisfactory agreement.

  5. Resonant drift of spiral waves in the complex ginzburg-landau equation.

    PubMed

    Biktasheva, I V; Elkin, Y E; Biktashev, V N

    1999-06-01

    Weak periodic external perturbations of an autowave medium can cause large-distance directed motion of the spiral wave. This happens when the period of the perturbation coincides with, or is close to the rotation period of a spiral wave, or its multiple. Such motion is called resonant or parametric drift. It may be used for low-voltage defibrillation of heart tissue. Theory of the resonant drift exists, but so far was used only qualitatively. In this paper, we show good quantitative agreement of the theory with direct numerical simulations. This is done for Complex Ginzburg-Landau Equation, one of the simplest autowave models.

  6. Spatiotemporal chaos control with a target wave in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Minxi; Wang, Xiaonan; Ouyang, Qi; Zhang, Hong

    2004-05-01

    An effective method for controlling spiral turbulence in spatially extended systems is realized by introducing a spatially localized inhomogeneity into a two-dimensional system described by the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. Our numerical simulations show that with the introduction of the inhomogeneity, a target wave can be produced, which will sweep all spiral defects out of the boundary of the system. The effects exist in certain parameter regions where the spiral waves are absolutely unstable. A theoretical explanation is given to reveal the underlying mechanism.

  7. Communication: Analytic gradients for the complex absorbing potential equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, Zsuzsanna; Jagau, Thomas-C.

    2017-01-01

    The general theory of analytic energy gradients is presented for the complex absorbing potential equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (CAP-EOM-CC) method together with an implementation within the singles and doubles approximation. Expressions for the CAP-EOM-CC energy gradient are derived based on a Lagrangian formalism with a special focus on the extra terms arising from the presence of the CAP. Our implementation allows for locating minima on high-dimensional complex-valued potential energy surfaces and thus enables geometry optimizations of resonance states of polyatomic molecules. The applicability of our CAP-EOM-CC gradients is illustrated by computations of the equilibrium structures and adiabatic electron affinities of the temporary anions of formaldehyde, formic acid, and ethylene. The results are compared to those obtained from standard EOM-CC calculations and the advantages of CAP methods are emphasized.

  8. Investigating size effects of complex nanostructures through Young-Laplace equation and finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Dingjie; Xie, Yi Min; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei; Li, Qing

    2015-11-28

    Analytical studies on the size effects of a simply-shaped beam fixed at both ends have successfully explained the sudden changes of effective Young's modulus as its diameter decreases below 100 nm. Yet they are invalid for complex nanostructures ubiquitously existing in nature. In accordance with a generalized Young-Laplace equation, one of the representative size effects is transferred to non-uniformly distributed pressure against an external surface due to the imbalance of inward and outward loads. Because the magnitude of pressure depends on the principal curvatures, iterative steps have to be adopted to gradually stabilize the structure in finite element analysis. Computational results are in good agreement with both experiment data and theoretical prediction. Furthermore, the investigation on strengthened and softened Young's modulus for two complex nanostructures demonstrates that the proposed computational method provides a general and effective approach to analyze the size effects for nanostructures in arbitrary shape.

  9. Complex generalized minimal residual algorithm for iterative solution of quantum-mechanical reactive scattering equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, David C.; Reeves, Melissa S.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Duneczky, Csilla; Schwenke, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Complex dense matrices corresponding to the D + H2 and O + HD reactions were solved using a complex generalized minimal residual (GMRes) algorithm described by Saad and Schultz (1986) and Saad (1990). To provide a test case with a different structure, the H + H2 system was also considered. It is shown that the computational effort for solutions with the GMRes algorithm depends on the dimension of the linear system, the total energy of the scattering problem, and the accuracy criterion. In several cases with dimensions in the range 1110-5632, the GMRes algorithm outperformed the LAPACK direct solver, with speedups for the linear equation solution as large as a factor of 23.

  10. Formation of localized sand patterns downstream from a vertical cylinder under steady flows: Experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzerais, Anthony; Jarno, Armelle; Ezersky, Alexander; Marin, François

    2016-11-01

    The generation of localized, spatially periodic patterns on a sandy bottom is experimentally and theoretically studied. Tests are performed in a hydrodynamic flume where patterns are produced downstream from a vertical cylinder under a steady current. It is found that patterns appear as a result of a subcritical instability of the water-sand bottom interface. A dependence of the area shape occupied by the patterns on the flow velocity and the cylinder diameter is investigated. It is shown that the patterns' characteristics can be explained using the Swift-Hohenberg equation. Numerical simulations point out that for a correct description of the patterns, an additional term which takes into account the impact of vortices on the sandy bottom in the wake of a cylinder must be added in the Swift-Hohenberg equation.

  11. Few-cycle optical rogue waves: complex modified Korteweg-de Vries equation.

    PubMed

    He, Jingsong; Wang, Lihong; Li, Linjing; Porsezian, K; Erdélyi, R

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the complex modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation as a model of few-cycle optical pulses. Using the Lax pair, we construct a generalized Darboux transformation and systematically generate the first-, second-, and third-order rogue wave solutions and analyze the nature of evolution of higher-order rogue waves in detail. Based on detailed numerical and analytical investigations, we classify the higher-order rogue waves with respect to their intrinsic structure, namely, fundamental pattern, triangular pattern, and ring pattern. We also present several new patterns of the rogue wave according to the standard and nonstandard decomposition. The results of this paper explain the generalization of higher-order rogue waves in terms of rational solutions. We apply the contour line method to obtain the analytical formulas of the length and width of the first-order rogue wave of the complex mKdV and the nonlinear Schrödinger equations. In nonlinear optics, the higher-order rogue wave solutions found here will be very useful to generate high-power few-cycle optical pulses which will be applicable in the area of ultrashort pulse technology.

  12. Dromion-like structures and stability analysis in the variable coefficients complex Ginzburg–Landau equation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pring; Pang, Li-Hui; Huang, Long-Gang; Li, Yan-Qing; Lei, Ming; Liu, Wen-Jun

    2015-09-15

    The study of the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation, which can describe the fiber laser system, is of significance for ultra-fast laser. In this paper, dromion-like structures for the complex Ginzburg–Landau equation are considered due to their abundant nonlinear dynamics. Via the modified Hirota method and simplified assumption, the analytic dromion-like solution is obtained. The partial asymmetry of structure is particularly discussed, which arises from asymmetry of nonlinear and dispersion terms. Furthermore, the stability of dromion-like structures is analyzed. Oscillation structure emerges to exhibit strong interference when the dispersion loss is perturbed. Through the appropriate modulation of modified exponent parameter, the oscillation structure is transformed into two dromion-like structures. It indicates that the dromion-like structure is unstable, and the coherence intensity is affected by the modified exponent parameter. Results in this paper may be useful in accounting for some nonlinear phenomena in fiber laser systems, and understanding the essential role of modified Hirota method.

  13. Generating rate equations for complex enzyme systems by a computer-assisted systematic method

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Feng; Dash, Ranjan K; Han, Yu; Beard, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    Background While the theory of enzyme kinetics is fundamental to analyzing and simulating biochemical systems, the derivation of rate equations for complex mechanisms for enzyme-catalyzed reactions is cumbersome and error prone. Therefore, a number of algorithms and related computer programs have been developed to assist in such derivations. Yet although a number of algorithms, programs, and software packages are reported in the literature, one or more significant limitation is associated with each of these tools. Furthermore, none is freely available for download and use by the community. Results We have implemented an algorithm based on the schematic method of King and Altman (KA) that employs the topological theory of linear graphs for systematic generation of valid reaction patterns in a GUI-based stand-alone computer program called KAPattern. The underlying algorithm allows for the assumption steady-state, rapid equilibrium-binding, and/or irreversibility for individual steps in catalytic mechanisms. The program can automatically generate MathML and MATLAB output files that users can easily incorporate into simulation programs. Conclusion A computer program, called KAPattern, for generating rate equations for complex enzyme system is a freely available and can be accessed at . PMID:19653903

  14. Pattern formation in rotating Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantz, M.; Friedrich, R.; Bestehorn, M.; Haken, H.

    1992-12-01

    Using an extension of the Swift-Hohenberg equation we study pattern formation in the Bénard experiment close to the onset of convection in the case of rotating cylindrical fluid containers. For small Taylor numbers we emphasize the existence of slowly rotating patterns and describe behaviour exhibiting defect motion. Finally, we study pattern formation close to the Küppers-Lortz instability. The instability is nucleated at defects and proceeds through front propagation into the bulk patterns.

  15. Second order Method for Solving 3D Elasticity Equations with Complex Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Elastic materials are ubiquitous in nature and indispensable components in man-made devices and equipments. When a device or equipment involves composite or multiple elastic materials, elasticity interface problems come into play. The solution of three dimensional (3D) elasticity interface problems is significantly more difficult than that of elliptic counterparts due to the coupled vector components and cross derivatives in the governing elasticity equation. This work introduces the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method for solving 3D elasticity interface problems. The proposed MIB elasticity interface scheme utilizes fictitious values on irregular grid points near the material interface to replace function values in the discretization so that the elasticity equation can be discretized using the standard finite difference schemes as if there were no material interface. The interface jump conditions are rigorously enforced on the intersecting points between the interface and the mesh lines. Such an enforcement determines the fictitious values. A number of new techniques has been developed to construct efficient MIB elasticity interface schemes for dealing with cross derivative in coupled governing equations. The proposed method is extensively validated over both weak and strong discontinuity of the solution, both piecewise constant and position-dependent material parameters, both smooth and nonsmooth interface geometries, and both small and large contrasts in the Poisson’s ratio and shear modulus across the interface. Numerical experiments indicate that the present MIB method is of second order convergence in both L∞ and L2 error norms for handling arbitrarily complex interfaces, including biomolecular surfaces. To our best knowledge, this is the first elasticity interface method that is able to deliver the second convergence for the molecular surfaces of proteins.. PMID:25914422

  16. Second order Method for Solving 3D Elasticity Equations with Complex Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-08-01

    Elastic materials are ubiquitous in nature and indispensable components in man-made devices and equipments. When a device or equipment involves composite or multiple elastic materials, elasticity interface problems come into play. The solution of three dimensional (3D) elasticity interface problems is significantly more difficult than that of elliptic counterparts due to the coupled vector components and cross derivatives in the governing elasticity equation. This work introduces the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method for solving 3D elasticity interface problems. The proposed MIB elasticity interface scheme utilizes fictitious values on irregular grid points near the material interface to replace function values in the discretization so that the elasticity equation can be discretized using the standard finite difference schemes as if there were no material interface. The interface jump conditions are rigorously enforced on the intersecting points between the interface and the mesh lines. Such an enforcement determines the fictitious values. A number of new techniques has been developed to construct efficient MIB elasticity interface schemes for dealing with cross derivative in coupled governing equations. The proposed method is extensively validated over both weak and strong discontinuity of the solution, both piecewise constant and position-dependent material parameters, both smooth and nonsmooth interface geometries, and both small and large contrasts in the Poisson's ratio and shear modulus across the interface. Numerical experiments indicate that the present MIB method is of second order convergence in both L∞ and L2 error norms for handling arbitrarily complex interfaces, including biomolecular surfaces. To our best knowledge, this is the first elasticity interface method that is able to deliver the second convergence for the molecular surfaces of proteins..

  17. Second order method for solving 3D elasticity equations with complex interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bao; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-08-01

    Elastic materials are ubiquitous in nature and indispensable components in man-made devices and equipments. When a device or equipment involves composite or multiple elastic materials, elasticity interface problems come into play. The solution of three-dimensional (3D) elasticity interface problems is significantly more difficult than that of elliptic counterparts due to the coupled vector components and cross derivatives in the governing elasticity equations. This work introduces the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method for solving 3D elasticity interface problems. The proposed MIB elasticity interface scheme utilizes fictitious values on irregular grid points near the material interface to replace function values in the discretization so that the elasticity equation can be discretized using the standard finite difference schemes as if there were no material interface. The interface jump conditions are rigorously enforced on the intersecting points between the interface and the mesh lines. Such an enforcement determines the fictitious values. A number of new techniques have been developed to construct efficient MIB elasticity interface schemes for dealing with cross derivative in coupled governing equations. The proposed method is extensively validated over both weak and strong discontinuities of the solution, both piecewise constant and position-dependent material parameters, both smooth and nonsmooth interface geometries, and both small and large contrasts in the Poisson's ratio and shear modulus across the interface. Numerical experiments indicate that the present MIB method is of second order convergence in both L∞ and L2 error norms for handling arbitrarily complex interfaces, including biomolecular surfaces. To our best knowledge, this is the first elasticity interface method that is able to deliver the second convergence for the molecular surfaces of proteins.

  18. Tetrahedral Finite-Volume Solutions to the Navier-Stokes Equations on Complex Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the algorithmic features and capabilities of the unstructured-grid flow solver USM3Dns is presented. This code, along with the tetrahedral grid generator, VGRIDns, is being extensively used throughout the U.S. for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on complex aerodynamic problems. Spatial discretization is accomplished by a tetrahedral cell-centered finite-volume formulation using Roe's upwind flux difference splitting. The fluxes are limited by either a Superbee or MinMod limiter. Solution reconstruction within the tetrahedral cells is accomplished with a simple, but novel, multidimensional analytical formula. Time is advanced by an implicit backward-Euler time-stepping scheme. Flow turbulence effects are modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, which is coupled with a wall function to reduce the number of cells in the near-wall region of the boundary layer. The issues of accuracy and robustness of USM3Dns Navier-Stokes capabilities are addressed for a flat-plate boundary layer, and a full F-16 aircraft with external stores at transonic speed.

  19. Comparison of some master equation descriptions of relaxation in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, A. K.; Ngai, K. L.; Rendell, R. W.; Teitler, S.

    1988-03-01

    Several models of relaxation based on master equation approaches have obtained the Kohlrausch fractional exponential form φ(t) = exp - ( {t}/{τ ∗}) 1-n, 0 < n < 1, or its equivalent for the relaxation function in complex systems. Representative models include (i) the Cohen-Grest free-volume theory, (ii) the work of Dhar and Barma, and Skinner based on Glauber's kinetic Ising model, (iii) the theory of De Dominicis et al. based on a random energy model for the spin glass, (iv) the Ogielski-Stein theory based on dynamics in an ultrametric space, and (v) Ngai's theory of time-dependent transition rates. In view of the different nature of these models and because of the claims that they are applicable outside of their original contexts, it is useful to make an intercomparison of these models and their consequences. A presentation of these models is here given based on a unified master equation approach. By experiment, many real systems have been shown to exhibit not only the Kohlrausch form but two additional related properties which are not encompassed in model types (i)-(iv). Only models that include time-dependent transition rates have so far been shown to be consistent with the experimental observations of the three empirical relations.

  20. General features and master equations for structurization in complex dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tsytovich, V. N.; Morfill, G. E.

    2012-02-15

    Dust structurization is considered to be typical for complex plasmas. Homogeneous dusty plasmas are shown to be universally unstable. The dusty plasma structurization instability is similar to the gravitational instability and can results in creation of different compact dust structures. A general approach for investigation of the nonlinear stage of structurization in dusty plasmas is proposed and master equations for the description of self-organized structures are formulated in the general form that can be used for any nonlinear model of dust screening. New effects due to the scattering of ions on the nonlinearly screened grains are calculated: nonlinear ion dust drag force and nonlinear ion diffusion. The physics of confinement of dust and plasma components in the equilibria of compact dust structures is presented and is supported by numerical calculations of master equations. The necessary conditions for the existence of equilibrium structures are found for an arbitrary nonlinearity in dust screening. Features of compact dust structures observed in recent experiments agree with the numerically calculated ones. Some proposals for future experiments in spherical chamber are given.

  1. Variable-complexity aerodynamic optimization of an HSCT wing using structural wing-weight equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchison, M. G.; Unger, E. R.; Mason, W. H.; Grossman, B.; Haftka, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for combining conceptual and preliminary design techniques for wing optimization is presented for the high-speed civil transport (HSCT). A wing-shape parametrization procedure is developed which allows the linking of planform and airfoil design variables. Variable-complexity design strategies are used to combine conceptual and preliminary-design approaches, both to preserve interdisciplinary design influences and to reduce computational expense. In the study, conceptual-design-level algebraic equations are used to estimate aircraft weight, supersonic wave drag, friction drag and drag due to lift. The drag due to lift and wave drag are also evaluated using more detailed, preliminary-design-level techniques. The methodology is applied to the minimization of the gross weight of an HSCT that flies at Mach 3.0 with a range of 6500 miles.

  2. A multiscale asymptotic analysis of time evolution equations on the complex plane

    SciTech Connect

    Braga, Gastão A.; Conti, William R. P.

    2016-07-15

    Using an appropriate norm on the space of entire functions, we extend to the complex plane the renormalization group method as developed by Bricmont et al. The method is based upon a multiscale approach that allows for a detailed description of the long time asymptotics of solutions to initial value problems. The time evolution equation considered here arises in the study of iterations of the block spin renormalization group transformation for the hierarchical N-vector model. We show that, for initial conditions belonging to a certain Fréchet space of entire functions of exponential type, the asymptotics is universal in the sense that it is dictated by the fixed point of a certain operator acting on the space of initial conditions.

  3. Model order reduction for the time-harmonic Maxwell equation applied to complex nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschmidt, Martin; Herrmann, Sven; Pomplun, Jan; Burger, Sven; Schmidt, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Fields such as optical metrology and computational lithography require fast and efficient methods for solving the time-harmonic Maxwell's equation. Highly accurate geometrical modelling and numerical accuracy at low computational costs are a prerequisite for any simulation study of complex nano-structured photonic devices. We present a reduced basis method (RBM) for the time-harmonic electromagnetic scattering problem based on the hp-adaptive finite element solver JCMsuite capable of handling geometric and non-geometric parameter dependencies allowing for online evaluations in milliseconds. We apply the RBM to compute light-scattering at optical wavelengths of periodic arrays of fin field-effect transistors (FinFETs) where geometrical properties such as the width and height of the fin and gate can vary in a large range.

  4. Computational Cellular Dynamics Based on the Chemical Master Equation: A Challenge for Understanding Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jie; Qian, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Modern molecular biology has always been a great source of inspiration for computational science. Half a century ago, the challenge from understanding macromolecular dynamics has led the way for computations to be part of the tool set to study molecular biology. Twenty-five years ago, the demand from genome science has inspired an entire generation of computer scientists with an interest in discrete mathematics to join the field that is now called bioinformatics. In this paper, we shall lay out a new mathematical theory for dynamics of biochemical reaction systems in a small volume (i.e., mesoscopic) in terms of a stochastic, discrete-state continuous-time formulation, called the chemical master equation (CME). Similar to the wavefunction in quantum mechanics, the dynamically changing probability landscape associated with the state space provides a fundamental characterization of the biochemical reaction system. The stochastic trajectories of the dynamics are best known through the simulations using the Gillespie algorithm. In contrast to the Metropolis algorithm, this Monte Carlo sampling technique does not follow a process with detailed balance. We shall show several examples how CMEs are used to model cellular biochemical systems. We shall also illustrate the computational challenges involved: multiscale phenomena, the interplay between stochasticity and nonlinearity, and how macroscopic determinism arises from mesoscopic dynamics. We point out recent advances in computing solutions to the CME, including exact solution of the steady state landscape and stochastic differential equations that offer alternatives to the Gilespie algorithm. We argue that the CME is an ideal system from which one can learn to understand “complex behavior” and complexity theory, and from which important biological insight can be gained. PMID:24999297

  5. Computational Cellular Dynamics Based on the Chemical Master Equation: A Challenge for Understanding Complexity.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jie; Qian, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Modern molecular biology has always been a great source of inspiration for computational science. Half a century ago, the challenge from understanding macromolecular dynamics has led the way for computations to be part of the tool set to study molecular biology. Twenty-five years ago, the demand from genome science has inspired an entire generation of computer scientists with an interest in discrete mathematics to join the field that is now called bioinformatics. In this paper, we shall lay out a new mathematical theory for dynamics of biochemical reaction systems in a small volume (i.e., mesoscopic) in terms of a stochastic, discrete-state continuous-time formulation, called the chemical master equation (CME). Similar to the wavefunction in quantum mechanics, the dynamically changing probability landscape associated with the state space provides a fundamental characterization of the biochemical reaction system. The stochastic trajectories of the dynamics are best known through the simulations using the Gillespie algorithm. In contrast to the Metropolis algorithm, this Monte Carlo sampling technique does not follow a process with detailed balance. We shall show several examples how CMEs are used to model cellular biochemical systems. We shall also illustrate the computational challenges involved: multiscale phenomena, the interplay between stochasticity and nonlinearity, and how macroscopic determinism arises from mesoscopic dynamics. We point out recent advances in computing solutions to the CME, including exact solution of the steady state landscape and stochastic differential equations that offer alternatives to the Gilespie algorithm. We argue that the CME is an ideal system from which one can learn to understand "complex behavior" and complexity theory, and from which important biological insight can be gained.

  6. Finding equilibrium in the spatiotemporal chaos of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Christopher C.; Esty, C. Clark; Egolf, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Equilibrium statistical mechanics allows the prediction of collective behaviors of large numbers of interacting objects from just a few system-wide properties; however, a similar theory does not exist for far-from-equilibrium systems exhibiting complex spatial and temporal behavior. We propose a method for predicting behaviors in a broad class of such systems and apply these ideas to an archetypal example, the spatiotemporal chaotic 1D complex Ginzburg-Landau equation in the defect chaos regime. Building on the ideas of Ruelle and of Cross and Hohenberg that a spatiotemporal chaotic system can be considered a collection of weakly interacting dynamical units of a characteristic size, the chaotic length scale, we identify underlying, mesoscale, chaotic units and effective interaction potentials between them. We find that the resulting equilibrium Takahashi model accurately predicts distributions of particle numbers. These results suggest the intriguing possibility that a class of far-from-equilibrium systems may be well described at coarse-grained scales by the well-established theory of equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  7. Finding equilibrium in the spatiotemporal chaos of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Christopher C; Esty, C Clark; Egolf, David A

    2016-11-01

    Equilibrium statistical mechanics allows the prediction of collective behaviors of large numbers of interacting objects from just a few system-wide properties; however, a similar theory does not exist for far-from-equilibrium systems exhibiting complex spatial and temporal behavior. We propose a method for predicting behaviors in a broad class of such systems and apply these ideas to an archetypal example, the spatiotemporal chaotic 1D complex Ginzburg-Landau equation in the defect chaos regime. Building on the ideas of Ruelle and of Cross and Hohenberg that a spatiotemporal chaotic system can be considered a collection of weakly interacting dynamical units of a characteristic size, the chaotic length scale, we identify underlying, mesoscale, chaotic units and effective interaction potentials between them. We find that the resulting equilibrium Takahashi model accurately predicts distributions of particle numbers. These results suggest the intriguing possibility that a class of far-from-equilibrium systems may be well described at coarse-grained scales by the well-established theory of equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  8. Existence and stability of solutions of the cubic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with delayed Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Facão, M; Carvalho, M I

    2015-08-01

    We found two stationary solutions of the cubic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CGLE) with an additional term modeling the delayed Raman scattering. Both solutions propagate with nonzero velocity. The solution that has lower peak amplitude is the continuation of the chirped soliton of the cubic CGLE and is unstable in all the parameter space of existence. The other solution is stable for values of nonlinear gain below a certain threshold. The solutions were found using a shooting method to integrate the ordinary differential equation that results from the evolution equation through a change of variables, and their stability was studied using the Evans function method. Additional integration of the evolution equation revealed the basis of attraction of the stable solutions. Furthermore, we have investigated the existence and stability of the high amplitude branch of solutions in the presence of other higher order terms originating from complex Raman, self-steepening, and imaginary group velocity.

  9. Designing molecular complexes using free-energy derivatives from liquid-state integral equation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrugalla, Florian; Kast, Stefan M.

    2016-09-01

    Complex formation between molecules in solution is the key process by which molecular interactions are translated into functional systems. These processes are governed by the binding or free energy of association which depends on both direct molecular interactions and the solvation contribution. A design goal frequently addressed in pharmaceutical sciences is the optimization of chemical properties of the complex partners in the sense of minimizing their binding free energy with respect to a change in chemical structure. Here, we demonstrate that liquid-state theory in the form of the solute-solute equation of the reference interaction site model provides all necessary information for such a task with high efficiency. In particular, computing derivatives of the potential of mean force (PMF), which defines the free-energy surface of complex formation, with respect to potential parameters can be viewed as a means to define a direction in chemical space toward better binders. We illustrate the methodology in the benchmark case of alkali ion binding to the crown ether 18-crown-6 in aqueous solution. In order to examine the validity of the underlying solute-solute theory, we first compare PMFs computed by different approaches, including explicit free-energy molecular dynamics simulations as a reference. Predictions of an optimally binding ion radius based on free-energy derivatives are then shown to yield consistent results for different ion parameter sets and to compare well with earlier, orders-of-magnitude more costly explicit simulation results. This proof-of-principle study, therefore, demonstrates the potential of liquid-state theory for molecular design problems.

  10. Designing molecular complexes using free-energy derivatives from liquid-state integral equation theory.

    PubMed

    Mrugalla, Florian; Kast, Stefan M

    2016-09-01

    Complex formation between molecules in solution is the key process by which molecular interactions are translated into functional systems. These processes are governed by the binding or free energy of association which depends on both direct molecular interactions and the solvation contribution. A design goal frequently addressed in pharmaceutical sciences is the optimization of chemical properties of the complex partners in the sense of minimizing their binding free energy with respect to a change in chemical structure. Here, we demonstrate that liquid-state theory in the form of the solute-solute equation of the reference interaction site model provides all necessary information for such a task with high efficiency. In particular, computing derivatives of the potential of mean force (PMF), which defines the free-energy surface of complex formation, with respect to potential parameters can be viewed as a means to define a direction in chemical space toward better binders. We illustrate the methodology in the benchmark case of alkali ion binding to the crown ether 18-crown-6 in aqueous solution. In order to examine the validity of the underlying solute-solute theory, we first compare PMFs computed by different approaches, including explicit free-energy molecular dynamics simulations as a reference. Predictions of an optimally binding ion radius based on free-energy derivatives are then shown to yield consistent results for different ion parameter sets and to compare well with earlier, orders-of-magnitude more costly explicit simulation results. This proof-of-principle study, therefore, demonstrates the potential of liquid-state theory for molecular design problems.

  11. Complex Riccati equations as a link between different approaches for the description of dissipative and irreversible systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Dieter

    2012-08-01

    Quantum mechanics is essentially described in terms of complex quantities like wave functions. The interesting point is that phase and amplitude of the complex wave function are not independent of each other, but coupled by some kind of conservation law. This coupling exists in time-independent quantum mechanics and has a counterpart in its time-dependent form. It can be traced back to a reformulation of quantum mechanics in terms of nonlinear real Ermakov equations or equivalent complex nonlinear Riccati equations, where the quadratic term in the latter equation explains the origin of the phase-amplitude coupling. Since realistic physical systems are always in contact with some kind of environment this aspect is also taken into account. In this context, different approaches for describing open quantum systems, particularly effective ones, are discussed and compared. Certain kinds of nonlinear modifications of the Schrödinger equation are discussed as well as their interrelations and their relations to linear approaches via non-unitary transformations. The modifications of the aforementioned Ermakov and Riccati equations when environmental effects are included can be determined in the time-dependent case. From formal similarities conclusions can be drawn how the equations of time-independent quantum mechanics can be modified to also incluce the enviromental aspects.

  12. Dissipative optical bullets modeled by the cubic-quintic-septic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with higher-order dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djoko, Martin; Kofane, T. C.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the propagation of dissipative optical bullets under the combined influence of dispersion, diffraction, gain, loss, spectral filtering, Raman effect and cubic-quintic-septic nonlinearities. Using the Maxwell equations, we derive a basic equation modeling the propagation of ultrashort optical solitons in optical fiber, named the higher-order (3+1)D cubic-quintic-septic complex Ginzburg-Landau [(3+1)D CQS-CGL] equation. Considering this higher-order (3+1)D CQS-CGL equation, we use a variational approach to obtain a set of differential equations characterizing the variation of the pulse parameters in fiber optic-links. The variational equations that we obtained are investigated numerically in order to observe the behavior of pulse parameters along the optical fiber. A fully direct numerical simulation of the higher-order (3+1)D CQS-CGL equation finally tests the results of the variational approach. A good agreement between analytical and numerical methods is observed. Among different behaviors, bell-shaped dissipative light bullets, double, triple and quadruple bullet complexes are obtained under certain parameter values for anomalous, zero and normal chromatic dispersion regimes.

  13. Dynamics on the attractor for the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    SciTech Connect

    Takac, P.

    1994-08-01

    We present a numerical study of the large-time asymptotic behavior of solutions to the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with periodic boundary conditions. Our parameters belong to the Benjamin-Feir unstable region. Our solutions start near a pure-mode rotating wave that is stable under sideband perturbations for the Reynolds number R ranging over an interval (R{sub sub},R{sub sup}). We find sub- and super-critical bifurcations from this stable rotating wave to a stable 2-torus as the parameter R is decreased or increased past the critical value R{sub sub} or R{sub sup}. As R > R{sub sup} further increases, we observe a variety of dynamical phenomena, such as a local attractor consisting of three unstable manifolds of periodic orbits or 2-tori cyclically connected by manifolds of connection orbits. We compare our numerical simulations to both rigorous mathematical results and experimental observations for binary fluid mixtures.

  14. Parameter Fluctuation-Induced Pattern Transition in the Complex Ginzburg-Landau Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Ja, Ya; Tang, Jun; Chen, Yong

    Parameter fluctuation, which is often induced by the noise, temperature, deformation of the media etc., plays an important role in changing the dynamics of the system. In this paper, the problem of parameter fluctuation-induced pattern transition in the Complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CGLE) is investigated. At first, the perpendicular-gradient initial values are used to generate spiral wave and spiral turbulence under appropriate parameters. At second, the parameter is perturbed with the periodical and/or random signal to simulate the parameter fluctuation, respectively. Then a class of linear error feedback is used to induce transition of the spiral wave and spiral turbulence. It is found that target waves can be induced by the complete feedback forcing, while the local feedback forcing seldom induce a target wave. In the case of spiral turbulence, spiral wave is generated and the spiral turbulence is removed by the new appeared spiral wave as the linear error feedback began to work on the whole media. Finally, the common negative feedback is also used to control the parameter-fluctuated CGLE, and the results are compared with the linear error feedback control, it is found that the whole system become homogeneous when the negative feedback is imposed on the whole media, and the local negative feedback can induce new target wave to remove the spiral wave while it is in vain to generate new target or spiral wave to overcome and eliminate the spiral turbulence.

  15. Modeling of dielectric properties of complex fluids with an equation of state.

    PubMed

    Maribo-Mogensen, Bjørn; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M; Thomsen, Kaj

    2013-03-28

    The static permittivity is a key property for describing solutions containing polar and hydrogen bonding compounds. However, the precise relationship between the molecular and dielectric properties is not well-established. Here we show that the relative permittivity at zero frequency (static permittivity) can be modeled simultaneously with thermodynamic properties. The static permittivity is calculated from an extension of the framework developed by Onsager, Kirkwood, and Fröhlich to associating mixtures. The thermodynamic properties are calculated from the cubic-plus-association (CPA) equation of state that includes the Wertheim association model as formulated in the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT) to account for hydrogen bonding molecules. We show that, by using a simple description of the geometry of the association, we may calculate the Kirkwood g-factor as a function of the probability of hydrogen bond formation. The results show that it is possible to predict the static permittivity of complex mixtures over wide temperature and pressure ranges from simple extensions of well-established theories simultaneously with the calculation of thermodynamic properties.

  16. Some Comments on the Use of de Moivre's Theorem to Solve Quadratic Equations with Real or Complex Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes how a simple application of de Moivre's theorem may be used to not only find the roots of a quadratic equation with real or generally complex coefficients but also to pinpoint their location in the Argand plane. This approach is much simpler than the comprehensive analysis presented by Bardell (2012, 2014), but it does not…

  17. Using the method of dual quadratic solutions to solve systems of polynomial equations in the complex domain

    SciTech Connect

    Shor, N.Z.; Berezovskii, O.A.

    1995-05-01

    In general, the dual solutions are applied in the branch and bound scheme to solve the optimization problem. Of special interest, however, are problems that can be reduced to a quadratic problem with {Omega}-property. In this paper, we consider one such problem, namely the problem of solving a system of polynomial equations in complex variables.

  18. Time-evolution of quantum systems via a complex nonlinear Riccati equation. I. Conservative systems with time-independent Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, Hans; Schuch, Dieter; Castaños, Octavio; Rosas-Ortiz, Oscar

    2015-09-15

    The sensitivity of the evolution of quantum uncertainties to the choice of the initial conditions is shown via a complex nonlinear Riccati equation leading to a reformulation of quantum dynamics. This sensitivity is demonstrated for systems with exact analytic solutions with the form of Gaussian wave packets. In particular, one-dimensional conservative systems with at most quadratic Hamiltonians are studied.

  19. Wigner distribution functions for complex dynamical systems: the emergence of the Wigner-Boltzmann equation.

    PubMed

    Sels, Dries; Brosens, Fons

    2013-10-01

    The equation of motion for the reduced Wigner function of a system coupled to an external quantum system is presented for the specific case when the external quantum system can be modeled as a set of harmonic oscillators. The result is derived from the Wigner function formulation of the Feynman-Vernon influence functional theory. It is shown how the true self-energy for the equation of motion is connected with the influence functional for the path integral. Explicit expressions are derived in terms of the bare Wigner propagator. Finally, we show under which approximations the resulting equation of motion reduces to the Wigner-Boltzmann equation.

  20. A numerical method for solving the 3D unsteady incompressible Navier Stokes equations in curvilinear domains with complex immersed boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2007-08-01

    A novel numerical method is developed that integrates boundary-conforming grids with a sharp interface, immersed boundary methodology. The method is intended for simulating internal flows containing complex, moving immersed boundaries such as those encountered in several cardiovascular applications. The background domain (e.g. the empty aorta) is discretized efficiently with a curvilinear boundary-fitted mesh while the complex moving immersed boundary (say a prosthetic heart valve) is treated with the sharp-interface, hybrid Cartesian/immersed-boundary approach of Gilmanov and Sotiropoulos [A. Gilmanov, F. Sotiropoulos, A hybrid cartesian/immersed boundary method for simulating flows with 3d, geometrically complex, moving bodies, Journal of Computational Physics 207 (2005) 457-492.]. To facilitate the implementation of this novel modeling paradigm in complex flow simulations, an accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for solving the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The method employs a novel, fully-curvilinear staggered grid discretization approach, which does not require either the explicit evaluation of the Christoffel symbols or the discretization of all three momentum equations at cell interfaces as done in previous formulations. The equations are integrated in time using an efficient, second-order accurate fractional step methodology coupled with a Jacobian-free, Newton-Krylov solver for the momentum equations and a GMRES solver enhanced with multigrid as preconditioner for the Poisson equation. Several numerical experiments are carried out on fine computational meshes to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method for standard benchmark problems as well as for unsteady, pulsatile flow through a curved, pipe bend. To demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate flows with complex, moving immersed boundaries we apply it to calculate pulsatile, physiological flow

  1. A reformulation of the conservative level set reinitialization equation for accurate and robust simulation of complex multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodi, Robert; Desjardins, Olivier

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an accurate and robust reinitialization equation for the conservative level set that does not significantly deform stationary surfaces. The compression and diffusion term of the reinitialization equation are reformulated to use a distance level set directly mapped from the conservative level set. The normals are calculated using a distance level set reconstructed from the interface using a fast marching method, increasing robustness and allowing the use of high order, non-TVD transport schemes. Using this new reinitialization equation, we present results for canonical test cases, such as Zalesak's disk and spurious currents, which show significant improvement. A simulation of a liquid-gas jet with Re = 5000 is also presented to demonstrate the volume conservation properties of the method in more complex flows.

  2. Multi-soliton, multi-breather and higher order rogue wave solutions to the complex short pulse equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Liming; Feng, Bao-Feng; Zhu, Zuonong

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, we are concerned with the general analytic solutions to the complex short pulse (CSP) equation including soliton, breather and rogue wave solutions. With the aid of a generalized Darboux transformation, we construct the N-bright soliton solution in a compact determinant form, the N-breather solution including the Akhmediev breather and a general higher order rogue wave solution. The first and second order rogue wave solutions are given explicitly and analyzed. The asymptotic analysis is performed rigorously for both the N-soliton and the N-breather solutions. All three forms of the analytical solutions admit either smoothed-, cusped- or looped-type ones for the CSP equation depending on the parameters. It is noted that, due to the reciprocal (hodograph) transformation, the rogue wave solution to the CSP equation can be a smoothed, cusponed or a looped one, which is different from the rogue wave solution found so far.

  3. Instability criteria and pattern formation in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with higher-order terms.

    PubMed

    Mohamadou, Alidou; Ayissi, Bebe Emilienne; Kofané, Timoléon Crépin

    2006-10-01

    We study the modulational instability and spatial pattern formation in extended media, taking the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with higher-order terms as a perturbation of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation as a model. By stability analysis for the original partial differential equation, we derive its stability condition as well as the threshold for amplitude perturbations and we show how nonlinear higher-order terms qualitatively change the behavior of the system. The analytical results are found to be in agreement with numerical findings. Modulational instability mediates pattern formation through the lattice. The main feature of the traveling plane waves is its disintegration in pulse train during the propagation through the system.

  4. Modulational instability in a purely nonlinear coupled complex Ginzburg-Landau equations through a nonlinear discrete transmission line.

    PubMed

    Ndzana, Fabien; Mohamadou, Alidou; Kofané, Timoléon C

    2008-12-01

    We study wave propagation in a nonlinear transmission line with dissipative elements. We show analytically that the telegraphers' equations of the electrical transmission line can be modeled by a pair of continuous coupled complex Ginzburg-Landau equations, coupled by purely nonlinear terms. Based on this system, we investigated both analytically and numerically the modulational instability (MI). We produce characteristics of the MI in the form of typical dependence of the instability growth rate on the wavenumbers and system parameters. Generic outcomes of the nonlinear development of the MI are investigated by dint of direct simulations of the underlying equations. We find that the initial modulated plane wave disintegrates into waves train. An apparently turbulent state takes place in the system during the propagation.

  5. Influence of the intrapulse Raman scattering on the localized pulsating solutions of generalized complex-quintic Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunov, Ivan M.; Georgiev, Zhivko D.

    2014-10-01

    We study the dynamics of the localized pulsating solutions of generalized complex cubic- quintic Ginzburg-Landau equation (CCQGLE) in the presence of intrapulse Raman scattering (IRS). We present an approach for identification of periodic attractors of the generalized CCQGLE. At first using ansatz of the travelling wave, and fixing some relations between the material parameters, we derive the strongly nonlinear Lienard - Van der Pol equation for the amplitude of the nonlinear wave. Next, we apply the Melnikov method to this equation to analyze the possibility of existence of limit cycles. For a set of fixed material parameters we show the existence of limit cycle that arises around a closed phase trajectory of the unperturbed system and prove its stability.

  6. Localized numerical impulse solutions in diffuse neural networks modeled by the complex fractional Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mvogo, Alain; Tambue, Antoine; Ben-Bolie, Germain H.; Kofané, Timoléon C.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate localized wave solutions in a network of Hindmarsh-Rose neural model taking into account the long-range diffusive couplings. We show by a specific analytical technique that the model equations in the infrared limit (wave number k → 0) can be governed by the complex fractional Ginzburg-Landau (CFGL) equation. According to the stiffness of the system, we propose both the semi and the linearly implicit Riesz fractional finite-difference schemes to solve efficiently the CFGL equation. The obtained fractional numerical solutions for the nerve impulse reveal localized short impulse properties. We also show the equivalence between the continuous CFGL and the discrete Hindmarsh-Rose models for relatively large network.

  7. Implementation of a complex multi-phase equation of state for cerium and its correlation with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cherne, Frank J; Jensen, Brian J; Elkin, Vyacheslav M

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of cerium combined with its interesting material properties makes it a desirable material to examine dynamically. Characteristics such as the softening of the material before the phase change, low pressure solid-solid phase change, predicted low pressure melt boundary, and the solid-solid critical point add complexity to the construction of its equation of state. Currently, we are incorporating a feedback loop between a theoretical understanding of the material and an experimental understanding. Using a model equation of state for cerium we compare calculated wave profiles with experimental wave profiles for a number of front surface impact (cerium impacting a plated window) experiments. Using the calculated release isentrope we predict the temperature of the observed rarefaction shock. These experiments showed that the release state occurs at different magnitudes, thus allowing us to infer where dynamic {gamma} - {alpha} phase boundary is.

  8. Solitary wave solutions and modulational instability in a system of coupled complex Newell-Segel-Whitehead equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, Asawari; Yomba, Emmanuel; Djellouli, Rabia

    2016-12-01

    By virtue of the modulational instability (MI) and phase amplitude ansatz approach, a system of coupled complex Newell-Segel-Whitehead equations (NSWEs), which describes isotropic systems near a subcritical oscillatory instability, is investigated. The constraints that allow the MI procedure to transform the system under consideration into a study of the roots of a polynomial equation of the fourth degree are obtained. A number of examples are analyzed graphically, to overcome the complexity of the dispersion relation and its dependence on many parameters. The existence of a variety of MI gain spectrum is observed. The influence of the cubic-quintic nonlinearity and the magnitude of the plane wave solutions of the system on the MI are also analyzed. Various novel solitary-wave solutions of the system, such as bright-bright, dark-dark, and dark-bright wave solutions, are analytically obtained using direct approach under some constraint conditions.

  9. A Bloch equation approach to intensity dependent optical spectra of light harvesting complex II: excitation dependence of light harvesting complex II pump-probe spectra.

    PubMed

    Richter, Marten; Renger, Thomas; Knorr, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the recent progress in the resolution of the structure of the antenna light harvesting complex II (LHC II) of the photosystem II, we propose a microscopically motivated theory to predict excitation intensity-dependent spectra. We show that optical Bloch equations provide the means to include all 2( N ) excited states of an oligomer complex of N coupled two-level systems and analyze the effects of Pauli Blocking and exciton-exciton annihilation on pump-probe spectra. We use LHC Bloch equations for 14 Coulomb coupled two-level systems, which describe the S (0) and S (1) level of every chlorophyll molecule. All parameter introduced into the Hamiltonian are based on microscopic structure and a quantum chemical model. The derived Bloch equations describe not only linear absorption but also the intensity dependence of optical spectra in a regime where the interplay of Pauli Blocking effects as well as exciton-exciton annihilation effects are important. As an example, pump-probe spectra are discussed. The observed saturation of the spectra for high intensities can be viewed as a relaxation channel blockade on short time scales due to Pauli blocking. The theoretical investigation is useful for the interpretation of the experimental data, if the experimental conditions exceed the low intensity pump limit and effects like strong Pauli Blocking and exciton-exciton annihilation need to be considered. These effects become important when multiple excitations are generated by the pump pulse in the complex.

  10. Controlling spatio-temporal chaos in the scenario of the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

    PubMed

    Boccaletti, S; Bragard, J

    2006-09-15

    We discuss some issues related with the process of controlling space-time chaotic states in the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. We address the problem of gathering control over turbulent regimes with the use of only a limited number of controllers, each one of them implementing, in parallel, a local control technique for restoring an unstable plane-wave solution. We show that the system extension does not influence the density of controllers needed in order to achieve control.

  11. Derivation of the equations of motion for complex structures by symbolic manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, A. L.; Meirovitch, L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper outlines a computer program especially tailored to the task of deriving explicit equations of motion for structures with point-connected substructures. The special purpose program is written in FORTRAN and is designed for performing the specific algebraic operations encountered in the derivation of explicit equations of motion. The derivation is by the Lagrangian approach. Using an orderly kinematical procedure and a discretization and/or truncation scheme, it is possible to write the kinetic and potential energy of each substructure in a compact vector-matrix form. Then, if each element of the matrices and vectors encountered in the kinetic and potential energy is a known algebraic expression, the computer program performs the necessary operations to evaluate the kinetic and potential energy of the system explicitly. Lagrange's equations for small motions about equilibrium can be deduced directly from the explicit form of the system kinetic and potential energy.

  12. Radiative transfer of acoustic waves in continuous complex media: Beyond the Helmholtz equation.

    PubMed

    Baydoun, Ibrahim; Baresch, Diego; Pierrat, Romain; Derode, Arnaud

    2016-11-01

    Heterogeneity can be accounted for by a random potential in the wave equation. For acoustic waves in a fluid with fluctuations of both density and compressibility (as well as for electromagnetic waves in a medium with fluctuation of both permittivity and permeability) the random potential entails a scalar and an operator contribution. For simplicity, the latter is usually overlooked in multiple scattering theory: whatever the type of waves, this simplification amounts to considering the Helmholtz equation with a sound speed c depending on position r. In this work, a radiative transfer equation is derived from the wave equation, in order to study energy transport through a multiple scattering medium. In particular, the influence of the operator term on various transport parameters is studied, based on the diagrammatic approach of multiple scattering. Analytical results are obtained for fundamental quantities of transport theory such as the transport mean-free path ℓ^{*}, scattering phase function f, and anisotropy factor g. Discarding the operator term in the wave equation is shown to have a significant impact on f and g, yet limited to the low-frequency regime, i.e., when the correlation length of the disorder ℓ_{c} is smaller than or comparable to the wavelength λ. More surprisingly, discarding the operator part has a significant impact on the transport mean-free path ℓ^{*} whatever the frequency regime. When the scalar and operator terms have identical amplitudes, the discrepancy on the transport mean-free path is around 300% in the low-frequency regime, and still above 30% for ℓ_{c}/λ=10^{3} no matter how weak fluctuations of the disorder are. Analytical results are supported by numerical simulations of the wave equation and Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Radiative transfer of acoustic waves in continuous complex media: Beyond the Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydoun, Ibrahim; Baresch, Diego; Pierrat, Romain; Derode, Arnaud

    2016-11-01

    Heterogeneity can be accounted for by a random potential in the wave equation. For acoustic waves in a fluid with fluctuations of both density and compressibility (as well as for electromagnetic waves in a medium with fluctuation of both permittivity and permeability) the random potential entails a scalar and an operator contribution. For simplicity, the latter is usually overlooked in multiple scattering theory: whatever the type of waves, this simplification amounts to considering the Helmholtz equation with a sound speed c depending on position r . In this work, a radiative transfer equation is derived from the wave equation, in order to study energy transport through a multiple scattering medium. In particular, the influence of the operator term on various transport parameters is studied, based on the diagrammatic approach of multiple scattering. Analytical results are obtained for fundamental quantities of transport theory such as the transport mean-free path ℓ*, scattering phase function f , and anisotropy factor g . Discarding the operator term in the wave equation is shown to have a significant impact on f and g , yet limited to the low-frequency regime, i.e., when the correlation length of the disorder ℓc is smaller than or comparable to the wavelength λ . More surprisingly, discarding the operator part has a significant impact on the transport mean-free path ℓ* whatever the frequency regime. When the scalar and operator terms have identical amplitudes, the discrepancy on the transport mean-free path is around 300 % in the low-frequency regime, and still above 30 % for ℓc/λ =103 no matter how weak fluctuations of the disorder are. Analytical results are supported by numerical simulations of the wave equation and Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. Solving Second-Order Ordinary Differential Equations without Using Complex Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kougias, Ioannis E.

    2009-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is a subject with a wide range of applications and the need of introducing it to students often arises in the last year of high school, as well as in the early stages of tertiary education. The usual methods of solving second-order ODEs with constant coefficients, among others, rely upon the use of complex…

  15. Solving Second-Order Ordinary Differential Equations without Using Complex Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kougias, Ioannis E.

    2009-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is a subject with a wide range of applications and the need of introducing it to students often arises in the last year of high school, as well as in the early stages of tertiary education. The usual methods of solving second-order ODEs with constant coefficients, among others, rely upon the use of complex…

  16. On obtaining spectrally accurate solutions of linear differential equations with complex interfaces using the immersed interface method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Sudipta; Saha, Sandeep

    2016-11-01

    Numerical solution of engineering problems with interfacial discontinuities requires exact implementation of the jump conditions else the accuracy deteriorates significantly; particularly, achieving spectral accuracy has been limited due to complex interface geometry and Gibbs phenomenon. We adopt a novel implementation of the immersed-interface method that satisfies the jump conditions at the interfaces exactly, in conjunction with the Chebyshev-collocation method. We consider solutions to linear second order ordinary and partial differential equations having a discontinuity in their zeroth and first derivatives across an interface traced by a complex curve. The solutions obtained demonstrate the ability of the proposed method to achieve spectral accuracy for discontinuous solutions across tortuous interfaces. The solution methodology is illustrated using two model problems: (i) an ordinary differential equation with jump conditions forced by an infinitely differentiable function, (ii) Poisson's equation having a discontinuous solution across interfaces that are ellipses of varying aspect ratio. The use of more polynomials in the direction of the major axis than the minor axis of the ellipse increases the convergence rate of the solution.

  17. Equation of motion and general solution for the one-dimensional complex cell response in the signal-tuned approach.

    PubMed

    Torreão, José R A

    2015-10-01

    A signal-tuned approach has been recently introduced for modeling stimulus-dependent cortical receptive fields. The approach is based on signal-tuned Gabor functions, which are Gaussian-modulated sinusoids whose parameters are obtained from a "tuning" signal. Given a stimulus to a cell, it is taken as the tuning signal for the Gabor function modeling the cell's receptive field, and the inner product of the stimulus and the stimulus-dependent field produces the cell's response. Here, we derive and solve the equation of motion for the signal-tuned complex cell response r(x,τ), where x and τ are receptive-field parameters: its center, and the delay with which it adapts to a change in input. The motion equation can be mapped onto the Schrödinger equation for a system with time-dependent imaginary mass and time-dependent complex potential, and yields a plane-wave solution and an Airy-packet solution. The plane-wave solution replicates responses previously obtained for temporally modulated and translating signals, and yields responses which seem compatible with apparent-motion effects, when the stimulus is a pair of alternating pulses. The Airy-packet solution can lead to long-range propagating responses.

  18. Stability on Time-Dependent Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.; Krechetnikov, R.

    2014-06-01

    We explore the key differences in the stability picture between extended systems on time-fixed and time-dependent spatial domains. As a paradigm, we take the complex Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is the simplest nonlinear model with a finite critical wavenumber, and use it to study dynamic pattern formation and evolution on time-dependent spatial domains in translationally invariant systems, i.e., when dilution effects are absent. In particular, we discuss the effects of a time-dependent domain on the stability of spatially homogeneous and spatially periodic base states, and explore its effects on the Eckhaus instability of periodic states. New equations describing the nonlinear evolution of the pattern wavenumber on time-dependent domains are derived, and the results compared with those on fixed domains. Pattern coarsening on time-dependent domains is contrasted with that on fixed domains with the help of the Cahn-Hilliard equation extended here to time-dependent domains. Parallel results for the evolution of the Benjamin-Feir instability on time-dependent domains are also given.

  19. Propagation equation of Hermite-Gauss beams through a complex optical system with apertures and its application to focal shift.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sun; Jin, Guo; Tingfeng, Wang

    2013-07-01

    Based on the generalized Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral (Collins' formula), the propagation equation of Hermite-Gauss beams through a complex optical system with a limiting aperture is derived. The elements of the optical system may be all those characterized by an ABCD ray-transfer matrix, as well as any kind of apertures represented by complex transmittance functions. To obtain the analytical expression, we expand the aperture transmittance function into a finite sum of complex Gaussian functions. Thus the limiting aperture is expressed as a superposition of a series of Gaussian-shaped limiting apertures. The advantage of this treatment is that we can treat almost all kinds of apertures in theory. As application, we define the width of the beam and the focal plane using an encircled-energy criterion and calculate the intensity distribution of Hermite-Gauss beams at the actual focus of an aperture lens.

  20. Multiphase Solutions to the Vector Allen-Cahn Equation: Crystalline and Other Complex Symmetric Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Peter W.; Fusco, Giorgio; Smyrnelis, Panayotis

    2017-08-01

    We present a systematic study of entire symmetric solutions {u : R^n →R^m} of the vector Allen-Cahn equation Δ u - W_u(u) = 0 \\quad{for all}\\quad x \\in R^n, where {W:R^m → R} is smooth, symmetric, nonnegative with a finite number of zeros, and where { W_u= (partial W / partial u_1,\\dots,partial W / partial u_m)^{\\top}}. We introduce a general notion of equivariance with respect to a homomorphism {f:G→Γ} ({G, Γ} reflection groups) and prove two abstract results, concerning the cases of G finite and G discrete, for the existence of equivariant solutions. Our approach is variational and based on a mapping property of the parabolic vector Allen-Cahn equation and on a pointwise estimate for vector minimizers.

  1. Outdoor Sound Propagation Modelling in Complex Environments: Recent Developments in the Parabolic Equation Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    equation for sound waves in inhomogeneous moving media”, Acustica united with Acta Acustica , Vol 83(3), pp 455-460,1997. [3] L. Dallois, Ph. Blanc...propagation in a turbulent atmosphere within the parabolic approximation”, Acustica united with Acta Acustica , Vol 87(1), pp 659-669, 2001 [6] M. Karweit...approaches", Acta Acustica united with Acustica , 89 (6), 980-991, (2003). [40] Ph. Voisin, Ph. Blanc-Benon, "The influence of meteorological

  2. Understanding complex coacervation in serum albumin and pectin mixtures using a combination of the Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunqi; Zhao, Qin; Huang, Qingrong

    2014-01-30

    A combination of turbidimetric titration, a sigmoidal Boltzmann equation approach and Monte Carlo simulation has been used to study the complex coacervation in serum albumin and pectin mixtures. The effects of the mass ratio of protein to polysaccharide on the critical pH values, the probability of complex coacervation and the electrostatic interaction from charge patches in serum albumin were investigated. Turbidimetric titration results showed an optimum pH for complex coacervation (pHm), which corresponded to the maximum turbidity in the protein/polysaccharide mixture. The pHm monotonically decreased as the ratio decreased, and could be fitted using the sigmoidal Boltzmann equation. It suggests that pHm could be a good ordering parameter to characterize the phase behavior associated with protein/polysaccharide complex coacervation. Qualitative understanding of pHm by taking into account the minimization of electrostatic interaction, as well as quantitative matching of pHm according to the concept of charge neutralization were both achieved. Our results suggest that the serum albumin/pectin complexes were ultimately neutralized by the partial charges originated from the titratable residues in protein and polysaccharide chains at pHm. The Monte Carlo simulation provided consistent phase boundaries for complex coacervation in the same system, and the intermolecular association strength was determined to be several kBT below the given ionic strength. The strongest binding site in the protein is convergent to the largest positive charge patch if pure electrostatic interaction was considered. Further inclusion of contribution from excluded volume resulted in the binding site distribution over five different positive charge patches at different protein/polysaccharide ratios and pH values. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Wall-function boundary conditions in the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for complex compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    To make computer codes for two-dimensional compressible flows more robust and economical, wall functions for these flows, under adiabatic conditions, have been developed and tested. These wall functions have been applied to three two-equation models of turbulence. The tests consist of comparisons of calculated and experimental results for transonic and supersonic flow over a flat plate and for two-dimensional and axisymmetrical transonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction flows with and without separation. The calculations are performed with an implicit algorithm that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that results obtained agree very well with the data for the complex compressible flows tested, provided criteria for use of the wall functions are followed. The expected savings in cost of the computations and improved robustness of the code were achieved.

  4. A study of the Lorentz-Dirac equation in complex space-time for clues to emergent quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Mark

    2012-05-01

    A hypothetical equation of motion is proposed for Kerr-Newman particles. Obtained by analytic continuation of the Lorentz-Dirac equation into complex space-time, the goal is to study the implications of this theory for emergent quantum mechanics. A new class of "runaway" solutions is found which bear similarity to the quantum phenomenon of Zitterbewegung. Other solutions incorporating external forces are also presented. The electromagnetic fields generated by these motions are studied. It is found that the retarded times are multi-sheeted functions of the field points. As a consequence, the solutions are not unique. A cloaking mechanism is found which inhibits electromagnetic radiation by combining the fields from several Riemann sheets for the retarded time. These results reinforce to some extent, but also pose additional conceptual questions for the idea that Kerr-Newman solutions provide insight into elementary particles and into emergent quantum mechanics.

  5. High-order compact ADI method using predictor-corrector scheme for 2D complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Ali; Afshari, Fatemeh

    2015-12-01

    In this article, a high-order compact alternating direction implicit (HOC-ADI) finite difference scheme is applied to numerical solution of the complex Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation in two spatial dimensions with periodical boundary conditions. The GL equation has been used as a mathematical model for various pattern formation systems in mechanics, physics, and chemistry. The proposed HOC-ADI method has fourth-order accuracy in space and second-order accuracy in time. To avoid solving the nonlinear system and to increase the accuracy and efficiency of the method, we proposed the predictor-corrector scheme. Validation of the present numerical solutions has been conducted by comparing with the exact and other methods results and evidenced a good agreement.

  6. Wall-function boundary conditions in the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for complex compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    To make computer codes for two-dimensional compressible flows more robust and economical, wall functions for these flows, under adiabatic conditions, have been developed and tested. These wall functions have been applied to three two-equation models of turbulence. The tests consist of comparisons of calculated and experimental results for transonic and supersonic flow over a flat plate and for two-dimensional and axisymmetrical transonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction flows with and without separation. The calculations are performed with an implicit algorithm that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that results obtained agree very well with the data for the complex compressible flows tested, provided criteria for use of the wall functions are followed. The expected savings in cost of the computations and improved robustness of the code were achieved.

  7. Solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using uniform complex scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Jakob; Lindroth, Eva; Selstø, Sølve; Argenti, Luca

    2009-11-01

    The formalism of complex rotation of the radial coordinate is studied in the context of time dependent systems. Complex rotation proves to be an efficient tool to obtain ionization probabilities and rates. Although, in principle, any information about the system may be obtained from the rotated wave function by transforming it back to its unrotated form, a good description of the ionized part of the wave function is generally subject to numerical challenges.

  8. Disclinations in square and hexagonal patterns.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A A; Nepomnyashchy, A A

    2003-05-01

    We report the observation of defects with fractional topological charges (disclinations) in square and hexagonal patterns as numerical solutions of several generic equations describing many pattern-forming systems: Swift-Hohenberg equation, damped Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, as well as nonlinear evolution equations describing large-scale Rayleigh-Benard and Marangoni convection in systems with thermally nearly insulated boundaries. It is found that disclinations in square and hexagonal patterns can be stable when nucleated from special initial conditions. The structure of the disclinations is analyzed by means of generalized Cross-Newell equations.

  9. Complex Solitary Wave Dynamics, Pattern Formation, and Chaos in the Gain-Loss Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Justin; Carr, Lincoln; Wu, Mingzhong

    2014-03-01

    Complex solitary wave dynamics, pattern formation and chaos are numerically studied in the context of spin wave envelopes in magnetic thin film active feedback rings and analogous driven damped nonlinear physical systems. Distinct dynamical behaviors of the gain-loss nonlinear Schrödinger equation were numerically identified during a parameter space exploration utilizing over 180 000 core hours of simulation. Numerically identified dynamical behaviors include: spatially symmetric/asymmetric interactions of solitary wave peaks; dynamical pattern formation and recurrence, intermittency, steady state solutions and chaotically modulating bright soliton trains. Ten new dynamical behaviors, eight demonstrating long lifetimes, are predicted to be observable in experiments. Supported by NSF.

  10. Validity of Saha's equation of thermal ionization for negatively charged spherical particles in complex plasmas in thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.

    2011-04-15

    The authors have discussed the validity of Saha's equation for the charging of negatively charged spherical particles in a complex plasma in thermal equilibrium, even when the tunneling of the electrons, through the potential energy barrier surrounding the particle is considered. It is seen that the validity requires the probability of tunneling of an electron through the potential energy barrier surrounding the particle to be independent of the direction (inside to outside and vice versa) or in other words the Born's approximation should be valid.

  11. Pulse solutions of the cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation in the case of normal dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Crespo, J. M.; Akhmediev, N. N.; Afanasjev, V. V.; Wabnitz, S.

    1997-04-01

    Time-localized solitary wave solutions of the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (CGLE) are analyzed for the case of normal group-velocity dispersion. Exact soliton solutions are found for both the cubic and the quintic CGLE. The stability of these solutions is investigated numerically. The regions in the parameter space in which stable pulselike solutions of the quintic CGLE exist are numerically determined. These regions contain subspaces where analytical solutions may be found. An investigation of the role of group-velocity dispersion changes in magnitude and sign on the spectral and temporal characteristics of the stable pulse solutions is also carried out.

  12. Connecting complexity with spectral entropy using the Laplace transformed solution to the fractional diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yingjie; Chen, Wen; Magin, Richard L.

    2016-07-01

    Analytical solutions to the fractional diffusion equation are often obtained by using Laplace and Fourier transforms, which conveniently encode the order of the time and the space derivatives (α and β) as non-integer powers of the conjugate transform variables (s, and k) for the spectral and the spatial frequencies, respectively. This study presents a new solution to the fractional diffusion equation obtained using the Laplace transform and expressed as a Fox's H-function. This result clearly illustrates the kinetics of the underlying stochastic process in terms of the Laplace spectral frequency and entropy. The spectral entropy is numerically calculated by using the direct integration method and the adaptive Gauss-Kronrod quadrature algorithm. Here, the properties of spectral entropy are investigated for the cases of sub-diffusion and super-diffusion. We find that the overall spectral entropy decreases with the increasing α and β, and that the normal or Gaussian case with α = 1 and β = 2, has the lowest spectral entropy (i.e., less information is needed to describe the state of a Gaussian process). In addition, as the neighborhood over which the entropy is calculated increases, the spectral entropy decreases, which implies a spatial averaging or coarse graining of the material properties. Consequently, the spectral entropy is shown to provide a new way to characterize the temporal correlation of anomalous diffusion. Future studies should be designed to examine changes of spectral entropy in physical, chemical and biological systems undergoing phase changes, chemical reactions and tissue regeneration.

  13. A systematic construction of parity-time (PT )-symmetric and non-PT -symmetric complex potentials from the solutions of various real nonlinear evolution equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamilselvan, K.; Kanna, T.; Khare, Avinash

    2017-10-01

    We systematically construct a distinct class of complex potentials including parity-time (PT ) symmetric potentials for the stationary Schrödinger equation by using the soliton and periodic solutions of the four integrable real nonlinear evolution equations (NLEEs), namely the sine-Gordon (sG) equation, the modified Korteweg–de Vries (mKdV) equation, combined mKdV–sG equation and the Gardner equation. These potentials comprise of kink, breather, bion, elliptic bion, periodic and soliton potentials which are explicitly constructed from the various respective solutions of the NLEEs. We demonstrate the relevance between the identified complex potentials and the potential of the graphene model from an application point of view.

  14. Variance Estimation Using Replication Methods in Structural Equation Modeling with Complex Sample Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stapleton, Laura M.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses replication sampling variance estimation techniques that are often applied in analyses using data from complex sampling designs: jackknife repeated replication, balanced repeated replication, and bootstrapping. These techniques are used with traditional analyses such as regression, but are currently not used with structural…

  15. Probing resonances in the Dirac equation with quadrupole-deformed potentials with the complex momentum representation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhi; Shi, Min; Guo, Jian-You; Niu, Zhong-Ming; Liang, Haozhao; Zhang, Shi-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Resonances play critical roles in the formation of many physical phenomena, and many techniques have been developed for the exploration of resonances. In a recent letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 062502 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.062502], we proposed a new method for probing single-particle resonances by solving the Dirac equation in complex momentum representation for spherical nuclei. Here, we develop the theoretical formalism of this method for deformed nuclei. We elaborate numerical details and calculate the bound and resonant states in 37Mg. The results are compared with those from the coordinate representation calculations with a satisfactory agreement. In particular, the present method can expose clearly the resonant states in a complex momentum plane and determine precisely the resonance parameters for not only narrow resonances but also broad resonances that were difficult to obtain before.

  16. Interface and vortex motion in the two-component complex dissipative Ginzburg-Landau equation in two-dimensional space.

    PubMed

    Yabunaka, Shunsuke

    2014-10-01

    We study interface and vortex motion in the two-component dissipative Ginzburg-Landau equation in two-dimensional space. We consider cases where the whole system is divided into several domains, and we assume that these domains are separated by interfaces and each domain contains quantized vortices. The equations for interface and vortex motion will be derived by means of a variational approach by Kawasaki. These equations indicate that, along an interface, the phase gradient fields of the complex order parameters is parallel to the interface. They also indicate that the interface motion is driven by the curvature and the phase gradient fields along the interface, and vortex motion is driven by the phase gradient field around the vortex. With respect to the static interactions between defects, we find an analogy between quantized vortices in a domain and electric charges in a vacuum domain surrounded by a metallic object in electrostatic. This analogy indicates that there is an attractive interaction between an interface and a quantized vortex with any charge. We also discuss several examples of interface and vortex motion.

  17. Interface and vortex motion in the two-component complex dissipative Ginzburg-Landau equation in two-dimensional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabunaka, Shunsuke

    2014-10-01

    We study interface and vortex motion in the two-component dissipative Ginzburg-Landau equation in two-dimensional space. We consider cases where the whole system is divided into several domains, and we assume that these domains are separated by interfaces and each domain contains quantized vortices. The equations for interface and vortex motion will be derived by means of a variational approach by Kawasaki. These equations indicate that, along an interface, the phase gradient fields of the complex order parameters is parallel to the interface. They also indicate that the interface motion is driven by the curvature and the phase gradient fields along the interface, and vortex motion is driven by the phase gradient field around the vortex. With respect to the static interactions between defects, we find an analogy between quantized vortices in a domain and electric charges in a vacuum domain surrounded by a metallic object in electrostatic. This analogy indicates that there is an attractive interaction between an interface and a quantized vortex with any charge. We also discuss several examples of interface and vortex motion.

  18. A stable finite difference method for the elastic wave equation on complex geometries with free surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Appelo, D; Petersson, N A

    2007-12-17

    The isotropic elastic wave equation governs the propagation of seismic waves caused by earthquakes and other seismic events. It also governs the propagation of waves in solid material structures and devices, such as gas pipes, wave guides, railroad rails and disc brakes. In the vast majority of wave propagation problems arising in seismology and solid mechanics there are free surfaces. These free surfaces have, in general, complicated shapes and are rarely flat. Another feature, characterizing problems arising in these areas, is the strong heterogeneity of the media, in which the problems are posed. For example, on the characteristic length scales of seismological problems, the geological structures of the earth can be considered piecewise constant, leading to models where the values of the elastic properties are also piecewise constant. Large spatial contrasts are also found in solid mechanics devices composed of different materials welded together. The presence of curved free surfaces, together with the typical strong material heterogeneity, makes the design of stable, efficient and accurate numerical methods for the elastic wave equation challenging. Today, many different classes of numerical methods are used for the simulation of elastic waves. Early on, most of the methods were based on finite difference approximations of space and time derivatives of the equations in second order differential form (displacement formulation), see for example [1, 2]. The main problem with these early discretizations were their inability to approximate free surface boundary conditions in a stable and fully explicit manner, see e.g. [10, 11, 18, 20]. The instabilities of these early methods were especially bad for problems with materials with high ratios between the P-wave (C{sub p}) and S-wave (C{sub s}) velocities. For rectangular domains, a stable and explicit discretization of the free surface boundary conditions is presented in the paper [17] by Nilsson et al. In summary

  19. The Pushkin—Varshney—Kamoonpuri equation for the evaluation of association constants for the charge transfer complexes of sparingly soluble acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Pushkin M.; Varshney, Rishi K.; Kamoonpuri, S. Iqbal M.

    The proposed Pushkin—Varshney—Kamoonpuri equation proposes a simple way in which the association constants of complexes of sparingly soluble acceptors may be evaluated. The method can be used where the concentration of the acceptor is not known.

  20. A (Not Really) Complex Method for Finding Solutions to Linear Differential Equations. Modules and Monographs in Undergraduate Mathematics and Its Applications Project. UMAP Unit 497.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uebelacker, James W.

    This module considers ordinary linear differential equations with constant coefficients. The "complex method" used to find solutions is discussed, with numerous examples. The unit includes both problem sets and an exam, with answers provided for both. (MP)

  1. A comparative study of penalization and phase field methods for the solution of the diffusion equation in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauriello, Gerardo; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2015-02-01

    We present a comparative study of penalization and phase field methods for the solution of the diffusion equation in complex geometries embedded using simple Cartesian meshes. The two methods have been widely employed to solve partial differential equations in complex and moving geometries for applications ranging from solid and fluid mechanics to biology and geophysics. Their popularity is largely due to their discretization on Cartesian meshes thus avoiding the need to create body-fitted grids. At the same time, there are questions regarding their accuracy and it appears that the use of each one is confined by disciplinary boundaries. Here, we compare penalization and phase field methods to handle problems with Neumann and Robin boundary conditions. We discuss extensions for Dirichlet boundary conditions and in turn compare with methods that have been explicitly designed to handle Dirichlet boundary conditions. The accuracy of all methods is analyzed using one and two dimensional benchmark problems such as the flow induced by an oscillating wall and by a cylinder performing rotary oscillations. This comparative study provides information to decide which methods to consider for a given application and their incorporation in broader computational frameworks. We demonstrate that phase field methods are more accurate than penalization methods on problems with Neumann boundary conditions and we present an error analysis explaining this result.

  2. Vortex-soliton complexes in coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with unequal dispersion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Charalampidis, E G; Kevrekidis, P G; Frantzeskakis, D J; Malomed, B A

    2016-08-01

    We consider a two-component, two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger system with unequal dispersion coefficients and self-defocusing nonlinearities, chiefly with equal strengths of the self- and cross-interactions. In this setting, a natural waveform with a nonvanishing background in one component is a vortex, which induces an effective potential well in the second component, via the nonlinear coupling of the two components. We show that the potential well may support not only the fundamental bound state, but also multiring excited radial state complexes for suitable ranges of values of the dispersion coefficient of the second component. We systematically explore the existence, stability, and nonlinear dynamics of these states. The complexes involving the excited radial states are weakly unstable, with a growth rate depending on the dispersion of the second component. Their evolution leads to transformation of the multiring complexes into stable vortex-bright solitons ones with the fundamental state in the second component. The excited states may be stabilized by a harmonic-oscillator trapping potential, as well as by unequal strengths of the self- and cross-repulsive nonlinearities.

  3. The Advantages of Structural Equation Modeling to Address the Complexity of Spatial Reference Learning

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Pedro S.; Sotiropoulos, Ioannis; Silva, Joana; Takashima, Akihiko; Sousa, Nuno; Leite-Almeida, Hugo; Costa, Patrício S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cognitive performance is a complex process influenced by multiple factors. Cognitive assessment in experimental animals is often based on longitudinal datasets analyzed using uni- and multi-variate analyses, that do not account for the temporal dimension of cognitive performance and also do not adequately quantify the relative contribution of individual factors onto the overall behavioral outcome. To circumvent these limitations, we applied an Autoregressive Latent Trajectory (ALT) to analyze the Morris water maze (MWM) test in a complex experimental design involving four factors: stress, age, sex, and genotype. Outcomes were compared with a traditional Mixed-Design Factorial ANOVA (MDF ANOVA). Results: In both the MDF ANOVA and ALT models, sex, and stress had a significant effect on learning throughout the 9 days. However, on the ALT approach, the effects of sex were restricted to the learning growth. Unlike the MDF ANOVA, the ALT model revealed the influence of single factors at each specific learning stage and quantified the cross interactions among them. In addition, ALT allows us to consider the influence of baseline performance, a critical and unsolved problem that frequently yields inaccurate interpretations in the classical ANOVA model. Discussion: Our findings suggest the beneficial use of ALT models in the analysis of complex longitudinal datasets offering a better biological interpretation of the interrelationship of the factors that may influence cognitive performance. PMID:26955327

  4. Scattering mean free path in continuous complex media: beyond the Helmholtz equation.

    PubMed

    Baydoun, Ibrahim; Baresch, Diego; Pierrat, Romain; Derode, Arnaud

    2015-09-01

    We present theoretical calculations of the ensemble-averaged (or effective or coherent) wave field propagating in a heterogeneous medium considered as one realization of a random process. In the literature, it is usually assumed that heterogeneity can be accounted for by a random scalar function of the space coordinates, termed the potential. Physically, this amounts to replacing the constant wave speed in Helmholtz' equation by a space-dependent speed. In the case of acoustic waves, we show that this approach leads to incorrect results for the scattering mean free path, no matter how weak the fluctuations. The detailed calculation of the coherent wave field must take into account both a scalar and an operator part in the random potential. When both terms have identical amplitudes, the correct value for the scattering mean free paths is shown to be more than 4 times smaller (13/3, precisely) in the low-frequency limit, whatever the shape of the correlation function. Based on the diagrammatic approach of multiple scattering, theoretical results are obtained for the self-energy and mean free path within Bourret's and on-shell approximations. They are confirmed by numerical experiments.

  5. Scattering mean free path in continuous complex media: Beyond the Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydoun, Ibrahim; Baresch, Diego; Pierrat, Romain; Derode, Arnaud

    2015-09-01

    We present theoretical calculations of the ensemble-averaged (or effective or coherent) wave field propagating in a heterogeneous medium considered as one realization of a random process. In the literature, it is usually assumed that heterogeneity can be accounted for by a random scalar function of the space coordinates, termed the potential. Physically, this amounts to replacing the constant wave speed in Helmholtz' equation by a space-dependent speed. In the case of acoustic waves, we show that this approach leads to incorrect results for the scattering mean free path, no matter how weak the fluctuations. The detailed calculation of the coherent wave field must take into account both a scalar and an operator part in the random potential. When both terms have identical amplitudes, the correct value for the scattering mean free paths is shown to be more than 4 times smaller (13/3, precisely) in the low-frequency limit, whatever the shape of the correlation function. Based on the diagrammatic approach of multiple scattering, theoretical results are obtained for the self-energy and mean free path within Bourret's and on-shell approximations. They are confirmed by numerical experiments.

  6. Control system of mobile radiographic complex to study equations of state of substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, O. V.; Valekzhanin, R. V.; Kustov, D. V.; Shamro, O. A.; Sharov, T. V.

    2017-05-01

    A source of x-ray radiation is one of the tools to study equations of state of substances in dynamics. The mobile radiographic bench based on BIM-1500 [1] was developed in RFNC-VNIIEF to increase output parameters of the x-ray radiation source. From automated control system side, BIM-1500 is a set of six high-voltage generators based on the capacitive energy storage, technological equipment, and elements of a blocking system. This paper considers automated control system of the mobile radiographic bench MCA BIM 1500. It consists of six high-voltage generator control circuits, synchronization subsystem, and block subsystem. The object of control has some peculiarities: high level of electromagnetic noise, remoteness of the control panel from the object of control. In connection with this, the coupling devices are arranged closer to the object of control and performed in the form of a set of galvanically insulated control units, which are combined into a net. The operator runs MCA BIM using the operator’s screens on PC or by means of manual control on the equipment in the mode of debugging. The control software provides performance of the experiment in automatic regime in accordance with preset settings. The operator can stop the experiment at the stage of charging the capacitive storage.

  7. Classical irregular blocks, Hill's equation and PT-symmetric periodic complex potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatek, Marcin; Pietrykowski, Artur R.

    2016-07-01

    The Schrödinger eigenvalue problems for the Whittaker-Hill potential {Q}_2(x) = 1/2{h}^2 cos 4x + 4hμ cos 2x and the periodic complex potential {Q}_1(x)=1/4{h}^2{e}^{-} 4ix} + 2{h}^2 cos 2x are studied using their realizations in two-dimensional conformal field theory (2dCFT). It is shown that for the weak coupling (small) h ∈ ℝ and non-integer Floquet parameter ν ∉ ℤ spectra of hamiltonians ℋi = - d2/d x 2 + Q i( x), i = 1, 2 and corresponding two linearly independent eigenfunctions are given by the classical limit of the "single flavor" and "two flavors" ( N f = 1 , 2) irregular conformal blocks. It is known that complex nonhermitian hamiltonians which are PT-symmetric (= invariant under simultaneous parity P and time reversal T transformations) can have real eigenvalues. The hamiltonian ℋ1 is PT-symmetric for h, x ∈ ℝ. It is found that ℋ1 has a real spectrum in the weak coupling region for ν ∈ ℝ ℤ. This fact in an elementary way follows from a definition of the N f = 1 classical irregular block. Thus, ℋ1 can serve as yet another new model for testing postulates of PT-symmetric quantum mechanics.

  8. Modified Scaled Hierarchical Equation of Motion Approach for the Study of Quantum Coherence in Photosynthetic Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Kais, S.; Rebentrost, P.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2011-02-17

    We present a detailed theoretical study of the transfer of electronic excitation energy through the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) pigment-protein complex, using the newly developed modified scaled hierarchical approach (Shi, Q.; et al. J. Chem. Phys.2009, 130, 084105). We show that this approach is computationally more efficient than the original hierarchical approach. The modified approach reduces the truncation levels of the auxiliary density operators and the correlation function. We provide a systematic study of how the number of auxiliary density operators and the higher-order correlation functions affect the exciton dynamics. The time scales of the coherent beating are consistent with experimental observations. Furthermore, our theoretical results exhibit population beating at physiological temperature. Additionally, the method does not require a low-temperature correction to obtain the correct thermal equilibrium at long times.

  9. Thermostatted kinetic equations as models for complex systems in physics and life sciences.

    PubMed

    Bianca, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    Statistical mechanics is a powerful method for understanding equilibrium thermodynamics. An equivalent theoretical framework for nonequilibrium systems has remained elusive. The thermodynamic forces driving the system away from equilibrium introduce energy that must be dissipated if nonequilibrium steady states are to be obtained. Historically, further terms were introduced, collectively called a thermostat, whose original application was to generate constant-temperature equilibrium ensembles. This review surveys kinetic models coupled with time-reversible deterministic thermostats for the modeling of large systems composed both by inert matter particles and living entities. The introduction of deterministic thermostats allows to model the onset of nonequilibrium stationary states that are typical of most real-world complex systems. The first part of the paper is focused on a general presentation of the main physical and mathematical definitions and tools: nonequilibrium phenomena, Gauss least constraint principle and Gaussian thermostats. The second part provides a review of a variety of thermostatted mathematical models in physics and life sciences, including Kac, Boltzmann, Jager-Segel and the thermostatted (continuous and discrete) kinetic for active particles models. Applications refer to semiconductor devices, nanosciences, biological phenomena, vehicular traffic, social and economics systems, crowds and swarms dynamics.

  10. Thermostatted kinetic equations as models for complex systems in physics and life sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianca, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    Statistical mechanics is a powerful method for understanding equilibrium thermodynamics. An equivalent theoretical framework for nonequilibrium systems has remained elusive. The thermodynamic forces driving the system away from equilibrium introduce energy that must be dissipated if nonequilibrium steady states are to be obtained. Historically, further terms were introduced, collectively called a thermostat, whose original application was to generate constant-temperature equilibrium ensembles. This review surveys kinetic models coupled with time-reversible deterministic thermostats for the modeling of large systems composed both by inert matter particles and living entities. The introduction of deterministic thermostats allows to model the onset of nonequilibrium stationary states that are typical of most real-world complex systems. The first part of the paper is focused on a general presentation of the main physical and mathematical definitions and tools: nonequilibrium phenomena, Gauss least constraint principle and Gaussian thermostats. The second part provides a review of a variety of thermostatted mathematical models in physics and life sciences, including Kac, Boltzmann, Jager-Segel and the thermostatted (continuous and discrete) kinetic for active particles models. Applications refer to semiconductor devices, nanosciences, biological phenomena, vehicular traffic, social and economics systems, crowds and swarms dynamics.

  11. Variational approach to studying solitary waves in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with complex potentials.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Franz G; Cooper, Fred; Arévalo, Edward; Khare, Avinash; Saxena, Avadh; Bishop, A R

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the behavior of solitary wave solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) as they interact with complex potentials, using a four-parameter variational approximation based on a dissipation functional formulation of the dynamics. We concentrate on spatially periodic potentials with the periods of the real and imaginary part being either the same or different. Our results for the time evolution of the collective coordinates of our variational ansatz are in good agreement with direct numerical simulation of the NLSE. We compare our method with a collective coordinate approach of Kominis and give examples where the two methods give qualitatively different answers. In our variational approach, we are able to give analytic results for the small oscillation frequency of the solitary wave oscillating parameters which agree with the numerical solution of the collective coordinate equations. We also verify that instabilities set in when the slope dp(t)/dv(t) becomes negative when plotted parametrically as a function of time, where p(t) is the momentum of the solitary wave and v(t) the velocity.

  12. The Cauchy Problem in Local Spaces for the Complex Ginzburg-Landau EquationII. Contraction Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginibre, J.; Velo, G.

    We continue the study of the initial value problem for the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (with a > 0, b > 0, g>= 0) in initiated in a previous paper [I]. We treat the case where the initial data and the solutions belong to local uniform spaces, more precisely to spaces of functions satisfying local regularity conditions and uniform bounds in local norms, but no decay conditions (or arbitrarily weak decay conditions) at infinity in . In [I] we used compactness methods and an extended version of recent local estimates [3] and proved in particular the existence of solutions globally defined in time with local regularity of the initial data corresponding to the spaces Lr for r>= 2 or H1. Here we treat the same problem by contraction methods. This allows us in particular to prove that the solutions obtained in [I] are unique under suitable subcriticality conditions, and to obtain for them additional regularity properties and uniform bounds. The method extends some of those previously applied to the nonlinear heat equation in global spaces to the framework of local uniform spaces.

  13. Integral equation analysis and optimization of 2D layered nanolithography masks by complex images Green's function technique in TM polarization.

    PubMed

    Haghtalab, Mohammad; Faraji-Dana, Reza

    2012-05-01

    Analysis and optimization of diffraction effects in nanolithography through multilayered media with a fast and accurate field-theoretical approach is presented. The scattered field through an arbitrary two-dimensional (2D) mask pattern in multilayered media illuminated by a TM-polarized incident wave is determined by using an electric field integral equation formulation. In this formulation the electric field is represented in terms of complex images Green's functions. The method of moments is then employed to solve the resulting integral equation. In this way an accurate and computationally efficient approximate method is achieved. The accuracy of the proposed method is vindicated through comparison with direct numerical integration results. Moreover, the comparison is made between the results obtained by the proposed method and those obtained by the full-wave finite-element method. The ray tracing method is combined with the proposed method to describe the imaging process in the lithography. The simulated annealing algorithm is then employed to solve the inverse problem, i.e., to design an optimized mask pattern to improve the resolution. Two binary mask patterns under normal incident coherent illumination are designed by this method, where it is shown that the subresolution features improve the critical dimension significantly.

  14. Galileo's relativity principle, the concept of pressure, and complex characteristics, for the six-equation, one-pressure model

    SciTech Connect

    Makowitz, H.

    1992-10-01

    We have studied various formulations of the concept of pressure, in the context of the usual Six-Equation Model of thermal-hydraulics. A different concept of pressure, than the usual one, has been used. This new pressure concept is Galilean Invariant, and results for the One-Pressure Model with the same complex characteristic roots as the Basic III-Posed Model,'' discussed in the literature for the cases we have investigated. We have also examined several Two-Pressure formulations and shown that two pressures are a necessary but not sufficient condition for obtaining a Well-Posed system. Several counter examples are presented. We have shown that the standard theory is not Galilean Invariant and suggested that the origin of III-Posedness is due to our closure relationships. We also question whether the current theory can satisfy conservation principles for mass, energy, and momentum.

  15. Impact of phase on collision between vortex solitons in three-dimensional cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Yun-Feng; He, Xing-Dao

    2014-10-20

    We present a systematic analysis for three generic collisional outcomes between stable dissipative vortices with intrinsic vorticity S = 0, 1, or 2 upon variation of relative phase in the three-dimensional (3D) cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. The first type outcome is merger of the vortices into a single one, of which velocity can be effectively controlled by relative phase. With the increase of the collision momentum, the following is creation of an extra vortex, and its velocity also increases with growth of relative phase. However, at largest collision momentum, the variety of relative phase cannot change the third type collisional outcomes, quasielastic interaction. In addition, the dynamic range of the outcome of creating an extra vortex decreases with the reduction of cubic-gain. The above features have potential applications in optical switching and logic gates based on interaction of optical solitons.

  16. Using a system of differential equations that models cattle growth to uncover the genetic basis of complex traits.

    PubMed

    Freua, Mateus Castelani; Santana, Miguel Henrique de Almeida; Ventura, Ricardo Vieira; Tedeschi, Luis Orlindo; Ferraz, José Bento Sterman

    2017-08-01

    The interplay between dynamic models of biological systems and genomics is based on the assumption that genetic variation of the complex trait (i.e., outcome of model behavior) arises from component traits (i.e., model parameters) in lower hierarchical levels. In order to provide a proof of concept of this statement for a cattle growth model, we ask whether model parameters map genomic regions that harbor quantitative trait loci (QTLs) already described for the complex trait. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with a Bayesian hierarchical LASSO method in two parameters of the Davis Growth Model, a system of three ordinary differential equations describing DNA accretion, protein synthesis and degradation, and fat synthesis. Phenotypic and genotypic data were available for 893 Nellore (Bos indicus) cattle. Computed values for parameter k1 (DNA accretion rate) ranged from 0.005 ± 0.003 and for α (constant for energy for maintenance requirement) 0.134 ± 0.024. The expected biological interpretation of the parameters is confirmed by QTLs mapped for k1 and α. QTLs within genomic regions mapped for k1 are expected to be correlated with the DNA pool: body size and weight. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which were significant for α mapped QTLs that had already been associated with residual feed intake, feed conversion ratio, average daily gain (ADG), body weight, and also dry matter intake. SNPs identified for k1 were able to additionally explain 2.2% of the phenotypic variability of the complex ADG, even when SNPs for k1 did not match the genomic regions associated with ADG. Although improvements are needed, our findings suggest that genomic analysis on component traits may help to uncover the genetic basis of more complex traits, particularly when lower biological hierarchies are mechanistically described by mathematical simulation models.

  17. Analytical and numerical validation for solving the fractional Klein-Gordon equation using the fractional complex transform and variational iteration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khader, M. M.; Adel, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we implement the fractional complex transform method to convert the nonlinear fractional Klein-Gordon equation (FKGE) to an ordinary differential equation. We use the variational iteration method (VIM) to solve the resulting ODE. The fractional derivatives are presented in terms of the Caputo sense. Some numerical examples are presented to validate the proposed techniques. Finally, a comparison with the numerical solution using Runge-Kutta of order four is given.

  18. Weighting Test Samples in IRT Linking and Equating: Toward an Improved Sampling Design for Complex Equating. Research Report. ETS RR-13-39

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qian, Jiahe; Jiang, Yanming; von Davier, Alina A.

    2013-01-01

    Several factors could cause variability in item response theory (IRT) linking and equating procedures, such as the variability across examinee samples and/or test items, seasonality, regional differences, native language diversity, gender, and other demographic variables. Hence, the following question arises: Is it possible to select optimal…

  19. Relationship between women's characteristics and continuum of care for maternal health in Kenya: Complex survey analysis using structural equation modeling.

    PubMed

    Owili, Patrick Opiyo; Muga, Miriam Adoyo; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Hsu, Yi-Hsin Elsa; Huang, Nicole; Chien, Li-Yin

    2016-08-11

    The objective of this study was to understand and estimate the complex relationships in the continuum of care for maternal health to provide information to improve maternal and newborn health outcomes. Women (n = 4,082) aged 15-49 years in the 2008/2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey data were used to explore the complex relationships in the continuum of care for maternal health (i.e., before, during, and after delivery) using structural equation modeling. Results showed that the use of antenatal care was significantly positively related to the use of delivery care (β = 0.06; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.10) but not postnatal care, while delivery care was associated with postnatal care (β = 0.68; AOR = 1.97; 95% CI: 1.75-2.22). Socioeconomic status was significantly related to all elements in the continuum of care for maternal health; barriers to delivery of care and personal characteristics were only associated with the use of delivery care (β = 0.34; AOR = 1.40; 95% CI: 1.30-1.52) and postnatal care (β = 0.03; AOR = 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05), respectively. The three periods of maternal health care were related to each other. Developing a referral system of continuity of care is critical in the Sustainable Development Goals era.

  20. Stable dipole solitons and soliton complexes in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with periodically modulated nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, M E; Alfimov, G L; Malomed, Boris A

    2016-07-01

    We develop a general classification of the infinite number of families of solitons and soliton complexes in the one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii/nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a nonlinear lattice pseudopotential, i.e., periodically modulated coefficient in front of the cubic term, which takes both positive and negative local values. This model finds direct implementations in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and nonlinear optics. The most essential finding is the existence of two branches of dipole solitons (DSs), which feature an antisymmetric shape, being essentially squeezed into a single cell of the nonlinear lattice. This soliton species was not previously considered in nonlinear lattices. We demonstrate that one branch of the DS family (namely, which obeys the Vakhitov-Kolokolov criterion) is stable, while unstable DSs spontaneously transform into stable fundamental solitons (FSs). The results are obtained in numerical and approximate analytical forms, the latter based on the variational approximation. Some stable bound states of FSs are found too.

  1. Stability of soliton families in nonlinear Schrödinger equations with non-parity-time-symmetric complex potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianke; Nixon, Sean

    2016-11-01

    Stability of soliton families in one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equations with non-parity-time (PT)-symmetric complex potentials is investigated numerically. It is shown that these solitons can be linearly stable in a wide range of parameter values both below and above phase transition. In addition, a pseudo-Hamiltonian-Hopf bifurcation is revealed, where pairs of purely-imaginary eigenvalues in the linear-stability spectra of solitons collide and bifurcate off the imaginary axis, creating oscillatory instability, which resembles Hamiltonian-Hopf bifurcations of solitons in Hamiltonian systems even though the present system is dissipative and non-Hamiltonian. The most important numerical finding is that, eigenvalues of linear-stability operators of these solitons appear in quartets (λ , - λ ,λ* , -λ*), similar to conservative systems and PT-symmetric systems. This quartet eigenvalue symmetry is very surprising for non- PT-symmetric systems, and it has far-reaching consequences on the stability behaviors of solitons.

  2. Stable dipole solitons and soliton complexes in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with periodically modulated nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, M. E. E-mail: galfimov@yahoo.com; Alfimov, G. L. E-mail: galfimov@yahoo.com; Malomed, Boris A.

    2016-07-15

    We develop a general classification of the infinite number of families of solitons and soliton complexes in the one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii/nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a nonlinear lattice pseudopotential, i.e., periodically modulated coefficient in front of the cubic term, which takes both positive and negative local values. This model finds direct implementations in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and nonlinear optics. The most essential finding is the existence of two branches of dipole solitons (DSs), which feature an antisymmetric shape, being essentially squeezed into a single cell of the nonlinear lattice. This soliton species was not previously considered in nonlinear lattices. We demonstrate that one branch of the DS family (namely, which obeys the Vakhitov-Kolokolov criterion) is stable, while unstable DSs spontaneously transform into stable fundamental solitons (FSs). The results are obtained in numerical and approximate analytical forms, the latter based on the variational approximation. Some stable bound states of FSs are found too.

  3. Stable dipole solitons and soliton complexes in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with periodically modulated nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, M. E.; Alfimov, G. L.; Malomed, Boris A.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a general classification of the infinite number of families of solitons and soliton complexes in the one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii/nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a nonlinear lattice pseudopotential, i.e., periodically modulated coefficient in front of the cubic term, which takes both positive and negative local values. This model finds direct implementations in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and nonlinear optics. The most essential finding is the existence of two branches of dipole solitons (DSs), which feature an antisymmetric shape, being essentially squeezed into a single cell of the nonlinear lattice. This soliton species was not previously considered in nonlinear lattices. We demonstrate that one branch of the DS family (namely, which obeys the Vakhitov-Kolokolov criterion) is stable, while unstable DSs spontaneously transform into stable fundamental solitons (FSs). The results are obtained in numerical and approximate analytical forms, the latter based on the variational approximation. Some stable bound states of FSs are found too.

  4. Saddle-node bifurcation and modulational instability associated with the pulse propagation of dust ion-acoustic waves in a viscous dusty plasma: A complex nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Amar P.; Roy Chowdhury, K.; Roy Chowdhury, A.

    2007-01-15

    Using the standard reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) with complex coefficients is derived in a dusty plasma consisting of positive ions, nonthermal electrons, and charged dust grains. The effect of ion kinematic viscosity is taken into consideration, which makes the coefficients of NLSE complex. By means of a matching approach, the appearance mechanism of static pulses through a saddle-node bifurcation in the complex nonlinear Schroedinger equation is studied analytically. The analytical results are in good agreement with the direct numerical simulation. The modulational instability analysis is carried out for the dust ion-acoustic envelope solitary waves. The important role of the real part of the complex group velocity in the propagation of the one-dimensional wave packets in homogeneous active medium is predicted.

  5. Understanding the complex determinants of height and adiposity in disadvantaged daycare preschoolers in Salvador, NE Brazil through structural equation modelling.

    PubMed

    Lander, Rebecca L; Williams, Sheila M; Costa-Ribeiro, Hugo; Mattos, Angela P; Barreto, Danile L; Houghton, Lisa A; Bailey, Karl B; Lander, Alastair G; Gibson, Rosalind S

    2015-10-23

    Earlier we reported on growth and adiposity in a cross-sectional study of disadvantaged Brazilian preschoolers. Here we extend the work on these children, using structural equation modelling (SEM) to gather information on the complex relationships between the variables influencing height and adiposity. We hope this information will help improve the design and effectiveness of future interventions for preschoolers. In 376 preschoolers aged 3-6 years attending seven philanthropic daycares in Salvador, we used SEM to examine direct and indirect relationships among biological (sex, ethnicity, birth order, maternal height and weight), socio-economic, micronutrient (haemoglobin, serum selenium and zinc), and environmental (helminths, de-worming) variables on height and adiposity, as reflected by Z-scores for height-for-age (HAZ) and body mass index (BMIZ). Of the children, 11 % had HAZ < -1, 15 % had WHZ < -1, and 14 % had BMIZ > 1. Of their mothers, 8 % had short stature, and 50 % were overweight or obese. Based on standardized regression coefficients, significant direct effects (p < 0.05) for HAZ were maternal height (0.39), being white (-0.07), having helminth infection (-0.09), and serum zinc (-0.11). For BMIZ, significant direct effects were maternal weight (0.21), extremely low SES (-0.15), and haemoglobin (0.14). Indirect (p < 0.05) effects for HAZ were sex (being male) (-0.02), helminth infection (-0.01), de-worming treatment (0.01), and serum selenium (-0.02), and for BMIZ were extremely low SES (-0.001), helminth infection (-0.004), and serum selenium (0.02). Of the multiple factors influencing preschoolers' growth, helminth infection was a modifiable risk factor directly and indirectly affecting HAZ and BMIZ, respectively. Hence the WHO de-worming recommendation should include preschoolers living in at-risk environments as well as school-aged children.

  6. Birth-death process of local structures in defect turbulence described by the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Yusuke; Konno, Hidetoshi

    2014-04-01

    Defect turbulence described by the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is investigated and analyzed via a birth-death process of the local structures composed of defects, holes, and modulated amplitude waves (MAWs). All the number statistics of each local structure, in its stationary state, are subjected to Poisson statistics. In addition, the probability density functions of interarrival times of defects, lifetimes of holes, and MAWs show the existence of long-memory and some characteristic time scales caused by zigzag motions of oscillating traveling holes. The corresponding stochastic process for these observations is fully described by a non-Markovian master equation.

  7. A Numerical Method for Solving the 3D Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Curvilinear Domains with Complex Immersed Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2008-01-01

    A novel numerical method is developed that integrates boundary-conforming grids with a sharp interface, immersed boundary methodology. The method is intended for simulating internal flows containing complex, moving immersed boundaries such as those encountered in several cardiovascular applications. The background domain (e.g the empty aorta) is discretized efficiently with a curvilinear boundary-fitted mesh while the complex moving immersed boundary (say a prosthetic heart valve) is treated with the sharp-interface, hybrid Cartesian/immersed-boundary approach of Gilmanov and Sotiropoulos [1]. To facilitate the implementation of this novel modeling paradigm in complex flow simulations, an accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for solving the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The method employs a novel, fully-curvilinear staggered grid discretization approach, which does not require either the explicit evaluation of the Christoffel symbols or the discretization of all three momentum equations at cell interfaces as done in previous formulations. The equations are integrated in time using an efficient, second-order accurate fractional step methodology coupled with a Jacobian-free, Newton-Krylov solver for the momentum equations and a GMRES solver enhanced with multigrid as preconditioner for the Poisson equation. Several numerical experiments are carried out on fine computational meshes to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method for standard benchmark problems as well as for unsteady, pulsatile flow through a curved, pipe bend. To demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate flows with complex, moving immersed boundaries we apply it to calculate pulsatile, physiological flow through a mechanical, bileaflet heart valve mounted in a model straight aorta with an anatomical-like triple sinus. PMID:19194533

  8. A Numerical Method for Solving the 3D Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Curvilinear Domains with Complex Immersed Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2007-08-01

    A novel numerical method is developed that integrates boundary-conforming grids with a sharp interface, immersed boundary methodology. The method is intended for simulating internal flows containing complex, moving immersed boundaries such as those encountered in several cardiovascular applications. The background domain (e.g the empty aorta) is discretized efficiently with a curvilinear boundary-fitted mesh while the complex moving immersed boundary (say a prosthetic heart valve) is treated with the sharp-interface, hybrid Cartesian/immersed-boundary approach of Gilmanov and Sotiropoulos [1]. To facilitate the implementation of this novel modeling paradigm in complex flow simulations, an accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for solving the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The method employs a novel, fully-curvilinear staggered grid discretization approach, which does not require either the explicit evaluation of the Christoffel symbols or the discretization of all three momentum equations at cell interfaces as done in previous formulations. The equations are integrated in time using an efficient, second-order accurate fractional step methodology coupled with a Jacobian-free, Newton-Krylov solver for the momentum equations and a GMRES solver enhanced with multigrid as preconditioner for the Poisson equation. Several numerical experiments are carried out on fine computational meshes to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method for standard benchmark problems as well as for unsteady, pulsatile flow through a curved, pipe bend. To demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate flows with complex, moving immersed boundaries we apply it to calculate pulsatile, physiological flow through a mechanical, bileaflet heart valve mounted in a model straight aorta with an anatomical-like triple sinus.

  9. Optical Rogue Waves in Vortex Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Christopher J; Yao, Alison M; Oppo, Gian-Luca

    2016-01-29

    We present a spatiotemporal mechanism for producing 2D optical rogue waves in the presence of a turbulent state with creation, interaction, and annihilation of optical vortices. Spatially periodic structures with bound phase lose stability to phase unbound turbulent states in complex Ginzburg-Landau and Swift-Hohenberg models with external driving. When the pumping is high and the external driving is low, synchronized oscillations are unstable and lead to spatiotemporal vortex-mediated turbulence with high excursions in amplitude. Nonlinear amplification leads to rogue waves close to turbulent optical vortices, where the amplitude tends to zero, and to probability density functions (PDFs) with long tails typical of extreme optical events.

  10. Solvent Binding Analysis and Computational Alanine Scanning of the Bovine Chymosin-Bovine κ-Casein Complex Using Molecular Integral Equation Theory.

    PubMed

    Palmer, David S; Sørensen, Jesper; Schiøtt, Birgit; Fedorov, Maxim V

    2013-12-10

    We demonstrate that the relative binding thermodynamics of single-point mutants of a model protein-peptide complex (the bovine chymosin-bovine κ-casein complex) can be calculated accurately and efficiently using molecular integral equation theory. The results are shown to be in good overall agreement with those obtained using implicit continuum solvation models. Unlike the implicit continuum models, however, molecular integral equation theory provides useful information about the distribution of solvent density. We find that experimentally observed water-binding sites on the surface of bovine chymosin can be identified quickly and accurately from the density distribution functions computed by molecular integral equation theory. The bovine chymosin-bovine κ-casein complex is of industrial interest because bovine chymosin is widely used to cleave bovine κ-casein and to initiate milk clotting in the manufacturing of processed dairy products. The results are interpreted in light of the recent discovery that camel chymosin is a more efficient clotting agent than bovine chymosin for bovine milk.

  11. Reply to "Comment on `Defocusing complex short-pulse equation and its multi-dark-soliton solution' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bao-Feng; Ling, Liming; Zhu, Zuonong

    2017-08-01

    Our paper [Phys. Rev. E 93, 052227 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.052227], proposing an integrable model for the propagation of ultrashort pulses, has recently received a Comment by Youssoufa et al. [Phys. Rev. E 96, 026201 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevE.96.026201] about a possible flaw in its derivation. We point out that their claim is incorrect since we have stated explicitly that a term is neglected to derive our model equation in our paper. Furthermore, the integrable model is validated by comparing with the normalized Maxwell equation and other known integrable models. Moreover, we show that a similar approximation has to be performed in deriving the same integrable equation as explained in the Comment.

  12. Perceived Social Relationships and Science Learning Outcomes for Taiwanese Eighth Graders: Structural Equation Modeling with a Complex Sampling Consideration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jen, Tsung-Hau; Lee, Che-Di; Chien, Chin-Lung; Hsu, Ying-Shao; Chen, Kuan-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Based on the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study 2007 study and a follow-up national survey, data for 3,901 Taiwanese grade 8 students were analyzed using structural equation modeling to confirm a social-relation-based affection-driven model (SRAM). SRAM hypothesized relationships among students' perceived social relationships in…

  13. Perceived Social Relationships and Science Learning Outcomes for Taiwanese Eighth Graders: Structural Equation Modeling with a Complex Sampling Consideration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jen, Tsung-Hau; Lee, Che-Di; Chien, Chin-Lung; Hsu, Ying-Shao; Chen, Kuan-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Based on the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study 2007 study and a follow-up national survey, data for 3,901 Taiwanese grade 8 students were analyzed using structural equation modeling to confirm a social-relation-based affection-driven model (SRAM). SRAM hypothesized relationships among students' perceived social relationships in…

  14. Propagation Effects on the Breakdown of a Linear Amplifier Model: Complex-Mass Schrödinger Equation Driven by the Square of a Gaussian Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounaix, Philippe; Collet, Pierre; Lebowitz, Joel L.

    2006-06-01

    Solutions to the equation [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] are investigated, where S( x, t) is a complex Gaussian field with zero mean and specified covariance, and m≠0 is a complex mass with Im( m) ≥ 0. For real m this equation describes the backscattering of a smoothed laser beam by an optically active medium. Assuming that S( x, t) is the sum of a finite number of independent complex Gaussian random variables, we obtain an expression for the value of λ at which the q th moment of [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] w.r.t. the Gaussian field S diverges. This value is found to be less or equal for all m ≠ 0, Im( m) ≥ 0 and | m|<+∞ than for | m| = +∞, i.e. when the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] term is absent. Our solution is based on a distributional formulation of the Feynman path-integral and the Paley-Wiener theorem.

  15. Derivation and theoretical assessment of a set of biomechanics-based, AIS2+ risk equations for the knee-thigh-hip complex.

    PubMed

    Laituri, Tony R; Henry, Scott; Sullivan, Kaye; Prasad, Priya

    2006-11-01

    A set of risk equations was derived to estimate the probability of sustaining a moderate-to-serious injury to the knee-thigh-hip complex (KTH) in a frontal crash. The study consisted of four parts. First, data pertaining to knee-loaded, whole-body, post-mortem human subjects (PMHS) were collected from the literature, and the attendant response data (e.g., axial compressive load applied to the knee) were normalized to those of a mid-sized male. Second, numerous statistical analyses and mathematical constructs were used to derive the set of risk equations for adults of various ages and genders. Third, field data from the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) were analyzed for subsequent comparison purposes. Fourth, the fidelity of the resulting set of risk equations was assessed by using the risk equations to transform the axial compressive femur loads from simulated, full-engagement, frontal crashes into event risks, and the resulting model-based injury rates were compared with the field-based injury rates. The results were promising: For unbelted drivers in towaway frontal crashes involving 1985-1997 model year passenger cars whose speed changes were less that 58 km/h, the model-based average injury rate was 1.10%; the field-based rate was 1.30%. Moreover, some of the trends in the field were confirmed with the model (e.g., there were more KTH-injured males than KTH-injured females). The risk equations demonstrated better fidelity for lower-speed crashes than high-speed crashes.

  16. Exp-Function Method and Fractional Complex Transform for Space-Time Fractional KP-BBM Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guner, Ozkan

    2017-08-01

    In the present article, He’s fractional derivative, the ansatz method, the (G‧/G)-expansion method, and the exp-function method are used to construct the exact solutions of nonlinear space-time fractional Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Benjamin-Bona-Mahony (KP-BBM). As a result, different types of exact solutions are obtained. Also we have examined the relation between the solutions obtained from the different methods. These methods are an efficient mathematical tool for solving fractional differential equations (FDEs) and it can be applied to other nonlinear FDEs.

  17. Calculating vibrational spectra without determining excited eigenstates: Solving the complex linear equations of damped response theory for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster states.

    PubMed

    Godtliebsen, Ian H; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-10-07

    It is demonstrated how vibrational IR and Raman spectra can be calculated from damped response functions using anharmonic vibrational wave function calculations, without determining the potentially very many eigenstates of the system. We present an implementation for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster, and describe how the complex equations can be solved using iterative techniques employing only real trial vectors and real matrix-vector transformations. Using this algorithm, arbitrary frequency intervals can be scanned independent of the number of excited states. Sample calculations are presented for the IR-spectrum of water, Raman spectra of pyridine and a pyridine-silver complex, as well as for the infra-red spectrum of oxazole, and vibrational corrections to the polarizability of formaldehyde.

  18. Calculating vibrational spectra without determining excited eigenstates: Solving the complex linear equations of damped response theory for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godtliebsen, Ian H.; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-10-01

    It is demonstrated how vibrational IR and Raman spectra can be calculated from damped response functions using anharmonic vibrational wave function calculations, without determining the potentially very many eigenstates of the system. We present an implementation for vibrational configuration interaction and vibrational coupled cluster, and describe how the complex equations can be solved using iterative techniques employing only real trial vectors and real matrix-vector transformations. Using this algorithm, arbitrary frequency intervals can be scanned independent of the number of excited states. Sample calculations are presented for the IR-spectrum of water, Raman spectra of pyridine and a pyridine-silver complex, as well as for the infra-red spectrum of oxazole, and vibrational corrections to the polarizability of formaldehyde.

  19. Automating Embedded Analysis Capabilities and Managing Software Complexity in Multiphysics Simulation, Part II: Application to Partial Differential Equations

    DOE PAGES

    Pawlowski, Roger P.; Phipps, Eric T.; Salinger, Andrew G.; ...

    2012-01-01

    A template-based generic programming approach was presented in Part I of this series of papers [Sci. Program. 20 (2012), 197–219] that separates the development effort of programming a physical model from that of computing additional quantities, such as derivatives, needed for embedded analysis algorithms. In this paper, we describe the implementation details for using the template-based generic programming approach for simulation and analysis of partial differential equations (PDEs). We detail several of the hurdles that we have encountered, and some of the software infrastructure developed to overcome them. We end with a demonstration where we present shape optimization and uncertaintymore » quantification results for a 3D PDE application.« less

  20. Third-order perturbative lattice and complex Langevin analyses of the finite-temperature equation of state of nonrelativistic fermions in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loheac, Andrew C.; Drut, Joaquín E.

    2017-05-01

    We analyze the pressure and density equations of state of unpolarized nonrelativistic fermions at finite temperature in one spatial dimension with contact interactions. For attractively interacting regimes, we perform a third-order lattice perturbation theory calculation, assess its convergence properties by comparing with hybrid Monte Carlo results (there is no sign problem in this regime), and demonstrate agreement with real Langevin calculations. For repulsive interactions, we present lattice perturbation theory results as well as complex Langevin calculations, with a modified action to prevent uncontrolled excursions in the complex plane. Although perturbation theory is a common tool, our implementation of it is unconventional; we use a Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation to decouple the system and automate the application of Wick's theorem, thus generating the diagrammatic expansion, including symmetry factors, at any desired order. We also present an efficient technique to tackle nested Matsubara frequency sums without relying on contour integration, which is independent of dimension and applies to both relativistic and nonrelativistic systems, as well as all energy-independent interactions. We find exceptional agreement between perturbative and nonperturbative results at weak couplings, and furnish predictions based on complex Langevin at strong couplings. We additionally present perturbative calculations of up to the fifth-order virial coefficient for repulsive and attractive couplings. Both the lattice perturbation theory and complex Langevin formalisms can easily be extended to a variety of situations including polarized systems, bosons, and higher dimension.

  1. Complex-scaled equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method with single and double substitutions for autoionizing excited states: theory, implementation, and examples.

    PubMed

    Bravaya, Ksenia B; Zuev, Dmitry; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Krylov, Anna I

    2013-03-28

    Theory and implementation of complex-scaled variant of equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method for excitation energies with single and double substitutions (EOM-EE-CCSD) is presented. The complex-scaling formalism extends the EOM-EE-CCSD model to resonance states, i.e., excited states that are metastable with respect to electron ejection. The method is applied to Feshbach resonances in atomic systems (He, H(-), and Be). The dependence of the results on one-electron basis set is quantified and analyzed. Energy decomposition and wave function analysis reveal that the origin of the dependence is in electron correlation, which is essential for the lifetime of Feshbach resonances. It is found that one-electron basis should be sufficiently flexible to describe radial and angular electron correlation in a balanced fashion and at different values of the scaling parameter, θ. Standard basis sets that are optimized for not-complex-scaled calculations (θ = 0) are not sufficiently flexible to describe the θ-dependence of the wave functions even when heavily augmented by additional sets.

  2. Complex-scaled equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method with single and double substitutions for autoionizing excited states: Theory, implementation, and examples

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Zuev, Dmitry; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Krylov, Anna I.

    2013-03-28

    Theory and implementation of complex-scaled variant of equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method for excitation energies with single and double substitutions (EOM-EE-CCSD) is presented. The complex-scaling formalism extends the EOM-EE-CCSD model to resonance states, i.e., excited states that are metastable with respect to electron ejection. The method is applied to Feshbach resonances in atomic systems (He, H{sup -}, and Be). The dependence of the results on one-electron basis set is quantified and analyzed. Energy decomposition and wave function analysis reveal that the origin of the dependence is in electron correlation, which is essential for the lifetime of Feshbach resonances. It is found that one-electron basis should be sufficiently flexible to describe radial and angular electron correlation in a balanced fashion and at different values of the scaling parameter, {theta}. Standard basis sets that are optimized for not-complex-scaled calculations ({theta} = 0) are not sufficiently flexible to describe the {theta}-dependence of the wave functions even when heavily augmented by additional sets.

  3. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  4. Error and Complexity Analysis for a Collocation-Grid-Projection Plus Precorrected-FFT Algorithm for Solving Potential Integral Equations with LaPlace or Helmholtz Kernels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we derive error bounds for a collocation-grid-projection scheme tuned for use in multilevel methods for solving boundary-element discretizations of potential integral equations. The grid-projection scheme is then combined with a precorrected FFT style multilevel method for solving potential integral equations with 1/r and e(sup ikr)/r kernels. A complexity analysis of this combined method is given to show that for homogeneous problems, the method is order n natural log n nearly independent of the kernel. In addition, it is shown analytically and experimentally that for an inhomogeneity generated by a very finely discretized surface, the combined method slows to order n(sup 4/3). Finally, examples are given to show that the collocation-based grid-projection plus precorrected-FFT scheme is competitive with fast-multipole algorithms when considering realistic problems and 1/r kernels, but can be used over a range of spatial frequencies with only a small performance penalty.

  5. Galileo`s relativity principle, the concept of pressure, and complex characteristics, for the six-equation, one-pressure model

    SciTech Connect

    Makowitz, H.

    1992-10-01

    We have studied various formulations of the concept of pressure, in the context of the usual Six-Equation Model of thermal-hydraulics. A different concept of pressure, than the usual one, has been used. This new pressure concept is Galilean Invariant, and results for the One-Pressure Model with the same complex characteristic roots as the ``Basic III-Posed Model,`` discussed in the literature for the cases we have investigated. We have also examined several Two-Pressure formulations and shown that two pressures are a necessary but not sufficient condition for obtaining a Well-Posed system. Several counter examples are presented. We have shown that the standard theory is not Galilean Invariant and suggested that the origin of III-Posedness is due to our closure relationships. We also question whether the current theory can satisfy conservation principles for mass, energy, and momentum.

  6. Effects of Competing First- and Second-Neighbour Couplings on the Propagation of Unstable Patterns in the Discrete Complex Cubic Ginzburg Landau Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamadou, Alidou; KenfackJiotsa, A.; Kofané, T. C.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the stability of a continuous wave solution in line of vortices. The weakly nonlinear dynamics are governed by a one-dimensional (1D) discrete complex cubic Ginzburg Landau (DCCGL) equation. In particular, within the framework of linear stability analysis, we show how the Lange and Newell criterion for the Benjamin Feir instability is modified by the lattice effects as well as the second neighbour coupling. A noteworthy feature of the present study is that the initial condition is not disintegrated into trains of unstable patterns which have the shape of solitons in the absence of second neighbour couplings and quintic term. The simulations also show that the main observed physical signatures of this instability are a variety of propagative patterns for short-time scales and chaotic states for long-time scales where the linear perturbation analysis fails.

  7. Long-time solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for an atom in an electromagnetic field using complex coordinate contours

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Liang; Rescigno, T. N.; Vanroose, W.; Reps, B.; McCurdy, C. W.

    2009-12-15

    We demonstrate that exterior complex scaling (ECS) can be used to impose outgoing wave boundary conditions exactly on solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for atoms in intense electromagnetic pulses using finite grid methods. The procedure is formally exact when applied in the appropriate gauge and is demonstrated in a calculation of high-harmonic generation in which multiphoton resonances are seen for long pulse durations. However, we also demonstrate that while the application of ECS in this way is formally exact, numerical error can appear for long-time propagations that can only be controlled by extending the finite grid. A mathematical analysis of the origins of that numerical error, illustrated with an analytically solvable model, is also given.

  8. Dynamical behavior of the random field on the pulsating and snaking solitons in cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtiar, Nurizatul Syarfinas Ahmad; Abdullah, Farah Aini; Hasan, Yahya Abu

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the dynamical behaviour of the random field on the pulsating and snaking solitons in a dissipative systems described by the one-dimensional cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation (cqCGLE). The dynamical behaviour of the random filed was simulated by adding a random field to the initial pulse. Then, we solve it numerically by fixing the initial amplitude profile for the pulsating and snaking solitons without losing any generality. In order to create the random field, we choose 0 ≤ ɛ ≤ 1.0. As a result, multiple soliton trains are formed when the random field is applied to a pulse like initial profile for the parameters of the pulsating and snaking solitons. The results also show the effects of varying the random field of the transient energy peaks in pulsating and snaking solitons.

  9. Long-time solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for an atom in an electromagnetic field using complex coordinate contours

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Liang; Vanroose, Wim; Reps, Brian; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2009-09-08

    We demonstrate that exterior complex scaling (ECS) can be used to impose outgoing wave boundary conditions exactly on solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation for atoms in intense electromagnetic pulses using finite grid methods. The procedure is formally exact when applied in the appropriate gauge and is demonstrated in a calculation of high harmonic generation in which multiphoton resonances are seen for long pulse durations. However, we also demonstrate that while the application of ECS in this way is formally exact, numerical error can appear for long time propagations that can only be controlled by extending the finite grid. A mathematical analysis of the origins of that numerical error, illustrated with an analytically solvable model, is also given.

  10. Bifurcation from rolls to multi-pulse planforms via reduction to a parabolic Boussinesq model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Thomas J.

    2014-05-01

    A mechanism is presented for the bifurcation from one-dimensional spatially periodic patterns (rolls) into two-dimensional planar states (planforms). The novelty is twofold: the planforms are solutions of a Boussinesq partial differential equation (PDE) on a periodic background and secondly explicit formulas for the coefficients in the Boussinesq equation are derived, based on a form of planar conservation of wave action flux. The Boussinesq equation is integrable with a vast array of solutions, and an example of a new planform bifurcating from rolls, which appears to be generic, is presented. Adding in time leads to a new time-dependent PDE, which models the nonlinear behaviour emerging from a generalization of Eckhaus instability. The class of PDEs to which the theory applies is evolution equations whose steady part is a gradient elliptic PDE. Examples are the 2+1 Ginzburg-Landau equation with real coefficients, and the 2+1 planar Swift-Hohenberg equation.

  11. Complex Burgers' Equation: Evolution of Shock Waves with a Pair of Non-isothermal Ions in an Arbitrarily Charged Dusty Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, Apul N.; Deka, Manoj Kr.

    2017-10-01

    The evolution characteristics of dust-acoustic shock wave phenomenon in an arbitrarily charged dusty plasma in presence of pair-ion are investigated by deriving modified Complex Burgers' equation. In this work, the effect of state of both the ions on the shock wave potential is analysed and discussed in detail. It has been observed that the variation of the non-linear coefficient is more consistent with the non-isothermal positive ions moving toward thermal equilibrium than with non-isothermal negative ions. A significant effect on the amplitude of the shock wave potential is observed as the distribution of the non-isothermal positive and negative ions changes from a hump shape through the flat-topped to Boltzmann type. A weighty effect on the height of the shock wave is observed as and when the Mach number of positive and negative ions changes. The shock wave potential shows a greater (lesser) value with negative (positive) ions moving ahead for thermal equilibrium.

  12. Complex Relationships between Occupation, Environment, DNA Adducts, Genetic Polymorphisms and Bladder Cancer in a Case-Control Study Using a Structural Equation Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Porru, Stefano; Pavanello, Sofia; Carta, Angela; Arici, Cecilia; Simeone, Claudio; Izzotti, Alberto; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA adducts are considered an integrate measure of carcinogen exposure and the initial step of carcinogenesis. Their levels in more accessible peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) mirror that in the bladder tissue. In this study we explore whether the formation of PBL DNA adducts may be associated with bladder cancer (BC) risk, and how this relationship is modulated by genetic polymorphisms, environmental and occupational risk factors for BC. These complex interrelationships, including direct and indirect effects of each variable, were appraised using the structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis. Within the framework of a hospital-based case/control study, study population included 199 BC cases and 213 non-cancer controls, all Caucasian males. Data were collected on lifetime smoking, coffee drinking, dietary habits and lifetime occupation, with particular reference to exposure to aromatic amines (AAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). No indirect paths were found, disproving hypothesis on association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk. DNA adducts were instead positively associated with occupational cumulative exposure to AAs (p = 0.028), whereas XRCC1 Arg 399 (p<0.006) was related with a decreased adduct levels, but with no impact on BC risk. Previous findings on increased BC risk by packyears (p<0.001), coffee (p<0.001), cumulative AAs exposure (p = 0.041) and MnSOD (p = 0.009) and a decreased risk by MPO (p<0.008) were also confirmed by SEM analysis. Our results for the first time make evident an association between occupational cumulative exposure to AAs with DNA adducts and BC risk, strengthening the central role of AAs in bladder carcinogenesis. However the lack of an association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk advises that these snapshot measurements are not representative of relevant exposures. This would envisage new scenarios for biomarker discovery and new challenges such as repeated measurements at different critical life

  13. Complex relationships between occupation, environment, DNA adducts, genetic polymorphisms and bladder cancer in a case-control study using a structural equation modeling.

    PubMed

    Porru, Stefano; Pavanello, Sofia; Carta, Angela; Arici, Cecilia; Simeone, Claudio; Izzotti, Alberto; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA adducts are considered an integrate measure of carcinogen exposure and the initial step of carcinogenesis. Their levels in more accessible peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) mirror that in the bladder tissue. In this study we explore whether the formation of PBL DNA adducts may be associated with bladder cancer (BC) risk, and how this relationship is modulated by genetic polymorphisms, environmental and occupational risk factors for BC. These complex interrelationships, including direct and indirect effects of each variable, were appraised using the structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis. Within the framework of a hospital-based case/control study, study population included 199 BC cases and 213 non-cancer controls, all Caucasian males. Data were collected on lifetime smoking, coffee drinking, dietary habits and lifetime occupation, with particular reference to exposure to aromatic amines (AAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). No indirect paths were found, disproving hypothesis on association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk. DNA adducts were instead positively associated with occupational cumulative exposure to AAs (p = 0.028), whereas XRCC1 Arg 399 (p<0.006) was related with a decreased adduct levels, but with no impact on BC risk. Previous findings on increased BC risk by packyears (p<0.001), coffee (p<0.001), cumulative AAs exposure (p = 0.041) and MnSOD (p = 0.009) and a decreased risk by MPO (p<0.008) were also confirmed by SEM analysis. Our results for the first time make evident an association between occupational cumulative exposure to AAs with DNA adducts and BC risk, strengthening the central role of AAs in bladder carcinogenesis. However the lack of an association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk advises that these snapshot measurements are not representative of relevant exposures. This would envisage new scenarios for biomarker discovery and new challenges such as repeated measurements at different critical life

  14. Coordinating Procedural and Conceptual Knowledge to Make Sense of Word Equations: Understanding the Complexity of a "Simple" Completion Task at the Learner's Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Keith S.; Bricheno, Pat

    2009-01-01

    The present paper discusses the conceptual demands of an apparently straightforward task set to secondary-level students--completing chemical word equations with a single omitted term. Chemical equations are of considerable importance in chemistry, and school students are expected to learn to be able to write and interpret them. However, it is…

  15. Nonlinear ordinary difference equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caughey, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Future space vehicles will be relatively large and flexible, and active control will be necessary to maintain geometrical configuration. While the stresses and strains in these space vehicles are not expected to be excessively large, their cumulative effects will cause significant geometrical nonlinearities to appear in the equations of motion, in addition to the nonlinearities caused by material properties. Since the only effective tool for the analysis of such large complex structures is the digital computer, it will be necessary to gain a better understanding of the nonlinear ordinary difference equations which result from the time discretization of the semidiscrete equations of motion for such structures.

  16. Corrections to the Eckhaus' stability criterion for one-dimensional stationary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malomed, B. A.; Staroselsky, I. E.; Konstantinov, A. B.

    1989-01-01

    Two amendments to the well-known Eckhaus' stability criterion for small-amplitude non-linear structures generated by weak instability of a spatially uniform state of a non-equilibrium one-dimensional system against small perturbations with finite wavelengths are obtained. Firstly, we evaluate small corrections to the main Eckhaus' term which, on the contrary so that term, do not have a universal form. Comparison of those non-universal corrections with experimental or numerical results gives a possibility to select a more relevant form of an effective nonlinear evolution equation. In particular, the comparison with such results for convective rolls and Taylor vortices gives arguments in favor of the Swift-Hohenberg equation. Secondly, we derive an analog of the Eckhaus criterion for systems degenerate in the sense that in an expansion of their non-linear parts in powers of dynamical variables, the second and third degree terms are absent.

  17. Nonlinear hydrodynamic stability and transition; Proceedings of the IUTAM Symposium, Nice, France, Sept. 3-7, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theoretical and experimental research on nonlinear hydrodynamic stability and transition is presented. Bifurcations, amplitude equations, pattern in experiments, and shear flows are considered. Particular attention is given to bifurcations of plane viscous fluid flow and transition to turbulence, chaotic traveling wave covection, chaotic behavior of parametrically excited surface waves in square geometry, amplitude analysis of the Swift-Hohenberg equation, traveling wave convection in finite containers, focus instability in axisymmetric Rayleigh-Benard convection, scaling and pattern formation in flowing sand, dynamical behavior of instabilities in spherical gap flows, and nonlinear short-wavelength Taylor vortices. Also discussed are stability of a flow past a two-dimensional grid, inertia wave breakdown in a precessing fluid, flow-induced instabilities in directional solidification, structure and dynamical properties of convection in binary fluid mixtures, and instability competition for convecting superfluid mixtures.

  18. Penetration equations

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.W.

    1997-10-01

    In 1967, Sandia National Laboratories published empirical equations to predict penetration into natural earth materials and concrete. Since that time there have been several small changes to the basic equations, and several more additions to the overall technique for predicting penetration into soil, rock, concrete, ice, and frozen soil. The most recent update to the equations was published in 1988, and since that time there have been changes in the equations to better match the expanding data base, especially in concrete penetration. This is a standalone report documenting the latest version of the Young/Sandia penetration equations and related analytical techniques to predict penetration into natural earth materials and concrete. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

  19. Basic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britz, Dieter

    In this chapter, we present most of the equations that apply to the systems and processes to be dealt with later. Most of these are expressed as equations of concentration dynamics, that is,concentration of one or more solution species as a function of time, as well as other variables, in the form of differential equations. Fundamentally, these are transport (diffusion-, convection- and migration-) equations but may be complicated by chemical processes occurring heterogeneously (i.e. at the electrode surface - electrochemical reaction) or homogeneously (in the solution bulk - chemical reaction). The transport components are all included in the general Nernst-Planck equation (see also Bard and Faulkner 2001) for the flux J j of species j

  20. Equation poems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentis, Jeffrey J.

    1996-05-01

    One of the most challenging goals of a physics teacher is to help students see that the equations of physics are connected to each other, and that they logically unfold from a small number of basic ideas. Derivations contain the vital information on this connective structure. In a traditional physics course, there are many problem-solving exercises, but few, if any, derivation exercises. Creating an equation poem is an exercise to help students see the unity of the equations of physics, rather than their diversity. An equation poem is a highly refined and eloquent set of symbolic statements that captures the essence of the derivation of an equation. Such a poetic derivation is uncluttered by the extraneous details that tend to distract a student from understanding the essential physics of the long, formal derivation.

  1. Random scalar fields and hyperuniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zheng; Torquato, Salvatore

    2017-06-01

    Disordered many-particle hyperuniform systems are exotic amorphous states of matter that lie between crystals and liquids. Hyperuniform systems have attracted recent attention because they are endowed with novel transport and optical properties. Recently, the hyperuniformity concept has been generalized to characterize two-phase media, scalar fields, and random vector fields. In this paper, we devise methods to explicitly construct hyperuniform scalar fields. Specifically, we analyze spatial patterns generated from Gaussian random fields, which have been used to model the microwave background radiation and heterogeneous materials, the Cahn-Hilliard equation for spinodal decomposition, and Swift-Hohenberg equations that have been used to model emergent pattern formation, including Rayleigh-Bénard convection. We show that the Gaussian random scalar fields can be constructed to be hyperuniform. We also numerically study the time evolution of spinodal decomposition patterns and demonstrate that they are hyperuniform in the scaling regime. Moreover, we find that labyrinth-like patterns generated by the Swift-Hohenberg equation are effectively hyperuniform. We show that thresholding (level-cutting) a hyperuniform Gaussian random field to produce a two-phase random medium tends to destroy the hyperuniformity of the progenitor scalar field. We then propose guidelines to achieve effectively hyperuniform two-phase media derived from thresholded non-Gaussian fields. Our investigation paves the way for new research directions to characterize the large-structure spatial patterns that arise in physics, chemistry, biology, and ecology. Moreover, our theoretical results are expected to guide experimentalists to synthesize new classes of hyperuniform materials with novel physical properties via coarsening processes and using state-of-the-art techniques, such as stereolithography and 3D printing.

  2. Regularized Structural Equation Modeling.

    PubMed

    Jacobucci, Ross; Grimm, Kevin J; McArdle, John J

    A new method is proposed that extends the use of regularization in both lasso and ridge regression to structural equation models. The method is termed regularized structural equation modeling (RegSEM). RegSEM penalizes specific parameters in structural equation models, with the goal of creating easier to understand and simpler models. Although regularization has gained wide adoption in regression, very little has transferred to models with latent variables. By adding penalties to specific parameters in a structural equation model, researchers have a high level of flexibility in reducing model complexity, overcoming poor fitting models, and the creation of models that are more likely to generalize to new samples. The proposed method was evaluated through a simulation study, two illustrative examples involving a measurement model, and one empirical example involving the structural part of the model to demonstrate RegSEM's utility.

  3. Equating Visual Function Scales to Facilitate Reporting of Medicare Functional G-Code Severity/Complexity Modifiers for Low-Vision Patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tiffany L; Perlmutter, Monica S; Andrews, Melva; Sunness, Janet S; Goldstein, Judith E; Massof, Robert W

    2015-10-01

    To present a method of estimating and equating scales across functional assessment instruments that appropriately represents changes in a patient's functional ability and can be meaningfully mapped to changes in Medicare G-code severity modifiers. Previously published measures of patients' overall visual ability, estimated from low-vision patient responses to 7 different visual function rating scale questionnaires, are equated and mapped onto Medicare G-code severity modifiers. Outpatient low-vision rehabilitation clinics. The analyses presented in this article were performed on raw or summarized low-vision patient ratings of visual function questionnaire (VFQ) items obtained from previously published research studies. Previously published visual ability measures from Rasch analysis of low-vision patient ratings of items in different VFQs (National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire, Index of Visual Functioning, Activities of Daily Vision Scale, Visual Activities Questionnaire) were equated with the Activity Inventory (AI) scale. The 39 items in the Self-Report Assessment of Functional Visual Performance (SRAFVP) and the 48 items in the Veterans Affairs Low Vision Visual Functioning Questionnaire (VA LV VFQ) were paired with similar items in the AI in order to equate the scales. Tests using different observation methods and indicators cannot be directly compared on the same scale. All test results would have to be transformed to measures of the same functional ability variable on a common scale as described here, before a single measure could be estimated from the multiple measures. Bivariate regression analysis was performed to linearly transform the SRAFVP and VA LV VFQ item measures to the AI item measure scale. The nonlinear relationship between person measures of visual ability on a logit scale and item response raw scores was approximated with a logistic function, and the 2 regression coefficients were estimated for each of the 7 VFQs. These

  4. Graphical Solution of Polynomial Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grishin, Anatole

    2009-01-01

    Graphing utilities, such as the ubiquitous graphing calculator, are often used in finding the approximate real roots of polynomial equations. In this paper the author offers a simple graphing technique that allows one to find all solutions of a polynomial equation (1) of arbitrary degree; (2) with real or complex coefficients; and (3) possessing…

  5. Beautiful equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljamaa, Panu; Jacobs, J. Richard; Chris; JamesHyman; Halma, Matthew; EricNolan; Coxon, Paul

    2014-07-01

    In reply to a Physics World infographic (part of which is given above) about a study showing that Euler's equation was deemed most beautiful by a group of mathematicians who had been hooked up to a functional magnetic-resonance image (fMRI) machine while viewing mathematical expressions (14 May, http://ow.ly/xHUFi).

  6. I-BIEM, an iterative boundary integral equation method for computer solutions of current distribution problems with complex boundaries: A new algorithm. I - Theoretical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahan, B. D.; Scherson, Daniel; Reid, Margaret A.

    1988-01-01

    A new algorithm for an iterative computation of solutions of Laplace's or Poisson's equations in two dimensions, using Green's second identity, is presented. This algorithm converges strongly and geometrically and can be applied to curved, irregular, or moving boundaries with nonlinear and/or discontinuous boundary conditions. It has been implemented in Pascal on a number of micro- and minicomputers and applied to several geometries. Cases with known analytic solutions have been tested. Convergence to within 0.1 percent to 0.01 percent of the theoretical values are obtained in a few minutes on a microcomputer.

  7. I-BIEM, an iterative boundary integral equation method for computer solutions of current distribution problems with complex boundaries: A new algorithm. I - Theoretical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahan, B. D.; Scherson, Daniel; Reid, Margaret A.

    1988-01-01

    A new algorithm for an iterative computation of solutions of Laplace's or Poisson's equations in two dimensions, using Green's second identity, is presented. This algorithm converges strongly and geometrically and can be applied to curved, irregular, or moving boundaries with nonlinear and/or discontinuous boundary conditions. It has been implemented in Pascal on a number of micro- and minicomputers and applied to several geometries. Cases with known analytic solutions have been tested. Convergence to within 0.1 percent to 0.01 percent of the theoretical values are obtained in a few minutes on a microcomputer.

  8. Lindblad rate equations

    SciTech Connect

    Budini, Adrian A.

    2006-11-15

    In this paper we derive an extra class of non-Markovian master equations where the system state is written as a sum of auxiliary matrixes whose evolution involve Lindblad contributions with local coupling between all of them, resembling the structure of a classical rate equation. The system dynamics may develop strong nonlocal effects such as the dependence of the stationary properties with the system initialization. These equations are derived from alternative microscopic interactions, such as complex environments described in a generalized Born-Markov approximation and tripartite system-environment interactions, where extra unobserved degrees of freedom mediates the entanglement between the system and a Markovian reservoir. Conditions that guarantee the completely positive condition of the solution map are found. Quantum stochastic processes that recover the system dynamics in average are formulated. We exemplify our results by analyzing the dynamical action of nontrivial structured dephasing and depolarizing reservoirs over a single qubit.

  9. Nonlocal electrical diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.; Olivares-Peregrino, V. H.; Benavides-Cruz, M.; Calderón-Ramón, C.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis and modeling of the electrical diffusion equation using the fractional calculus approach. This alternative representation for the current density is expressed in terms of the Caputo derivatives, the order for the space domain is 0<β≤1 and for the time domain is 0<γ≤2. We present solutions for the full fractional equation involving space and time fractional derivatives using numerical methods based on Fourier variable separation. The case with spatial fractional derivatives leads to Levy flight type phenomena, while the time fractional equation is related to sub- or super diffusion. We show that the mathematical concept of fractional derivatives can be useful to understand the behavior of semiconductors, the design of solar panels, electrochemical phenomena and the description of anomalous complex processes.

  10. Accuracy assessment of the linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation and reparametrization of the OBC generalized Born model for nucleic acids and nucleic acid-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Esposito, Gennaro

    2015-04-05

    The generalized Born model in the Onufriev, Bashford, and Case (Onufriev et al., Proteins: Struct Funct Genet 2004, 55, 383) implementation has emerged as one of the best compromises between accuracy and speed of computation. For simulations of nucleic acids, however, a number of issues should be addressed: (1) the generalized Born model is based on a linear model and the linearization of the reference Poisson-Boltmann equation may be questioned for highly charged systems as nucleic acids; (2) although much attention has been given to potentials, solvation forces could be much less sensitive to linearization than the potentials; and (3) the accuracy of the Onufriev-Bashford-Case (OBC) model for nucleic acids depends on fine tuning of parameters. Here, we show that the linearization of the Poisson Boltzmann equation has mild effects on computed forces, and that with optimal choice of the OBC model parameters, solvation forces, essential for molecular dynamics simulations, agree well with those computed using the reference Poisson-Boltzmann model.

  11. Marcus equation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1998-09-21

    In the late 1950s to early 1960s Rudolph A. Marcus developed a theory for treating the rates of outer-sphere electron-transfer reactions. Outer-sphere reactions are reactions in which an electron is transferred from a donor to an acceptor without any chemical bonds being made or broken. (Electron-transfer reactions in which bonds are made or broken are referred to as inner-sphere reactions.) Marcus derived several very useful expressions, one of which has come to be known as the Marcus cross-relation or, more simply, as the Marcus equation. It is widely used for correlating and predicting electron-transfer rates. For his contributions to the understanding of electron-transfer reactions, Marcus received the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. This paper discusses the development and use of the Marcus equation. Topics include self-exchange reactions; net electron-transfer reactions; Marcus cross-relation; and proton, hydride, atom and group transfers.

  12. Functional entropy variables: A new methodology for deriving thermodynamically consistent algorithms for complex fluids, with particular reference to the isothermal Navier–Stokes–Korteweg equations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ju; Gomez, Hector; Landis, Chad M.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a new methodology for the numerical solution of the isothermal Navier–Stokes–Korteweg equations. Our methodology is based on a semi-discrete Galerkin method invoking functional entropy variables, a generalization of classical entropy variables, and a new time integration scheme. We show that the resulting fully discrete scheme is unconditionally stable-in-energy, second-order time-accurate, and mass-conservative. We utilize isogeometric analysis for spatial discretization and verify the aforementioned properties by adopting the method of manufactured solutions and comparing coarse mesh solutions with overkill solutions. Various problems are simulated to show the capability of the method. Our methodology provides a means of constructing unconditionally stable numerical schemes for nonlinear non-convex hyperbolic systems of conservation laws.

  13. BeF\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{_{3}^{-}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} acts as a phosphate analog in proteins phosphorylated on aspartate: Structure of a BeF\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{_{3}^{-}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} complex with phosphoserine phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ho; Wang, Weiru; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Damo, Steven; Kim, Sung-Hou; Wemmer, David; Kustu, Sydney; Yan, Dalai

    2001-01-01

    Protein phosphoaspartate bonds play a variety of roles. In response regulator proteins of two-component signal transduction systems, phosphorylation of an aspartate residue is coupled to a change from an inactive to an active conformation. In phosphatases and mutases of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily, phosphoaspartate serves as an intermediate in phosphotransfer reactions, and in P-type ATPases, also members of the HAD family, it serves in the conversion of chemical energy to ion gradients. In each case, lability of the phosphoaspartate linkage has hampered a detailed study of the phosphorylated form. For response regulators, this difficulty was recently overcome with a phosphate analog, BeF\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{_{3}^{-}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}, which yields persistent complexes with the active site aspartate of their receiver domains. We now extend the application of this analog to a HAD superfamily member by solving at 1.5-Å resolution the x-ray crystal structure of the complex of BeF\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{_{3}^{-}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} with phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) from Methanococcus jannaschii. The structure is comparable to that of a phosphoenzyme intermediate: BeF\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{_{3}^{-}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} is bound to Asp-11 with the

  14. Lattice Boltzmann model for nonlinear convection-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Baochang; Guo, Zhaoli

    2009-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model for convection-diffusion equation with nonlinear convection and isotropic-diffusion terms is proposed through selecting equilibrium distribution function properly. The model can be applied to the common real and complex-valued nonlinear evolutionary equations, such as the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, Burgers-Fisher equation, nonlinear heat conduction equation, and sine-Gordon equation, by using a real and complex-valued distribution function and relaxation time. Detailed simulations of these equations are performed, and it is found that the numerical results agree well with the analytical solutions and the numerical solutions reported in previous studies.

  15. Equational Abstractions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    A b. Given an arbitrary relation→, we write →• for the total relation that extends→ by adding a pair a→• a for each a such that there is no b with a→ b...kind of a sort s is denoted by [s]. We write TΣ,k and TΣ,k(~x) to denote respectively the set of ground Σ-terms with kind k and of Σ-terms with kind k...variables. In membership equational logic, subsort relations and operator overloading are just a convenient way of writing corresponding Horn clauses

  16. Functional Entropy Variables: A New Methodology for Deriving Thermodynamically Consistent Algorithms for Complex Fluids, with Particular Reference to the Isothermal Navier-Stokes-Korteweg Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    and Computer Aided Design ( CAD ) [37]. Invoking the isoparametric paradigm, isogeometric analysis utilizes the same basis functions that are used in CAD ...a2b λ T0t ∗ = L0 √ a λ t∗ = We 1 2 t∗. (42) The relation (42) will be useful when we design our numerical algorithm in Section 3.3. We will...ICES REPORT 12-43 November 2012 Functional Entropy Variables: A New Methodology for Deriving Thermodynamically Consistent Algorithms for Complex

  17. On the extension of solutions of the real to complex KdV equation and a mechanism for the construction of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Gawad, H. I.; Tantawy, M.; Abo Elkhair, R. E.

    2016-07-01

    Rogue waves are more precisely defined as waves whose height is more than twice the significant wave height. This remarkable height was measured (by Draupner in 1995). Thus, the need for constructing a mechanism for the rogue waves is of great utility. This motivated us to suggest a mechanism, in this work, that rogue waves may be constructed via nonlinear interactions of solitons and periodic waves. This suggestion is consolidated here, in an example, by studying the behavior of solutions of the complex (KdV). This is done here by the extending the solutions of its real version.

  18. Simple taper: Taper equations for the field forester

    Treesearch

    David R. Larsen

    2017-01-01

    "Simple taper" is set of linear equations that are based on stem taper rates; the intent is to provide taper equation functionality to field foresters. The equation parameters are two taper rates based on differences in diameter outside bark at two points on a tree. The simple taper equations are statistically equivalent to more complex equations. The linear...

  19. Using global sensitivity analysis to understand higher order interactions in complex models: an application of GSA on the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) to quantify model sensitivity and implications for ecosystem services management in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremier, A. K.; Estrada Carmona, N.; Harper, E.; DeClerck, F.

    2011-12-01

    Appropriate application of complex models to estimate system behavior requires understanding the influence of model structure and parameter estimates on model output. To date, most researchers perform local sensitivity analyses, rather than global, because of computational time and quantity of data produced. Local sensitivity analyses are limited in quantifying the higher order interactions among parameters, which could lead to incomplete analysis of model behavior. To address this concern, we performed a GSA on a commonly applied equation for soil loss - the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation. USLE is an empirical model built on plot-scale data from the USA and the Revised version (RUSLE) includes improved equations for wider conditions, with 25 parameters grouped into six factors to estimate long-term plot and watershed scale soil loss. Despite RUSLE's widespread application, a complete sensitivity analysis has yet to be performed. In this research, we applied a GSA to plot and watershed scale data from the US and Costa Rica to parameterize the RUSLE in an effort to understand the relative importance of model factors and parameters across wide environmental space. We analyzed the GSA results using Random Forest, a statistical approach to evaluate parameter importance accounting for the higher order interactions, and used Classification and Regression Trees to show the dominant trends in complex interactions. In all GSA calculations the management of cover crops (C factor) ranks the highest among factors (compared to rain-runoff erosivity, topography, support practices, and soil erodibility). This is counter to previous sensitivity analyses where the topographic factor was determined to be the most important. The GSA finding is consistent across multiple model runs, including data from the US, Costa Rica, and a synthetic dataset of the widest theoretical space. The three most important parameters were: Mass density of live and dead roots found in the upper inch

  20. Taxis equations for amoeboid cells.

    PubMed

    Erban, Radek; Othmer, Hans G

    2007-06-01

    The classical macroscopic chemotaxis equations have previously been derived from an individual-based description of the tactic response of cells that use a "run-and-tumble" strategy in response to environmental cues [17,18]. Here we derive macroscopic equations for the more complex type of behavioral response characteristic of crawling cells, which detect a signal, extract directional information from a scalar concentration field, and change their motile behavior accordingly. We present several models of increasing complexity for which the derivation of population-level equations is possible, and we show how experimentally measured statistics can be obtained from the transport equation formalism. We also show that amoeboid cells that do not adapt to constant signals can still aggregate in steady gradients, but not in response to periodic waves. This is in contrast to the case of cells that use a "run-and-tumble" strategy, where adaptation is essential.

  1. Correlation between ¹⁹⁵Pt chemical shifts and the electronic transitions among d orbitals in pincer NCN Pt(II) complexes: A theoretical study and application of Ramsey's equation.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Majid

    2015-12-05

    The chemical potentials for two series of [PtCl(NCN-Z-4)] (NCN=2,6-bis[(dimethylamino)methyl]phenyl, Z=H, CHO, COOH, NH2, OH, NO2, SiMe3, I, t-Bu) and [PtCl(NCN-4-CHN-C6H4-Z'-4')] (Z'=NMe2, Me, H, Cl, CN) were calculated. The energies of platinum d orbitals were calculated by NBO analysis. Good correlations were obtained between (195)Pt chemical shifts and the spectral parameters obtained from the energies of electronic transitions between Pt d orbitals in these complexes. The correlations between (195)Pt chemical shifts and the chemical potentials were also good. The correlations were discussed based on Ramsey's equation.

  2. The zero dispersion limits of nonlinear wave equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tso, T.

    1992-01-01

    In chapter 2 the author uses functional analytic methods and conservation laws to solve the initial-value problem for the Korteweg-de Vries equation, the Benjamin-Bona-Mahony equation, and the nonlinear Schroedinger equation for initial data that satisfy some suitable conditions. In chapter 3 the energy estimates are used to show that the strong convergence of the family of the solutions of the KdV equation obtained in chapter 2 in H[sup 3](R) as [epsilon] [yields] 0; also, it is shown that the strong L[sup 2](R)-limit of the solutions of the BBM equation as [epsilon] [yields] 0 before a critical time. In chapter 4 the author uses the Whitham modulation theory and averaging method to find the 2[pi]-periodic solutions and the modulation equations of the KdV equation, the BBM equation, the Klein-Gordon equation, the NLS equation, the mKdV equation, and the P-system. It is shown that the modulation equations of the KdV equation, the K-G equation, the NLS equation, and the mKdV equation are hyperbolic but those of the BBM equation and the P-system are not hyperbolic. Also, the relations are studied of the KdV equation and the mKdV equation. Finally, the author studies the complex mKdV equation to compare with the NLS equation, and then study the complex gKdV equation.

  3. Extended rate equations

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.

    1981-01-30

    The equations of motion are discussed which describe time dependent population flows in an N-level system, reviewing the relationship between incoherent (rate) equations, coherent (Schrodinger) equations, and more general partially coherent (Bloch) equations. Approximations are discussed which replace the elaborate Bloch equations by simpler rate equations whose coefficients incorporate long-time consequences of coherence.

  4. Simple, Flexible, Trigonometric Taper Equations

    Treesearch

    Charles E. Thomas; Bernard R. Parresol

    1991-01-01

    There have been numerous approaches to modeling stem form in recent decades. The majority have concentrated on the simpler coniferous bole form and have become increasingly complex mathematical expressions. Use of trigonometric equations provides a simple expression of taper that is flexible enough to fit both coniferous and hard-wood bole forms. As an illustration, we...

  5. Equating Error in Observed-Score Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, error in equating observed scores on two versions of a test is defined as the difference between the transformations that equate the quantiles of their distributions in the sample and population of test takers. But it is argued that if the goal of equating is to adjust the scores of test takers on one version of the test to make…

  6. Basic lubrication equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Lubricants, usually Newtonian fluids, are assumed to experience laminar flow. The basic equations used to describe the flow are the Navier-Stokes equation of motion. The study of hydrodynamic lubrication is, from a mathematical standpoint, the application of a reduced form of these Navier-Stokes equations in association with the continuity equation. The Reynolds equation can also be derived from first principles, provided of course that the same basic assumptions are adopted in each case. Both methods are used in deriving the Reynolds equation, and the assumptions inherent in reducing the Navier-Stokes equations are specified. Because the Reynolds equation contains viscosity and density terms and these properties depend on temperature and pressure, it is often necessary to couple the Reynolds with energy equation. The lubricant properties and the energy equation are presented. Film thickness, a parameter of the Reynolds equation, is a function of the elastic behavior of the bearing surface. The governing elasticity equation is therefore presented.

  7. Variational Derivation of Dissipative Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogo, Kiyoshi

    2017-03-01

    A new variational principle is formulated to derive various dissipative equations. Model equations considered are the damping equation, Bloch equation, diffusion equation, Fokker-Planck equation, Kramers equation and Smoluchowski equation. Each equation and its time reversal equation are simultaneously obtained in our variational principle.

  8. Simplex and Polygon Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimakis, Aristophanes; Müller-Hoissen, Folkert

    2015-06-01

    It is shown that higher Bruhat orders admit a decomposition into a higher Tamari order, the corresponding dual Tamari order, and a ''mixed order''. We describe simplex equations (including the Yang-Baxter equation) as realizations of higher Bruhat orders. Correspondingly, a family of ''polygon equations'' realizes higher Tamari orders. They generalize the well-known pentagon equation. The structure of simplex and polygon equations is visualized in terms of deformations of maximal chains in posets forming 1-skeletons of polyhedra. The decomposition of higher Bruhat orders induces a reduction of the N-simplex equation to the (N+1)-gon equation, its dual, and a compatibility equation.

  9. Wei-Norman equations for classical groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charzyński, Szymon; Kuś, Marek

    2015-08-01

    We show that the nonlinear autonomous Wei-Norman equations, expressing the solution of a linear system of non-autonomous equations on a Lie algebra, can be reduced to the hierarchy of matrix Riccati equations in the case of all classical simple Lie algebras. The result generalizes our previous one concerning the complex Lie algebra of the special linear group. We show that it cannot be extended to all simple Lie algebras, in particular to the exceptional G2 algebra.

  10. Symbolic Solution of Linear Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, R. B.; Grooms, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations is presented. The computational complexity of the algorithm is discussed and its implementation in the FORMAC system is described. A comparison is made between the algorithm and some classical algorithms for solving differential equations.

  11. Chemical Equation Balancing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakley, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews mathematical techniques for solving systems of homogeneous linear equations and demonstrates that the algebraic method of balancing chemical equations is a matter of solving a system of homogeneous linear equations. FORTRAN programs using this matrix method to chemical equation balancing are available from the author. (JN)

  12. The Arrhenius equation revisited.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Micha; Normand, Mark D; Corradini, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    The Arrhenius equation has been widely used as a model of the temperature effect on the rate of chemical reactions and biological processes in foods. Since the model requires that the rate increase monotonically with temperature, its applicability to enzymatic reactions and microbial growth, which have optimal temperature, is obviously limited. This is also true for microbial inactivation and chemical reactions that only start at an elevated temperature, and for complex processes and reactions that do not follow fixed order kinetics, that is, where the isothermal rate constant, however defined, is a function of both temperature and time. The linearity of the Arrhenius plot, that is, Ln[k(T)] vs. 1/T where T is in °K has been traditionally considered evidence of the model's validity. Consequently, the slope of the plot has been used to calculate the reaction or processes' "energy of activation," usually without independent verification. Many experimental and simulated rate constant vs. temperature relationships that yield linear Arrhenius plots can also be described by the simpler exponential model Ln[k(T)/k(T(reference))] = c(T-T(reference)). The use of the exponential model or similar empirical alternative would eliminate the confusing temperature axis inversion, the unnecessary compression of the temperature scale, and the need for kinetic assumptions that are hard to affirm in food systems. It would also eliminate the reference to the Universal gas constant in systems where a "mole" cannot be clearly identified. Unless proven otherwise by independent experiments, one cannot dismiss the notion that the apparent linearity of the Arrhenius plot in many food systems is due to a mathematical property of the model's equation rather than to the existence of a temperature independent "energy of activation." If T+273.16°C in the Arrhenius model's equation is replaced by T+b, where the numerical value of the arbitrary constant b is substantially larger than T and T

  13. Kinetic energy equations for the average-passage equation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Important kinetic energy equations derived from the average-passage equation sets are documented, with a view to their interrelationships. These kinetic equations may be used for closing the average-passage equations. The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation used is formed by subtracting the mean kinetic energy equation from the averaged total instantaneous kinetic energy equation. The aperiodic kinetic energy equation, averaged steady kinetic energy equation, averaged unsteady kinetic energy equation, and periodic kinetic energy equation, are also treated.

  14. Analysis of nonlocal neural fields for both general and gamma-distributed connectivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutt, Axel; Atay, Fatihcan M.

    2005-04-01

    This work studies the stability of equilibria in spatially extended neuronal ensembles. We first derive the model equation from statistical properties of the neuron population. The obtained integro-differential equation includes synaptic and space-dependent transmission delay for both general and gamma-distributed synaptic connectivities. The latter connectivity type reveals infinite, finite, and vanishing self-connectivities. The work derives conditions for stationary and nonstationary instabilities for both kernel types. In addition, a nonlinear analysis for general kernels yields the order parameter equation of the Turing instability. To compare the results to findings for partial differential equations (PDEs), two typical PDE-types are derived from the examined model equation, namely the general reaction-diffusion equation and the Swift-Hohenberg equation. Hence, the discussed integro-differential equation generalizes these PDEs. In the case of the gamma-distributed kernels, the stability conditions are formulated in terms of the mean excitatory and inhibitory interaction ranges. As a novel finding, we obtain Turing instabilities in fields with local inhibition-lateral excitation, while wave instabilities occur in fields with local excitation and lateral inhibition. Numerical simulations support the analytical results.

  15. Relations between nonlinear Riccati equations and other equations in fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Dieter

    2014-10-01

    Many phenomena in the observable macroscopic world obey nonlinear evolution equations while the microscopic world is governed by quantum mechanics, a fundamental theory that is supposedly linear. In order to combine these two worlds in a common formalism, at least one of them must sacrifice one of its dogmas. Linearizing nonlinear dynamics would destroy the fundamental property of this theory, however, it can be shown that quantum mechanics can be reformulated in terms of nonlinear Riccati equations. In a first step, it will be shown that the information about the dynamics of quantum systems with analytical solutions can not only be obtainable from the time-dependent Schrödinger equation but equally-well from a complex Riccati equation. Comparison with supersymmetric quantum mechanics shows that even additional information can be obtained from the nonlinear formulation. Furthermore, the time-independent Schrödinger equation can also be rewritten as a complex Riccati equation for any potential. Extension of the Riccati formulation to include irreversible dissipative effects is straightforward. Via (real and complex) Riccati equations, other fields of physics can also be treated within the same formalism, e.g., statistical thermodynamics, nonlinear dynamical systems like those obeying a logistic equation as well as wave equations in classical optics, Bose- Einstein condensates and cosmological models. Finally, the link to abstract "quantizations" such as the Pythagorean triples and Riccati equations connected with trigonometric and hyperbolic functions will be shown.

  16. Single wall penetration equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Five single plate penetration equations are compared for accuracy and effectiveness. These five equations are two well-known equations (Fish-Summers and Schmidt-Holsapple), two equations developed by the Apollo project (Rockwell and Johnson Space Center (JSC), and one recently revised from JSC (Cour-Palais). They were derived from test results, with velocities ranging up to 8 km/s. Microsoft Excel software was used to construct a spreadsheet to calculate the diameters and masses of projectiles for various velocities, varying the material properties of both projectile and target for the five single plate penetration equations. The results were plotted on diameter versus velocity graphs for ballistic and spallation limits using Cricket Graph software, for velocities ranging from 2 to 15 km/s defined for the orbital debris. First, these equations were compared to each other, then each equation was compared with various aluminum projectile densities. Finally, these equations were compared with test results performed at JSC for the Marshall Space Flight Center. These equations predict a wide variety of projectile diameters at a given velocity. Thus, it is very difficult to choose the 'right' prediction equation. The thickness of a single plate could have a large variation by choosing a different penetration equation. Even though all five equations are empirically developed with various materials, especially for aluminum alloys, one cannot be confident in the shield design with the predictions obtained by the penetration equations without verifying by tests.

  17. Communication complexity and information complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, Denis

    Information complexity enables the use of information-theoretic tools in communication complexity theory. Prior to the results presented in this thesis, information complexity was mainly used for proving lower bounds and direct-sum theorems in the setting of communication complexity. We present three results that demonstrate new connections between information complexity and communication complexity. In the first contribution we thoroughly study the information complexity of the smallest nontrivial two-party function: the AND function. While computing the communication complexity of AND is trivial, computing its exact information complexity presents a major technical challenge. In overcoming this challenge, we reveal that information complexity gives rise to rich geometrical structures. Our analysis of information complexity relies on new analytic techniques and new characterizations of communication protocols. We also uncover a connection of information complexity to the theory of elliptic partial differential equations. Once we compute the exact information complexity of AND, we can compute exact communication complexity of several related functions on n-bit inputs with some additional technical work. Previous combinatorial and algebraic techniques could only prove bounds of the form theta( n). Interestingly, this level of precision is typical in the area of information theory, so our result demonstrates that this meta-property of precise bounds carries over to information complexity and in certain cases even to communication complexity. Our result does not only strengthen the lower bound on communication complexity of disjointness by making it more exact, but it also shows that information complexity provides the exact upper bound on communication complexity. In fact, this result is more general and applies to a whole class of communication problems. In the second contribution, we use self-reduction methods to prove strong lower bounds on the information

  18. Interpretation of Bernoulli's Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Robert P.; Schwaneberg, Rolf

    1994-01-01

    Discusses Bernoulli's equation with regards to: horizontal flow of incompressible fluids, change of height of incompressible fluids, gases, liquids and gases, and viscous fluids. Provides an interpretation, properties, terminology, and applications of Bernoulli's equation. (MVL)

  19. Reflections on Chemical Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Mel

    1981-01-01

    The issue of how much emphasis balancing chemical equations should have in an introductory chemistry course is discussed. The current heavy emphasis on finishing such equations is viewed as misplaced. (MP)

  20. Random equations in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bharucha-Reid, A. T.

    1984-01-01

    Literature was reviewed to identify aerodynamic models which might be treated by probablistic methods. The numerical solution of some integral equations that arise in aerodynamical problems were investigated. On the basis of the numerical studies a qualitative theory of random integral equations was developed to provide information on the behavior of the solutions of these equations (in particular, boundary and asymptotic behavior, and stability) and their statistical properties without actually obtaining explicit solutions of the equations.

  1. Parametrically defined differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyanin, A. D.; Zhurov, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with nonlinear ordinary differential equations defined parametrically by two relations. It proposes techniques to reduce such equations, of the first or second order, to standard systems of ordinary differential equations. It obtains the general solution to some classes of nonlinear parametrically defined ODEs dependent on arbitrary functions. It outlines procedures for the numerical solution of the Cauchy problem for parametrically defined differential equations.

  2. Integrable nonlinear relativistic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadad, Yaron

    This work focuses on three nonlinear relativistic equations: the symmetric Chiral field equation, Einstein's field equation for metrics with two commuting Killing vectors and Einstein's field equation for diagonal metrics that depend on three variables. The symmetric Chiral field equation is studied using the Zakharov-Mikhailov transform, with which its infinitely many local conservation laws are derived and its solitons on diagonal backgrounds are studied. It is also proven that it is equivalent to a novel equation that poses a fascinating similarity to the Sinh-Gordon equation. For the 1+1 Einstein equation the Belinski-Zakharov transformation is explored. It is used to derive explicit formula for N gravitational solitons on arbitrary diagonal background. In particular, the method is used to derive gravitational solitons on the Einstein-Rosen background. The similarities and differences between the attributes of the solitons of the symmetric Chiral field equation and those of the 1+1 Einstein equation are emphasized, and their origin is pointed out. For the 1+2 Einstein equation, new equations describing diagonal metrics are derived and their compatibility is proven. Different gravitational waves are studied that naturally extend the class of Bondi-Pirani-Robinson waves. It is further shown that the Bondi-Pirani-Robinson waves are stable with respect to perturbations of the spacetime. Their stability is closely related to the stability of the Schwarzschild black hole and the relation between the two allows to conjecture about the stability of a wide range of gravitational phenomena. Lastly, a new set of equations that describe weak gravitational waves is derived. This new system of equations is closely and fundamentally connected with the nonlinear Schrodinger equation and can be properly called the nonlinear Schrodinger-Einstein equations. A few preliminary solutions are constructed.

  3. The Pendulum Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the pendulum equation [theta] + [lambda][squared] sin [theta] = 0 and two approximations for it. On the one hand, we suggest that the third and fifth-order Taylor series approximations for sin [theta] do not yield very good differential equations to approximate the solution of the pendulum equation unless the initial conditions are…

  4. New approach for exact solutions of time fractional Cahn-Allen equation and time fractional Phi-4 equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Hira; Akram, Ghazala

    2017-05-01

    In this article, new exact analytical solutions of some nonlinear evolution equations (NLEEs) arising in science, engineering and mathematical physics, namely time fractional Cahn-Allen equation and time fractional Phi-4 equation are developed using tanh method by means of fractional complex transform. The obtained results are demonstrated by graphs for the new solutions.

  5. The Thin Oil Film Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, James L.; Naughton, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    A thin film of oil on a surface responds primarily to the wall shear stress generated on that surface by a three-dimensional flow. The oil film is also subject to wall pressure gradients, surface tension effects and gravity. The partial differential equation governing the oil film flow is shown to be related to Burgers' equation. Analytical and numerical methods for solving the thin oil film equation are presented. A direct numerical solver is developed where the wall shear stress variation on the surface is known and which solves for the oil film thickness spatial and time variation on the surface. An inverse numerical solver is also developed where the oil film thickness spatial variation over the surface at two discrete times is known and which solves for the wall shear stress variation over the test surface. A One-Time-Level inverse solver is also demonstrated. The inverse numerical solver provides a mathematically rigorous basis for an improved form of a wall shear stress instrument suitable for application to complex three-dimensional flows. To demonstrate the complexity of flows for which these oil film methods are now suitable, extensive examination is accomplished for these analytical and numerical methods as applied to a thin oil film in the vicinity of a three-dimensional saddle of separation.

  6. The SQG Equation as a Geodesic Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washabaugh, Pearce

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that the surface quasi-geostrophic (SQG) equation given by θ_t + < u, nabla θrangle = 0,quad θ = nabla × (-Δ)^{-1/2} u, is the geodesic equation on the group of volume-preserving diffeomorphisms of a Riemannian manifold M in the right-invariant {dot{H}^{-1/2}} metric. We show by example, that the Riemannian exponential map is smooth and non-Fredholm, and that the sectional curvature at the identity is unbounded of both signs.

  7. Fem Formulation of Coupled Partial Differential Equations for Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameer Ahamad, N.; Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Anjum Badruddin, Irfan

    2017-08-01

    Heat Transfer in any field plays an important role for transfer of energy from one region to another region. The heat transfer in porous medium can be simulated with the help of two partial differential equations. These equations need an alternate and relatively easy method due to complexity of the phenomenon involved. This article is dedicated to discuss the finite element formulation of heat transfer in porous medium in Cartesian coordinates. A triangular element is considered to discretize the governing partial differential equations and matrix equations are developed for 3 nodes of element. Iterative approach is used for the two sets of matrix equations involved representing two partial differential equations.

  8. Nonlinear acoustic wave equations with fractional loss operators.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Fabrice; Holm, Sverre

    2011-09-01

    Fractional derivatives are well suited to describe wave propagation in complex media. When introduced in classical wave equations, they allow a modeling of attenuation and dispersion that better describes sound propagation in biological tissues. Traditional constitutive equations from solid mechanics and heat conduction are modified using fractional derivatives. They are used to derive a nonlinear wave equation which describes attenuation and dispersion laws that match observations. This wave equation is a generalization of the Westervelt equation, and also leads to a fractional version of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov and Burgers' equations.

  9. Implementing Parquet equations using HPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellar, Samuel; Wagle, Bibek; Yang, Shuxiang; Tam, Ka-Ming; Kaiser, Hartmut; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    A new C++ runtime system (HPX) enables simulations of complex systems to run more efficiently on parallel and heterogeneous systems. This increased efficiency allows for solutions to larger simulations of the parquet approximation for a system with impurities. The relevancy of the parquet equations depends upon the ability to solve systems which require long runs and large amounts of memory. These limitations, in addition to numerical complications arising from stability of the solutions, necessitate running on large distributed systems. As the computational resources trend towards the exascale and the limitations arising from computational resources vanish efficiency of large scale simulations becomes a focus. HPX facilitates efficient simulations through intelligent overlapping of computation and communication. Simulations such as the parquet equations which require the transfer of large amounts of data should benefit from HPX implementations. Supported by the the NSF EPSCoR Cooperative Agreement No. EPS-1003897 with additional support from the Louisiana Board of Regents.

  10. Exact solutions to nonlinear delay differential equations of hyperbolic type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyazmin, Andrei V.; Sorokin, Vsevolod G.

    2017-01-01

    We consider nonlinear delay differential equations of hyperbolic type, including equations with varying transfer coefficients and varying delays. The equations contain one or two arbitrary functions of a single argument. We present new classes of exact generalized and functional separable solutions. All the solutions involve free parameters and can be suitable for solving certain model problems as well as testing numerical and approximate analytical methods for similar and more complex nonlinear differential-difference equations.

  11. Fractional chemotaxis diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Langlands, T A M; Henry, B I

    2010-05-01

    We introduce mesoscopic and macroscopic model equations of chemotaxis with anomalous subdiffusion for modeling chemically directed transport of biological organisms in changing chemical environments with diffusion hindered by traps or macromolecular crowding. The mesoscopic models are formulated using continuous time random walk equations and the macroscopic models are formulated with fractional order differential equations. Different models are proposed depending on the timing of the chemotactic forcing. Generalizations of the models to include linear reaction dynamics are also derived. Finally a Monte Carlo method for simulating anomalous subdiffusion with chemotaxis is introduced and simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the model equations. The model equations developed here could be used to replace Keller-Segel type equations in biological systems with transport hindered by traps, macromolecular crowding or other obstacles.

  12. Functional BES equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Ivan; Serban, Didina; Volin, Dmytro

    2008-08-01

    We give a realization of the Beisert, Eden and Staudacher equation for the planar Script N = 4 supersymetric gauge theory which seems to be particularly useful to study the strong coupling limit. We are using a linearized version of the BES equation as two coupled equations involving an auxiliary density function. We write these equations in terms of the resolvents and we transform them into a system of functional, instead of integral, equations. We solve the functional equations perturbatively in the strong coupling limit and reproduce the recursive solution obtained by Basso, Korchemsky and Kotański. The coefficients of the strong coupling expansion are fixed by the analyticity properties obeyed by the resolvents.

  13. Solving Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Initial-value ordinary differential equation solution via variable order Adams method (SIVA/DIVA) package is collection of subroutines for solution of nonstiff ordinary differential equations. There are versions for single-precision and double-precision arithmetic. Requires fewer evaluations of derivatives than other variable-order Adams predictor/ corrector methods. Option for direct integration of second-order equations makes integration of trajectory problems significantly more efficient. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  14. Television Tracker Range Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan-Wen, Zhu

    1987-05-01

    The paper gives an approximate television tracker range equation based on the concept of the radiology and signal-to-noise of television system, and describes the physical process and mathematical method of reckoning range equation. The range equation is useful to the desing and development of a system. This paper also discusses the demand and selection standard of the television tracker system to the imaging device and gives some possible approaches to increase the range.

  15. Rubel's universal differential equation

    PubMed Central

    Duffin, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Fourth-order differential equations such as 16y′my′2 - 32ymyny′ + 17y03 = 0 are developed. It is shown that the equation is “universal” in the sense that any continuous function can be approximated with arbitrary accuracy over the whole x axis by a solution y(x) of the equation. This solution is a piecewise polynomial of degree 9 and of class C4. PMID:16593068

  16. Hyperbolic type transport equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Colín, L. S.; Olivares-Robles, M. A.

    1995-02-01

    In recent years hyperbolic type transport equations have acquired a great deal of importance in problems ranging from theoretical physics to biology. In spite of their greater mathematical difficulty as compared with their parabolic type analogs arising from the framework of Linear Irreversible Thermodynamics, they have, in many ways, superseded the latter ones. Although the use of this type of equations is well known since the last century through the telegraphist equation of electromagnetic theory, their use in studying several problems in transport theory is hardly fifty years old. In fact the first appearance of a hyperbolic type transport equation for the problem of heat conduction dates back to Cattaneos' work in 1948. Three years later, in 1951 S. Goldstein showed how in the theory of stochastic processes this type of an equation is obtained in the continuous limit of a one-dimensional persistent random walk problem. After that, other phenomenological derivations have been offered for such equations. The main purpose of this paper is to critically discuss a derivation of a hyperbolic type Fokker-Planck equation recently presented using the same ideas as M.S. Green did in 1952 to provide the stochastic foundations of irreversible statistical mechanics. Arguments are given to show that such an equation as well as transport equations derived from it by taking appropriate averages are at most approximate and that a much more detailed analysis is required before asserting their validity.

  17. Solutions of the coupled Higgs field equations.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Benoy; Ghosh, Swapan K; Saha, Aparna; Pal, Debabrata

    2013-07-01

    By an appropriate choice for the phase of the complex nucleonic field and going over to the traveling coordinate, we reduce the coupled Higgs equations to the Hamiltonian form and treat the resulting equation using the dynamical system theory. We present a phase-space analysis of its stable points. The results of our study demonstrate that the equation can support both traveling- and standing-wave solutions. The traveling-wave solution appears in the form of a soliton and resides in the midst of doubly periodic standing-wave solutions.

  18. Stability on time-dependent domains: convective and dilution effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechetnikov, R.; Knobloch, E.

    2017-03-01

    We explore near-critical behavior of spatially extended systems on time-dependent spatial domains with convective and dilution effects due to domain flow. As a paradigm, we use the Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is the simplest nonlinear model with a non-zero critical wavenumber, to study dynamic pattern formation on time-dependent domains. A universal amplitude equation governing weakly nonlinear evolution of patterns on time-dependent domains is derived and proves to be a generalization of the standard Ginzburg-Landau equation. Its key solutions identified here demonstrate a substantial variety-spatially periodic states with a time-dependent wavenumber, steady spatially non-periodic states, and pulse-train solutions-in contrast to extended systems on time-fixed domains. The effects of domain flow, such as bifurcation delay due to domain growth and destabilization due to oscillatory domain flow, on the Eckhaus instability responsible for phase slips in spatially periodic states are analyzed with the help of both local and global stability analyses. A nonlinear phase equation describing the approach to a phase-slip event is derived. Detailed analysis of a phase slip using multiple time scale methods demonstrates different mechanisms governing the wavelength changing process at different stages.

  19. ADVANCED WAVE-EQUATION MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    L. HUANG; M. C. FEHLER

    2000-12-01

    Wave-equation migration methods can more accurately account for complex wave phenomena than ray-tracing-based Kirchhoff methods that are based on the high-frequency asymptotic approximation of waves. With steadily increasing speed of massively parallel computers, wave-equation migration methods are becoming more and more feasible and attractive for imaging complex 3D structures. We present an overview of several efficient and accurate wave-equation-based migration methods that we have recently developed. The methods are implemented in the frequency-space and frequency-wavenumber domains and hence they are called dual-domain methods. In the methods, we make use of different approximate solutions of the scalar-wave equation in heterogeneous media to recursively downward continue wavefields. The approximations used within each extrapolation interval include the Born, quasi-Born, and Rytov approximations. In one of our dual-domain methods, we use an optimized expansion of the square-root operator in the one-way wave equation to minimize the phase error for a given model. This leads to a globally optimized Fourier finite-difference method that is a hybrid split-step Fourier and finite-difference scheme. Migration examples demonstrate that our dual-domain migration methods provide more accurate images than those obtained using the split-step Fourier scheme. The Born-based, quasi-Born-based, and Rytov-based methods are suitable for imaging complex structures whose lateral variations are moderate, such as the Marmousi model. For this model, the computational cost of the Born-based method is almost the same as the split-step Fourier scheme, while other methods takes approximately 15-50% more computational time. The globally optimized Fourier finite-difference method significantly improves the accuracy of the split-step Fourier method for imaging structures having strong lateral velocity variations, such as the SEG/EAGE salt model, at an approximately 30% greater

  20. Advanced lab on Fresnel equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova-Mayor, Anna; Gimbal, Scott

    2015-11-01

    This experimental and theoretical exercise is designed to promote students' understanding of polarization and thin-film coatings for the practical case of a scanning protected-metal coated mirror. We present results obtained with a laboratory scanner and a polarimeter and propose an affordable and student-friendly experimental arrangement for the undergraduate laboratory. This experiment will allow students to apply basic knowledge of the polarization of light and thin-film coatings, develop hands-on skills with the use of phase retarders, apply the Fresnel equations for metallic coating with complex index of refraction, and compute the polarization state of the reflected light.

  1. Higher Order Equations and Constituent Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barci, D. G.; Bollini, C. G.; Oxman, L. E.; Rocca, M.

    We consider a simple wave equation of fourth degree in the D'Alembertian operator. It contains the main ingredients of a general Lorentz-invariant higher order equation, namely, a normal bradyonic sector, a tachyonic state and a pair of complex conjugate modes. The propagators are respectively the Feynman causal function and three Wheeler-Green functions (half-advanced and half-retarded). The latter are Lorentz-invariant and consistent with the elimination of tachyons and complex modes from free asymptotic states. We also verify the absence of absorptive parts from convolutions involving Wheeler propagators.

  2. Linear Equations: Equivalence = Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    The ability to solve linear equations sets students up for success in many areas of mathematics and other disciplines requiring formula manipulations. There are many reasons why solving linear equations is a challenging skill for students to master. One major barrier for students is the inability to interpret the equals sign as anything other than…

  3. Reduced Braginskii equations

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, M.; Horton, W. )

    1994-07-01

    A set of reduced Braginskii equations is derived without assuming flute ordering and the Boussinesq approximation. These model equations conserve the physical energy. It is crucial at finite [beta] that the perpendicular component of Ohm's law be solved to ensure [del][center dot][bold j]=0 for energy conservation.

  4. Uniqueness of Maxwell's Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Jack

    1978-01-01

    Shows that, as a consequence of two feasible assumptions and when due attention is given to the definition of charge and the fields E and B, the lowest-order equations that these two fields must satisfy are Maxwell's equations. (Author/GA)

  5. Reduced Braginskii equations

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, M.; Horton, W.

    1993-11-01

    A set of reduced Braginskii equations is derived without assuming flute ordering and the Boussinesq approximation. These model equations conserve the physical energy. It is crucial at finite {beta} that we solve the perpendicular component of Ohm`s law to conserve the physical energy while ensuring the relation {del} {center_dot} j = 0.

  6. Functional Cantor equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabat, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the class of entire functions of exponential type in relation to the scattering theory for the Schrödinger equation with a finite potential that is a finite Borel measure. These functions have a special self-similarity and satisfy q-difference functional equations. We study their asymptotic behavior and the distribution of zeros.

  7. Uniqueness of Maxwell's Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Jack

    1978-01-01

    Shows that, as a consequence of two feasible assumptions and when due attention is given to the definition of charge and the fields E and B, the lowest-order equations that these two fields must satisfy are Maxwell's equations. (Author/GA)

  8. Global feedback control for pattern-forming systems.

    PubMed

    Stanton, L G; Golovin, A A

    2007-09-01

    Global feedback control of pattern formation in a wide class of systems described by the Swift-Hohenberg (SH) equation is investigated theoretically, by means of stability analysis and numerical simulations. Two cases are considered: (i) feedback control of the competition between hexagon and roll patterns described by a supercritical SH equation, and (ii) the use of feedback control to suppress the blowup in a system described by a subcritical SH equation. In case (i), it is shown that feedback control can change the hexagon and roll stability regions in the parameter space as well as cause a transition from up to down hexagons and stabilize a skewed (mixed-mode) hexagonal pattern. In case (ii), it is demonstrated that feedback control can suppress blowup and lead to the formation of spatially localized patterns in the weakly nonlinear regime. The effects of a delayed feedback are also investigated for both cases, and it is shown that delay can induce temporal oscillations as well as blowup.

  9. The Effective Equation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksin, Sergei; Maiocchi, Alberto

    In this chapter we present a general method of constructing the effective equation which describes the behavior of small-amplitude solutions for a nonlinear PDE in finite volume, provided that the linear part of the equation is a hamiltonian system with a pure imaginary discrete spectrum. The effective equation is obtained by retaining only the resonant terms of the nonlinearity (which may be hamiltonian, or may be not); the assertion that it describes the limiting behavior of small-amplitude solutions is a rigorous mathematical theorem. In particular, the method applies to the three- and four-wave systems. We demonstrate that different possible types of energy transport are covered by this method, depending on whether the set of resonances splits into finite clusters (this happens, e.g. in case of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation), or is connected (this happens, e.g. in the case of the NLS equation if the space-dimension is at least two). For equations of the first type the energy transition to high frequencies does not hold, while for equations of the second type it may take place. Our method applies to various weakly nonlinear wave systems, appearing in plasma, meteorology and oceanography.

  10. Nonlinear gyrokinetic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, D.H.E.; Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.; Lee, W.W.

    1983-03-01

    Nonlinear gyrokinetic equations are derived from a systematic Hamiltonian theory. The derivation employs Lie transforms and a noncanonical perturbation theory first used by Littlejohn for the simpler problem of asymptotically small gyroradius. For definiteness, we emphasize the limit of electrostatic fluctuations in slab geometry; however, there is a straight-forward generalization to arbitrary field geometry and electromagnetic perturbations. An energy invariant for the nonlinear system is derived, and various of its limits are considered. The weak turbulence theory of the equations is examined. In particular, the wave kinetic equation of Galeev and Sagdeev is derived from an asystematic truncation of the equations, implying that this equation fails to consider all gyrokinetic effects. The equations are simplified for the case of small but finite gyroradius and put in a form suitable for efficient computer simulation. Although it is possible to derive the Terry-Horton and Hasegawa-Mima equations as limiting cases of our theory, several new nonlinear terms absent from conventional theories appear and are discussed.

  11. The Quadrature Master Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, N. J.; Pourdarvish, A.; Sadeghi, J.; Olaomi, J. O.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we derive the non-Markovian stochastic equation of motion (SEM) and master equations (MEs) for the open quantum system by using the non-Markovian stochastic Schrödinger equations (SSEs) for the quadrature unraveling in linear and nonlinear cases. The SSEs for quadrature unraveling arise as a special case of a quantum system. Also we derive the Markovian SEM and ME by using linear and nonlinear Itô SSEs for the measurement probabilities. In linear non-Markovian case, we calculate the convolutionless linear quadrature non-Markovian SEM and ME. We take advantage from example and show that corresponding theory.

  12. A Comparison of IRT Equating and Beta 4 Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Dong-In; Brennan, Robert; Kolen, Michael

    Four equating methods were compared using four equating criteria: first-order equity (FOE), second-order equity (SOE), conditional mean squared error (CMSE) difference, and the equipercentile equating property. The four methods were: (1) three parameter logistic (3PL) model true score equating; (2) 3PL observed score equating; (3) beta 4 true…

  13. Nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1988-01-01

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics.

  14. Equations For Rotary Transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, Phil M.; Wiktor, Peter J.; Marchetto, Carl A.

    1988-01-01

    Equations derived for input impedance, input power, and ratio of secondary current to primary current of rotary transformer. Used for quick analysis of transformer designs. Circuit model commonly used in textbooks on theory of ac circuits.

  15. Solving Equations Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumway, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrated is the problem of solving equations and some different strategies students might employ when using available technology. Gives illustrations for: exact solutions, approximate solutions, and approximate solutions which are graphically generated. (RT)

  16. Discrete wave equation upscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Hanasoge, Shravan M.

    2017-01-01

    We present homogenisation technique for the uniformly discretised wave equation, based on the derivation of an effective equation for the low-wavenumber component of the solution. The method produces a down-sampled, effective medium, thus making the solution of the effective equation less computationally expensive. Advantages of the method include its conceptual simplicity and ease of implementation, the applicability to any uniformly discretised wave equation in one, two or three dimensions, and the absence of any constraints on the medium properties. We illustrate our method with a numerical example of wave propagation through a one-dimensional multiscale medium, and demonstrate the accurate reproduction of the original wavefield for sufficiently low frequencies.

  17. An integrable coupled short pulse equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bao-Feng

    2012-03-01

    An integrable coupled short pulse (CSP) equation is proposed for the propagation of ultra-short pulses in optical fibers. Based on two sets of bilinear equations to a two-dimensional Toda lattice linked by a Bäcklund transformation, and an appropriate hodograph transformation, the proposed CSP equation is derived. Meanwhile, its N-soliton solutions are given by the Casorati determinant in a parametric form. The properties of one- and two-soliton solutions are investigated in detail. Same as the short pulse equation, the two-soliton solution turns out to be a breather type if the wave numbers are complex conjugate. We also illustrate an example of soliton-breather interaction.

  18. SIMULTANEOUS DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION COMPUTER

    DOEpatents

    Collier, D.M.; Meeks, L.A.; Palmer, J.P.

    1960-05-10

    A description is given for an electronic simulator for a system of simultaneous differential equations, including nonlinear equations. As a specific example, a homogeneous nuclear reactor system including a reactor fluid, heat exchanger, and a steam boiler may be simulated, with the nonlinearity resulting from a consideration of temperature effects taken into account. The simulator includes three operational amplifiers, a multiplier, appropriate potential sources, and interconnecting R-C networks.

  19. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  20. Solving the Noncommutative Batalin-Vilkovisky Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barannikov, Serguei

    2013-06-01

    Given an odd symmetry acting on an associative algebra, I show that the summation over arbitrary ribbon graphs gives the construction of the solutions to the noncommutative Batalin-Vilkovisky equation, introduced in (Barannikov in IMRN, rnm075, 2007), and to the equivariant version of this equation. This generalizes the known construction of A ∞-algebra via summation over ribbon trees. I give also the generalizations to other types of algebras and graph complexes, including the stable ribbon graph complex. These solutions to the noncommutative Batalin-Vilkovisky equation and to its equivariant counterpart, provide naturally the supersymmetric matrix action functionals, which are the gl( N)-equivariantly closed differential forms on the matrix spaces, as in (Barannikov in Comptes Rendus Mathematique vol 348, pp. 359-362.

  1. Exact solution of some linear matrix equations using algebraic methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djaferis, T. E.; Mitter, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    A study is done of solution methods for Linear Matrix Equations including Lyapunov's equation, using methods of modern algebra. The emphasis is on the use of finite algebraic procedures which are easily implemented on a digital computer and which lead to an explicit solution to the problem. The action f sub BA is introduced a Basic Lemma is proven. The equation PA + BP = -C as well as the Lyapunov equation are analyzed. Algorithms are given for the solution of the Lyapunov and comment is given on its arithmetic complexity. The equation P - A'PA = Q is studied and numerical examples are given.

  2. Photonic Equations of Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, A B; Crenshaw, M E

    2004-09-17

    Although the concept of the photon as a quantum particle is sharpened by the quantization of the energy of the classical radiation field in a cavity, the photon's spin has remained a classical degree of freedom. The photon is considered a spin-1 particle, although only two classical polarization states transverse to its direction of propagation are allowed. Effectively therefore the photon is a spin-1/2 particle, although it still obeys Bose-Einstein statistics because the photon-photon interaction is zero. Here they show that the two polarization states of the photon can be quantized using Pauli's spin vector, such that a suitable equation of motion for the photon is Dirac's relativistic wave equation for zero mass and zero charge. Maxwell's equations for a free photon are inferred from the Dirac-field formalism and thus provide proof of this claim. For photons in the presence of electronic sources for electromagnetic fields we posit Lorentz-invariant inhomogeneous photonic equations of motion. Electro-dynamic operator equations are inferred from this modified Dirac-field formalism which reduce to Maxwell's equations if spin-dependent terms in the radiation-matter interaction are dropped.

  3. Equations with Technology: Different Tools, Different Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drijvers, Paul; Barzel, Barbel

    2012-01-01

    Has technology revolutionised the mathematics classroom, or is it still a device waiting to be exploited for the benefit of the learner? There are applets that will enable the user to solve complex equations at the push of a button. So, does this jeopardise other methods, make other methods redundant, or even diminish other methods in the mind of…

  4. Equations with Technology: Different Tools, Different Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drijvers, Paul; Barzel, Barbel

    2012-01-01

    Has technology revolutionised the mathematics classroom, or is it still a device waiting to be exploited for the benefit of the learner? There are applets that will enable the user to solve complex equations at the push of a button. So, does this jeopardise other methods, make other methods redundant, or even diminish other methods in the mind of…

  5. Damping filter method for obtaining spatially localized solutions.

    PubMed

    Teramura, Toshiki; Toh, Sadayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Spatially localized structures are key components of turbulence and other spatiotemporally chaotic systems. From a dynamical systems viewpoint, it is desirable to obtain corresponding exact solutions, though their existence is not guaranteed. A damping filter method is introduced to obtain variously localized solutions and adapted in two typical cases. This method introduces a spatially selective damping effect to make a good guess at the exact solution, and we can obtain an exact solution through a continuation with the damping amplitude. The first target is a steady solution to the Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is a representative of bistable systems in which localized solutions coexist and a model for spanwise-localized cases. Not only solutions belonging to the well-known snaking branches but also those belonging to isolated branches known as "isolas" are found with continuation paths between them in phase space extended with the damping amplitude. This indicates that this spatially selective excitation mechanism has an advantage in searching spatially localized solutions. The second target is a spatially localized traveling-wave solution to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, which is a model for streamwise-localized cases. Since the spatially selective damping effect breaks Galilean and translational invariances, the propagation velocity cannot be determined uniquely while the damping is active, and a singularity arises when these invariances are recovered. We demonstrate that this singularity can be avoided by imposing a simple condition, and a localized traveling-wave solution is obtained with a specific propagation speed.

  6. Noise strength in shaken granular media near onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreft, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    The effects of fluctuations in Rayleigh-Benard (RB) convection near the onset of long range order have been found to be described well by the stochastic Swift-Hohenberg (SH) equation with a noise strength proportional to kT [J. Oh and G. Ahlers, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 094501, (2003)]. Similar behavior has been found in vertically oscillated granular material where the thermal fluctuations are negligible [D. I. Goldman, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.92, 174302, (2004)]. We conjecture that fluctuations in the granular system arise from the small number of particles per wavelength, typically of order 10, in contrast to the 10^6 particles per wavelength in RB convection. Here, we investigate the onset of patterns in an event-driven molecular dynamics simulation of vertically oscillated frictional hard spheres, and we use the SH equation to quantify the strength of the noise for different wavelengths. We show that the noise decreases as the wavelength increases, but is independent of layer depth, suggesting that only the fluidized grains on the surface of the bulk contribute.

  7. Damping filter method for obtaining spatially localized solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramura, Toshiki; Toh, Sadayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Spatially localized structures are key components of turbulence and other spatiotemporally chaotic systems. From a dynamical systems viewpoint, it is desirable to obtain corresponding exact solutions, though their existence is not guaranteed. A damping filter method is introduced to obtain variously localized solutions and adapted in two typical cases. This method introduces a spatially selective damping effect to make a good guess at the exact solution, and we can obtain an exact solution through a continuation with the damping amplitude. The first target is a steady solution to the Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is a representative of bistable systems in which localized solutions coexist and a model for spanwise-localized cases. Not only solutions belonging to the well-known snaking branches but also those belonging to isolated branches known as "isolas" are found with continuation paths between them in phase space extended with the damping amplitude. This indicates that this spatially selective excitation mechanism has an advantage in searching spatially localized solutions. The second target is a spatially localized traveling-wave solution to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, which is a model for streamwise-localized cases. Since the spatially selective damping effect breaks Galilean and translational invariances, the propagation velocity cannot be determined uniquely while the damping is active, and a singularity arises when these invariances are recovered. We demonstrate that this singularity can be avoided by imposing a simple condition, and a localized traveling-wave solution is obtained with a specific propagation speed.

  8. Singularities of the Euler equation and hydrodynamic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanveer, S.; Speziale, Charles G.

    1993-01-01

    Equations governing the motion of a specific class of singularities of the Euler equation in the extended complex spatial domain are derived. Under some assumptions, it is shown how this motion is dictated by the smooth part of the complex velocity at a singular point in the unphysical domain. These results are used to relate the motion of complex singularities to the stability of steady solutions of the Euler equation. A sufficient condition for instability is conjectured. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of this sufficient condition which include the class of elliptical flows and the Kelvin-Stuart Cat's Eye.

  9. Singularities of the Euler equation and hydrodynamic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanveer, S.; Speziale, Charles G.

    1992-01-01

    Equations governing the motion of a specific class of singularities of the Euler equation in the extended complex spatial domain are derived. Under some assumptions, it is shown how this motion is dictated by the smooth part of the complex velocity at a singular point in the unphysical domain. These results are used to relate the motion of complex singularities to the stability of steady solutions of the Euler equation. A sufficient condition for instability is conjectured. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of this sufficient condition which include the class of elliptical flows and the Kelvin-Stuart Cat's Eye.

  10. The Bernoulli-Poiseuille Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badeer, Henry S.; Synolakis, Costas E.

    1989-01-01

    Describes Bernoulli's equation and Poiseuille's equation for fluid dynamics. Discusses the application of the combined Bernoulli-Poiseuille equation in real flows, such as viscous flows under gravity and acceleration. (YP)

  11. The Bernoulli-Poiseuille Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badeer, Henry S.; Synolakis, Costas E.

    1989-01-01

    Describes Bernoulli's equation and Poiseuille's equation for fluid dynamics. Discusses the application of the combined Bernoulli-Poiseuille equation in real flows, such as viscous flows under gravity and acceleration. (YP)

  12. Spatial equation for water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, A. I.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2016-02-01

    A compact spatial Hamiltonian equation for gravity waves on deep water has been derived. The equation is dynamical and can describe extreme waves. The equation for the envelope of a wave train has also been obtained.

  13. Introducing Chemical Formulae and Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Chris; Rowell, Jack

    1979-01-01

    Discusses when the writing of chemical formula and equations can be introduced in the school science curriculum. Also presents ways in which formulae and equations learning can be aided and some examples for balancing and interpreting equations. (HM)

  14. Self-organization of network dynamics into local quantized states.

    PubMed

    Nicolaides, Christos; Juanes, Ruben; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis

    2016-02-17

    Self-organization and pattern formation in network-organized systems emerges from the collective activation and interaction of many interconnected units. A striking feature of these non-equilibrium structures is that they are often localized and robust: only a small subset of the nodes, or cell assembly, is activated. Understanding the role of cell assemblies as basic functional units in neural networks and socio-technical systems emerges as a fundamental challenge in network theory. A key open question is how these elementary building blocks emerge, and how they operate, linking structure and function in complex networks. Here we show that a network analogue of the Swift-Hohenberg continuum model-a minimal-ingredients model of nodal activation and interaction within a complex network-is able to produce a complex suite of localized patterns. Hence, the spontaneous formation of robust operational cell assemblies in complex networks can be explained as the result of self-organization, even in the absence of synaptic reinforcements.

  15. Self-organization of network dynamics into local quantized states

    DOE PAGES

    Nicolaides, Christos; Juanes, Ruben; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis

    2016-02-17

    Self-organization and pattern formation in network-organized systems emerges from the collective activation and interaction of many interconnected units. A striking feature of these non-equilibrium structures is that they are often localized and robust: only a small subset of the nodes, or cell assembly, is activated. Understanding the role of cell assemblies as basic functional units in neural networks and socio-technical systems emerges as a fundamental challenge in network theory. A key open question is how these elementary building blocks emerge, and how they operate, linking structure and function in complex networks. Here we show that a network analogue of themore » Swift-Hohenberg continuum model—a minimal-ingredients model of nodal activation and interaction within a complex network—is able to produce a complex suite of localized patterns. Thus, the spontaneous formation of robust operational cell assemblies in complex networks can be explained as the result of self-organization, even in the absence of synaptic reinforcements.« less

  16. Self-organization of network dynamics into local quantized states

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolaides, Christos; Juanes, Ruben; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis

    2016-02-17

    Self-organization and pattern formation in network-organized systems emerges from the collective activation and interaction of many interconnected units. A striking feature of these non-equilibrium structures is that they are often localized and robust: only a small subset of the nodes, or cell assembly, is activated. Understanding the role of cell assemblies as basic functional units in neural networks and socio-technical systems emerges as a fundamental challenge in network theory. A key open question is how these elementary building blocks emerge, and how they operate, linking structure and function in complex networks. Here we show that a network analogue of the Swift-Hohenberg continuum model—a minimal-ingredients model of nodal activation and interaction within a complex network—is able to produce a complex suite of localized patterns. Thus, the spontaneous formation of robust operational cell assemblies in complex networks can be explained as the result of self-organization, even in the absence of synaptic reinforcements.

  17. Complex spatiotemporal convection patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesch, W.

    1996-09-01

    This paper reviews recent efforts to describe complex patterns in isotropic fluids (Rayleigh-Bénard convection) as well as in anisotropic liquid crystals (electro-hydrodynamic convection) when driven away from equilibrium. A numerical scheme for solving the full hydrodynamic equations is presented that allows surprisingly well for a detailed comparison with experiments. The approach can also be useful for a systematic construction of models (order parameter equations).

  18. Parallel tridiagonal equation solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Three parallel algorithms were compared for the direct solution of tridiagonal linear systems of equations. The algorithms are suitable for computers such as ILLIAC 4 and CDC STAR. For array computers similar to ILLIAC 4, cyclic odd-even reduction has the least operation count for highly structured sets of equations, and recursive doubling has the least count for relatively unstructured sets of equations. Since the difference in operation counts for these two algorithms is not substantial, their relative running times may be more related to overhead operations, which are not measured in this paper. The third algorithm, based on Buneman's Poisson solver, has more arithmetic operations than the others, and appears to be the least favorable. For pipeline computers similar to CDC STAR, cyclic odd-even reduction appears to be the most preferable algorithm for all cases.

  19. LINPACK. Simultaneous Linear Algebraic Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.A.

    1990-05-01

    LINPACK is a collection of FORTRAN subroutines which analyze and solve various classes of systems of simultaneous linear algebraic equations. The collection deals with general, banded, symmetric indefinite, symmetric positive definite, triangular, and tridiagonal square matrices, as well as with least squares problems and the QR and singular value decompositions of rectangular matrices. A subroutine-naming convention is employed in which each subroutine name consists of five letters which represent a coded specification (TXXYY) of the computation done by that subroutine. The first letter, T, indicates the matrix data type. Standard FORTRAN allows the use of three such types: S REAL, D DOUBLE PRECISION, and C COMPLEX. In addition, some FORTRAN systems allow a double-precision complex type: Z COMPLEX*16. The second and third letters of the subroutine name, XX, indicate the form of the matrix or its decomposition: GE General, GB General band, PO Positive definite, PP Positive definite packed, PB Positive definite band, SI Symmetric indefinite, SP Symmetric indefinite packed, HI Hermitian indefinite, HP Hermitian indefinite packed, TR Triangular, GT General tridiagonal, PT Positive definite tridiagonal, CH Cholesky decomposition, QR Orthogonal-triangular decomposition, SV Singular value decomposition. The final two letters, YY, indicate the computation done by the particular subroutine: FA Factor, CO Factor and estimate condition, SL Solve, DI Determinant and/or inverse and/or inertia, DC Decompose, UD Update, DD Downdate, EX Exchange. The LINPACK package also includes a set of routines to perform basic vector operations called the Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS).

  20. LINPACK. Simultaneous Linear Algebraic Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, J.J.

    1982-05-02

    LINPACK is a collection of FORTRAN subroutines which analyze and solve various classes of systems of simultaneous linear algebraic equations. The collection deals with general, banded, symmetric indefinite, symmetric positive definite, triangular, and tridiagonal square matrices, as well as with least squares problems and the QR and singular value decompositions of rectangular matrices. A subroutine-naming convention is employed in which each subroutine name consists of five letters which represent a coded specification (TXXYY) of the computation done by that subroutine. The first letter, T, indicates the matrix data type. Standard FORTRAN allows the use of three such types: S REAL, D DOUBLE PRECISION, and C COMPLEX. In addition, some FORTRAN systems allow a double-precision complex type: Z COMPLEX*16. The second and third letters of the subroutine name, XX, indicate the form of the matrix or its decomposition: GE General, GB General band, PO Positive definite, PP Positive definite packed, PB Positive definite band, SI Symmetric indefinite, SP Symmetric indefinite packed, HI Hermitian indefinite, HP Hermitian indefinite packed, TR Triangular, GT General tridiagonal, PT Positive definite tridiagonal, CH Cholesky decomposition, QR Orthogonal-triangular decomposition, SV Singular value decomposition. The final two letters, YY, indicate the computation done by the particular subroutine: FA Factor, CO Factor and estimate condition, SL Solve, DI Determinant and/or inverse and/or inertia, DC Decompose, UD Update, DD Downdate, EX Exchange. The LINPACK package also includes a set of routines to perform basic vector operations called the Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS).

  1. Neutron-transport equation in a general curvelinear coordinate system

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H

    1981-01-01

    Different from a fission reactor, a fusion reactor has complex geometry, such as toroidal geometry. Neutron transport equation for the toroidal coordinate system has been derived by using coordinate transformation from the cartesian coordinate. These methods require rather tedious calculations. Presented here is a simple method to formulate the neutron transport equation in the general curvelinear coordinate system. The equations for parabolic cylinder and toroidal coordinate systems are derived as an example.

  2. Exp-function method for solving fractional partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bin

    2013-01-01

    We extend the Exp-function method to fractional partial differential equations in the sense of modified Riemann-Liouville derivative based on nonlinear fractional complex transformation. For illustrating the validity of this method, we apply it to the space-time fractional Fokas equation and the nonlinear fractional Sharma-Tasso-Olver (STO) equation. As a result, some new exact solutions for them are successfully established.

  3. Exp-Function Method for Solving Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We extend the Exp-function method to fractional partial differential equations in the sense of modified Riemann-Liouville derivative based on nonlinear fractional complex transformation. For illustrating the validity of this method, we apply it to the space-time fractional Fokas equation and the nonlinear fractional Sharma-Tasso-Olver (STO) equation. As a result, some new exact solutions for them are successfully established. PMID:23818823

  4. Obtaining Maxwell's equations heuristically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Gerhard; Weissbarth, Jürgen; Grossmann, Frank; Schmidt, Rüdiger

    2013-02-01

    Starting from the experimental fact that a moving charge experiences the Lorentz force and applying the fundamental principles of simplicity (first order derivatives only) and linearity (superposition principle), we show that the structure of the microscopic Maxwell equations for the electromagnetic fields can be deduced heuristically by using the transformation properties of the fields under space inversion and time reversal. Using the experimental facts of charge conservation and that electromagnetic waves propagate with the speed of light, together with Galilean invariance of the Lorentz force, allows us to finalize Maxwell's equations and to introduce arbitrary electrodynamics units naturally.

  5. Kepler Equation solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    1995-01-01

    Kepler's Equation is solved over the entire range of elliptic motion by a fifth-order refinement of the solution of a cubic equation. This method is not iterative, and requires only four transcendental function evaluations: a square root, a cube root, and two trigonometric functions. The maximum relative error of the algorithm is less than one part in 10(exp 18), exceeding the capability of double-precision computer arithmetic. Roundoff errors in double-precision implementation of the algorithm are addressed, and procedures to avoid them are developed.

  6. Stochastic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczyk, K. )

    1990-01-01

    This book provides a unified treatment of both regular (or random) and Ito stochastic differential equations. It focuses on solution methods, including some developed only recently. Applications are discussed, in particular an insight is given into both the mathematical structure, and the most efficient solution methods (analytical as well as numerical). Starting from basic notions and results of the theory of stochastic processes and stochastic calculus (including Ito's stochastic integral), many principal mathematical problems and results related to stochastic differential equations are expounded here for the first time. Applications treated include those relating to road vehicles, earthquake excitations and offshore structures.

  7. Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britz, Dieter

    In this chapter, the numerical solution of ordinary differential equations (odes) will be described. There is a direct connection between this area and that of partial differential equations (pdes), as noted in, for example [558]. The ode field is large; but here we restrict ourselves to those techniques that appear again in the pde field. Readers wishing greater depth than is presented here can find it in the great number of texts on the subject, such as the classics by Lapidus & Seinfeld [351], Gear [264] or Jain [314];there is a very clear chapter in Gerald [266].

  8. Accumulative Equating Error after a Chain of Linear Equatings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Hongwen

    2010-01-01

    After many equatings have been conducted in a testing program, equating errors can accumulate to a degree that is not negligible compared to the standard error of measurement. In this paper, the author investigates the asymptotic accumulative standard error of equating (ASEE) for linear equating methods, including chained linear, Tucker, and…

  9. Comparison of Kernel Equating and Item Response Theory Equating Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The kernel method of test equating is a unified approach to test equating with some advantages over traditional equating methods. Therefore, it is important to evaluate in a comprehensive way the usefulness and appropriateness of the Kernel equating (KE) method, as well as its advantages and disadvantages compared with several popular item…

  10. Comparison of Kernel Equating and Item Response Theory Equating Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The kernel method of test equating is a unified approach to test equating with some advantages over traditional equating methods. Therefore, it is important to evaluate in a comprehensive way the usefulness and appropriateness of the Kernel equating (KE) method, as well as its advantages and disadvantages compared with several popular item…

  11. The Statistical Drake Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We provide the statistical generalization of the Drake equation. From a simple product of seven positive numbers, the Drake equation is now turned into the product of seven positive random variables. We call this "the Statistical Drake Equation". The mathematical consequences of this transformation are then derived. The proof of our results is based on the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) of Statistics. In loose terms, the CLT states that the sum of any number of independent random variables, each of which may be ARBITRARILY distributed, approaches a Gaussian (i.e. normal) random variable. This is called the Lyapunov Form of the CLT, or the Lindeberg Form of the CLT, depending on the mathematical constraints assumed on the third moments of the various probability distributions. In conclusion, we show that: The new random variable N, yielding the number of communicating civilizations in the Galaxy, follows the LOGNORMAL distribution. Then, as a consequence, the mean value of this lognormal distribution is the ordinary N in the Drake equation. The standard deviation, mode, and all the moments of this lognormal N are also found. The seven factors in the ordinary Drake equation now become seven positive random variables. The probability distribution of each random variable may be ARBITRARY. The CLT in the so-called Lyapunov or Lindeberg forms (that both do not assume the factors to be identically distributed) allows for that. In other words, the CLT "translates" into our statistical Drake equation by allowing an arbitrary probability distribution for each factor. This is both physically realistic and practically very useful, of course. An application of our statistical Drake equation then follows. The (average) DISTANCE between any two neighboring and communicating civilizations in the Galaxy may be shown to be inversely proportional to the cubic root of N. Then, in our approach, this distance becomes a new random variable. We derive the relevant probability density

  12. Consistent lattice Boltzmann equations for phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Siebert, D N; Philippi, P C; Mattila, K K

    2014-11-01

    Unlike conventional computational fluid dynamics methods, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) describes the dynamic behavior of fluids in a mesoscopic scale based on discrete forms of kinetic equations. In this scale, complex macroscopic phenomena like the formation and collapse of interfaces can be naturally described as related to source terms incorporated into the kinetic equations. In this context, a novel athermal lattice Boltzmann scheme for the simulation of phase transition is proposed. The continuous kinetic model obtained from the Liouville equation using the mean-field interaction force approach is shown to be consistent with diffuse interface model using the Helmholtz free energy. Density profiles, interface thickness, and surface tension are analytically derived for a plane liquid-vapor interface. A discrete form of the kinetic equation is then obtained by applying the quadrature method based on prescribed abscissas together with a third-order scheme for the discretization of the streaming or advection term in the Boltzmann equation. Spatial derivatives in the source terms are approximated with high-order schemes. The numerical validation of the method is performed by measuring the speed of sound as well as by retrieving the coexistence curve and the interface density profiles. The appearance of spurious currents near the interface is investigated. The simulations are performed with the equations of state of Van der Waals, Redlich-Kwong, Redlich-Kwong-Soave, Peng-Robinson, and Carnahan-Starling.

  13. Consistent lattice Boltzmann equations for phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, D. N.; Philippi, P. C.; Mattila, K. K.

    2014-11-01

    Unlike conventional computational fluid dynamics methods, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) describes the dynamic behavior of fluids in a mesoscopic scale based on discrete forms of kinetic equations. In this scale, complex macroscopic phenomena like the formation and collapse of interfaces can be naturally described as related to source terms incorporated into the kinetic equations. In this context, a novel athermal lattice Boltzmann scheme for the simulation of phase transition is proposed. The continuous kinetic model obtained from the Liouville equation using the mean-field interaction force approach is shown to be consistent with diffuse interface model using the Helmholtz free energy. Density profiles, interface thickness, and surface tension are analytically derived for a plane liquid-vapor interface. A discrete form of the kinetic equation is then obtained by applying the quadrature method based on prescribed abscissas together with a third-order scheme for the discretization of the streaming or advection term in the Boltzmann equation. Spatial derivatives in the source terms are approximated with high-order schemes. The numerical validation of the method is performed by measuring the speed of sound as well as by retrieving the coexistence curve and the interface density profiles. The appearance of spurious currents near the interface is investigated. The simulations are performed with the equations of state of Van der Waals, Redlich-Kwong, Redlich-Kwong-Soave, Peng-Robinson, and Carnahan-Starling.

  14. A closure scheme for chemical master equations.

    PubMed

    Smadbeck, Patrick; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2013-08-27

    Probability reigns in biology, with random molecular events dictating the fate of individual organisms, and propelling populations of species through evolution. In principle, the master probability equation provides the most complete model of probabilistic behavior in biomolecular networks. In practice, master equations describing complex reaction networks have remained unsolved for over 70 years. This practical challenge is a reason why master equations, for all their potential, have not inspired biological discovery. Herein, we present a closure scheme that solves the master probability equation of networks of chemical or biochemical reactions. We cast the master equation in terms of ordinary differential equations that describe the time evolution of probability distribution moments. We postulate that a finite number of moments capture all of the necessary information, and compute the probability distribution and higher-order moments by maximizing the information entropy of the system. An accurate order closure is selected, and the dynamic evolution of molecular populations is simulated. Comparison with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, which merely sample the probability distribution, demonstrates this closure scheme is accurate for several small reaction networks. The importance of this result notwithstanding, a most striking finding is that the steady state of stochastic reaction networks can now be readily computed in a single-step calculation, without the need to simulate the evolution of the probability distribution in time.

  15. A closure scheme for chemical master equations

    PubMed Central

    Smadbeck, Patrick; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2013-01-01

    Probability reigns in biology, with random molecular events dictating the fate of individual organisms, and propelling populations of species through evolution. In principle, the master probability equation provides the most complete model of probabilistic behavior in biomolecular networks. In practice, master equations describing complex reaction networks have remained unsolved for over 70 years. This practical challenge is a reason why master equations, for all their potential, have not inspired biological discovery. Herein, we present a closure scheme that solves the master probability equation of networks of chemical or biochemical reactions. We cast the master equation in terms of ordinary differential equations that describe the time evolution of probability distribution moments. We postulate that a finite number of moments capture all of the necessary information, and compute the probability distribution and higher-order moments by maximizing the information entropy of the system. An accurate order closure is selected, and the dynamic evolution of molecular populations is simulated. Comparison with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, which merely sample the probability distribution, demonstrates this closure scheme is accurate for several small reaction networks. The importance of this result notwithstanding, a most striking finding is that the steady state of stochastic reaction networks can now be readily computed in a single-step calculation, without the need to simulate the evolution of the probability distribution in time. PMID:23940327

  16. Solving Equations of Multibody Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan; Lim, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Darts++ is a computer program for solving the equations of motion of a multibody system or of a multibody model of a dynamic system. It is intended especially for use in dynamical simulations performed in designing and analyzing, and developing software for the control of, complex mechanical systems. Darts++ is based on the Spatial-Operator- Algebra formulation for multibody dynamics. This software reads a description of a multibody system from a model data file, then constructs and implements an efficient algorithm that solves the dynamical equations of the system. The efficiency and, hence, the computational speed is sufficient to make Darts++ suitable for use in realtime closed-loop simulations. Darts++ features an object-oriented software architecture that enables reconfiguration of system topology at run time; in contrast, in related prior software, system topology is fixed during initialization. Darts++ provides an interface to scripting languages, including Tcl and Python, that enable the user to configure and interact with simulation objects at run time.

  17. Solutions of the cylindrical nonlinear Maxwell equations.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hao; Si, Liu-Gang; Ding, Chunling; Lü, Xin-You; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical nonlinear optics is a burgeoning research area which describes cylindrical electromagnetic wave propagation in nonlinear media. Finding new exact solutions for different types of nonlinearity and inhomogeneity to describe cylindrical electromagnetic wave propagation is of great interest and meaningful for theory and application. This paper gives exact solutions for the cylindrical nonlinear Maxwell equations and presents an interesting connection between the exact solutions for different cylindrical nonlinear Maxwell equations. We also provide some examples and discussion to show the application of the results we obtained. Our results provide the basis for solving complex systems of nonlinearity and inhomogeneity with simple systems.

  18. Advanced Methods for the Solution of Differential Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Braun, Willis H.

    This is a textbook, originally developed for scientists and engineers, which stresses the actual solutions of practical problems. Theorems are precisely stated, but the proofs are generally omitted. Sample contents include first-order equations, equations in the complex plane, irregular singular points, and numerical methods. A more recent idea,…

  19. A Quadratic Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2010-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]…

  20. Structural Equation Model Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree…

  1. Balancing Chemical Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savoy, L. G.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a study of students' ability to balance equations. Answers to a test on this topic were analyzed to determine the level of understanding and processes used by the students. Presented is a method to teach this skill to high school chemistry students. (CW)

  2. Do Differential Equations Swing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    One of the units of in a standard differential equations course is a discussion of the oscillatory motion of a spring and the associated material on forcing functions and resonance. During the presentation on practical resonance, the instructor may tell students that it is similar to when they take their siblings to the playground and help them on…

  3. Modelling by Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaachoua, Hamid; Saglam, Ayse

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to show the close relation between physics and mathematics taking into account especially the theory of differential equations. By analysing the problems posed by scientists in the seventeenth century, we note that physics is very important for the emergence of this theory. Taking into account this analysis, we show the…

  4. Structural analysis equations

    Treesearch

    Lawrence A. Soltis

    1999-01-01

    Equations for deformation and stress, which are the basis for tension members and beam and column design, are discussed in this chapter. The first two sections cover tapered members, straight members, and special considerations such as notches, slits, and size effect. A third section presents stability criteria for members subject to buckling and for members subject to...

  5. Dunkl Hyperbolic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejjaoli, Hatem

    2008-12-01

    We introduce and study the Dunkl symmetric systems. We prove the well-posedness results for the Cauchy problem for these systems. Eventually we describe the finite speed of it. Next the semi-linear Dunkl-wave equations are also studied.

  6. Modelling by Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaachoua, Hamid; Saglam, Ayse

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to show the close relation between physics and mathematics taking into account especially the theory of differential equations. By analysing the problems posed by scientists in the seventeenth century, we note that physics is very important for the emergence of this theory. Taking into account this analysis, we show the…

  7. Structural Equation Model Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree…

  8. Equating Practical Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunz, Mary E.; And Others

    This paper describes and illustrates a method for equating examinations with multiple facets (i.e., items, examinees, judges, tasks, and rating scales). The data are from the practical section of two histotechnology certification examinations. The first practical examination involved 210 examinees, 14 judges, 15 slides, 3 tasks, and 2 rating…

  9. Structural analysis equations

    Treesearch

    Douglas R. Rammer

    2010-01-01

    Equations for deformation and stress, which are the basis for tension members and beam and column design, are discussed in this chapter. The first two sections cover tapered members, straight members, and special considerations such as notches, slits, and size effect. A third section presents stability criteria for members subject to buckling and for members subject to...

  10. Generalized reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, S.E.

    1999-02-01

    A new derivation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is presented. A multiple-time-scale expansion is employed. It has the advantage of clearly separating the three time scales of the problem associated with (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) fluctuations whose wave vector is aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, and (3) those aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The derivation is carried out without relying on a large aspect ratio assumption; therefore this model can be applied to any general configuration. By accounting for the MHD equilibrium and constraints to eliminate the fast perpendicular waves, equations are derived to evolve scalar potential quantities on a time scale associated with the parallel wave vector (shear-Alfven wave time scale), which is the time scale of interest for MHD instability studies. Careful attention is given in the derivation to satisfy energy conservation and to have manifestly divergence-free magnetic fields to all orders in the expansion parameter. Additionally, neoclassical closures and equilibrium shear flow effects are easily accounted for in this model. Equations for the inner resistive layer are derived which reproduce the linear ideal and resistive stability criterion of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson. The equations have been programmed into a spectral initial value code and run with shear flow that is consistent with the equilibrium input into the code. Linear results of tearing modes with shear flow are presented which differentiate the effects of shear flow gradients in the layer with the effects of the shear flow decoupling multiple harmonics.

  11. Parallel Multigrid Equation Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Mark

    2001-09-07

    Prometheus is a fully parallel multigrid equation solver for matrices that arise in unstructured grid finite element applications. It includes a geometric and an algebraic multigrid method and has solved problems of up to 76 mullion degrees of feedom, problems in linear elasticity on the ASCI blue pacific and ASCI red machines.

  12. Quenching equation for scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takahisa

    1980-06-01

    A mathematical expression is postulated showing the relationship between counting rate and quenching agent concentration in a liquid scintillation solution. The expression is more suited to a wider range of quenching agent concentrations than the Stern-Volmer equation. An estimation of the quenched correction is demonstrated using the expression.

  13. Minimal continuum theories of structure formation in dense active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Bär, Markus; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-04-01

    Self-sustained dynamical phases of living matter can exhibit remarkable similarities over a wide range of scales, from mesoscopic vortex structures in microbial suspensions and motility assays of biopolymers to turbulent large-scale instabilities in flocks of birds or schools of fish. Here, we argue that, in many cases, the phenomenology of such active states can be efficiently described in terms of fourth- and higher-order partial differential equations. Structural transitions in these models can be interpreted as Landau-type kinematic transitions in Fourier (wavenumber) space, suggesting that microscopically different biological systems can share universal long-wavelength features. This general idea is illustrated through numerical simulations for two classes of continuum models for incompressible active fluids: a Swift-Hohenberg-type scalar field theory, and a minimal vector model that extends the classical Toner-Tu theory and appears to be a promising candidate for the quantitative description of dense bacterial suspensions. We discuss how microscopic symmetry-breaking mechanisms can enter macroscopic continuum descriptions of collective microbial motion near surfaces, and conclude by outlining future applications.

  14. Bifurcating fronts for the Taylor-Couette problem in infinite cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hărăguş-Courcelle, M.; Schneider, G.

    We show the existence of bifurcating fronts for the weakly unstable Taylor-Couette problem in an infinite cylinder. These fronts connect a stationary bifurcating pattern, here the Taylor vortices, with the trivial ground state, here the Couette flow. In order to show the existence result we improve a method which was already used in establishing the existence of bifurcating fronts for the Swift-Hohenberg equation by Collet and Eckmann, 1986, and by Eckmann and Wayne, 1991. The existence proof is based on spatial dynamics and center manifold theory. One of the difficulties in applying center manifold theory comes from an infinite number of eigenvalues on the imaginary axis for vanishing bifurcation parameter. But nevertheless, a finite dimensional reduction is possible, since the eigenvalues leave the imaginary axis with different velocities, if the bifurcation parameter is increased. In contrast to previous work we have to use normalform methods and a non-standard cut-off function to obtain a center manifold which is large enough to contain the bifurcating fronts.

  15. Homoclinic snaking in plane Couette flow: bending, skewing and finite-size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. F.; Schneider, T. M.

    2016-05-01

    Invariant solutions of shear flows have recently been extended from spatially periodic solutions in minimal flow units to spatially localized solutions on extended domains. One set of spanwise-localized solutions of plane Couette flow exhibits homoclinic snaking, a process by which steady-state solutions grow additional structure smoothly at their fronts when continued parametrically. Homoclinic snaking is well understood mathematically in the context of the one-dimensional Swift-Hohenberg equation. Consequently, the snaking solutions of plane Couette flow form a promising connection between the largely phenomenological study of laminar-turbulent patterns in viscous shear flows and the mathematically well-developed field of pattern-formation theory. In this paper we present a numerical study of the snaking solutions, generalizing beyond the fixed streamwise wavelength of previous studies. We find a number of new solution features, including bending, skewing, and finite-size effects. We show that the finite-size effects result from the shift-reflect symmetry of the traveling wave and establish the parameter regions over which snaking occurs. A new winding solution of plane Couette flow is derived from a strongly skewed localized equilibrium.

  16. Patterns formation in ferrofluids and solid dissolutions using stochastic models with dissipative dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Marco A.; Fernández-Cervantes, Irving; Agustín-Serrano, Ricardo; Anzo, Andrés; Sampedro, Mercedes P.

    2016-08-01

    A functional with interactions short-range and long-range low coarse-grained approximation is proposed. This functional satisfies models with dissipative dynamics A, B and the stochastic Swift-Hohenberg equation. Furthermore, terms associated with multiplicative noise source are added in these models. These models are solved numerically using the method known as fast Fourier transform. Results of the spatio-temporal dynamic show similarity with respect to patterns behaviour in ferrofluids phases subject to external fields (magnetic, electric and temperature), as well as with the nucleation and growth phenomena present in some solid dissolutions. As a result of the multiplicative noise effect over the dynamic, some microstructures formed by changing solid phase and composed by binary alloys of Pb-Sn, Fe-C and Cu-Ni, as well as a NiAl-Cr(Mo) eutectic composite material. The model A for active-particles with a non-potential term in form of quadratic gradient explain the formation of nanostructured particles of silver phosphate. With these models is shown that the underlying mechanisms in the patterns formation in all these systems depends of: (a) dissipative dynamics; (b) the short-range and long-range interactions and (c) the appropiate combination of quadratic and multiplicative noise terms.

  17. Nonlinear equations of 'variable type'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, N. A.; Novikov, V. A.; Ianenko, N. N.

    In this monograph, new scientific results related to the theory of equations of 'variable type' are presented. Equations of 'variable type' are equations for which the original type is not preserved within the entire domain of coefficient definition. This part of the theory of differential equations with partial derivatives has been developed intensively in connection with the requirements of mechanics. The relations between equations of the considered type and the problems of mathematical physics are explored, taking into account quasi-linear equations, and models of mathematical physics which lead to equations of 'variable type'. Such models are related to transonic flows, problems involving a separation of the boundary layer, gasdynamics and the van der Waals equation, shock wave phenomena, and a combustion model with a turbulent diffusion flame. Attention is also given to nonlinear parabolic equations, and nonlinear partial differential equations of the third order.

  18. Methods for Equating Mental Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    1983) compared conventional and IRT methods for equating the Test of English as a Foreign Language ( TOEFL ) after chaining. Three conventional and...three IRT equating methods were examined in this study; two sections of TOEFL were each (separately) equated. The IRT methods included the following: (a...group. A separate base form was established for each of the six equating methods. Instead of equating the base-form TOEFL to itself, the last (eighth

  19. Supersymmetric fifth order evolution equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, K.; Liu, Q. P.

    2010-03-08

    This paper considers supersymmetric fifth order evolution equations. Within the framework of symmetry approach, we give a list containing six equations, which are (potentially) integrable systems. Among these equations, the most interesting ones include a supersymmetric Sawada-Kotera equation and a novel supersymmetric fifth order KdV equation. For the latter, we supply some properties such as a Hamiltonian structures and a possible recursion operator.

  20. Brownian motion from Boltzmann's equation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1971-01-01

    Two apparently disparate lines of inquiry in kinetic theory are shown to be equivalent: (1) Brownian motion as treated by the (stochastic) Langevin equation and Fokker-Planck equation; and (2) Boltzmann's equation. The method is to derive the kinetic equation for Brownian motion from the Boltzmann equation for a two-component neutral gas by a simultaneous expansion in the density and mass ratios.

  1. Propagating Qualitative Values Through Quantitative Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Deepak

    1992-01-01

    In most practical problems where traditional numeric simulation is not adequate, one need to reason about a system with both qualitative and quantitative equations. In this paper, we address the problem of propagating qualitative values represented as interval values through quantitative equations. Previous research has produced exponential-time algorithms for approximate solution of the problem. These may not meet the stringent requirements of many real time applications. This paper advances the state of art by producing a linear-time algorithm that can propagate a qualitative value through a class of complex quantitative equations exactly and through arbitrary algebraic expressions approximately. The algorithm was found applicable to Space Shuttle Reaction Control System model.

  2. Flavored quantum Boltzmann equations

    SciTech Connect

    Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Lee, Christopher; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Tulin, Sean

    2010-05-15

    We derive from first principles, using nonequilibrium field theory, the quantum Boltzmann equations that describe the dynamics of flavor oscillations, collisions, and a time-dependent mass matrix in the early universe. Working to leading nontrivial order in ratios of relevant time scales, we study in detail a toy model for weak-scale baryogenesis: two scalar species that mix through a slowly varying time-dependent and CP-violating mass matrix, and interact with a thermal bath. This model clearly illustrates how the CP asymmetry arises through coherent flavor oscillations in a nontrivial background. We solve the Boltzmann equations numerically for the density matrices, investigating the impact of collisions in various regimes.

  3. Perturbed nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    For perturbed nonlinear systems, a norm, other than the supremum norm, is introduced on some spaces of continuous functions. This makes possible the study of new types of behavior. A study is presented on a perturbed nonlinear differential equation defined on a half line, and the existence of a family of solutions with special boundedness properties is established. The ideas developed are applied to the study of integral manifolds, and examples are given.

  4. Dirac equation for strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzetrzelewski, Maciej

    2016-11-01

    Starting with a Nambu-Goto action, a Dirac-like equation can be constructed by taking the square-root of the momentum constraint. The eigenvalues of the resulting Hamiltonian are real and correspond to masses of the excited string. In particular there are no tachyons. A special case of radial oscillations of a closed string in Minkowski space-time admits exact solutions in terms of wave functions of the harmonic oscillator.

  5. Quantum molecular master equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brechet, Sylvain D.; Reuse, Francois A.; Maschke, Klaus; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-01

    We present the quantum master equations for midsize molecules in the presence of an external magnetic field. The Hamiltonian describing the dynamics of a molecule accounts for the molecular deformation and orientation properties, as well as for the electronic properties. In order to establish the master equations governing the relaxation of free-standing molecules, we have to split the molecule into two weakly interacting parts, a bath and a bathed system. The adequate choice of these systems depends on the specific physical system under consideration. Here we consider a first system consisting of the molecular deformation and orientation properties and the electronic spin properties and a second system composed of the remaining electronic spatial properties. If the characteristic time scale associated with the second system is small with respect to that of the first, the second may be considered as a bath for the first. Assuming that both systems are weakly coupled and initially weakly correlated, we obtain the corresponding master equations. They describe notably the relaxation of magnetic properties of midsize molecules, where the change of the statistical properties of the electronic orbitals is expected to be slow with respect to the evolution time scale of the bathed system.

  6. Fractional Vorticity Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, D.; Tchguirinskaia, I.; Lovejoy, S.; Tuck, A.

    2012-04-01

    As a result of a thorough discussion (Schertzer et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 327-336, 2012 ) of the limitations of the quasi-geostrophic approximation and turbulence, fractional vorticity equations were obtained. This was done with the help of an anisotropic scaling analysis, instead of the classical scale analysis, as done to derive the quasi-geostrophic approximation. This breaks the rotational symmetry of the classical 3D vorticity equations and a priori yields a (2 + Hz)-dimensional turbulence (0 ≤ Hz ≤ 1). This corresponds to a first step in the derivation of a dynamical alternative to the quasi-geostrophic approximation and turbulence. The corresponding precise definition of fractional dimensional turbulence already demonstrates that the classical 2-D and 3-D turbulence are not the main options to understand atmospheric and oceanic dynamics. Although (2 + Hz)-dimensional turbulence (with 0 < Hz < 1) has more common features with 3-D turbulence than with 2-D turbulence, it has nevertheless very distinctive features: its scaling anisotropy is in agreement with the layered pancake structure, which is typical of rotating and stratified turbulence, but not of the classical 3-D turbulence. In this presentation, we further discuss the properties of this set of deterministic-like equations, especially how they can generate a statistical scaling anisotropy, as well as the relevance of the theoretical value Hz = 5/9.

  7. Equations of Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Philipp O. J.

    We discuss several strategies for the time integration of first order initial value problems. The explicit Euler forward difference has low error order. The much more accurate symmetric difference quotient can be used as the corrector step in combination with an explicit Euler predictor step and is often used for the time integration of partial differential equations. Methods with higher error order can be obtained from a Taylor series expansion, like the Nordsieck and Gear predictor-corrector methods which have been often applied in molecular dynamics calculations. Runge-Kutta methods are very important for ordinary differential equations. They are robust and allow an adaptive control of the step size. Very accurate results can be obtained for ordinary differential equations with extrapolation methods like the famous Gragg-Bulirsch-Stör method. Multistep methods use information from several points. Best known are Adams-Bashforth-Moulton methods and Gear methods (also known as backward differentiation methods), which are especially useful for stiff problems. The class of Verlet methods has been developed for molecular dynamics calculations. These are symplectic and time reversible and conserve energy over long trajectories.

  8. Double-Plate Penetration Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    This report compares seven double-plate penetration predictor equations for accuracy and effectiveness of a shield design. Three of the seven are the Johnson Space Center original, modified, and new Cour-Palais equations. The other four are the Nysmith, Lundeberg-Stern-Bristow, Burch, and Wilkinson equations. These equations, except the Wilkinson equation, were derived from test results, with the velocities ranging up to 8 km/sec. Spreadsheet software calculated the projectile diameters for various velocities for the different equations. The results were plotted on projectile diameter versus velocity graphs for the expected orbital debris impact velocities ranging from 2 to 15 km/sec. The new Cour-Palais double-plate penetration equation was compared to the modified Cour-Palais single-plate penetration equation. Then the predictions from each of the seven double-plate penetration equations were compared to each other for a chosen shield design. Finally, these results from the equations were compared with test results performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Because the different equations predict a wide range of projectile diameters at any given velocity, it is very difficult to choose the "right" prediction equation for shield configurations other than those exactly used in the equations' development. Although developed for various materials, the penetration equations alone cannot be relied upon to accurately predict the effectiveness of a shield without using hypervelocity impact tests to verify the design.

  9. Solving Partial Differential Equations on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D

    2008-09-22

    We discuss the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on overlapping grids. This is a powerful technique for efficiently solving problems in complex, possibly moving, geometry. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured grids that overlap and cover the computational domain. By allowing the grids to overlap, grids for complex geometries can be more easily constructed. The overlapping grid approach can also be used to remove coordinate singularities by, for example, covering a sphere with two or more patches. We describe the application of the overlapping grid approach to a variety of different problems. These include the solution of incompressible fluid flows with moving and deforming geometry, the solution of high-speed compressible reactive flow with rigid bodies using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), and the solution of the time-domain Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism.

  10. Evaluation of a Predictive Equation for Runup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdon, H. F.; Stockdon, H. F.; Holman, R. A.; Sallenger, A. H.

    2001-12-01

    Extreme runup occurring during storms and hurricanes is likely to be responsible for the most dramatic erosional events, impacting both the beach and dunes and forming an important design criterion for coastal structures and set back. Yet one of the most commonly used predictive equations for runup (Holman, 1986) is based on data from a single site and has not been broadly tested. We will examine the consequences of the extension of Holman's equation to other beach and wave conditions by comprehensive testing using data from seven field experiments: Duck, NC (1982, 1990, 1997); Scripps Beach, CA (1989); San Onofre, CA (1993); Gleneden, OR (1994); and Agate Beach, OR (1996). Special attention will be given to data collected during high tides and large wave events as they represent times of highest runup and most significant erosion. Holman's equation shows a relationship between extreme runup and the Iribarren number, which includes a linear dependence on beach slope. However, on more complex topographies, it is unclear whether runup is more dependent upon the foreshore or surf zone slope. Our analysis will investigate the most appropriate definition of beach slope by testing both in the single horizontal dimension equation. We will then expand the one-dimensional equation to examine beaches with longshore variable topographies. Here, the equation predicts significant variations in runup with possible consequences to short scale variability in beach erosion. Using the improved equation and data from sites with multiple longshore locations, we will examine the longshore variability of beach slope and how it relates to both predicted and observed runup statistics.

  11. Computing generalized Langevin equations and generalized Fokker-Planck equations.

    PubMed

    Darve, Eric; Solomon, Jose; Kia, Amirali

    2009-07-07

    The Mori-Zwanzig formalism is an effective tool to derive differential equations describing the evolution of a small number of resolved variables. In this paper we present its application to the derivation of generalized Langevin equations and generalized non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equations. We show how long time scales rates and metastable basins can be extracted from these equations. Numerical algorithms are proposed to discretize these equations. An important aspect is the numerical solution of the orthogonal dynamics equation which is a partial differential equation in a high dimensional space. We propose efficient numerical methods to solve this orthogonal dynamics equation. In addition, we present a projection formalism of the Mori-Zwanzig type that is applicable to discrete maps. Numerical applications are presented from the field of Hamiltonian systems.

  12. Reduction operators of Burgers equation

    PubMed Central

    Pocheketa, Oleksandr A.; Popovych, Roman O.

    2013-01-01

    The solution of the problem on reduction operators and nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation is systematically treated and completed. A new proof of the theorem on the special “no-go” case of regular reduction operators is presented, and the representation of the coefficients of operators in terms of solutions of the initial equation is constructed for this case. All possible nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation to single ordinary differential equations are exhaustively described. Any Lie reduction of the Burgers equation proves to be equivalent via the Hopf–Cole transformation to a parameterized family of Lie reductions of the linear heat equation. PMID:23576819

  13. Reduction operators of Burgers equation.

    PubMed

    Pocheketa, Oleksandr A; Popovych, Roman O

    2013-02-01

    The solution of the problem on reduction operators and nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation is systematically treated and completed. A new proof of the theorem on the special "no-go" case of regular reduction operators is presented, and the representation of the coefficients of operators in terms of solutions of the initial equation is constructed for this case. All possible nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation to single ordinary differential equations are exhaustively described. Any Lie reduction of the Burgers equation proves to be equivalent via the Hopf-Cole transformation to a parameterized family of Lie reductions of the linear heat equation.

  14. Extracting model equations from experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, R.; Siegert, S.; Peinke, J.; Lück, St.; Siefert, M.; Lindemann, M.; Raethjen, J.; Deuschl, G.; Pfister, G.

    2000-06-01

    This letter wants to present a general data-driven method for formulating suitable model equations for nonlinear complex systems. The method is validated in a quantitative way by its application to experimentally found data of a chaotic electric circuit. Furthermore, the results of an analysis of tremor data from patients suffering from Parkinson's disease, from essential tremor, and from normal subjects with physiological tremor are presented, discussed and compared. They allow a distinction between the different forms of tremor.

  15. Optimal active control for Burgers equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeda, Yutaka

    1994-01-01

    A method for active fluid flow control based on control theory is discussed. Dynamic programming and fixed point successive approximations are used to accommodate the nonlinear control problem. The long-term goal of this project is to establish an effective method applicable to complex flows such as turbulence and jets. However, in this report, the method is applied to stochastic Burgers equation as an intermediate step towards this goal. Numerical results are compared with those obtained by gradient search methods.

  16. The quasicontinuum Fokker-Plank equation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Francis J

    2008-01-01

    We present a regularized Fokker-Planck equation with more accurate short-time and high-frequency behavior for continuous-time, discrete-state systems. The regularization preserves crucial aspects of state-space discreteness lost in the standard Kramers-Moyal expansion. We apply the method to a simple example of biochemical reaction kinetics and to a two-dimensional symmetric random walk, and suggest its application to more complex systerns.

  17. Evaluating Equating Results: Percent Relative Error for Chained Kernel Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Yanlin; von Davier, Alina A.; Chen, Haiwen

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a method for evaluating equating results. Within the kernel equating framework, the percent relative error (PRE) for chained equipercentile equating was computed under the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design. The method was applied to two data sets to obtain the PRE, which can be used to measure equating…

  18. Differential Equations Compatible with Boundary Rational qKZ Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, Yoshihiro

    2011-10-01

    We give diffierential equations compatible with the rational qKZ equation with boundary reflection. The total system contains the trigonometric degeneration of the bispectral qKZ equation of type (Cěen, Cn) which in the case of type GLn was studied by van Meer and Stokman. We construct an integral formula for solutions to our compatible system in a special case.

  19. Evaluating Equating Results: Percent Relative Error for Chained Kernel Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Yanlin; von Davier, Alina A.; Chen, Haiwen

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a method for evaluating equating results. Within the kernel equating framework, the percent relative error (PRE) for chained equipercentile equating was computed under the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design. The method was applied to two data sets to obtain the PRE, which can be used to measure equating…

  20. Explicit infiltration equations and the Lambert W-function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlange, J.-Y.; Barry, D. A.; Haverkamp, R.

    The Green and Ampt infiltration formula, as well as the Talsma and Parlange formula, are two-parameter equations that are both expressible in terms of Lambert W-functions. These representations are used to derive explicit, simple and accurate approximations for each case. The two infiltration formulas are limiting cases that can be deduced from an existing three-parameter infiltration equation, the third parameter allowing for interpolation between the limiting cases. Besides the limiting cases, there is another case for which the three-parameter infiltration equation yields an exact solution. The three-parameter equation can be solved by fixed-point iteration, a scheme which can be exploited to obtain a sequence of increasingly complex explicit infiltration equations. For routine use, a simple, explicit approximation to the three-parameter infiltration equation is derived. This approximation eliminates the need to iterate for most practical circumstances.

  1. Whitham modulation equations, coalescing characteristics, and dispersive Boussinesq dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, Daniel J.; Bridges, Thomas J.

    2016-10-01

    Whitham modulation theory with degeneracy in wave action is considered. The case where all components of the wave action conservation law, when evaluated on a family of periodic travelling waves, have vanishing derivative with respect to wavenumber is considered. It is shown that Whitham modulation equations morph, on a slower time scale, into the two way Boussinesq equation. Both the 1 + 1 and 2 + 1 cases are considered. The resulting Boussinesq equation arises in a universal form, in that the coefficients are determined from the abstract properties of the Lagrangian and do not depend on particular equations. One curious by-product of the analysis is that the theory can be used to confirm that the two-way Boussinesq equation is not a valid model in shallow water hydrodynamics. Modulation of nonlinear travelling waves of the complex Klein-Gordon equation is used to illustrate the theory.

  2. Inferring Mathematical Equations Using Crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Crowdsourcing, understood as outsourcing work to a large network of people in the form of an open call, has been utilized successfully many times, including a very interesting concept involving the implementation of computer games with the objective of solving a scientific problem by employing users to play a game—so-called crowdsourced serious games. Our main objective was to verify whether such an approach could be successfully applied to the discovery of mathematical equations that explain experimental data gathered during the observation of a given dynamic system. Moreover, we wanted to compare it with an approach based on artificial intelligence that uses symbolic regression to find such formulae automatically. To achieve this, we designed and implemented an Internet game in which players attempt to design a spaceship representing an equation that models the observed system. The game was designed while considering that it should be easy to use for people without strong mathematical backgrounds. Moreover, we tried to make use of the collective intelligence observed in crowdsourced systems by enabling many players to collaborate on a single solution. The idea was tested on several hundred players playing almost 10,000 games and conducting a user opinion survey. The results prove that the proposed solution has very high potential. The function generated during weeklong tests was almost as precise as the analytical solution of the model of the system and, up to a certain complexity level of the formulae, it explained data better than the solution generated automatically by Eureqa, the leading software application for the implementation of symbolic regression. Moreover, we observed benefits of using crowdsourcing; the chain of consecutive solutions that led to the best solution was obtained by the continuous collaboration of several players. PMID:26713846

  3. Inferring Mathematical Equations Using Crowdsourcing.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Szymon; Fratczak, Filip; Krzyskow, Jakub; Wulnikowski, Jaroslaw

    2015-01-01

    Crowdsourcing, understood as outsourcing work to a large network of people in the form of an open call, has been utilized successfully many times, including a very interesting concept involving the implementation of computer games with the objective of solving a scientific problem by employing users to play a game-so-called crowdsourced serious games. Our main objective was to verify whether such an approach could be successfully applied to the discovery of mathematical equations that explain experimental data gathered during the observation of a given dynamic system. Moreover, we wanted to compare it with an approach based on artificial intelligence that uses symbolic regression to find such formulae automatically. To achieve this, we designed and implemented an Internet game in which players attempt to design a spaceship representing an equation that models the observed system. The game was designed while considering that it should be easy to use for people without strong mathematical backgrounds. Moreover, we tried to make use of the collective intelligence observed in crowdsourced systems by enabling many players to collaborate on a single solution. The idea was tested on several hundred players playing almost 10,000 games and conducting a user opinion survey. The results prove that the proposed solution has very high potential. The function generated during weeklong tests was almost as precise as the analytical solution of the model of the system and, up to a certain complexity level of the formulae, it explained data better than the solution generated automatically by Eureqa, the leading software application for the implementation of symbolic regression. Moreover, we observed benefits of using crowdsourcing; the chain of consecutive solutions that led to the best solution was obtained by the continuous collaboration of several players.

  4. Unsteady subsonic and supersonic potential aerodynamics for complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.; Tseng, K.

    1977-01-01

    A recently developed general theory for unsteady compressible potential fluid dynamics for complex-configuration aircraft is reviewed. The method is based on a combination of the following techniques: Green's function method (to transform the differential equation into an integral differential-delay equation), finite element method (to transform the equation into a set of differential-delay equations in time), and the Laplace transform method (to transform the differential-delay equations into algebraic equations).

  5. Young's equation revisited.

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Lasse

    2016-04-06

    Young's construction for a contact angle at a three-phase intersection forms the basis of all fields of science that involve wetting and capillary action. We find compelling evidence from recent experimental results on the deformation of a soft solid at the contact line, and displacement of an elastic wire immersed in a liquid, that Young's equation can only be interpreted by surface energies, and not as a balance of surface tensions. It follows that the a priori variable in finding equilibrium is not the position of the contact line, but the contact angle. This finding provides the explanation for the pinning of a contact line.

  6. Perturbed nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, T. G.

    1972-01-01

    The existence of a solution defined for all t and possessing a type of boundedness property is established for the perturbed nonlinear system y = f(t,y) + F(t,y). The unperturbed system x = f(t,x) has a dichotomy in which some solutions exist and are well behaved as t increases to infinity, and some solution exists and are well behaved as t decreases to minus infinity. A similar study is made for a perturbed nonlinear differential equation defined on a half line, R+, and the existence of a family of solutions with special boundedness properties is established. The ideas are applied to integral manifolds.

  7. Problems, Perspectives, and Practical Issues in Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Issues concerning equating test scores are discussed in an introduction, four papers, and two commentaries. Equating methods research, sampling errors, linear equating, population differences, sources of equating errors, and a circular equating paradigm are considered. (SLD)

  8. Noncommutativity and the Friedmann Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sabido, M.; Socorro, J.; Guzman, W.

    2010-07-12

    In this paper we study noncommutative scalar field cosmology, we find the noncommutative Friedmann equations as well as the noncommutative Klein-Gordon equation, interestingly the noncommutative contributions are only present up to second order in the noncommutitive parameter.

  9. Conservational PDF Equations of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have revisited the traditional probability density function (PDF) equations for the velocity and species in turbulent incompressible flows. They are all unclosed due to the appearance of various conditional means which are modeled empirically. However, we have observed that it is possible to establish a closed velocity PDF equation and a closed joint velocity and species PDF equation through conditions derived from the integral form of the Navier-Stokes equations. Although, in theory, the resulted PDF equations are neither general nor unique, they nevertheless lead to the exact transport equations for the first moment as well as all higher order moments. We refer these PDF equations as the conservational PDF equations. This observation is worth further exploration for its validity and CFD application

  10. ``Riemann equations'' in bidifferential calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvartatskyi, O.; Müller-Hoissen, F.; Stoilov, N.

    2015-10-01

    We consider equations that formally resemble a matrix Riemann (or Hopf) equation in the framework of bidifferential calculus. With different choices of a first-order bidifferential calculus, we obtain a variety of equations, including a semi-discrete and a fully discrete version of the matrix Riemann equation. A corresponding universal solution-generating method then either yields a (continuous or discrete) Cole-Hopf transformation, or leaves us with the problem of solving Riemann equations (hence an application of the hodograph method). If the bidifferential calculus extends to second order, solutions of a system of "Riemann equations" are also solutions of an equation that arises, on the universal level of bidifferential calculus, as an integrability condition. Depending on the choice of bidifferential calculus, the latter can represent a number of prominent integrable equations, like self-dual Yang-Mills, as well as matrix versions of the two-dimensional Toda lattice, Hirota's bilinear difference equation, (2+1)-dimensional Nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS), Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation, and Davey-Stewartson equations. For all of them, a recent (non-isospectral) binary Darboux transformation result in bidifferential calculus applies, which can be specialized to generate solutions of the associated "Riemann equations." For the latter, we clarify the relation between these specialized binary Darboux transformations and the aforementioned solution-generating method. From (arbitrary size) matrix versions of the "Riemann equations" associated with an integrable equation, possessing a bidifferential calculus formulation, multi-soliton-type solutions of the latter can be generated. This includes "breaking" multi-soliton-type solutions of the self-dual Yang-Mills and the (2+1)-dimensional NLS equation, which are parametrized by solutions of Riemann equations.

  11. A note on singularities of the 3-D Euler equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanveer, S.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we consider analytic initial conditions with finite energy, whose complex spatial continuation is a superposition of a smooth background flow and a singular field. Through explicit calculation in the complex plane, we show that under some assumptions, the solution to the 3-D Euler equation ceases to be analytic in the real domain in finite time.

  12. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  13. The Forced Hard Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, various examples of the Duffing type forced spring equation with epsilon positive, are studied. Since [epsilon] is positive, all solutions to the associated homogeneous equation are periodic and the same is true with the forcing applied. The damped equation exhibits steady state trajectories with the interesting…

  14. Successfully Transitioning to Linear Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colton, Connie; Smith, Wendy M.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010) asks students in as early as fourth grade to solve word problems using equations with variables. Equations studied at this level generate a single solution, such as the equation x + 10 = 25. For students in fifth grade, the Common Core standard for algebraic thinking expects them to…

  15. Solving Nonlinear Coupled Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, L.; David, J.

    1986-01-01

    Harmonic balance method developed to obtain approximate steady-state solutions for nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations. Method usable with transfer matrices commonly used to analyze shaft systems. Solution to nonlinear equation, with periodic forcing function represented as sum of series similar to Fourier series but with form of terms suggested by equation itself.

  16. Successfully Transitioning to Linear Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colton, Connie; Smith, Wendy M.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010) asks students in as early as fourth grade to solve word problems using equations with variables. Equations studied at this level generate a single solution, such as the equation x + 10 = 25. For students in fifth grade, the Common Core standard for algebraic thinking expects them to…

  17. Ultra Deep Wave Equation Imaging and Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander M. Popovici; Sergey Fomel; Paul Sava; Sean Crawley; Yining Li; Cristian Lupascu

    2006-09-30

    In this project we developed and tested a novel technology, designed to enhance seismic resolution and imaging of ultra-deep complex geologic structures by using state-of-the-art wave-equation depth migration and wave-equation velocity model building technology for deeper data penetration and recovery, steeper dip and ultra-deep structure imaging, accurate velocity estimation for imaging and pore pressure prediction and accurate illumination and amplitude processing for extending the AVO prediction window. Ultra-deep wave-equation imaging provides greater resolution and accuracy under complex geologic structures where energy multipathing occurs, than what can be accomplished today with standard imaging technology. The objective of the research effort was to examine the feasibility of imaging ultra-deep structures onshore and offshore, by using (1) wave-equation migration, (2) angle-gathers velocity model building, and (3) wave-equation illumination and amplitude compensation. The effort consisted of answering critical technical questions that determine the feasibility of the proposed methodology, testing the theory on synthetic data, and finally applying the technology for imaging ultra-deep real data. Some of the questions answered by this research addressed: (1) the handling of true amplitudes in the downward continuation and imaging algorithm and the preservation of the amplitude with offset or amplitude with angle information required for AVO studies, (2) the effect of several imaging conditions on amplitudes, (3) non-elastic attenuation and approaches for recovering the amplitude and frequency, (4) the effect of aperture and illumination on imaging steep dips and on discriminating the velocities in the ultra-deep structures. All these effects were incorporated in the final imaging step of a real data set acquired specifically to address ultra-deep imaging issues, with large offsets (12,500 m) and long recording time (20 s).

  18. Generalized Klein-Kramers equations.

    PubMed

    Fa, Kwok Sau

    2012-12-21

    A generalized Klein-Kramers equation for a particle interacting with an external field is proposed. The equation generalizes the fractional Klein-Kramers equation introduced by Barkai and Silbey [J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 3866 (2000)]. Besides, the generalized Klein-Kramers equation can also recover the integro-differential Klein-Kramers equation for continuous-time random walk; this means that it can describe the subdiffusive and superdiffusive regimes in the long-time limit. Moreover, analytic solutions for first two moments both in velocity and displacement (for force-free case) are obtained, and their dynamic behaviors are investigated.

  19. Analysis of Coupled Reaction-Diffusion Equations for RNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, Maryann E.; Li, Bo; Yang, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    We consider a system of coupled reaction-diffusion equations that models the interaction between multiple types of chemical species, particularly the interaction between one messenger RNA and different types of non-coding microRNAs in biological cells. We construct various modeling systems with different levels of complexity for the reaction, nonlinear diffusion, and coupled reaction and diffusion of the RNA interactions, respectively, with the most complex one being the full coupled reaction-diffusion equations. The simplest system consists of ordinary differential equations (ODE) modeling the chemical reaction. We present a derivation of this system using the chemical master equation and the mean-field approximation, and prove the existence, uniqueness, and linear stability of equilibrium solution of the ODE system. Next, we consider a single, nonlinear diffusion equation for one species that results from the slow diffusion of the others. Using variational techniques, we prove the existence and uniqueness of solution to a boundary-value problem of this nonlinear diffusion equation. Finally, we consider the full system of reaction-diffusion equations, both steady-state and time-dependent. We use the monotone method to construct iteratively upper and lower solutions and show that their respective limits are solutions to the reaction-diffusion system. For the time-dependent system of reaction-diffusion equations, we obtain the existence and uniqueness of global solutions. We also obtain some asymptotic properties of such solutions. PMID:25601722

  20. Analysis of Coupled Reaction-Diffusion Equations for RNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hohn, Maryann E; Li, Bo; Yang, Weihua

    2015-05-01

    We consider a system of coupled reaction-diffusion equations that models the interaction between multiple types of chemical species, particularly the interaction between one messenger RNA and different types of non-coding microRNAs in biological cells. We construct various modeling systems with different levels of complexity for the reaction, nonlinear diffusion, and coupled reaction and diffusion of the RNA interactions, respectively, with the most complex one being the full coupled reaction-diffusion equations. The simplest system consists of ordinary differential equations (ODE) modeling the chemical reaction. We present a derivation of this system using the chemical master equation and the mean-field approximation, and prove the existence, uniqueness, and linear stability of equilibrium solution of the ODE system. Next, we consider a single, nonlinear diffusion equation for one species that results from the slow diffusion of the others. Using variational techniques, we prove the existence and uniqueness of solution to a boundary-value problem of this nonlinear diffusion equation. Finally, we consider the full system of reaction-diffusion equations, both steady-state and time-dependent. We use the monotone method to construct iteratively upper and lower solutions and show that their respective limits are solutions to the reaction-diffusion system. For the time-dependent system of reaction-diffusion equations, we obtain the existence and uniqueness of global solutions. We also obtain some asymptotic properties of such solutions.

  1. Impact of Matched Samples Equating Methods on Equating Accuracy and the Adequacy of Equating Assumptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Sonya Jean

    2010-01-01

    When test forms are administered to examinee groups that differ in proficiency, equating procedures are used to disentangle group differences from form differences. This dissertation investigates the extent to which equating results are population invariant, the impact of group differences on equating results, the impact of group differences on…

  2. On nonautonomous Dirac equation

    SciTech Connect

    Hovhannisyan, Gro; Liu Wen

    2009-12-15

    We construct the fundamental solution of time dependent linear ordinary Dirac system in terms of unknown phase functions. This construction gives approximate representation of solutions which is useful for the study of asymptotic behavior. Introducing analog of Rayleigh quotient for differential equations we generalize Hartman-Wintner asymptotic integration theorems with the error estimates for applications to the Dirac system. We also introduce the adiabatic invariants for the Dirac system, which are similar to the adiabatic invariant of Lorentz's pendulum. Using a small parameter method it is shown that the change in the adiabatic invariants approaches zero with the power speed as a small parameter approaches zero. As another application we calculate the transition probabilities for the Dirac system. We show that for the special choice of electromagnetic field, the only transition of an electron to the positron with the opposite spin orientation is possible.

  3. Λ scattering equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Humberto

    2016-06-01

    The CHY representation of scattering amplitudes is based on integrals over the moduli space of a punctured sphere. We replace the punctured sphere by a double-cover version. The resulting scattering equations depend on a parameter Λ controlling the opening of a branch cut. The new representation of scattering amplitudes possesses an enhanced redundancy which can be used to fix, modulo branches, the location of four punctures while promoting Λ to a variable. Via residue theorems we show how CHY formulas break up into sums of products of smaller (off-shell) ones times a propagator. This leads to a powerful way of evaluating CHY integrals of generic rational functions, which we call the Λ algorithm.

  4. Elliptic scattering equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Carlos; Gomez, Humberto

    2016-06-01

    Recently the CHY approach has been extended to one loop level using elliptic functions and modular forms over a Jacobian variety. Due to the difficulty in manipulating these kind of functions, we propose an alternative prescription that is totally algebraic. This new proposal is based on an elliptic algebraic curve embedded in a mathbb{C}{P}^2 space. We show that for the simplest integrand, namely the n - gon, our proposal indeed reproduces the expected result. By using the recently formulated Λ-algorithm, we found a novel recurrence relation expansion in terms of tree level off-shell amplitudes. Our results connect nicely with recent results on the one-loop formulation of the scattering equations. In addition, this new proposal can be easily stretched out to hyperelliptic curves in order to compute higher genus.

  5. The classical Bloch equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmer, Martin; Novotny, Lukas

    2014-10-01

    Coherent control of a quantum mechanical two-level system is at the heart of magnetic resonance imaging, quantum information processing, and quantum optics. Among the most prominent phenomena in quantum coherent control are Rabi oscillations, Ramsey fringes, and Hahn echoes. We demonstrate that these phenomena can be derived classically by use of a simple coupled-harmonic-oscillator model. The classical problem can be cast in a form that is formally equivalent to the quantum mechanical Bloch equations with the exception that the longitudinal and the transverse relaxation times (T1 and T2) are equal. The classical analysis is intuitive and well suited for familiarizing students with the basic concepts of quantum coherent control, while at the same time highlighting the fundamental differences between classical and quantum theories.

  6. Structural Equation Model Trees

    PubMed Central

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2015-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree structures that separate a data set recursively into subsets with significantly different parameter estimates in a SEM. SEM Trees provide means for finding covariates and covariate interactions that predict differences in structural parameters in observed as well as in latent space and facilitate theory-guided exploration of empirical data. We describe the methodology, discuss theoretical and practical implications, and demonstrate applications to a factor model and a linear growth curve model. PMID:22984789

  7. Silicon nitride equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert C.; Swaminathan, Pazhayannur K.

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the development of a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4).1 Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonal β-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data that have indicated a complex and slow time dependent phase change to the c-Si3N4 phase. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products; however, the need for a kinetic approach is suggested to combine with the single component solid models to simulate and further investigate the global phase coexistences.

  8. Conformal invariance and new exact solutions of the elastostatics equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirkunov, Yu. A.

    2017-03-01

    We fulfilled a group foliation of the system of n-dimensional (n ≥ 2) Lame equations of the classical static theory of elasticity with respect to the infinite subgroup contained in normal subgroup of main group of this system. It permitted us to move from the Lame equations to the equivalent unification of two first-order systems: automorphic and resolving. We obtained a general solution of the automorphic system. This solution is an n-dimensional analogue of the Kolosov-Muskhelishvili formula. We found the main Lie group of transformations of the resolving system of this group foliation. It turned out that in the two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases, which have a physical meaning, this system is conformally invariant, while the Lame equations admit only a group of similarities of the Euclidean space. This is a big success, since in the method of group foliation, resolving equations usually inherit Lie symmetries subgroup of the full symmetry group that was not used for the foliation. In the three-dimensional case for the solutions of the resolving system, we found the general form of the transformations similar to the Kelvin transformation. These transformations are the consequence of the conformal invariance of the resolving system. In the three-dimensional case with a help of the complex dependent and independent variables, the resolving system is written as a simple complex system. This allowed us to find non-trivial exact solutions of the Lame equations, which direct for the Lame equations practically impossible to obtain. For this complex system, all the essentially distinct invariant solutions of the maximal rank we have found in explicit form, or we reduced the finding of those solutions to the solving of the classical one-dimensional equations of the mathematical physics: the heat equation, the telegraph equation, the Tricomi equation, the generalized Darboux equation, and other equations. For the resolving system, we obtained double wave of a

  9. Iterative solution of the Helmholtz equation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, E.; Otto, K.

    1996-12-31

    We have shown that the numerical solution of the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation can be obtained in a very efficient way by using a preconditioned iterative method. We discretize the equation with second-order accurate finite difference operators and take special care to obtain non-reflecting boundary conditions. We solve the large, sparse system of equations that arises with the preconditioned restarted GMRES iteration. The preconditioner is of {open_quotes}fast Poisson type{close_quotes}, and is derived as a direct solver for a modified PDE problem.The arithmetic complexity for the preconditioner is O(n log{sub 2} n), where n is the number of grid points. As a test problem we use the propagation of sound waves in water in a duct with curved bottom. Numerical experiments show that the preconditioned iterative method is very efficient for this type of problem. The convergence rate does not decrease dramatically when the frequency increases. Compared to banded Gaussian elimination, which is a standard solution method for this type of problems, the iterative method shows significant gain in both storage requirement and arithmetic complexity. Furthermore, the relative gain increases when the frequency increases.

  10. Synchronization with propagation - The functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rǎsvan, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    The structure represented by one or several oscillators couple to a one-dimensional transmission environment (e.g. a vibrating string in the mechanical case or a lossless transmission line in the electrical case) turned to be attractive for the research in the field of complex structures and/or complex behavior. This is due to the fact that such a structure represents some generalization of various interconnection modes with lumped parameters for the oscillators. On the other hand the lossless and distortionless propagation along transmission lines has generated several research in electrical, thermal, hydro and control engineering leading to the association of some functional differential equations to the basic initial boundary value problems. The present research is performed at the crossroad of the aforementioned directions. We shall associate to the starting models some functional differential equations - in most cases of neutral type - and make use of the general theorems for existence and stability of forced oscillations for functional differential equations. The challenges introduced by the analyzed problems for the general theory are emphasized, together with the implication of the results for various applications.

  11. Fast multipole method for the biharmonic equation in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Gumerov, Nail A. . E-mail: gumerov@umiacs.umd.edu; Duraiswami, Ramani

    2006-06-10

    The evaluation of sums (matrix-vector products) of the solutions of the three-dimensional biharmonic equation can be accelerated using the fast multipole method, while memory requirements can also be significantly reduced. We develop a complete translation theory for these equations. It is shown that translations of elementary solutions of the biharmonic equation can be achieved by considering the translation of a pair of elementary solutions of the Laplace equations. The extension of the theory to the case of polyharmonic equations in R{sup 3} is also discussed. An efficient way of performing the FMM for biharmonic equations using the solution of a complex valued FMM for the Laplace equation is presented. Compared to previous methods presented for the biharmonic equation our method appears more efficient. The theory is implemented and numerical tests presented that demonstrate the performance of the method for varying problem sizes and accuracy requirements. In our implementation, the FMM for the biharmonic equation is faster than direct matrix-vector product for a matrix size of 550 for a relative L{sub 2} accuracy {epsilon}{sub 2}=10{sup -4}, and N=3550 for {epsilon}{sub 2}=10{sup -12}.

  12. Fast multipole method for the biharmonic equation in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumerov, Nail A.; Duraiswami, Ramani

    2006-06-01

    The evaluation of sums (matrix-vector products) of the solutions of the three-dimensional biharmonic equation can be accelerated using the fast multipole method, while memory requirements can also be significantly reduced. We develop a complete translation theory for these equations. It is shown that translations of elementary solutions of the biharmonic equation can be achieved by considering the translation of a pair of elementary solutions of the Laplace equations. The extension of the theory to the case of polyharmonic equations in R3 is also discussed. An efficient way of performing the FMM for biharmonic equations using the solution of a complex valued FMM for the Laplace equation is presented. Compared to previous methods presented for the biharmonic equation our method appears more efficient. The theory is implemented and numerical tests presented that demonstrate the performance of the method for varying problem sizes and accuracy requirements. In our implementation, the FMM for the biharmonic equation is faster than direct matrix-vector product for a matrix size of 550 for a relative L2 accuracy ɛ2 = 10 -4, and N = 3550 for ɛ2 = 10 -12.

  13. Solitary Wave Solutions of KP equation, Cylindrical KP Equation and Spherical KP Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang-Zheng; Zhang, Jin-Liang; Wang, Ming-Liang

    2017-02-01

    Three (2+1)-dimensional equations–KP equation, cylindrical KP equation and spherical KP equation, have been reduced to the same KdV equation by different transformation of variables respectively. Since the single solitary wave solution and 2-solitary wave solution of the KdV equation have been known already, substituting the solutions of the KdV equation into the corresponding transformation of variables respectively, the single and 2-solitary wave solutions of the three (2+1)-dimensional equations can be obtained successfully. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11301153 and the Doctoral Foundation of Henan University of Science and Technology under Grant No. 09001562, and the Science and Technology Innovation Platform of Henan University of Science and Technology under Grant No. 2015XPT001

  14. Mode decomposition evolution equations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be

  15. Mode decomposition evolution equations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2012-03-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be

  16. Infinite hierarchy of nonlinear Schrödinger equations and their solutions.

    PubMed

    Ankiewicz, A; Kedziora, D J; Chowdury, A; Bandelow, U; Akhmediev, N

    2016-01-01

    We study the infinite integrable nonlinear Schrödinger equation hierarchy beyond the Lakshmanan-Porsezian-Daniel equation which is a particular (fourth-order) case of the hierarchy. In particular, we present the generalized Lax pair and generalized soliton solutions, plane wave solutions, Akhmediev breathers, Kuznetsov-Ma breathers, periodic solutions, and rogue wave solutions for this infinite-order hierarchy. We find that "even- order" equations in the set affect phase and "stretching factors" in the solutions, while "odd-order" equations affect the velocities. Hence odd-order equation solutions can be real functions, while even-order equation solutions are always complex.

  17. Hydrodynamic representation of the Klein-Gordon-Einstein equations in the weak field limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Abril; Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2015-11-01

    Using a generalization of the Madelung transformation, we derive the hydrodynamic representation of the Klein-Gordon-Einstein equations in the weak field limit. We consider a complex self-interacting scalar field with an arbitrary potential of the form V(|ϕ|2). We compare the results with simplified models in which the gravitational potential is introduced by hand in the Klein-Gordon equation, and assumed to satisfy a (generalized) Poisson equation. Nonrelativistic hydrodynamic equations based on the Schrodinger-Poisson equations or on the Gross-Pitaevskii-Poisson equations are recovered in the limit c → +∞.

  18. Perfectly matched layers for Maxwell's equations in second order formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sjogreen, B; Petersson, A

    2004-07-26

    We consider the two-dimensional Maxwell's equations in domains external to perfectly conducting objects of complex shape. The equations are discretized using a node-centered finite-difference scheme on a Cartesian grid and the boundary condition are discretized to second order accuracy employing an embedded technique which does not suffer from a ''small-cell'' time-step restriction in the explicit time-integration method. The computational domain is truncated by a perfectly matched layer (PML). We derive estimates for both the error due to reflections at the outer boundary of the PML, and due to discretizing the continuous PML equations. Using these estimates, we show how the parameters of the PML can be chosen to make the discrete solution of the PML equations converge to the solution of Maxwell's equations on the unbounded domain, as the grid size goes to zero. Several numerical examples are given.

  19. Multigrid shallow water equations on an FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffress, Stephen; Duben, Peter; Palmer, Tim

    2015-04-01

    A novel computing technology for multigrid shallow water equations is investigated. As power consumption begins to constrain traditional supercomputing advances, weather and climate simulators are exploring alternative technologies that achieve efficiency gains through massively parallel and low power architectures. In recent years FPGA implementations of reduced complexity atmospheric models have shown accelerated speeds and reduced power consumption compared to multi-core CPU integrations. We continue this line of research by designing an FPGA dataflow engine for a mulitgrid version of the 2D shallow water equations. The multigrid algorithm couples grids of variable resolution to improve accuracy. We show that a significant reduction of precision in the floating point representation of the fine grid variables allows greater parallelism and thus improved overall peformance while maintaining accurate integrations. Preliminary designs have been constructed by software emulation. Results of the hardware implementation will be presented at the conference.

  20. A New Low Dissipative High Order Schemes for MHD Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this talk is to extend our recently developed highly parallelizable nonlinear stable high order schemes for complex multiscale hydrodynamic applications to the viscous MHD equations. These schemes employed multiresolution wavelets as adaptive numerical dissipation controls to limit the amount and to aid the selection and/or blending of the appropriate types of dissipation to be used. The new scheme is formulated for both the conservative and non-conservative form of the MHD equations in curvilinear grids.

  1. Ito equations out of domino cellular automaton with efficiency parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowski, Zbigniew; Białecki, Mariusz

    2012-06-01

    Ito equations are derived for simple stochastic cellular automaton with parameters describing efficiencies for avalanche triggering and cell occupation. Analytical results are compared with the numerical one obtained from the histogram method. Good agreement for various parameters supports the wide applicability of the Ito equation as a macroscopic model of some cellular automata and complex natural phenomena which manifest random energy release. Also, the paper is an example of effectiveness of histogram procedure as an adequate method of nonlinear modeling of time series.

  2. The (G'/G)-expansion method for the nonlinear time fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unsal, Omer; Guner, Ozkan; Bekir, Ahmet; Cevikel, Adem C.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we obtain exact solutions of two time fractional differential equations using Jumarie's modified Riemann-Liouville derivative which is encountered in mathematical physics and applied mathematics; namely (3 + 1)-dimensional time fractional KdV-ZK equation and time fractional ADR equation by using fractional complex transform and (G/'G )-expansion method. It is shown that the considered transform and method are very useful in solving nonlinear fractional differential equations.

  3. New Solutions of Three Nonlinear Space- and Time-Fractional Partial Differential Equations in Mathematical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ruo-Xia; Wang, Wei; Chen, Ting-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Motivated by the widely used ansätz method and starting from the modified Riemann—Liouville derivative together with a fractional complex transformation that can be utilized to transform nonlinear fractional partial differential equations to nonlinear ordinary differential equations, new types of exact traveling wave solutions to three important nonlinear space- and time-fractional partial differential equations are obtained simultaneously in terms of solutions of a Riccati equation. The results are new and first reported in this paper.

  4. Coagulation equations with gelation

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriks, E.M.; Ernst, M.H.; Ziff, R.M.

    1983-06-01

    Smoluchowski's equation for rapid coagulation is used to describe the kinetics of gelation, in which the coagulation kernel K/sub i/j models the bonding mechanism. For different classes of kernels we derive criteria for the occurrences of gelation, and obtain critical exponents in the pre- and postgelation stage in terms of the model parameters; we calculate bounds on the time of gelation t/sub c/, and give an exact postgelation solution for the model K/sub i/j = (ij)/sup ..omega../ (..omega..>1/2) and K/sub i/j = ..cap alpha../sup i/+j (..cap alpha..>1). For the model K/sub i/j = i/sup ..omega../+j/sup ..omega../ (..omega..<1, without gelation) initial solutions are given. It is argued that the kernel K/sub i/japprox. (ij)/sup ..omega../ with ..omega..approx. =1-1/d (d is dimensionality) effectively models the sol-gel transformation is polymerizing systems and approximately accounts for the effects of cross-linking and steric hindrance neglected in the classical theory of Flory and Stockmayer (..omega.. = 1). For all ..omega.. the exponents, tau = ..omega..+3/2 and sigma = ..omega..-1/2, ..gamma.. = (3/2-..omega..)/(..omega..-1/2) and ..beta.. = 1, characterize the size distribution, at the slightly below the gel point, under the assumption that scaling is valid.

  5. And now... Equations!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivron, Ran

    2006-12-01

    With the introduction of "Ranking Tests" some quantitative ideas were added to a large body of successful techniques for teaching conceptual astronomy. We incorporated those methods into our classes, and added a new ingredient: On a biweekly basis we included a quantitative excercise: Students working in groups of 2-3 draw geometrical figures, say: a circle, and use some trivial geometry equations, such as circumference = 2 x pi x r, in solving astronomy problems on 3'x4' white boards. A few examples included: Finding the distance to the moon with the Aristarchus method, finding the Solar Constant with the inverse square law, etc. Our methodolgy was similar to problem solving techniques in introductory physics. We were therefore worried that the students may be intimidated. To our surprize, not only did most students succeed in solving the problems, but they were not intimidated at all (that is: after the first class...) As a matter of fact, their test results improved, and the students interviewed expressed great enthusiasm for the new method. Warning: Our classes were relatively small <40 studets). For larger classes TA help is needed.

  6. JWL Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-15

    The JWL equation of state (EOS) is frequently used for the products (and sometimes reactants) of a high explosive (HE). Here we review and systematically derive important properties. The JWL EOS is of the Mie-Grueneisen form with a constant Grueneisen coefficient and a constants specific heat. It is thermodynamically consistent to specify the temperature at a reference state. However, increasing the reference state temperature restricts the EOS domain in the (V, e)-plane of phase space. The restrictions are due to the conditions that P ≥ 0, T ≥ 0, and the isothermal bulk modulus is positive. Typically, this limits the low temperature regime in expansion. The domain restrictions can result in the P-T equilibrium EOS of a partly burned HE failing to have a solution in some cases. For application to HE, the heat of detonation is discussed. Example JWL parameters for an HE, both products and reactions, are used to illustrate the restrictions on the domain of the EOS.

  7. Amplitude equation for a diffusion-reaction system: The reversible Sel'kov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    For a model glycolytic diffusion-reaction system, an amplitude equation has been derived in the framework of a weakly nonlinear theory. The linear stability analysis of this amplitude equation interprets the structural transitions and stability of various forms of Turing structures. This amplitude equation also conforms to the expectation that time-invariant amplitudes in Turing structures are independent of complexing reaction with the activator species, whereas complexing reaction strongly influences Hopf-wave bifurcation.

  8. Testing Complex Correlational Hypotheses with Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2006-01-01

    It is often of interest to estimate partial or semipartial correlation coefficients as indexes of the linear association between 2 variables after partialing one or both for the influence of covariates. Squaring these coefficients expresses the proportion of variance in 1 variable explained by the other variable after controlling for covariates.…

  9. University-Industry-Government Relations. A "Complexes" Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marceau, Jane

    1996-01-01

    The triple helix image of university-industry-government relations should be reconsidered with a focus on knowledge production systems. Public policies aimed at improving relationships should recognize the contributions made in this new mode of production and take into account users as the fourth player. (SK)

  10. Doctoral Assistants = Critical Friends: A Simple yet Complex Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, John; Laguerre, Fabrice; Moore, Eric; Reedy, Katherine; Rose, Scott; Vickers, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) encourages doctoral candidates volunteering in order to give back and continue their relationship with the university after completing their dissertation. Volunteering can take on many forms, from acting as doctoral assistants to performing the role of critical friends on future doctoral…

  11. A note on "Kepler's equation".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutka, J.

    1997-07-01

    This note briefly points out the formal similarity between Kepler's equation and equations developed in Hindu and Islamic astronomy for describing the lunar parallax. Specifically, an iterative method for calculating the lunar parallax has been developed by the astronomer Habash al-Hasib al-Marwazi (about 850 A.D., Turkestan), which is surprisingly similar to the iterative method for solving Kepler's equation invented by Leonhard Euler (1707 - 1783).

  12. Electronic representation of wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veigend, Petr; Kunovský, Jiří; Kocina, Filip; Nečasová, Gabriela; Šátek, Václav; Valenta, Václav

    2016-06-01

    The Taylor series method for solving differential equations represents a non-traditional way of a numerical solution. Even though this method is not much preferred in the literature, experimental calculations done at the Department of Intelligent Systems of the Faculty of Information Technology of TU Brno have verified that the accuracy and stability of the Taylor series method exceeds the currently used algorithms for numerically solving differential equations. This paper deals with solution of Telegraph equation using modelling of a series small pieces of the wire. Corresponding differential equations are solved by the Modern Taylor Series Method.

  13. Sedeonic equations of ideal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, Victor L.; Mironov, Sergey V.

    2017-08-01

    In the present paper, we propose the generalized equations for an ideal fluid based on space-time algebra of sixteen-component sedeons. It is shown that the dynamics of isentropic fluid can be described by sedeonic first-order wave equation for fluid potentials. The key features of the proposed formalism are illustrated on the problem of the sound waves propagation. We consider the plane wave solution of linearized sedeonic wave equation and derive the second-order relations for the sound potential analogues to the Poynting theorem in electrodynamics. The generalization of proposed sedeonic equations for the description of viscous fluid is also discussed.

  14. Electronic representation of wave equation

    SciTech Connect

    Veigend, Petr; Kunovský, Jiří Kocina, Filip; Nečasová, Gabriela; Valenta, Václav; Šátek, Václav

    2016-06-08

    The Taylor series method for solving differential equations represents a non-traditional way of a numerical solution. Even though this method is not much preferred in the literature, experimental calculations done at the Department of Intelligent Systems of the Faculty of Information Technology of TU Brno have verified that the accuracy and stability of the Taylor series method exceeds the currently used algorithms for numerically solving differential equations. This paper deals with solution of Telegraph equation using modelling of a series small pieces of the wire. Corresponding differential equations are solved by the Modern Taylor Series Method.

  15. Extracting Dynamical Equations from Experimental Data is NP Hard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubitt, Toby S.; Eisert, Jens; Wolf, Michael M.

    2012-03-01

    The behavior of any physical system is governed by its underlying dynamical equations. Much of physics is concerned with discovering these dynamical equations and understanding their consequences. In this Letter, we show that, remarkably, identifying the underlying dynamical equation from any amount of experimental data, however precise, is a provably computationally hard problem (it is NP hard), both for classical and quantum mechanical systems. As a by-product of this work, we give complexity-theoretic answers to both the quantum and classical embedding problems, two long-standing open problems in mathematics (the classical problem, in particular, dating back over 70 years).

  16. Extracting dynamical equations from experimental data is NP hard.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Toby S; Eisert, Jens; Wolf, Michael M

    2012-03-23

    The behavior of any physical system is governed by its underlying dynamical equations. Much of physics is concerned with discovering these dynamical equations and understanding their consequences. In this Letter, we show that, remarkably, identifying the underlying dynamical equation from any amount of experimental data, however precise, is a provably computationally hard problem (it is NP hard), both for classical and quantum mechanical systems. As a by-product of this work, we give complexity-theoretic answers to both the quantum and classical embedding problems, two long-standing open problems in mathematics (the classical problem, in particular, dating back over 70 years).

  17. A Circuit Equation as a Limit of Eddy Current Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirat, Youcef; Touzani, Rachid

    2017-06-01

    We consider a three-dimensional time-harmonic eddy current problem formulated in terms of the magnetic field. We prove that in the case of one thin toroidal conductor, eddy current equations have as a limit Kirchhoff's algebraic equation for circuits. This approximation is valid in the case of small resistivity and voltage.

  18. A Circuit Equation as a Limit of Eddy Current Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirat, Youcef; Touzani, Rachid

    2017-10-01

    We consider a three-dimensional time-harmonic eddy current problem formulated in terms of the magnetic field. We prove that in the case of one thin toroidal conductor, eddy current equations have as a limit Kirchhoff's algebraic equation for circuits. This approximation is valid in the case of small resistivity and voltage.

  19. Coal from the equator

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, P.

    1995-10-01

    In the mid-1970s PT Rio Tinto Indonesia, a wholly owned subsidiary of CRA of Australia, entered into an agreement with BP of the United Kingdom to explore jointly for coal in Indonesia on a 50:50 basis. In 1978, the government of Indonesia invited tenders from foreign companies for the exploration and development of coal resources in eastern and southern Kalimantan (Borneo). The CRA-BP joint venture was successful in bidding for an area of 7,900 km{sup 2} in two blocks extending 300 km along the coast of eastern Kalimantan. In April 1982, PT Kaltim Prima Coal (KPC) entered into an agreement with the Indonesian State Coal Company whereby it could explore, produce, and market coal from the agreed blocks for a period of 30 years. From 1982 to 1986, detailed exploration led to the delineation of several propsects of which the most promising was near the small town of Sangatta, 200 km north of Balikpapan and less than one degree north of the equator. After this exploration period KPC relinquished all but 1,962 km{sup 2} of the original agreement area. In its simplest form, the mining operation can be described as: a series of open pits, coal preparation facilities, 13.7 km of overland conveyor to the coast, and a marine terminal capable of handling bulk carriers of up to 200K dwt. The remote location necessities a fully supportive infrastructure, including a power station, housing, schools, hospitals, water supply, and recreational facilities. In 1994 the mine produced 10M mt coal of which 70% was Prima coal, one of the highest quality internationally traded thermal coals.

  20. A transport equation for eddy viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.; Yang, Z.

    1992-01-01

    A transport equation for eddy viscosity is proposed for wall bounded turbulent flows. The proposed model reduces to a quasi-homogeneous form far from surfaces. Near to a surface, the nonhomogeneous effect of the wall is modeled by an elliptic relaxation model. All the model terms are expressed in local variables and are coordinate independent; the model is intended to be used in complex flows. Turbulent channel flow and turbulent boundary layer flows with/without pressure gradient are calculated using the present model. Comparisons between model calculations and direct numerical simulation or experimental data show good agreement.

  1. Robinson-Trautman solutions to Einstein's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, William

    2017-02-01

    Solutions to Einstein's equations in the form of a Robinson-Trautman metric are presented. In particular, we derive a pure radiation solution which is non-stationary and involves a mass m, The resulting spacetime is of Petrov Type II A special selection of parametric values throws up the feature of the particle `rocket', a Type D metric. A suitable transformation of the complex coordinates allows the metrics to be expressed in real form. A modification, by setting m to zero, of the Type II metric thereby converting it to Type III, is then shown to admit a null Einstein-Maxwell electromagnetic field.

  2. Fast permutation preconditioning for fractional diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Feng; Huang, Ting-Zhu; Gu, Xian-Ming; Luo, Wei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an implicit finite difference scheme with the shifted Grünwald formula, which is unconditionally stable, is used to discretize the fractional diffusion equations with constant diffusion coefficients. The coefficient matrix possesses the Toeplitz structure and the fast Toeplitz matrix-vector product can be utilized to reduce the computational complexity from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text], where N is the number of grid points. Two preconditioned iterative methods, named bi-conjugate gradient method for Toeplitz matrix and bi-conjugate residual method for Toeplitz matrix, are proposed to solve the relevant discretized systems. Finally, numerical experiments are reported to show the effectiveness of our preconditioners.

  3. Diffusive instabilities in hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Zemskov, Evgeny P; Horsthemke, Werner

    2016-03-01

    We investigate two-variable reaction-diffusion systems of the hyperbolic type. A linear stability analysis is performed, and the conditions for diffusion-driven instabilities are derived. Two basic types of eigenvalues, real and complex, are described. Dispersion curves for both types of eigenvalues are plotted and their behavior is analyzed. The real case is related to the Turing instability, and the complex one corresponds to the wave instability. We emphasize the interesting feature that the wave instability in the hyperbolic equations occurs in two-variable systems, whereas in the parabolic case one needs three reaction-diffusion equations.

  4. Homotopy Solutions of Kepler's Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitz-Coy, Norman; Jang, Jiann-Woei

    1996-01-01

    Kepler's Equation is solved using an integrative algorithm developed using homotropy theory. The solution approach is applicable to both elliptic and hyperbolic forms of Kepler's Equation. The results from the proposed algorithm compare quite favorably with those from existing iterative schemes.

  5. Students' Understanding of Quadratic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López, Jonathan; Robles, Izraim; Martínez-Planell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Action-Process-Object-Schema theory (APOS) was applied to study student understanding of quadratic equations in one variable. This required proposing a detailed conjecture (called a genetic decomposition) of mental constructions students may do to understand quadratic equations. The genetic decomposition which was proposed can contribute to help…

  6. How Students Understand Physics Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherin, Bruce L.

    2001-01-01

    Analyzed a corpus of videotapes in which university students solved physics problems to determine how students learn to understand a physics equation. Found that students learn to understand physics equations in terms of a vocabulary of elements called symbolic forms, each associating a simple conceptual schema with a pattern of symbols. Findings…

  7. Uncertainty of empirical correlation equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistel, R.; Lovell-Smith, J. W.; Saunders, P.; Seitz, S.

    2016-08-01

    The International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS) has published a set of empirical reference equations of state, forming the basis of the 2010 Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater (TEOS-10), from which all thermodynamic properties of seawater, ice, and humid air can be derived in a thermodynamically consistent manner. For each of the equations of state, the parameters have been found by simultaneously fitting equations for a range of different derived quantities using large sets of measurements of these quantities. In some cases, uncertainties in these fitted equations have been assigned based on the uncertainties of the measurement results. However, because uncertainties in the parameter values have not been determined, it is not possible to estimate the uncertainty in many of the useful quantities that can be calculated using the parameters. In this paper we demonstrate how the method of generalised least squares (GLS), in which the covariance of the input data is propagated into the values calculated by the fitted equation, and in particular into the covariance matrix of the fitted parameters, can be applied to one of the TEOS-10 equations of state, namely IAPWS-95 for fluid pure water. Using the calculated parameter covariance matrix, we provide some preliminary estimates of the uncertainties in derived quantities, namely the second and third virial coefficients for water. We recommend further investigation of the GLS method for use as a standard method for calculating and propagating the uncertainties of values computed from empirical equations.

  8. Drug Levels and Difference Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    American university offers a course in finite mathematics whose focus is difference equation with emphasis on real world applications. The conclusion states that students learned to look for growth and decay patterns in raw data, to recognize both arithmetic and geometric growth, and to model both scenarios with graphs and difference equations.

  9. Equation of State of Solids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report describes a program for computing equation of state parameters for a material which undergoes a phase transition, either rate-dependent or...obtaining explicit temperature dependence if measurements are made at three temperatures. It is applied to data from calcite. Finally a theoretical equation of state is described for solid iron. (Author)

  10. Complete solution of Boolean equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapia, M. A.; Tucker, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    A method is presented for generating a single formula involving arbitary Boolean parameters, which includes in it each and every possible solution of a system of Boolean equations. An alternate condition equivalent to a known necessary and sufficient condition for solving a system of Boolean equations is given.

  11. Students' Understanding of Quadratic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López, Jonathan; Robles, Izraim; Martínez-Planell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Action-Process-Object-Schema theory (APOS) was applied to study student understanding of quadratic equations in one variable. This required proposing a detailed conjecture (called a genetic decomposition) of mental constructions students may do to understand quadratic equations. The genetic decomposition which was proposed can contribute to help…

  12. Generalized Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Skrondal, Anders; Pickles, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A unifying framework for generalized multilevel structural equation modeling is introduced. The models in the framework, called generalized linear latent and mixed models (GLLAMM), combine features of generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) and structural equation models (SEM) and consist of a response model and a structural model for the latent…

  13. The Bessel Equation and Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfinito, Eleonora; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    The Bessel equation can be cast, by means of suitable transformations, into a system of two damped/amplified parametric oscillator equations. The role of group contraction and the breakdown of loop-antiloop symmetry is discussed. The relation between the Virasoro algebra and the Euclidean algebras e(2) and e(3) is also presented.

  14. Unleashing Empirical Equations with "Nonlinear Fitting" and "GUM Tree Calculator"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell-Smith, J. W.; Saunders, P.; Feistel, R.

    2017-10-01

    Empirical equations having large numbers of fitted parameters, such as the international standard reference equations published by the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS), which form the basis of the "Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater—2010" (TEOS-10), provide the means to calculate many quantities very accurately. The parameters of these equations are found by least-squares fitting to large bodies of measurement data. However, the usefulness of these equations is limited since uncertainties are not readily available for most of the quantities able to be calculated, the covariance of the measurement data is not considered, and further propagation of the uncertainty in the calculated result is restricted since the covariance of calculated quantities is unknown. In this paper, we present two tools developed at MSL that are particularly useful in unleashing the full power of such empirical equations. "Nonlinear Fitting" enables propagation of the covariance of the measurement data into the parameters using generalized least-squares methods. The parameter covariance then may be published along with the equations. Then, when using these large, complex equations, "GUM Tree Calculator" enables the simultaneous calculation of any derived quantity and its uncertainty, by automatic propagation of the parameter covariance into the calculated quantity. We demonstrate these tools in exploratory work to determine and propagate uncertainties associated with the IAPWS-95 parameters.

  15. The Equations of Oceanic Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Modeling and prediction of oceanographic phenomena and climate is based on the integration of dynamic equations. The Equations of Oceanic Motions derives and systematically classifies the most common dynamic equations used in physical oceanography, from large scale thermohaline circulations to those governing small scale motions and turbulence. After establishing the basic dynamical equations that describe all oceanic motions, M|ller then derives approximate equations, emphasizing the assumptions made and physical processes eliminated. He distinguishes between geometric, thermodynamic and dynamic approximations and between the acoustic, gravity, vortical and temperature-salinity modes of motion. Basic concepts and formulae of equilibrium thermodynamics, vector and tensor calculus, curvilinear coordinate systems, and the kinematics of fluid motion and wave propagation are covered in appendices. Providing the basic theoretical background for graduate students and researchers of physical oceanography and climate science, this book will serve as both a comprehensive text and an essential reference.

  16. Upper bounds for parabolic equations and the Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestre, Luis

    2017-02-01

    We consider a parabolic equation in nondivergence form, defined in the full space [ 0 , ∞) ×Rd, with a power nonlinearity as the right-hand side. We obtain an upper bound for the solution in terms of a weighted control in Lp. This upper bound is applied to the homogeneous Landau equation with moderately soft potentials. We obtain an estimate in L∞ (Rd) for the solution of the Landau equation, for positive time, which depends only on the mass, energy and entropy of the initial data.

  17. Mathematical and numerical studies of nonstandard difference equation models of differential equations. Final technical report, September 1995--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mickens, R.E.

    1997-12-12

    The major thrust of this proposal was to continue our investigations of so-called non-standard finite-difference schemes as formulated by other authors. These schemes do not follow the standard rules used to model continuous differential equations by discrete difference equations. The two major aspects of this procedure consist of generalizing the definition of the discrete derivative and using a nonlocal model (on the computational grid or lattice) for nonlinear terms that may occur in the differential equations. Our aim was to investigate the construction of nonstandard finite-difference schemes for several classes of ordinary and partial differential equations. These equations are simple enough to be tractable, yet, have enough complexity to be both mathematically and scientifically interesting. It should be noted that all of these equations differential equations model some physical phenomena under an appropriate set of experimental conditions. The major goal of the project was to better understand the process of constructing finite-difference models for differential equations. In particular, it demonstrates the value of using nonstandard finite-difference procedures. A secondary goal was to construct and study a variety of analytical techniques that can be used to investigate the mathematical properties of the obtained difference equations. These mathematical procedures are of interest in their own right and should be a valuable contribution to the mathematics research literature in difference equations. All of the results obtained from the research done under this project have been published in the relevant research/technical journals or submitted for publication. Our expectation is that these results will lead to improved finite difference schemes for the numerical integration of both ordinary and partial differential equations. Section G of the Appendix gives a concise summary of the major results obtained under funding by the grant.

  18. A New Reynolds Stress Algebraic Equation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Lumley, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A general turbulent constitutive relation is directly applied to propose a new Reynolds stress algebraic equation model. In the development of this model, the constraints based on rapid distortion theory and realizability (i.e. the positivity of the normal Reynolds stresses and the Schwarz' inequality between turbulent velocity correlations) are imposed. Model coefficients are calibrated using well-studied basic flows such as homogeneous shear flow and the surface flow in the inertial sublayer. The performance of this model is then tested in complex turbulent flows including the separated flow over a backward-facing step and the flow in a confined jet. The calculation results are encouraging and point to the success of the present model in modeling turbulent flows with complex geometries.

  19. Generalized Langevin equation with tempered memory kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemert, André; Sandev, Trifce; Kantz, Holger

    2017-01-01

    We study a generalized Langevin equation for a free particle in presence of a truncated power-law and Mittag-Leffler memory kernel. It is shown that in presence of truncation, the particle from subdiffusive behavior in the short time limit, turns to normal diffusion in the long time limit. The case of harmonic oscillator is considered as well, and the relaxation functions and the normalized displacement correlation function are represented in an exact form. By considering external time-dependent periodic force we obtain resonant behavior even in case of a free particle due to the influence of the environment on the particle movement. Additionally, the double-peak phenomenon in the imaginary part of the complex susceptibility is observed. It is obtained that the truncation parameter has a huge influence on the behavior of these quantities, and it is shown how the truncation parameter changes the critical frequencies. The normalized displacement correlation function for a fractional generalized Langevin equation is investigated as well. All the results are exact and given in terms of the three parameter Mittag-Leffler function and the Prabhakar generalized integral operator, which in the kernel contains a three parameter Mittag-Leffler function. Such kind of truncated Langevin equation motion can be of high relevance for the description of lateral diffusion of lipids and proteins in cell membranes.

  20. Stagewise generalized estimating equations with grouped variables.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Gregory; Aseltine, Robert; Chen, Kun; Yan, Jun

    2017-02-13

    Forward stagewise estimation is a revived slow-brewing approach for model building that is particularly attractive in dealing with complex data structures for both its computational efficiency and its intrinsic connections with penalized estimation. Under the framework of generalized estimating equations, we study general stagewise estimation approaches that can handle clustered data and non-Gaussian/non-linear models in the presence of prior variable grouping structure. As the grouping structure is often not ideal in that even the important groups may contain irrelevant variables, the key is to simultaneously conduct group selection and within-group variable selection, that is, bi-level selection. We propose two approaches to address the challenge. The first is a bi-level stagewise estimating equations (BiSEE) approach, which is shown to correspond to the sparse group lasso penalized regression. The second is a hierarchical stagewise estimating equations (HiSEE) approach to handle more general hierarchical grouping structure, in which each stagewise estimation step itself is executed as a hierarchical selection process based on the grouping structure. Simulation studies show that BiSEE and HiSEE yield competitive model selection and predictive performance compared to existing approaches. We apply the proposed approaches to study the association between the suicide-related hospitalization rates of the 15-19 age group and the characteristics of the school districts in the State of Connecticut.

  1. The Einstein-Boltzmann equations revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadkarni-Ghosh, Sharvari; Refregier, Alexandre

    2017-10-01

    The linear Einstein-Boltzmann (E-B) equations describe the evolution of perturbations in the universe and its numerical solutions play a central role in cosmology. We revisit this system of differential equations and present a detailed investigation of its mathematical properties. For this purpose, we focus on a simplified set of equations aimed at describing the broad features of the matter power spectrum. We first perform an eigenvalue analysis and study the onset of oscillations in the system signalled by the transition from real to complex eigenvalues. We then provide a stability criterion of different numerical schemes for this linear system and estimate the associated step size. We elucidate the stiffness property of the E-B system and show how it can be characterized in terms of the eigenvalues. While the parameters of the system are time dependent making it non-autonomous, we define an adiabatic regime where the parameters vary slowly enough for the system to be quasi-autonomous. We summarize the different regimes of the system for these different criteria as function of wavenumber k and scalefactor a. We also provide a compendium of analytic solutions for all perturbation variables in six limits on the k-a plane and express them explicitly in terms of initial conditions. These results are aimed to help the further development and testing of numerical cosmological Boltzmann solvers.

  2. Spectrum of the ballooning Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Dewar, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The ballooning Schroedinger equation (BSE) is a model equation for investigating global modes that can, when approximated by a Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) ansatz, be described by a ballooning formalism locally to a field line. This second order differential equation with coefficients periodic in the independent variable {theta}{sub k} is assumed to apply even in cases where simple WKB quantization conditions break down, thus providing an alternative to semiclassical quantization. Also, it provides a test bed for developing more advanced WKB methods: e.g. the apparent discontinuity between quantization formulae for {open_quotes}trapped{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}passing{close_quotes} modes, whose ray paths have different topologies, is removed by extending the WKB method to include the phenomena of tunnelling and reflection. The BSE is applied to instabilities with shear in the real part of the local frequency, so that the dispersion relation is inherently complex. As the frequency shear is increased, it is found that trapped modes go over to passing modes, reducing the maximum growth rate by averaging over {theta}{sub k}.

  3. Solution of Pride's Equations Through Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyushchenkov, Boris D.; Turchaninov, Victor I.

    In 1994, S. Pride offered a system of equations describing interdependent propagation of acoustic and electromagnetic (EM) fields in porous media saturated by a fluid electrolyte (electrokinetic effect). We proved that the displacement vectors of frame and of pore fluid can be represented as a linear combinations of gradients of two scalar potentials and rotors of two vector potentials provided the coefficients of Pride's equations are independent of spatial coordinates. Each of these potentials satisfies Helmholtz equation with appropriate complex velocity. This representation underlies the computer code created by us for exploring borehole acoustics logging problems in axial-symmetric radially layered medium. Noteworthy, layers can be of any of the following types: uniform porous medium saturated by fluid electrolyte, uniform nonporous elastic medium, compressible nonviscous fluid or compressible viscous fluid. Results of numerical experiments are presented and discussed. The most important of them is that the back influence on acoustic disturbance of EM field excited by this disturbance is negligibly small in usually used frequency band and for realistic formation parameters. The mechanism of generation and propagation of different types of EM waves during acoustic logging is discussed as well.

  4. Linear stochastic degenerate Sobolev equations and applications†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaskos, Konstantinos B.; Pantelous, Athanasios A.; Stratis, Ioannis G.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a general class of linear stochastic degenerate Sobolev equations with additive noise is considered. This class of systems is the infinite-dimensional analogue of linear descriptor systems in finite dimensions. Under appropriate assumptions, the mild and strong well-posedness for the initial value problem are studied using elements of the semigroup theory and properties of the stochastic convolution. The final value problem is also examined and it is proved that this is uniquely strongly solvable and the solution is continuously dependent on the final data. Based on the results of the forward and backward problem, the conditions for the exact controllability are investigated for a special but important class of these equations. The abstract results are illustrated by applications in complex media electromagnetics, in the one-dimensional stochastic Dirac equation in the non-relativistic limit and in a potential application in input-output analysis in economics. Dedicated to Professor Grigoris Kalogeropoulos on the occasion of his seventieth birthday.

  5. Equating TIMSS Mathematics Subtests with Nonlinear Equating Methods Using NEAT Design: Circle-Arc Equating Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdemir, Burhanettin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to equate Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) mathematics subtest scores obtained from TIMSS 2011 to scores obtained from TIMSS 2007 form with different nonlinear observed score equating methods under Non-Equivalent Anchor Test (NEAT) design where common items are used to link two or more test…

  6. Higher derivative gravity: Field equation as the equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Ramit; Liberati, Stefano; Mohd, Arif

    2016-08-01

    One of the striking features of general relativity is that the Einstein equation is implied by the Clausius relation imposed on a small patch of locally constructed causal horizon. The extension of this thermodynamic derivation of the field equation to more general theories of gravity has been attempted many times in the last two decades. In particular, equations of motion for minimally coupled higher-curvature theories of gravity, but without the derivatives of curvature, have previously been derived using a thermodynamic reasoning. In that derivation the horizon slices were endowed with an entropy density whose form resembles that of the Noether charge for diffeomorphisms, and was dubbed the Noetheresque entropy. In this paper, we propose a new entropy density, closely related to the Noetheresque form, such that the field equation of any diffeomorphism-invariant metric theory of gravity can be derived by imposing the Clausius relation on a small patch of local causal horizon.

  7. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  8. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  9. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  10. On the Shallow Water Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrahman, Mahmoud A. E.

    2017-08-01

    We studied the shallow water equations of nonlinear conservation laws. First we studied the parametrisation of nonlinear elementary waves and hence we present the solution to the Riemann problem. We also prove the uniqueness of the Riemann solution. The Riemann invariants are formulated. Moreover we give an interesting application of the Riemann invariants. We present the shallow water system in a diagonal form, which admits the existence of a global smooth solution for these equations. The other application is to introduce new conservation laws for the shallow water equations.

  11. Langevin equations from time series.

    PubMed

    Racca, E; Porporato, A

    2005-02-01

    We discuss the link between the approach to obtain the drift and diffusion of one-dimensional Langevin equations from time series, and Pope and Ching's relationship for stationary signals. The two approaches are based on different interpretations of conditional averages of the time derivatives of the time series at given levels. The analysis provides a useful indication for the correct application of Pope and Ching's relationship to obtain stochastic differential equations from time series and shows its validity, in a generalized sense, for nondifferentiable processes originating from Langevin equations.

  12. Dirac's equation and the nature of quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2012-11-01

    This paper re-examines the key aspects of Dirac's derivation of his relativistic equation for the electron in order advance our understanding of the nature of quantum field theory. Dirac's derivation, the paper argues, follows the key principles behind Heisenberg's discovery of quantum mechanics, which, the paper also argues, transformed the nature of both theoretical and experimental physics vis-à-vis classical physics and relativity. However, the limit theory (a crucial consideration for both Dirac and Heisenberg) in the case of Dirac's theory was quantum mechanics, specifically, Schrödinger's equation, while in the case of quantum mechanics, in Heisenberg's version, the limit theory was classical mechanics. Dirac had to find a new equation, Dirac's equation, along with a new type of quantum variables, while Heisenberg, to find new theory, was able to use the equations of classical physics, applied to different, quantum-mechanical variables. In this respect, Dirac's task was more similar to that of Schrödinger in his work on his version of quantum mechanics. Dirac's equation reflects a more complex character of quantum electrodynamics or quantum field theory in general and of the corresponding (high-energy) experimental quantum physics vis-à-vis that of quantum mechanics and the (low-energy) experimental quantum physics. The final section examines this greater complexity and its implications for fundamental physics.

  13. A wave equation interpolating between classical and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleich, W. P.; Greenberger, D. M.; Kobe, D. H.; Scully, M. O.

    2015-10-01

    We derive a ‘master’ wave equation for a family of complex-valued waves {{Φ }}\\equiv R{exp}[{{{i}}S}({cl)}/{{\\hbar }}] whose phase dynamics is dictated by the Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the classical action {S}({cl)}. For a special choice of the dynamics of the amplitude R which eliminates all remnants of classical mechanics associated with {S}({cl)} our wave equation reduces to the Schrödinger equation. In this case the amplitude satisfies a Schrödinger equation analogous to that of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field where the roles of the scalar and the vector potentials are played by the classical energy and the momentum, respectively. In general this amplitude is complex and thereby creates in addition to the classical phase {S}({cl)}/{{\\hbar }} a quantum phase. Classical statistical mechanics, as described by a classical matter wave, follows from our wave equation when we choose the dynamics of the amplitude such that it remains real for all times. Our analysis shows that classical and quantum matter waves are distinguished by two different choices of the dynamics of their amplitudes rather than two values of Planck’s constant. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Richard Lewis Arnowitt—a pioneer of many-body theory, a path finder at the interface of gravity and quantum mechanics, and a true leader in non-relativistic and relativistic quantum field theory.

  14. Structural equation modeling for observational studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grace, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) represents a framework for developing and evaluating complex hypotheses about systems. This method of data analysis differs from conventional univariate and multivariate approaches familiar to most biologists in several ways. First, SEMs are multiequational and capable of representing a wide array of complex hypotheses about how system components interrelate. Second, models are typically developed based on theoretical knowledge and designed to represent competing hypotheses about the processes responsible for data structure. Third, SEM is conceptually based on the analysis of covariance relations. Most commonly, solutions are obtained using maximum-likelihood solution procedures, although a variety of solution procedures are used, including Bayesian estimation. Numerous extensions give SEM a very high degree of flexibility in dealing with nonnormal data, categorical responses, latent variables, hierarchical structure, multigroup comparisons, nonlinearities, and other complicating factors. Structural equation modeling allows researchers to address a variety of questions about systems, such as how different processes work in concert, how the influences of perturbations cascade through systems, and about the relative importance of different influences. I present 2 example applications of SEM, one involving interactions among lynx (Lynx pardinus), mongooses (Herpestes ichneumon), and rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), and the second involving anuran species richness. Many wildlife ecologists may find SEM useful for understanding how populations function within their environments. Along with the capability of the methodology comes a need for care in the proper application of SEM.

  15. A multigrid preconditioner for the semiconductor equations

    SciTech Connect

    Meza, J.C.; Tuminaro, R.S.

    1994-12-31

    Currently, integrated circuits are primarily designed in a {open_quote}trial and error{close_quote} fashion. That is, prototypes are built and improved via experimentation and testing. In the near future, however, it may be possible to significantly reduce the time and cost of designing new devices by using computer simulations. To accurately perform these complex simulations in three dimensions, however, new algorithms and high performance computers are necessary. In this paper the authors discuss the use of multigrid preconditioning inside a semiconductor device modeling code, DANCIR. The DANCIR code is a full three-dimensional simulator capable of computing steady-state solutions of the drift-diffusion equations for a single semiconductor device and has been used to simulate a wide variety of different devices. At the inner core of DANCIR is a solver for the nonlinear equations that arise from the spatial discretization of the drift-diffusion equations on a rectangular grid. These nonlinear equations are resolved using Gummel`s method which requires three symmetric linear systems to be solved within each Gummel iteration. It is the resolution of these linear systems which comprises the dominant computational cost of this code. The original version of DANCIR uses a Cholesky preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm to solve these linear systems. Unfortunately, this algorithm has a number of disadvantages: (1) it takes many iterations to converge (if it converges), (2) it can require a significant amount of computing time, and (3) it is not very parallelizable. To improve the situation, the authors consider a multigrid preconditioner. The multigrid method uses iterations on a hierarchy of grids to accelerate the convergence on the finest grid.

  16. Finding the Real Wave Equation Sought by Schrodinger for a Nonconservative System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Robert L. W.

    2004-05-01

    Schrodinger believed that a proper quantum mechanical wave equation should be a real wave equation rather than a complex one. The use of some modern mathematical works that did not exist in his time- a theorem in Courant & Hilbert Vol. II among others- enable us to (1) show that there is indeed a problem with the complex wave equation for the case of a nonconservative system, and (2) obtain a satisfactory real wave equation, applicable to conservative as well as nonconservative systems. The difference in results from the existing theory is significant for particles of very small mass.

  17. Exact solution of the space-time fractional coupled EW and coupled MEW equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raslan, K. R.; S. EL-Danaf, Talaat; K. Ali, Khalid

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we obtained a traveling wave solution by using the Kudryashov method for the space-time fractional nonlinear partial differential equations. The method is used to obtain the exact solutions for different types of the space-time fractional nonlinear partial differential equations, such as the space-time fractional coupled equal width wave equation (CEWE) and the space-time fractional coupled modified equal width wave equation (CMEWE), which are the important soliton equations. Both equations are reduced to ordinary differential equations by use of the fractional complex transform and of the properties of the modified Riemann-Liouville derivative. We plot the exact solutions for these equations at different time levels.

  18. The thermal-vortex equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1987-01-01

    The Boussinesq approximation is extended so as to explicitly account for the transfer of fluid energy through viscous action into thermal energy. Ideal and dissipative integral invariants are discussed, in addition to the general equations for thermal-fluid motion.

  19. Parametric Equations, Maple, and Tubeplots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feicht, Louis

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity that establishes a graphical foundation for parametric equations by using a graphing output form called tubeplots from the computer program Maple. Provides a comprehensive review and exploration of many previously learned topics. (ASK)

  20. On systems of Boolean equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leont'ev, V. K.; Tonoyan, G. P.

    2013-05-01

    Systems of Boolean equations are considered. The order of maximal consistent subsystems is estimated in the general and "typical" (in a probability sense) cases. Applications for several well-known discrete problems are given.