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Sample records for complexes electronic resource

  1. Electronic Resource Management and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Kimberly R.

    2015-01-01

    We have now reached a tipping point at which electronic resources comprise more than half of academic library budgets. Because of the increasing work associated with the ever-increasing number of e-resources, there is a trend to distribute work throughout the library even in the presence of an electronic resources department. In 2013, the author…

  2. Electronic Resources: A Wolf in Sheep's Clothing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Bradley L.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the impact of electronic technology on libraries and scholarship. Focuses on some of the challenges of using electronic resources in research libraries, which include cost of acquiring electronic formats and the effect such expenditures have on other library services and collection development practices. Explores how electronic resources…

  3. Searching Electronic Resources. Professional Growth Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Marjorie L.; And Others

    The ever-increasing availability of electronic information resources online and on CD-ROM presents library media specialists, teachers, and students with a new set of challenges for accessing information. Electronic information resources enable access to nonlinear information, which allows searchers to explore relationships and make connections…

  4. Implementing CORAL: An Electronic Resource Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    A 2010 electronic resource management survey conducted by Maria Collins of North Carolina State University and Jill E. Grogg of University of Alabama Libraries found that the top six electronic resources management priorities included workflow management, communications management, license management, statistics management, administrative…

  5. University Facilities for Electronic Resource Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haviland, David S.

    A report on electronic media investigates and reveals the basis for and the use of electronic resource systems on the university campus. Computer system facilities, environments, and equipment guidelines and criteria are given with the what, why and how aspects of the resource systems. The functions and categories of the university electronic…

  6. Information Skills for Electronic Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of developing strong skills in electronic searching and stresses the importance of teaching these skills across the curriculum. Several skill models, are suggested and components of search strategies are briefly outlined. (JKP)

  7. Metadata for Electronic Information Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    Foundation, establishes a specific syntax for the DOI under the Handle framework. The DOI is the basis for a system called CrossRef . CrossRef is a DOI...Registration Agency formed by a consortium of electronic journal publishers. The members of CrossRef deposit their DOIs into a central repository...maintained by CrossRef . The purpose of CrossRef is to facilitate linking between electronic journals, primarily from the references at the end of an article

  8. Herding Cats: Options for Organizing Electronic Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vellucci, Sherry L.

    1996-01-01

    Examines strengths and weaknesses of organizational systems developed to organize and access electronic resources available via the Internet. Highlights include library online catalogs; cataloging rules and MARC records; text encoding initiative (TEI) headers; the Internet union catalog; browsing lists; robot-generated indexes; a core data set of…

  9. Electronic Resources: Selection and Bibliographic Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattie, Ling-yuh W., Ed.; Cox, Bonnie Jean, Ed.

    This book is a baseline guide for professionals and library school students on issues that concern the selection and bibliographic control of electronic resources, from both conceptual and pragmatic standpoints. The book includes the following articles: (1) "Foreward" (Lois Mai Chan); (2) "Introduction" (Ling-yuh W. (Miko)…

  10. Reviewing the Electronic Resources & Libraries Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijerina, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    The third Electronic Resources & Libraries (ER&L) conference gathered at Georgia Institute of Technology's Global Learning and Conference Center in Atlanta, Georgia, March 18-21, 2008. Over 360 attendees, from six countries and from 80% of the United States, represented their libraries and organizations resulting in a diverse and…

  11. Making sense of the electronic resource marketplace: trends in health-related electronic resources.

    PubMed Central

    Blansit, B D; Connor, E

    1999-01-01

    Changes in the practice of medicine and technological developments offer librarians unprecedented opportunities to select and organize electronic resources, use the Web to deliver content throughout the organization, and improve knowledge at the point of need. The confusing array of available products, access routes, and pricing plans makes it difficult to anticipate the needs of users, identify the top resources, budget effectively, make sound collection management decisions, and organize the resources effectively and seamlessly. The electronic resource marketplace requires much vigilance, considerable patience, and continuous evaluation. There are several strategies that librarians can employ to stay ahead of the electronic resource curve, including taking advantage of free trials from publishers; marketing free trials and involving users in evaluating new products; watching and testing products marketed to the clientele; agreeing to beta test new products and services; working with aggregators or republishers; joining vendor advisory boards; benchmarking institutional resources against five to eight competitors; and forming or joining a consortium for group negotiating and purchasing. This article provides a brief snapshot of leading biomedical resources; showcases several libraries that have excelled in identifying, acquiring, and organizing electronic resources; and discusses strategies and trends of potential interest to biomedical librarians, especially those working in hospital settings. PMID:10427421

  12. Checklist Manifesto for Electronic Resources: Getting Ready for the Fiscal Year and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, Lenore; Fu, Li; Miller, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Organization of electronic resources workflow is critical in the increasingly complicated and complex world of library management. A simple organizational tool that can be readily applied to electronic resources management (ERM) is the use of checklists. Based on the principles discussed in The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right, the…

  13. From Tedious to Timely: Screencasting to Troubleshoot Electronic Resource Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartnett, Eric; Thompson, Carole

    2010-01-01

    The shift from traditional print materials to electronic resources, in conjunction with the rise in the number of distance education programs, has left many electronic resource librarians scrambling to keep up with the resulting inundation of electronic resource problems. When it comes to diagnosing these problems, words do not always convey all…

  14. Resource Letter CS-1: Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. E. J.

    2011-08-01

    A complex system is a system composed of many interacting parts, often called agents, which displays collective behavior that does not follow trivially from the behaviors of the individual parts. Examples include condensed-matter systems, ecosystems, stock markets and economies, biological evolution, and indeed the whole of human society. Substantial progress has been made in the quantitative understanding of complex systems, particularly since the 1980s, using a combination of basic theory, much of it derived from physics, and computer simulation. The subject is a broad one, drawing on techniques and ideas from a wide range of areas. Here, I give a selection of introductory resources, ranging from classic papers to recent books and reviews.

  15. Complex Moving Parts: Assessment Systems and Electronic Portfolios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Martha J.; Robertson, Royce L.

    2013-01-01

    The largest college within an online university of over 50,000 students invested significant resources in translating a complex assessment system focused on continuous improvement and national accreditation into an effective and efficient electronic portfolio (ePortfolio). The team building the system needed a model to address problems met…

  16. Computational complexity in electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, James Daniel; Love, Peter John; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-01-14

    In quantum chemistry, the price paid by all known efficient model chemistries is either the truncation of the Hilbert space or uncontrolled approximations. Theoretical computer science suggests that these restrictions are not mere shortcomings of the algorithm designers and programmers but could stem from the inherent difficulty of simulating quantum systems. Extensions of computer science and information processing exploiting quantum mechanics has led to new ways of understanding the ultimate limitations of computational power. Interestingly, this perspective helps us understand widely used model chemistries in a new light. In this article, the fundamentals of computational complexity will be reviewed and motivated from the vantage point of chemistry. Then recent results from the computational complexity literature regarding common model chemistries including Hartree-Fock and density functional theory are discussed.

  17. Electronic properties of complex nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhen

    Nanostructured materials have brought an unprecedented opportunity for advancement in many fields of human endeavor and in applications. Nanostructures are a new research field which may revolutionize people's everyday life. In the Thesis, I have used theoretical methods including density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamic simulations (MD) and tight-binding methods to explore the structural, mechanical and electronic properties of various nanomaterials. In all this, I also paid attention to potential applications of these findings. First, I will briefly introduce the scientific background of this Thesis, including the motivation for the study of a boron enriched aluminum surface, novel carbon foam structures and my research interest in 2D electronics. Then I will review the computational techniques I used in the study, mostly DFT methods. In Chapter 3, I introduce an effective way to enhance surface hardness of aluminum by boron nanoparticle implantation. Using boron dimers to represent the nanoparticles, the process of boron implantation is modeled in a molecular dynamics simulation of bombarding the aluminum surface by energetic B 2 molecules. Possible metastable structures of boron-coated aluminum surface are identified. Within these structures, I find that boron atoms prefer to stay in the subsurface region of aluminum. By modeling the Rockwell indentation process, boron enriched aluminum surface is found to be harder than the pristine aluminum surface by at least 15%. In Chapter 4, I discuss novel carbon structures, including 3D carbon foam and related 2D slab structures. Carbon foam contains both sp 2 and sp3 hybridized carbon atoms. It forms a 3D honeycomb lattice with a comparable stability to fullerenes, suggesting possible existence of such carbon foam structures. Although the bulk 3D foam structure is semiconducting, an sp2 terminated carbon surface could maintain a conducting channel even when passivated by hydrogen. To promote the experimental

  18. Quantum electron tunneling in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2011-05-12

    We have simulated the atomistic details of electronic wiring of all Fe/S clusters in complex I, a key enzyme in the respiratory electron transport chain. The tunneling current theory of many-electron systems is applied to the broken-symmetry (BS) states of the protein at the ZINDO level. While the one-electron tunneling approximation is found to hold in electron tunneling between the antiferromagnetic binuclear and tetranuclear Fe/S clusters without major orbital or spin rearrangement of the core electrons, induced polarization of the core electrons contributes significantly to decrease the electron transfer rates to 19-56 %. Calculated tunneling energy is about 3 eV higher than Fermi level in the band gap of the protein, which supports that the mechanism of electron transfer is quantum mechanical tunneling, as in the rest of the electron transport chain. Resulting electron tunneling pathways consist of up to three key contributing protein residues between neighboring Fe/S clusters. A signature of the wave properties of electrons is observed as distinct quantum interferences when multiple tunneling pathways exist. In N6a-N6b, electron tunnels along different pathways depending on the involved BS states, suggesting possible fluctuations of the tunneling pathways driven by the local protein environment. The calculated distance dependence of the electron transfer rates with internal water molecules included is in good agreement with a reported phenomenological relation.

  19. Use of Electronic Resources in Scholarly Electronic Journals: A Citation Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Susan Davis

    2002-01-01

    Describes a citation analysis of research articles from scholarly electronic journals published in 1999-2000 that focused on the extent to which scholars are using electronic resources and the types and subject areas of online resources that are being referenced. Results indicate a growing reliance on electronic resources, especially…

  20. Using Electronic Resources to Support Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chen-Chi; Jong, Ay; Huang, Fu-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Students acquire skills in problem solving and critical thinking through the process as well as team work on problem-based learning courses. Many courses have started to involve the online learning environment and integrate these courses with electronic resources. Teachers use electronic resources in their classes. To overcome the problem of the…

  1. The Role of the Acquisitions Librarian in Electronic Resources Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomerantz, Sarah B.

    2010-01-01

    With the ongoing shift to electronic formats for library resources, acquisitions librarians, like the rest of the profession, must adapt to the rapidly changing landscape of electronic resources by keeping up with trends and mastering new skills related to digital publishing, technology, and licensing. The author sought to know what roles…

  2. You Have "How Many" Spreadsheets? Rethinking Electronic Resource Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rux, Erika; Borchert, Theresa

    2010-01-01

    As libraries face a veritable explosion of electronic resources and as the interconnectedness of print and online resources becomes increasingly complicated, many librarians are challenged to find efficient and cost-friendly ways to manage these resources. In this article, the authors describe how a team of people from various library departments…

  3. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  4. Complex structures of dense lithium: Electronic origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyareva, V. F.

    2016-11-01

    Lithium—the lightest alkali metal exhibits unexpected structures and electronic behavior at high pressures. Like the heavier alkali metals, Li is bcc at ambient pressure and transforms first to fcc (at 7.5 GPa). The post-fcc high-pressure form Li-cI 16 (at 40-60 GPa) is similar to Na-cI 16 and related to more complex structures of heavy alkalis Rb-oC52 and Cs- oC84. The other high pressure phases for Li (oC88, oC40, oC24) observed at pressures up to 130 GPa are found only in Li. The different route of Li high-pressure structures correlates with its special electronic configuration containing the only 3 electrons (at 1s and 2s levels). Crystal structures for Li are analyzed within the model of Fermi sphere-Brillouin zone interactions. Stability of post-fcc structures for Li are supported by the Hume-Rothery arguments when new diffraction plains appear close to the Fermi level producing pseudogaps near the Fermi level and decreasing the crystal energy. The filling of Brillouin-Jones zones by electron states for a given structure defines the physical properties as optical reflectivity, electrical resistivity and superconductivity. To understand the complexity of structural and physical properties of Li above 60 GPa it is necessary to assume the valence electron band overlap with the core electrons and increase the valence electron count under compression.

  5. Electronic Media: A Motif for Shared Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightner, Stanley L.; Johnson, W. C.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of trade and industrial education supervisors from 10 states determined the degree of use of electronic education methods. Instructors in these states used presentation software and web-based exercises most often; fewer used video, CD-ROM, and distance technologies; 70% had been taught electronic presentation methods in preservice or…

  6. Complexity in electronic negotiation support systems.

    PubMed

    Griessmair, Michele; Strunk, Guido; Vetschera, Rudolf; Koeszegi, Sabine T

    2011-10-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the medium influences the way we communicate and negotiation research directs considerable attention to the impact of different electronic communication modes on the negotiation process and outcomes. Complexity theories offer models and methods that allow the investigation of how pattern and temporal sequences unfold over time in negotiation interactions. By focusing on the dynamic and interactive quality of negotiations as well as the information, choice, and uncertainty contained in the negotiation process, the complexity perspective addresses several issues of central interest in classical negotiation research. In the present study we compare the complexity of the negotiation communication process among synchronous and asynchronous negotiations (IM vs. e-mail) as well as an electronic negotiation support system including a decision support system (DSS). For this purpose, transcripts of 145 negotiations have been coded and analyzed with the Shannon entropy and the grammar complexity. Our results show that negotiating asynchronically via e-mail as well as including a DSS significantly reduces the complexity of the negotiation process. Furthermore, a reduction of the complexity increases the probability of reaching an agreement.

  7. Electronic neural network for dynamic resource allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Eberhardt, S. P.; Daud, T.

    1991-01-01

    A VLSI implementable neural network architecture for dynamic assignment is presented. The resource allocation problems involve assigning members of one set (e.g. resources) to those of another (e.g. consumers) such that the global 'cost' of the associations is minimized. The network consists of a matrix of sigmoidal processing elements (neurons), where the rows of the matrix represent resources and columns represent consumers. Unlike previous neural implementations, however, association costs are applied directly to the neurons, reducing connectivity of the network to VLSI-compatible 0 (number of neurons). Each row (and column) has an additional neuron associated with it to independently oversee activations of all the neurons in each row (and each column), providing a programmable 'k-winner-take-all' function. This function simultaneously enforces blocking (excitatory/inhibitory) constraints during convergence to control the number of active elements in each row and column within desired boundary conditions. Simulations show that the network, when implemented in fully parallel VLSI hardware, offers optimal (or near-optimal) solutions within only a fraction of a millisecond, for problems up to 128 resources and 128 consumers, orders of magnitude faster than conventional computing or heuristic search methods.

  8. Improving Electronic Resources through Holistic Budgeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusik, James P.; Vargas, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    To establish a more direct link between its collections and the educational goals of Saint Xavier University, the Byrne Memorial Library has adopted a "holistic" approach to collection development. This article examines how traditional budget practices influenced the library's selection of resources and describes how holistic collection…

  9. Negotiating two electronic resources for nursing.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, J; Kuipers, J

    1995-07-01

    The five primary knowledge resource databases available in the Virginia Henderson International Library are reviewed and other menu items are discussed including library services currently under development. This article guides nurse managers to access the library on their own computer. In addition, the opportunities and advantages of the new On-line Journal of Knowledge Synthesis for Nursing are related and requirements for accessing the journal are outlined.

  10. Cataloging and Indexing of Electronic Information Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    for a system called CrossRef . CrossRef is a DOI Registration Agency formed by a consortium of electronic journal publishers. The members of CrossRef ...deposit their DOIs into a central repository maintained by CrossRef . The purpose of CrossRef is to facilitate linking between electronic journals...primarily from the references at the end of an article to the full text for those articles. The DOI in CrossRef is used to form the reference link from a

  11. Using XML technologies to organize electronic reference resources.

    PubMed

    Huser, Vojtech; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Rocha, Roberto A

    2005-01-01

    Provision of access to reference electronic resources to clinicians is becoming increasingly important. We have created a framework for librarians to manage access to these resources at an enterprise level, rather than at the individual hospital libraries. We describe initial project requirements, implementation details, and some preliminary results.

  12. Integrating Print and Electronic Resources: Joyner Library's "Pirate Source"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nall, Clark; Lewis, Janice Steed

    2005-01-01

    Valuable information in print is often neglected because of the rapid proliferation of electronic resources and the bias of many library users against print sources. At Joyner Library, it was decided to construct an interactive subject guide database that included resources in all formats to offer users a convenient starting point for research and…

  13. Evaluating Electronic Resources: Personal Development Planning Resources at the Open University, a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelfs, Anne; Kelly, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the evaluation of Web-based tools to support Personal Development Planning (PDP) in order to illustrate issues associated with the introduction and assessment of the effectiveness of online resources. The aims of the evaluation were based on concerns about the very complex situation that offering online resources including PDP…

  14. Electronic structures of ytterbocene-imine complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Da Re, R. E.; Kuehl, C. J.; John, K. D.; Morris, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    The electronic structures of complexes of the form [(C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb(L)]{sup +/0} (L = bipyridine, phenanthroline, terpyridine) have been probed using cyclic voltammetry and electronic spectroscopy. Remarkably, the voltammetric data reveal that the imine-based LUMO is stabilized and the redox-active metal f orbital is destabilized by ca. 1 V each upon formation of the ytterbocene-imine adduct, which is presumably responsible for the [(f){sup 13}({pi}*(L)){sup 1}] charge-transfer ground state characteristic of these complexes. The ca. 0.8 V separation between ligand-based oxidation and metal-based reduction waves for each ytterbocene adduct correlates with the energy of its optically promoted {pi}*(L)-f(Yb) charge transfer (LMCT) transition (ca. 5000 cm{sup -1}). The coupling between this LMCT excited state and the {sup 2}F{sub 7/2} ground and {sup 2}F{sub 5/2} excited states of Yb(III) leads to unusually large intensities ({var_epsilon} {approx} 1000) for the metal-localized f-f bands, which will be discussed in the context of an intensity borrowing mechanism that invokes exchange between the ligand-based {sup 2}S and metal-based {sup 2}F spin states.

  15. Software Process Assurance for Complex Electronics (SPACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plastow, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Complex Electronics (CE) are now programmed to perform tasks that were previously handled in software, such as communication protocols. Many of the methods used to develop software bare a close resemblance to CE development. For instance, Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) can have over a million logic gates while system-on-chip (SOC) devices can combine a microprocessor, input and output channels, and sometimes an FPGA for programmability. With this increased intricacy, the possibility of software-like bugs such as incorrect design, logic, and unexpected interactions within the logic is great. Since CE devices are obscuring the hardware/software boundary, we propose that mature software methodologies may be utilized with slight modifications in the development of these devices. Software Process Assurance for Complex Electronics (SPACE) is a research project that looks at using standardized S/W Assurance/Engineering practices to provide an assurance framework for development activities. Tools such as checklists, best practices and techniques can be used to detect missing requirements and bugs earlier in the development cycle creating a development process for CE that will be more easily maintained, consistent and configurable based on the device used.

  16. Software Process Assurance for Complex Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plastow, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Complex Electronics (CE) now perform tasks that were previously handled in software, such as communication protocols. Many methods used to develop software bare a close resemblance to CE development. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) can have over a million logic gates while system-on-chip (SOC) devices can combine a microprocessor, input and output channels, and sometimes an FPGA for programmability. With this increased intricacy, the possibility of software-like bugs such as incorrect design, logic, and unexpected interactions within the logic is great. With CE devices obscuring the hardware/software boundary, we propose that mature software methodologies may be utilized with slight modifications in the development of these devices. Software Process Assurance for Complex Electronics (SPACE) is a research project that used standardized S/W Assurance/Engineering practices to provide an assurance framework for development activities. Tools such as checklists, best practices and techniques were used to detect missing requirements and bugs earlier in the development cycle creating a development process for CE that was more easily maintained, consistent and configurable based on the device used.

  17. Filling the Assurance Gap on Complex Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plastow, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the methods used to develop software bare a close resemblance to Complex Electronics (CE) development. CE are now programmed to perform tasks that were previously handled by software, such as communication protocols. For example, the James Webb Space Telescope will use Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), which can have over a million logic gates, to send telemetry. System-on-chip (SoC) devices, another type of complex electronics, can combine a microprocessor, input and output channels, and sometimes an FPGA for programmability. With this increased intricacy, the possibility of software-like bugs such as incorrect design, logic, and unexpected interactions within the logic is great. Since CE devices are obscuring the hardware/software boundary, mature software methodologies have been proposed, with slight modifications, to develop these devices. By using standardized S/W Engineering methods such as checklists, missing requirements and bugs can be detected earlier in the development cycle, thus creating a development process for CE that can be easily maintained and configurable based on the device used.

  18. Interweaving Knowledge Resources to Address Complex Environmental Health Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Beth Ellen; Suk, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Complex problems do not respect academic disciplinary boundaries. Environmental health research is complex and often moves beyond these boundaries, integrating diverse knowledge resources to solve such challenges. Here we describe an evolving paradigm for interweaving approaches that integrates widely diverse resources outside of traditional academic environments in full partnerships of mutual respect and understanding. We demonstrate that scientists, social scientists, and engineers can work with government agencies, industry, and communities to interweave their expertise into metaphorical knowledge fabrics to share understanding, resources, and enthusiasm. Objective Our goal is to acknowledge and validate how interweaving research approaches can contribute to research-driven, solution-oriented problem solving in environmental health, and to inspire more members of the environmental health community to consider this approach. Discussion The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program (SRP), as mandated by Congress, has evolved to become a program that reaches across a wide range of knowledge resources. SRP fosters interweaving multiple knowledge resources to develop innovative multidirectional partnerships for research and training. Here we describe examples of how motivation, ideas, knowledge, and expertise from different people, institutions, and agencies can integrate to tackle challenges that can be as complex as the resources they bring to bear on it. Conclusions By providing structure for interweaving science with its stakeholders, we are better able to leverage resources, increase potential for innovation, and proactively ensure a more fully developed spectrum of beneficial outcomes of research investments. Citation Anderson BE, Naujokas MF, Suk WA. 2015. Interweaving knowledge resources to address complex environmental health challenges. Environ Health Perspect 123:1095–1099

  19. Direct electronic probing of biological complexes formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchia, Eleonora; Magliulo, Maria; Manoli, Kyriaki; Giordano, Francesco; Palazzo, Gerardo; Torsi, Luisa

    2014-10-01

    Functional bio-interlayer organic field - effect transistors (FBI-OFET), embedding streptavidin, avidin and neutravidin as bio-recognition element, have been studied to probe the electronic properties of protein complexes. The threshold voltage control has been achieved modifying the SiO2 gate diaelectric surface by means of the deposition of an interlayer of bio-recognition elements. A threshold voltage shift with respect to the unmodified dielectric surface toward more negative potential values has been found for the three different proteins, in agreement with their isoelectric points. The relative responses in terms of source - drain current, mobility and threshold voltage upon exposure to biotin of the FBI-OFET devices have been compared for the three bio-recognition elements.

  20. Redesign of Library Workflows: Experimental Models for Electronic Resource Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Karen

    This paper explores the potential for and progress of a gradual transition from a highly centralized model for cataloging to an iterative, collaborative, and broadly distributed model for electronic resource description. The purpose is to alert library managers to some experiments underway and to help them conceptualize new methods for defining,…

  1. Electronic Commerce Resource Centers. An Industry--University Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulledge, Thomas R.; Sommer, Rainer; Tarimcilar, M. Murat

    1999-01-01

    Electronic Commerce Resource Centers focus on transferring emerging technologies to small businesses through university/industry partnerships. Successful implementation hinges on a strategic operating plan, creation of measurable value for customers, investment in customer-targeted training, and measurement of performance outputs. (SK)

  2. Electronic Resources: Access and Usage at Ashesi University College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadzie, Perpetua S.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Sets out to investigate the use of electronic resources by students and faculty of Ashesi University, Ghana, in order to determine the level of use, the type of information accessed and the effectiveness of the library's communication tools for information research. Design/methodology/approach: A questionnaire-based survey was utilized.…

  3. Functional Complexity in Soft Electronic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Alan

    2006-08-04

    A substantial change is presently taking place in experimental and theoretical approaches to large classes of "strongly correlated" materials. The change reflects growing evidence that multiscale complexity (in space and time) is frequently both intrinsic and functional, and further, that intimate relationships between hierarchies of functional scales consitute essential "Systems" or "Networks." This complexity provides qualitatively new avenues for predictive design of technological materaisl, including instrically nanoscale structures. In the search for underpinning concepts and principles, the prevalence of local constraints and coexisting short- and long-range forces have become apparent as keys to some major class of materaisl with emergent "landscapes" of spatio-temporal patterns and associated glassy dynamics and statistics. This talk reviews our recent work in these directions in the context of elastically-driven textures in (a) directionally-bonded electronic materials, including superonducting, magnetoresistant, and ferroelectric oxides; and (b) bubble opening patterns in DNA. Underscored is the importance of suites of experimental probes being applied to establish the networks of functional scales: microscopic to mesoscopic to macroscopic. Recent advances in angle-resolved photoemission and inelastic neutron scattering experimental techniques are particularly valuable in this regard.

  4. Evaluating the appropriateness of electronic information resources for learning

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Nathanial S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Current US medical students have begun to rely on electronic information repositories—such as UpToDate, AccessMedicine, and Wikipedia—for their pre-clerkship medical education. However, it is unclear whether these resources are appropriate for this level of learning due to factors involving information quality, level of evidence, and the requisite knowledgebase. This study evaluated appropriateness of electronic information resources from a novel perspective: amount of mental effort learners invest in interactions with these resources and effects of the experienced mental effort on learning. Methods Eighteen first-year medical students read about three unstudied diseases in the above-mentioned resources (a total of fifty-four observations). Their eye movement characteristics (i.e., fixation duration, fixation count, visit duration, and task-evoked pupillary response) were recorded and used as psychophysiological indicators of the experienced mental effort. Post reading, students' learning was assessed with multiple-choice tests. Eye metrics and test results constituted quantitative data analyzed according to the repeated Latin square design. Students' perceptions of interacting with the information resources were also collected. Participants' feedback during semi-structured interviews constituted qualitative data and was reviewed, transcribed, and open coded for emergent themes. Results Compared to AccessMedicine and Wikipedia, UpToDate was associated with significantly higher values of eye metrics, suggesting learners experienced higher mental effort. No statistically significant difference between the amount of mental effort and learning outcomes was found. More so, descriptive statistical analysis of the knowledge test scores suggested similar levels of learning regardless of the information resource used. Conclusions Judging by the learning outcomes, all three information resources were found appropriate for learning. UpToDate, however, when used

  5. How students combine resources to build understanding of complex topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Alan J.

    The field of Physics Education Research (PER) seeks to investigate how students learn physics and how instructors can help students learn more effectively. The process by which learners create understanding about a complex physics concept is an active area of research. My study explores this process, using solar cells as the context. To understand how a photovoltaic cell works involves drawing knowledge from many different areas of physics, so this provides a fertile area to study how students build understanding of complex ideas. I have used the "knowledge in pieces" theoretical framework to understand how students learn about solar cells by activating cognitive resources. In this framework, we can see learners building understanding out of more basic bits of knowledge, known as resources, that are derived from students' prior experience. This study seeks to learn more about how students combine multiple resources as they construct understanding of a complex physics topic. To achieve this goal, I have created instructional materials and assessment instruments used to collect written and spoken data on students' reasoning. The analysis of this data revealed that students are most likely to successfully build understanding when they activate multiple types of resource simultaneously. I propose possible explanations for this pattern and present ways this finding could impact instruction.

  6. E-Resources Management: How We Positioned Our Organization to Implement an Electronic Resources Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marilyn; Sanders, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The Information Services Division (ISD) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) positioned itself to successfully implement an electronic resources management system. This article highlights the ISD's unique ability to "team" across the organization to realize a common goal, develop leadership qualities in support of…

  7. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Complex Biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi

    2005-03-01

    For over a century vitamin B12 and its enzyme cofactor derivates have persistently attracted research efforts for their vital biological role, unique Co-C bonding, rich red-ox chemistry, and recently their candidacies as drug delivery vehicles etc. However, our understanding of this complex metalorganic molecule's efficient enzyme activated catalytic power is still controversial. We have for the first time calculated the electronic structure, Mulliken effective charge and bonding of a whole Vitamin B12 molecule without any structural simplification by first- principles approaches based on density functional theory using structures determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction. A partial density of states analysis shows excellent agreement with X-ray absorption data and has been used successfully to interpret measured optical absorption spectra. Mulliken bonding analysis of B12 and its derivatives reveal noticeable correlations between the two axial ligands which could be exploited by the enzyme to control the catalytic process. Our calculated X-ray near edge structure of B12 and its derivates using Slater's transition state theory are also in good agreement with experiments. The same approach has been applied to other B12 derivatives, ferrocene peptides, and recently DNA molecules.

  8. A Complex Systems Model Approach to Quantified Mineral Resource Appraisal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.; Bultman, M.W.; Fisher, F.S.

    2004-01-01

    For federal and state land management agencies, mineral resource appraisal has evolved from value-based to outcome-based procedures wherein the consequences of resource development are compared with those of other management options. Complex systems modeling is proposed as a general framework in which to build models that can evaluate outcomes. Three frequently used methods of mineral resource appraisal (subjective probabilistic estimates, weights of evidence modeling, and fuzzy logic modeling) are discussed to obtain insight into methods of incorporating complexity into mineral resource appraisal models. Fuzzy logic and weights of evidence are most easily utilized in complex systems models. A fundamental product of new appraisals is the production of reusable, accessible databases and methodologies so that appraisals can easily be repeated with new or refined data. The data are representations of complex systems and must be so regarded if all of their information content is to be utilized. The proposed generalized model framework is applicable to mineral assessment and other geoscience problems. We begin with a (fuzzy) cognitive map using (+1,0,-1) values for the links and evaluate the map for various scenarios to obtain a ranking of the importance of various links. Fieldwork and modeling studies identify important links and help identify unanticipated links. Next, the links are given membership functions in accordance with the data. Finally, processes are associated with the links; ideally, the controlling physical and chemical events and equations are found for each link. After calibration and testing, this complex systems model is used for predictions under various scenarios.

  9. Analysis of empty responses from electronic resources in infobutton managers

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jie; Hulse, Nathan C.; Tao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Infobuttons provide context-aware educational materials to both providers and patients and are becoming an important element in modern electronic health records (EHR) and patient health records (PHR). However, the content from different electronic resources (e-resource) as responses from infobutton manager has not been fully analyzed and evaluated. In this paper, we propose a method for automatically analyzing responses from infobutton manager. A tool is implemented to retrieve and analyze responses from infobutton manager. To test the tool, we extracted and sampled common and uncommon concepts from EHR usage data in Intermountain Healthcare’s enterprise data warehouse. From the output of the tool, we evaluate infobutton performance by multiple categories, including against the most and less common used concepts, grouped by different modules in patient portal, by different e-resources, and by type of access (standardized Health Level Seven (HL7) vs not). Based on the results of our evaluation, we provide suggestions for further enhancements of infobuttons to the current implementation, including suggesting accessing priorities of e-resources and encouraging the use of the HL7 standard. PMID:26958221

  10. Electronic Resources Evaluation Central: Using Off-the-Shelf Software, Web 2.0 Tools, and LibGuides to Manage an Electronic Resources Evaluation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, Lenore; Fu, Li

    2011-01-01

    A critical part of electronic resources management, the electronic resources evaluation process is multi-faceted and includes a seemingly endless range of resources and tools involving numerous library staff. A solution is to build a Web site to bring all of the components together that can be implemented quickly and result in an organizational…

  11. Journals, Data and Abstracts Make an Integrated Electronic Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, P.

    1996-12-01

    Astronomy now has an integrated, Web-based information resource for research papers, data and bibliographic information. The major scholarly research journals, a comprehensive abstract service and the astronomical data centers are now linked together to provide an information resource which is not available to most other scientific disciplines. As of January, 1997, the Astrophysical Journal joins the ApJ Letters on the Web. Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplements now has a page image version. Elsevier's electronic journal New Astronomy has recently made its appearance. Over forty percent of the new peer-reviewed, astronomical literature is now available electronically. The main Astronomy and Astrophysics journal, the Astronomical Journal and others will be available by 1998, at which point ninety percent of the literature will be available electronically, a figure not approached by any other scientific discipline. With so many different sources, one of the challenges has been to integrate the on-line, peer-reviewed literature into a resource which serves the astronomical community in a unified and coherent manner. Following the lead of the AAS, the major publishers have chosen to rely upon the NASA-supported Astrophysics Data System (ADS) and the astronomical data centers to provide the means by which the various separate journals can interoperate. The data centers and the ADS have developed unique identification codes for journal articles. By adopting the existing standard "bibcodes" and integrating them into their WWW links, each of the major astronomical journals are able to link to the abstracts of most of the referenced articles. Since the ADS also serves as an on-line repository for page images of the past twenty years of the major astronomical journals, the full text of many of the referenced articles are available, too. The articles in the ADS have recently been linked through their references, both forward and backward in time. With the "bibcode" providing

  12. Analysis of Human Resources Management Strategy in China Electronic Commerce Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Fang

    The paper discussed electronic-commerce's influence on enterprise human resources management, proposed and proved the human resources management strategy which electronic commerce enterprise should adopt from recruitment strategy to training strategy, keeping talent strategy and other ways.

  13. Evolution of complexity in a resource-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Lenin; Campos, Paulo R. A.

    2017-02-01

    Through a resource-based modelling the evolution of organismal complexity is studied. In the model, the cells are characterized by their metabolic rates which, together with the availability of resource, determine the rate at which they divide. The population is structured in groups. Groups are also autonomous entities regarding reproduction and propagation, and so they correspond to a higher biological organization level. The model assumes reproductive altruism as there exists a fitness transfer from the cell level to the group level. Reproductive altruism comes about by inflicting a higher energetic cost to cells belonging to larger groups. On the other hand, larger groups are less prone to extinction. The strength of this benefit arising from group augmentation can be tuned by the synergistic parameter γ. Through extensive computer simulations we make a thorough exploration of the parameter space to find out the domain in which the formation of larger groups is allowed. We show that formation of small groups can be obtained for a low level of synergy. Larger group sizes can only be attained as synergistic interactions surpass a given level of strength. Although the total resource influx rate plays a key role in determining the number of groups coexisting at the equilibrium, its function on driving group size is minor. On the other hand, how the resource is seized by the groups matters.

  14. Evaluating increased resource use in fibromyalgia using electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Jay M; Masters, Elizabeth T; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Smith, David M; Faulkner, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Objective The management of fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic musculoskeletal disease, remains challenging, and patients with FM are often characterized by high health care resource utilization. This study sought to explore potential drivers of all-cause health care resource utilization and other factors associated with high resource use, using a large electronic health records (EHR) database to explore data from patients diagnosed with FM. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of de-identified EHR data from the Humedica database. Adults (≥18 years) with FM were identified based on ≥2 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for FM (729.1) ≥30 days apart between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012 and were required to have evidence of ≥12 months continuous care pre- and post-index; first FM diagnosis was the index event; 12-month pre- and post-index reporting periods. Multivariable analysis evaluated relationships between variables and resource utilization. Results Patients were predominantly female (81.4%), Caucasian (87.7%), with a mean (standard deviation) age of 54.4 (14.8) years. The highest health care resource utilization was observed for the categories of “medication orders” and “physician office visits,” with 12-month post-index means of 21.2 (21.5) drug orders/patient and 15.1 (18.1) office visits/patient; the latter accounted for 73.3% of all health care visits. Opioids were the most common prescription medication, 44.3% of all patients. The chance of high resource use was significantly increased (P<0.001) 26% among African-Americans vs Caucasians and for patients with specific comorbid conditions ranging from 6% (musculoskeletal pain or depression/bipolar disorder) to 21% (congestive heart failure). Factors significantly associated with increased medications ordered included being female (P<0.001) and specific comorbid conditions (P<0.05). Conclusion Physician office visits and pharmacotherapy orders were key

  15. Effects of Electronic Information Resources Skills Training for Lecturers on Pedagogical Practices and Research Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhukuvhani, Crispen; Chiparausha, Blessing; Zuvalinyenga, Dorcas

    2012-01-01

    Lecturers use various electronic resources at different frequencies. The university library's information literacy skills workshops and seminars are the main sources of knowledge of accessing electronic resources. The use of electronic resources can be said to have positively affected lecturers' pedagogical practices and their work in general. The…

  16. Electronic Resources and Mission Creep: Reorganizing the Library for the Twenty-First Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stachokas, George

    2009-01-01

    The position of electronic resources librarian was created to serve as a specialist in the negotiation of license agreements for electronic resources, but mission creep has added more functions to the routine work of electronic resources such as cataloging, gathering information for collection development, and technical support. As electronic…

  17. Internal switches modulating electron tunneling currents in respiratory complex III.

    PubMed

    Hagras, Muhammad A; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2016-06-01

    In different X-ray crystal structures of bc1 complex, some of the key residues of electron tunneling pathways are observed in different conformations; here we examine their relative importance in modulating electron transfer and propose their possible gating function in the Q-cycle. The study includes inter-monomeric electron transfer; here we provide atomistic details of the reaction, and discuss the possible roles of inter-monomeric electronic communication in bc(1) complex. Binding of natural ligands or inhibitors leads to local conformational changes which propagate through protein and control the conformation of key residues involved in the electron tunneling pathways. Aromatic-aromatic interactions are highly utilized in the communication network since the key residues are aromatic in nature. The calculations show that there is a substantial change of the electron transfer rates between different redox pairs depending on the different conformations acquired by the key residues of the complex.

  18. Computational resources for cryo-electron tomography in Bsoft.

    PubMed

    Heymann, J Bernard; Cardone, Giovanni; Winkler, Dennis C; Steven, Alasdair C

    2008-03-01

    The Bsoft package [Heymann, J.B., Belnap, D.M., 2007. Bsoft: image processing and molecular modeling for electron microscopy. J. Struct. Biol. 157, 3-18] has been enhanced by adding utilities for processing electron tomographic (ET) data; in particular, cryo-ET data characterized by low contrast and high noise. To handle the high computational load efficiently, a workflow was developed, based on the database-like parameter handling in Bsoft, aimed at minimizing user interaction and facilitating automation. To the same end, scripting elements distribute the processing among multiple processors on the same or different computers. The resolution of a tomogram depends on the precision of projection alignment, which is usually based on pinpointing fiducial markers (electron-dense gold particles). Alignment requires accurate specification of the tilt axis, and our protocol includes a procedure for determining it to adequate accuracy. Refinement of projection alignment provides information that allows assessment of its precision, as well as projection quality control. We implemented a reciprocal space algorithm that affords an alternative to back-projection or real space algorithms for calculating tomograms. Resources are also included that allow resolution assessment by cross-validation (NLOO2D); denoising and interpretation; and the extraction, mutual alignment, and averaging of tomographic sub-volumes.

  19. Fingerprinting Electronic Molecular Complexes in Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmalraj, Peter; La Rosa, Andrea; Thompson, Damien; Sousa, Marilyne; Martin, Nazario; Gotsmann, Bernd; Riel, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the electronic framework of an organic molecule under practical conditions is essential if the molecules are to be wired in a realistic circuit. This demands a clear description of the molecular energy levels and dynamics as it adapts to the feedback from its evolving chemical environment and the surface topology. Here, we address this issue by monitoring in real-time the structural stability and intrinsic molecular resonance states of fullerene (C60)-based hybrid molecules in the presence of the solvent. Energetic levels of C60 hybrids are resolved by in situ scanning tunnelling spectroscopy with an energy resolution in the order of 0.1 eV at room-temperature. An ultra-thin organic spacer layer serves to limit contact metal-molecule energy overlap. The measured molecular conductance gap spread is statistically benchmarked against first principles electronic structure calculations and used to quantify the diversity in electronic species within a standard population of molecules. These findings provide important progress towards understanding conduction mechanisms at a single-molecular level and in serving as useful guidelines for rational design of robust nanoscale devices based on functional organic molecules.

  20. Fingerprinting Electronic Molecular Complexes in Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Nirmalraj, Peter; La Rosa, Andrea; Thompson, Damien; Sousa, Marilyne; Martin, Nazario; Gotsmann, Bernd; Riel, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the electronic framework of an organic molecule under practical conditions is essential if the molecules are to be wired in a realistic circuit. This demands a clear description of the molecular energy levels and dynamics as it adapts to the feedback from its evolving chemical environment and the surface topology. Here, we address this issue by monitoring in real-time the structural stability and intrinsic molecular resonance states of fullerene (C60)-based hybrid molecules in the presence of the solvent. Energetic levels of C60 hybrids are resolved by in situ scanning tunnelling spectroscopy with an energy resolution in the order of 0.1 eV at room-temperature. An ultra-thin organic spacer layer serves to limit contact metal-molecule energy overlap. The measured molecular conductance gap spread is statistically benchmarked against first principles electronic structure calculations and used to quantify the diversity in electronic species within a standard population of molecules. These findings provide important progress towards understanding conduction mechanisms at a single-molecular level and in serving as useful guidelines for rational design of robust nanoscale devices based on functional organic molecules. PMID:26743542

  1. Geothermal resources and energy complex use in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalova, V.

    2009-04-01

    Geothermal energy use is the perspective way to clean sustainable development of the world. Russia has rich high and low temperature geothermal resources and makes good steps in their use. In Russia the geothermal resources are used predominantly for heat supply both heating of several cities and settlements on Northern Caucasus and Kamchatka with a total number of the population 500000. Besides in some regions of country the deep heat is used for greenhouses of common area 465000 m2. Most active the hydrothermal resources are used in Krasnodar territory, Dagestan and on Kamchatka. The approximately half of extracted resources is applied for heat supply of habitation and industrial puttings, third - to a heating of greenhouses, and about 13 % - for industrial processes. Besides the thermal waters are used approximately on 150 health resorts and 40 factories on bottling mineral water. The most perspective direction of usage of low temperature geothermal resources is the use of heat pumps. This way is optimal for many regions of Russia - in its European part, on Ural and others. The electricity is generated by some geothermal power plants (GeoPP) only in the Kamchatka Peninsula and Kuril Islands. At present three stations work in Kamchatka: Pauzhetka GeoPP (11MW e installed capacity) and two Severo-Mutnovka GeoPP ( 12 and 50 MWe). Moreover, another GeoPP of 100 MVe is now under preparation in the same place. Two small GeoPP are in operation in Kuril's Kunashir Isl, and Iturup Isl, with installed capacity of 2,б MWe and 6 MWe respectively. There are two possible uses of geothermal resources depending on structure and properties of thermal waters: heat/power and mineral extraction. The heat/power direction is preferable for low mineralized waters when valuable components in industrial concentration are absent, and the general mineralization does not interfere with normal operation of system. When high potential geothermal waters are characterized by the high

  2. Assessing Ongoing Electronic Resource Purchases: Linking Tools to Synchronize Staff Workflows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Jeffrey D.; Major, Colleen; O'Neal, Nada; Tofanelli, John

    2012-01-01

    Ongoing electronic resource purchases represent a substantial proportion of collections budgets. Recognizing the necessity of systematic ongoing assessment with full selector engagement, Columbia University Libraries appointed an Electronic Resources Assessment Working Group to promote the inclusion of such resources within our current culture of…

  3. Electronic Safety Resource Tools -- Supporting Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Commercialization

    SciTech Connect

    Barilo, Nick F.

    2014-09-29

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrogen Safety Program conducted a planning session in Los Angeles, CA on April 1, 2014 to consider what electronic safety tools would benefit the next phase of hydrogen and fuel cell commercialization. A diverse, 20-person team led by an experienced facilitator considered the question as it applied to the eight most relevant user groups. The results and subsequent evaluation activities revealed several possible resource tools that could greatly benefit users. The tool identified as having the greatest potential for impact is a hydrogen safety portal, which can be the central location for integrating and disseminating safety information (including most of the tools identified in this report). Such a tool can provide credible and reliable information from a trustworthy source. Other impactful tools identified include a codes and standards wizard to guide users through a series of questions relating to application and specific features of the requirements; a scenario-based virtual reality training for first responders; peer networking tools to bring users from focused groups together to discuss and collaborate on hydrogen safety issues; and a focused tool for training inspectors. Table ES.1 provides results of the planning session, including proposed new tools and changes to existing tools.

  4. Controlling user access to electronic resources without password

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Fred Hewitt

    2015-06-16

    Described herein are devices and techniques for remotely controlling user access to a restricted computer resource. The process includes pre-determining an association of the restricted computer resource and computer-resource-proximal environmental information. Indicia of user-proximal environmental information are received from a user requesting access to the restricted computer resource. Received indicia of user-proximal environmental information are compared to associated computer-resource-proximal environmental information. User access to the restricted computer resource is selectively granted responsive to a favorable comparison in which the user-proximal environmental information is sufficiently similar to the computer-resource proximal environmental information. In at least some embodiments, the process further includes comparing user-supplied biometric measure and comparing it with a predetermined association of at least one biometric measure of an authorized user. Access to the restricted computer resource is granted in response to a favorable comparison.

  5. Electronic Resource Management 2.0: Using Web 2.0 Technologies as Cost-Effective Alternatives to an Electronic Resource Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Designed to assist with the management of e-resources, electronic resource management (ERM) systems are time- and fund-consuming to purchase and maintain. Questions of system compatibility, data population, and workflow design/redesign can be difficult to answer; sometimes those answers are not what we'd prefer to hear. The two primary functions…

  6. Synthesis, electronic, photoacoustic and electron spin resonance investigations on some tetrathiocyanate binuclear mixed-metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raghuvir

    Complexes of the type M 1M 2(SCN) 4xL[M 1 = Ni(II); M 2 = Cd(II) and Hg(II) and L = pyridine, morpholine, dioxan, benzo(f)quinoline, 2,2'-bipyridine, 2,2'-bipyridine N, N'-dioxide, isonicotinic acid hydrazide and 1,10-phenanthroline: x = 2 or 4] have been synthesized and characterized by chemical analysis, magnetic susceptibility, infrared, electronic and photoacoustic (PAS) spectra as well as electron spin resonance (ESR) spectral studies in the solid and solution state. The different coordination sites have been investigated in these ligands towards metal coordination and the behaviour of thiocyanate anions studied. Electron spin resonance spectral data for copper complexes show the distorted octahedral stereochemistry around copper(II) in these complexes. The parameters such as g∥, g⊥, A∥, A⊥, < g>, < A> and α 2 calculated for the copper complexes from their ESR spectra indicate the presence of unpaired electron in d x2- y2 or d z2 orbitals. The photoacoustic and electronic spectra of these complexes were studied in the solid state to see the nature of thiocyanate and overall symmetry of the complexes. The results on electronic and photoacoustic spectral studies are in good agreement with ESR data.

  7. Structural complexities in the active layers of organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephanie S; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has progressed rapidly in recent years. However, understanding the direct structure-function relationships between the morphology in electrically active layers and the performance of devices composed of these materials has proven difficult. The morphology of active layers in organic electronics is inherently complex, with heterogeneities existing across multiple length scales, from subnanometer to micron and millimeter range. A major challenge still facing the organic electronics community is understanding how the morphology across all of the length scales in active layers collectively determines the device performance of organic electronics. In this review we highlight experiments that have contributed to the elucidation of structure-function relationships in organic electronics and also point to areas in which knowledge of such relationships is still lacking. Such knowledge will lead to the ability to select active materials on the basis of their inherent properties for the fabrication of devices with prespecified characteristics.

  8. Developing Humanities Collections in the Digital Age: Exploring Humanities Faculty Engagement with Electronic and Print Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kachaluba, Sarah Buck; Brady, Jessica Evans; Critten, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on quantitative and qualitative research examining humanities scholars' understandings of the advantages and disadvantages of print versus electronic information resources. It explores how humanities' faculty members at Florida State University (FSU) use print and electronic resources, as well as how they perceive these…

  9. One-Stop Shopping: Presenting Disparate Electronic Resources through a Single Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briden, Judi; Reeb, Brenda; Zhang, Allison

    The Electronic Resources Team at the University of Rochester (New York) River Campus Libraries pursued the concept of one-stop shopping as a component of their new integrated library system Voyager, which debuted in January 1997. Faced with a growing variety of electronic resources with no single guide to their existence and access, the Team dealt…

  10. Quantum simulations of small electron-hole complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.A.; Kalia, R.K.; Vashishta, P.D.

    1984-09-01

    The Green's Function Monte Carlo method is applied to the calculation of the binding energies of electron-hole complexes in semiconductors. The quantum simulation method allows the unambiguous determination of the ground state energy and the effects of band anisotropy on the binding energy. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  11. The Relevancy of Graduate Curriculum to Human Resource Professionals' Electronic Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoell, Robert C.; Henry, Gordon O.

    2003-01-01

    Electronic communications of human resource professionals and the content of 23 university human resource management courses were categorized using the Human Resource Certification Institute's body of knowledge. Differences between proportion of topics discussed and topics covered in curricula suggest some topics are over- or undertaught.…

  12. Use and Users of Electronic Library Resources: An Overview and Analysis of Recent Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2003-01-01

    This Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) report summarizes and analyzes more than 200 recent research publications that focus on the use of electronic library resources (digital libraries and digital resources) and were published between 1995 and 2003. Eight major ongoing studies (each with multiple publications) are identified as…

  13. Strategic Planning for Electronic Resources Management: A Case Study at Gustavus Adolphus College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulseberg, Anna; Monson, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Electronic resources, the tools we use to manage them, and the needs and expectations of our users are constantly evolving; at the same time, the roles, responsibilities, and workflow of the library staff who manage e-resources are also in flux. Recognizing a need to be more intentional and proactive about how we manage e-resources, the…

  14. Glycan complexity dictates microbial resource allocation in the large intestine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structure of the human gut microbiota, which impacts on the health of the host, is controlled by complex dietary carbohydrates and members of the Bacteroidetes phylum are the major contributors to the degradation of complex dietary carbohydrates. The extent to which complex dietary carbohydrates...

  15. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    DOE PAGES

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G.; ...

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that ismore » not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the δ-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.« less

  16. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G.; Arnold, John

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that is not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the δ-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.

  17. The electronic spectra of mu-peroxodicobalt(III) complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miskowski, Vincent M.

    1987-01-01

    Problems found in the determination of the electronic spectra of mu-peroxodicobalt(III) complexes are considered, and the common formation of different mu-peroxocomplexes upon oxygenation of Co(II)-ligand solutions is discussed. Three classes of spectra have been identified: (1) planar single bridged complexes; (2) nonplanar single-bridged complexes with a dihedral angle near 145 deg; and (3) dibridged mu-OH(-),O2(2-) complexes with a dihedral angle near 60 deg. All of the peroxide ligand-to-metal charge-transfer spectra are found to be consistent with a simple model that assumes a sinusoidal dependence of pi-asterisk O2(2-) energies and sigma-overlaps upon the dihedral angle.

  18. Nursing resource considerations for implementing an electronic documentation system.

    PubMed

    Saletnik, Laurie Ann; Niedlinger, Margaret K; Wilson, Marisa

    2008-03-01

    Implementation of an or management information system (ORMIS) requires a significant commitment of human resources. The experiences of the personnel at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, as they transitioned to using a single, unified, computerized ORMIS are detailed in this article. Included are discussions of the nursing resources involved in the process, the lessons learned, and the work that remains to be completed for the hospital to fully utilize the system.

  19. Remote Electronic Resources and the OPAC: Illustrated by the Unisa Library Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Merwe, Ina; Van Eeden, Welna; Hartzer, Sandra

    This paper describes the Unisa (University of South Africa) Library's experience with cataloging remote electronic resources, including electronic journals, electronic text files, online databases, digital images, Unisa campus Web sites, and mailing list discussions. The first section discusses the decision to add bibliographic references for…

  20. Paper versus electronic documentation in complex chronic illness: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Smith, Catherine Arnott; Haque, Saira N

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports an analysis and comparison of the electronic and paper medical records of 5 clinically complex persons with spina bifida, who were seen as in- and outpatients at a small Northeastern urban hospital. The combination of chronic illness, multiple medical and allied health specialties, and longer lifespan in this population ensures both a quantitative volume and qualitative complexity of medical event documentation. This ensures a rich field for research into the content and the nature of the fragmented data presently locked in the paper record.

  1. [HYGIENIC REGULATION OF THE USE OF ELECTRONIC EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES IN THE MODERN SCHOOL].

    PubMed

    Stepanova, M I; Aleksandrova, I E; Sazanyuk, Z I; Voronova, B Z; Lashneva, L P; Shumkova, T V; Berezina, N O

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effect of academic studies with the use a notebook computer and interactive whiteboard on the functional state of an organism of schoolchildren. Using a complex of hygienic and physiological methods of the study we established that regulation of the computer activity of students must take into account not only duration but its intensity either. Design features of a notebook computer were shown both to impede keeping the optimal working posture in primary school children and increase the risk offormation of disorders of vision and musculoskeletal system. There were established the activating influence of the interactive whiteboard on performance activities and favorable dynamics of indices of the functional state of the organism of students under keeping optimal density of the academic study and the duration of its use. There are determined safety regulations of the work of schoolchildren with electronic resources in the educational process.

  2. Electronic Spectra of Bare and Solvated Ruthenium Polypyridine Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuang; Smith, James E. T.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2016-06-01

    We present work on a prototypical water oxidation catalyst, namely the aqua-complex [(bpy)(tpy)Ru-OH_2]2+ (2,2'-bpy = bipyridine, tpy = 2,2':6',2"-terpyridine), and its hydrated clusters [(bpy)(tpy)Ru-OH_2]2+ ·(H2O)_n, with n = 1 - 4. This complex is the starting species in a catalytic cycle for water oxidation. We couple electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with laser spectroscopy to circumvent challenges that arise in reactive solutions from speciation. Here, we report the electronic spectrum of [(bpy)(tpy)Ru-OH_2]2+ by photodissociation spectroscopy of mass selected, cryogenically prepared ions, and we examine effects of its microhydration environment on its electronic structure. In particular, we investigate the solvatochromic shift of the spectral envelope upon sequential addition of water molecules up to the tetrahydrate.

  3. Geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tsung-Lung; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2015-06-28

    The geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes are studied in this article. It is found that the potassium-rubrene (K{sub 1}RUB) complexes inherit the main symmetry characteristics from their pristine counterparts and are thus classified into D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like complexes according to the relative orientations of the four phenyl side groups. The geometric structures of K{sub 1}RUB are governed by two general effects on the total energy: Deformation of the carbon frame of the pristine rubrene increases the total energy, while proximity of the potassium ion to the phenyl ligands decreases the energy. Under these general rules, the structures of D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like K{sub 1}RUB, however, exhibit their respective peculiarities. These peculiarities can be illustrated by their energy profiles of equilibrium structures. For the potassium adsorption-sites, the D{sub 2}-like complexes show minimum-energy basins, whereas the C{sub 2h}-like ones have single-point minimum-energies. If the potassium atom ever has the energy to diffuse from the minimum-energy site, the potassium diffusion path on the D{sub 2}-like complexes is most likely along the backbone in contrast to the C{sub 2h}-like ones. Although the electronic structures of the minimum-energy structures of D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like K{sub 1}RUB are very alike, decompositions of their total spectra reveal insights into the electronic structures. First, the spectral shapes are mainly determined by the facts that, in comparison with the backbone carbons, the phenyl carbons have more uniform chemical environments and far less contributions to the electronic structures around the valence-band edge. Second, the electron dissociated from the potassium atom mainly remains on the backbone and has little effects on the electronic structures of the phenyl groups. Third, the two phenyls on the same side of the backbone as the potassium atom have more similar chemical environments

  4. Perspective: Explicitly correlated electronic structure theory for complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grüneis, Andreas; Hirata, So; Ohnishi, Yu-ya; Ten-no, Seiichiro

    2017-02-01

    The explicitly correlated approach is one of the most important breakthroughs in ab initio electronic structure theory, providing arguably the most compact, accurate, and efficient ansatz for describing the correlated motion of electrons. Since Hylleraas first used an explicitly correlated wave function for the He atom in 1929, numerous attempts have been made to tackle the significant challenges involved in constructing practical explicitly correlated methods that are applicable to larger systems. These include identifying suitable mathematical forms of a correlated wave function and an efficient evaluation of many-electron integrals. R12 theory, which employs the resolution of the identity approximation, emerged in 1985, followed by the introduction of novel correlation factors and wave function ansätze, leading to the establishment of F12 theory in the 2000s. Rapid progress in recent years has significantly extended the application range of explicitly correlated theory, offering the potential of an accurate wave-function treatment of complex systems such as photosystems and semiconductors. This perspective surveys explicitly correlated electronic structure theory, with an emphasis on recent stochastic and deterministic approaches that hold significant promise for applications to large and complex systems including solids.

  5. Glycan complexity dictates microbial resource allocation in the large intestine

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Artur; Briggs, Jonathon A.; Mortimer, Jennifer C.; Tryfona, Theodora; Terrapon, Nicolas; Lowe, Elisabeth C.; Baslé, Arnaud; Morland, Carl; Day, Alison M.; Zheng, Hongjun; Rogers, Theresa E.; Thompson, Paul; Hawkins, Alastair R.; Yadav, Madhav P.; Henrissat, Bernard; Martens, Eric C.; Dupree, Paul; Gilbert, Harry J.; Bolam, David N.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the human gut microbiota is controlled primarily through the degradation of complex dietary carbohydrates, but the extent to which carbohydrate breakdown products are shared between members of the microbiota is unclear. We show here, using xylan as a model, that sharing the breakdown products of complex carbohydrates by key members of the microbiota, such as Bacteroides ovatus, is dependent on the complexity of the target glycan. Characterization of the extensive xylan degrading apparatus expressed by B. ovatus reveals that the breakdown of the polysaccharide by the human gut microbiota is significantly more complex than previous models suggested, which were based on the deconstruction of xylans containing limited monosaccharide side chains. Our report presents a highly complex and dynamic xylan degrading apparatus that is fine-tuned to recognize the different forms of the polysaccharide presented to the human gut microbiota. PMID:26112186

  6. Making Sense of Complex Problems: A Resource for Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    of key challenges that military design teams encounter, and describes lessons, strategies , and approaches used by military leaders to optimize the...operational settings. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Planning teams, Design teams, Army Design Methodology, Best practices, Strategies ...address these unfamiliar problems.1 The resource offers practical tips, strategies , and examples designed to support planning teams and their leaders

  7. Iterative resource allocation for ranking spreaders in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhuo-Ming; Zeng, An; Chen, Duan-Bing; Liao, Hao; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2014-05-01

    Ranking the spreading influence of nodes in networks is a very important issue with wide applications in many different fields. Various topology-based centrality measures have been proposed to identify influential spreaders. However, the spreading influence of a node is usually not only determined by its own centrality but also largely influenced by the centrality of neighbors. To incorporate the centrality information of neighbors in ranking spreaders, we design an iterative resource allocation (IRA) process in which the resource of nodes distributes to their neighbors according to neighbors' centrality. After iterations, the resource amount on each node will be stable and the final resources of nodes are used to rank their spreading influence. The iterative process can be applied to many traditional centrality measures including degree, K-shell, closeness, and betweenness. The validation of our method is based on the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) spreading in four representative real datasets. The results show that the ranking accuracy of the traditional centrality measures is remarkably enhanced by IRA.

  8. Preservation of and Permanent Access to Electronic Information Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    up in this attitude as well. Electronic information includes a variety of object types such as electronic journals, e-books, databases , data sets...firewalls, require passwords to access, are hidden within Web-accessible databases , or require payment. The major lesson from efforts to develop selection...pages or those that are created out of a database , portal system, or content management system. The American Astronomical Society (AAS) has perhaps

  9. Building an Integrated User Interface to Electronic Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caswell, Jerry V.

    1997-01-01

    Client/server computing and the adoption of the World Wide Web make it possible for academic libraries to build automated library systems that present locally mounted and remote resources through a common interface. This article recounts issues encountered by the Iowa State University Library as it undertook this process. (Author/LRW)

  10. Interactive Printouts Integrating Multilingual Multimedia and Sign Language Electronic Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanev, Kamen; Barneva, Reneta P.; Brimkov, Valentin E.; Kaneva, Dimitrina

    2010-01-01

    In this article we outline our previous implementations of multilingual multimedia dictionaries and discuss possibilities for adding new functionalities and expanding their coverage. Independently developed sign language dictionary resources are further explored and considered for inclusion in an integrated multilingual multimedia dictionary with…

  11. Developing integrated methods to address complex resource and environmental issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathleen S.; Phillips, Jeffrey D.; McCafferty, Anne E.; Clark, Roger N.

    2016-02-08

    IntroductionThis circular provides an overview of selected activities that were conducted within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Integrated Methods Development Project, an interdisciplinary project designed to develop new tools and conduct innovative research requiring integration of geologic, geophysical, geochemical, and remote-sensing expertise. The project was supported by the USGS Mineral Resources Program, and its products and acquired capabilities have broad applications to missions throughout the USGS and beyond.In addressing challenges associated with understanding the location, quantity, and quality of mineral resources, and in investigating the potential environmental consequences of resource development, a number of field and laboratory capabilities and interpretative methodologies evolved from the project that have applications to traditional resource studies as well as to studies related to ecosystem health, human health, disaster and hazard assessment, and planetary science. New or improved tools and research findings developed within the project have been applied to other projects and activities. Specifically, geophysical equipment and techniques have been applied to a variety of traditional and nontraditional mineral- and energy-resource studies, military applications, environmental investigations, and applied research activities that involve climate change, mapping techniques, and monitoring capabilities. Diverse applied geochemistry activities provide a process-level understanding of the mobility, chemical speciation, and bioavailability of elements, particularly metals and metalloids, in a variety of environmental settings. Imaging spectroscopy capabilities maintained and developed within the project have been applied to traditional resource studies as well as to studies related to ecosystem health, human health, disaster assessment, and planetary science. Brief descriptions of capabilities and laboratory facilities and summaries of some

  12. On Convergence of Development Costs and Cost Models for Complex Spaceflight Instrument Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Patel, Umeshkumar D.; Kasa, Robert L.; Hestnes, Phyllis; Brown, Tammy; Vootukuru, Madhavi

    2008-01-01

    Development costs of a few recent spaceflight instrument electrical and electronics subsystems have diverged from respective heritage cost model predictions. The cost models used are Grass Roots, Price-H and Parametric Model. These cost models originated in the military and industry around 1970 and were successfully adopted and patched by NASA on a mission-by-mission basis for years. However, the complexity of new instruments recently changed rapidly by orders of magnitude. This is most obvious in the complexity of representative spaceflight instrument electronics' data system. It is now required to perform intermediate processing of digitized data apart from conventional processing of science phenomenon signals from multiple detectors. This involves on-board instrument formatting of computational operands from row data for example, images), multi-million operations per second on large volumes of data in reconfigurable hardware (in addition to processing on a general purpose imbedded or standalone instrument flight computer), as well as making decisions for on-board system adaptation and resource reconfiguration. The instrument data system is now tasked to perform more functions, such as forming packets and instrument-level data compression of more than one data stream, which are traditionally performed by the spacecraft command and data handling system. It is furthermore required that the electronics box for new complex instruments is developed for one-digit watt power consumption, small size and that it is light-weight, and delivers super-computing capabilities. The conflict between the actual development cost of newer complex instruments and its electronics components' heritage cost model predictions seems to be irreconcilable. This conflict and an approach to its resolution are addressed in this paper by determining the complexity parameters, complexity index, and their use in enhanced cost model.

  13. Stability of sulfate complexes of electronically excited uranyl

    SciTech Connect

    Ostakhov, S.S.; Kazakov, V.P.; Afonichev, D.D.

    1995-11-01

    The complex formation of electronically excited uranyl ions with SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}anions in 0.1 M aqueous HClO{sub 4} has been studied by time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. The stability constants of uranyl sulfate complexes (UO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (K=870 1 mol{sup -1}) and [UO{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup 2-}](K=47000 1 mol{sup -1}) in excited state have been determined; they are more than an order of magnitude greater than those reported for complex formation of uranyl ions in the ground state. The complex formation of uranyl with sulfate ions is accompanied by the increase of the quantum yield of the uranyl lumenescence. The maxima of luminescence and absorption bands of uranyl ions are shifted with increasing the total concentration of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in solution, which supports the data obtained. The shift of the maxima of luminescence bands is observed at a sulfate concentration that is considerably lower than that causing the same shift of the maxima of the absorption bands. Such effect is consistent with the calculated stability constants of sulfate complexes of excited uranyl ions.

  14. Complex formation dynamics in a single-molecule electronic device

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Huimin; Li, Wengang; Chen, Jiewei; He, Gen; Li, Longhua; Olson, Mark A.; Sue, Andrew C.-H.; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Guo, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule electronic devices offer unique opportunities to investigate the properties of individual molecules that are not accessible in conventional ensemble experiments. However, these investigations remain challenging because they require (i) highly precise device fabrication to incorporate single molecules and (ii) sufficient time resolution to be able to make fast molecular dynamic measurements. We demonstrate a graphene-molecule single-molecule junction that is capable of probing the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of a host-guest complex. By covalently integrating a conjugated molecular wire with a pendent crown ether into graphene point contacts, we can transduce the physical [2]pseudorotaxane (de)formation processes between the electron-rich crown ether and a dicationic guest into real-time electrical signals. The conductance of the single-molecule junction reveals two-level fluctuations that are highly dependent on temperature and solvent environments, affording a nondestructive means of quantitatively determining the binding and rate constants, as well as the activation energies, for host-guest complexes. The thermodynamic processes reveal the host-guest binding to be enthalpy-driven and are consistent with conventional 1H nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments. This electronic device opens up a new route to developing single-molecule dynamics investigations with microsecond resolution for a broad range of chemical and biochemical applications. PMID:28138528

  15. Managing Selection for Electronic Resources: Kent State University Develops a New System to Automate Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Kent State University has developed a centralized system that manages the communication and work related to the review and selection of commercially available electronic resources. It is an automated system that tracks the review process, provides selectors with price and trial information, and compiles reviewers' feedback about the resource. It…

  16. A Study on Developing Evaluation Criteria for Electronic Resources in Evaluation Indicators of Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noh, Younghee

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to improve the current state of electronic resource evaluation in libraries. While the use of Web DB, e-book, e-journal, and other e-resources such as CD-ROM, DVD, and micro materials is increasing in libraries, their use is not comprehensively factored into the general evaluation of libraries and may diminish the reliability of…

  17. An Evaluation of Electronic Product Design Education Using Hypermedia-Resourced Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Tom; Thorsteinsson, Gisli

    2006-01-01

    The work outlined here provides a comprehensive report and formative observations of the development and implementation of hypermedia resources for learning and teaching used in conjunction with a managed learning environment (MLE). These resources are used to enhance teaching and learning of an electronics module in product design at final year…

  18. Video Killed the Radio Star: Language Students' Use of Electronic Resources-Reading or Viewing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiliçkaya, Ferit

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate language students' use of print and electronic resources for their research papers required in research techniques class, focusing on which reading strategies they used while reading these resources. The participants of the study were 90 sophomore students enrolled in the research techniques class offered at…

  19. Using Electron Distributions to Probe Energy Surfaces at Complex R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macek, J. H.; Ovchinnikov, S. Yu.

    1997-04-01

    The hidden crossing theory describes ion-atom collisions(S. Yu. Ovchinnikov and E. A. Solovév, Comments At. Mol. Phys. 22) 69 (1988). in terms of a single function \\varepsilon(R) defined for all complex R, where R is the distance between target and projectile nuclei. Conventional adiabatic energy curves \\varepsilon_n(R) represent different branches of \\varepsilon(R) at real, positive R. Electron distributions are computed by evaluating a phase integral along an appropriate path in the complex R-plane. The real part of the phase oscillates rapidly for a class of transitions that proceed via the "top of barrier" mechanism. Electron distributions oscillate owing to interfrence between σ and π transitions, and this oscillation relates closely to the real part of \\varepsilon(R) for complex R. The oscillation rate is in qualitative agreement with measurements (R. Döner, K. Khemliche, M. H. Prior, C. L. Cocke, J. A. Gary, R. E. Olson, V. Mergel, J. Ullrich and H. Schmidt-Böking, Phys. Rev. Lett.77), 1024 (1996).

  20. Electronic Resources and the Education of History Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, William H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The transforming effects of the tremendous advances in technology that have reshaped the economy and many other elements of American society have had an equally profound impact on historical agencies. The personal computer, the Internet, and associated electronic communications developments have already transformed the museum and historical agency…

  1. How Students Combine Resources to Build Understanding of Complex Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    The field of Physics Education Research (PER) seeks to investigate how students learn physics and how instructors can help students learn more effectively. The process by which learners create understanding about a complex physics concept is an active area of research. My study explores this process, using solar cells as the context. To understand…

  2. Radio Resource Allocation on Complex 4G Wireless Cellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psannis, Kostas E.

    2015-09-01

    In this article we consider the heuristic algorithm which improves step by step wireless data delivery over LTE cellular networks by using the total transmit power with the constraint on users’ data rates, and the total throughput with the constraints on the total transmit power as well as users’ data rates, which are jointly integrated into a hybrid-layer design framework to perform radio resource allocation for multiple users, and to effectively decide the optimal system parameter such as modulation and coding scheme (MCS) in order to adapt to the varying channel quality. We propose new heuristic algorithm which balances the accessible data rate, the initial data rates of each user allocated by LTE scheduler, the priority indicator which signals delay- throughput- packet loss awareness of the user, and the buffer fullness by achieving maximization of radio resource allocation for multiple users. It is noted that the overall performance is improved with the increase in the number of users, due to multiuser diversity. Experimental results illustrate and validate the accuracy of the proposed methodology.

  3. Structural and Electronic Investigations of Complex Intermetallic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Hyunjin

    2008-01-01

    In solid state chemistry, numerous investigations have been attempted to address the relationships between chemical structure and physical properties. Such questions include: (1) How can we understand the driving forces of the atomic arrangements in complex solids that exhibit interesting chemical and physical properties? (2) How do different elements distribute themselves in a solid-state structure? (3) Can we develop a chemical understanding to predict the effects of valence electron concentration on the structures and magnetic ordering of systems by both experimental and theoretical means? Although these issues are relevant to various compound classes, intermetallic compounds are especially interesting and well suited for a joint experimental and theoretical effort. For intermetallic compounds, the questions listed above are difficult to answer since many of the constituent atoms simply do not crystallize in the same manner as in their separate, elemental structures. Also, theoretical studies suggest that the energy differences between various structural alternatives are small. For example, Al and Ga both belong in the same group on the Periodic Table of Elements and share many similar chemical properties. Al crystallizes in the fcc lattice with 4 atoms per unit cell and Ga crystallizes in an orthorhombic unit cell lattice with 8 atoms per unit cell, which are both fairly simple structures (Figure 1). However, when combined with Mn, which itself has a very complex cubic crystal structure with 58 atoms per unit cell, the resulting intermetallic compounds crystallize in a completely different fashion. At the 1:1 stoichiometry, MnAl forms a very simple tetragonal lattice with two atoms per primitive unit cell, while MnGa crystallizes in a complicated rhombohedral unit cell with 26 atoms within the primitive unit cell. The mechanisms influencing the arrangements of atoms in numerous crystal structures have been studied theoretically by calculating electronic

  4. Progression in Complexity: Contextualizing Sustainable Marine Resources Management in a 10th Grade Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bravo-Torija, Beatriz; Jimenez-Aleixandre, Maria-Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable management of marine resources raises great challenges. Working with this socio-scientific issue in the classroom requires students to apply complex models about energy flow and trophic pyramids in order to understand that food chains represent transfer of energy, to construct meanings for sustainable resources management through…

  5. The Tolman electronic parameter (TEP) and the metal-metal electronic communication in ditopic NHC complexes.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Dmitry G; Peris, Eduardo

    2013-05-28

    Whereas the electronic communication between metals in dimetallic organometallic compounds is often assessed through cyclic voltammetric measurements, we have found that the variations in the Tolman electronic parameter (TEP) can also be an alternative and effective way of determining this type of interaction. The TEP values of several (CO)3Ni-NHC-X systems with five different ditopic NHC ligand systems [triazolyldiylidene (A), bis(imidazolylidene) (B), benzobis(imidazolylidene) (C), cyclopenta[f,g]acenaphthylenebis(imidazolylidene) (D) and bis(imidazolidinylidene) (F)] were determined by means of DFT calculations. Based on these values, the electron-withdrawing character of the X metal fragments employed in this study was found to increase in the order IrCp(CO) → RhCl(COD) → Ni(CO)3 → Cr(CO)5 → RhCl(CO)2. We found that the degree of electronic interaction through the ditopic NHC ligands is the strongest in A, followed by B and F, while being weak in B and C. The TEP values and the quantitative analysis of the upper molecular orbitals of A and F and their (CO)3Ni-NHC-Ni(CO)3 complexes strongly suggest that the principal electronic interaction between the metal centres of the M-NHC-M' complexes is of σ-type, via the delocalized HOMO and HOMO - 1 orbitals of the NHC ligands.

  6. Beyond Information Quality: Fitness for Purpose and Electronic Information Resource Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klobas, Jane E.

    1995-01-01

    Examines influences on the use of electronic information resources, including the Internet. Highlights include information quality and accessibility; the Technology Assessment Model; the Fitness for Purpose model; the Theory of Planned Behavior; and a study in Australia that compared the ability of these models to explain electronic information…

  7. Where Do Electronic Books Fit in the College Research Arsenal of Resources?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbier, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Student use of electronic books has become an accepted supplement to traditional resources. Student use and satisfaction was monitored through an online course discussion board. Increased use of electronic books indicate this service is an accepted supplement to the print book collection.

  8. Protein complexing in a methanogen suggests electron bifurcation and electron delivery from formate to heterodisulfide reductase

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Kyle C.; Wong, Phoebe M.; Wang, Tiansong; Lie, Thomas J.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Swanson, Ingrid; Burn, June A.; Hackett, Murray; Leigh, John A.

    2010-01-01

    In methanogenic Archaea, the final step of methanogenesis generates methane and a heterodisulfide of coenzyme M and coenzyme B (CoM-S-S-CoB). Reduction of this heterodisulfide by heterodisulfide reductase to regenerate HS-CoM and HS-CoB is an exergonic process. Thauer et al. [Thauer, et al. 2008 Nat Rev Microbiol 6:579–591] recently suggested that in hydrogenotrophic methanogens the energy of heterodisulfide reduction powers the most endergonic reaction in the pathway, catalyzed by the formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase, via flavin-based electron bifurcation. Here we present evidence that these two steps in methanogenesis are physically linked. We identify a protein complex from the hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanococcus maripaludis, that contains heterodisulfide reductase, formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase, F420-nonreducing hydrogenase, and formate dehydrogenase. In addition to establishing a physical basis for the electron-bifurcation model of energy conservation, the composition of the complex also suggests that either H2 or formate (two alternative electron donors for methanogenesis) can donate electrons to the heterodisulfide-H2 via F420-nonreducing hydrogenase or formate via formate dehydrogenase. Electron flow from formate to the heterodisulfide rather than the use of H2 as an intermediate represents a previously unknown path of electron flow in methanogenesis. We further tested whether this path occurs by constructing a mutant lacking F420-nonreducing hydrogenase. The mutant displayed growth equal to wild-type with formate but markedly slower growth with hydrogen. The results support the model of electron bifurcation and suggest that formate, like H2, is closely integrated into the methanogenic pathway. PMID:20534465

  9. Preparation of macromolecular complexes for cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Grassucci, Robert A; Taylor, Derek J; Frank, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    This protocol describes the preparation of frozen-hydrated single-particle specimens of macromolecular complexes. First, it describes how to create a grid surface coated with holey carbon by first inducing holes in a Formvar film to act as a template for the holey carbon that is stable under cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) conditions and is sample-friendly. The protocol then describes the steps required to deposit the homogeneous sample on the grid and to plunge-freeze the grid into liquid ethane at the temperature of liquid nitrogen, so that it is suitable for cryo-EM visualization. It takes 4-5 h to make several hundred holey carbon grids and about 1 h to make the frozen-hydrated grids. The time required for sample purification varies from hours to days, depending on the sample and the specific procedure required. A companion protocol details how to collect cryo-EM data using an FEI Tecnai transmission electron microscope that can subsequently be processed to obtain a three-dimensional reconstruction of the macromolecular complex.

  10. Potassium under pressure: Electronic origin of complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyareva, V. F.

    2014-10-01

    Recent high-pressure X-ray diffraction studies of alkali metals revealed unusual complex structures that follow the body-centred and face-centred cubic structures on compression. The structural sequence of potassium under compression to 1 Mbar is as follows: bcc-fcc-h-g (tI19*), hP4-oP8-tI4-oC16. We consider configurations of Brillouin-Jones zones and the Fermi surface within a nearly-free-electron model in order to analyze the importance of these configurations for the crystal structure stability. Formation of Brillouin zone planes close to the Fermi surface is related to opening an energy gap at these planes and reduction of crystal energy. Under pressure, this mechanism becomes more important leading to appearance of complex low-symmetry structures. The stability of the post-fcc phases in K is attributed to the changes in the valence electron configuration under strong compression.

  11. Focused Research Group in Correlated Electron and Complex Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ziqiang

    2016-02-17

    While the remarkable physical properties of correlated and complex electronic materials hold great promise for technological applications, one of the key values of the research in this field is its profound impact on fundamental physics. The transition metal oxides, pnictides, and chalcogenides play a key role and occupy an especially important place in this field. The basic reason is that the outer shell of transition metals contains the atomic d-orbitals that have small spatial extent, but not too small to behave as localized orbtials. These d-electrons therefore have a small wave function overlap in a solid, e.g. in an octahedral environment, and form energy bands that are relatively narrow and on the scale of the short-range intra-atomic Coulomb repulsion (Hubbard U). In this intermediate correlation regime lies the challenge of the many-body physics responsible for new and unconventional physical properties. The study of correlated electron and complex materials represents both the challenge and the vitality of condensed matter and materials physics and often demands close collaborations among theoretical and experimental groups with complementary techniques. Our team has a track record and a long-term research goal of studying the unusual complexities and emergent behaviors in the charge, spin, and orbital sectors of the transition metal compounds in order to gain basic knowledge of the quantum electronic states of matter. During the funding period of this grant, the team continued their close collaborations between theory, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy and made significant progress and contributions to the field of iron-based superconductors, copper-oxide high-temperature superconductors, triangular lattice transition metal oxide cobaltates, strontium ruthenates, spin orbital coupled iridates, as well as topological insulators and other topological quantum states of matter. These results include both new

  12. Diameter dependent electron transfer kinetics in semiconductor-enzyme complexes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Katherine A; Song, Qing; Mulder, David W; King, Paul W

    2014-10-28

    Excited state electron transfer (ET) is a fundamental step for the catalytic conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. To understand the properties controlling ET between photoexcited nanoparticles and catalysts, the ET kinetics were measured for solution-phase complexes of CdTe quantum dots and Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase I (CaI) using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Over a 2.0-3.5 nm diameter range of CdTe nanoparticles, the observed ET rate (kET) was sensitive to CaI concentration. To account for diameter effects on CaI binding, a Langmuir isotherm and two geometric binding models were created to estimate maximal CaI affinities and coverages at saturating concentrations. Normalizing the ET kinetics to CaI surface coverage for each CdTe diameter led to k(ET) values that were insensitive to diameter, despite a decrease in the free energy for photoexcited ET (ΔGET) with increasing diameter. The turnover frequency (TOF) of CaI in CdTe-CaI complexes was measured at several molar ratios. Normalization for diameter-dependent changes in CaI coverage showed an increase in TOF with diameter. These results suggest that k(ET) and H2 production for CdTe-CaI complexes are not strictly controlled by ΔG(ET) and that other factors must be considered.

  13. 77 FR 50726 - Software Requirement Specifications for Digital Computer Software and Complex Electronics Used in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... COMMISSION Software Requirement Specifications for Digital Computer Software and Complex Electronics Used in... Digital Computer Software and Complex Electronics used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants.'' The DG... Requirement Specifications for Digital Computer Software and Complex Electronics used in Safety Systems...

  14. Controlling collective dynamics in complex minority-game resource-allocation systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Qiang; Huang, Zi-Gang; Dong, Jia-Qi; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Resource allocation takes place in various kinds of real-world complex systems, such as traffic systems, social services institutions or organizations, or even ecosystems. The fundamental principle underlying complex resource-allocation dynamics is Boolean interactions associated with minority games, as resources are generally limited and agents tend to choose the least used resource based on available information. A common but harmful dynamical behavior in resource-allocation systems is herding, where there are time intervals during which a large majority of the agents compete for a few resources, leaving many other resources unused. Accompanying the herd behavior is thus strong fluctuations with time in the number of resources being used. In this paper, we articulate and establish that an intuitive control strategy, namely pinning control, is effective at harnessing the herding dynamics. In particular, by fixing the choices of resources for a few agents while leaving the majority of the agents free, herding can be eliminated completely. Our investigation is systematic in that we consider random and targeted pinning and a variety of network topologies, and we carry out a comprehensive analysis in the framework of mean-field theory to understand the working of control. The basic philosophy is then that, when a few agents waive their freedom to choose resources by receiving sufficient incentives, the majority of the agents benefit in that they will make fair, efficient, and effective use of the available resources. Our work represents a basic and general framework to address the fundamental issue of fluctuations in complex dynamical systems with significant applications to social, economical, and political systems.

  15. The Role of Habitat Complexity in Community Development Is Mediated by Resource Availability

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel S.; Johnston, Emma L.; Clark, Graeme F.

    2014-01-01

    Habitat complexity strongly affects the structure and dynamics of ecological communities, with increased complexity often leading to greater species diversity and abundance. However, habitat complexity changes as communities develop, and some species alter their environment to themselves provide habitat for other species. Most experimental studies manipulate basal substrate complexity, and while the importance of complexity likely changes during community development, few studies have examined the temporal dynamics of this variable. We used two experiments to quantify the importance of basal substrate complexity to sessile marine invertebrate community development through space and time. First, we compared effects of substrate complexity at 70 sites across ten estuaries. Sites differed in recruitment and community development rates, and after three months provided spatial variation in community development stage. Second, we tested for effects of substrate complexity at multiple times at a single site. In both experiments, complexity affected marine sessile invertebrate community composition in the early stages of community development when resource availability was high. Effects of complexity diminished through time as the amount of available space (the primary limiting resource) declined. Our work suggests the presence of a bare-space threshold, at which structural complexity of the basal substrate is overwhelmed by secondary biotic complexity. This threshold will be met at different times depending on local recruitment and growth rates and is likely to vary with productivity gradients. PMID:25054325

  16. The role of habitat complexity in community development is mediated by resource availability.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel S; Johnston, Emma L; Clark, Graeme F

    2014-01-01

    Habitat complexity strongly affects the structure and dynamics of ecological communities, with increased complexity often leading to greater species diversity and abundance. However, habitat complexity changes as communities develop, and some species alter their environment to themselves provide habitat for other species. Most experimental studies manipulate basal substrate complexity, and while the importance of complexity likely changes during community development, few studies have examined the temporal dynamics of this variable. We used two experiments to quantify the importance of basal substrate complexity to sessile marine invertebrate community development through space and time. First, we compared effects of substrate complexity at 70 sites across ten estuaries. Sites differed in recruitment and community development rates, and after three months provided spatial variation in community development stage. Second, we tested for effects of substrate complexity at multiple times at a single site. In both experiments, complexity affected marine sessile invertebrate community composition in the early stages of community development when resource availability was high. Effects of complexity diminished through time as the amount of available space (the primary limiting resource) declined. Our work suggests the presence of a bare-space threshold, at which structural complexity of the basal substrate is overwhelmed by secondary biotic complexity. This threshold will be met at different times depending on local recruitment and growth rates and is likely to vary with productivity gradients.

  17. Assurance of Complex Electronics. What Path Do We Take?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plastow, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the methods used to develop software bare a close resemblance to Complex Electronics (CE) development. CE are now programmed to perform tasks that were previously handled in software, such as communication protocols. For instance, Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) can have over a million logic gates while system-on-chip (SOC) devices can combine a microprocessor, input and output channels, and sometimes an FPGA for programmability. With this increased intricacy, the possibility of "software-like" bugs such as incorrect design, logic, and unexpected interactions within the logic is great. Since CE devices are obscuring the hardware/software boundary, we propose that mature software methodologies may be utilized with slight modifications to develop these devices. By using standardized S/W Engineering methods such as checklists, missing requirements and "bugs" can be detected earlier in the development cycle, thus creating a development process for CE that will be easily maintained and configurable based on the device used.

  18. Electron transfer and catalysis with high-valent metal-oxo complexes.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-04-21

    High-valent metal-oxo complexes are produced by reductive activation of dioxygen via reduction of metal complexes with reductants and dioxygen. Photoinduced electron transfer from substrates to metal complexes with dioxygen also leads to the generation of high-valent metal-oxo complexes that can oxygenate substrates. In such a case metal complexes act as a photocatalyst to oxygenate substrates with dioxygen. High-valent metal-oxo complexes are also produced by proton-coupled electron-transfer oxidation of metal complexes by one-electron oxidants with water, oxygenating substrates to regenerate metal complexes. In such a case metal complexes act as a catalyst for electron-transfer oxygenation of substrates by one-electron oxidants with water that acts as an oxygen source. The one-electron oxidants which can oxidize metal complexes can be replaced by much weaker oxidants by a combination of redox photocatalysts and metal complexes. Thus, photocatalytic oxygenation of substrates proceeds via photoinduced electron transfer from a photocatalyst to reductants followed by proton-coupled electron transfer oxidation of metal complexes with the oxidized photocatalyst to produce high-valent metal-oxo complexes that oxygenate substrates. Thermal and photoinduced electron-transfer catalytic reactions of high-valent metal-oxo complexes for oxygenation of substrates using water or dioxygen as an oxygen source are summarized in this perspective.

  19. Internest food sharing within wood ant colonies: resource redistribution behavior in a complex system

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Elva J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Resource sharing is an important cooperative behavior in many animals. Sharing resources is particularly important in social insect societies, as division of labor often results in most individuals including, importantly, the reproductives, relying on other members of the colony to provide resources. Sharing resources between individuals is therefore fundamental to the success of social insects. Resource sharing is complicated if a colony inhabits several spatially separated nests, a nesting strategy common in many ant species. Resources must be shared not only between individuals in a single nest but also between nests. We investigated the behaviors facilitating resource redistribution between nests in a dispersed-nesting population of wood ant Formica lugubris. We marked ants, in the field, as they transported resources along the trails between nests of a colony, to investigate how the behavior of individual workers relates to colony-level resource exchange. We found that workers from a particular nest “forage” to other nests in the colony, treating them as food sources. Workers treating other nests as food sources means that simple, pre-existing foraging behaviors are used to move resources through a distributed system. It may be that this simple behavioral mechanism facilitates the evolution of this complex life-history strategy. PMID:27004016

  20. Reliable modeling of the electronic spectra of realistic uranium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecmer, Paweł; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; de Jong, Wibe A.; Visscher, Lucas

    2013-07-01

    We present an EOMCCSD (equation of motion coupled cluster with singles and doubles) study of excited states of the small [UO2]2+ and [UO2]+ model systems as well as the larger UVIO2(saldien) complex. In addition, the triples contribution within the EOMCCSDT and CR-EOMCCSD(T) (completely renormalized EOMCCSD with non-iterative triples) approaches for the [UO2]2+ and [UO2]+ systems as well as the active-space variant of the CR-EOMCCSD(T) method—CR-EOMCCSd(t)—for the UVIO2(saldien) molecule are investigated. The coupled cluster data were employed as benchmark to choose the "best" appropriate exchange-correlation functional for subsequent time-dependent density functional (TD-DFT) studies on the transition energies for closed-shell species. Furthermore, the influence of the saldien ligands on the electronic structure and excitation energies of the [UO2]+ molecule is discussed. The electronic excitations as well as their oscillator dipole strengths modeled with TD-DFT approach using the CAM-B3LYP exchange-correlation functional for the [UVO2(saldien)]- with explicit inclusion of two dimethyl sulfoxide molecules are in good agreement with the experimental data of Takao et al. [Inorg. Chem. 49, 2349 (2010), 10.1021/ic902225f].

  1. Resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be found on the web, through local libraries, your health care provider, and the yellow pages under "social service organizations." AIDS - resources Alcoholism - resources Allergy - resources ...

  2. Iron Hill (Powderhorn) carbonatite complex, Gunnison County, CO - A potential source of several uncommon mineral resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, B. S.; Lowers, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    The Iron Hill (Powderhorn) carbonatite complex is a 31-kM2 (12-sq mile) alkalic intrusion located about 35 km (22 miles) south-southwest of Gunnison, CO. The intrusion has been well studied and described because of its classic petrology and architecture ofa carbonatite-alkalic complex. The complex is also noteworthy because it contains enrichments of titanium, rare earth elements, thorium, niobium (columbium), vanadium and deposits of vermiculite and nepheline syenite. In particular, the complex is thought to host the largest titanium and niobium resources in the United States, although neither has been developed. It may be economic to extract multiple resources from this complex with a well-coordinated mine and mill plan.

  3. Connecting knowledge resources to the veterinary electronic health record: opportunities for learning at point of care.

    PubMed

    Alpi, Kristine M; Burnett, Heidi A; Bryant, Sheila J; Anderson, Katherine M

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) provide clinical learning opportunities through quick and contextual linkage of patient signalment, symptom, and diagnosis data with knowledge resources covering tests, drugs, conditions, procedures, and client instructions. This paper introduces the EHR standards for linkage and the partners-practitioners, content publishers, and software developers-necessary to leverage this possibility in veterinary medicine. The efforts of the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) Electronic Health Records Task Force to partner with veterinary practice management systems to improve the use of controlled vocabulary is a first step in the development of standards for sharing knowledge at the point of care. The Veterinary Medical Libraries Section (VMLS) of the Medical Library Association's Task Force on Connecting the Veterinary Health Record to Information Resources compiled a list of resources of potential use at point of care. Resource details were drawn from product Web sites and organized by a metric used to evaluate medical point-of-care resources. Additional information was gathered from questions sent by e-mail and follow-up interviews with two practitioners, a hospital network, two software developers, and three publishers. Veterinarians with electronic records use a variety of information resources that are not linked to their software. Systems lack the infrastructure to use the Infobutton standard that has been gaining popularity in human EHRs. While some veterinary knowledge resources are digital, publisher sites and responses do not indicate a Web-based linkage of veterinary resources with EHRs. In order to facilitate lifelong learning and evidence-based practice, veterinarians and educators of future practitioners must demonstrate to veterinary practice software developers and publishers a clinically-based need to connect knowledge resources to veterinary EHRs.

  4. A framework for unravelling the complexities of unsustainable water resource use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermody, Brian; Bierkens, Marc; Wassen, Martin; Dekker, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The majority of unsustainable water resource use is associated with food production, with the agricultural sector accounting for up to 70% of total freshwater use by humans. Water resource use in food production emerges as a result of dynamic interactions between humans and their environment in importing and exporting regions as well as the physical and socioeconomic trade infrastructure linking the two. Thus in order to understand unsustainable water resource use, it is essential to understand the complex socioecological food production and trade system. We present a modelling framework of the food production and trade system that facilitates an understanding of complex socioenvironmental processes that lead to unsustainable water resource use. Our framework is based on a coupling of the global hydrological model PC Raster Global Water Balance (PCR-GLOBWB) with a multi-agent socioeconomic food production and trade network. In our framework, agents perceive environmental conditions. They make food supply decisions based upon those perceptions and the heterogeneous socioeconomic conditions in which they exist. Agent decisions modify land and water resources. Those environmental changes feedback to influence decision making further. The framework presented has the potential to go beyond a diagnosis of the causes of unsustainable water resource and provide pathways towards a sustainable food system in terms of water resources.

  5. Electron collisions with the CH2O-H2O complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, T. C.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; Canuto, S.

    2009-11-01

    In this conference we will present cross sections for elastic electron collisions with the CH2O-H2O complex bonded through hydrogen bond. We will investigate electron collisions with different structures of this complex which were obtained by Classical Monte Carlo simulations. This work would help in understanding the hole of water in the dissociative electron attachment in biological molecules.

  6. The Acquisition and Management of Electronic Resources: Can Use Justify Cost?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehn, Shona L.; Hawamdeh, Suliman

    2010-01-01

    As library collections increasingly become digital, libraries are faced with many challenges regarding the acquisition and management of electronic resources. Some of these challenges include copyright and fair use, the first-sale doctrine, licensing versus ownership, digital preservation, long-term archiving, and, most important, the issue of…

  7. Selection and Presentation of Commercially Available Electronic Resources: Issues and Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell, Timothy D.

    This report focuses on practices related to the selection and presentation of commercially available electronic resources. As part of the Digital Library Federation's Collection Practices Initiative, the report also shares the goal of identifying and propagating practices that support the growth of sustainable and scalable collections. It looks in…

  8. Cost of Electronic Reference Resources and LCM: The Library Costing Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    Views assessment of "Costs of Electronic Reference Resources" both in a general descriptive framework and within the context of a specific model for costing of library operations and services called LCM, the Library Costing Model. Examples of costing data uses are provided, and categories of costs are related to types of electronic…

  9. EDI (electronic data interchange) for human resources saves money and time.

    PubMed

    Moynihan, J J; Kibat, G

    1994-01-01

    Healthcare financial managers seeking immediate cost savings through the use of electronic data interchange (EDI) may find that the automation of repetitive transactions can reduce staffing levels in hospital human resource departments and lower the cost of employee benefits. New procedures and EDI also can tighten controls on hospital employee health benefit eligibility and reduce the per employee cost of benefits.

  10. Managing Electronic Resources: A Survey of Current Practices in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Beth Hansen

    This document reports results of an online survey that examined practices and procedures in the management of electronic resources in 65 academic library reference departments. Responses are related to: (1) student population; (2) library use by community people; (3) number of public access workstations, workstations with World Wide Web access,…

  11. Electronics/Electromechanical Technology. Instructional Resource Guide for Competency Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuchinsky, Charlotte A.

    This instructional resource guide is intended to aid teachers and curriculum specialists in developing instructional materials for the first two years of preparation of electronics technicians. It is part of the secondary/postsecondary master technician program. Section I on occupational information presents general information and the…

  12. A Survey of the Use of Electronic Resources at Seven Universities in Wuhan, China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Liyi; Ye, Pinghao; Liu, Qihua

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on users' information behaviour in China, a topic which has not been researched extensively. The aim is to help producers and providers collect and develop more electronic resources. Design/methodology/approach: The study investigates users' information behaviour at seven "211 Project"…

  13. Implementation of an Electronic Resource Assessment System in an Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a library with useful information about selection criteria for an electronic resource assessment system and practical assistance on how to implement efficiently such a system. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on literature review, desk research, and implementation experience.…

  14. Internet Resources on Women: Using Electronic Media in Curriculum Transformation. Women in the Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korenman, Joan

    This manual has been written primarily for internet novices and for people already familiar with online communications who want to learn more about the growing array of electronic resources pertaining to Women's Studies and to transforming the curriculum so that it better reflects women's experience, accomplishments, and perspectives. Chapter 1…

  15. Using Electronic Information Resources Centers by Faculty Members at University Education: Competencies, Needs and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abouelenein, Yousri

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the factual situation of electronic information resources centers to faculty members at university education. Competencies that faculty members should possess regarding this issue were determined. Also their needs for (scientific research skills and teaching) were assessed. In addition, problems that hinder their…

  16. Oklahoma Library Technology Network (OLTN) Electronic Resources for Elementary Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Carol, Comp.

    This document describes Oklahoma Library Technology Network electronic resources for elementary age children. The first section provides a history of Oklahoma statewide shared databases. Oklahoma statewide information database contacts are listed in the second section. The third section presents information on InfoTrac Kid's Edition Online…

  17. Speech as a breakthrough signaling resource in the cognitive evolution of biological complex adaptive systems.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Tobias A

    2014-12-01

    In self-adapting dynamical systems, a significant improvement in the signaling flow among agents constitutes one of the most powerful triggering events for the emergence of new complex behaviors. Ackermann and colleagues' comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the brain structures involved in acoustic communication provides further evidence of the essential role which speech, as a breakthrough signaling resource, has played in the evolutionary development of human cognition viewed from the standpoint of complex adaptive system analysis.

  18. Cryo-electron tomography for structural characterization of macromolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Cope, Julia; Heumann, John; Hoenger, Andreas

    2011-08-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is an emerging 3-D reconstruction technology that combines the principles of tomographic 3-D reconstruction with the unmatched structural preservation of biological matter embedded in vitreous ice. Cryo-ET is particularly suited to investigating cell-biological samples and large macromolecular structures that are too polymorphic to be reconstructed by classical averaging-based 3-D reconstruction procedures. This unit aims to make cryo-ET accessible to newcomers and discusses the specialized equipment required, as well as relevant advantages and hurdles associated with sample preparation by vitrification and cryo-ET. Protocols describe specimen preparation, data recording and 3-D data reconstruction for cryo-ET, with a special focus on macromolecular complexes. A step-by-step procedure for specimen vitrification by plunge freezing is provided, followed by the general practicalities of tilt-series acquisition for cryo-ET, including advice on how to select an area appropriate for acquiring a tilt series. A brief introduction to the underlying computational reconstruction principles applied in tomography is described, along with instructions for reconstructing a tomogram from cryo-tilt series data. Finally, a method is detailed for extracting small subvolumes containing identical macromolecular structures from tomograms for alignment and averaging as a means to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and eliminate missing wedge effects inherent in tomographic reconstructions.

  19. Lunar Dust Grain Charging by Electron Impact: Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Space Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; LeClair, A. C.; Spann, J. F.

    2010-08-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEEs). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 μm size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEEs discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  20. Lunary Dust Grain Charging by Electron Impact: Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Crave, P. D.; LeClair, A.; Spann, J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEES). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/ planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 m size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEES discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  1. LUNAR DUST GRAIN CHARGING BY ELECTRON IMPACT: COMPLEX ROLE OF SECONDARY ELECTRON EMISSIONS IN SPACE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; LeClair, A. C.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.

    2010-08-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEEs). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 {mu}m size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEEs discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  2. Integrating Genomic Resources with Electronic Health Records using the HL7 Infobutton Standard

    PubMed Central

    Overby, Casey Lynnette; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Maglott, Donna R.; Nelson, Tristan H.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Martin, Christa L.; Goehringer, Scott R.; Freimuth, Robert R.; Williams, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The Clinical Genome Resource (ClinGen) Electronic Health Record (EHR) Workgroup aims to integrate ClinGen resources with EHRs. A promising option to enable this integration is through the Health Level Seven (HL7) Infobutton Standard. EHR systems that are certified according to the US Meaningful Use program provide HL7-compliant infobutton capabilities, which can be leveraged to support clinical decision-making in genomics. Objectives To integrate genomic knowledge resources using the HL7 infobutton standard. Two tactics to achieve this objective were: (1) creating an HL7-compliant search interface for ClinGen, and (2) proposing guidance for genomic resources on achieving HL7 Infobutton standard accessibility and compliance. Methods We built a search interface utilizing OpenInfobutton, an open source reference implementation of the HL7 Infobutton standard. ClinGen resources were assessed for readiness towards HL7 compliance. Finally, based upon our experiences we provide recommendations for publishers seeking to achieve HL7 compliance. Results Eight genomic resources and two sub-resources were integrated with the ClinGen search engine via OpenInfobutton and the HL7 infobutton standard. Resources we assessed have varying levels of readiness towards HL7-compliance. Furthermore, we found that adoption of standard terminologies used by EHR systems is the main gap to achieve compliance. Conclusion Genomic resources can be integrated with EHR systems via the HL7 Infobutton standard using OpenInfobutton. Full compliance of genomic resources with the Infobutton standard would further enhance interoperability with EHR systems. PMID:27579472

  3. Identifying and evaluating electronic learning resources for use in adult-gerontology nurse practitioner education.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Hilaire J; Belza, Basia; Baker, Margaret; Christianson, Phyllis; Doorenbos, Ardith; Nguyen, Huong

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing existing curricula to meet newly published adult-gerontology advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) competencies in an efficient manner presents a challenge to nurse educators. Incorporating shared, published electronic learning resources (ELRs) in existing or new courses may be appropriate in order to assist students in achieving competencies. The purposes of this project were to (a) identify relevant available ELR for use in enhancing geriatric APRN education and (b) to evaluate the educational utility of identified ELRs based on established criteria. A multilevel search strategy was used. Two independent team members reviewed identified ELR against established criteria to ensure utility. Only resources meeting all criteria were retained. Resources were found for each of the competency areas and included formats such as podcasts, Web casts, case studies, and teaching videos. In many cases, resources were identified using supplemental strategies and not through traditional search or search of existing geriatric repositories. Resources identified have been useful to advanced practice educators in improving lecture and seminar content in a particular topic area and providing students and preceptors with additional self-learning resources. Addressing sustainability within geriatric APRN education is critical for sharing of best practices among educators and for sustainability of teaching and related resources.

  4. Integrated optimal allocation model for complex adaptive system of water resources management (II): Case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanlai; Guo, Shenglian; Xu, Chong-Yu; Liu, Dedi; Chen, Lu; Wang, Dong

    2015-12-01

    Climate change, rapid economic development and increase of the human population are considered as the major triggers of increasing challenges for water resources management. This proposed integrated optimal allocation model (IOAM) for complex adaptive system of water resources management is applied in Dongjiang River basin located in the Guangdong Province of China. The IOAM is calibrated and validated under baseline period 2010 year and future period 2011-2030 year, respectively. The simulation results indicate that the proposed model can make a trade-off between demand and supply for sustainable development of society, economy, ecology and environment and achieve adaptive management of water resources allocation. The optimal scheme derived by multi-objective evaluation is recommended for decision-makers in order to maximize the comprehensive benefits of water resources management.

  5. Availability, Level of Use and Constraints to Use of Electronic Resources by Law Lecturers in Public Universities in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amusa, Oyintola Isiaka; Atinmo, Morayo

    2016-01-01

    (Purpose) This study surveyed the level of availability, use and constraints to use of electronic resources among law lecturers in Nigeria. (Methodology) Five hundred and fifty-two law lecturers were surveyed and four hundred and forty-two responded. (Results) Data analysis revealed that the level of availability of electronic resources for the…

  6. Defining the Electronic And Geometric Structure of One-Electron Oxidized Copper-Bis-Phenoxide Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Storr, T.; Verma, P.; Pratt, R.C.; Wasinger, E.C.; Shimazaki, Y.; Stack, T.D.P.

    2009-05-26

    The geometric and electronic structure of an oxidized Cu complex ([CuSal](+); Sal = N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) with a non-innocent salen ligand has been investigated both in the solid state and in solution. Integration of information from UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, electrochemistry, resonance Raman spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations provides critical insights into the nature of the localization/delocalization of the oxidation locus. In contrast to the analogous Ni derivative [NiSal](+) (Storr, T.; et al. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2007, 46, 5198), which exists solely in the Ni(II) ligand-radical form, the locus of oxidation is metal-based for [CuSal](+), affording exclusively a Cu(III) species in the solid state (4-300 K). Variable-temperature solution studies suggest that [CuSal](+) exists in a reversible spin-equilibrium between a ligand-radical species [Cu(II)Sal(*)](+) (S = 1) and the high-valent metal form [Cu(III)Sal](+) (S = 0), indicative of nearly isoenergetic species. It is surprising that a bis-imine-bis-phenolate ligation stabilizes the Cu(III) oxidation state, and even more surprising that in solution a spin equilibrium occurs without a change in coordination number. The oxidized tetrahydrosalen analogue [CuSal(red)](+) (Sal(red) = N,N'-bis(3,5-di- tert-butylhydroxybenzyl)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) exists as a temperature-invariant Cu(II)-ligand-radical complex in solution, demonstrating that ostensibly simple variations of the ligand structure affect the locus of oxidation in Cu-bis-phenoxide complexes.

  7. Defining the Electronic and Geometric Structure of One-Electron Oxidized Copper–Bis-phenoxide Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Storr, Tim; Verma, Pratik; Pratt, Russell C.; Wasinger, Erik C.; Shimazaki, Yuichi; Stack, T. Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    The geometric and electronic structure of an oxidized Cu complex ([CuSal]+; Sal = N, N′-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) with a non-innocent salen ligand has been investigated both in the solid state and in solution. Integration of information from UV–vis–NIR spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, electrochemistry, resonance Raman spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations provides critical insights into the nature of the localization/delocalization of the oxidation locus. In contrast to the analogous Ni derivative [NiSal]+ (Storr, T.; et al. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2007, 46, 5198), which exists solely in the Ni(II) ligand-radical form, the locus of oxidation is metal-based for [CuSal]+, affording exclusively a Cu(III) species in the solid state (4–300 K). Variable-temperature solution studies suggest that [CuSal]+ exists in a reversible spin-equilibrium between a ligand-radical species [Cu(II)Sal•]+ (S = 1) and the high-valent metal form [Cu(III)Sal]+ (S = 0), indicative of nearly isoenergetic species. It is surprising that a bis-imine–bis-phenolate ligation stabilizes the Cu(III) oxidation state, and even more surprising that in solution a spin equilibrium occurs without a change in coordination number. The oxidized tetrahydrosalen analogue [CuSalred]+ (Salred = N, N′-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylhydroxybenzyl)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) exists as a temperature-invariant Cu(II)–ligand-radical complex in solution, demonstrating that ostensibly simple variations of the ligand structure affect the locus of oxidation in Cu–bis-phenoxide complexes. PMID:18939830

  8. Infrastructure and resources for an aging population: embracing complexity in translational research.

    PubMed

    High, Kevin P

    2014-05-01

    The population of the United States and most industrialized nations is undergoing rapid expansion of persons aged 65 years and older. This group experiences more illness, disability, and dependency than young adults and consumes the majority of heath care resources. This demographic change presents a number of challenges to current research infrastructure aimed at translating discoveries to improved human health. Key issues include the need to expand the workforce trained in aging research, development of specific resources and harmonization of measures and outcomes, and a culture change within the scientific community. In particular, complexity must be represented within research design and embraced as an important aspect of review panel critiques.

  9. A survey of electronic drug information resources and identification of problems associated with the differing vocabularies used to key them.

    PubMed Central

    Gnassi, J. A.; Barnett, G. O.

    1993-01-01

    Drug information resources are increasingly becoming electronically available. They differ in scope, granularity, and purpose. These considerations have shaped the selection of dissimilar drug name keys, complicating access. An abbreviated and simplified historical context of the development of official controlled vocabularies and their relationships is followed by a review of the kinds of information available in several electronic drug information resources. The key vocabularies used are discussed with examples. Problems using the differing terms of the resource vocabularies are identified. PMID:8130551

  10. Electronic and steric influences of pendant amine groups on the protonation of molybdenum bis (dinitrogen) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Labios, Liezel A.; Heiden, Zachariah M.; Mock, Michael T.

    2015-05-04

    The synthesis of a series of PEtPNRR' (PEtPNRR' = Et₂PCH₂CH₂P(CH₂NRR')₂, R = H, R' = Ph or 2,4-difluorophenyl; R = R' = Ph or iPr) diphosphine ligands containing mono- and disubstituted pendant amine groups, and the preparation of their corresponding molybdenum bis(dinitrogen) complexes trans-Mo(N₂)₂(PMePh₂)₂(PEtPNRR') is described. In situ IR and multinuclear NMR spectroscopic studies monitoring the stepwise addition of (HOTf) to trans-Mo(N₂)₂(PMePh₂)₂(PEtPNRR') complexes in THF at -40 °C show that the electronic and steric properties of the R and R' groups of the pendant amines influence whether the complexes are protonated at Mo, a pendant amine, a coordinated N2 ligand, or a combination of these sites. For example, complexes containing mono-aryl substituted pendant amines are protonated at Mo and pendant amine to generate mono- and dicationic Mo–H species. Protonation of the complex containing less basic diphenyl-substituted pendant amines exclusively generates a monocationic hydrazido (Mo(NNH₂)) product, indicating preferential protonation of an N₂ ligand. Addition of HOTf to the complex featuring more basic diisopropyl amines primarily produces a monocationic product protonated at a pendant amine site, as well as a trace amount of dicationic Mo(NNH₂) product that contain protonated pendant amines. In addition, trans-Mo(N₂)₂(PMePh₂)₂(depe) (depe = Et₂PCH₂CH₂PEt₂) without a pendant amine was synthesized and treated with HOTf, generating a monocationic Mo(NNH₂) product. Protonolysis experiments conducted on select complexes in the series afforded trace amounts of NH₄⁺. Computational analysis of the series of trans-Mo(N₂)₂(PMePh₂)₂(PEtPNRR') complexes provides further insight into the proton affinity values of the metal center, N₂ ligand, and pendant amine sites to rationalize

  11. Dismounted complex blast injuries: patterns of injuries and resource utilization associated with the multiple extremity amputee.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Mark; Waterman, Scott; Dunne, James; D'Alleyrand, Jean-Claude; Andersen, Romney C

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this report is to analyze the resource utilization and injury patterns of complex dismounted blast injuries. A retrospective review of U.S. service members injured in combat between 2007 and 2010 was conducted. Data analyzed included age, injury mechanism, amputated limbs, number and type of associated injuries, blood products utilized, intensive care unit length of stay (ILOS), hospital length of stay (HLOS) and the Injury Severity Score (ISS). Patients were stratified based on the number of amputations. Sixty-three patients comprised the multiple extremity amputation (MEA) group. Ninety-eight percent sustained injuries from an improvised explosive device (IED) and 96% were dismounted. The ISS, number of surgical encounters, blood products utilized and ILOS were all clinically significantly different than controls. Care of multiple extremity amputees involves the utilization of significant resources. This knowledge may better help surgeons and administrators allocate assets at hospitals, both military and civilian, who care for this complex and challenging patient population.

  12. Electron Transfer Reactivity on Novel Dirhenium and Dirhodium Tetraazaannulene Complexes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse polarography. Potentials are reported for the electrochemcial generation of pi cation and pi anion radicals of these complexes in the solvents dichloromethane and dimethylformamide. The potential differences between the pi radical reactions of the metallomacrocyclic complexes were compared to the potential differences of the pi radical reactions of the free macrocycles.

  13. Potential resource and toxicity impacts from metals in waste electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seung H; Lee, Dae Sung; Lim, Seong-Rin

    2016-04-01

    As a result of the continuous release of new electronic devices, existing electronic devices are quickly made obsolete and rapidly become electronic waste (e-waste). Because e-waste contains a variety of metals, information about those metals with the potential for substantial environmental impact should be provided to manufacturers, recyclers, and disposers to proactively reduce this impact. This study assesses the resource and toxicity (i.e., cancer, noncancer, and ecotoxicity) potentials of various heavy metals commonly found in e-waste from laptop computers, liquid-crystal display (LCD) monitors, LCD TVs, plasma TVs, color cathode ray tube (CRT) TVs, and cell phones and then evaluates such potentials using life cycle impact-based methods. Resource potentials derive primarily from Cu, Sb, Ag, and Pb. Toxicity potentials derive primarily from Pb, Ni, and Hg for cancer toxicity; from Pb, Hg, Zn, and As for noncancer toxicity; and from Cu, Pb, Hg, and Zn for ecotoxicity. Therefore, managing these heavy metals should be a high priority in the design, recycling, and disposal stages of electronic devices.

  14. Opening a Can of wERMS: Texas A&M University's Experiences in Implementing Two Electronic Resource Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartnett, Eric; Price, Apryl; Smith, Jane; Barrett, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few years, Texas A&M University (TAMU) has searched for a way to administer its electronic subscriptions as well as the electronic subscriptions shared among the TAMU System. In this article, we address our attempts to implement an effective electronic resource management system (ERMS), both for subscriptions on the main campus…

  15. Electron Transfer Studies of Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Biologically Important Phenolic Acids and Tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-03-01

    The ruthenium(II) complexes having 2,2'-bipyridine and phenanthroline derivatives are synthesized and characterized. The photophysical properties of these complexes at pH 12.5 are studied. The electron transfer reaction of biologically important phenolic acids and tyrosine are studied using absorption, emission and transient absorption spectral techniques. Semiclassical theory is applied to calculate the rate of electron transfer between ruthenium(II) complexes and biologically important phenolic acids.

  16. Electronic structure and driving forces in β-cyclodextrin: Diclofenac inclusion complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Diana; Morari, C.

    2007-07-01

    We investigate the geometry and electronic structure for complexes of β-cyclodextrin with diclofenac using DFT calculations. The effect of solvent is explicitly taken into account. This investigation allows us to draw meaningful conclusions upon the stability of the complex and the nature of the driving forces leading to the complexation process. In particular we emphasize the role of the water, by pointing out the changes in the solvent's electronic structure for different docking geometries.

  17. Redox induced electron transfer in doublet azo-anion diradical rhenium(II) complexes. Characterization of complete electron transfer series.

    PubMed

    Paul, Nandadulal; Samanta, Subhas; Goswami, Sreebrata

    2010-03-15

    Reactions of dirhenium decacarbonyl with the two azoaromatic ligands, L(a) = (2-phenylazo)pyridine and L(b) = (4-chloro-2-phenylazo)pyridine (general abbreviation of the ligands is L) afford paramagnetic rhenium(II) complexes, [Re(II)(L(*-))(2)(CO)(2)] (1) (S = 1/2 ground state) with two one-electron reduced azo-anion radical ligands in an octahedral geometrical arrangement. At room temperature (300 K) the complexes 1a-b, showed magnetic moments (mu(eff)) close to 1.94 mu(B), which is suggestive of the existence of strong antiferromagnetic interactions in the complexes. The results of magnetic measurements on one of the complexes, 1b, in the temperature range 2-300 K are reported. The above complexes showed two cathodic and two anodic responses in cyclic voltammetry where one-electron oxidation leads to an unusual redox event involving simultaneous reduction of the rhenium(II) and oxidation of the second ligand via intramolecular electron transfer. The oxidized complexes 1a(+) and 1b(+) are air stable and were isolated as crystalline solids as their tri-iodide (I(3)(-)) salts. The structures of the two representative complexes, 1b and [1b]I(3), as determined by X-ray crystallography, are compared. The anionic complexes, [1](-) and [1](2-) were characterized in solution by their spectral properties.

  18. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of lanthanide (Ce, Pr, and Nd) complexes of cyclooctatetraene: The role of 4f electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Sudesh; Roudjane, Mourad; Hewage, Dilrukshi; Yang Dongsheng; Liu Yang

    2013-04-28

    Cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium complexes of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene (COT) complexes were produced in a laser-vaporization metal cluster source and studied by pulsed-field ionization zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The computations included the second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, the coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, and the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method. The spectrum of each complex exhibits multiple band systems and is assigned to ionization of several low-energy electronic states of the neutral complex. This observation is different from previous studies of M(COT) (M = Sc, Y, La, and Gd), for which a single band system was observed. The presence of the multiple low-energy electronic states is caused by the splitting of the partially filled lanthanide 4f orbitals in the ligand field, and the number of the low-energy states increases rapidly with increasing number of the metal 4f electrons. On the other hand, the 4f electrons have a small effect on the geometries and vibrational frequencies of these lanthanide complexes.

  19. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of lanthanide (Ce, Pr, and Nd) complexes of cyclooctatetraene: the role of 4f electrons.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sudesh; Roudjane, Mourad; Hewage, Dilrukshi; Liu, Yang; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2013-04-28

    Cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium complexes of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene (COT) complexes were produced in a laser-vaporization metal cluster source and studied by pulsed-field ionization zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The computations included the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, the coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, and the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method. The spectrum of each complex exhibits multiple band systems and is assigned to ionization of several low-energy electronic states of the neutral complex. This observation is different from previous studies of M(COT) (M = Sc, Y, La, and Gd), for which a single band system was observed. The presence of the multiple low-energy electronic states is caused by the splitting of the partially filled lanthanide 4f orbitals in the ligand field, and the number of the low-energy states increases rapidly with increasing number of the metal 4f electrons. On the other hand, the 4f electrons have a small effect on the geometries and vibrational frequencies of these lanthanide complexes.

  20. Army Electronic Equipment Support Options: Assessment of Maintenance Complexity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    lognormally distributed, the ratio follows from the following equation: MTTR ~ in 2-7j FIGURE 2-2. MEASURES OF MAINTENANCE COMLEXITY A OTHER FACTORS 0...tenance personnel have been noted in various studies (3). Many new systems are compute r- control led, which increases inherent complexity. Computer ...hydraulically driven turret, all controlled by a computer receiving signals from a radar set, crosses several disciplines, making the system inherently complex

  1. Tuning ground states and excitations in complex electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, A.R.

    1996-09-01

    Modern electronic materials are characterized by a great variety of broken-symmetry ground states and excitations. Their control requires understanding and tuning underlying driving forces of spin-charge-lattice coupling, critical to macroscopic properties and applications. We report representative model calculations which demonstrate some of the richness of the phenomena and the challenges for successful microscopic modeling.

  2. Review of material recovery from used electric and electronic equipment-alternative options for resource conservation.

    PubMed

    Friege, Henning

    2012-09-01

    For waste from electric and electronic equipment, the WEEE Directive stipulates the separate collection of electric and electronic waste. As to new electric and electronic devices, the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive bans the use of certain chemicals dangerous for man and environment. From the implementation of the WEEE directive, many unsolved problems have been documented: poor collection success, emission of dangerous substances during collection and recycling, irretrievable loss of valuable metals among others. As to RoHS, data from the literature show a satisfying success. The problems identified in the process can be reduced to some basic dilemmas at the borders between waste management, product policy and chemical safety. The objectives of the WEEE Directive and the specific targets for use and recycling of appliances are not consistent. There is no focus on scarce resources. Extended producer responsibility is not sufficient to guarantee sustainable waste management. Waste management reaches its limits due to problems of implementation but also due to physical laws. A holistic approach is necessary looking at all branch points and sinks in the stream of used products and waste from electric and electronic equipment. This may be done with respect to the general rules for sustainable management of material streams covering the three dimensions of sustainable policy. The relationships between the players in the field of electric and electronic devices have to be taken into account. Most of the problems identified in the implementation process will not be solved by the current amendment of the WEEE Directive.

  3. New trends in the optical and electronic applications of polymers containing transition-metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Juan; Chen, Yang; Xu, Wen-Juan; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei

    2012-04-13

    Polymers containing transition-metal complexes exhibit excellent optical and electronic properties, which are different from those of polymers with a pure organic skeleton and combine the advantages of both polymers and metal complexes. Hence, research about this class of polymers has attracted more and more interest in recent years. Up to now, a number of novel polymers containing transition-metal complexes have been exploited, and significant advances in their optical and electronic applications have been achieved. In this article, we summarize some new research trends in the applications of this important class of optoelectronic polymers, such as chemo/biosensors, electronic memory devices and photovoltaic devices.

  4. Electronic spectroscopy of I2-Xe complexes in solid Krypton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulkko, Eero; Ahokas, Jussi; Lindgren, Johan; Myllyperkiö, Pasi; Pettersson, Mika

    2012-05-01

    In the present work, we have studied ion-pair states of matrix-isolated I2 with vacuum-UV absorption and UV-vis-NIR emission, where the matrix environment is systematically changed by mixing Kr with Xe, from pure Kr to a more polarizable Xe host. Particular emphasis is put on low doping levels of Xe that yield a binary complex I2-Xe, as verified by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) measurements. Associated with interaction of I2 with Xe we can observe strong new absorption in vacuum-UV, redshifted 2400 cm-1 from the X → D transition of I2. Observed redshift can be explained by symmetry breaking of ion-pair states within the I2-Xe complex. Systematic Xe doping of Kr matrices shows that at low doping levels, positions of I2 ion-pair emissions are not significantly affected by complexation with Xe, but simultaneous increase of emissions from doubly spin-excited states indicates non-radiative relaxation to valence states. At intermediate doping levels ion-pair emissions shift systematically to red due to change in the average polarizability of the environment. We have conducted spectrally resolved ultrafast pump-probe ion-pair emission studies with pure and Xe doped Kr matrices, in order to reveal the influence of Xe to I2 dynamics in solid Kr. Strikingly, relaxed emission from the ion-pair states shows no indication of complex presence. It further indicates that the complex escapes detection due to a non-radiative relaxation.

  5. Evolving complex dynamics in electronic models of genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Jonathan; Linsay, Paul S.; Collins, J. J.; Glass, Leon

    2004-09-01

    Ordinary differential equations are often used to model the dynamics and interactions in genetic networks. In one particularly simple class of models, the model genes control the production rates of products of other genes by a logical function, resulting in piecewise linear differential equations. In this article, we construct and analyze an electronic circuit that models this class of piecewise linear equations. This circuit combines CMOS logic and RC circuits to model the logical control of the increase and decay of protein concentrations in genetic networks. We use these electronic networks to study the evolution of limit cycle dynamics. By mutating the truth tables giving the logical functions for these networks, we evolve the networks to obtain limit cycle oscillations of desired period. We also investigate the fitness landscapes of our networks to determine the optimal mutation rate for evolution.

  6. Determining the level of awareness of the physicians in using the variety of electronic information resources and the effecting factors

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Ahmad; Ghazavi, Roghayeh; Moradi, Salimeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Understanding of the medical society's from the types of information resources for quick and easy access to information is an imperative task in medical researches and management of the treatment. The present study was aimed to determine the level of awareness of the physicians in using various electronic information resources and the factors affecting it. Materials and Methods: This study was a descriptive survey. The data collection tool was a researcher-made questionnaire. The study population included all the physicians and specialty physicians of the teaching hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and numbered 350. The sample size based on Morgan's formula was set at 180. The content validity of the tool was confirmed by the library and information professionals and the reliability was 95%. Descriptive statistics were used including the SPSS software version 19. Results: On reviewing the need of the physicians to obtain the information on several occasions, the need for information in conducting the researches was reported by the maximum number of physicians (91.9%) and the usage of information resources, especially the electronic resources, formed 65.4% as the highest rate with regard to meeting the information needs of the physicians. Among the electronic information databases, the maximum awareness was related to Medline with 86.5%. Among the various electronic information resources, the highest awareness (43.3%) was related to the E-journals. The highest usage (36%) was also from the same source. The studied physicians considered the most effective deterrent in the use of electronic information resources as being too busy and lack of time. Conclusion: Despite the importance of electronic information resources for the physician's community, there was no comprehensive knowledge of these resources. This can lead to less usage of these resources. Therefore, careful planning is necessary in the hospital libraries in order to

  7. A preliminary categorization of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment as secondary metal resources

    SciTech Connect

    Oguchi, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinsuke; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Kida, Akiko; Kameya, Takashi

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > End-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) as secondary metal resources. > The content and the total amount of metals in specific equipment are both important. > We categorized 21 EEE types from contents and total amounts of various metals. > Important equipment types as secondary resources were listed for each metal kind. > Collectability and possible collection systems of various EEE types were discussed. - Abstract: End-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) has recently received attention as a secondary source of metals. This study examined characteristics of end-of-life EEE as secondary metal resources to consider efficient collection and metal recovery systems according to the specific metals and types of EEE. We constructed an analogy between natural resource development and metal recovery from end-of-life EEE and found that metal content and total annual amount of metal contained in each type of end-of-life EEE should be considered in secondary resource development, as well as the collectability of the end-of-life products. We then categorized 21 EEE types into five groups and discussed their potential as secondary metal resources. Refrigerators, washing machines, air conditioners, and CRT TVs were evaluated as the most important sources of common metals, and personal computers, mobile phones, and video games were evaluated as the most important sources of precious metals. Several types of small digital equipment were also identified as important sources of precious metals; however, mid-size information and communication technology (ICT) equipment (e.g., printers and fax machines) and audio/video equipment were shown to be more important as a source of a variety of less common metals. The physical collectability of each type of EEE was roughly characterized by unit size and number of end-of-life products generated annually. Current collection systems in Japan were examined and potentially appropriate collection methods

  8. Progression in Complexity: Contextualizing Sustainable Marine Resources Management in a 10th Grade Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Torija, Beatriz; Jiménez-Aleixandre, María-Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable management of marine resources raises great challenges. Working with this socio-scientific issue in the classroom requires students to apply complex models about energy flow and trophic pyramids in order to understand that food chains represent transfer of energy, to construct meanings for sustainable resources management through discourse, and to connect them to actions and decisions in a real-life context. In this paper we examine the process of elaboration of plans for resources management in a marine ecosystem by 10th grade students (15-16 year) in the context of solving an authentic task. A complete class ( N = 14) worked in a sequence about ecosystems. Working in small groups, the students made models of energy flow and trophic pyramids, and used them to solve the problem of feeding a small community for a long time. Data collection included videotaping and audiotaping of all of the sessions, and collecting the students' written productions. The research objective is to examine the process of designing a plan for sustainable resources management in terms of the discursive moves of the students across stages in contextualizing practices, or different degrees of complexity (Jiménez-Aleixandre & Reigosa International Journal of Science Education, 14(1): 51-61 2006), understood as transformations from theoretical statements to decisions about the plan. The analysis of students' discursive moves shows how the groups progressed through stages of connecting different models, between them and with the context, in order to solve the task. The challenges related to taking this sustainability issue to the classroom are discussed.

  9. Complex housing environment for farmed blue foxes (Vulpes lagopus): use of various resources.

    PubMed

    Koistinen, T; Korhonen, H T

    2013-08-01

    The present study was designed to measure the use of various, simultaneously available resources in a complex housing environment in juvenile blue foxes. Twelve blue fox sibling (male-female) pairs were housed in two-section experimental cages from the age of 8 weeks until the age of 7 months (from June to December). Each experimental cage was furnished with two platforms, a nest box, a sand box and a wooden block. This housing set-up provided the foxes with social contact, and an opportunity for oral manipulation, scratching and nesting, as well as the choice of staying on a solid floor material or on an elevated location. The foxes' behaviour was recorded at three time points during autumn (September, November and December). The foxes used all available resources. The most utilised resource was the nest box, possibly because it could be utilised in several ways (as a shelter, an elevated location, an object for scratching and for oral manipulation). The foxes also stayed more in the cage section containing the nest box than in the cage section containing a sand box. The foxes rested much on the cage floor, but they also used the interior of the nest box and elevated locations for resting. Social contact often occurred during resting. Thus, the nest box and elevated location, in conjunction with social contact seem to be valuable while resting. While active, the foxes utilised the cage floor and roof of the nest box instead of the platforms. Scratching, digging and an interaction with the wooden block were seldom observed. Activity occurred mainly on the 'empty' cage area. In conclusion, all studied resources provided blue foxes with a distinct value, as they all were used in the complex housing environment. The nest box is used most and for most variable behaviours.

  10. Towards Intelligent Dynamic Deployment of Mobile Sensors in Complex Resource-Bounded Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, B M; Hanley, W G

    2007-05-08

    Decision-making in the face of uncertainty requires an understanding of the probabilistic mechanisms that govern the complex behavior of these systems. This issue applies to many domains: financial investments, disease control, military planning and homeland security. In each of these areas, there is a practical need for efficient resource-bounded reasoning capabilities to support optimal decision-making. Specifically, given a highly complex system, with numerous random variables and their dynamic interactions, how do we monitor such a system and detect crucial events that might impact our decision making process? More importantly, how do we perform this reasoning efficiently--to an acceptable degree of accuracy in real time--when there are only limited computational power and sensory capabilities? These questions encapsulate nontrivial key issues faced by many high-profile Laboratory missions: the problem of efficient inference and dynamic sensor deployment for risk/uncertainty reduction. By leveraging solid ideas such as system decomposition into loosely coupled subsystems and smart resource allocation among these subsystems, we can parallelize inference and data acquisition for faster and improved computational performance. In this report, we propose technical approaches for developing algorithmic tools to enable future scientific and engineering endeavors to better achieve the optimal use of limited resources for maximal return of information on a complex system. The result of the proposed research effort will be an efficient reasoning framework that would enable mobile sensors to work collaboratively as teams of adaptive and responsive agents, whose joint goal is to gather useful information that would assist in the inference process.

  11. Impact of Knowledge Resources Linked to an Electronic Health Record on Frequency of Unnecessary Tests and Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Kenneth; Grad, Roland; Pluye, Pierre; Nowacki, Amy; Hickner, John

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic knowledge resources have the potential to rapidly provide answers to clinicians' questions. We sought to determine clinicians' reasons for searching these resources, the rate of finding relevant information, and the perceived clinical impact of the information they retrieved. Methods: We asked general internists, family…

  12. U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Modeling Software: Making Sense of a Complex Natural Resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Provost, Alden M.; Reilly, Thomas E.; Harbaugh, Arlen W.; Pollock, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Computer models of groundwater systems simulate the flow of groundwater, including water levels, and the transport of chemical constituents and thermal energy. Groundwater models afford hydrologists a framework on which to organize their knowledge and understanding of groundwater systems, and they provide insights water-resources managers need to plan effectively for future water demands. Building on decades of experience, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) continues to lead in the development and application of computer software that allows groundwater models to address scientific and management questions of increasing complexity.

  13. Effect of pressure on electronic excitations in TCNQ and its complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tkacz, M.; Jurgensen, C.W.; Drickamer, H.G.

    1986-01-15

    The electronic spectra of TCNQ and TCNQ complexes has been investigated at high pressure up to 150 kbar. The observed pressure shifts are discussed in terms of intermolecular interactions. The results are also compared with available theoretical calculations.

  14. Virtual enterprise model for the electronic components business in the Nuclear Weapons Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, T.J.; Long, K.S.; Sayre, J.A.; Hull, A.L.; Carey, D.A.; Sim, J.R.; Smith, M.G.

    1994-08-01

    The electronic components business within the Nuclear Weapons Complex spans organizational and Department of Energy contractor boundaries. An assessment of the current processes indicates a need for fundamentally changing the way electronic components are developed, procured, and manufactured. A model is provided based on a virtual enterprise that recognizes distinctive competencies within the Nuclear Weapons Complex and at the vendors. The model incorporates changes that reduce component delivery cycle time and improve cost effectiveness while delivering components of the appropriate quality.

  15. Gd(III) complexes for electron-electron dipolar spectroscopy: Effects of deuteration, pH and zero field splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbuio, Luca; Zimmermann, Kaspar; Häussinger, Daniel; Yulikov, Maxim

    2015-10-01

    Spectral parameters of Gd(III) complexes are intimately linked to the performance of the Gd(III)-nitroxide or Gd(III)-Gd(III) double electron-electron resonance (DEER or PELDOR) techniques, as well as to that of relaxation induced dipolar modulation enhancement (RIDME) spectroscopy with Gd(III) ions. These techniques are of interest for applications in structural biology, since they can selectively detect site-to-site distances in biomolecules or biomolecular complexes in the nanometer range. Here we report relaxation properties, echo detected EPR spectra, as well as the magnitude of the echo reduction effect in Gd(III)-nitroxide DEER for a series of Gadolinium(III) complexes with chelating agents derived from tetraazacyclododecane. We observed that solvent deuteration does not only lengthen the relaxation times of Gd(III) centers but also weakens the DEER echo reduction effect. Both of these phenomena lead to an improved signal-to-noise ratios or, alternatively, longer accessible distance range in pulse EPR measurements. The presented data enrich the knowledge on paramagnetic Gd(III) chelate complexes in frozen solutions, and can help optimize the experimental conditions for most types of the pulse measurements of the electron-electron dipolar interactions.

  16. Western Mineral and Environmental Resources Science Center--providing comprehensive earth science for complex societal issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, David G.; Wallace, Alan R.; Schneider, Jill L.

    2010-01-01

    supports approximately 40 USGS research specialists who utilize cooperative agreements with universities, industry, and other governmental agencies to support their collaborative research and information exchange. Scientists of the WMERSC study how and where non-fuel mineral resources form and are concentrated in the earth's crust, where mineral resources might be found in the future, and how mineral materials interact with the environment to affect human and ecosystem health. Natural systems (ecosystems) are complex - our understanding of how ecosystems operate requires collecting and synthesizing large amounts of geologic, geochemical, biologic, hydrologic, and meteorological information. Scientists in the Center strive to understand the interplay of various processes and how they affect the structure, composition, and health of ecosystems. Such understanding, which is then summarized in publicly available reports, is used to address and solve a wide variety of issues that are important to society and the economy. WMERSC scientists have extensive national and international experience in these scientific specialties and capabilities - they have collaborated with many Federal, State, and local agencies; with various private sector organizations; as well as with foreign countries and organizations. Nearly every scientific and societal challenge requires a different combination of scientific skills and capabilities. With their breadth of scientific specialties and capabilities, the scientists of the WMERSC can provide scientifically sound approaches to a wide range of societal challenges and issues. The following sections describe examples of important issues that have been addressed by scientists in the Center, the methods employed, and the relevant conclusions. New directions are inevitable as societal needs change over time. Scientists of the WMERSC have a diverse set of skills and capabilities and are proficient in the collection and integration of

  17. Fluctuation electron microscopy studies of complex structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gongpu; Rougée, Annick; Buseck, Peter; Treacy, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) is a hybrid imaging-diffraction technique. This technique is particularly sensitive to paracrystalline structures of dimension 0.5-2 nm, which are difficult to detect by either imaging or diffraction techniques alone. It has been successfully deployed to study paracrystalline structures in amorphous silicon, germanium thin film. This technique has also been used to study metallic glasses and oxide glasses. Until now, FEM has not been used to study disordered geological materials. In this talk we present our FEM studies of shungite, a naturally occurring disordered carbonaceous material, reveal that trace quantities of tightly curved graphene structures such as C60, or fragments of C60, is present in shungite. We also present results from our study of metamict zircon, whose crystal structure is destroyed by self-radiation during naturally occurring α decay events. Work is in progress to study the structural evolution during the metamictization process.

  18. Electronic interactions in metal complexed photoconducting polymers : a ZINDO study.

    SciTech Connect

    Manas, E. S.; Chen, L. X.; Chemistry; Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

    2000-12-01

    Semi-empirical (INDO/s) calculations have been conducted on molecular fragments with zero to three phenylenevinylene (PV) units attached to 4 and 4{prime} positions of a 2,2{prime}-bipyridine (bpy) group, with and without chelated metal ions, mimicking metal-free and metal-chelated photoconducting polymers 1 and 2 [Chen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 104 (2000) 1950]. The calculations suggest that: (1) a global lowering of the molecular orbital energy levels due to metal-chelation is responsible for the observed red-shift in the lowest energy transitions; and (2) metal chelation attenuates {pi}-electron delocalization. The relevance of these effects to photoluminescence of metal-chelated polymers is also discussed.

  19. Unveiling the complex electronic structure of amorphous metal oxides

    PubMed Central

    Århammar, C.; Pietzsch, Annette; Bock, Nicolas; Holmström, Erik; Araujo, C. Moyses; Gråsjö, Johan; Zhao, Shuxi; Green, Sara; Peery, T.; Hennies, Franz; Amerioun, Shahrad; Föhlisch, Alexander; Schlappa, Justine; Schmitt, Thorsten; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Wallace, Duane C.; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Johansson, Börje; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous materials represent a large and important emerging area of material’s science. Amorphous oxides are key technological oxides in applications such as a gate dielectric in Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor devices and in Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon and TANOS (TaN-Al2O3-Si3N4-SiO2-Silicon) flash memories. These technologies are required for the high packing density of today’s integrated circuits. Therefore the investigation of defect states in these structures is crucial. In this work we present X-ray synchrotron measurements, with an energy resolution which is about 5–10 times higher than is attainable with standard spectrometers, of amorphous alumina. We demonstrate that our experimental results are in agreement with calculated spectra of amorphous alumina which we have generated by stochastic quenching. This first principles method, which we have recently developed, is found to be superior to molecular dynamics in simulating the rapid gas to solid transition that takes place as this material is deposited for thin film applications. We detect and analyze in detail states in the band gap that originate from oxygen pairs. Similar states were previously found in amorphous alumina by other spectroscopic methods and were assigned to oxygen vacancies claimed to act mutually as electron and hole traps. The oxygen pairs which we probe in this work act as hole traps only and will influence the information retention in electronic devices. In amorphous silica oxygen pairs have already been found, thus they may be a feature which is characteristic also of other amorphous metal oxides.

  20. Application of models for exchange of electronic documents in complex administrative services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavev, Victor

    2015-11-01

    The report presents application of models for exchange of electronic documents between different administrations in government and business sectors. It shows the benefits of implementing electronic exchange of documents between different local offices of one administration in government sector such as a municipality and the way it is useful for implementing complex administrative services.

  1. Application of models for exchange of electronic documents in complex administrative services

    SciTech Connect

    Glavev, Victor

    2015-11-30

    The report presents application of models for exchange of electronic documents between different administrations in government and business sectors. It shows the benefits of implementing electronic exchange of documents between different local offices of one administration in government sector such as a municipality and the way it is useful for implementing complex administrative services.

  2. Making the Right Connections: Perceptions of Human Resource/Personnel Directors Concerning Electronic Job-Search Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Joan C.; North, Alexa B.; Arjomand, H. Lari

    1997-01-01

    Examines methods used to search for entry-level managerial positions and assesses how human resource and personnel directors in Georgia perceive these methods. Findings indicate that few of the directors use electronic technology to fill such positions, but they view positively those applicants who use electronic job searching methods. (RJM)

  3. Electron spin resonance of radicals and metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The materials are a collection of extended synopsis of papers presented at the conference sessions. The broad area of magnetic technique applications has been described as well as their spectra interpretation methods. The ESR, NMR, ENDOR, and spin echo were applied for studying the radiation and UV induced radicals in chemical and biological systems. Also in the study of complexes of metallic ions (having the paramagnetic properties) and their interaction with the matrix, the magnetic techniques have been commonly used. They are also very convenient tool for the study of reaction kinetics and mechanism as well as interaction of paramagnetic species with themselves and crystal lattice or with the surface as for the catalytic processes.

  4. Knowledge and use of electronic information resources by medical sciences faculty at The University of the West Indies

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, Shamin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to determine faculty's knowledge of electronic resources, access to a computer, use of electronic resources (both number and frequency) available at the Medical Sciences Library (MSL), and the areas of training needed and to identify areas for further research. Methods: A survey was administered to faculty in medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, and veterinary sciences at The University of the West Indies. The questions covered computer literacy, computer access and location, knowledge and use of electronic resources, and training needs. Results: The response rate was 70%, of whom 97% were computer users. Seventy-three percent used computers daily, and 82% felt that their computer literacy level was average or beyond. Overall, it was found that faculty had high awareness of the electronic resources made available by the MSL but low use of MSL-specific resources supporting the suggested problem of underutilization. Many respondents felt that e-resources were important, and, though many felt that they were competent users, 83% were self-taught and many still expressed a need for training. Over 60% felt that a workshop with a hands-on component was the preferred format for training. It was recommended that there be greater promotion of the library's e-resources. PMID:15685270

  5. A preliminary categorization of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment as secondary metal resources.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinsuke; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Kida, Akiko; Kameya, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    End-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) has recently received attention as a secondary source of metals. This study examined characteristics of end-of-life EEE as secondary metal resources to consider efficient collection and metal recovery systems according to the specific metals and types of EEE. We constructed an analogy between natural resource development and metal recovery from end-of-life EEE and found that metal content and total annual amount of metal contained in each type of end-of-life EEE should be considered in secondary resource development, as well as the collectability of the end-of-life products. We then categorized 21 EEE types into five groups and discussed their potential as secondary metal resources. Refrigerators, washing machines, air conditioners, and CRT TVs were evaluated as the most important sources of common metals, and personal computers, mobile phones, and video games were evaluated as the most important sources of precious metals. Several types of small digital equipment were also identified as important sources of precious metals; however, mid-size information and communication technology (ICT) equipment (e.g., printers and fax machines) and audio/video equipment were shown to be more important as a source of a variety of less common metals. The physical collectability of each type of EEE was roughly characterized by unit size and number of end-of-life products generated annually. Current collection systems in Japan were examined and potentially appropriate collection methods were suggested for equipment types that currently have no specific collection systems in Japan, particularly for video games, notebook computers, and mid-size ICT and audio/video equipment.

  6. Metal complex-based electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, C. Michael; Sapp, Shawn A.; Bignozzi, Carlo Alberto; Contado, Cristiano; Caramori, Stefano

    2006-03-28

    This present invention provides a metal-ligand complex and methods for using and preparing the same. In particular, the metal-ligand complex of the present invention is of the formula: L.sub.a-M-X.sub.b where L, M, X, a, and b are those define herein. The metal-ligand complexes of the present invention are useful in a variety of applications including as electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells and related photoelectrochromic devices.

  7. Reactivity of seventeen- and nineteen-valence electron complexes in organometallic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegman, Albert E.; Tyler, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A guideline to the reactivity of 17- and 19-valence electron species in organometallic chemistry is proposed which the authors believe will supersede all others. The thesis holds that the reactions of 17-electron metal radicals are associatively activated with reactions proceeding through a 19-valence electron species. The disparate reaction chemistry of the 17-electron metal radicals are unified in terms of this associative reaction pathway, and the intermediacy of 19-valence electron complexes in producing the observed products is discussed. It is suggested that related associatively activated pathways need to be considered in some reactions that are thought to occur by more conventional routes involving 16- and 18-electron intermediates. The basic reaction chemistry and electronic structures of these species are briefly discussed.

  8. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Hexachloroplatinate-Nucleobase Complexes: Nucleobase Excited State Decay Observed via Delayed Electron Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue B.; Dessent, Caroline

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ~1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl6 2- dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl6 2-∙thymine and PtCl6 2-∙adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes [Sen et al, J. Phys. Chem. B, 119, 11626, 2015]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl6 2-∙nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes, is attributed to onephoton excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a timescale long enough to allow autodetachment.

  9. Ultrafast Charge Recombination Dynamics in Ternary Electron Donor-Acceptor Complexes: (Benzene)2-Tetracyanoethylene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chih-Chung; Hung, Chih-Chang; Cheng, Po-Yuan

    2016-12-08

    The charge-transfer (CT) state relaxation dynamics of the binary (1:1) and ternary (2:1) benzene/tetracyanoethylene (BZ/TCNE) complexes are reported. Steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved broadband fluorescence (TRFL) spectra of TCNE dissolved in a series of BZ/CCl4 mixed solvents are measured to elucidate the spectroscopic properties of the BZ/TCNE complexes and their CT-state relaxation dynamics. Both steady-state and TRFL spectra exhibit marked BZ concentration dependences, which can be attributed to the formation of two types of 2:1 complexes in the ground and excited states. By combining with the density functional theory (DFT) calculations, it was concluded that the BZ concentration dependence of the absorption spectra is mainly due to the formation and excitation of the sandwich-type 2:1 ternary complexes, whereas the changes in fluorescence spectra at high BZ concentrations are due to the formation of the asymmetric-type 2:1 ternary complex CT1 state. A unified mechanism involving both direct excitation and secondary formation of the 2:1 complexes CT states are proposed to account for the observations. The equilibrium charge recombination (CR) time constant of the 1:1 CT1 state is determined to be ∼150 ps in CCl4, whereas that of the 2:1 DDA-type CT1 state becomes ∼70 ps in 10% BZ/CCl4 and ∼34 ps in pure BZ. The CR rates and the CT1-S0 energy gap of these complexes in different solvents exhibit a correlation conforming to the Marcus inverted region. It is concluded that partial charge resonance occurring between the two adjacent BZs in the asymmetric-type 2:1 CT1-state reduces the CR reaction exothermicity and increases the CR rate.

  10. Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The resources listed different types of materials related to the aerospace science under specified categories: free materials and inexpensive, selected government publication, audiovisual (government, nongovernment), aviation books, and space books. The list includes the publisher's name and the price for each publication. (SK)

  11. Medical Image Resource Center--making electronic teaching files from PACS.

    PubMed

    Lim, C C Tchoyoson; Yang, Guo Liang; Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Hui, Francis

    2003-12-01

    A picture archive and communications system (PACS) is a rich source of images and data suitable for creating electronic teaching files (ETF). However, the potential for PACS to support nonclinical applications has not been fully realized: at present there is no mechanism for PACS to identify and store teaching files; neither is there a standardized method for sharing such teaching images. The Medical Image Resource Center (MIRC) is a new central image repository that defines standards for data exchange among different centers. We developed an ETF server that retrieves digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) images from PACS, and enables users to create teaching files that conform to the new MIRC schema. We test-populated our ETF server with illustrative images from the clinical case load of the National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore. Together, PACS and MIRC have the potential to benefit radiology teaching and research.

  12. Influence of Electron-Withdrawing Substituents on the Electronic Structure of Oxidized Ni and Cu Salen Complexes.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Linus; Herasymchuk, Khrystyna; Thomas, Fabrice; Storr, Tim

    2015-06-15

    Nickel (Ni(Sal(CF3))) and copper (Cu(Sal(CF3))) complexes of an electron-poor salen ligand were prepared, and their one-electron oxidized counterparts were studied using an array of spectroscopic and theoretical methods. The electrochemistry of both complexes exhibited quasi-reversible redox processes at higher potentials in comparison to the M(Sal(R)) (R = (t)Bu, OMe, NMe2) analogues, in line with the electron-withdrawing nature of the para-CF3 substituent. Chemical oxidation, monitored by ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy, afforded their corresponding one-electron oxidized products. Ligand-based oxidation was observed for [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•), as evidenced by sharp NIR transitions in the UV-vis-NIR spectrum and a broad isotropic signal at g = 2.067 by solution electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Such sharp NIR transitions observed for [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•) are indicative of a delocalized electronic structure, which is in good agreement with electrochemical measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In addition, the increased Lewis acidity of [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•), evident from the EPR g-value and DFT calculations, was further quantified by the binding affinity of axial ligands to [Ni(Sal(CF3))](+•). For [Cu(Sal(CF3))](+), an intense ligand-to-metal charge transfer band at 18 700 cm(-1) in the UV-vis-NIR spectrum was observed, which is diagnostic for the formation of a Cu(III) species [J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 15448-15459]. The Cu(III) character for [Cu(Sal(CF3))](+) is further confirmed by (19)F NMR analysis. Taken together, these results show that the electron-deficient salen ligand H2Sal(CF3) increases the Lewis acidity of the coordinating metal center.

  13. Correlative super-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopy of the nuclear pore complex with molecular resolution.

    PubMed

    Löschberger, Anna; Franke, Christian; Krohne, Georg; van de Linde, Sebastian; Sauer, Markus

    2014-10-15

    Here, we combine super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy with scanning electron microscopy to map the position of proteins of nuclear pore complexes in isolated Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclear envelopes with molecular resolution in both imaging modes. We use the periodic molecular structure of the nuclear pore complex to superimpose direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images with a precision of <20 nm on electron micrographs. The correlative images demonstrate quantitative molecular labeling and localization of nuclear pore complex proteins by standard immunocytochemistry with primary and secondary antibodies and reveal that the nuclear pore complex is composed of eight gp210 (also known as NUP210) protein homodimers. In addition, we find subpopulations of nuclear pore complexes with ninefold symmetry, which are found occasionally among the more typical eightfold symmetrical structures.

  14. The shadow uniform resource locator: standardizing citations of electronically published materials.

    PubMed

    DiCarlo, J V; Pastor, X; Markovitz, B P

    2000-01-01

    Citation of scientific materials published on the Internet is often cumbersome because of unwieldy uniform resource locators (URLs). The authors describe a format for URLs that simplifies citation of scholarly materials. Its use depends on a simple HTML device, the "refresh page." Uniform citation would follow this format: [Author I. Title of article. http:// domain/year/month-day(e#).html]. The HTML code for such a page is: (HTML) (head) (meta HTTP-EQUIV="Refresh" CONTENT="0; URL= http://Actual-URL/ for-article/ referred-to/ incitation.html") (/head) (/HTML). The code instructs the browser to suppress the content of the refresh page and bring up the title page of the cited article instead. Citations would be succinct and predictable. An electronic journal would not need to alter its existing file hierarchy but would need to establish a distinct domain name and maintain a file of refresh pages. Utilization of the "shadow" URL would bring us one step closer to truly universal resource locators.

  15. Electronic properties and electron-phonon interaction in complex, multicomponent alloys in application to high-entropy alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyuk, German; Daene, Markus; Stocks, George Malcolm; Caro, Jose Alfredo; Stoller, Roger

    2015-03-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) have recently been developed as nontraditional alloy systems. They are composed of multiple elements at or near equiatomic ratios that form random solid solutions on simple underlying fcc or bcc lattices. In recent years HEAs have attracted significant attention due to their high strength, ductility and possible high radiation resistance. The complexity of the alloys results in very interesting electronic system behavior. Even in thermal equilibrium, disorder, especially extreme disorder, has important impacts on all electronic, atomic, and magnetic properties. In the current work we present results of first principle investigation of the electronic and magnetic properties of Ni-based multicomponent concentrated alloys using the coherent potential approximation (CPA). The influence of electronic structure modifications on the electron mean free path and values of electron-phonon coupling are calculated, together with preliminary results on similar quantities obtained by Time Dependent DFT. We discuss possible effects of tuning the mean free path and energy dissipation mechanisms to defect production and recombination in HEAs under irradiation.

  16. Navigating a strange and complex environment: experiences of Sudanese refugee women using a new nutrition resource

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, Cynthia A; Raffin-Bouchal, Shelley; Henshaw, Christena Jane

    2014-01-01

    Background Refugees experience dietary changes as part of the daily challenges they face resettling in a new country. Sudanese women seek to care and feed their families, but face language barriers in the marketplace, limited access to familiar foods, and forced new food choices. This study aimed to understand the acceptability of a purse-sized nutrition resource, “The Market Guide”, which was developed to help recently immigrated Sudanese refugee women identify and purchase healthy foods and navigate grocery stores. Methods Eight women participated in a focus group, four of whom were also observed during accompanied grocery store visits. Individual interviews were conducted with four health care workers at the resettlement center to gather perceptions about the suitability of The Market Guide. Focus groups and interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. Data from field notes and transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory for preliminary open codes, followed by selective and theoretical coding. Results The Market Guide was of limited use to Sudanese women. Their response to this resource revealed the struggles of women acculturating during their first year in Calgary, Canada. We discovered the basic social process, “Navigating through a strange and complex environment: learning ways to feed your family.” Language, transportation, and an unfamiliar marketplace challenged women and prevented them from exercising their customary role of “knowing” which foods were “safe and good” for their families. The nutrition resource fell short of informing food choices and purchases, and we discovered that “learning to feed your family” is a relational process where trusted persons, family, and friends help navigate dietary acculturation. Conclusion Emergent theory based on the basic social process may help health care professionals consider relational learning when planning health promotion and nutrition activities with Sudanese families. PMID:24790470

  17. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-11-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment.

  18. Mathematical model and software complex for computer simulation of field emission electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiforov, Konstantin

    2015-03-10

    The software complex developed in MATLAB allows modelling of function of diode and triode structures based on field emission electron sources with complex sub-micron geometry, their volt-ampere characteristics, calculating distribution of electric field for educational and research needs. The goal of this paper is describing the physical-mathematical model, calculation methods and algorithms the software complex is based on, demonstrating the principles of its function and showing results of its work. For getting to know the complex, a demo version with graphical user interface is presented.

  19. Proton-coupled electron transfer and multielectron oxidations in complexes of ruthenium and osmium

    SciTech Connect

    Dovletoglou, A.

    1992-01-01

    This doctoral research concerns the mechanism of proton-coupled electron transfer over an extended pH range. These processes between ruthenium and osmium complexes and hydroquinones have been studied using spectrophotometric methods and cyclic voltammetry. Elucidation of the mechanistic details has been attempted by using isotopic labelling, kinetic analysis, and numerical simulation of complex kinetic schemes. The coordination and redox chemistry of polypyridyl-acetylacetonato and -oxalato complexes of ruthenium and the role of ancillary ligands in defining the properties of Ru[sup IV]O complexes were explored. These studies represent the first attempt to probe possible 2e[sup [minus

  20. Plastics disassembly versus bulk recycling: engineering design for end-of-life electronics resource recovery.

    PubMed

    Rios, Pedro; Stuart, Julie Ann; Grant, Ed

    2003-12-01

    Annual plastic flows through the business and consumer electronics manufacturing supply chain include nearly 3 billion lb of high-value engineering plastics derived from petroleum. The recovery of resource value from this stream presents critical challenges in areas of materials identification and recycling process design that demand new green engineering technologies applied together with life cycle assessment and ecological supply chain analysis to create viable plastics-to-plastics supply cycles. The sustainable recovery of potentially high-value engineering plastics streams requires that recyclers either avoid mixing plastic parts or purify later by separating smaller plastic pieces created in volume reduction (shredding) steps. Identification and separation constitute significant barriers in the plastics-to-plastics recycling value proposition. In the present work, we develop a model that accepts randomly arriving electronic products to study scenarios by which a recycler might identify and separate high-value engineering plastics as well as metals. Using discrete eventsimulation,we compare current mixed plastics recovery with spectrochemical plastic resin identification and subsequent sorting. Our results show that limited disassembly with whole-part identification can produce substantial yields in separated streams of recovered engineering thermoplastics. We find that disassembly with identification does not constitute a bottleneck, but rather, with relatively few workers, can be configured to pull the process and thus decrease maximum staging space requirements.

  1. Tunable entanglement resource in elastic electron-exchange collisions out of chaotic spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, B.; Blum, K.; Langer, B.

    2016-09-01

    Elastic collisions between initially unpolarized electrons and hydrogenlike atoms are discussed aiming to analyze the entanglement properties of the correlated final spin system. Explicit spin-dependent interactions are neglected and electron exchange only is taken into account. We show the final spin system to be completely characterized by a single spin correlation parameter depending on scattering angle and energy. Its numerical value identifies the final spins of the collision partners to be either in the separable, entangled, or Bell correlated regions. The symmetry of the scattering process allows for the construction of explicit examples applying methods of classical communication and local operations for illustrating the concepts of nonlocality versus separability. It is shown that strong correlations can be produced violating Bell's inequalities significantly. Furthermore, the degree of entanglement can be continuously varied simply by changing either the scattering angle and/or energy. This allows for the generation of tunable spin pairs with any desired degree of entanglement. It is suggested to use such nonlocally entangled spin pairs as a resource for further experiments, for example in quantum information processes.

  2. SAGES: a suite of freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Sheri L; Feighner, Brian H; Loschen, Wayne A; Wojcik, Richard A; Skora, Joseph F; Coberly, Jacqueline S; Blazes, David L

    2011-05-10

    Public health surveillance is undergoing a revolution driven by advances in the field of information technology. Many countries have experienced vast improvements in the collection, ingestion, analysis, visualization, and dissemination of public health data. Resource-limited countries have lagged behind due to challenges in information technology infrastructure, public health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular, flexible, freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings. One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system. The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations.

  3. Electronic structure and optical properties of the intrinsically chiral 16-electron superatom complex [Au20(PP3)4](4+).

    PubMed

    Knoppe, Stefan; Lehtovaara, Lauri; Häkkinen, Hannu

    2014-06-12

    The recently solved crystal structure of the [Au20(PP3)4]Cl4 cluster (PP3: tris(2-(diphenylphophino)ethyl)phosphine) is examined using density functional theory (DFT). The Au20 core of the cluster is intrinsically chiral by the arrangement of the Au atoms. This is in contrast to the chirality of thiolate-protected gold clusters, in which the protecting Au-thiolate units are arranged in chiral patterns on achiral cores. We interpret the electronic structure of the [Au20(PP3)4]Cl4 cluster in terms of the superatom complex model. The 16-electron cluster cannot be interpreted as a dimer of 8-electron clusters (which are magic). Instead, a superatomic electron configuration of 1S(2) 1P(6) 1D(6) 2S(2) is found. The 2S band is strongly stabilized, and the 1D states are nondegenerate with a large gap. Ligand protection of the (Au20)(4+) core leads to a significant increase of the HL-gap and thus stabilization. We also tested a charge of +II, which would give rise to an 18-electron superatom complex. Our results indicate that the 16-electron cluster is indeed more stable. We also investigate the optical properties of the cluster. The experimental absorption spectrum is well-reproduced by time-dependent DFT. Prominent transitions are analyzed by time-dependent density-functional perturbation theory. The intrinsic chirality of the cluster is compared to that of Au38(SR)24. We observe that the chiral arrangement of the protecting Au-SR units in Au38(SR)24 has very strong influence on the strength of the CD spectra, whereas phosphine protection in the title compound does not.

  4. Rare Earth Complex as Electron Trapper and Energy Transfer Ladder for Efficient Red Iridium Complex Based Electroluminescent Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Li, Leijiao; Jiang, Yunlong; Cui, Rongzhen; Li, Yanan; Zhao, Xuesen; Zhang, Hongjie

    2015-07-29

    In this work, we experimentally demonstrated the new functions of trivalent rare earth complex in improving the electroluminescent (EL) performances of iridium complex by codoping trace Eu(TTA)3phen (TTA = thenoyltrifluoroacetone, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) into a light-emitting layer based on PQ2Ir(dpm) (iridium(III)bis(2-phenylquinoly-N,C(2'))dipivaloylmethane). Compared with a reference device, the codoped devices displayed higher efficiencies, slower efficiency roll-off, higher brightness, and even better color purity. Experimental results demonstrated that Eu(TTA)3phen molecules function as electron trappers due to its low-lying energy levels, which are helpful in balancing holes and electrons and in broadening recombination zone. In addition, the matched triplet energy of Eu(TTA)3phen is instrumental in facilitating energy transfer from host to emitter. Finally, highly efficient red EL devices with the highest current efficiency, power efficiency and brightness up to 58.98 cd A(-1) (external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 21%), 61.73 lm W(-1) and 100870 cd m(-2), respectively, were obtained by appropriately decreasing the doping concentration of iridium complex. At certain brightness of 1000 cd m(-2), EL current efficiency up to 51.94 cd A(-1) (EQE = 18.5%) was retained. Our investigation extends the application of rare earth complexes in EL devices and provides a chance to improve the device performances.

  5. Crystal structure of an electron transfer complex between aromatic amine dehydrogenase and azurin from Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Chen, Zhi-wei; Ferrari, Davide; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Bellamy, Henry D; Chistoserdov, Andrei; Davidson, Victor L; Mathews, F Scott

    2006-11-14

    The crystal structure of an electron transfer complex of aromatic amine dehydrogenase (AADH) and azurin is presented. Electrons are transferred from the tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) cofactor of AADH to the type I copper of the cupredoxin azurin. This structure is compared with the complex of the TTQ-containing methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH) and the cupredoxin amicyanin. Despite significant similarities between the two quinoproteins and the two cupredoxins, each is specific for its respective partner and the ionic strength dependence and magnitude of the binding constant for each complex are quite different. The AADH-azurin interface is largely hydrophobic, covering approximately 500 A(2) of surface on each molecule, with one direct hydrogen bond linking them. The closest distance from TTQ to copper is 12.6 A compared with a distance of 9.3 A in the MADH-amicyanin complex. When the MADH-amicyanin complex is aligned with the AADH-azurin complex, the amicyanin lies on top of the azurin but is oriented quite differently. Although the copper atoms differ in position by approximately 4.7 A, the amicyanin bound to MADH appears to be rotated approximately 90 degrees from its aligned position with azurin. Comparison of the structures of the two complexes identifies features of the interface that dictate the specificity of the protein-protein interaction and determine the rate of interprotein electron transfer.

  6. Electron collisions with the CH2O-H2O complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, T. C.; Lima, M. A. P.; Canuto, S.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2009-12-01

    We report cross sections for elastic collisions of low-energy electrons with the CH2O-H2O complex. We employed the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and in the static-exchange-polarization approximations for energies from 0.1 to 20 eV. We considered four different hydrogen-bonded structures for the complex that were generated by classical Monte Carlo simulations. Our aim is to investigate the effect of the water molecule on the π∗ shape resonance of formaldehyde. Previous studies reported a π∗ shape resonance for CH2O at around 1 eV. The resonance positions of the complexes appear at lower energies in all cases due to the mutual polarization between the two molecules. This indicates that the presence of water may favor dissociation by electron impact and may lead to an important effect on strand breaking in wet DNA by electron impact.

  7. Electron mobility of rare earth complexes measured by transient electroluminescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, F. X.; Lengyel, O.; Li, Wenlian; Hong, Z. R.; Liu, Ze; Lee, C. S.; Lee, S. T.

    2006-09-01

    Electron mobility of gadolinium/europium (dibenzoylmethanato) 3(bathophenanthroline) (Gd/Eu(DBM) 3 bath) was measured by transient electroluminescence (EL) method. Although electron mobility of the two complexes were expected to be same, the value of mobility (1.2 × 10 -4 cm 2/Vs at electric field of 1 MV/cm) of Eu(DBM) 3 bath complex was bigger than that (8 × 10 -5 cm 2/Vs at electric field of 1 MV/cm) of Gd(DBM) 3 bath complex. It was found to be related to the different luminescent mechanisms of active materials and recombination zones in the devices. According to this, penetration length of hole injected into electron transport layer of Eu(DBM) 3 bath was estimated.

  8. Tuning steric and electronic effects in transition-metal β-diketiminate complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chi; Bellows, Sarina M.; Holland, Patrick L.

    2015-01-01

    β-Diketiminates are widely used supporting ligands for building a range of metal complexes with different oxidation states, structures, and reactivities. This Perspective summarizes the steric and electronic influences of ligand substituents on these complexes, with an eye toward informing the design of new complexes with optimized properties. The backbone and N-aryl substituents can give significant steric effects on structure, reactivity and selectivity of reactions. The electron density on the metal can be tuned by installation of electron withdrawing or donating groups on the β-diketiminate ligand as well. Examples are shown from throughout the transition metal series to demonstrate different types of effects attributable to systematic variation of β-diketiminate ligands. PMID:26244489

  9. Geometric and Electronic Structure of a Peroxomanganese(III) Complex Supported by a Scorpionate Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Colmer, Hannah E.; Geiger, Robert A.; Leto, Domenick F.; Wijeratne, Gayan B.; Day, Victor W.; Jackson, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    A monomeric MnII complex has been prepared with the facially-coordinating TpPh2 ligand, (TpPh2 = hydrotris(3,5-diphenylpyrazol-1-yl)borate). The X-ray crystal structure shows three coordinating solvent molecules resulting in a six-coordinate complex with Mn-ligand bond lengths that are consistent with a high-spin MnII ion. Treatment of this MnII complex with excess KO2 at room temperature resulted in the formation of a MnIII-O2 complex that is stable for several days at ambient conditions, allowing for the determination of the X-ray crystal structure of this intermediate. The electronic structure of this peroxomanganese(III) adduct was examined by using electronic absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), low-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature variable-field (VTVH) MCD spectroscopies. Density functional theory (DFT), time-dependent (TD)-DFT, and multireference ab initio CASSCF/NEVPT2 calculations were used to assign the electronic transitions and further investigate the electronic structure of the peroxomanganese(III) species. The lowest ligand-field transition in the electronic absorption spectrum of the MnIII-O2 complex exhibits a blue shift in energy compared to other previously characterized peroxomanganese(III) complexes that results from a large axial bond elongation, reducing the metal-ligand covalency and stabilizing the σ-antibonding Mn dz2 MO that is the donor MO for this transition. PMID:25312785

  10. Use of Ruthenium Photooxidation Techniques to Study Electron Transfer in the Cytochrome bc1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Millett, Francis; Durham, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Ruthenium photooxidation methods are presented to study electron transfer between the cytochrome bc1 complex and cytochrome c, and within the cytochrome bc1 complex. Methods are described to prepare a ruthenium cytochrome c derivative, Ruz-39-Cc, by labeling the single sulfhydryl on yeast H39C;C102T iso-1-Cc with the reagent Ru(bpz)2(4-bromomethyl-4′-methylbipyridine). The ruthenium complex attached to Cys-39 on the opposite side of Cc from the heme crevice does not affect the interaction with cyt bc1. Laser excitation of reduced Ruz-39-Cc results in photooxidation of heme c within 1 μs with a yield of 20%. Flash photolysis of a 1:1 complex between reduced yeast cytochrome bc1 and Ruz-39-Cc leads to electron transfer from heme c1 to heme c with a rate constant of 1.4 × 104 s-1. Methods are described for the use of the ruthenium dimer, Ru2D, to photooxidize cyt c1 in the cytochrome bc1 complex within 1 μs with a yield of 20%. Electron transfer from the Rieske iron-sulfur center [2Fe2S] to cyt c1 was detected with a rate constant of 6 × 104 s-1 in R. sphaeroides cyt bc1 using this method. This electron transfer step is rate-limited by the rotation of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein in a conformational gating mechanism. This method provides critical information on the dynamics of rotation of the iron-sulfur protein (ISP) as it transfers electrons from QH2 in the Qo site to cyt c1 These ruthenium photooxidation methods can be used to measure many of the electron transfer reactions in cytochrome bc1 complexes from any source. PMID:19348884

  11. Electrostatic effects on proton coupled electron transfer in oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhamed; Vogt, Leslie; Vassiliev, Serguei; Rivalta, Ivan; Sultan, Mohammad M; Bruce, Doug; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S; Gunner, M R

    2013-05-23

    The influence of electrostatic interactions on the free energy of proton coupled electron transfer in biomimetic oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) are investigated. The reported study introduces an enhanced multiconformer continuum electrostatics (MCCE) model, parametrized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with a classical valence model for the oxomanganese core. The calculated pKa's and oxidation midpoint potentials (E(m)'s) match experimental values for eight complexes, indicating that purely electrostatic contributions account for most of the observed couplings between deprotonation and oxidation state transitions. We focus on pKa's of terminal water ligands in [Mn(II/III)(H2O)6](2+/3+) (1), [Mn(III)(P)(H2O)2](3-) (2, P = 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(2,6-dichloro-3-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinato), [Mn2(IV,IV)(μ-O)2(terpy)2(H2O)2](4+) (3, terpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), and [Mn3(IV,IV,IV)(μ-O)4(phen)4(H2O)2](4+) (4, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and the pKa's of μ-oxo bridges and Mn E(m)'s in [Mn2(μ-O)2(bpy)4] (5, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridyl), [Mn2(μ-O)2(salpn)2] (6, salpn = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine), [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(Cl)-salpn)2] (7), and [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(NO2)-salpn)2] (8). The analysis of complexes 6-8 highlights the strong coupling between electron and proton transfers, with any Mn oxidation lowering the pKa of an oxo bridge by 10.5 ± 0.9 pH units. The model also accounts for changes in the E(m)'s by ligand substituents, such as found in complexes 6-8, due to the electron withdrawing Cl (7) and NO2 (8). The reported study provides the foundation for analysis of electrostatic effects in other oxomanganese complexes and metalloenzymes, where proton coupled electron transfer plays a fundamental role in redox-leveling mechanisms.

  12. Cyclic (Alkyl)(Amino)Carbene Complexes of Rhodium and Nickel and Their Steric and Electronic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ursula S D; Sieck, Carolin; Haehnel, Martin; Hammond, Kai; Marder, Todd B; Radius, Udo

    2016-07-25

    N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) and cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbenes (CAACs) are of great interest, as their electronic and steric properties provide a unique class of ligands and organocatalysts. Herein, substitution reactions involving novel carbonyl complexes of rhodium and nickel were studied to provide a deeper understanding of the fundamental electronic factors characterizing CAAC(methyl) , which were compared with the large array of data available for NHC and sterically more demanding CAAC ligands.

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer in a protein-surfactant complex: probing the interaction of SDS with BSA.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Anjan; Seth, Debabrata; Setua, Palash; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2006-08-24

    Photoinduced fluorescence quenching electron transfer from N,N-dimethyl aniline to different 7-amino coumarin dyes has been investigated in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles and in bovine serum albumin (BSA)-SDS protein-surfactant complexes using steady state and picosecond time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The electron transfer rate has been found to be slower in BSA-SDS protein-surfactant complexes compared to that in SDS micelles. This observation has been explained with the help of the "necklace-and-bead" structure formed by the protein-surfactant complex due to coiling of protein molecules around the micelles. In the correlation of free energy change to the fluorescence quenching electron transfer rate, we have observed that coumarin 151 deviates from the normal Marcus region, showing retardation in the electron transfer rate at higher negative free energy region. We endeavored to establish that the retardation in the fluorescence quenching electron transfer rate for coumarin 151 at higher free energy region is a result of slower rotational relaxation and slower translational diffusion of coumarin 151 (C-151) compared to its analogues coumarin 152 and coumarin 481 in micelles and in protein-surfactant complexes. The slower rotational relaxation and translational diffusion of C-151 are supposed to be arising from the different location of coumarin 151 compared to coumarin 152 and coumarin 481.

  14. Visualizing Macromolecular Complexes with In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Wong, Peony C. K.; Chiu, Po-Lin; Dutrow, Gavin H.; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-11-01

    A central focus of biological research is understanding the structure/function relationship of macromolecular protein complexes. Yet conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques are limited to static observations. Here we present the first direct images of purified macromolecular protein complexes using in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy. Our results establish the capability of this technique for visualizing the interface between biology and nanotechnology with high fidelity while also probing the interactions of biomolecules within solution. This method represents an important advancement towards allowing future high-resolution observations of biological processes and conformational dynamics in real-time.

  15. Visualizing macromolecular complexes with in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Evans, James E; Jungjohann, Katherine L; Wong, Peony C K; Chiu, Po-Lin; Dutrow, Gavin H; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D

    2012-11-01

    A central focus of biological research is understanding the structure/function relationship of macromolecular protein complexes. Yet conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques are limited to static observations. Here we present the first direct images of purified macromolecular protein complexes using in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy. Our results establish the capability of this technique for visualizing the interface between biology and nanotechnology with high fidelity while also probing the interactions of biomolecules within solution. This method represents an important advancement towards allowing future high-resolution observations of biological processes and conformational dynamics in real-time.

  16. Electronic structure and spectral properties of terbium(III) nitrate complex with hexamethylphosphoramide.

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, Valerii I; Kurbatov, Ilya A; Cherednichenko, Alexander I; Mirochnik, Anatoly G; Zhikhareva, Polina A

    2017-03-05

    Spectral properties of terbium(III) nitrate complex with hexamethylphosphoramide have been studied by quantum-chemical methods within the density functional theory and methods of luminescent and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Analysis of the luminescence excitation spectrum of the complex has indicated the absence of intramolecular transfer of electronic excitation energy from the ligand levels to the resonance levels of the rare earth central ion, so luminescence of the complex is associated with the electronic f-f-transitions of Tb(3+) ion (transitions (5)D4→(7)FJ, J=3-6). According to quantum-chemical modeling of the excited singlet and triplet levels of the complex, the excitation energy transfer from the ligands onto the central ion does not occur because of the significant difference of energies of their excited states.

  17. Electronic structure and spectral properties of terbium(III) nitrate complex with hexamethylphosphoramide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, Valerii I.; Kurbatov, Ilya A.; Cherednichenko, Alexander I.; Mirochnik, Anatoly G.; Zhikhareva, Polina A.

    2017-03-01

    Spectral properties of terbium(III) nitrate complex with hexamethylphosphoramide have been studied by quantum-chemical methods within the density functional theory and methods of luminescent and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Analysis of the luminescence excitation spectrum of the complex has indicated the absence of intramolecular transfer of electronic excitation energy from the ligand levels to the resonance levels of the rare earth central ion, so luminescence of the complex is associated with the electronic f-f-transitions of Tb3 + ion (transitions 5D4 → 7FJ, J = 3-6). According to quantum-chemical modeling of the excited singlet and triplet levels of the complex, the excitation energy transfer from the ligands onto the central ion does not occur because of the significant difference of energies of their excited states.

  18. Spectroscopic and Electronic Structure Studies of Phenolate Cu(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Somdatta; Cirera, Jordi; Vance, Michael A.; Ono, Tetsuya; Fujisawa, Kiyoshi; Solomon, Edward I.

    2009-01-01

    A combination of spectroscopies and DFT calculations have been used to define the electronic structures of two crystallographically defined CuII-phenolate complexes. These complexes differ in the orientation of the phenolate ring which results in different bonding interactions of the phenolate donor orbitals with the CuII, which are reflected in the very different spectroscopic properties of the two complexes. These differences in electronic structures lead to significant differences in DFT calculated reactivities with oxygen. These calculations suggest that oxygen activation via a CuI phenoxyl ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) complex is highly endergonic (> 50 kcal/mol), hence an unlikely pathway. Rather, the two electron oxidation of the phenolate forming a bridging CuII peroxoquinone complex is more favorable (11.3 kcal/mol). The role of the oxidized metal in mediating this two electron oxidation of the coordinated phenolate and its relevance to the biogenesis of the covalently bound topa quinone in amine oxidase are discussed. PMID:18998639

  19. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters and Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, K

    2008-10-06

    Our research in this area since October 2007 has resulted in seven completed publications and more papers of the completed work are in progress. Our work during this period principally focused on actinide complexes with secondary emphasis on spectroscopic properties and electronic structure of metal complexes. As the publications are available online with all of the details of the results, tables and figures, we are providing here only a brief summary of major highlights, in each of the categories.

  20. Electronic structure and luminescence of tellurium (IV) halide complexes with guanidine and caesium cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotsenko, A. A.; Shcheka, O. L.; Vovna, V. I.; Korochentsev, V. V.; Mirochnik, A. G.; Sedakova, T. V.

    2016-04-01

    The present paper continues a series of publications on the investigation of complex compounds of s2 ions and their properties. The structure of the valence levels of Cs2TeX6, (HGu)2TeCl6 complexes (where X = Cl, Br; HGu+ - guanidinium) is examined, the orbital nature of luminescence excitation is established, and the relationship of properties with the electronic structure is determined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT).

  1. SAGES: A Suite of Freely-Available Software Tools for Electronic Disease Surveillance in Resource-Limited Settings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-10

    health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular...concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility...the scope of reportable conditions and are intended to help prevent and respond to global public health threats. SAGES, an electronic biosurveillance

  2. Ultrafast events in the electron photodetachment from the hexacyanoferrate(II) complex in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommeret, Stanislas; Naskrecki, Ryszard; van der Meulen, Peter; Ménard, Marjorie; Vigneron, Georges; Gustavsson, Thomas

    1998-05-01

    Following excitation of the hexacyanoferrate(II) complex in water with a 40 fs laser pulse at 267 nm, the absorption of the hydrated electron rises with a global time constant of 510 fs, whereas the characteristic absorption of the hexacyanoferrate(III) appears almost instantaneously. A transient absorption band around 490 nm is tentatively assigned to the charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) state of the hexacyanoferrate(II). Its ultra-rapid decay (≪60 fs) is due to the electronic repulsion between the electron and its parent core.

  3. Wind Resource Assessment in Complex Terrain with a High-Resolution Numerical Weather Prediction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Karin; Serafin, Stefano; Grubišić, Vanda; Dorninger, Manfred; Zauner, Rudolf; Fink, Martin

    2014-05-01

    A crucial step in planning new wind farms is the estimation of the amount of wind energy that can be harvested in possible target sites. Wind resource assessment traditionally entails deployment of masts equipped for wind speed measurements at several heights for a reasonably long period of time. Simplified linear models of atmospheric flow are then used for a spatial extrapolation of point measurements to a wide area. While linear models have been successfully applied in the wind resource assessment in plains and offshore, their reliability in complex terrain is generally poor. This represents a major limitation to wind resource assessment in Austria, where high-altitude locations are being considered for new plant sites, given the higher frequency of sustained winds at such sites. The limitations of linear models stem from two key assumptions in their formulation, the neutral stratification and attached boundary-layer flow, both of which often break down in complex terrain. Consequently, an accurate modeling of near-surface flow over mountains requires the adoption of a NWP model with high horizontal and vertical resolution. This study explores the wind potential of a site in Styria in the North-Eastern Alps. The WRF model is used for simulations with a maximum horizontal resolution of 800 m. Three nested computational domains are defined, with the innermost one encompassing a stretch of the relatively broad Enns Valley, flanked by the main crest of the Alps in the south and the Nördliche Kalkalpen of similar height in the north. In addition to the simulation results, we use data from fourteen 10-m wind measurement sites (of which 7 are located within valleys and 5 near mountain tops) and from 2 masts with anemometers at several heights (at hillside locations) in an area of 1600 km2 around the target site. The potential for wind energy production is assessed using the mean wind speed and turbulence intensity at hub height. The capacity factor is also evaluated

  4. Generation and accretion of electrons in complex plasmas with cylindrical particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Misra, Shikha; Mishra, S. K.

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents an analytical model for the physical understanding of the charging of cylindrical dust particles in an open complex plasma system. Two different mechanisms, viz., thermionic emission and photoelectric emission have been considered for the electron generation from the charged cylindrical dust particles; the corresponding expressions for the rate of emission of electrons and their mean energy have been derived. A simple approach has been adopted to derive the expression for the rate of electron accretion to the dust particle. Further a new expression for the mean energy associated with the accreted electrons due to cylindrical dust particle has been derived and presented. An interesting comparison of results obtained in the case of spherical and cylindrical dust particles has also been made. Using these expressions, a formalism has been developed for the electronic processes in an illuminated dust cloud with cylindrical particles, on the basis of charge neutrality condition and number and energy balance of electrons; the charge carried by the cylindrical dust particles, electron temperature, and electron density corresponding to a given situation have been determined. The limitation of the applicability of the theory, viz., that the mean free path of an electron for accretion by dust particles be less than the dimension of the dust cloud has been pointed out.

  5. Modeling electron transfer thermodynamics in protein complexes: interaction between two cytochromes c(3).

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Vitor H; Baptista, António M; Soares, Cláudio M

    2004-05-01

    Redox protein complexes between type I and type II tetraheme cytochromes c(3) from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough are here analyzed using theoretical methodologies. Various complexes were generated using rigid-body docking techniques, and the two lowest energy complexes (1 and 2) were relaxed using molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent and subjected to further characterization. Complex 1 corresponds to an interaction between hemes I from both cytochromes c(3). Complex 2 corresponds to an interaction between the heme IV from type I and the heme I from type II cytochrome c(3). Binding free energy calculations using molecular mechanics, Poisson-Boltzmann, and surface accessibility methods show that complex 2 is more stable than complex 1. Thermodynamic calculations on complex 2 show that complex formation induces changes in the reduction potential of both cytochromes c(3), but the changes are larger in the type I cytochrome c(3) (the largest one occurring on heme IV, of approximately 80 mV). These changes are sufficient to invert the global titration curves of both cytochromes, generating directionally in electron transfer from type I to type II cytochrome c(3), a phenomenon of obvious thermodynamic origin and consequences, but also with kinetic implications. The existence of processes like this occurring at complex formation may constitute a natural design of efficient redox chains.

  6. Principles of the electronic structure of complexes of non-transition elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostikova, Galina P.; Korol'kov, Dimitrii V.; Kostikov, Yury P.

    1997-04-01

    The results of quantum-chemical calculations of electronic structures of complexes of non-transition elements are surveyed. Their X-ray emission and X-ray photoelectron spectra are analysed. General principles of the electronic structure of these complexes are established. It is shown that the effective participation of partially or completely occupied valence npm orbitals of the central atom A of ALk complexes in the formation of delocalised MOs, the negligibly small contribution of vacant And orbitals to the bonds with ligands, the valence inertness or rather low contribution of occupied Ans2 orbitals (except for 2s2 AO) to the valence MOs, and the initiation of the multiple bonds (in the electronic structure of complexes) due to covalent or hypervalent π-interactions involving only 2p (but not 3p, 4p, etc.) atomic orbitals are the most significant factors influencing the electronic structure of non-transition element compounds. The concept of d orbitals and hypervalent bonds is critisised. The bibliography includes 130 references.

  7. Fabrication of an Organic Light-Emitting Diode from New Host π Electron Rich Zinc Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Mohammad Reza; Janghouri, Mohammad; Shahedi, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    A new π electron rich zinc complex was used as a fluorescent material in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Devices with a structure of indium tin oxide/poly (3,4-ethylenedi-oxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT: PSS) (50 nm)/polyvinylcarbazole (60 nm)/Zn: %2 porphyrin derivatives (45 nm)/Al (150 nm) were fabricated. Porphyrin derivatives accounting for 2 wt.% in the π electron rich zinc complex were used as a host. The electroluminescence (EL) spectra of porphyrin derivatives indicated a red shift, as π electron rich zinc complex EL spectra. The device (4) has also a luminance of 3420 cd/m2 and maximum efficiency of 1.58 cd/A at 15 V, which are the highest values among four devices. The result of Commission International del'Eclairage (CIE) (X, Y) coordinate and EL spectrum of device (3) indicated that it is more red shifted compared to other devices. Results of this work indicate that π electron rich zinc complex is a promising host material for high efficiency red OLEDs and has a simple structure compared to Alq3-based devices.

  8. Simple relationship between oxidation state and electron affinity in gas-phase metal-oxo complexes.

    PubMed

    Waller, Sarah E; Ray, Manisha; Yoder, Bruce L; Jarrold, Caroline Chick

    2013-12-19

    The photoelectron spectra of WO3H(-) and WO2F(-) are presented and analyzed in the context of a series of previous similar measurements on MO(y)(-) (M = Mo, W; y = 0-3), MO4H(-) and AlMOy(-) (y ≤ 4) complexes. The electronic structures of the WO3H and WO2F anion and neutral complexes were investigated using the B3LYP hybrid density functional method. The spectra of WO3H(-), WO2F(-), and previously measured AlWO3(-) photoelectron spectra show that the corresponding neutrals, in which the transition metal centers are all in a +5 oxidation state, have comparable electron affinities. In addition, the electron affinities fit the general trend of monotonically increasing electron affinity with oxidation state, in spite of the WO3H(-), WO2F(-), and AlWO3(-) having closed shell ground states, suggesting that the oxidation state of the metal atom has more influence than shell closing on the electron affinity of these transition metal-oxo complexes. Results of DFT calculations suggest that the neutrals are pyramidal and the anions are planar. However, the barriers for inversion on the neutral surface are low, and attempts to generate simple Franck-Condon simulations based on simple normal coordinate displacement, ignoring the effects of inversion, are inadequate.

  9. Utilization of Electronic Information Resources by Undergraduate Students of University of Ibadan: A Case Study of Social Sciences and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owolabi, Sola; Idowu, Oluwafemi A.; Okocha, Foluke; Ogundare, Atinuke Omotayo

    2016-01-01

    The study evaluated utilization of electronic information resources by undergraduates in the Faculties of Education and the Social Sciences in University of Ibadan. The study adopted a descriptive survey design with a study population of 1872 undergraduates in the Faculties of Education and the Social Sciences in University of Ibadan, from which a…

  10. True Serials: A True Solution for Electronic Resource Management Needs in a Medium-Size Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milczarski, Vivian; Garofalo, Denise A.

    2011-01-01

    A desire for more functionality seemed to clash with the fiscal reality of limited funds, but after investigating alternatives, Mount Saint Mary College was able to provide its faculty and students with a more useful and function-rich electronic resource management through a move to a hosted open source service. (Contains 8 figures.)

  11. Impact of Electronic Resources and Usage in Academic Libraries in Ghana: Evidence from Koforidua Polytechnic & All Nations University College, Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akussah, Maxwell; Asante, Edward; Adu-Sarkodee, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    The study investigates the relationship between impact of electronic resources and its usage in academic libraries in Ghana: evidence from Koforidua Polytechnic & All Nations University College, Ghana. The study was a quantitative approach using questionnaire to gather data and information. A valid response rate of 58.5% was assumed. SPSS…

  12. A major light rare-earth element (LREE) resource in the Khanneshin carbonatite complex, southern Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, Robert D.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Peters, Stephen G.; Horton, Forrest; Buttleman, Kim; Scott, Emily R.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid rise in world demand for the rare-earth elements (REEs) has expanded the search for new REE resources. We document two types of light rare-earth element (LREE)-enriched rocks in the Khanneshin carbonatite complex of southern Afghanistan: type 1 concordant seams of khanneshite-(Ce), synchysite-(Ce), and parisite-(Ce) within banded barite-strontianite alvikite, and type 2 igneous dikes of coarse-grained carbonatite, enriched in fluorine or phosphorus, containing idiomorphic crystals of khanneshite-(Ce) or carbocernaite. Type 1 mineralized barite-strontianite alvikite averages 22.25 wt % BaO, 4.27 wt % SrO, and 3.25 wt % ∑ LREE2O3 (sum of La, Ce, Pr, and Nd oxides). Type 2 igneous dikes average 14.51 wt % BaO, 5.96 wt % SrO, and 3.77 wt % ∑ LREE2O3. A magmatic origin is clearly indicated for the type 2 LREE-enriched dikes, and type 1 LREE mineralization probably formed in the presence of LREE-rich hydrothermal fluid. Both types of LREE mineralization may be penecontemporaneous, having formed in a carbonate-rich magma in the marginal zone of the central vent, highly charged with volatile constituents (i.e., CO2, F, P2O5), and strongly enriched in Ba, Sr, and the LREE. Based on several assumptions, and employing simple geometry for the zone of LREE enrichment, we estimate that at least 1.29 Mt (million metric tonnes) of LREE2O3 is present in this part of the Khanneshin carbonatite complex.

  13. Accurate electronic-structure description of Mn complexes: a GGA+U approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Elise Y.; Kulik, Heather; Marzari, Nicola

    2008-03-01

    Conventional density-functional approach often fail in offering an accurate description of the spin-resolved energetics in transition metals complexes. We will focus here on Mn complexes, where many aspects of the molecular structure and the reaction mechanisms are still unresolved - most notably in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II and the manganese catalase (MC). We apply a self-consistent GGA + U approach [1], originally designed within the DFT framework for the treatment of strongly correlated materials, to describe the geometry, the electronic and the magnetic properties of various manganese oxide complexes, finding very good agreement with higher-order ab-initio calculations. In particular, the different oxidation states of dinuclear systems containing the [Mn2O2]^n+ (n= 2, 3, 4) core are investigated, in order to mimic the basic face unit of the OEC complex. [1]. H. J. Kulik, M. Cococcioni, D. A. Scherlis, N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2006, 97, 103001

  14. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Dessent, Caroline E. H. E-mail: xuebin.wang@pnnl.gov; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin E-mail: xuebin.wang@pnnl.gov

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ∼1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ thymine and PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to

  15. Spatial Complexity Due to Bulk Electronic Liquid Crystals in Superconducting Dy-Bi2212

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Erica; Phillabaum, Benjamin; Dahmen, Karin

    2012-02-01

    Surface probes such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) have detected complex electronic patterns at the nanoscale in many high temperature superconductors. In cuprates, the pattern formation is associated with the pseudogap phase, a precursor to the high temperature superconducting state. Rotational symmetry breaking of the host crystal (i.e. from C4 to C2) in the form of electronic nematicity has recently been proposed as a unifying theme of the pseudogap phase [Lawler Nature 2010]. However, the fundamental physics governing the nanoscale pattern formation has not yet been identified. Here we use universal cluster properties extracted from STM studies of cuprate superconductors to identify the funda- mental physics controlling the complex pattern formation. We find that due to a delicate balance between disorder, interactions, and material anisotropy, the rotational symmetry breaking is fractal in nature, and that the electronic liquid crystal extends throughout the bulk of the material.

  16. Correlation between oxygen adsorption energy and electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kexi; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng

    2013-11-28

    Oxygen adsorption energy is directly relevant to the catalytic activity of electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we established the correlation between the O{sub 2} adsorption energy and the electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes which exhibit activity for ORR. To this end, we have predicted the molecular and electronic structures of a series of transition metal macrocyclic complexes with planar N{sub 4} chelation, as well as the molecular and electronic structures for the O{sub 2} adsorption on these macrocyclic molecules, using the density functional theory calculation method. We found that the calculated adsorption energy of O{sub 2} on the transition metal macrocyclic complexes was linearly related to the average position (relative to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the macrocyclic complexes) of the non-bonding d orbitals (d{sub z{sup 2}}, d{sub xy}, d{sub xz}, and d{sub yz}) which belong to the central transition metal atom. Importantly, our results suggest that varying the energy level of the non-bonding d orbitals through changing the central transition metal atom and/or peripheral ligand groups could be an effective way to tuning their O{sub 2} adsorption energy for enhancing the ORR activity of transition metal macrocyclic complex catalysts.

  17. Correlation between oxygen adsorption energy and electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kexi; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng

    2013-11-28

    Oxygen adsorption energy is directly relevant to the catalytic activity of electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we established the correlation between the O2 adsorption energy and the electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes which exhibit activity for ORR. To this end, we have predicted the molecular and electronic structures of a series of transition metal macrocyclic complexes with planar N4 chelation, as well as the molecular and electronic structures for the O2 adsorption on these macrocyclic molecules, using the density functional theory calculation method. We found that the calculated adsorption energy of O2 on the transition metal macrocyclic complexes was linearly related to the average position (relative to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the macrocyclic complexes) of the non-bonding d orbitals (d(z(2)), d(xy), d(xz), and d(yz)) which belong to the central transition metal atom. Importantly, our results suggest that varying the energy level of the non-bonding d orbitals through changing the central transition metal atom and/or peripheral ligand groups could be an effective way to tuning their O2 adsorption energy for enhancing the ORR activity of transition metal macrocyclic complex catalysts.

  18. Architecture of complex I and its implications for electron transfer and proton pumping

    PubMed Central

    Zickermann, Volker; Kerscher, Stefan; Zwicker, Klaus; Tocilescu, Maja A.; Radermacher, Michael; Brandt, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Proton pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the largest and remains by far the least understood enzyme complex of the respiratory chain. It consists of a peripheral arm harbouring all known redox active prosthetic groups and a membrane arm with a yet unknown number of proton translocation sites. The ubiquinone reduction site close to iron-sulfur cluster N2 at the interface of the 49-kDa and PSST subunits has been mapped by extensive site directed mutagenesis. Independent lines of evidence identified electron transfer events during reduction of ubiquinone to be associated with the potential drop that generates the full driving force for proton translocation with a 4 H+/2e− stoichiometry. Electron microscopic analysis of immuno-labelled native enzyme and of a subcomplex lacking the electron input module indicated a distance of 35–60 Å of cluster N2 to the membrane surface. Resolution of the membrane arm into subcomplexes showed that even the distal part harbours subunits that are prime candidates to participate in proton translocation because they are homologous to sodium/proton antiporters and contain conserved charged residues in predicted transmembrane helices. The mechanism of redox linked proton translocation by complex I is largely unknown but has to include steps where energy is transmitted over extremely long distances. In this review we compile the available structural information on complex I and discuss implications for complex I function. PMID:19366614

  19. Resource allocation for reliability of a complex system with aging components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson-cook, Christine M; Graves, Todd L; Hamada, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    To assess the reliability of a complex system, many different types of data may be available. Full-system tests are the most direct measure of reliability, but may be prohibitively expensive or difficult to obtain. Other less direct measures, such as component or section level tests, may be cheaper to obtain and more readily available. Using a single Bayesian analysis, multiple sources of data can be combined to give component and system reliability estimates. Resource allocation looks to develop methods to predict which new data would most improve the precision of the estimate of system reliability, in order to maximally improve understanding. In this paper, we consider a relatively simple system with different types of data from the components and system. We present a methodology for assessing the relative improvement in system reliability estimation for additional data from the various types. Various metrics for comparing improvement and a response surface approach to modeling the relationship between improvement and the additional data are presented.

  20. The systems genetics resource: a web application to mine global data for complex disease traits.

    PubMed

    van Nas, Atila; Pan, Calvin; Ingram-Drake, Leslie A; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Drake, Thomas A; Sobel, Eric M; Papp, Jeanette C; Lusis, Aldons J

    2013-01-01

    The Systems Genetics Resource (SGR) (http://systems.genetics.ucla.edu) is a new open-access web application and database that contains genotypes and clinical and intermediate phenotypes from both human and mouse studies. The mouse data include studies using crosses between specific inbred strains and studies using the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. SGR is designed to assist researchers studying genes and pathways contributing to complex disease traits, including obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, heart failure, osteoporosis, and lipoprotein metabolism. Over the next few years, we hope to add data relevant to deafness, addiction, hepatic steatosis, toxin responses, and vascular injury. The intermediate phenotypes include expression array data for a variety of tissues and cultured cells, metabolite levels, and protein levels. Pre-computed tables of genetic loci controlling intermediate and clinical phenotypes, as well as phenotype correlations, are accessed via a user-friendly web interface. The web site includes detailed protocols for all of the studies. Data from published studies are freely available; unpublished studies have restricted access during their embargo period.

  1. PGSB/MIPS Plant Genome Information Resources and Concepts for the Analysis of Complex Grass Genomes.

    PubMed

    Spannagl, Manuel; Bader, Kai; Pfeifer, Matthias; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2016-01-01

    PGSB (Plant Genome and Systems Biology; formerly MIPS-Munich Institute for Protein Sequences) has been involved in developing, implementing and maintaining plant genome databases for more than a decade. Genome databases and analysis resources have focused on individual genomes and aim to provide flexible and maintainable datasets for model plant genomes as a backbone against which experimental data, e.g., from high-throughput functional genomics, can be organized and analyzed. In addition, genomes from both model and crop plants form a scaffold for comparative genomics, assisted by specialized tools such as the CrowsNest viewer to explore conserved gene order (synteny) between related species on macro- and micro-levels.The genomes of many economically important Triticeae plants such as wheat, barley, and rye present a great challenge for sequence assembly and bioinformatic analysis due to their enormous complexity and large genome size. Novel concepts and strategies have been developed to deal with these difficulties and have been applied to the genomes of wheat, barley, rye, and other cereals. This includes the GenomeZipper concept, reference-guided exome assembly, and "chromosome genomics" based on flow cytometry sorted chromosomes.

  2. Coupling of Spin and Charge Ordering and Elastic Finescales in Complex Electronic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lookman, T.; Saxena, A.; Albers, R. C.; Bishop, A. R.; Shenoy, S. R.

    2000-03-01

    There has been an intense focus in the past decade on complex electronic/magnetic materials such as high temperature cuprate and bismuthate superconductors, colossal magnetoresistance manganites, martensitic (and shape memory) alloys, ferroelectric as well as relaxor titanates and zirconates. Various high-resolution microscopies probing spin, charge and lattice degrees of freedom have revealed new, intrinsically inhomogeneous phases, with complex multiscale patterning over hundreds of lattice spacings. We show that long-range anisotropic strain interactions arising from general elastic compatibility considerations, linking components of the strain tensor, can enable interfaces or atomic-scale defects, to induce global strain textures. Symmetry-allowed couplings between strains and electronic/magnetic variables can then generate effective strain-mediated long-range interactions between these variables. This provides a generic elastic mechanism for mutual multiscale texturing of spin, charge and microstructural variables in the above complex materials.

  3. (Comparison of group transfer, inner sphere and outer sphere electron transfer mechanisms of organometallic complexes)

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, J.

    1990-01-01

    During the course of Grant ER13775 we have constructed an infrared stopped-flow spectrophotometer and initiated a study of the mechanisms of reactions that involve a change in the oxidation state of organometallic complexes. The spectrometer combined conventional stopped-flow techniques with an infrared optical system comprised of a carbon monoxide laser, an IRTRAN flow-through cell and a mercury-cadium-telluride detector. In this summary we will highlight our results on reactions: (1) that formally involve exchange of a charged species between two metal carbonyl anions, (2) that involve additional of an electron to, or removal of an electron from organometallic complexes that contain a metal-metal bond, and (3) between coordination complexes and metal carbonyl anions. 12 refs.

  4. Electron transfer reactions of osmium(II) complexes with phenols and phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Velayudham, Murugesan; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-07-01

    Three [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes (NN = polypyridine) with ligands of varying hydrophobicity were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectral techniques. The geometry of the molecules are optimized by DFT calculations. The interaction between [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes and phenolate ion in ground state is confirmed by absorption spectral study and the binding constant values are in the range of 3-740 M-1. The photoinduced electron transfer reaction of these [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes with phenols and phenolic acids at pH 12.5 leads to the formation of phenoxyl radical confirmed through transient absorption spectral study. Binding constants and electron transfer rate constants within the [Os(NN)3]2+-phenolate ion adduct account for the change for the overall quenching constant with the change of structure of reactants.

  5. Preparation and spectroscopic studies on charge-transfer complexes of 2-hydroxypyridine with electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Akmal S.

    2013-07-01

    The CT-interactions of electron acceptors such as iodine (I2), chloranilic acid (H2CA) and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) with 2-hydroxypyridine (HPyO) have been investigated in the defined solvent. The data indicate the formation of CT-complexes with the general formula [(HPyO)(acceptor)]. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the (HPyO)-acceptors were based on elemental analysis, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis of the solid CT-complexes along with the photometric titration measurements for the reactions. The formation constants (KCT) for the CT-complexes are shown to be strongly dependent on the type and structure of the electron acceptors. Factors affecting the CT-processes are discussed.

  6. Preparation and spectroscopic studies on charge-transfer complexes of famciclovir drug with different electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Akmal S.; Teleb, Said M.; Nour, El-Metwally

    2012-09-01

    The CT-interaction of electron acceptors such as chloranilic acid (H2CA), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) and and 7,7',8,8'-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TCNQ) with the antiviral drug famciclovir (FCV) have been investigated spectrophotometrically in the defined solvent. The data indicate the formation of CT-complexes with the general formula [(FCV)(acceptor)]. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the (FCV)-acceptors were based on elemental analysis, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis of the solid CT-complexes along with the photometric titration measurements for the reactions. The formation constants (KCT) for the CT-complexes are shown to be strongly dependent on the type and structure of the electron acceptor. Factors affecting the CT-processes such as redox potentials and steric hinderance of reactants are discussed.

  7. The Alternative complex III: properties and possible mechanisms for electron transfer and energy conservation.

    PubMed

    Refojo, Patrícia N; Teixeira, Miguel; Pereira, Manuela M

    2012-10-01

    Alternative complexes III (ACIII) are recently identified membrane-bound enzymes that replace functionally the cytochrome bc(1/)b(6)f complexes. In general, ACIII are composed of four transmembrane proteins and three peripheral subunits that contain iron-sulfur centers and C-type hemes. ACIII are built by a combination of modules present in different enzyme families, namely the complex iron-sulfur molybdenum containing enzymes. In this article a historical perspective on the investigation of ACIII is presented, followed by an overview of the present knowledge on these enzymes. Electron transfer pathways within the protein are discussed taking into account possible different locations (cytoplasmatic or periplasmatic) of the iron-sulfur containing protein and their contribution to energy conservation. In this way several hypotheses for energy conservation modes are raised including linear and bifurcating electron transfer pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012).

  8. Managing complex research datasets using electronic tools: a meta-analysis exemplar.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sharon A; Martin, Ellen E; Garcia, Theresa J; Winter, Mary A; García, Alexandra A; Brown, Adama; Cuevas, Heather E; Sumlin, Lisa L

    2013-06-01

    Meta-analyses of broad scope and complexity require investigators to organize many study documents and manage communication among several research staff. Commercially available electronic tools, for example, EndNote, Adobe Acrobat Pro, Blackboard, Excel, and IBM SPSS Statistics (SPSS), are useful for organizing and tracking the meta-analytic process as well as enhancing communication among research team members. The purpose of this article is to describe the electronic processes designed, using commercially available software, for an extensive, quantitative model-testing meta-analysis. Specific electronic tools improved the efficiency of (a) locating and screening studies, (b) screening and organizing studies and other project documents, (c) extracting data from primary studies, (d) checking data accuracy and analyses, and (e) communication among team members. The major limitation in designing and implementing a fully electronic system for meta-analysis was the requisite upfront time to decide on which electronic tools to use, determine how these tools would be used, develop clear guidelines for their use, and train members of the research team. The electronic process described here has been useful in streamlining the process of conducting this complex meta-analysis and enhancing communication and sharing documents among research team members.

  9. Electronic Resource Sharing in Community Colleges: A Snapshot of Florida, Wisconsin, Texas, and Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Brian D.

    2000-01-01

    States that several states are establishing networks for resource sharing. Florida offers these resources through the Florida Distance Learning Library Initiative, Wisconsin has BadgerLink and WISCAT, TexShare provides library resource sharing in Texas, and Louisiana has LOUIS and LLN. These are some of the states successfully demonstrating…

  10. A theoretical study on the electronic structures and equilibrium constants evaluation of Deferasirox iron complexes.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Samie; Saljooghi, Amir Shokooh; Izadyar, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Elemental iron is essential for cellular growth and homeostasis but it is potentially toxic to the cells and tissues. Excess iron can contribute in tumor initiation and tumor growth. Obviously, in iron overload issues using an iron chelator in order to reduce iron concentration seems to be vital. This study presents the density functional theory calculations of the electronic structure and equilibrium constant for iron-deferasirox (Fe-DFX) complexes in the gas phase, water and DMSO. A comprehensive study was performed to investigate the Deferasirox-iron complexes in chelation therapy. Calculation was performed in CAMB3LYP/6-31G(d,p) to get the optimized structures for iron complexes in high and low spin states. Natural bond orbital and quantum theory of atoms in molecules analyses was carried out with B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) to understand the nature of complex bond character and electronic transition in complexes. Electrostatic potential effects on the complexes were evaluated using the CHelpG calculations. The results indicated that higher affinity for Fe(III) is not strictly a function of bond length but also the degree of Fe-X (X=O,N) covalent bonding. Based on the quantum reactivity parameters which have been investigated here, it is possible reasonable design of the new chelators to improve the chelator abilities.

  11. Electron tomography of negatively stained complex viruses: application in their diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Jan; Demeestere, Lien

    2009-01-01

    Background Electron tomographic analysis can be combined with the simple and rapid negative staining technique used in electron microscopy based virus diagnosis. Methods Standard negative staining of representative examples of parapoxviruses and paramyxoviruses was combined with electron tomographic analysis. Results Digital sectioning of reconstructions of these viruses at a selected height demonstrated the viral ultrastructure in detail, including the characteristic diagnostic features like the surface threads on C-particles of a parapoxvirus and individual glycoproteins and the internal nucleoprotein strand of Newcastle disease virus. For both viruses, deformation and flattening were observed. Conclusion The combination of negative staining of complex viruses with electron tomographic analysis, allows visualizing and measuring artifacts typical for negative staining. This approach allows sharp visualisation of structures in a subnanometer-thick plane, avoiding blurring due to superposition which is inherent to TEM. In selected examples, such analyses can improve diagnosis of viral agents. PMID:19208223

  12. Concerted proton-coupled electron transfer from a metal-hydride complex.

    PubMed

    Bourrez, Marc; Steinmetz, Romain; Ott, Sascha; Gloaguen, Frederic; Hammarström, Leif

    2014-02-01

    Metal hydrides are key intermediates in the catalytic reduction of protons and CO2 as well as in the oxidation of H2. In these reactions, electrons and protons are transferred to or from separate acceptors or donors in bidirectional protoncoupled electron transfer (PCET) steps. The mechanistic interpretation of PCET reactions of metal hydrides has focused on the stepwise transfer of electrons and protons. A concerted transfer may, however, occur with a lower reaction barrier and therefore proceed at higher catalytic rates. Here we investigate the feasibility of such a reaction by studying the oxidation–deprotonation reactions of a tungsten hydride complex. The rate dependence on the driving force for both electron transfer and proton transfer—employing different combinations of oxidants and bases—was used to establish experimentally the concerted, bidirectional PCET of a metal-hydride species. Consideration of the findings presented here in future catalyst designs may lead to more-efficient catalysts.

  13. Electronic structures and magnetic/optical properties of metal phthalocyanine complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Shintaro; Suzuki, Atsushi Oku, Takeo

    2016-02-01

    Electronic structures and magnetic / optical properties of metal phthalocyanine complexes were studied by quantum calculations using density functional theory. Effects of central metal and expansion of π orbital on aromatic ring as conjugation system on the electronic structures, magnetic, optical properties and vibration modes of infrared and Raman spectra of metal phthalocyanines were investigated. Electron and charge density distribution and energy levels near frontier orbital and excited states were influenced by the deformed structures varied with central metal and charge. The magnetic parameters of chemical shifts in {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 13}C-NMR), principle g-tensor, A-tensor, V-tensor of electric field gradient and asymmetry parameters derived from the deformed structures with magnetic interaction of nuclear quadruple interaction based on electron and charge density distribution with a bias of charge near ligand under crystal field.

  14. Mechanistic studies of photoinduced spin crossover and electron transfer in inorganic complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenkai; Gaffney, Kelly J

    2015-04-21

    Electronic excited-state phenomena provide a compelling intersection of fundamental and applied research interests in the chemical sciences. This holds true for coordination chemistry, where harnessing the strong optical absorption and photocatalytic activity of compounds depends on our ability to control fundamental physical and chemical phenomena associated with the nonadiabatic dynamics of electronic excited states. The central events of excited-state chemistry can critically influence the dynamics of electronic excited states, including internal conversion (transitions between distinct electronic states) and intersystem crossing (transitions between electronic states with different spin multiplicities), events governed by nonadiabatic interactions between electronic states in close proximity to conical intersections, as well as solvation and electron transfer. The diversity of electronic and nuclear dynamics also makes the robust interpretation of experimental measurements challenging. Developments in theory, simulation, and experiment can all help address the interpretation and understanding of chemical dynamics in organometallic and coordination chemistry. Synthesis presents the opportunity to chemically engineer the strength and symmetry of the metal-ligand interactions. This chemical control can be exploited to understand the influence of electronic ground state properties on electronic excited-state dynamics. New time-resolved experimental methods and the insightful exploitation of established methods have an important role in understanding, and ideally controlling, the photophysics and photochemistry of transition metal complexes. Techniques that can disentangle the coupled motion of electrons and nuclear dynamics warrant emphasis. We present a review of electron localization dynamics in charge transfer excited states and the dynamics of photoinitiated spin crossover dynamics. Both electron localization and spin crossover have been investigated by

  15. Cultural Resource Investigation for the Materials and Fuels Complex Wastewater System Upgrade at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B raun Williams; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Julie Brizzee

    2010-05-01

    The Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located in Bingham County at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho is considering several alternatives to upgrade wastewater systems to meet future needs at the facility. In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, archaeological field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed construction and to provide recommendations to protect any resources listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that one National Register-eligible archaeological site is located on the boundary of the area of potential effects for the wastewater upgrade. This report outlines protective measures to help ensure that this resource is not adversely affected by construction.

  16. Proton transfer in phenol-amine complexes: phenol electronic effects on free energy profile in solution.

    PubMed

    Aono, Shinji; Kato, Shigeki

    2010-12-01

    Free energy profiles for the proton transfer reactions in hydrogen-bonded complex of phenol with trimethylamine in methyl chloride solvent are studied with the reference interaction site model self-consistent field method. The reactions in both the electronic ground and excited states are considered. The second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP) theory or the second-order multireference MP theory is used to evaluate the effect of the dynamical electron correlation on the free energy profiles. The free energy surface in the ground state shows a discrepancy with the experimental results for the related hydrogen-bonded complexes. To resolve this discrepancy, the effects of chloro-substitutions in phenol are examined, and its importance in stabilizing the ionic form is discussed. The temperature effect is also studied. In contrast to the ground state, the ππ* excited state of phenol-trimethylamine complex exhibits the proton transfer reaction with a low barrier. The reaction is almost thermoneutral. This is attributed to the reduction of proton affinity of phenol by the ππ* electronic excitation. We further examine the possibility of the electron-proton-coupled transfer in the ππ* state through the surface crossing with the charge transfer type πσ* state.

  17. Design of photoactive ruthenium complexes to study electron transfer and proton pumping in cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Durham, Bill; Millett, Francis

    2012-04-01

    This review describes the development and application of photoactive ruthenium complexes to study electron transfer and proton pumping reactions in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). CcO uses four electrons from Cc to reduce O(2) to two waters, and pumps four protons across the membrane. The electron transfer reactions in cytochrome oxidase are very rapid, and cannot be resolved by stopped-flow mixing techniques. Methods have been developed to covalently attach a photoactive tris(bipyridine)ruthenium group [Ru(II)] to Cc to form Ru-39-Cc. Photoexcitation of Ru(II) to the excited state Ru(II*), a strong reductant, leads to rapid electron transfer to the ferric heme group in Cc, followed by electron transfer to Cu(A) in CcO with a rate constant of 60,000s(-1). Ruthenium kinetics and mutagenesis studies have been used to define the domain for the interaction between Cc and CcO. New ruthenium dimers have also been developed to rapidly inject electrons into Cu(A) of CcO with yields as high as 60%, allowing measurement of the kinetics of electron transfer and proton release at each step in the oxygen reduction mechanism.

  18. Novel open-source electronic medical records system for palliative care in low-resource settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The need for palliative care in sub-Saharan Africa is staggering: this region shoulders over 67% of the global burden of HIV/AIDS and cancer. However, provisions for these essential services remain limited and poorly integrated with national health systems in most nations. Moreover, the evidence base for palliative care in the region remains scarce. This study chronicles the development and evaluation of DataPall, an open-source electronic medical records system that can be used to track patients, manage data, and generate reports for palliative care providers in these settings. DataPall was developed using design criteria encompassing both functional and technical objectives articulated by hospital leaders and palliative care staff at a leading palliative care center in Malawi. The database can be used with computers that run Windows XP SP 2 or newer, and does not require an internet connection for use. Subsequent to its development and implementation in two hospitals, DataPall was tested among both trained and untrained hospital staff populations on the basis of its usability with comparison to existing paper records systems as well as on the speed at which users could perform basic database functions. Additionally, all participants evaluated this program on a standard system usability scale. Results In a study of health professionals in a Malawian hospital, DataPall enabled palliative care providers to find patients’ appointments, on average, in less than half the time required to locate the same record in current paper records. Moreover, participants generated customizable reports documenting patient records and comprehensive reports on providers’ activities with little training necessary. Participants affirmed this ease of use on the system usability scale. Conclusions DataPall is a simple, effective electronic medical records system that can assist in developing an evidence base of clinical data for palliative care in low resource settings. The

  19. The mechanism of coupling between electron transfer and proton translocation in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sazanov, Leonid A

    2014-08-01

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the first and largest enzyme in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and many bacteria. It couples the transfer of two electrons between NADH and ubiquinone to the translocation of four protons across the membrane. Complex I is an L-shaped assembly formed by the hydrophilic (peripheral) arm, containing all the redox centres performing electron transfer and the membrane arm, containing proton-translocating machinery. Mitochondrial complex I consists of 44 subunits of about 1 MDa in total, whilst the prokaryotic enzyme is simpler and generally consists of 14 conserved "core" subunits. Recently we have determined the first atomic structure of the entire complex I, using the enzyme from Thermus thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 Fe-S clusters, 64 TM helices). Structure suggests a unique coupling mechanism, with redox energy of electron transfer driving proton translocation via long-range (up to ~200 Å) conformational changes. It resembles a steam engine, with coupling elements (akin to coupling rods) linking parts of this molecular machine.

  20. Multi-Electron Oxidation of Anthracene Derivatives by Nonheme Manganese(IV)-Oxo Complexes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Namita; Jung, Jieun; Lee, Yong-Min; Seo, Mi Sook; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2017-03-27

    Six-electron oxidation of anthracene to anthraquinone by a nonheme Mn(IV)-oxo complex, [(Bn-TPEN)MnIV(O)]2+, proceeds via the rate-determining electron transfer from anthracene to [(Bn-TPEN)MnIV(O)]2+, followed by subsequent fast oxidation reactions to give anthraquinone. The reduced Mn(II) complex ([(Bn-TPEN)MnII]2+) is oxidized by [(Bn-TPEN)MnIV(O)]2+ rapidly to produce the μ-oxo dimer ([(Bn-TPEN)MnIII-O-MnIII(Bn-TPEN)]4+). The oxygen atoms of the anthraquinone product were found to derive from the manganese-oxo species by the 18O labelling experiments. In the presence of Sc3+ ion, formation of anthracene radical cation was directly detected in electron transfer from anthracene to a Sc3+ ion-bound MnIV(O) com-plex, [(Bn-TPEN)MnIV(O)-(Sc(OTf)3)2]2+, followed by subsequent further oxidation to yield anthraquinone. When anthracene was replaced by 9,10-dimethylanthracene, elec-tron transfer from 9,10-dimethylanthracene to [(Bn-TPEN)MnIV(O)-(Sc(OTf)3)2]2+ occurred rapidly to produce stable 9,10-dimethylanthracene radical cation. The driving force dependence of the rate constants of electron transfer from anthracene derivatives to [(Bn-TPEN)MnIV(O)]2+ and [(Bn-TPEN)MnIV(O)-(Sc(OTf)3)2]2+ was well evaluated in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer.

  1. Systematically Assessing the Situational Relevance of Electronic Knowledge Resources: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland M.; Mysore, Naveen; Knaapen, Loes; Johnson-Lafleur, Janique; Dawes, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Electronic Knowledge Resources (EKRs) are increasingly used by physicians, but their situational relevance has not been systematically examined. Objective Systematically scrutinize the situational relevance of EKR-derived information items in and outside clinical settings. Background Physicians use EKRs to accomplish four cognitive objectives (C1-4), and three organizational objectives (O1-3): (C1) Answer questions/solve problems/support decision-making in a clinical context; (C2) fulfill educational-research objectives; (C3) search for personal interest or curiosity; (C4) overcome limits of human memory; (O1) share information with patients, families, or caregivers; (O2) exchange information with other health professionals; (O3) plan-manage-monitor tasks with other health professionals. Methods Longitudinal mixed methods multiple case study: Cases were 17 residents’ critical searches for information, using a commercial EKR, during a 2-month block of family practice. Usage data were automatically recorded. Each “opened” item of information was linked to an impact assessment questionnaire, and 1,981 evaluations of items were documented. Interviews with residents were guided by log files, which tracked use and impact of EKR-derived information items. Thematic analysis identified 156 critical searches linked to 877 information items. For each case, qualitative data were assigned to one of the seven proposed objectives. Results Residents achieved their search objectives in 85.9% of cases (situational relevance). Additional sources of information were sought in 52.6% of cases. Results support the seven proposed objectives, levels of comparative relevance (less, equally, more), and levels of stimulation of learning and knowledge (individual, organizational). Conclusion Our method of systematic assessment may contribute to user-based evaluation of EKRs. PMID:17600105

  2. Quantum-chemical investigation of the structure and electronic absorption spectra of electroluminescent zinc complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, B. F.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Korop, A. A.; Minaeva, V. A.; Kaplunov, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Using the quantum chemical methods of the density functional theory and of the electron density topological analysis, we have studied the structure of two recently synthesized electroluminescent zinc complexes, one with aminoquinoline ligands and the other with a Schiff base (N,O-donor). The energies and intensities of vertical excitations for the molecules under study have been calculated in terms of the PM3 semiempirical approximation taking into account the configurational interaction between singly excited singlet excited states. Good agreement between calculation results and experimental data on the electron density topological characteristics and on the visible and UV absorption spectra has been obtained.

  3. Interface electronic complexes and Landau damping of magnons in ultrathin magnets.

    PubMed

    Buczek, Paweł; Ernst, Arthur; Sandratskii, Leonid M

    2011-04-15

    The damping of magnons in ultrathin metallic magnets is studied from first-principles. We contrast Fe/Cu(100) and Fe/W(110) systems for which the influence of the substrate on the magnon life time differs strongly. We introduce the concept of Landau map in momentum space to assess the role of different electronic states in the attenuation. The formation of electronic complexes localized at the film-substrate interface leads to hot spots in the Landau maps and enhances the damping. This finding allows tuning the attenuation of high-frequency magnetization dynamics in nanostructures.

  4. Complex Households and the Distribution of Multiple Resources in Later Life: Findings from A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juyeon; Link, Arts; Waite, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The availability of social and financial resources has profound implications for health and well-being in later life. Older adults often share resources with others who live with them, sometimes in households including relatives or friends. We examine differences in social support, social connections, money, and the household environment across types of living arrangements, develop hypotheses from two theoretical perspectives, one focusing on obligations toward kin, and one focused on social exchange within households, and test them using data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. We find that availability of resources is not consistently associated with the presence of grandchildren and other young relatives, but often differs with presence of other adults. These findings suggest that a single type of resource tells us little about the distribution of the resources of older adults, and call on us to examine multiple resources simultaneously. PMID:25904682

  5. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/− 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 104 and 108 CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection. PMID:27231636

  6. Solar resource assessment in complex orography: a comparison of available datasets for the Trentino region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiti, Lavinia; Giovannini, Lorenzo; Zardi, Dino

    2015-04-01

    The accurate assessment of the solar radiation available at the Earth's surface is essential for a wide range of energy-related applications, such as the design of solar power plants, water heating systems and energy-efficient buildings, as well as in the fields of climatology, hydrology, ecology and agriculture. The characterization of solar radiation is particularly challenging in complex-orography areas, where topographic shadowing and altitude effects, together with local weather phenomena, greatly increase the spatial and temporal variability of such variable. At present, approaches ranging from surface measurements interpolation to orographic down-scaling of satellite data, to numerical model simulations are adopted for mapping solar radiation. In this contribution a high-resolution (200 m) solar atlas for the Trentino region (Italy) is presented, which was recently developed on the basis of hourly observations of global radiation collected from the local radiometric stations during the period 2004-2012. Monthly and annual climatological irradiation maps were obtained by the combined use of a GIS-based clear-sky model (r.sun module of GRASS GIS) and geostatistical interpolation techniques (kriging). Moreover, satellite radiation data derived by the MeteoSwiss HelioMont algorithm (2 km resolution) were used for missing-data reconstruction and for the final mapping, thus integrating ground-based and remote-sensing information. The results are compared with existing solar resource datasets, such as the PVGIS dataset, produced by the Joint Research Center Institute for Energy and Transport, and the HelioMont dataset, in order to evaluate the accuracy of the different datasets available for the region of interest.

  7. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings.

    PubMed

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-05-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/- 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 10(4) and 10(8) CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection.

  8. Energetics, molecular electronic structure, and spectroscopy of forming Group IIA dihalide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devore, T. C.; Gole, J. L.

    1999-02-01

    Multiple-collision relaxed (helium) chemiluminescence and laser-induced fluorescent spectroscopy have been used to demonstrate the highly efficient collisional stabilization of electronically excited Group IIA dihalide collision complexes formed in M (Ca,Sr)+X 2 (XY) (Cl 2, Br 2, ICl, IBr, I 2) reactive encounters. The first discrete emission spectra for the CaCl 2, CaBr 2, SrCl 2, SrBr 2, and SrICl dihalides are observed and evaluated; however, the low-pressure `continuous' chemiluminescent emission observed for forming barium dihalide (BaX 2) complexes is quenched under these experimental conditions. The reactions of the Group IIA metals with molecular fluorine do not readily produce the corresponding dihalide. While the lowest-lying observed dihalide visible transition is, as predicted, found to result in an extended progression in a dihalide complex bending mode (SrCl 2), the observed progression suggests the presence of a residual halogen (Cl-Cl) bond. Two higher-lying transitions are dominated by a vibrational mode structure corresponding to progressions in the symmetric stretching mode or, for nominally forbidden electronic transitions, odd quanta of the asymmetric stretching mode. Some evidence for sequence structure associated with the dihalide bending mode is also obtained. These observations are consistent with complex formation as it is coupled with a modified valence electron structure (correlation diagram) associated with the highly ionic nature of the dihalides. The bonding in the Group IIA dihalides (and their complexes), whose atomization energies are more than twice the metal monohalide bond energy, strongly influences the evaluation of energetics and the determination of monohalide bond energies from chemiluminescent processes. Discrepancies between those bond strengths determined by mass spectrometry and chemiluminescence are discussed with a focus on energy partitioning in dihalide complex formation and its influence on chemical vapor

  9. Electronic Spectra of TRIS(2,2'-BIPYRIDINE)-METAL Complex Ions in Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuang; Smith, James E. T.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2016-06-01

    Tris(bpy)-metal complexes (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and their derivatives are important systems in metal-organic chemistry. While tris(bpy)-ruthenium, Ru(bpy)32+, has been extensively studied, less attention has been paid to analogous complexes involving first row transition metals. Here we report the electronic spectra of a series of dicationic tris(bpy) chelates with different transition metals, measured by photodisscociation spectroscopy of cryogenically prepared ions. We focus our attention on the π-π* transitions in the UV region of the spectrum.

  10. Electronic and magnetic properties of bimetallic ytterbocene complexes: the impact of bridging ligand geometry.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Christin N; Veauthier, Jacqueline M; John, Kevin D; Morris, David E

    2008-01-01

    Bimetallic ytterbocene complexes with bridging N-heterocylic ligands have been studied extensively in recent years due to their potential applications ranging from molecular wires to single-molecule magnets. Herein, we review our recent results for a series of ytterbocene polypyridyl bimetallic complexes to highlight the versatility and tunability of these systems based on simple changes in bridging ligand geometry. Our work has involved structural, electrochemical, optical, and magnetic measurements with the goal of better understanding the electronic and magnetic communication between the two ytterbium metal centers in this new class of bimetallics.

  11. Structure Determination of the Nuclear Pore Complex with Three-Dimensional Cryo electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    von Appen, Alexander; Beck, Martin

    2016-05-22

    Determining the structure of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) imposes an enormous challenge due to its size, intricate composition and membrane-embedded nature. In vertebrates, about 1000 protein building blocks assemble into a 110-MDa complex that fuses the inner and outer membranes of a cell's nucleus. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the in situ architecture of the NPC with a specific focus on approaches using three-dimensional cryo electron microscopy. We discuss technological benefits and limitations and give an outlook toward obtaining a high-resolution structure of the NPC.

  12. Impact of an Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum on Resident Use of Electronic Resources: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Laura R.; Murphy, David J.; O’Rourke, Kerry; Sharma, Ranita; Shea, Judy A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is widely taught in residency, but evidence for effectiveness of EBM teaching on changing residents’ behavior is limited. Objective To investigate the impact of an EBM curriculum on residents’ use of evidence-based resources in a simulated clinical experience. Design/Participants Fifty medicine residents randomized to an EBM teaching or control group. Measurements A validated test of EBM knowledge (Fresno test) was administered before and after intervention. Post intervention, residents twice completed a Web-based, multiple-choice instrument (15 items) comprised of clinical vignettes, first without then with access to electronic resources. Use of electronic resources was tracked using ProxyPlus software. Within group pre–post differences and between group post-test differences were examined. Results There was more improvement in EBM knowledge (100-point scale) for the intervention group compared to the control group (mean score increase 22 vs. 12,  = 0.012). In the simulated clinical experience, the most commonly accessed resources were Ovid (71% of residents accessed) and InfoPOEMs (62%) for the EBM group and UptoDate (67%) and MDConsult (58%) for the control group. Residents in the EBM group were more likely to use evidence-based resources than the control group. Performance on clinical vignettes was similar between the groups both at baseline ( = 0.19) and with access to information resources ( = 0.89). Conclusions EBM teaching improved EBM knowledge and increased use of evidence-based resources by residents, but did not improve performance on Web-based clinical vignettes. Future studies will need to examine impact of EBM teaching on clinical outcomes. PMID:18769979

  13. Interfacial electron transfer in TiO(2) surfaces sensitized with Ru(II)-polypyridine complexes.

    PubMed

    Jakubikova, Elena; Snoeberger, Robert C; Batista, Victor S; Martin, Richard L; Batista, Enrique R

    2009-11-12

    Studies of interfacial electron transfer (IET) in TiO(2) surfaces functionalized with (1) pyridine-4-phosphonic acid, (2) [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO(3)H(2)))](2+), and (3) [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H(2)O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO(3)H(2)))](4+) (tpy = 2,2':6,2''-terpyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) are reported. We characterize the electronic excitations, electron injection time scales, and interfacial electron transfer (IET) mechanisms through phosphonate anchoring groups. These are promising alternatives to the classic carboxylates of conventional dye-sensitized solar cells since they bind more strongly to TiO(2) surfaces and form stable covalent bonds that are unaffected by humidity. Density functional theory calculations and quantum dynamics simulations of IET indicate that electron injection in 1-TiO(2) can be up to 1 order of magnitude faster when 1 is attached to TiO(2) in a bidentate mode (tau approximately 60 fs) than when attached in a monodentate motif (tau approximately 460 fs). The IET time scale also depends strongly on the properties of the sensitizer as well as on the nature of the electronic excitation initially localized in the adsorbate molecule. We show that IET triggered by the visible light excitation of 2-TiO(2) takes 1-10 ps when 2 is attached in a bidentate mode, a time comparable to the lifetime of the excited electronic state. IET due to visible-light photoexcitation of 3-TiO(2) is slower, since the resulting electronic excitation remains localized in the tpy-tpy bridge that is weakly coupled to the electronic states of the conduction band of TiO(2). These results are particularly valuable to elucidate the possible origin of IET efficiency drops during photoconversion in solar cells based on Ru(II)-polypyridine complexes covalently attached to TiO(2) thin films with phosphonate linkers.

  14. Interfacial Electron Transfer in TiO2 Surfaces Sensitized with Ru(II)-Polypyridine Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubikova, Elena; Snoeberger, Robert C., III; Batista, Victor S.; Martin, Richard L.; Batista, Enrique R.

    2009-07-01

    Studies of interfacial electron transfer (IET) in TiO2 surfaces functionalized with (1) pyridine-4-phosphonic acid, (2) [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO3H2))]2+, and (3) [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H2O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO3H2))]4+ (tpy = 2,2':6,2''-terpyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) are reported. We characterize the electronic excitations, electron injection time scales, and interfacial electron transfer (IET) mechanisms through phosphonate anchoring groups. These are promising alternatives to the classic carboxylates of conventional dye-sensitized solar cells since they bind more strongly to TiO2 surfaces and form stable covalent bonds that are unaffected by humidity. Density functional theory calculations and quantum dynamics simulations of IET indicate that electron injection in 1-TiO2 can be up to 1 order of magnitude faster when 1 is attached to TiO2 in a bidentate mode (τ ˜ 60 fs) than when attached in a monodentate motif (τ ˜ 460 fs). The IET time scale also depends strongly on the properties of the sensitizer as well as on the nature of the electronic excitation initially localized in the adsorbate molecule. We show that IET triggered by the visible light excitation of 2-TiO2 takes 1-10 ps when 2 is attached in a bidentate mode, a time comparable to the lifetime of the excited electronic state. IET due to visible-light photoexcitation of 3-TiO2 is slower, since the resulting electronic excitation remains localized in the tpy-tpy bridge that is weakly coupled to the electronic states of the conduction band of TiO2. These results are particularly valuable to elucidate the possible origin of IET efficiency drops during photoconversion in solar cells based on Ru(II)-polypyridine complexes covalently attached to TiO2 thin films with phosphonate linkers.

  15. Deactivation pathways of the electronic excitation of ions of lanthanide complexes in polymers with functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sveshnikova, E. B.; Ermolaev, V. L.; Shablya, A. V.; Goĭkhman, M. Ya.; Yakimanskiĭ, A. V.; Podeshvo, I. V.; Kudryavtsev, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    Complexes Eu(TTA)3phen and Eu(MBTA)3phen, as well as complexes Tb(MBTA)3phen and Tb(TTA)3phen, which do not luminesce in solutions, are shown to luminesce in polymer films (TTA is thenoyltrifluoroacetone, MBTA is n-methoxybenzoyltrifluoroacetone, and phen is o-phenanthroline). Luminescence of complexes of Eu and Tb in films of a polymer, poly(methylene-bis-anthranilamide) 1,6-hexamethylenedicarboxylic acid (PAA-5), having a high concentration of functional anthranilate groups, is studied. From the behavior of the luminescence intensity (I lum), the luminescence decay time, and the luminescence spectra of complexes of these lanthanides in polymer films, the following regular features were revealed. (i) During the film preparation at 90°C, Ln complexes are attached to PAA-5 via anthranilate groups. (ii) Irradiation of these films in the range of the absorption band of ligands (TTA or MBTA) leads to deactivation of the electronic excitation of ions according to the diketone detachment mechanism and to further binding of complexes to polymers. In this case, I lum(Eu(III)) decreases because the introduction of anthranilate groups of the polymer into the first coordination sphere of Eu(III) complexes enhances the nonradiative deactivation of these ions, whereas I lum(Tb(III)) increases since the introduction of these groups suppresses the nonradiative deactivation of Tb complexes through triplet states of ligands (TTA and MBTA). (iii) Upon storage of films in the dark (20°C), complexes detach themselves from the polymer and return to their initial structure. In PAA-5 films into which Eu and Tb complexes were simultaneously introduced, the color of the emission from the irradiation spot changes from red to green.

  16. Analyzing the Heterogeneity and Complexity of Electronic Health Record Oriented Phenotyping Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Mike; Berg, Richard L.; Carrell, David; Denny, Joshua C.; Kho, Abel N.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Linneman, James G.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Peissig, Peggy; Rasmussen, Luke; Weston, Noah; Chute, Christopher G.; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2011-01-01

    The need for formal representations of eligibility criteria for clinical trials – and for phenotyping more generally – has been recognized for some time. Indeed, the availability of a formal computable representation that adequately reflects the types of data and logic evidenced in trial designs is a prerequisite for the automatic identification of study-eligible patients from Electronic Health Records. As part of the wider process of representation development, this paper reports on an analysis of fourteen Electronic Health Record oriented phenotyping algorithms (developed as part of the eMERGE project) in terms of their constituent data elements, types of logic used and temporal characteristics. We discovered that the majority of eMERGE algorithms analyzed include complex, nested boolean logic and negation, with several dependent on cardinality constraints and complex temporal logic. Insights gained from the study will be used to augment the CDISC Protocol Representation Model. PMID:22195079

  17. Pure electronic metal-insulator transition at the interface of complex oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, D.; Liu, Jian; Freeland, J. W.; Middey, S.; Kareev, M.; Kwon, Jihwan; Zuo, J. M.; Chuang, Yi-De; Kim, J. W.; Ryan, P. J.; Chakhalian, J.

    2016-06-21

    We observed complex materials in electronic phases and transitions between them often involve coupling between many degrees of freedom whose entanglement convolutes understanding of the instigating mechanism. Metal-insulator transitions are one such problem where coupling to the structural, orbital, charge, and magnetic order parameters frequently obscures the underlying physics. We demonstrate a way to unravel this conundrum by heterostructuring a prototypical multi-ordered complex oxide NdNiO3 in ultra thin geometry, which preserves the metal-to-insulator transition and bulk-like magnetic order parameter, but entirely suppresses the symmetry lowering and long-range charge order parameter. Furthermore, these findings illustrate the utility of heterointerfaces as a powerful method for removing competing order parameters to gain greater insight into the nature of the transition, here revealing that the magnetic order generates the transition independently, leading to an exceptionally rare purely electronic metal-insulator transition with no symmetry change.

  18. Coherent operation of detector systems and their readout electronics in a complex experiment control environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koestner, Stefan

    2009-09-01

    With the increasing size and degree of complexity of today's experiments in high energy physics the required amount of work and complexity to integrate a complete subdetector into an experiment control system is often underestimated. We report here on the layered software structure and protocols used by the LHCb experiment to control its detectors and readout boards. The experiment control system of LHCb is based on the commercial SCADA system PVSS II. Readout boards which are outside the radiation area are accessed via embedded credit card sized PCs which are connected to a large local area network. The SPECS protocol is used for control of the front end electronics. Finite state machines are introduced to facilitate the control of a large number of electronic devices and to model the whole experiment at the level of an expert system.

  19. Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated cell death via impairing electron transport chain complex III

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seokheon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Hwang, Joohyun; Shin, Ki Soon; Kang, Shin Jung

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Heptachlor inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. •Heptachlor promoted generation of reactive oxygen species. •Heptachlor induced Bax activation. •Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. -- Abstract: Environmental toxins like pesticides have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Epidemiological studies suggested that exposures to organochlorine pesticides have an association with an increased PD risk. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of toxicity induced by an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor. In a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, heptachlor induced both morphological and functional damages in mitochondria. Interestingly, the compound inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. Rapid generation of reactive oxygen species and the activation of Bax were then detected. Subsequently, mitochondria-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis followed. Our results raise a possibility that an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor can act as a neurotoxicant associated with PD.

  20. Complex absorbing potentials in the framework of electron propagator theory. II. Application to temporary anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerbacher, Sven; Sommerfeld, Thomas; Santra, Robin; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2003-04-01

    In continuation of Paper I of this work we describe a practical application of the combination of complex absorbing potentials (CAPs) with Green's functions. We use a new approach for calculation of energies and lifetimes of temporary anions, which emerge, e.g., from elastic scattering of electrons from closed-shell targets. This new method is able to treat the continuum and correlation effects simultaneously and reduces the problem to the diagonalization of a number of relatively small, complex symmetric matrices. The efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated and its dependence on basis set and parameters characterizing the CAP is investigated using the 2Πg resonance state of N2- as an example. We also present the first correlated ab initio calculation of energies and lifetimes of resonances in elastic electron scattering from the organic molecule chlorobenzene. Our results for both examples are in good agreement with existing experimental values and other theoretical calculations. Possible future developments are discussed.

  1. Pure electronic metal-insulator transition at the interface of complex oxides

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, D.; Liu, Jian; Freeland, J. W.; Middey, S.; Kareev, M.; Kwon, Jihwan; Zuo, J. M.; Chuang, Yi-De; Kim, J. W.; Ryan, P. J.; Chakhalian, J.

    2016-01-01

    In complex materials observed electronic phases and transitions between them often involve coupling between many degrees of freedom whose entanglement convolutes understanding of the instigating mechanism. Metal-insulator transitions are one such problem where coupling to the structural, orbital, charge, and magnetic order parameters frequently obscures the underlying physics. Here, we demonstrate a way to unravel this conundrum by heterostructuring a prototypical multi-ordered complex oxide NdNiO3 in ultra thin geometry, which preserves the metal-to-insulator transition and bulk-like magnetic order parameter, but entirely suppresses the symmetry lowering and long-range charge order parameter. These findings illustrate the utility of heterointerfaces as a powerful method for removing competing order parameters to gain greater insight into the nature of the transition, here revealing that the magnetic order generates the transition independently, leading to an exceptionally rare purely electronic metal-insulator transition with no symmetry change. PMID:27324948

  2. Mechanistic Study on Electronic Excitation Dissociation of the Cellobiose-Na+ Complex

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yiqun; Pu, Yi; Yu, Xiang; Costello, Catherine E.; Lin, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of electron activated dissociation (ExD) techniques has opened the door for high-throughput, detailed glycan structural elucidation. Among them, ExD methods employing higher-energy electrons offer several advantages over low-energy electron capture dissociation (ECD), owing to their applicability towards chromophore-labeled glycans and singly charged ions, and ability to provide more extensive structural information. However, a lack of understanding of these processes has hindered rational optimization of the experimental conditions for more efficient fragmentation, as well as the development of informatics tools for interpretation of the complex glycan ExD spectra. Here, cellobiose-Na+ was used as the model system to investigate the fragmentation behavior of metal-adducted glycans under irradiation of electrons with energy exceeding their ionization potential, and served as the basis on which a novel electronic excitation dissociation (EED) mechanism was proposed. It was found that ionization of the glycan produces a mixture of radical cations and ring-opened distonic ions. These distonic ions then capture a low-energy electron to produce diradicals with trivial singlet-triplet splitting, and subsequently undergo radical-induced dissociation to produce a variety of fragment ions, whose abundances are influenced by the stability of the distonic ions from which they originate. PMID:26432580

  3. Controlling High-Frequency Collective Electron Dynamics via Single-Particle Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeeva, N.; Greenaway, M. T.; Balanov, A. G.; Makarovsky, O.; Patanè, A.; Gaifullin, M. B.; Kusmartsev, F.; Fromhold, T. M.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate, through experiment and theory, enhanced high-frequency current oscillations due to magnetically-induced conduction resonances in superlattices. Strong increase in the ac power originates from complex single-electron dynamics, characterized by abrupt resonant transitions between unbound and localized trajectories, which trigger and shape propagating charge domains. Our data demonstrate that external fields can tune the collective behavior of quantum particles by imprinting configurable patterns in the single-particle classical phase space.

  4. Controlling high-frequency collective electron dynamics via single-particle complexity.

    PubMed

    Alexeeva, N; Greenaway, M T; Balanov, A G; Makarovsky, O; Patanè, A; Gaifullin, M B; Kusmartsev, F; Fromhold, T M

    2012-07-13

    We demonstrate, through experiment and theory, enhanced high-frequency current oscillations due to magnetically-induced conduction resonances in superlattices. Strong increase in the ac power originates from complex single-electron dynamics, characterized by abrupt resonant transitions between unbound and localized trajectories, which trigger and shape propagating charge domains. Our data demonstrate that external fields can tune the collective behavior of quantum particles by imprinting configurable patterns in the single-particle classical phase space.

  5. Complex Genetic Effects on Early Vegetative Development Shape Resource Allocation Differences Between Arabidopsis lyrata Populations

    PubMed Central

    Remington, David L.; Leinonen, Päivi H.; Leppälä, Johanna; Savolainen, Outi

    2013-01-01

    Costs of reproduction due to resource allocation trade-offs have long been recognized as key forces in life history evolution, but little is known about their functional or genetic basis. Arabidopsis lyrata, a perennial relative of the annual model plant A. thaliana with a wide climatic distribution, has populations that are strongly diverged in resource allocation. In this study, we evaluated the genetic and functional basis for variation in resource allocation in a reciprocal transplant experiment, using four A. lyrata populations and F2 progeny from a cross between North Carolina (NC) and Norway parents, which had the most divergent resource allocation patterns. Local alleles at quantitative trait loci (QTL) at a North Carolina field site increased reproductive output while reducing vegetative growth. These QTL had little overlap with flowering date QTL. Structural equation models incorporating QTL genotypes and traits indicated that resource allocation differences result primarily from QTL effects on early vegetative growth patterns, with cascading effects on later vegetative and reproductive development. At a Norway field site, North Carolina alleles at some of the same QTL regions reduced survival and reproductive output components, but these effects were not associated with resource allocation trade-offs in the Norway environment. Our results indicate that resource allocation in perennial plants may involve important adaptive mechanisms largely independent of flowering time. Moreover, the contributions of resource allocation QTL to local adaptation appear to result from their effects on developmental timing and its interaction with environmental constraints, and not from simple models of reproductive costs. PMID:23979581

  6. CC-LR: Providing Interactive, Challenging and Attractive Collaborative Complex Learning Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caballé, S.; Mora, N.; Feidakis, M.; Gañán, D.; Conesa, J.; Daradoumis, T.; Prieto, J.

    2014-01-01

    Many researchers argue that students must be meaningfully engaged in the learning resources for effective learning to occur. However, current online learners still report a problematic lack of attractive and challenging learning resources that engage them in the learning process. This endemic problem is even more evident in online collaborative…

  7. Exploring the Interaction Natures in Plutonyl (VI) Complexes with Topological Analyses of Electron Density.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiguang; Sun, Xiyuan; Jiang, Gang

    2016-04-11

    The interaction natures between Pu and different ligands in several plutonyl (VI) complexes are investigated by performing topological analyses of electron density. The geometrical structures in both gaseous and aqueous phases are obtained with B3LYP functional, and are generally in agreement with available theoretical and experimental results when combined with all-electron segmented all-electron relativistic contracted (SARC) basis set. The Pu- O y l bond orders show significant linear dependence on bond length and the charge of oxygen atoms in plutonyl moiety. The closed-shell interactions were identified for Pu-Ligand bonds in most complexes with quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses. Meanwhile, we found that some Pu-Ligand bonds, like Pu-OH(-), show weak covalent. The interactive nature of Pu-ligand bonds were revealed based on the interaction quantum atom (IQA) energy decomposition approach, and our results indicate that all Pu-Ligand interactions is dominated by the electrostatic attraction interaction as expected. Meanwhile it is also important to note that the quantum mechanical exchange-correlation contributions can not be ignored. By means of the non-covalent interaction (NCI) approach it has been found that some weak and repulsion interactions existed in plutonyl(VI) complexes, which can not be distinguished by QTAIM, can be successfully identified.

  8. Ubisemiquinone is the electron donor for superoxide formation by complex III of heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Turrens, J F; Alexandre, A; Lehninger, A L

    1985-03-01

    Much evidence indicates that superoxide is generated from O2 in a cyanide-sensitive reaction involving a reduced component of complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, particularly when antimycin A is present. Although it is generally believed that ubisemiquinone is the electron donor to O2, little experimental evidence supporting this view has been reported. Experiments with succinate as electron donor in the presence of antimycin A in intact rat heart mitochondria, which contain much superoxide dismutase but little catalase, showed that myxothiazol, which inhibits reduction of the Rieske iron-sulfur center, prevented formation of hydrogen peroxide, determined spectrophotometrically as the H2O2-peroxidase complex. Similarly, depletion of the mitochondria of their cytochrome c also inhibited formation of H2O2, which was restored by addition of cytochrome c. These observations indicate that factors preventing the formation of ubisemiquinone also prevent H2O2 formation. They also exclude ubiquinol, which remains reduced under these conditions, as the reductant of O2. Since cytochrome b also remains fully reduced when myxothiazol is added to succinate- and antimycin A-supplemented mitochondria, reduced cytochrome b may also be excluded as the reductant of O2. These observations, which are consistent with the Q-cycle reactions, by exclusion of other possibilities leave ubisemiquinone as the only reduced electron carrier in complex III capable of reducing O2 to O2-.

  9. Electronic Structure Determination of Pyridine N-Heterocyclic Carbene Iron Dinitrogen Complexes and Neutral Ligand Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The electronic structures of pyridine N-heterocyclic dicarbene (iPrCNC) iron complexes have been studied by a combination of spectroscopic and computational methods. The goal of these studies was to determine if this chelate engages in radical chemistry in reduced base metal compounds. The iron dinitrogen example (iPrCNC)Fe(N2)2 and the related pyridine derivative (iPrCNC)Fe(DMAP)(N2) were studied by NMR, Mössbauer, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy and are best described as redox non-innocent compounds with the iPrCNC chelate functioning as a classical π acceptor and the iron being viewed as a hybrid between low-spin Fe(0) and Fe(II) oxidation states. This electronic description has been supported by spectroscopic data and DFT calculations. Addition of N,N-diallyl-tert-butylamine to (iPrCNC)Fe(N2)2 yielded the corresponding iron diene complex. Elucidation of the electronic structure again revealed the CNC chelate acting as a π acceptor with no evidence for ligand-centered radicals. This ground state is in contrast with the case for the analogous bis(imino)pyridine iron complexes and may account for the lack of catalytic [2π + 2π] cycloaddition reactivity. PMID:25328270

  10. Exploring the Interaction Natures in Plutonyl (VI) Complexes with Topological Analyses of Electron Density

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiguang; Sun, Xiyuan; Jiang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The interaction natures between Pu and different ligands in several plutonyl (VI) complexes are investigated by performing topological analyses of electron density. The geometrical structures in both gaseous and aqueous phases are obtained with B3LYP functional, and are generally in agreement with available theoretical and experimental results when combined with all-electron segmented all-electron relativistic contracted (SARC) basis set. The Pu–Oyl bond orders show significant linear dependence on bond length and the charge of oxygen atoms in plutonyl moiety. The closed-shell interactions were identified for Pu-Ligand bonds in most complexes with quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses. Meanwhile, we found that some Pu–Ligand bonds, like Pu–OH−, show weak covalent. The interactive nature of Pu–ligand bonds were revealed based on the interaction quantum atom (IQA) energy decomposition approach, and our results indicate that all Pu–Ligand interactions is dominated by the electrostatic attraction interaction as expected. Meanwhile it is also important to note that the quantum mechanical exchange-correlation contributions can not be ignored. By means of the non-covalent interaction (NCI) approach it has been found that some weak and repulsion interactions existed in plutonyl(VI) complexes, which can not be distinguished by QTAIM, can be successfully identified. PMID:27077844

  11. Electron collisions with the CH{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}O complex

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T. C.; Lima, M. A. P.; Canuto, S.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2009-12-15

    We report cross sections for elastic collisions of low-energy electrons with the CH{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}O complex. We employed the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and in the static-exchange-polarization approximations for energies from 0.1 to 20 eV. We considered four different hydrogen-bonded structures for the complex that were generated by classical Monte Carlo simulations. Our aim is to investigate the effect of the water molecule on the pi* shape resonance of formaldehyde. Previous studies reported a pi* shape resonance for CH{sub 2}O at around 1 eV. The resonance positions of the complexes appear at lower energies in all cases due to the mutual polarization between the two molecules. This indicates that the presence of water may favor dissociation by electron impact and may lead to an important effect on strand breaking in wet DNA by electron impact.

  12. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  13. Comparison of the electronic and vibrational optical activity of a europium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Hudecová, Jana; You, Xiao-Zeng; Urbanová, Marie; Bouř, Petr

    2015-04-07

    The geometry and the electronic structure of chiral lanthanide(III) complexes are traditionally probed by electronic methods, such as circularly polarised luminescence (CPL) and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectroscopy. The vibrational phenomena are much weaker. In the present study, however, significant enhancements of vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectral intensities were observed during the formation of a chiral bipyridine-Eu(III) complex. The ten-fold enhancement of the vibrational absorption and VCD intensities was explained by a charge-transfer process and the dominant effect of the nitrate ion on the spectra. A much larger enhancement of the ROA and Raman intensities and a hundred-fold increase of the circular intensity difference (CID) ratio were explained by the resonance of the λ = 532 nm laser light with the (7)F0 → (5)D0 transitions. This phenomenon is combined with a chirality transfer, and mixing of the Raman and luminescence effects involving low-energy (7)F states of europium. The results thus indicate that the vibrational optical activity (VOA) may be a very sensitive tool for chirality detection and probing of the electronic structure of Eu(III) and other coordination compounds.

  14. Quantum transport in molecular electronic devices described with complex source and sink potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyer, Francois; Goker, Ali; Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2008-03-01

    We present a non-Hermitian model Hamiltonian containing complex potentials [1,2] that is devised to study ballistic transport in molecular electronic devices (MEDs). The complex potentials replace semi-infinite contacts and act as source and sink of probability current density. This approach is rigorous in the sense that the exact wave function is recovered in the interior of the MED. We employ this technique to calculate the conductance through certain prototypical MEDs [3]. We also extend this method [4] such that we can go beyond the one- electron picture by constructing two-electron states explicitly. We present results for simple model system described by Hubbard-type Hamiltonians. The impact of electron correlation effects on the molecular conductance is discussed. [1] F. Goyer, M. Ernzerhof, M. Zhuang, JCP, 126, 144104 (2007). [2] M. Ernzerhof, JCP, to appear nov. 2007. [3] M. Ernzerhof, H. Bahmann, F. Goyer, M. Zhuang, P. Rocheleau, J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2, 1291 (2006); M. Ernzerhof, M. Zhuang, P. Rocheleau, JCP, 123, 134704 (2005). [4] A. Goker, F. Goyer, M. Ernzerhof, work in pogress.

  15. Molecular and electronic structure of terminal and alkali metal-capped uranium(V) nitride complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, David M.; Cleaves, Peter A.; Wooles, Ashley J.; Gardner, Benedict M.; Chilton, Nicholas F.; Tuna, Floriana; Lewis, William; McInnes, Eric J. L.; Liddle, Stephen T.

    2016-12-01

    Determining the electronic structure of actinide complexes is intrinsically challenging because inter-electronic repulsion, crystal field, and spin-orbit coupling effects can be of similar magnitude. Moreover, such efforts have been hampered by the lack of structurally analogous families of complexes to study. Here we report an improved method to U≡N triple bonds, and assemble a family of uranium(V) nitrides. Along with an isoelectronic oxo, we quantify the electronic structure of this 5f1 family by magnetometry, optical and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies and modelling. Thus, we define the relative importance of the spin-orbit and crystal field interactions, and explain the experimentally observed different ground states. We find optical absorption linewidths give a potential tool to identify spin-orbit coupled states, and show measurement of UV...UV super-exchange coupling in dimers by EPR. We show that observed slow magnetic relaxation occurs via two-phonon processes, with no obvious correlation to the crystal field.

  16. Molecular and electronic structure of terminal and alkali metal-capped uranium(V) nitride complexes

    PubMed Central

    King, David M.; Cleaves, Peter A.; Wooles, Ashley J.; Gardner, Benedict M.; Chilton, Nicholas F.; Tuna, Floriana; Lewis, William; McInnes, Eric J. L.; Liddle, Stephen T.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the electronic structure of actinide complexes is intrinsically challenging because inter-electronic repulsion, crystal field, and spin–orbit coupling effects can be of similar magnitude. Moreover, such efforts have been hampered by the lack of structurally analogous families of complexes to study. Here we report an improved method to U≡N triple bonds, and assemble a family of uranium(V) nitrides. Along with an isoelectronic oxo, we quantify the electronic structure of this 5f1 family by magnetometry, optical and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies and modelling. Thus, we define the relative importance of the spin–orbit and crystal field interactions, and explain the experimentally observed different ground states. We find optical absorption linewidths give a potential tool to identify spin–orbit coupled states, and show measurement of UV···UV super-exchange coupling in dimers by EPR. We show that observed slow magnetic relaxation occurs via two-phonon processes, with no obvious correlation to the crystal field. PMID:27996007

  17. Defect Control of Conventional and Anomalous Electron Transport at Complex Oxide Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunkel, F.; Bell, Chris; Inoue, Hisashi; Kim, Bongju; Swartz, Adrian G.; Merz, Tyler A.; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Harashima, Satoshi; Sato, Hiroki K.; Minohara, Makoto; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne; Dittmann, Regina; Hwang, Harold Y.

    2016-07-01

    Using low-temperature electrical measurements, the interrelation between electron transport, magnetic properties, and ionic defect structure in complex oxide interface systems is investigated, focusing on NdGaO3 /SrTiO3 (100) interfaces. Field-dependent Hall characteristics (2-300 K) are obtained for samples grown at various growth pressures. In addition to multiple electron transport, interfacial magnetism is tracked exploiting the anomalous Hall effect (AHE). These two properties both contribute to a nonlinearity in the field dependence of the Hall resistance, with multiple carrier conduction evident below 30 K and AHE at temperatures ≲10 K . Considering these two sources of nonlinearity, we suggest a phenomenological model capturing the complex field dependence of the Hall characteristics in the low-temperature regime. Our model allows the extraction of the conventional transport parameters and a qualitative analysis of the magnetization. The electron mobility is found to decrease systematically with increasing growth pressure. This suggests dominant electron scattering by acceptor-type strontium vacancies incorporated during growth. The AHE scales with growth pressure. The most pronounced AHE is found at increased growth pressure and, thus, in the most defective, low-mobility samples, indicating a correlation between transport, magnetism, and cation defect concentration.

  18. Influence of Copper Oxidation State on the Bonding and Electronic Structure of Cobalt-Copper Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhart, Reed J.; Carlson, Rebecca K.; Clouston, Laura J.; Victor G. Young Jr.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Bill, Eckhard; Gagliardi, Laura; Lu, Connie C.

    2016-03-04

    Heterobimetallic complexes that pair cobalt and copper were synthesized and characterized by a suite of physical methods, including X-ray diffraction, X-ray anomalous scattering, cyclic voltammetry, magnetometry, electronic absorption spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, and quantum chemical methods. Both Cu(II) and Cu(I) reagents were independently added to a Co(II) metalloligand to provide (py3tren)CoCuCl (1-Cl) and (py3tren)CoCu(CH3CN) (2-CH3CN), respectively, where py3tren is the triply deprotonated form of N,N,N-tris(2-(2-pyridylamino)ethyl)amine. Complex 2-CH3CN can lose the acetonitrile ligand to generate a coordination polymer consistent with the formula “(py3tren)CoCu” (2). One-electron chemical oxidation of 2-CH3CN with AgOTf generated (py3tren)CoCuOTf (1-OTf). The Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox couple for 1-OTf and 2-CH3CN is reversible at -0.56 and -0.33 V vs Fc+/Fc, respectively. The copper oxidation state impacts the electronic structure of the heterobimetallic core, as well as the nature of the Co–Cu interaction. Quantum chemical calculations showed modest electron delocalization in the (CoCu)+4 state via a Co–Cu σ bond that is weakened by partial population of the Co–Cu σ antibonding orbital. By contrast, no covalent Co–Cu bonding is predicted for the (CoCu)+3 analogue, and the d-electrons are fully localized at individual metals.

  19. Challenges in the implementation of an electronic surveillance system in a resource-limited setting: Alerta, in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Giselle; Araujo-Castillo, Roger V; Neyra, Joan; Fernandez, Miguel; Leturia, Carlos; Mundaca, Carmen C; Blazes, David L

    2008-01-01

    Background Infectious disease surveillance is a primary public health function in resource-limited settings. In 2003, an electronic disease surveillance system (Alerta) was established in the Peruvian Navy with support from the U.S. Naval Medical Research Center Detachment (NMRCD). Many challenges arose during the implementation process, and a variety of solutions were applied. The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss these issues. Methods This is a retrospective description of the Alerta implementation. After a thoughtful evaluation according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines, the main challenges to implementation were identified and solutions were devised in the context of a resource-limited setting, Peru. Results After four years of operation, we have identified a number of challenges in implementing and operating this electronic disease surveillance system. These can be divided into the following categories: (1) issues with personnel and stakeholders; (2) issues with resources in a developing setting; (3) issues with processes involved in the collection of data and operation of the system; and (4) issues with organization at the central hub. Some of the challenges are unique to resource-limited settings, but many are applicable for any surveillance system. For each of these challenges, we developed feasible solutions that are discussed. Conclusion There are many challenges to overcome when implementing an electronic disease surveillance system, not only related to technology issues. A comprehensive approach is required for success, including: technical support, personnel management, effective training, and cultural sensitivity in order to assure the effective deployment of an electronic disease surveillance system. PMID:19025681

  20. A different 'spin' on rhenium chemistry. synthetic approaches and perspectives of 17-electron rhenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Zobi, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    Transition metal complexes of rhenium and technetium find wide application in nuclear medicine and the chemistry of these elements is still the focus of intense research efforts. For therapeutic and diagnostic applications, currently much attention is dedicated to the development of new targeting strategies aimed at appending the metal complexes to biological vectors (e.g. a peptide) for a site-specific delivery of the radionuclides. Advancements in radiopharmacy, however, will not only arise from the development of new targeted strategies but also from the exploration of the chemistry of these elements in their unusual oxidation states. In this respect the even number oxidation states of Re and Tc (i.e. +II, +IV and +VI) are relatively poorly understood. In particular, stable and substitutionally labile mononuclear 17-electron species of the elements (+II, d(5)) are a rarely encountered class of complexes. In this review we present our recent developments in the field of rhenium (II) chemistry with emphasis on the novel synthetic strategies we have recently introduced. We will also describe how the unique chemical and electronic properties of Re(II)-based complexes may provide a potentially new approach for applications in inorganic medicinal chemistry.

  1. Cardiolipin promotes electron transport between ubiquinone and complex I to rescue PINK1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vos, Melissa; Geens, Ann; Böhm, Claudia; Deaulmerie, Liesbeth; Swerts, Jef; Rossi, Matteo; Craessaerts, Katleen; Leites, Elvira P; Seibler, Philip; Rakovic, Aleksandar; Lohnau, Thora; De Strooper, Bart; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Morais, Vanessa A; Klein, Christine; Verstreken, Patrik

    2017-03-06

    PINK1 is mutated in Parkinson's disease (PD), and mutations cause mitochondrial defects that include inefficient electron transport between complex I and ubiquinone. Neurodegeneration is also connected to changes in lipid homeostasis, but how these are related to PINK1-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is unknown. Based on an unbiased genetic screen, we found that partial genetic and pharmacological inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FASN) suppresses toxicity induced by PINK1 deficiency in flies, mouse cells, patient-derived fibroblasts, and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons. Lower FASN activity in PINK1 mutants decreases palmitate levels and increases the levels of cardiolipin (CL), a mitochondrial inner membrane-specific lipid. Direct supplementation of CL to isolated mitochondria not only rescues the PINK1-induced complex I defects but also rescues the inefficient electron transfer between complex I and ubiquinone in specific mutants. Our data indicate that genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of FASN to increase CL levels bypasses the enzymatic defects at complex I in a PD model.

  2. Ferrocene-o-benzosemiquinonato tin(IV) electron-transfer complexes.

    PubMed

    Ilyakina, Ekaterina V; Poddel'sky, Andrey I; Fukin, Georgy K; Bogomyakov, Artem S; Cherkasov, Vladimir K; Abakumov, Gleb A

    2013-05-06

    The interaction of ferrocene with tin(IV) o-benzosemiquinonato complexes in acetonitrile results in a reversible electron transfer (ET) from ferrocene to the redox-active ligand with the formation of electron-transfer complexes [(3,6-Cat)SnBr3](-)[Cp2Fe](+) (1) and [(3,6-Cat)(3,6-SQ)SnCl2](-)[Cp2Fe](+) (2), where 3,6-Cat is the 3,6-di-tert-butyl-catecholate dianion and 3,6-SQ is the 3,6-di-tert-butyl-o-benzosemiquinonato radical anion. The ET process and the solvent effect in the system "ferrocene-o-benzosemiquinonato tin(IV) complexes" were investigated on the basis of a combination of spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction methods. The molecular structures of 1 and 2 were confirmed by X-ray analysis. Complex 2 demonstrates the ferromagnetic coupling in the linear chain alternating ···D(+•)A(-•)D(+•)A(-•)··· motif.

  3. Cannabinoid-Induced Changes in the Activity of Electron Transport Chain Complexes of Brain Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the activity of individual mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, II/III, IV) and citrate synthase induced by pharmacologically different cannabinoids. In vitro effects of selected cannabinoids on mitochondrial enzymes were measured in crude mitochondrial fraction isolated from pig brain. Both cannabinoid receptor agonists, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, anandamide, and R-(+)-WIN55,212-2, and antagonist/inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptors, AM251, and cannabidiol were examined in pig brain mitochondria. Different effects of these cannabinoids on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and citrate synthase were found. Citrate synthase activity was decreased only by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and AM251. Significant increase in the complex I activity was induced by anandamide. At micromolar concentration, all the tested cannabinoids inhibited the activity of electron transport chain complexes II/III and IV. Stimulatory effect of anandamide on activity of complex I may participate on distinct physiological effects of endocannabinoids compared to phytocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoids. Common inhibitory effect of cannabinoids on activity of complex II/III and IV confirmed a non-receptor-mediated mechanism of cannabinoid action on individual components of system of oxidative phosphorylation.

  4. Three-dimensional structure of human chromatin accessibility complex hCHRAC by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.; Hainfeld, J.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Qian, L.; Brinas, R. P.; Kuznetsova, L.

    2008-12-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes modulate the dynamic assembly and remodeling of chromatin involved in DNA transcription, replication, and repair. There is little structural detail known about these important multiple-subunit enzymes that catalyze chromatin remodeling processes. Here we report a three-dimensional structure of the human chromatin accessibility complex, hCHRAC, using single particle reconstruction by negative stain electron microscopy. This structure shows an asymmetric 15 x 10 x 12 nm disk shape with several lobes protruding out of its surfaces. Based on the factors of larger contact area, smaller steric hindrance, and direct involvement of hCHRAC in interactions with the nucleosome, we propose that four lobes on one side form a multiple-site contact surface 10 nm in diameter for nucleosome binding. This work provides the first determination of the three-dimensional structure of the ISWI-family of chromatin remodeling complexes.

  5. Proton and Electron Additions to Iron (II) Dinitrogen Complexes Containing Pendant Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, Zachariah M.; Chen, Shentan; Labios, Liezel AN; Bullock, R. Morris; Walter, Eric D.; Tyson, Elizabeth L.; Mock, Michael T.

    2014-03-10

    We describe a single site cis-(H)FeII-N2 complex, generated by the protonation of an iron-carbon bond of a "reduced" iron complex, that models key aspects of proposed protonated intermediates of the E4 state of nitrogenase. The influence on N2 binding from the addition of protons to the pendant amine sites in the second coordination sphere is described. Furthermore, the addition of electrons to the protonated complexes results in H2 loss. The mechanism of H2 loss is explored to draw a parallel to the origin of H2 loss (homolytic or heterolytic) and the nature of N2 coordination in intermediates of the E4 state of nitrogenase.

  6. Determination of electronic ground state properties of a dinuclear iron(II) spin crossover complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, T. O.; Schmitz, M.; Graf, M.; Kelm, H.; Krüger, H.-J.; Schünemann, V.

    2016-12-01

    The dinuclear complex [(Fe(L-N4Me2))2(BiBzIm)](ClO4)2ṡ2EtCN (1) has been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy carried out in the temperature range from 5 to 150 K with externally applied magnetic fields of up to B = 5 T. By means of a consistent simulation of all experimental data sets within the Spin Hamiltonian formalism, the zero-field splitting D and the rhombicity parameter E/ D of the ferrous high-spin (HS) site in this complex was determined to be D = -15.0 ± 1.0 cm-1 and E/ D = 0.33 respectively. The sign of the quadrupole splitting of the HS site is positive which indicates that this iron site of the dinuclear complex 1 has an electronic ground state with the dxy orbital being twofold occupied.

  7. Localized reconstruction of subunits from electron cryomicroscopy images of macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ilca, Serban L.; Kotecha, Abhay; Sun, Xiaoyu; Poranen, Minna M.; Stuart, David I.; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2015-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy can yield near-atomic resolution structures of highly ordered macromolecular complexes. Often however some subunits bind in a flexible manner, have different symmetry from the rest of the complex, or are present in sub-stoichiometric amounts, limiting the attainable resolution. Here we report a general method for the localized three-dimensional reconstruction of such subunits. After determining the particle orientations, local areas corresponding to the subunits can be extracted and treated as single particles. We demonstrate the method using three examples including a flexible assembly and complexes harbouring subunits with either partial occupancy or mismatched symmetry. Most notably, the method allows accurate fitting of the monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase bound at the threefold axis of symmetry inside a viral capsid, revealing for the first time its exact orientation and interactions with the capsid proteins. Localized reconstruction is expected to provide novel biological insights in a range of challenging biological systems. PMID:26534841

  8. Tracking the Flow of Resources in Electronic Waste - The Case of End-of-Life Computer Hard Disk Drives.

    PubMed

    Habib, Komal; Parajuly, Keshav; Wenzel, Henrik

    2015-10-20

    Recovery of resources, in particular, metals, from waste flows is widely seen as a prioritized option to reduce their potential supply constraints in the future. The current waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) treatment system is more focused on bulk metals, where the recycling rate of specialty metals, such as rare earths, is negligible compared to their increasing use in modern products, such as electronics. This study investigates the challenges in recovering these resources in the existing WEEE treatment system. It is illustrated by following the material flows of resources in a conventional WEEE treatment plant in Denmark. Computer hard disk drives (HDDs) containing neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets were selected as the case product for this experiment. The resulting output fractions were tracked until their final treatment in order to estimate the recovery potential of rare earth elements (REEs) and other resources contained in HDDs. The results further show that out of the 244 kg of HDDs treated, 212 kg comprising mainly of aluminum and steel can be finally recovered from the metallurgic process. The results further demonstrate the complete loss of REEs in the existing shredding-based WEEE treatment processes. Dismantling and separate processing of NdFeB magnets from their end-use products can be a more preferred option over shredding. However, it remains a technological and logistic challenge for the existing system.

  9. Direct comparison of the magnetic and electronic properties of samarocene and ytterbocene terpyridine complexes.

    PubMed

    Veauthier, Jacqueline M; Schelter, Eric J; Carlson, Christin N; Scott, Brian L; Da Re, Ryan E; Thompson, J D; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Morris, David E; John, Kevin D

    2008-07-07

    A new complex, Cp* 2Sm(tpy) ( 1, where Cp* = C 5Me 5, tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) and its one-electron oxidized congener [Cp* 2Sm(tpy)]PF 6 ([ 1] (+)) have been synthesized and characterized with the aim of comparing their electronic and magnetic behavior to the known ytterbium analogues: Cp* 2Yb(tpy) ( 2) and [Cp* 2Yb(tpy)]OTf ([ 2] ( + )). These new samarium complexes have been characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, optical spectroscopy, and bulk magnetic susceptibility measurements. All data for 1 indicate a Sm(III)-tpy* (-)[(4f) (5)-(pi*) (1)] ground-state electronic configuration similar to that found previously for 2 [(4f) (13)-(pi*) (1)]. Structural comparisons reveal that there are no significant changes in the overall geometries associated with the neutral and cationic samarium and ytterbium congeners aside from those anticipated based upon the lanthanide contraction. The redox potentials for the divalent Cp* 2Ln(THF) n precursors ( E 1/2(Sm (2+)) = -2.12 V, E 1/2(Yb (2+)) = -1.48 V) are consistent with established trends, the redox potentials (metal-based reduction and ligand-based oxidation) for 1 are nearly identical to those for 2. The correlation in the optical spectra of 1 and 2 is excellent, as expected for this ligand-radical based electronic structural assignment, but there does appear to be a red-shift ( approximately 400 cm (-1)) in all of the bands of 1 relative to those of 2 that suggests a slightly greater stabilization of the pi* level(s) in the samarium(III) complex compared to that in the ytterbium(III) complex. Similar spectroscopic overlap is observed for the monocationic complexes [ 1] (+) and [ 2] (+). Bulk magnetic susceptibility measurements for 1 reveal significantly different behavior than that of 2 due to differences in the electronic-state structure of the two metal ions. The implications of these differences in magnetic behavior are discussed.

  10. Electron microscopy visualization of DNA-protein complexes formed by Ku and DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Grob, Patricia; Zhang, Teri T; Hannah, Ryan; Yang, Hui; Hefferin, Melissa L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Nogales, Eva

    2012-01-02

    The repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell viability and genome stability. Aberrant repair of DSBs has been linked with cancer predisposition and aging. During the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), DNA ends are brought together, processed and then joined. In eukaryotes, this repair pathway is initiated by the binding of the ring-shaped Ku heterodimer and completed by DNA ligase IV. The DNA ligase IV complex, DNA ligase IV/XRRC4 in humans and Dnl4/Lif1 in yeast, is recruited to DNA ends in vitro and in vivo by an interaction with Ku and, in yeast, Dnl4/Lif1 stabilizes the binding of yKu to in vivo DSBs. Here we have analyzed the interactions of these functionally conserved eukaryotic NHEJ factors with DNA by electron microscopy. As expected, the ring-shaped Ku complex bound stably and specifically to DNA ends at physiological salt concentrations. At a ratio of 1 Ku molecule per DNA end, the majority of DNA ends were occupied by a single Ku complex with no significant formation of linear DNA multimers or circular loops. Both Dnl4/Lif1 and DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 formed complexes with Ku-bound DNA ends, resulting in intra- and intermolecular DNA end bridging, even with non-ligatable DNA ends. Together, these studies, which provide the first visualization of the conserved complex formed by Ku and DNA ligase IV at juxtaposed DNA ends by electron microscopy, suggest that the DNA ligase IV complex mediates end-bridging by engaging two Ku-bound DNA ends.

  11. The Iron Hill (Powderhorn) Carbonatite Complex, Gunnison County, Colorado - A Potential Source of Several Uncommon Mineral Resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2009-01-01

    A similar version of this slide show was presented on three occasions during 2008: two times to local chapters of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration (SME), as part of SME's Henry Krumb lecture series, and the third time at the Northwest Mining Association's 114th Annual Meeting, held December 1-5, 2008, in Sparks (Reno), Nevada. In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a study of the diverse and uncommon mineral resources associated with carbonatites and associated alkaline igneous rocks. Most of these deposit types have not been studied by the USGS during the last 25 years, and many of these mineral resources have important applications in modern technology. The author chose to begin this study at Iron Hill in southwestern Colorado because it is the site of a classic carbonatite complex, which is thought to host the largest known resources of titanium and niobium in the United States.

  12. Magnetism and electronic structure of triplet binuclear niobium complexes in inorganic glasses, organic ligand environment, and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhimov, R. R.; Arrington, S. A.; Jackson, E. M.; Hwang, J. S.; Prokof'ev, A. I.; Alexandrov, I. A.; Aleksandrov, A. I.

    2005-05-01

    We investigated paramagnetic properties of binuclear niobium complexes Nb-O-Nb with two nonequivalent Nb4+ ions in lithium-niobium phosphate glasses (LNPG), in the environment of catechol/ortho-quinone ligands and in polyethylene. Experimental electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum analysis revealed nonequivalent distribution of the charge and electron spin density between two Nb atoms. Mechanochemical interaction of LNPG with an organic donor-acceptor mixture catechol/ortho-quinone followed by organic solvent extraction leads to the formation of a new binuclear complex with catechol/ortho-quinone ligands. This complex can be further incorporated into polyethylene matrix to form the complex with properties close to the complex in LNPG.

  13. Probing the chemistry, electronic structure and redox energetics in pentavalent organometallic actinide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Christopher R; Vaughn, Anthony E; Morris, David E; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2008-01-01

    Complexes of the early actinides (Th-Pu) have gained considerable prominence in organometallic chemistry as they have been shown to undergo chemistries not observed with their transition- or lanthanide metal counterparts. Further, while bonding in f-element complexes has historically been considered to be ionic, the issue of covalence remains a subject of debate in the area of actinide science, and studies aimed at elucidating key bonding interactions with 5f-orbitals continue to garner attention. Towards this end, our interests have focused on the role that metal oxidation state plays in the structure, reactivity and spectral properties of organouranium complexes. We report our progress in the synthesis of substituted U{sup V}-imido complexes using various routes: (1) Direct oxidation of U{sup IV}-imido complexes with copper(I) salts; (2) Salt metathesis with U{sup V}-imido halides; (3) Protonolysis and insertion of an U{sup V}-imido alkyl or aryl complex with H-N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2} or N{triple_bond}C-Ph, respectively, to form a U{sup V}-imido ketimide complex. Further, we report and compare the crystallographic, electrochemical, spectroscopic and magnetic characterization of the pentavalent uranium (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}U({double_bond}N-Ar)(Y) series (Y = OTf, SPh, C{triple_bond}C-Ph, NPh{sub 2}, OPh, N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2}) to further interrogate the molecular, electronic, and magnetic structures of this new class of uranium complexes.

  14. The Nickel-Pincer Complex in Lactate Racemase Is an Electron Relay and Sink that acts through Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binju; Shaik, Sason

    2017-02-03

    QM/MM calculations reveal that the nickel pincer complex in lactate racemase functions as a reversible "single-center electrode" that accepts and donates back an electron. In this way, it catalyzes the isomerization process d-lactate⇌l-lactate through successive proton-coupled electron-transfer steps.

  15. Electronic and optical response of functionalized Ru(II) complexes: joint theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Kilina, Svetlana; Tretiak, Sergei; Sykora, Milan; Albert, Victor; Badaeva, Ekaterina; Koposov, Alexey

    2008-01-01

    New photovoltaic and photocatalysis applications have been recently proposed based on the hybrid Ru(II)-bipyridine-complex/semiconductor quantum dot systems. In order to attach the Ru(II) complex to the surface of a semiconductor, a linking bridge -- a carboxyl group -- needs to be added to one or two of the 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) ligands. Such changes in the ligand structure affect electronic and optical properties and, consequently, the charge transfer reactivity of Ru(II)-systems. In this study, we analyze the effects brought by functionalization of bipyridine ligands with the methyl, carboxyl, and carboxilate groups on the electronic structure and optical response of the [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} complex. First principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent DFT (TDDFT) are used to simulate the ground and excited-state properties, respectively, of functionalized Ru-complexes in the gas phase and acetonitrile solution. In addition, an effective Frenkel exciton model is used to explain the optical activity and splitting patterns of the low-energy excited states in all molecules. All theoretical results nicely complement and allow for detailed interpretation of experimental absorption spectra of Ru-complexes that have been done in parallel with our theoretical investigations. We found that the carboxyl group breaks the degeneracy of two low-energy optically bright excited states and red-shifts the absorption spectrum, while leaves ionization and affinity energies of complexes almost unchanged. Experimental studies show that deprotonation of the carboxyl group in the Ru-complexes results in a slight blue shift and decrease of oscillator strengths of the low energy absorption peaks. Comparison of experimental and theoretical linear response spectra of deprotonated complexes demonstrate strong agreement if the theoretical calculations are performed with the addition of a dielectric continuum model. A polar solvent is found to play an

  16. Understanding intention to use electronic information resources: A theoretical extension of the technology acceptance model (TAM).

    PubMed

    Tao, Donghua

    2008-11-06

    This study extended the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) by examining the roles of two aspects of e-resource characteristics, namely, information quality and system quality, in predicting public health students' intention to use e-resources for completing research paper assignments. Both focus groups and a questionnaire were used to collect data. Descriptive analysis, data screening, and Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) techniques were used for data analysis. The study found that perceived usefulness played a major role in determining students' intention to use e-resources. Perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use fully mediated the impact that information quality and system quality had on behavior intention. The research model enriches the existing technology acceptance literature by extending TAM. Representing two aspects of e-resource characteristics provides greater explanatory information for diagnosing problems of system design, development, and implementation.

  17. Building and Managing Electronic Resources in Digital Era in India with Special Reference to IUCAA and NIV, Pune: A Comparative Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, H. K.; Singh, S. N.

    2015-04-01

    This paper discusses and presents a comparative case study of two libraries in Pune, India, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics and Information Centre and Library of National Institute of Virology (Indian Council of Medical Research). It compares how both libraries have managed their e-resource collections, including acquisitions, subscriptions, and consortia arrangements, while also developing a collection of their own resources, including pre-prints and publications, video lectures, and other materials in an institutional repository. This study illustrates how difficult it is to manage electronic resources in a developing country like India, even though electronic resources are used more than print resources. Electronic resource management can be daunting, but with a systematic approach, various problems can be solved, and use of the materials will be enhanced.

  18. Size and structure of antigen-antibody complexes. Electron microscopy and light scattering studies.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, R M; Slayter, H; Schurtenberger, P; Chamberlin, R A; Colton, C K; Yarmush, M L

    1988-01-01

    Size parameters of model antigen-antibody (Ag-Ab) complexes formed by the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and pairs of monoclonal anti-BSA antibodies (mAb) were evaluated by quasielastic light scattering, classical light scattering, and electron microscopy (EM). Mean values for the hydrodynamic radius, radius of gyration, and molecular weight were determined by light scattering. Detailed information regarding the molecular weight distribution and the presence of cycles or open chains was obtained with EM. Average molecular weights were calculated from the EM data, and the Porod-Kratky wormlike chain theory was used to model the conformational behavior of the Ag-mAb complexes. Ag-mAb complexes prepared from three different mAb pairs displayed significantly different properties as assessed by each of the techniques employed. Observations and size parameter calculations from EM photomicrographs were consistent with the results from light scattering. The differences observed between the mab pairs would not have been predicted by idealized thermodynamic models. These results suggest that the geometric constraints imposed by the individual epitope environment and/or the relative epitope location are important in determining the average size of complexes and the ratio of linear to cyclic complexes. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:3416033

  19. Synthesis and binding properties of arylethyne-linked porphyrin-zinc complexes for organic electronics applications.

    PubMed

    Reainthippayasakul, W; Paosawatyanyong, B; Bhanthumnavin, W

    2013-05-01

    Conjugated meso-alkynyl 5,15-dimesitylporphyrin metal complexes have been synthesized by Sonogashira coupling reaction in good yields. Alkynyl groups were chosen as a link at the meso positions in order to extend the pi-conjugated length of porphyrin rings. These synthesized porphyrin derivatives were characterized by 1H NMR spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Moreover, UV-visible spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy were also used to investigate their photophysical properties. It has been demonstrated that central metal ions as well as meso substituents on porphyrin rings affected the electronic absorption and emission spectra of the compounds. Spectroscopic results revealed that alkyne-linked porphyrin metal complexes showed higher pi-conjugation compared with porphyrin building blocks resulting in red shifts in both absorption and emission spectra. Coordination properties of synthesized porphyrins were preliminarily investigated by UV-visible absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopic titration with pyridine as axial ligand. The formation of porphyrin-pyridine complexes resulted in significant red shifts in absorption spectra and decrease of fluorescence intensity in emission spectra. Moreover, the 1H NMR titration experiments suggested that central metal ions play an important role to coordinate with pyridine and the coordination of porphyrin zinc(II) complex with pyridine occur in a 1:1 ratio. From these spectroscopic results, alkyne-linked porphyrin metal complexes offer potential applications as materials for optical organic nanosensors.

  20. Synthesis and electronic structure determination of uranium(vi) ligand radical complexes.

    PubMed

    Herasymchuk, Khrystyna; Chiang, Linus; Hayes, Cassandra E; Brown, Matthew L; Ovens, Jeffrey S; Patrick, Brian O; Leznoff, Daniel B; Storr, Tim

    2016-08-02

    Pentagonal bipyramidal uranyl (UO2(2+)) complexes of salen ligands, N,N'-bis(3-tert-butyl-(5R)-salicylidene)-1,2-phenylenediamine, in which R = (t)Bu (1a), OMe (1b), and NMe2 (1c), were prepared and the electronic structure of the one-electron oxidized species [1a-c]+ were investigated in solution. The solid-state structures of 1a and 1b were solved by X-ray crystallography, and in the case of 1b an asymmetric UO2(2+) unit was found due to an intermolecular hydrogen bonding interaction. Electrochemical investigation of 1a-c by cyclic voltammetry showed that each complex exhibited at least one quasi-reversible redox process assigned to the oxidation of the phenolate moieties to phenoxyl radicals. The trend in redox potentials matches the electron-donating ability of the para-phenolate substituents. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of cations [1a-c]+ exhibited gav values of 1.997, 1.999, and 1.995, respectively, reflecting the ligand radical character of the oxidized forms, and in addition, spin-orbit coupling to the uranium centre. Chemical oxidation as monitored by ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy afforded the one-electron oxidized species. Weak low energy intra-ligand charge transfer (CT) transitions were observed for [1a-c]+ indicating localization of the ligand radical to form a phenolate/phenoxyl radical species. Further analysis using density functional theory (DFT) calculations predicted a localized phenoxyl radical for [1a-c]+ with a small but significant contribution of the phenylenediamine unit to the spin density. Time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations provided further insight into the nature of the low energy transitions, predicting both phenolate to phenoxyl intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) and phenylenediamine to phenoxyl CT character. Overall, [1a-c]+ are determined to be relatively localized ligand radical complexes, in which localization is enhanced as the electron donating ability of the para

  1. Cu(II) complexes in bacterial growth medium: electron spin resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Katinka; Ristori, Sandra; Martini, Giacomo

    2000-02-01

    In this study we report a spectroscopic investigation on the structure and stability of Cu(II)-complexes that are formed in a minimum growth medium (MM), normally used for Bacillus subtilis cultures. As other transition metals, Cu(II) compounds are toxic to this bacterium and the toxicity depends on the Cu(II) concentration. MM contained NH 4+ ions and asparagine (asn) as the source of inorganic and organic nitrogen. Both ESR and electronic spectra demonstrated the very important role played by the amino acid asparagine in the coordinative behaviour of Cu(II). In particular, three different complexes were evidenced: Cu(H 2O) 62+; Cu(asn) + and Cu(asn) 2. The relative amount of these three species strongly depended on pH, on Cu:asn ratio and on the presence of the phosphate ions. They were identified and evaluated quantitatively by extensive simulation of the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra recorded in different experimental conditions. The bis-complex was found to be more stable in MM than in an asparagine-containing water solution with the same Cu:asn ratio. A comparison of the spectroscopic results with microbiological investigations is also made.

  2. Chlorophyll ring deformation modulates Qy electronic energy in chlorophyll-protein complexes and generates spectral forms.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Giuseppe; Brogioli, Doriano; Casazza, Anna Paola; Garlaschi, Flavio M; Jennings, Robert C

    2007-09-15

    The possibility that the chlorophyll (chl) ring distortions observed in the crystal structures of chl-protein complexes are involved in the transition energy modulation, giving rise to the spectral forms, is investigated. The out-of-plane chl-macrocycle distortions are described using an orthonormal set of deformations, defined by the displacements along the six lowest-frequency, out-of-plane normal coordinates. The total chl-ring deformation is the linear combination of these six deformations. The two higher occupied and the two lower unoccupied chl molecular orbitals, which define the Q(y) electronic transition, have the same symmetry as four of the six out-of-plane lowest frequency modes. We assume that a deformation along the normal-coordinate having the same symmetry as a given molecular orbital will perturb that orbital and modify its energy. The changes in the chl Q(y) transition energies are evaluated in the Peridinin-Chl-Protein complex and in light harvesting complex II (LHCII), using crystallographic data. The macrocycle deformations induce a distribution of the chl Q(y) electronic energy transitions which, for LHCII, is broader for chla than for chlb. This provides the physical mechanism to explain the long-held view that the chla spectral forms in LHCII are both more numerous and cover a wider energy range than those of chlb.

  3. Print and Electronic Resources: Usage Statistics at Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapoor, Kanta

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to quantify the use of electronic journals in comparison with the print collections in the Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University Library. Design/methodology/approach: A detailed analysis was made of the use of lending services, the Xerox facility and usage of electronic journals such as Science Direct,…

  4. Theoretical Studies on the Electronic Structures and Properties of Complex Ceramic Crystals and Novel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Wai-Yim

    2012-01-14

    This project is a continuation of a long program supported by the Office of Basic Energy Science in the Office of Science of DOE for many years. The final three-year continuation started on November 1, 2005 with additional 1 year extension to October 30, 2009. The project was then granted a two-year No Cost Extension which officially ended on October 30, 2011. This report covers the activities within this six year period with emphasis on the work completed within the last 3 years. A total of 44 papers with acknowledgement to this grant were published or submitted. The overall objectives of this project are as follows. These objectives have been evolved over the six year period: (1) To use the state-of-the-art computational methods to investigate the electronic structures of complex ceramics and other novel crystals. (2) To further investigate the defects, surfaces/interfaces and microstructures in complex materials using large scale modeling. (3) To extend the study on ceramic materials to more complex bioceramic crystals. (4) To initiate the study on soft condensed matters including water and biomolecules. (5) To focus on the spectroscopic studies of different materials especially on the ELNES and XANES spectral calculations and their applications related to experimental techniques. (6) To develop and refine computational methods to be effectively executed on DOE supercomputers. (7) To evaluate mechanical properties of different crystals and those containing defects and relate them to the fundamental electronic structures. (8) To promote and publicize the first-principles OLCAO method developed by the PI (under DOE support for many years) for applications to large complex material systems. (9) To train a new generation of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in modern computational materials science and condensed matter physics. (10) To establish effective international and domestic collaborations with both experimentalists and theorists in materials

  5. Dimethylamine borane dehydrogenation chemistry: syntheses, X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of 18-electron aminoborane and 14-electron aminoboryl complexes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Christina Y; Phillips, Nicholas; Bates, Joshua I; Thompson, Amber L; Gutmann, Matthias J; Aldridge, Simon

    2012-08-21

    The reactions of Me(2)NH·BH(3) with cationic Rh(III) and Ir(III) complexes have been shown to generate the 18-electron aminoborane adduct [Ir(IMes)(2)(H)(2){κ(2)-H(2)BNMe(2))](+) and the remarkable 14-electron aminoboryl complex [Rh(IMes)(2)(H)-{B(H)NMe(2))](+). Neutron diffraction studies have been used for the first time to define H-atom locations in metal complexes of this type formed under catalytic conditions.

  6. Controlling the two-dimensional electron gas at complex oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janotti, Anderson

    2014-03-01

    Heterostructures of complex oxides have attracted great interest since the demonstration of a high-density two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the SrTiO3/LaAlO3 (STO/LAO) interface. Still, the density of the 2DEG is only one tenth of what was expected from simple electron counting, i.e., 1/2 electron per unit-cell area. Since then, the origin and amount of the charge, the electrical properties of the 2DEG, the role of native defects, and the abrupt variation of the electron density with the thickness of the LAO top layer have been the subject of numerous theoretical and experimental studies. More recently, a 2DEG with the full density of 1/2 electron per unit cell area has been observed at the interface between the band insulator STO and the Mott insulator GdTiO3 (GTO), shedding additional light on the origin of the 2DEG, and raising important questions on the differences between the STO/LAO and STO/GTO heterostructures. Here we will discuss the similarities of the 2DEG at the STO/LAO and STO/GTO heterostructures from the perspective of first-principles simulations. We will address the differences in band alignments in the STO/LAO and STO/GTO heterostructures, and how the 2DEG is affected by the surface of the LAO top layer in the STO/LAO, but apparently not in the STO/GTO case. Finally, we will also discuss how heterostructures can be used to drastically alter the electronic structure of STO, transforming it from a band insulator into a Mott insulator. This work was performed in collaboration with Lars Bjaalie, Luke Gordon, Burak Himmetoglu, and Chris G. Van de Walle, and supported by ARO and NSF.

  7. Electron transfer reactions in the alkene mono-oxygenase complex from Nocardia corallina B-276.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, S C; Cammack, R; Dalton, H

    1999-01-01

    Nocardia corallina B-276 possesses a multi-component enzyme, alkene mono-oxygenase (AMO), that catalyses the stereoselective epoxygenation of alkenes. The reductase component of this system has been shown by EPR and fluorescence spectroscopy to contain two prosthetic groups, an FAD centre and a [2Fe-2S] cluster. The role of these centres in the epoxygenation reaction was determined by midpoint potential measurements and electron transfer kinetics. The order of potentials of the prosthetic groups of the reductase were FAD/FAD.=-216 mV, [2Fe-2S]/[2Fe-2S].=-160 mV and FAD./FAD.=-134 mV. Combined, these data implied that the reductase component supplied the energy required for the epoxygenation reaction and allowed a prediction of the mechanism of electron transfer within the AMO complex. The FAD moiety was reduced by bound NADH in a two-electron reaction. The electrons were then transported to the [2Fe-2S] centre one at a time, which in turn reduced the di-iron centre of the epoxygenase. Reduction of the di-iron centre is required for oxygen binding and substrate oxidation. PMID:10085230

  8. Liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy: imaging protein complexes in their native environment in whole eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-04-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of specimens in liquid, so-called Liquid STEM, is capable of imaging the individual subunits of macromolecular complexes in whole eukaryotic cells in liquid. This paper discusses this new microscopy modality within the context of state-of-the-art microscopy of cells. The principle of operation and equations for the resolution are described. The obtained images are different from those acquired with standard transmission electron microscopy showing the cellular ultrastructure. Instead, contrast is obtained on specific labels. Images can be recorded in two ways, either via STEM at 200 keV electron beam energy using a microfluidic chamber enclosing the cells, or via environmental scanning electron microscopy at 30 keV of cells in a wet environment. The first series of experiments involved the epidermal growth factor receptor labeled with gold nanoparticles. The labels were imaged in whole fixed cells with nanometer resolution. Since the cells can be kept alive in the microfluidic chamber, it is also feasible to detect the labels in unfixed, live cells. The rapid sample preparation and imaging allows studies of multiple whole cells.

  9. Cooperative catalysis: electron-rich Fe-H complexes and DMAP, a successful "joint venture" for ultrafast hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Susanne; Hettmanczyk, Lara; Klein, Johannes E M N; Plietker, Bernd

    2014-08-01

    A series of defined iron-hydrogen complexes was prepared in a straightforward one-pot approach. The structure and electronic properties of such complexes were investigated by means of quantum-chemical analysis. These new complexes were then applied in the dehydrogenative silylation of methanol. The complex (dppp)(CO)(NO)FeH showed a remarkable activity with a TOF of more than 600 000 h(-1) of pure hydrogen gas within seconds.

  10. Density functional calculation of core-electron binding energies of transition metal carbonyl and nitrosyl complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ching-Han; Chong, Delano P.

    1996-11-01

    Our recent procedure of the unrestricted generalized transition state (uGTS) model for density functional calculations of core-electron binding energies has been applied to seven carbonyl and nitrosyl inorganic complexes: Fe(CO) 5, Ni(CO) 4, Mn(CO) 4NO, Co(CO) 3NO, Fe(CO) 2(NO) 2, Mn(NO) 3CO and Cr(NO) 4. The exchange-correlation potential is based on a combined functional of Becke's exchange (B88) and Perdew's correlation (P86). The cc-pVTZ basis set was used for the calculation of neutral molecules, while for the partial cation created in the uGTS approach we scaled the cc-pVTZ basis set using a procedure based on Clementi and Raimondi's rules for atomic screening. The average absolute deviation of the calculated core-electron binding energy from experiment is 0.28 eV.

  11. Electronic states of alkali metal-NTCDA complexes: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Structures and electronic states of organic-inorganic compound of 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (NTCDA) with alkali metals, Mn(NTCDA) (Mdbnd Li and Na, n = 0-2), have been investigated by means of hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations. From the DFT calculations, it was found that the electronic state of the complex at the ground state is characterized by a charge-transfer state expressed by (M)+(NTCDA)-. The alkali metals were bound equivalently to the carbonyl oxygen and ether oxygen atoms of NTCDA. The Cdbnd O double bond character of NTCDA was changed to a C-O single bond like character by the strong interaction of M to the Cdbnd O and O sites. This change was the origin of the red-shift of the IR spectrum. The UV-vis absorption spectra of Mn(NTCDA) were theoretically predicted on the basis of theoretical results.

  12. Traceability and Risk Analysis Strategies for Addressing Counterfeit Electronics in Supply Chains for Complex Systems.

    PubMed

    DiMase, Daniel; Collier, Zachary A; Carlson, Jinae; Gray, Robin B; Linkov, Igor

    2016-10-01

    Within the microelectronics industry, there is a growing concern regarding the introduction of counterfeit electronic parts into the supply chain. Even though this problem is widespread, there have been limited attempts to implement risk-based approaches for testing and supply chain management. Supply chain risk management tends to focus on the highly visible disruptions of the supply chain instead of the covert entrance of counterfeits; thus counterfeit risk is difficult to mitigate. This article provides an overview of the complexities of the electronics supply chain, and highlights some gaps in risk assessment practices. In particular, this article calls for enhanced traceability capabilities to track and trace parts at risk through various stages of the supply chain. Placing the focus on risk-informed decision making through the following strategies is needed, including prioritization of high-risk parts, moving beyond certificates of conformance, incentivizing best supply chain management practices, adoption of industry standards, and design and management for supply chain resilience.

  13. Fort Collins Science Center Ecosystem Dynamics branch--interdisciplinary research for addressing complex natural resource issues across landscapes and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Zachary H.; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Wilson, Juliette T.

    2013-01-01

    The Ecosystem Dynamics Branch of the Fort Collins Science Center offers an interdisciplinary team of talented and creative scientists with expertise in biology, botany, ecology, geology, biogeochemistry, physical sciences, geographic information systems, and remote-sensing, for tackling complex questions about natural resources. As demand for natural resources increases, the issues facing natural resource managers, planners, policy makers, industry, and private landowners are increasing in spatial and temporal scope, often involving entire regions, multiple jurisdictions, and long timeframes. Needs for addressing these issues include (1) a better understanding of biotic and abiotic ecosystem components and their complex interactions; (2) the ability to easily monitor, assess, and visualize the spatially complex movements of animals, plants, water, and elements across highly variable landscapes; and (3) the techniques for accurately predicting both immediate and long-term responses of system components to natural and human-caused change. The overall objectives of our research are to provide the knowledge, tools, and techniques needed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, state agencies, and other stakeholders in their endeavors to meet the demand for natural resources while conserving biodiversity and ecosystem services. Ecosystem Dynamics scientists use field and laboratory research, data assimilation, and ecological modeling to understand ecosystem patterns, trends, and mechanistic processes. This information is used to predict the outcomes of changes imposed on species, habitats, landscapes, and climate across spatiotemporal scales. The products we develop include conceptual models to illustrate system structure and processes; regional baseline and integrated assessments; predictive spatial and mathematical models; literature syntheses; and frameworks or protocols for improved ecosystem monitoring, adaptive management, and program evaluation. The descriptions

  14. Intention to use and actual use of electronic information resources: further exploring Technology Acceptance Model (TAM).

    PubMed

    Tao, Donghua

    2009-11-14

    Following up a previous study that examined public health students' intention to use e-resources for completing research paper assignments, the present study proposed two models to investigate whether or not public health students actually used the e-resources they intended to use and whether or not the determinants of intention to use predict actual use of e-resources. Focus groups and pre- and post-questionnaires were used to collect data. Descriptive analysis, data screening, and Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) techniques were used for data analysis. The study found that the determinants of intention-to-use significantly predict actual use behavior. Direct impact of perceived usefulness and indirect impact of perceived ease of use to both behavior intention and actual behavior indicated the importance of ease of use at the early stage of technology acceptance. Non-significant intention-behavior relationship prompted thoughts on the measurement of actual behavior and multidimensional characteristics of the intention construct.

  15. Molecular basis of coupled protein and electron transfer dynamics of cytochrome c in biomimetic complexes.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Paggi, Damián; Martín, Diego F; DeBiase, Pablo M; Hildebrandt, Peter; Martí, Marcelo A; Murgida, Daniel H

    2010-04-28

    Direct electron transfer (ET) of redox proteins immobilized on biomimetic or biocompatible electrodes represents an active field of fundamental and applied research. In this context, several groups have reported for a variety of proteins unexpected distance dependencies of the ET rate, whose origin remains largely speculative and controversial, but appears to be a quite general phenomenon. Here we have employed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and electron pathway analyses to study the ET properties of cytochrome c (Cyt) electrostatically immobilized on Au coated by carboxyl-terminated alkylthiols. The MD simulations and concomitant binding energy calculations allow identification of preferred binding configurations of the oxidized and reduced Cyt which are established via different lysine residues and, thus, correspond to different orientations and dipole moments. Calculations of the electronic coupling matrices for the various Cyt/self-assembled monolayer (SAM) complexes indicate that the thermodynamically preferred protein orientations do not coincide with the orientations of optimum coupling. These findings demonstrate that the ET of the immobilized Cyt is controlled by an interplay between protein dynamics and tunneling probabilities. Protein dynamics exerts two level of tuning on the electronic coupling via reorientation (coarse) and low amplitude thermal fluctuations (fine). Upon operating the Au support as an electrode, electric-field-dependent alignment of the protein dipole moment becomes an additional determinant for the protein dynamics and thus for the overall ET rate. The present results provide a consistent molecular description of previous (spectro)electrochemical data and allow conclusions concerning the coupling of protein dynamics and ET of Cyt in physiological complexes.

  16. Complex internal rearrangement processes triggered by electron transfer to acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limão-Vieira, P.; Meneses, G.; Cunha, T.; Gil, A.; Calhorda, M. J.; García, G.; Ferreira da Silva, F.

    2015-09-01

    We present negative ion formation from collisions of 100 eV neutral potassium atoms with acetic acid (CH3COOH) and its deuterated analogue molecules (CH3COOD, CD3COOH). From the negative ion time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra, OH- is the main fragment detected accounting on average for more than 25% of the total anion yield. The complex internal rearrangement processes triggered by electron transfer to acetic acid have been evaluated with the help of theoretical calculations at the DFT levels explaining the fragmentation channel yielding OH-.

  17. Protein film voltammetry and co-factor electron transfer dynamics in spinach photosystem II core complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Magdaong, Nikki; Frank, Harry A; Rusling, James F

    2014-05-01

    Direct protein film voltammetry (PFV) was used to investigate the redox properties of the photosystem II (PSII) core complex from spinach. The complex was isolated using an improved protocol not used previously for PFV. The PSII core complex had high oxygen-evolving capacity and was incorporated into thin lipid and polyion films. Three well-defined reversible pairs of reduction and oxidation voltammetry peaks were observed at 4 °C in the dark. Results were similar in both types of films, indicating that the environment of the PSII-bound cofactors was not influenced by film type. Based on comparison with various control samples including Mn-depleted PSII, peaks were assigned to chlorophyll a (Chl a) (Em = -0.47 V, all vs. NHE, at pH 6), quinones (-0.12 V), and the manganese (Mn) cluster (Em = 0.18 V). PFV of purified iron heme protein cytochrome b-559 (Cyt b-559), a component of PSII, gave a partly reversible peak pair at 0.004 V that did not have a potential similar to any peaks observed from the intact PSII core complex. The closest peak in PSII to 0.004 V is the 0.18 V peak that was found to be associated with a two-electron process, and thus is inconsistent with iron heme protein voltammetry. The -0.47 V peak had a peak potential and peak potential-pH dependence similar to that found for purified Chl a incorporated into DMPC films. The midpoint potentials reported here may differ to various extents from previously reported redox titration data due to the influence of electrode double-layer effects. Heterogeneous electron transfer (hET) rate constants were estimated by theoretical fitting and digital simulations for the -0.47 and 0.18 V peaks. Data for the Chl a peaks were best fit to a one-electron model, while the peak assigned to the Mn cluster was best fit by a two-electron/one-proton model.

  18. [Characteristics of mixed association and deactivation of electron excitation in chlorophyll-pheophytin complexes].

    PubMed

    Zen'kevich, E I; Zen'kevich, T V

    1984-01-01

    The regularities of the individual and mixed association of chlorophylls (Chl a, PChl a) with pheophytin (Pheo) were investigated. The complex studies of optical activity, spectral--luminescent and energetic characteristics of aggregates were carried out in mixture of solvents aceton-water (1:49). The formation of pigment mixed associates leads to intracomplex energy transfer from Chl (or PChl) to Pheo. It is shown that the efficiencies of such process, determined by independent ways via the luminescence quenching of energy donor or the emission sensibilization of acceptor, are identical. The energy migration mechanism is the inductive resonance one in studied complexes. The main patterns of the electronic excitation energy deactivation in such systems are discussed. The obtained results are analysed taking into account the contemporary background of the role of pheophytin in the primary processes of photosynthesis.

  19. Structural Characterization of Native Proteins and Protein Complexes by Electron Ionization Dissociation-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Huilin; Sheng, Yuewei; McGee, William; Cammarata, Michael; Holden, Dustin; Loo, Joseph A

    2017-03-07

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has played an increasingly important role in the identification and structural and functional characterization of proteins. In particular, the use of tandem mass spectrometry has afforded one of the most versatile methods to acquire structural information for proteins and protein complexes. The unique nature of electron capture dissociation (ECD) for cleaving protein backbone bonds while preserving noncovalent interactions has made it especially suitable for the study of native protein structures. However, the intra- and intermolecular interactions stabilized by hydrogen bonds and salt bridges can hinder the separation of fragments even with preactivation, which has become particularly problematic for the study of large macromolecular proteins and protein complexes. Here, we describe the capabilities of another activation method, 30 eV electron ionization dissociation (EID), for the top-down MS characterization of native protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes. Rich structural information that cannot be delivered by ECD can be generated by EID. EID allowed for the comparison of the gas-phase and the solution-phase structural stability and unfolding process of human carbonic anhydrase I (HCA-I). In addition, the EID fragmentation patterns reflect the structural similarities and differences among apo-, Zn-, and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) dimers. In particular, the structural changes due to Cu-binding and a point mutation (G41D) were revealed by EID-MS. The performance of EID was also compared to that of 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD), which allowed us to explore their qualitative similarities and differences as potential valuable tools for the MS study of native proteins and protein complexes.

  20. European Social Fund in Portugal: A Complex Question for Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tome, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to review the application of the funds awarded by the European Social Fund (ESF) to Portugal, since 1986, from a human resource development (HRD) perspective. Design/methodology/approach: Several variables are analyzed: investment, absorption, people, impact of investment, evolution of skills, main programs, supply and…

  1. National Aquatic Resource Surveys: Multiple objectives and constraints lead to design complexity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency began conducting the National Aquatic resource Surveys (NARS) in 2007 with a national survey of lakes (NLA 2007) followed by rivers and streams in 2008-9 (NRSA 2008), coastal waters in 2010 (NCCA 2010) and wetlands in 2011 (NWCA). The surve...

  2. Detection and structural characterization of oxo-chromium(V)-sugar complexes by electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Sala, Luis F; González, Juan C; García, Silvia I; Frascaroli, María I; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the detection and characterization of oxo-Cr(V)-saccharide coordination compounds, produced during chromic oxidation of carbohydrates by Cr(VI) and Cr(V), using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. After an introduction into the main importance of chromium (bio)chemistry, and more specifically the oxo-chromium(V)-sugar complexes, a general overview is given of the current state-of-the-art EPR techniques. The next step reviews which types of EPR spectroscopy are currently applied to oxo-Cr(V) complexes, and what information about these systems can be gained from such experiments. The advantages and pitfalls of the different approaches are discussed, and it is shown that the potential of high-field and pulsed EPR techniques is as yet still largely unexploited in the field of oxo-Cr(V) complexes. Subsequently, the discussion focuses on the analysis of oxo-Cr(V) complexes of different types of sugars and the implications of the results in terms of understanding chromium (bio)chemistry.

  3. On the electronic structure of nitro-substituted bipyridines and their platinum complexes.

    PubMed

    Murray, Paul R; Crawford, Stephen; Dawson, Alice; Delf, Alexander; Findlay, Calum; Jack, Lorna; McInnes, Eric J L; Al-Musharafi, Salma; Nichol, Gary S; Oswald, Iain; Yellowlees, Lesley J

    2012-01-07

    We report the preparation and electrochemical studies of a systematic series of mono- and di-nitro-substituted 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) compounds [x-NO(2)-bipy (x = 3,4) and x,x'-(NO(2))(2)-bipy (x,x' = 3, 4, 5)] and their complexes with platinum(II), [Pt(x-NO(2)-bipy)Cl(2)] and [Pt(x,x'-(NO(2))(2)-bipy)Cl(2)]. The effect of the number and substitution pattern of the nitro groups on the low-lying acceptor molecular orbitals (involved in charge transfer transitions) is probed by in situ UV/Vis/NIR and EPR spectroelectrochemical methods, supported by DFT calculations. The LUMOs of x-NO(2)-bipy (x = 3-5) are largely localised on the NO(2)-pyridyl moiety; this is also true of their {PtCl(2)} complexes but with a small but significant shift of electron density from the nitro groups. The LUMOs of x,x'-(NO(2))(2)-bipy with x = 3 and 5 are delocalised over both NO(2)-pyridyl rings, but for 4,4'-(NO(2))(2)-bipy is localised on a single NO(2)-pyridyl ring. In all cases the LUMO of the [Pt(x,x'-(NO(2))(2)-bipy)Cl(2)] complexes is delocalised over both nitro-pyridyl rings. For all complexes, the 4(4') derivatives allows greatest overlap with metal valence orbitals in the LUMO.

  4. Structural and mutational studies of an electron transfer complex of maize sulfite reductase and ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Yaen; Nakayama, Masato; Toyota, Hiroshi; Kurisu, Genji; Hase, Toshiharu

    2016-08-01

    The structure of the complex of maize sulfite reductase (SiR) and ferredoxin (Fd) has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Co-crystals of the two proteins prepared under different conditions were subjected to the diffraction analysis and three possible structures of the complex were solved. Although topological relationship of SiR and Fd varied in each of the structures, two characteristics common to all structures were found in the pattern of protein-protein interactions and positional arrangements of redox centres; (i) a few negative residues of Fd contact with a narrow area of SiR with positive electrostatic surface potential and (ii) [2Fe-2S] cluster of Fd and [4Fe-4S] cluster of SiR are in a close proximity with the shortest distance around 12 Å. Mutational analysis of a total of seven basic residues of SiR distributed widely at the interface of the complex showed their importance for supporting an efficient Fd-dependent activity and a strong physical binding to Fd. These combined results suggest that the productive electron transfer complex of SiR and Fd could be formed through multiple processes of the electrostatic intermolecular interaction and this implication is discussed in terms of the multi-functionality of Fd in various redox metabolisms.

  5. Supporting Learning and Information Sharing in Natural Resource Management with Technologies for Electronic Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alem, Leila; McLean, Alistair

    2005-01-01

    Community participation is central to achieving sustainable natural resource management. A prerequisite to informed participation is that community and stakeholder groups have access to different knowledge sources, are more closely attuned to the different issues and viewpoints, and are sufficiently equipped to understand and maybe resolve complex…

  6. Helping Patrons Find Locally Held Electronic Resources: An Interlibrary Loan Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The University of North Texas Libraries provide extensive online access to academic journals through major vendor databases. As illustrated by interlibrary loan borrowing requests for items held in our databases, patrons often have difficulty navigating the available resources. In this study, the Interlibrary Loan staff used data gathered from the…

  7. QR Codes as Finding Aides: Linking Electronic and Print Library Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Danielle; Schneidewind, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    As part of a focused, methodical, and evaluative approach to emerging technologies, QR codes are one of many new technologies being used by the UC Irvine Libraries. QR codes provide simple connections between print and virtual resources. In summer 2010, a small task force began to investigate how QR codes could be used to provide information and…

  8. MendelWeb: An Electronic Science/Math/History Resource for the WWW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumberg, Roger B.

    This paper describes a hypermedia resource, called MendelWeb that integrates elementary biology, discrete mathematics, and the history of science. MendelWeb is constructed from Gregor Menders 1865 paper, "Experiments in Plant Hybridization". An English translation of Mendel's paper, which is considered to mark the birth of classical and…

  9. Electronic Resources for Youth Services: A Print Bibliography and Web Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amey, Larry; Segal, Erez

    1996-01-01

    This article evaluates 57 World Wide Web sites related to children's literature and youth-oriented library services, in categories including award-winning books; book reviews; reading and storytelling; writing resources; online children's literature; educational entertainment; and authors, publishers, and booksellers. Also included is information…

  10. Synthesis, spectroscopic (electronic, IR, NMR and ESR) and theoretical studies of transition metal complexes with some unsymmetrical Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vinod P.; Singh, Shweta; Singh, Divya P.; Tiwari, K.; Mishra, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Two unsymmetrical Schiff bases, glyoxal salicylaldehyde oxalic acid dihydrazone (gsodh) and glyoxal salicylaldehyde malonic acid dihydrazone (gsmdh) and their Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been synthesized. The structures of metal complexes are elucidated on the basis of elemental analyses, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements, electronic, ESR, IR and NMR (1H and 13C) spectral studies. Both ligands show monobasic tetra-dentate behaviour, bonding through CO, two CN and a phenolate group. The electronic spectral studies in solid state indicate a square planar geometry for Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes and a tetrahedral geometry for Co(II) complexes. However, Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes adopt octahedral geometry in DMSO solution. The ESR spectra of Cu(II) complexes in DMSO solution at 77 K predict an elongated tetragonal distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion and presence of unpaired electron in d orbital. Further, the structures of ligands and their Ni(II) complexes have been satisfactorily modelled by calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). The electronic spectra of Ni(II) complexes are also analyzed in depth with the help of time dependent-DFT (TD-DFT). The theoretical analyses of electronic structure and molecular orbitals have demonstrated that the high-energy absorption bands are M → L charge transfer and low energy transitions are d-d transitions.

  11. Mechanistic Study on Electron Capture Dissociation of the Oligosaccharide-Mg2+ Complex

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yiqun; Pu, Yi; Yu, Xiang; Costello, Catherine E.; Lin, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) has shown great potential in structural characterization of glycans. However, our current understanding of the glycan ECD process is inadequate for accurate interpretation of the complex glycan ECD spectra. Here, we present the first comprehensive theoretical investigation on the ECD fragmentation behavior of metal-adducted glycans, using the cellobiose-Mg2+ complex as the model system. Molecular dynamics simulation was carried out to determine the typical glycan-Mg2+ binding patterns and the lowest-energy conformer identified was used as the initial geometry for density functional theory-based theoretical modeling. It was found that the electron is preferentially captured by Mg2+ and the resultant Mg+• can abstract a hydroxyl group from the glycan moiety to form a carbon radical. Subsequent radical migration and α-cleavage(s) result in the formation of a variety of product ions. The proposed hydroxyl abstraction mechanism correlates well with the major features in the ECD spectrum of the Mg2+-adducted cellohexaose. The mechanism presented here also predicts the presence of secondary, radical-induced fragmentation pathways. These secondary fragment ions could be misinterpreted, leading to erroneous structural determination. The present study highlights an urgent need for continuing investigation of the glycan ECD mechanism, which is imperative for successful development of bioinformatics tools that can take advantage of the rich structural information provided by ECD of metal-adducted glycans. PMID:24845360

  12. The electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides: a complex band structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczesniak, Dominik

    Recently, monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted much attention due to their potential use in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of group-VIB transition metal dichalcogenides (MX2 , where M=Mo, W; X=S, Se, Te) are particularly important. Herein, new insight into these properties is presented by studying the complex band structures (CBS's) of MX2 monolayers while accounting for spin-orbit coupling effects. By using the symmetry-based tight-binding model a nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problem for CBS's is obtained. An efficient method for solving such class of problems is presented and gives a complete set of physically relevant solutions. Next, these solutions are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states present not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gaps, which describe the tunneling currents in the MX2 materials. The importance of CBS's and tunneling currents is demonstrated by the analysis of the quantum transport across MX2 monolayers within phase field matching theory. Present work has been prepared within the Qatar Energy and Environment Research Institute (QEERI) grand challenge ATHLOC project (Project No. QEERI- GC-3008).

  13. Pure electronic metal-insulator transition at the interface of complex oxides

    DOE PAGES

    Meyers, D.; Liu, Jian; Freeland, J. W.; ...

    2016-06-21

    We observed complex materials in electronic phases and transitions between them often involve coupling between many degrees of freedom whose entanglement convolutes understanding of the instigating mechanism. Metal-insulator transitions are one such problem where coupling to the structural, orbital, charge, and magnetic order parameters frequently obscures the underlying physics. We demonstrate a way to unravel this conundrum by heterostructuring a prototypical multi-ordered complex oxide NdNiO3 in ultra thin geometry, which preserves the metal-to-insulator transition and bulk-like magnetic order parameter, but entirely suppresses the symmetry lowering and long-range charge order parameter. Furthermore, these findings illustrate the utility of heterointerfaces as amore » powerful method for removing competing order parameters to gain greater insight into the nature of the transition, here revealing that the magnetic order generates the transition independently, leading to an exceptionally rare purely electronic metal-insulator transition with no symmetry change.« less

  14. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) ytterbium: Electron-transfer reactions with organotransition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, P.T.

    1991-11-01

    The divalent lanthanide complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb, reacts with methylcopper to produce the base-free, ytterbium-methyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe. This product forms a asymmetric, methyl-bridged dimer in the solid state. The bulky alkyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, displays similar chemistry to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe, but at a reduced reaction rate due to the limited accessibility of the metal in (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. Copper and silver halide salts react with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V to produce the trivalent halide derivatives, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VX (X + F, Cl, Br, I). The chloride complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VCl, reacts with lithium reagents to form the phenyl and borohydride species. Nitrous oxide transfers an oxygen atom to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V producing the vanadium-oxo complex, (Me{sub 5}Ce{sub 5}){sub 2}VO. The trivalent titanium species, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}TiX (X = Cl, Br, Me, BH{sub 4}), form bimetallic coordination complexes with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb. The magnetic behavior of the products indicates that electron transfer has not occurred. The solid state structures of the chloride and bromide complexes show unusual bend angles for the halide bridges between ytterbium and titanium. A model based on frontier orbital theory has been proposed to account for the bending behavior in these species. The bimetallic methyl complex contains a linear methyl bridge between ytterbium and titanium.

  15. Control of electronic and magnetic coupling via bridging ligand geometry in a bimetallic ytterbocene complex.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Christin N; Scott, Brian L; Martin, Richard L; Thompson, Joe D; Morris, David E; John, Kevin D

    2007-06-11

    The ligand 1-methyl-3,5-bis(2,2':6',2' '-terpyridin-4'-yl)benzene has been employed in the synthesis of a new bimetallic ytterbocene complex [(Cp*)2Yb](1-methyl-3,5-bis(2,2':6',2' '-terpyridin-4'-yl)benzene)[Yb(Cp*)2] (1) and the doubly oxidized congener [1]2+ in an attempt to determine the impact of the bridging ligand geometry on the magnetic/electronic properties as compared to the previously reported 1,4-analog [(Cp*)2Yb](1,4-di(terpyridyl)benzene)[Yb(Cp*)2] (2). Electrochemical, electronic, and magnetic data provide compelling evidence that the 1,3-geometry associated with the bridging ligand of 1 has done an effective job of inhibiting electronic communication between metal centers and magnetic coupling of spin carriers at room temperature as compared to 2. In fact, the physical data associated with 1 are quite similar to those reported for the monometallic analog (Cp*)2Yb(tpy) (3). In particular, the f-f profile of [1]2+ is nearly identical to that of [3]+ in its spectral features but with an almost exact doubling of the intensities. Further, the electronic coupling between metal centers as manifested in the potential separation between metal-based reduction waves has for the first time in these bimetallic ytterbocene complexes been found to go to zero for 1. Thus, the linkage isomerism at the phenyl coupling unit has induced a change in the ground-state electronic configuration from the singlet dianion-bridged (4f)13(pi*)2(4f)13 state found in 2 to the diradical-bridged (4f)13(piA*)1(piB*)1(4f)13 state in 1. This diradical formulation on the bridging ligand in 1 is supported by DFT calculations for the uncomplexed doubly reduced ligand that indicate the ground-state configuration is a singlet diradical state with the triplet-diradical state lying to slightly higher energy. Magnetic characterization of 1 is most consistent with the behavior previously observed for monometallic analogs such as 3, and there is no evidence of long-range magnetic ordering such

  16. Coordination Sphere Tuning of the Electron Transfer Dissociation Behavior of Cu(II)-Peptide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jia; Vachet, Richard W.

    2012-02-01

    In contrast to previous electron capture dissociation (ECD) studies, we find that electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of Cu(II)-peptide complexes can generate c- and z-type product ions when the peptide has a sufficient number of strongly coordinating residues. Double-resonance experiments, ion-molecule reactions, and collision-induced dissociation (CID) prove that the c and z product ions are formed via typical radical pathways without the associated reduction of Cu(II), despite the high second ionization energy of Cu. A positive correlation between the number of Cu(II) binding groups in the peptide sequence and the extent of c and z ion formation was also observed. This trend is rationalized by considering that the recombination energy of Cu(II) can be lowered by strong binding ligands to an extent that enables electron transfer to non-Cu sites (e.g., protonation sites) to compete with Cu(II) reduction, thereby generating c/z ions in a manner similar to that observed for protonated (i.e., nonmetalated) peptides.

  17. Three-Dimensional Imaging of Complex Molecular Electronic States via Atomic Manipulation Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Eric; Rastawicki, Dominik; Contryman, Alex; Sun, Yan; Reuter, Dylan; Manoharan, Hari

    2015-03-01

    We describe a method based on STM atomic manipulation for experimentally capturing the complete three-dimensional electronic structure of complex molecules. Using techniques we have recently developed for assembling molecular graphene and related materials, we vary specific site potentials, intersite hopping amplitudes, and Fermi energy in 2D nanostructures which when wrapped into a 3D container represent a new probe molecule. Here we present the design methods and analyses of a number of such molecules, focusing on those containing rotational symmetry. We show how various types of fullerenes, of interest due to their electronic and vibrational properties, can be unwrapped on a 2D surface, reprogrammed, and rewrapped to 3D. Examples of the unwrapping methods include cutting selected bonds in order to sever adjacent faces or sites. Analysis of the local density of states for 2D correspondents to fullerenes yields the presence of peaks at the highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, with an energy gap between these levels. The replication of these properties of fullerenes in 2D space serves as evidence of the significant potential of STM assembly and spectroscopy in studying the applicability of exotic 3D molecules in electronics.

  18. Dynamic Localization of Electronic Excitation in Photosynthetic Complexes Revealed with Chiral Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved ultrafast optical probes of chiral dynamics provide a new window allowing us to explore how interactions with such structured environments drive electronic dynamics. Incorporating optical activity into time-resolved spectroscopies has proven challenging due to the small signal and large achiral background. Here, we demonstrate that two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy can be adapted to detect chiral signals and that these signals reveal how excitations delocalize and contract following excitation. We dynamically probe the evolution of chiral electronic structure in the light harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria following photoexcitation by creating a chiral two-dimensional mapping. The dynamics of the chiral two-dimensional signal directly reports on changes in the degree of delocalization of the excitonic state following photoexcitation. The mechanism of energy transfer in this system may enhance transfer probability due to the coherent coupling among chromophores while suppressing fluorescence that arises from populating delocalized states. This generally applicable spectroscopy will provide an incisive tool to probe ultrafast transient molecular fluctuations that are obscured in non-chiral experiments. PMID:24504144

  19. Framework for Smart Electronic Health Record-Linked Predictive Models to Optimize Care for Complex Digestive Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0133 TITLE: Framework for Smart Electronic Health...NUMBER Framework for Smart Electronic Health Record-Linked Predictive Models to Optimize Care for Complex Digestive Diseases 5b. GRANT NUMBER...an intelligent workspace , by displaying annotation forms and de-identified reports with the same view, automatic report queuing and providing easy

  20. Electronic load as part of the test complex of the power processing unit of electric and plasma propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubov, S. V.; Soldatov, A. I.

    2017-02-01

    This article provides the advantages and technical solutions for the use of electronic loads as part of a testing complex of power and management systems of electric and plasma propulsion of three types. The paper shows the parameters that were applied to select the electronic loads and describes their functionality.

  1. Qualitative Analysis of Association of Research Libraries' E-Metrics Participant Feedback about the Evolution of Measures for Networked Electronic Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha; Giersch, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    The Association of Research Libraries' (ARL) E-Metrics Project is an ongoing effort to develop new measures that describe and measure networked electronic resources and also to underscore the need for measuring the value of such resources. This article presents results from an ongoing iterative qualitative study with the following goals: (a) to…

  2. Electron-deficient ruthenium and osmium complexes: From 14-electron species to C-F bond cleavage reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dejian

    1999-12-01

    Stepwise removal of the fluoride from RuRF(CO)L2 gives [RuR(CO)L 2]BAr'4 (L = PtBu 2Me, R = H, CH3, Ph, Ar' = 3,5- bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl). This 14-electron cation has a saw-horse shape with two bulky L trans and CO and R cis. The two vacant sites are in fact occupied weakly by C-H bonds from the phosphines. [RuH(CO)L2] + has a strong Lewis acidic but weakened π- basic Ru center as it is illustrated by its reactivity pattern towards olefins and alkynes. While organic fluorocarbon is notorious for its inertness due to the strong C-F bond, the α-C-F bond of a transition metal fluorocarbyl complex is activated. The chemistry in Chapter 3 illustrates this argument. Attempts to replace fluoride of MHF(CO)L2 with CF3 using Me 3SiCF3 do not give MH(CF3)(CO)L2, instead, M[HF(CF2)(CO)L2 is isolated. Fast equilibrium exists between RuHF(CF2)(CO)L2 and RuH(CF3)(CO)L 2 but not for OsHF(CF2)(CO)L2, which is converted to OsF2(CFH)(CO)L2 upon heating. In contrast, isomerization of RuHF(CF2)(CO)L2 gives RUF(CF2H)(CO)L 2.

  3. Stereochemical Properties of Multidentate Nitrogen Donor Ligands and Their Copper Complexes by Electronic CD and DFT.

    PubMed

    Poopari, Mohammad Reza; Dezhahang, Zahra; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-07-01

    UV-Vis and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectroscopy, complemented with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, were used to elucidate the structural diversities of three multidentate nitrogen donor ligands and two associated copper complexes in solution directly. The three chiral salen ligands all consist of trans-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine as a chiral scaffold and also of pyridine rings as chromophores, differing only in the linking groups between the two functional groups mentioned above. Very different ECD intensities and somewhat different ECD patterns were observed for these ligands and satisfactorily interpreted theoretically. For the geometry optimization and spectral simulation of the open-shell metal complexes, the LANL2DZ basis set with effective core potential for the Cu and Cl atoms and pure cc-pVTZ for the rest of the atoms was utilized. The performance of the same calculations with the polarization functions (f,g) from the cc-pVTZ basis added to the LANL2DZ basis was compared. While the three ligands exhibit different conformational flexibility, the associated copper complexes show great rigidity imposed by the metal-ligand coordination, taking on a single structure in each case. In addition, dispersion interactions were shown to change the conformational stability ordering of the ligands noticeably and to exert considerable influence on the simulated UV-Vis and ECD spectra. Chirality 28:545-555, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. First Principles Study of Electronic Structure of BF3-NH3 Complex and Associated Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Archana; Mahanti, Mahendra K.; Pink, Roger

    2005-03-01

    BF3 is a planar molecule with three-fold symmetry which is widely used to promote various organic reactions such as Friedel-Crafts acylations and alkylations. To obtain a thorough understanding of the mechanisms for this role of BF3, we are studying from first-principles the electronic structures of BF3 and its complexes with NH3. The procedure used is the first principles Hartree-Fock-Roothaan procedure combined with many body perturbation theory. The results for BF3-NH3 system will be reported, such as the binding energy and equilibrium geometry of the complex, the nature of the B-N bond and the changes in the B-F and N-H bond strengths on complex formation. The Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions of the ^19F* (spin 5/2), ^14N, ^11B, and ^2H will be presented and compared with available experimental data. (*) Present Address: Dept. of Physics, Uppsala University, Sweden (**) Also: Dept of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida

  5. Do-It-Yourself Printing: An Introduction to Electronic Publishing. Curriculum and Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, W. Tad

    This guide contains a proposed curriculum for an introductory secondary and postsecondary course in electronic publishing. The course is designed to allow students to develop technical competence and knowledge in a real-life, practical environment that fosters the development of problem-solving, decision-making, and creativity. The teacher…

  6. Bringing Up Gopher: Access to Local & Remote Electronic Resources for University Library Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Melvin Marlo; And Others

    Some of the administrative and organizational issues in creating a gopher, specifically a library gopher for university libraries, are discussed. In 1993 the Electronic Collections Task Force of the New Mexico State University library administration began to develop a library-based gopher system that would enable users to have unlimited access to…

  7. Electronic Resources in a Next-Generation Catalog: The Case of WorldCat Local

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadle, Steve

    2009-01-01

    In April 2007, the University of Washington Libraries debuted WorldCat Local (WCL), a localized version of the WorldCat database that interoperates with a library's integrated library system and fulfillment services to provide a single-search interface for a library's physical and electronic content. This brief will describe how WCL incorporates a…

  8. Data Needs and Use of Electronic Resources and Services at Academic Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Wonsik; McClure, Charles R.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the ARL (Association of Research Libraries) E-Metrics project that is investigating problems related to collecting and using data for electronic materials and services. Describes a survey of libraries that focused on data collection activities and showed a lack of preparation as well as a lack of consistent statistics from database…

  9. Eavesdropping on Electronic Guidebooks: Observing Learning Resources in Shared Listening Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Allison; Aoki, Paul M.; Grinter, Rebecca E.; Hurst, Amy; Szymanski, Margaret H.; Thornton, James D.

    This paper describes an electronic guidebook, "Sotto Voce," that enables visitors to share audio information by eavesdropping on each others guidebook activity. The first section discusses the design and implementation of the guidebook device, key aspects of its user interface, the design goals for the audio environment, the eavesdropping…

  10. Searching Semantic Resources for Complex Selectional Restrictions to Support Verb Sense Disambiguation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Resnik discussed a probabilistic model that captures the co-occurrence behavior of predicates and conceptual classes in a taxonomy for noun sense...Information Systems (FOIS-2001). [3] Fellbaum, Christiane. “WordNet: An electronic lexical database,” s.l. : MIT Press, 1998. [4] Resnik , Phillip...International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence IJCAI󈧋. [12] Resnik , Philip, “Semantic similarity in a taxonomy: An information-based measure and

  11. Enhanced method for multiscale wind simulations over complex terrain for wind resource assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Maradiaga, A.; Benoit, R.; Masson, C.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the natural variability of the wind, it is necessary to conduct thorough wind resource assessments to determine how much energy can be extracted at a given site. Lately, important advancements have been achieved in numerical methods of multiscale models used for high resolution wind simulations over steep topography. As a contribution to this effort, an enhanced numerical method was devised in the mesoscale compressible community (MC2) model of the Meteorological Service of Canada, adapting a new semi-implicit scheme with its imbedded large-eddy simulation (LES) capability for mountainous terrain. This implementation has been verified by simulating the neutrally stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat terrain and a Gaussian ridge. These preliminary results indicate that the enhanced MC2-LES model reproduces efficiently the results reported by other researchers who use similar models with more sophisticated sub-grid scale turbulence schemes. The proposed multiscale method also provides a new wind initialization scheme and additional utilities to improve numerical accuracy and stability. The resulting model can be used to assess the wind resource at meso- and micro-scales, reducing significantly the wind speed overestimation in mountainous areas.

  12. (Comparison of group transfer, inner sphere and outer sphere electron transfer mechanisms of organometallic complexes: Progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, J.

    1990-01-01

    We have constructed an infrared stopped-flow spectrophotometer and initiated a study of the mechanisms of reactions that involve a change in the oxidation state of organometallic complexes. In this summary we highlight our results on reactions (1) that formally involve exchange of a charged species between two metal carbonyl anions, (2) that involve addition of an electron to, or removal of an electron from organometallic complexes that contain a metal-metal bond, and (3) between coordination complexes and metal carbonyl anions.

  13. [Comparison of group transfer, inner sphere and outer sphere electron transfer mechanisms of organometallic complexes: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, J.

    1990-12-31

    We have constructed an infrared stopped-flow spectrophotometer and initiated a study of the mechanisms of reactions that involve a change in the oxidation state of organometallic complexes. In this summary we highlight our results on reactions (1) that formally involve exchange of a charged species between two metal carbonyl anions, (2) that involve addition of an electron to, or removal of an electron from organometallic complexes that contain a metal-metal bond, and (3) between coordination complexes and metal carbonyl anions.

  14. Understanding and engineering two-dimensional electron gases in complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjaalie, Lars Gunnar Tangen

    The next generation of electronic devices faces the challenge of adequately containing and controlling extremely high charge densities within structures of nanometer dimensions. Atomic-scale transistors must be thin and be able to control extremely high charge densities (>10e13/cm. 2). Silicon devicestypically have two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) densities around 10e12/cm. 2.Nitride-based devices can sustain densities an order of magnitude higher. The "complex oxides" have recently emerged as an attractive materials system to support these developments. The demonstration of a 2DEG at the SrTiO 3/LaAlO3 interface has triggered an avalanche of research, including the unprecedentedly high density of 3x10e14/cm. 2 at SrTiO3/GdTiO3and SrTiO3/SmTiO3 interfaces. Metal-insulator (Mott) transitions that are inherent to some of these complex oxides could offer even greater prospects for enhanced functionality or novel device concepts. The materials and heterostructures that have been explored to date are clearly only a small subset of the vast number of materials combinations that could lead to interesting phenomena. In this work we use first-principles methods to build greater understanding of the interface phenomena, so that searches can be better informed and more focused. We also develop a set of criteria that the materials and their heterostructures should satisfy to develop a high-performance 2DEG-based device. We focus in particular on the band alignment, calculating it for a variety of different potential materials. Next, we study GdTiO3/SrTiO3/GdTiO3 heterostructures in depth, where each interface contributes excess electrons into the SrTiO3. We calculate the 2DEG formation for a superlattice containing six layers of SrTiO3, and compare with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy results. Together, the experimental and theoretical results conclusively show that the 2DEG results from the interface itself, and does not originate from a secondary source such as

  15. Minorities in the Aquatic Sciences: Establishing a Database and Electronic Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, C. S.

    2001-05-01

    This new project builds on existing undergraduate programs and emerging electronic technologies to enhance the visibility, networking and professional success of minorites across the aquatic sciences. Specific components include: 1) Centralized database to identify, characterize and eventually track minority undergraduate students,graduate students, and recent graduates interested in aquatic science careers. 2) Website dedicated to minority issues, including an on-line Student Registry to introduce minority scholars to the larger community. 3) Electronic distribution list to creata a "virtual community" of minority aquatic science scholars and a link between students and the larger community. The program will ultimately establish a coherent infrastructure to facilitate career development of underrepresented groups and establish networks within and beyond the minority aquatic science community. Work to date and future plans will be presented, and input from the community is welcomed.

  16. Barrier-Free Intermolecular Proton Transfer Induced by Excess Electron Attachment to the Complex of Alanine with Uracil

    SciTech Connect

    Dabkowska, Iwona; Rak, Janusz; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Nilles, J.M.; Stokes, Sarah; Bowen, Kit H.

    2004-04-01

    The photoelectron spectrum of the uracil-alanine anionic complex (UA)- has been recorded with 2.540 eV photons. This spectrum reveals a broad feature with a maximum between 1.6-2.1 eV. The vertical electron detachment energy is too large to be attributed to an (UA)- anionic complex in which an intact uracil anion is solvated by alanine, or vice versa. The neutral and anionic complexes of uracil and alanine were studied at the B3LYP and second order Moeller-Plesset level of theory with 6-31++G** basis sets. The neutral complexes form cyclic hydrogen bonds and the three most stable neutral complexes are bound by 0.72, 0.61 and 0.57 eV. The electron hole in complexes of uracil with alaninie is localized on uracil, but the formation of a complex with alanine strongly modulates the vertical ionization energy of uracil. The theoretical results indicate that the excess electron in (UA)- occupies a p* orbital localized on uracil. The excess electron attachment to the complex can induce a barrier-free proton transfer (BFPT) from the carboxylic group of alanine to the O8 atom of uracil. As a result, the four most stable structures of the uracil-alanine anionic complex can be characterized as the neutral radical of hydrogenated uracil solvated by the anion of deprotonated alanine. Our current results for the anionic complex of uracil with alanine are similar to our previous results for the anion of uracil with glycine [Eur. Phys. J. D 20, 431 (2002)], and together they indicate that the BFPT process is not very sensitive to the nature of the amino acid's hydrophobic residual group. The BFPT to the O8 atom of uracil may be relevant to the damage suffered by nucleic acid bases due to exposure to low energy electrons.

  17. Internet and electronic resources for inflammatory bowel disease: a primer for providers and patients.

    PubMed

    Fortinsky, Kyle J; Fournier, Marc R; Benchimol, Eric I

    2012-06-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly turning to the Internet to research their condition and engage in discourse on their experiences. This has resulted in new dynamics in the relationship between providers and their patients, with misinformation and advertising potentially presenting barriers to the cooperative patient-provider partnership. This article addresses important issues of online IBD-related health information and social media activity, such as quality, reliability, objectivity, and privacy. We reviewed the medical literature on the quality of online information provided to IBD patients, and summarized the most commonly accessed Websites related to IBD. We also assessed the activity on popular social media sites (such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube), and evaluated currently available applications for use by IBD patients and providers on mobile phones and tablets. Through our review of the literature and currently available resources, we developed a list of recommended online resources to strengthen patient participation in their care by providing reliable, comprehensive educational material.

  18. Development of a complex groundwater model to assess the relation among groundwater resource exploitation, seawater intrusion and land subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsi Ting, Fang; Yih Chi, Tan; Chen, Jhong Bing

    2016-04-01

    The land subsidence, which is usually irreversible, in Taiwan Pintung Plain occurred due to groundwater overexploitation. Many of the land subsidence areas in Taiwan are located in coastal area. It could not only result in homeland loss, but also vulnerability to flooding because the function of drainage system and sea wall are weakened for the lowered ground surface. Groundwater salinization and seawater intrusion could happen more easily as well. This research focuses on grasping the trend of environmental change due to the damage and impact from inappropriate development of aquaculture in the last decades. The main task is developing the artificial neural networks (ANNs) and complex numerical model for conjunctive use of surface and groundwater which is composed of a few modules such as land use, land subsidence, contamination transportation and etc. An approach based on self-organizing map (SOM) is proposed to delineate groundwater recharge zones. Several topics will be studied such as coupling of surface water and groundwater modeling, assessing the benefit of improving groundwater resources by recharge, identifying the improper usage of groundwater resources, and investigating the effect of over-pumping on land subsidence in different depth. In addition, a complete plan for managing both the flooding and water resources will be instituted by scheming non-engineering adaptation strategies for homeland planning, ex. controlling pumping behavior in area vulnerable to land subsidence and increasing groundwater recharge.

  19. Magnetic, electronic and electrochemical studies of mono and binuclear Cu(II) complexes using novel macrocyclic ligands.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nidhi; Gupta, Rachna; Chandra, Sulekh; Bawa, S S

    2005-04-01

    A series of new mono and binuclear copper (II) complexes [Cul]X(2)and [Cu(2)lX(2)] where 1 = L(1), L(2) and L(3) are the macrocyclic ligands. In mononuclear complexes the geometry of Cu(II) ion is distorted squareplanar and in binuclear complexes the geometry of Cu(II) is tetragonal. The synthesized complexes were characterized by spectroscopic (IR,UV-vis and ESR) techniques. Electrochemical studies of the complexes reveals that all the mononuclear Cu(II) complexes show a single quasireversible one-electron transfer reduction wave (E(pc) = -0.76 to -0.84V) and the binuclear complexes show two quasireversible one electron transfer reduction waves (E(pc)(1) = -0.86 to -1.01V, E(pc)(2) = -1.11 to -1.43V) in cathodic region. The ESR spectra of mononuclear complexes show four lines with nuclear hyperfine splittings with the observed g(11) values in the ranges 2.20-2.28, g( perpendicular) = 2.01-2.06 and A(11) = 125-273. The binuclear complexes show a broad ESR spectra with g = 2.10-2.11. The room temperature magnetic moment values for the mononuclear complexes are in the range [mu(eff) = 1.70-1.72BM] and for the binuclear complexes the range is [mu(eff) = 1.46-1.59BM].

  20. Accessory subunit NUYM (NDUFS4) is required for stability of the electron input module and activity of mitochondrial complex I.

    PubMed

    Kahlhöfer, Flora; Kmita, Katarzyna; Wittig, Ilka; Zwicker, Klaus; Zickermann, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is an intricate 1MDa membrane protein complex with a central role in aerobic energy metabolism. The minimal form of complex I consists of fourteen central subunits that are conserved from bacteria to man. In addition, eukaryotic complex I comprises some 30 accessory subunits of largely unknown function. The gene for the accessory NDUFS4 subunit of human complex I is a hot spot for fatal pathogenic mutations in humans. We have deleted the gene for the orthologous NUYM subunit in the aerobic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, an established model system to study eukaryotic complex I and complex I linked diseases. We observed assembly of complex I which lacked only subunit NUYM and retained weak interaction with assembly factor N7BML (human NDUFAF2). Absence of NUYM caused distortion of iron sulfur clusters of the electron input domain leading to decreased complex I activity and increased release of reactive oxygen species. We conclude that NUYM has an important stabilizing function for the electron input module of complex I and is essential for proper complex I function.

  1. Electron and nuclear dynamics in many-electron atoms, molecules and chlorophyll-protein complexes: a review.

    PubMed

    Shuvalov, Vladimir A

    2007-06-01

    It has been shown [V.A. Shuvalov, Quantum dynamics of electrons in many-electron atoms of biologically important compounds, Biochemistry (Mosc.) 68 (2003) 1333-1354; V.A. Shuvalov, Quantum dynamics of electrons in atoms of biologically important molecules, Uspekhi biologicheskoi khimii, (Pushchino) 44 (2004) 79-108] that the orbit angular momentum L of each electron in many-electron atoms is L=mVr=nPlanck's and similar to L for one-electron atom suggested by N. Bohr. It has been found that for an atom with N electrons the total electron energy equation E=-(Z(eff))(2)e(4)m/(2n(2)Planck's(2)N) is more appropriate for energy calculation than standard quantum mechanical expressions. It means that the value of L of each electron is independent of the presence of other electrons in an atom and correlates well to the properties of virtual photons emitted by the nucleus and creating a trap for electrons. The energies for elements of the 1st up to the 5th rows and their ions (total amount 240) of Mendeleev' Periodical table were calculated consistent with the experimental data (deviations in average were 5 x 10(-3)). The obtained equations can be used for electron dynamics calculations in molecules. For H(2) and H(2)(+) the interference of electron-photon orbits between the atoms determines the distances between the nuclei which are in agreement with the experimental values. The formation of resonance electron-photon orbit in molecules with the conjugated bonds, including chlorophyll-like molecules, appears to form a resonance trap for an electron with E values close to experimental data. Two mechanisms were suggested for non-barrier primary charge separation in reaction centers (RCs) of photosynthetic bacteria and green plants by using the idea of electron-photon orbit interference between the two molecules. Both mechanisms are connected to formation of the exciplexes of chlorophyll-like molecules. The first one includes some nuclear motion before exciplex formation, the

  2. Complexity Analysis and Algorithms for Optimal Resource Allocation in Wireless Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    independent orthogonal signaling such as OFDM . The general formulation will exploit the concept of ‘interference alignment’ which is known to provide...substantial rate gain over OFDM signalling for general interference channels. We have successfully analyzed the complexity to characterize the optimal...DSM problem formulation which allows correlated signaling rather than being restricted to the conventional independent orthogonal signaling such as OFDM

  3. Rare earth element mineralogy, geochemistry, and preliminary resource assessment of the Khanneshin carbonatite complex, Helmand Province, Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, Robert D.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Peters, Stephen G.; Buttleman, Kim P.

    2011-01-01

    There is increased concern about the future availability of rare earth elements (REE) because of China's dominance as the supplier of more than 95 percent of world REE output, their decision to restrict exports of rare earth products, and the rapid increase in world-wide consumption of rare earth product. As a result, countries such as the United States, Japan, and member nations of the European Union face a future of tight supplies and high prices for rare earth products unless other sources of REE are found and developed (Long and others, 2010; U.S. Geological Survey, 2011, p. 128-129, 184-185). We report and describe a significant new deposit of light rare earth elements (LREE), estimated at 1 Mt, within the Khanneshin carbonatite complex of south Afghanistan. The potential resource is located in a remote and rugged part of the igneous complex in a region previously identified by Soviet geologists in the 1970s. This report reviews the geologic setting of LREE deposit, presents new geochemical data documenting the grade of LREE mineralization, briefly describes the mineralogy and mineralogical associations of the deposit, and presents a preliminary estimate of LREE resources based on our current understanding of the geology.

  4. Faster Interprotein Electron Transfer in a [Myoglobin, b5] Complex with a Redesigned Interface

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Peng; Nocek, Judith M.; Vura-Weis, Josh; Lockard, Jenny V.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Hoffman, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct measurements of electron transfer (ET) within a protein-protein complex with a redesigned interface formed by physiological partner proteins myoglobin (Mb) and cytochrome b5 (b5) reveal interprotein ET rates comparable to those observed within the photosynthetic reaction center. Brownian dynamics simulations show that Mb in which three surface acid residues are mutated to lysine binds b5 in an ensemble of configurations distributed around a reactive most-probable structure. Correspondingly, charge-separation ET from a photoexcited singlet zinc porphyrin incorporated within Mb to the heme of b5 and the follow-up charge-recombination exhibit distributed kinetics, with median rate constants, kfs=2.1×109second−1 and kbs=4.3×1010second−1, respectively. The latter approaches that for the initial step in photosynthetic charge separation, k = 3.3 × 1011 second−1. PMID:21097931

  5. Faster interprotein electron transfer in a [myoglobin, b⁵] complex with a redesigned interface.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Peng; Nocek, Judith M; Vura-Weis, Josh; Lockard, Jenny V; Wasielewski, Michael R; Hoffman, Brian M

    2010-11-19

    Direct measurements of electron transfer (ET) within a protein-protein complex with a redesigned interface formed by physiological partner proteins myoglobin (Mb) and cytochrome b(5) (b(5)) reveal interprotein ET rates comparable to those observed within the photosynthetic reaction center. Brownian dynamics simulations show that Mb in which three surface acid residues are mutated to lysine binds b(5) in an ensemble of configurations distributed around a reactive most-probable structure. Correspondingly, charge-separation ET from a photoexcited singlet zinc porphyrin incorporated within Mb to the heme of b(5) and the follow-up charge-recombination exhibit distributed kinetics, with median rate constants, k(f)(s) = 2.1 × 10(9) second(-1) and k(b)(s) = 4.3 × 10(10) second(-1), respectively. The latter approaches that for the initial step in photosynthetic charge separation, k = 3.3 × 10(11) second(-1).

  6. Complex (Nonstandard) Six-Layer Polytypes of Lizardite Revealed from Oblique-Texture Electron Diffraction Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukhlistov, A.P.; Zinchuk, N.N.; Kotel'nikov, D.D.

    2004-11-01

    Association of simple (1T and 3R) and two complex (nonstandard) orthogonal polytypes of the serpentine mineral lizardite from the Catoca kimberlite pipe (West Africa) association is revealed from oblique-texture electron diffraction patterns. A six-layer polytype with an ordered superposition of equally oriented layers (notation 3{sub 2}3{sub 2}3{sub 4}3{sub 4}3{sub 6}3{sub 6} or ++ - -00) belonging to the structural group A and a three-layer (336 or I,I,II) or a six-layer (336366 or I,I,II,I,II,II) polytype with alternating oppositely oriented layers and semi-disordered structure are identified using polytype analysis.

  7. Electron tomography of the nucleoid of Gemmata obscuriglobus reveals complex liquid crystalline cholesteric structure

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Benjamin; Sagulenko, Evgeny; Morgan, Garry P.; Webb, Richard I.; Fuerst, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleoid of the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus is unique within the Bacteria in being both highly condensed and enclosed by a double-membrane nuclear envelope, seemingly analogous to the nucleus of eukaryotes. Here we have applied electron tomography to study high-pressure frozen, cryosubstituted cells of G. obscuriglobus and found multiple nested orders of DNA organization within the condensed nucleoid structure. Detailed examination of the nucleoid revealed a series of nested arcs characteristic of liquid crystalline cholesteric DNA structure. The finest fibers were arranged in parallel concentrically in a double-twist organization. At the highest order of nucleoid organization, several of these structures come together to form the core of the G. obscuriglobus nucleoid. The complex structure of DNA within this nucleoid may have implications for understanding the evolutionary significance of compartmentalized planctomycete cells. PMID:22993511

  8. Carboxylated dithiafulvenes and tetrathiafulvalene vinylogues: synthesis, electronic properties, and complexation with zinc ions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    Summary A class of carboxyl and carboxylate ester-substituted dithiafulvene (DTF) derivatives and tetrathiafulvalene vinylogues (TTFVs) has been synthesized and their electronic and electrochemical redox properties were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopic and cyclic voltammetric analyses. The carboxyl-TTFV was applied as a redox-active ligand to complex with Zn(II) ions, forming a stable Zn-TTFV coordination polymer. The structural, electrochemical, and thermal properties of the coordination polymer were investigated by infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. Furthermore, the microscopic porosity and surface area of the Zn-TTFV coordination polymer were measured by nitrogen gas adsorption analysis, showing a BET surface of 148.2 m2 g−1 and an average pore diameter of 10.2 nm. PMID:26124898

  9. Complex temperature evolution of the electronic structure of CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikary, Ganesh; Biswas, Deepnarayan; Sahadev, Nishaina; Bindu, R.; Kumar, Neeraj; Dhar, S. K.; Thamizhavel, A.; Maiti, Kalobaran

    2014-03-01

    Employing high resolution photoemission spectroscopy, we investigate the temperature evolution of the electronic structure of CaFe2As2, which is a parent compound of high temperature superconductors—CaFe2As2 exhibits superconductivity under pressure as well as doping of charge carriers. Photoemission results of CaFe2As2 in this study reveal a gradual shift of an energy band, α away from the chemical potential with decreasing temperature in addition to the spin density wave (SDW) transition induced Fermi surface reconstruction across SDW transition temperature. The corresponding hole pocket eventually disappears at lower temperatures, while the hole Fermi surface of the β band possessing finite p orbital character survives till the lowest temperature studied. These results, thus, reveal signature of complex charge redistribution among various energy bands as a function of temperature.

  10. Nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer in a solvated phenol-amine complex.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Puja; Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-02-12

    Photoinduced concerted electron-proton transfer (EPT), denoted photo-EPT, is important for a wide range of energy conversion processes. Transient absorption and Raman spectroscopy experiments on the hydrogen-bonded p-nitrophenylphenol-t-butylamine complex, solvated in 1,2-dichloroethane, suggested that this complex may undergo photo-EPT. The experiments probed two excited electronic states that were interpreted as an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state and an EPT state. Herein mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical nonadiabatic surface hopping dynamics is used to investigate the relaxation pathways following photoexcitation. The potential energy surface is generated on the fly with a semiempirical floating occupation molecular orbital complete active space configuration interaction method for the solute molecule and a molecular mechanical force field for the explicit solvent molecules. The free energy curves along the proton transfer coordinate illustrate that proton transfer is thermodynamically and kinetically favorable on the lower-energy excited state but not on the higher-energy excited state, supporting the characterization of these states as EPT and ICT, respectively. The nonadiabatic dynamics simulations indicate that the population decays from the ICT state to the EPT state in ∼100 fs and from the EPT state to the ground state on the slower time scale of ∼1 ps, qualitatively consistent with the experimental measurements. For ∼54% of the trajectories, the proton transfers from the phenol to the amine in ∼400 fs on the EPT state and then transfers back to the phenol rapidly upon decay to the ground state. Thus, these calculations augment the original interpretation of the experimental data by providing evidence of proton transfer on the EPT state prior to decay to the ground state. The fundamental insights obtained from these simulations are also relevant to other photo-EPT processes.

  11. Electronic structures of ruthenium and osmium complexes of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Manas Kumar; Patra, Sarat Chandra; Maity, Amarendra Nath; Ke, Shyue-Chu; Adhikary, Nirmal Das; Ghosh, Prasanta

    2012-06-18

    The reaction of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) with [M(II)(H)(CO)(X)(PPh(3))(3)] in boiling toluene leads to the homolytic cleavage of the M(II)-H bond, affording the paramagnetic trans-[M(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)X] (M = Ru, X = Cl, 1; M = Os, X = Br, 3) and cis-[M(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)X] (M = Ru, X = Cl, 2; M = Os, X = Br, 4) complexes. Single-crystal X-ray structure determinations of 1, 2·toluene, and 4·CH(2)Cl(2), EPR spectra, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations have substantiated that 1-4 are 9,10-phenanthrenesemiquinone radical (PQ(•-)) complexes of ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) and are defined as trans-[Ru(II)(PQ(•-))(PPh(3))(2)(CO)Cl] (1), cis-[Ru(II)(PQ(•-))(PPh(3))(2)(CO)Cl] (2), trans-[Os(II)(PQ(•-))(PPh(3))(2)(CO) Br] (3), and cis-[Os(II)(PQ(•-))(PPh(3))(2)(CO)Br] (4). Two comparatively longer C-O [average lengths: 1, 1.291(3) Å; 2·toluene, 1.281(5) Å; 4·CH(2)Cl(2), 1.300(8) Å] and shorter C-C lengths [1, 1.418(5) Å; 2·toluene, 1.439(6) Å; 4·CH(2)Cl(2), 1.434(9) Å] of the OO chelates are consistent with the presence of a reduced PQ(•-) ligand in 1-4. A minor contribution of the alternate resonance form, trans- or cis-[M(I)(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)X], of 1-4 has been predicted by the anisotropic X- and Q-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the frozen glasses of the complexes at 25 K and unrestricted DFT calculations on 1, trans-[Ru(PQ)(PMe(3))(2)(CO)Cl] (5), cis-[Ru(PQ)(PMe(3))(2)(CO)Cl] (6), and cis-[Os(PQ)(PMe(3))(2)(CO)Br] (7). However, no thermodynamic equilibria between [M(II)(PQ(•-))(PPh(3))(2)(CO)X] and [M(I)(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)X] tautomers have been detected. 1-4 undergo one-electron oxidation at -0.06, -0.05, 0.03, and -0.03 V versus a ferrocenium/ferrocene, Fc(+)/Fc, couple because of the formation of PQ complexes as trans-[Ru(II)(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)Cl](+) (1(+)), cis-[Ru(II)(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)Cl](+) (2(+)), trans-[Os(II)(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)Br](+) (3(+)), and cis-[Os(II)(PQ)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)Br](+) (4(+)). The trans

  12. Artificial Intelligence Methods: Choice of algorithms, their complexity, and appropriateness within the context of hydrology and water resources. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastidas, L. A.; Pande, S.

    2009-12-01

    Pattern analysis deals with the automatic detection of patterns in the data and there are a variety of algorithms available for the purpose. These algorithms are commonly called Artificial Intelligence (AI) or data driven algorithms, and have been applied lately to a variety of problems in hydrology and are becoming extremely popular. When confronting such a range of algorithms, the question of which one is the “best” arises. Some algorithms may be preferred because of the lower computational complexity; others take into account prior knowledge of the form and the amount of the data; others are chosen based on a version of the Occam’s razor principle that a simple classifier performs better. Popper has argued, however, that Occam’s razor is without operational value because there is no clear measure or criterion for simplicity. An example of measures that can be used for this purpose are: the so called algorithmic complexity - also known as Kolmogorov complexity or Kolmogorov (algorithmic) entropy; the Bayesian information criterion; or the Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension. On the other hand, the No Free Lunch Theorem states that there is no best general algorithm, and that specific algorithms are superior only for specific problems. It should be noted also that the appropriate algorithm and the appropriate complexity are constrained by the finiteness of the available data and the uncertainties associated with it. Thus, there is compromise between the complexity of the algorithm, the data properties, and the robustness of the predictions. We discuss the above topics; briefly review the historical development of applications with particular emphasis on statistical learning theory (SLT), also known as machine learning (ML) of which support vector machines and relevant vector machines are the most commonly known algorithms. We present some applications of such algorithms for distributed hydrologic modeling; and introduce an example of how the complexity measure

  13. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Clusters, Actinide Complexes and Their Reactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan Balasubramanian

    2009-07-18

    This is a continuing DOE-BES funded project on transition metal and actinide containing species, aimed at the electronic structure and spectroscopy of transition metal and actinide containing species. While a long term connection of these species is to catalysis and environmental management of high-level nuclear wastes, the immediate relevance is directly to other DOE-BES funded experimental projects at DOE-National labs and universities. There are a number of ongoing gas-phase spectroscopic studies of these species at various places, and our computational work has been inspired by these experimental studies and we have also inspired other experimental and theoretical studies. Thus our studies have varied from spectroscopy of diatomic transition metal carbides to large complexes containing transition metals, and actinide complexes that are critical to the environment. In addition, we are continuing to make code enhancements and modernization of ALCHEMY II set of codes and its interface with relativistic configuration interaction (RCI). At present these codes can carry out multi-reference computations that included up to 60 million configurations and multiple states from each such CI expansion. ALCHEMY II codes have been modernized and converted to a variety of platforms such as Windows XP, and Linux. We have revamped the symbolic CI code to automate the MRSDCI technique so that the references are automatically chosen with a given cutoff from the CASSCF and thus we are doing accurate MRSDCI computations with 10,000 or larger reference space of configurations. The RCI code can also handle a large number of reference configurations, which include up to 10,000 reference configurations. Another major progress is in routinely including larger basis sets up to 5g functions in thee computations. Of course higher angular momenta functions can also be handled using Gaussian and other codes with other methods such as DFT, MP2, CCSD(T), etc. We have also calibrated our RECP

  14. Making sense of complex electronic records: socio-technical design in social care.

    PubMed

    Wastell, David; White, Sue

    2014-03-01

    Dealing with complex electronic documentation is an integral part of much contemporary professional work. In this paper, we address the design of electronic records for social care professionals in the UK. Recent reforms in UK child welfare have followed a top-down, managerial approach emphasizing conformance to standard processes. The vicissitudes of a major national IT project, the Integrated Children's System, show the limitations of this approach, in particular the detrimental effect it has had on professional autonomy. Following in the foot-steps of Ken Eason, we argue that socio-technical design, by focussing on innovative applications of technology to support users (rather than the interests of the bureaucracy) offers a more promising alternative. A user-centred design exercise is presented to illustrate this approach in action. A novel interface was developed for handling the heterogeneous bundle of documents which make up the social care record, helping social workers make better sense of case-files. The prototype draws on the metaphor of the dining-room table as a way of overcoming the limitations of the computer display. We conclude that socio-technical thinking engenders a shift in mind-set, opening up a radically different design space compared to current design orthodoxy.

  15. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for complex transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing-Hua, Zhang; Dong-Dong, Xiao; Lin, Gu

    2016-06-01

    Lattice, charge, orbital, and spin are the four fundamental degrees of freedom in condensed matter, of which the interactive coupling derives tremendous novel physical phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (high-T c SC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in strongly correlated electronic system. Direct experimental observation of these freedoms is essential to understanding the structure-property relationship and the physics behind it, and also indispensable for designing new materials and devices. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) integrating multiple techniques of structure imaging and spectrum analysis, is a comprehensive platform for providing structural, chemical and electronic information of materials with a high spatial resolution. Benefiting from the development of aberration correctors, STEM has taken a big breakthrough towards sub-angstrom resolution in last decade and always steps forward to improve the capability of material characterization; many improvements have been achieved in recent years, thereby giving an in-depth insight into material research. Here, we present a brief review of the recent advances of STEM by some representative examples of perovskite transition metal oxides; atomic-scale mapping of ferroelectric polarization, octahedral distortions and rotations, valence state, coordination and spin ordering are presented. We expect that this brief introduction about the current capability of STEM could facilitate the understanding of the relationship between functional properties and these fundamental degrees of freedom in complex oxides. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Project, China (Grant No. 2014CB921002), the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51522212 and 51421002).

  16. Predation Risk, Resource Quality, and Reef Structural Complexity Shape Territoriality in a Coral Reef Herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Bridgette K.; Kelley, Megan C.

    2015-01-01

    For many species securing territories is important for feeding and reproduction. Factors such as competition, habitat availability, and male characteristics can influence an individual’s ability to establish and maintain a territory. The risk of predation can have an important influence on feeding and reproduction; however, few have studied its effect on territoriality. We investigated territoriality in a haremic, polygynous species of coral reef herbivore, Sparisoma aurofrenatum (redband parrotfish), across eight reefs in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary that were either protected or unprotected from fishing of piscivorous fishes. We examined how territory size and quality varied with reef protection status, competition, predation risk, and male size. We then determined how territory size and quality influenced harem size and female size to understand the effect of territoriality on reproductive potential. We found that protected reefs trended towards having more large predatory fishes and that territories there were smaller but had greater algal nutritional quality relative to unprotected reefs. Our data suggest that even though males in protected sites have smaller territories, which support fewer females, they may improve their reproductive potential by choosing nutritionally rich areas, which support larger females. Thus, reef protection appears to shape the trade-off that herbivorous fishes make between territory size and quality. Furthermore, we provide evidence that males in unprotected sites, which are generally less complex than protected sites, choose territories with higher structural complexity, suggesting the importance of this type of habitat for feeding and reproduction in S. aurofrenatum. Our work argues that the loss of corals and the resulting decline in structural complexity, as well as management efforts to protect reefs, could alter the territory dynamics and reproductive potential of important herbivorous fish species. PMID

  17. Predation risk, resource quality, and reef structural complexity shape territoriality in a coral reef herbivore.

    PubMed

    Catano, Laura B; Gunn, Bridgette K; Kelley, Megan C; Burkepile, Deron E

    2015-01-01

    For many species securing territories is important for feeding and reproduction. Factors such as competition, habitat availability, and male characteristics can influence an individual's ability to establish and maintain a territory. The risk of predation can have an important influence on feeding and reproduction; however, few have studied its effect on territoriality. We investigated territoriality in a haremic, polygynous species of coral reef herbivore, Sparisoma aurofrenatum (redband parrotfish), across eight reefs in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary that were either protected or unprotected from fishing of piscivorous fishes. We examined how territory size and quality varied with reef protection status, competition, predation risk, and male size. We then determined how territory size and quality influenced harem size and female size to understand the effect of territoriality on reproductive potential. We found that protected reefs trended towards having more large predatory fishes and that territories there were smaller but had greater algal nutritional quality relative to unprotected reefs. Our data suggest that even though males in protected sites have smaller territories, which support fewer females, they may improve their reproductive potential by choosing nutritionally rich areas, which support larger females. Thus, reef protection appears to shape the trade-off that herbivorous fishes make between territory size and quality. Furthermore, we provide evidence that males in unprotected sites, which are generally less complex than protected sites, choose territories with higher structural complexity, suggesting the importance of this type of habitat for feeding and reproduction in S. aurofrenatum. Our work argues that the loss of corals and the resulting decline in structural complexity, as well as management efforts to protect reefs, could alter the territory dynamics and reproductive potential of important herbivorous fish species.

  18. Integrative Modeling of Biomolecular Complexes: HADDOCKing with Cryo-Electron Microscopy Data.

    PubMed

    van Zundert, Gydo C P; Melquiond, Adrien S J; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-05-05

    Protein-protein interactions play a central role in all cellular processes. Insight into their atomic architecture is therefore of paramount importance. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is capable of directly imaging large macromolecular complexes. Unfortunately, the resolution is usually not sufficient for a direct atomic interpretation. To overcome this, cryo-EM data are often combined with high-resolution atomic structures. However, current computational approaches typically do not include information from other experimental sources nor a proper physico-chemical description of the interfaces. Here we describe the integration of cryo-EM data into our data-driven docking program HADDOCK and its performance on a benchmark of 17 complexes. The approach is demonstrated on five systems using experimental cryo-EM data in the range of 8.5-21 Å resolution. For several cases, cryo-EM data are integrated with additional interface information, e.g. mutagenesis and hydroxyl radical footprinting data. The resulting models have high-quality interfaces, revealing novel details of the interactions.

  19. An innovative electronic health records system for rare and complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background There exists a large number of rare and complex diseases that are neglected due to the difficulty in diagnosis and treatment. Being rare, they normally do not justify the costs of developing an especialized Electronic Health Record (EHR) system to assist doctors and patients of these diseases. In this work we propose the use of Computer applications known as Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) to address this issue. Results In this work we describe a fully customizable EHR system that uses a workflow based LIMS with an easy to adapt interface for data collection and retrieval. This system can easily be customized to manage different types of medical data. The customization for a new disease can be done in a few hours with the help of a specialist. Conclusion We have used the proposed system to manage data from patients of three complex diseases: neuromyelitis optica, paracoccidioidomycosis and adrenoleukodistrofy. These diseases have very different symptoms, exams, diagnostics and treatments, but the FluxMED system is able to manage these data in a highly specialized manner without any modifications to its code. PMID:26695733

  20. Dark States in the Light-Harvesting complex 2 Revealed by Two-dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Ferretti, Marco; Hendrikx, Ruud; Romero, Elisabet; ...

    2016-02-09

    Energy transfer and trapping in the light harvesting antennae of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ultrafast process, which occurs with a quantum efficiency close to unity. However the mechanisms behind this process have not yet been fully understood. Recently it was proposed that low-lying energy dark states, such as charge transfer states and polaron pairs, play an important role in the dynamics and directionality of energy transfer. However, it is difficult to directly detect those states because of their small transition dipole moment and overlap with the B850/B870 exciton bands. Here we present a new experimental approach, which combines themore » selectivity of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with the availability of genetically modified light harvesting complexes, to reveal the presence of those dark states in both the genetically modified and the wild-type light harvesting 2 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. In conclusion, we suggest that Nature has used the unavoidable charge transfer processes that occur when LH pigments are concentrated to enhance and direct the flow of energy.« less

  1. Dark States in the Light-Harvesting complex 2 Revealed by Two-dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferretti, Marco; Hendrikx, Ruud; Romero, Elisabet; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-02-09

    Energy transfer and trapping in the light harvesting antennae of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ultrafast process, which occurs with a quantum efficiency close to unity. However the mechanisms behind this process have not yet been fully understood. Recently it was proposed that low-lying energy dark states, such as charge transfer states and polaron pairs, play an important role in the dynamics and directionality of energy transfer. However, it is difficult to directly detect those states because of their small transition dipole moment and overlap with the B850/B870 exciton bands. Here we present a new experimental approach, which combines the selectivity of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with the availability of genetically modified light harvesting complexes, to reveal the presence of those dark states in both the genetically modified and the wild-type light harvesting 2 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. In conclusion, we suggest that Nature has used the unavoidable charge transfer processes that occur when LH pigments are concentrated to enhance and direct the flow of energy.

  2. Dark States in the Light-Harvesting complex 2 Revealed by Two-dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Marco; Hendrikx, Ruud; Romero, Elisabet; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-02-01

    Energy transfer and trapping in the light harvesting antennae of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ultrafast process, which occurs with a quantum efficiency close to unity. However the mechanisms behind this process have not yet been fully understood. Recently it was proposed that low-lying energy dark states, such as charge transfer states and polaron pairs, play an important role in the dynamics and directionality of energy transfer. However, it is difficult to directly detect those states because of their small transition dipole moment and overlap with the B850/B870 exciton bands. Here we present a new experimental approach, which combines the selectivity of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with the availability of genetically modified light harvesting complexes, to reveal the presence of those dark states in both the genetically modified and the wild-type light harvesting 2 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. We suggest that Nature has used the unavoidable charge transfer processes that occur when LH pigments are concentrated to enhance and direct the flow of energy.

  3. Simulated two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of the eight-bacteriochlorophyll FMO complex

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Shu-Hao; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-21

    The Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein-pigment complex acts as a molecular wire conducting energy between the outer antenna system and the reaction center; it is an important photosynthetic system to study the transfer of excitonic energy. Recent crystallographic studies report the existence of an additional (eighth) bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) in some of the FMO monomers. To understand the functionality of this eighth BChl, we simulated the two-dimensional electronic spectra of both the 7-site (apo form) and the 8-site (holo form) variant of the FMO complex from green sulfur bacteria, Prosthecochloris aestuarii. By comparing the spectrum, it was found that the eighth BChl can affect two different excitonic energy transfer pathways: (1) it is directly involved in the first apo form pathway (6 → 3 → 1) by passing the excitonic energy to exciton 6; and (2) it facilitates an increase in the excitonic wave function overlap between excitons 4 and 5 in the second pathway (7 → 4,5 → 2 → 1) and thus increases the possible downward sampling routes across the BChls.

  4. Architecture of the Xenopus nuclear pore complex revealed by three- dimensional cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex spans the nuclear envelope and functions as a macromolecular transporter in the ATP-dependent process of nucleocytoplasmic transport. In this report, we present three dimensional (3D) structures for both membrane-associated and detergent- extracted Xenopus NPCs, imaged in frozen buffers by cryo-electron microscopy. A comparison of the differing configurations present in the 3D maps suggests that the spokes may possess an intrinsic conformational flexibility. When combined with recent data from a 3D map of negatively stained NPCs (Hinshaw, J. E., B. O. Carragher, and R. A. Milligan. 1992. Cell. 69:1133-1141), these observations suggest a minimal domain model for the spoke-ring complex which may account for the observed plasticity of this assembly. Moreover, lumenal domains in adjacent spokes are interconnected by radial arm dimers, forming a lumenal ring that may be responsible for anchoring the NPC within the nuclear envelope pore. Importantly, the NPC transporter is visualized as a centrally tapered cylinder that spans the entire width of the NPC, in a direction normal to the nuclear envelope. The central positioning, tripartite structure, and hollow nature of the transporter suggests that it may form a macromolecular transport channel, with a globular gating domain at each end. Finally, the packing of the transporter within the spokes creates a set of eight internal channels that may be responsible, in part, for the diffusion of ions and small molecules across the nuclear envelope. PMID:8314837

  5. Cation-limited kinetic model for microbial extracellular electron transport via an outer membrane cytochrome C complex

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Akihiro; Tokunou, Yoshihide; Saito, Junki

    2016-01-01

    Outer-membrane c-type cytochrome (OM c-Cyt) complexes in several genera of iron-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella and Geobacter, are capable of transporting electrons from the cell interior to extracellular solids as a terminal step of anaerobic respiration. The kinetics of this electron transport has implications for controlling the rate of microbial electron transport during bioenergy or biochemical production, iron corrosion, and natural mineral cycling. Herein, we review the findings from in-vivo and in-vitro studies examining electron transport kinetics through single OM c-Cyt complexes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In-vitro electron flux via a purified OM c-Cyt complex, comprised of MtrA, B, and C proteins from S. oneidensis MR-1, embedded in a proteoliposome system is reported to be 10- to 100-fold faster compared with in-vivo estimates based on measurements of electron flux per cell and OM c-Cyts density. As the proteoliposome system is estimated to have 10-fold higher cation flux via potassium channels than electrons, we speculate that the slower rate of electron-coupled cation transport across the OM is responsible for the significantly lower electron transport rate that is observed in-vivo. As most studies to date have primarily focused on the energetics or kinetics of interheme electron hopping in OM c-Cyts in this microbial electron transport mechanism, the proposed model involving cation transport provides new insight into the rate detemining step of EET, as well as the role of self-secreted flavin molecules bound to OM c-Cyt and proton management for energy conservation and production in S. oneidensis MR-1. PMID:27924259

  6. Structural and electronic dependence of the single-molecule-magnet behavior of dysprosium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Victoria E; Bolvin, Hélène; Rivière, Eric; Guillot, Regis; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Mallah, Talal

    2014-03-03

    We investigate and compare the magnetic properties of two isostructural Dy(III)-containing complexes. The Dy(III) ions are chelated by hexadentate ligands and possess two apical bidendate nitrate anions. In dysprosium(III) N,N'-bis(imine-2-yl)methylene-1,8-diamino-3,6-dioxaoctane (1), the ligand's donor atoms are two alkoxo, two pyridine, and two imine nitrogen atoms. Dysprosium(III) N,N'-bis(amine-2-yl)methylene-1,8-diamino-3,6-dioxaoctane (2) is identical with 1 except for one modification: the two imine groups have been replaced by amine groups. This change has a minute effect on the structure and a larger effect the magnetic behavior. The two complexes possess slow relaxation of the magnetization in the presence of an applied field of 1000 Oe but with a larger barrier for reorientation of the magnetization for 1 (Ueff/kB = 50 K) than for 2 (Ueff/kB = 34 K). First-principles calculations using the spin-orbit complete active-space self-consistent-field method were performed and allowed to fit the experimental magnetization data. The calculations gave the energy spectrum of the 2J + 1 sublevels issued from the J = 15/2 free-ion ground state. The lowest-lying sublevels were found to have a large contribution of MJ = ±15/2 for 1, while for 2, MJ = ±13/2 was dominant. The observed differences were attributed to a synergistic effect between the electron density of the ligand and the small structural changes provoked by a slight alteration of the coordination environment. It was observed that the stronger ligand field (imine) resulted in complex 1 with a larger energy barrier for reorientation of the magnetization than 2.

  7. Light and electron microscopic study on the pineal complex of the coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae Smith.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, M A; Merhige, M E

    1977-03-09

    The pineal complex of the coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae was studied light and electron microscopically. It consists of two vesicles representing parapineal and pineal organs. Both occur intracranially and openly communicate with each other and the brain ventricle. The entire complex shows a striking photoreceptor morphology with sensory, ependymal and nerve cells. The last cell type is more abundant in the parapineal vesicle than in the pineal organ. The following ultrastructural details of the parapineal are noteworthy: 1. The sensory cells possess large inner and outer segments protruding freely in the vesicular cavity. The outer segments measure 8-10 mum in length and consist of as many as 275 lamellae. The basal processes of these cells terminate in neuropil-like regions. Occasionally, dense granules (500-1000 A) of uncertain identity occur in the perinuclear and inner segment cytoplasm of the cells. 2. The supporting cells are of the ependymal type. Their cytoplasm contains a filamentous feltwork and pinocytotic vesicles, but lacks secretory granules. Cytosomes are particularly abundant in cell processes in the neuropil-like zones. The basal end-feet of these cells isolate the receptor and nerve cells from the perivascular space. 3. In the neuropil-like regions, terminals of sensory cells make synaptic contacts with neuronal dendrites. Synaptic ribbon-like profiles in the terminals characterize the contact zones. Only unmyelinated nerve fibers could be observed in the small area of the tissue examined. The results are discussed with regard to photoreceptive and secretory functions of the pineal complex and its evolution in lower vertebrates.

  8. Core size determination and structural characterization of intravenous iron complexes by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Petrochenko, Peter; Chen, Lynn; Wong, Sook Yee; Absar, Mohammad; Choi, Stephanie; Zheng, Jiwen

    2016-05-30

    Understanding physicochemical properties of intravenous (IV) iron drug products is essential to ensure the manufacturing process is consistent and streamlined. The history of physicochemical characterization of IV iron complex formulations stretches over several decades, with disparities in iron core size and particle morphology as the major source of debate. One of the main reasons for this controversy is room temperature sample preparation artifacts, which affect accurate determination of size, shape and agglomeration/aggregation of nanoscale iron particles. The present study is first to report the ultra-fine iron core structures of four IV iron complex formulations, sodium ferric gluconate, iron sucrose, low molecular weight iron dextran and ferumoxytol, using a cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) preservation technique, as opposed to the conventional room temperature (RT-TEM) technique. Our results show that room temperature preparation causes nanoparticle aggregation and deformation, while cryo-TEM preserves IV iron colloidal suspension in their native frozen-hydrated and undiluted state. In contrast to the current consensus in literature, all four IV iron colloids exhibit a similar morphology of their iron oxide cores with a spherical shape, narrow size distribution and an average size of 2nm. Moreover, out of the four tested formulations, ferumoxytol exhibits a cluster-like community of several iron carbohydrate particles which likely accounts for its large hydrodynamic size of 25nm, measured with dynamic light scattering. Our findings outline a suitable method for identifying colloidal nanoparticle core size in the native state, which is increasingly important for manufacturing and design control of complex drug formulations, such as IV iron drug products.

  9. Revealing the Complexity of Health Determinants in Resource-poor Settings

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Fraser I.; McCormick, Benjamin J. J.

    2012-01-01

    An epidemiologic systems analysis of diarrhea in children in Pakistan is presented. Application of additive Bayesian network modeling to 2005–2006 data from the Pakistan Social and Living Standards Measurement Survey reveals the complexity of child diarrhea as a disease system. The key distinction between standard analytical approaches, such as multivariable regression, and Bayesian network analyses is that the latter attempt to not only identify statistically associated variables but also, additionally and empirically, separate these into those directly and indirectly dependent upon the outcome variable. Such discrimination is vastly more ambitious but has the potential to reveal far more about key features of complex disease systems. Additive Bayesian network analyses across 41 variables from the Pakistan Social and Living Standards Measurement Survey identified 182 direct dependencies but with only 3 variables: 1) access to a dry pit latrine (protective; odds ratio = 0.67); 2) access to an atypical water source (protective; odds ratio = 0.49); and 3) no formal garbage collection (unprotective; odds ratio = 1.32), supported as directly dependent with the presence of diarrhea. All but 2 of the remaining variables were also, in turn, directly or indirectly dependent upon these 3 key variables. These results are contrasted with the use of a standard approach (multivariable regression). PMID:23139247

  10. Single particle electron microscopy reconstruction of the exosome complex using the random conical tilt method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueqi; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2011-03-28

    Single particle electron microscopy (EM) reconstruction has recently become a popular tool to get the three-dimensional (3D) structure of large macromolecular complexes. Compared to X-ray crystallography, it has some unique advantages. First, single particle EM reconstruction does not need to crystallize the protein sample, which is the bottleneck in X-ray crystallography, especially for large macromolecular complexes. Secondly, it does not need large amounts of protein samples. Compared with milligrams of proteins necessary for crystallization, single particle EM reconstruction only needs several micro-liters of protein solution at nano-molar concentrations, using the negative staining EM method. However, despite a few macromolecular assemblies with high symmetry, single particle EM is limited at relatively low resolution (lower than 1 nm resolution) for many specimens especially those without symmetry. This technique is also limited by the size of the molecules under study, i.e. 100 kDa for negatively stained specimens and 300 kDa for frozen-hydrated specimens in general. For a new sample of unknown structure, we generally use a heavy metal solution to embed the molecules by negative staining. The specimen is then examined in a transmission electron microscope to take two-dimensional (2D) micrographs of the molecules. Ideally, the protein molecules have a homogeneous 3D structure but exhibit different orientations in the micrographs. These micrographs are digitized and processed in computers as "single particles". Using two-dimensional alignment and classification techniques, homogenous molecules in the same views are clustered into classes. Their averages enhance the signal of the molecule's 2D shapes. After we assign the particles with the proper relative orientation (Euler angles), we will be able to reconstruct the 2D particle images into a 3D virtual volume. In single particle 3D reconstruction, an essential step is to correctly assign the proper orientation

  11. Atypical behavior in the electron capture induced dissociation of biologically relevant transition metal ion complexes of the peptide hormone oxytocin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinnijenhuis, Anne J.; Mihalca, Romulus; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2006-07-01

    Doubly protonated ions of the disulfide bond containing nonapeptide hormone oxytocin and oxytocin complexes with different transition metal ions, that have biological relevance under physiological conditions, were subjected to electron capture dissociation (ECD) to probe their structural features in the gas phase. Although, all the ECD spectra were strikingly different, typical ECD behavior was observed for complexes of the nonapeptide hormone oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+, i.e., abundant c/z' and a'/y backbone cleavages and ECD characteristic S-S and S-C bond cleavages were observed. We propose that, although in the oxytocin-transition metal ion complexes the metal ions serve as the main initial capture site, the captured electron is transferred to other sites in the complex to form a hydrogen radical, which drives the subsequent typical ECD fragmentations. The complex of oxytocin with Cu2+ displayed noticeably different ECD behavior. The fragment ions were similar to fragment ions typically observed with low-energy collision induced dissociation (CID). We propose that the electrons captured by the oxytocin-Cu2+ complex might be favorably involved in reducing the Cu2+ metal ion to Cu+. Subsequent energy redistribution would explain the observed low-energy CID-type fragmentations. Electron capture resulted also in quite different specific cleavage sites for the complexes of oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+. This is an indication for structural differences in these complexes possibly linked to their significantly different biological effects on oxytocin-receptor binding, and suggests that ECD may be used to study subtle structural differences in transition metal ion-peptide complexes.

  12. How Electron Spectroscopy with Synchrotron Light Can Help Us Understand High-Tc Superconductivity and Other Complex States of Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Campuzano, Juan Carlos

    2012-03-07

    All the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of materials are controlled by electrons that occupy the highest energy levels in solids, those near the Fermi energy. Many techniques were developed to study those electrons, leading to the great successes of condensed matter physics. Newer and complex materials, such as the high-temperature superconductors, tend to exhibit very large anisotropies in their physical properties, requiring a more detailed knowledge of the behavior of electrons not only as a function of their energy, but also their momentum. Angle-resolved photoemission can contribute to our understanding by providing a great deal of information on many of the momentum-dependent properties of electrons and their interactions. In this talk, I will present a brief overview of how a long-term and focused collaboration between scientists at Argonne and other institutions has contributed to making angle-resolved photoemissions a most useful tool in the study of complex states of matter.

  13. Liquid-crystalline dendrimer Cu(II) complexes and Cu(0) nanoclusters based on the Cu(II) complexes: An electron paramagnetic resonance investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domracheva, N. E.; Mirea, A.; Schwoerer, M.; Torre-Lorente, L.; Lattermann, G.

    2007-07-01

    New nanostructured materials, namely, the liquid-crystalline copper(II) complexes that contain poly(propylene imine) dendrimer ligands of the first (ligand 1) and second (ligand 2) generations and which have a columnar mesophase and different copper contents (x = Cu/L), are investigated by EPR spectroscopy. The influence of water molecules and nitrate counterions on the magnetic properties of complex 2 (x = 7.3) is studied. It is demonstrated that water molecules can extract some of the copper ions from dendrimer complexes and form hexaaqua copper complexes with free ions. The dimer spectra of fully hydrated complex 2 (x = 7.3) are observed at temperatures T < 10 K. For this complex, the structure is identified and the distance between the copper ions is determined. It is shown that the nitrate counterion plays the role of a bridge between the hexaaqua copper(II) complex and the dendrimer copper(II) complex. The temperature-induced valence tautomerism attended by electron transport is revealed for the first time in blue dendrimer complexes 1 (x = 1.9) with a dimer structure. The activation energy for electron transport is estimated to be 0.35 meV. The coordination of the copper ion site (NO4) and the structural arrangement of green complexes 1 (x = 1.9) in the columnar mesophase are determined. Complexes of this type form linear chains in which nitrate counterions serve as bridges between copper centers. It is revealed that green complexes 1 (x = 1.9) dissolved in isotropic inert solvents can be oriented in the magnetic field (B 0 = 8000 G). The degree of orientation of these complexes is rather high (S z = 0.76) and close to that of systems with a complete ordering (S z = 1) in the magnetic field. Copper(0) nanoclusters prepared by reduction of complex 2 (x = 7.3) in two reducing agents (NaBH4, N2H4 · H2O) are examined. A model is proposed for a possible location of Cu(0) nanoclusters in a dendrimer matrix.

  14. A resource from 3D electron microscopy of hippocampal neuropil for user training and tool development

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kristen M.; Spacek, Josef; Bell, Maria Elizabeth; Parker, Patrick H.; Lindsey, Laurence F.; Baden, Alexander D.; Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Burns, Randal

    2015-01-01

    Resurgent interest in synaptic circuitry and plasticity has emphasized the importance of 3D reconstruction from serial section electron microscopy (3DEM). Three volumes of hippocampal CA1 neuropil from adult rat were imaged at X-Y resolution of ~2 nm on serial sections of ~50–60 nm thickness. These are the first densely reconstructed hippocampal volumes. All axons, dendrites, glia, and synapses were reconstructed in a cube (~10 μm3) surrounding a large dendritic spine, a cylinder (~43 μm3) surrounding an oblique dendritic segment (3.4 μm long), and a parallelepiped (~178 μm3) surrounding an apical dendritic segment (4.9 μm long). The data provide standards for identifying ultrastructural objects in 3DEM, realistic reconstructions for modeling biophysical properties of synaptic transmission, and a test bed for enhancing reconstruction tools. Representative synapses are quantified from varying section planes, and microtubules, polyribosomes, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and endosomes are identified and reconstructed in a subset of dendrites. The original images, traces, and Reconstruct software and files are freely available and visualized at the Open Connectome Project (Data Citation 1). PMID:26347348

  15. Bidirectional Spectral Reflectance of Earth Resources: Influence of Scene Complexity and Atmospheric Effects on Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Practical methods for remote sensing when scene complexity and atmospheric effects modify intrinsic reflective properties are developed. The radiation history from ground to space of light reflected from individual leaves is initially multiply scattered within the crop canopy, whose geometry provides a controlling influence, then scattered and attenuated as a result of transmission through the Earth's atmosphere. The experimental and theoretical tools for studying these effects quantitatively are under development. A new radiative transfer code which uses Fourier transforms to solve the 3-D equation of transfer was developed. The initial version permits inhomogeneous non-Lambertian surfaces but assumes horizontal uniformity for the atmosphere. The computational results are in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo calculations. Laboratory apparatus to study the variation of spectral reflectance of individual leaves as a function of illumination incidence angle and reflection angle was used. These data can then be used in models to determine canopy scattering effects. Stress tests by observing leaf reflectance at 0.9 microns as a function of time following clipping from the stem was performed. A reflectance increase due to loss of water has been observed.

  16. Sustainable Water Resources Management in a Complex Watershed Under Climate Change Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, J. P.; McPhee, J.

    2007-05-01

    The Aconcagua River Basin in central Chile supplies water for over one million people, high-return agriculture, mining and hydropower industries. The Aconcagua river basin has Mediterranean/semi-arid climate, its hydrologic regime varies along its path from snow- to a rainfall-dominated, and significant stream-aquifer interaction is observed throughout the river path. A complex water market operates in the Aconcagua River Basin, where private owners hold surface and subsurface water rights independently of land ownership and/or intended use. The above yield integrated watershed management critical for the sustainability of basin operations, moreover under conditions of significant precipitation interannual variability and uncertain future climatic scenarios. In this work we propose an integrated hydrologic-operational model for the Aconcagua River in order to evaluate sustainable management scenarios under conditions of climatic uncertainty. The modeling software WEAP (Water Evaluation and Planning System) serves as the platform for decision support, allowing the assessment of diverse scenarios of water use development and hydrologic conditions. The hydrologic component of the adopted model utilizes conceptual functions for describing the relations between different hydrologic variables. The management component relies on economic valuation for characterizing the space of efficient operational policies.

  17. [Growing complexity of cardiologic intensive rehabilitation: motor rehabilitation resources and programs of physical training].

    PubMed

    Michelis, E; Capurro, E; Remaggi, C; Belloni, L; Griffo, R

    2002-09-01

    In the last few years the population referred to cardiac rehabilitation centers has changed profoundly: the number of survivors of acute cardiac events has increased and heart surgery is being proposed to ever greater numbers of elderly patients with frequent and greater comorbidities, which make the management of physical training programs more complex. Consequently, just as rehabilitation cardiologists have had to expand their field of analyses and professional skills and nurses have had to integrate their care protocols, physiotherapists too have had to adapt the management of motor rehabilitation programs to the various needs and problems of each patient in the different phases of recovery. The aim of this paper is to present and discuss the procedures followed in our center concerning both the mode and contents of a standard course of motor rehabilitation for patients without complications and those for patients with complications. The paper analyzes the various assessments, the training program, the instruments of control and verification of the results, and discusses the instruments of intervention in patients affected by complications such as respiratory disturbances, musculoskeletal impairment, complications arising from injury, neurological deficit and severe deconditioning. Finally, the role of the physiotherapist in the active, propositive management of a recovery program is discussed.

  18. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 2. Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region. (WHK)

  19. Review: Formation of Peptide Radical Ions Through Dissociative Electron Transfer in Ternary Metal-Ligand-Peptide Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Ivan K.; Laskin, Julia

    2011-12-31

    The formation and fragmentation of odd-electron ions of peptides and proteins is of interest to applications in biological mass spectrometry. Gas-phase redox chemistry occurring during collision-induced dissociation of ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes enables the formation of a variety of peptide radicals including the canonical radical cations, M{sup +{sm_bullet}}, radical dications, [M{sup +}H]{sup 2+{sm_bullet}}, radical anions, [M-2H]{sup -{sm_bullet}}. In addition, odd-electron peptide ions with well-defined initial location of the radical site are produced through side chain losses from the radical ions. Subsequent fragmentation of these species provides information on the role of charge and the location of the radical site on the competition between radical-induced and proton-driven fragmentation of odd-electron peptide ions. This account summarizes current understanding of the factors that control the efficiency of the intramolecular electron transfer (ET) in ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes resulting in formation of odd-electron peptide ions. Specifically, we discuss the effect of the metal center, the ligand and the peptide structure on the competition between the ET, proton transfer (PT), and loss of neutral peptide and neutral peptide fragments from the complex. Fundamental studies of the structures, stabilities, and the energetics and dynamics of fragmentation of such complexes are also important for detailed molecular-level understanding of photosynthesis and respiration in biological systems.

  20. Quantum effects in electron emission from and accretion on negatively charged spherical particles in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.; Misra, Shikha

    2012-07-15

    The authors have investigated the electron emissions (thermionic, electric field, photoelectric, and light induced field) from and electron accretion on a charged particle in a complex plasma, on the basis of a three region electrical potential model in and around a charged spherical particle in a complex plasma, characterized by Debye shielding. A continuous variation of the transmission coefficient across the surface of a particle (corresponding to emission and accretion) with the radial electron energy {epsilon}{sub r} has been obtained. It is seen that the numerical values of the emission and accretion transmission coefficients [D({epsilon}{sub r})] are almost the same. This is the necessary and sufficient condition for the validity of Saha's equation for thermal equilibrium of a system of dust and electrons. This is in contrast to the earlier condition, which limited the range of validity of Saha's equation to the range of the applicability of Born approximation. It is seen that D({epsilon}{sub r}) increases with increasing {epsilon}{sub r}, increasing negative electric potential on the surface, decreasing radius, and deceasing Debye length. The electron currents, corresponding to thermionic, electric field, photoelectric and light induced field emission increase with increasing surface potential; this fact may have significant repercussions in complex plasma kinetics. Since numerically D({epsilon}{sub r}) is significantly different from unity in the range of {epsilon}{sub r} of interest, it is necessary to take into account the D({epsilon}{sub r})-{epsilon}{sub r} dependence in complex plasma theory.

  1. Modeling Feasibility of a Proposed Renewable Energy System with Wind and Solar Resources and Hydro Storage in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Koracin, D.; Hamilton, R.; Hagen, D.; King, K. C.

    2012-04-01

    High temporal and spatial variability in wind and solar power brings difficulties in integrating these resources into an electricity grid. These difficulties are even more emphasized in areas with complex topography due to complicated flow patterns and cloudiness evolution. This study investigates the feasibility and efficiency of a proposed renewable energy system with wind and solar resources and hydro storages in western Nevada, U.S.A. The state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used for the prediction of wind fields and incoming solar radiation at the ground surface. Forecast winds and solar radiation were evaluated with observational data from four wind masts and four meteorological towers in two months, July 2007 and January 2010. Based on a hypothetical wind farm and an assumed neighboring solar power plant both located near the hydro storage facility, as well as considering local power demand, the efficiency of the renewable energy system is projected. One of the main questions was how to optimize a schedule of activating pump storages according to the characteristics of several available hydro pumps, and wind and/or solar power predictions. The results show that segmentation of the pump-storage channel provides improved efficiency of the entire system. This modeled renewable energy system shows promise for possible applications and grid integration.

  2. Effects of formate binding on the quinone-iron electron acceptor complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Sedoud, Arezki; Kastner, Lisa; Cox, Nicholas; El-Alaoui, Sabah; Kirilovsky, Diana; Rutherford, A William

    2011-02-01

    EPR was used to study the influence of formate on the electron acceptor side of photosystem II (PSII) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Two new EPR signals were found and characterized. The first is assigned to the semiquinone form of Q(B) interacting magnetically with a high spin, non-heme-iron (Fe²(+), S=2) when the native bicarbonate/carbonate ligand is replaced by formate. This assignment is based on several experimental observations, the most important of which were: (i) its presence in the dark in a significant fraction of centers, and (ii) the period-of-two variations in the concentration expected for Q(B)(•-) when PSII underwent a series of single-electron turnovers. This signal is similar but not identical to the well-know formate-modified EPR signal observed for the Q(A)(•-)Fe²(+) complex (W.F.J. Vermaas and A.W. Rutherford, FEBS Lett. 175 (1984) 243-248). The formate-modified signals from Q(A)(•-)Fe²(+) and Q(B)(•-)Fe²(+) are also similar to native semiquinone-iron signals (Q(A)(•-)Fe²(+)/Q(B)(•-)Fe²(+)) seen in purple bacterial reaction centers where a glutamate provides the carboxylate ligand to the iron. The second new signal was formed when Q(A)(•-) was generated in formate-inhibited PSII when the secondary acceptor was reduced by two electrons. While the signal is reminiscent of the formate-modified semiquinone-iron signals, it is broader and its main turning point has a major sub-peak at higher field. This new signal is attributed to the Q(A)(•-)Fe²(+) with formate bound but which is perturbed when Q(B) is fully reduced, most likely as Q(B)H₂ (or possibly Q(B)H(•-) or Q(B)(²•-)). Flash experiments on formate-inhibited PSII monitoring these new EPR signals indicate that the outcome of charge separation on the first two flashes is not greatly modified by formate. However on the third flash and subsequent flashes, the modified Q(A)(•-)Fe²(+)Q(B)H₂ signal is trapped in the EPR experiment and there is a marked

  3. Determining electron temperature for small spherical probes from network analyzer measurements of complex impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. N.; Fernsler, R. F.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2008-12-01

    In earlier work, using a network analyzer, it was shown that collisionless resistance (CR) exists in the sheath of a spherical probe when driven by a small rf signal. The CR is inversely proportional to the plasma density gradient at the location where the applied angular frequency equals the plasma frequency ωpe. Recently, efforts have concentrated on a study of the low-to-intermediate frequency response of the probe to the rf signal. At sufficiently low frequencies, the CR is beyond cutoff, i.e., below the plasma frequency at the surface of the probe. Since the electron density at the probe surface decreases as a function of applied (negative) bias, the CR will extend to lower frequencies as the magnitude of negative bias increases. Therefore to eliminate both CR and ion current contributions, the frequencies presently being considered are much greater than the ion plasma frequency, ωpi, but less than the plasma frequency, ωpe(r0), where r0 is the probe radius. It is shown that, in this frequency regime, the complex impedance measurements made with a network analyzer can be used to determine electron temperature. An overview of the theory is presented along with comparisons to data sets made using three stainless steel spherical probes of different sizes in different experimental environments and different plasma parameter regimes. The temperature measurements made by this method are compared to those made by conventional Langmuir probe sweeps; the method shown here requires no curve fitting as is the usual procedure with Langmuir probes when a Maxwell-Boltzmann electron distribution is assumed. The new method requires, however, a solution of the Poisson equation to determine the approximate sheath dimensions and integrals to determine approximate plasma and sheath inductances. The solution relies on the calculation of impedance for a spherical probe immersed in a collisionless plasma and is based on a simple circuit analogy for the plasma. Finally, the

  4. Electronic eRAPID3 (Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data): opportunities and complexities.

    PubMed

    Pincus, Theodore

    2016-01-01

    RAPID3 (routine assessment of patient index data) is an index found within a multi-dimensional health assessment questionnaire (MDHAQ) for routine clinical care, composed only of 3 self-report scores for physical function, pain, and patient global estimate, each scored 0-10, for a total of 0-30. RAPID3 is correlated significantly with DAS28 (Disease Activity Score) and CDAI (Clinical Disease Activity Index), and distinguishes active from control treatments as efficiently as these indices in clinical trials involving adalimumab, abatacept, certolizumab, infliximab, and rituximab. Many versions of an electronic RAPID3 (eRAPID3) have been developed, which are incompatible with one another, as seen for electronic medical records (EMR). Therefore, opportunities are lost to pool data from many sites for advancement of patient care and outcomes. Interfaces for linkage to EMRs and pooling of data are available as Health Level Seven (HL7) standards, FHIR (Fast Health Interoperability Resources), and innovative open platforms like SMART (Substitutable Medical Apps, Reusable Technology), but many eRAPID3 versions do not have this capacity. RAPID3 scores may be elevated in many patients due to damage or distress, rather than, or in addition to, inflammation, a problem that also affects DAS28, CDAI, and all RA indices which include a patient global estimate, even if they include a formal joint count. A full MDHAQ, of which RAPID3 is a component, provides clues to the presence of damage, and/or distress and adds much further information, with no more work for the health professional and little more time for the patient. A RheuMetric physician checklist of global scores for inflammation, damage, and distress is also useful to recognise damage and/or distress, but not available with most available eRAPID3 versions. Many eRAPID3 versions also are limited by the absence of flowsheets to monitor scores over time, the absence of strategies to convey data to health professionals to

  5. Framework for Smart Electronic Health Record-Linked Predictive Models to Optimize Care for Complex Digestive Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Regueiro MD, Krasinskas AM, Saul M, Sapienza D, Binion DG, Hartman D. Mucosal IgG4 Cell Infiltration in Ulcerative Colitis (UC) is Linked to Disease ...Record-Linked Predictive Models to Optimize Care for Complex Digestive Diseases PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael A. Dunn, MD CONTRACTING...Framework for Smart Electronic Health Record-Linked Predictive Models to Optimize Care for Complex Digestive Diseases 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH11-2

  6. Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-03

    of Arsenic- Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory June 3, 2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. L. Huang S.g...NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic- Water Complexes Using... water molecules should be associated with response features that are intermediate between that of isolated molecules and that of a bulk system. DFT and

  7. Electronic medical record data to identify variables associated with a fibromyalgia diagnosis: importance of health care resource utilization

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Elizabeth T; Mardekian, Jack; Emir, Birol; Clair, Andrew; Kuhn, Max; Silverman, Stuart L

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of fibromyalgia (FM) is often challenging. Identifying factors associated with an FM diagnosis may guide health care providers in implementing appropriate diagnostic and management strategies. Methods This retrospective study used the de-identified Humedica electronic medical record (EMR) database to identify variables associated with an FM diagnosis. Cases (n=4,296) were subjects ≥18 years old with ≥2 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for FM (729.1) ≥30 days apart during 2012, associated with an integrated delivery network, with ≥1 encounter with a health care provider in 2011 and 2012. Controls without FM (no-FM; n=583,665) did not have the ICD-9 codes for FM. Demographic, clinical, and health care resource utilization variables were extracted from structured EMR data. Univariate analysis identified variables showing significant differences between the cohorts based on odds ratios (ORs). Results Consistent with FM epidemiology, FM subjects were predominantly female (78.7% vs 64.5%; P<0.0001) and slightly older (mean age 53.3 vs 52.7 years; P=0.0318). Relative to the no-FM cohort, the FM cohort was characterized by a higher prevalence of nearly all evaluated comorbidities; the ORs suggested a higher likelihood of an FM diagnosis (P<0.0001), especially for musculoskeletal and neuropathic pain conditions (OR 3.1 for each condition). Variables potentially associated with an FM diagnosis included higher levels of use of specific health care resources including emergency-room visits, outpatient visits, hospitalizations, and medications. Units used per subject for emergency-room visits, outpatient visits, hospitalizations, and medications were also significantly higher in the FM cohort (P<0.0001), confirming resource utilization as an important variable associated with an FM diagnosis. Conclusion Significant differences between the FM and no-FM cohorts were observed for nearly all the demographic

  8. Collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms II. Low-energy program using the method of the exterior complex scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, Jakub; Houfek, Karel

    2014-11-01

    While collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms pose a well studied and in some sense closed problem, there is still no free computer code ready for “production use”, that would enable applied researchers to generate necessary data for arbitrary impact energies and scattering transitions directly if absent in on-line scattering databases. This is the second article on the Hex program package, which describes a new computer code that is, with a little setup, capable of solving the scattering equations for energies ranging from a fraction of the ionization threshold to approximately 100 eV or more, depending on the available computational resources. The program implements the exterior complex scaling method in the B-spline basis. Catalogue identifier: AETI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 44 440 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 322 643 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++11. Computer: Any. Operating system: Any system with a C++11 compiler (e.g. GCC 4.8.1; tested on OpenSUSE 13.1 and Windows 8). Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Parallelized by OpenMP and MPI. RAM: Depending on input; 4.9 GiB for the test run. Classification: 2.4. External routines: GSL [1], HDF5 [2], UMFPACK [3], FFTW3 [4], optionally with OpenBLAS [5]. Nature of problem: Solution of the two-particle Schrödinger equation in central field. Solution method: The two-electron states are expanded into angular momentum eigenstates, which gives rise to the coupled bi-radial equations. The bi-radially dependent solution is then represented in a B-spline basis, which transforms the set of equations into a large matrix equation in this basis. The boundary condition

  9. Fresh look at electron-transfer mechanisms via the donor/acceptor bindings in the critical encounter complex.

    PubMed

    Rosokha, Sergiy V; Kochi, Jay K

    2008-05-01

    Seminal insights provided by the iconic R. S. Mulliken and his "charge-transfer" theory, H. Taube and his "outer/inner-sphere" mechanisms, R. A. Marcus and his "two-state non-adiabatic" theory, and N. S. Hush and his "intervalence" theory are each separately woven into the rich panoramic tapestry constituting chemical research into electron-transfer dynamics, and its mechanistic dominance for the past half century and more. In this Account, we illustrate how the simultaneous melding of all four key concepts allows sharp focus on the charge-transfer character of the critical encounter complex to evoke the latent facet of traditional electron-transfer mechanisms. To this end, we exploit the intervalence (electronic) transition that invariably accompanies the diffusive encounter of electron-rich organic donors (D) with electron-poor acceptors (A) as the experimental harbinger of the collision complex, which is then actually isolated and X-ray crystallographically established as loosely bound pi-stacked pairs of various aromatic and olefinic donor/acceptor dyads with uniform interplanar separations of r(DA) = 3.1 +/- 0.2 A. These X-ray structures, together with the spectral measurements of their intervalence transitions, lead to the pair of important electron-transfer parameters, H(DA) (electronic coupling element) versus lambdaT (reorganization energy), the ratio of which generally defines the odd-electron mobility within such an encounter complex in terms of the resonance stabilization of the donor/acceptor assembly [D, A] as opposed to the reorganization-energy penalty required for its interconversion to the electron-transfer state [D(+*), A(-*)]. We recognize the resonance-stabilization energy relative to the intrinsic activation barrier as the mechanistic binding factor, Q = 2H(DA)/lambdaT, to represent the quantitative measure of the highly variable continuum of inner-sphere/outer-sphere interactions that are possible within various types of precursor complexes

  10. Faster Interprotein Electron Transfer in a [Myoglobin, b(5)] Complex with a Redesigned Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, P.; Nocek, J.M.; Vura-Weis, Josh; Lockard, Jenny V.; Wasielewski, Michael R; Hoffman, Brian M.

    2010-11-18

    Direct measurements of electron transfer (ET) within a protein-protein complex with a redesigned interface formed by physiological partner proteins myoglobin (Mb) and cytochrome b5 (b5) reveal interprotein ET rates comparable to those observed within the photosynthetic reaction center. Brownian dynamics simulations show that Mb in which three surface acid residues are mutated to lysine binds b5 in an ensemble of configurations distributed around a reactive most-probable structure. Correspondingly, charge-separation ET from a photoexcited singlet zinc porphyrin incorporated within Mb to the heme of b5 and the follow-up charge-recombination exhibit distributed kinetics, with median rate constants, ksf = 2.1 × 109 second-1 and ksb = 4.3 × 1010 second-1, respectively. The latter approaches that for the initial step in photosynthetic charge separation, k = 3.3 × 1011 second-1.

  11. Evolution of opto-electronic properties during film formation of complex semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, M. D.; Mainz, R.; Österle, F.; Rodriguez-Alvarez, H.; Greiner, D.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Unold, T.

    2017-01-01

    Optical and electrical properties of complex semiconducting alloys like Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) are strongly influenced by the reaction pathways occurring during their deposition process. This makes it desirable to observe and control these properties in real-time during the deposition. Here we show for the first time the evolution of the band gap and the sub-band-gap defect absorption of CIGS thin film as well as surface roughness during a three-stage co-evaporation process by means of an optical analysis technique, based on white light reflectometry (WLR). By simultaneously recording structural information with in-situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence we can directly correlate the evolution of opto-electronic material parameters with the structural properties of the film during growth. We find that the surface roughness and the sub-gap light absorption can be correlated with the phase evolution during the transformation from (In,Ga)2Se3 to Cu(In,Ga)Se2 by the incorporation of Cu into the film. Sub-bandgap light absorption is found to be influenced by the Cu-saturated growth phase and is lowered close to the points of stoichiometry, allowing for an advanced process design. PMID:28374745

  12. Complexation and Electronic Communication between Corannulene-Based Buckybowls and a Curved Truxene-TTF Donor.

    PubMed

    Gallego, María; Calbo, Joaquín; Krick Calderon, Rafael M; Pla, Paula; Hsieh, Ya-Chu; Pérez, Emilio M; Wu, Yao-Ting; Ortí, Enrique; Guldi, Dirk M; Martín, Nazario

    2017-03-13

    The association behavior of an electron-donating, bowl-shaped, truxene-based tetrathiafulvalene (truxTTF) with two corannulene-based fullerene fragments, C32 H12 and C38 H14 , is investigated in several solvents. Formation of 1:1 complexes is followed by absorption titrations and complemented by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The binding constants are in the range log Ka =2.9-3.5. DFT calculations reveal that the most stable arrangement is the conformation in which the 1,3-dithiole ring of truxTTF is placed inside the concave cavity of the corannulene derivative. This arrangement is confirmed experimentally by NMR measurements, and implies that a combination of π-π and CH-π interactions is the driving force for association. Time-dependent DFT calculations reproduce the experimental UV/Vis titrations and provide a detailed understanding of the spectral changes observed. Femtosecond transient absorption studies reveal the processes occurring after photoexcitation of either C32 H12 or C38 H14 and their supramolecular associates with truxTTF. In the case of truxTTF⋅C38 H14 , photoexcitation yields the charge-separated state truxTTF(.+) ⋅C38 H14(.-) with a lifetime of approximately 160 ps.

  13. A scheme for the uniform mapping and monitoring of earth resources and environmental complexes using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulton, C. E. (Principal Investigator); Welch, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Progress on plans for the development and testing of a practical procedure and system for the uniform mapping and monitoring of natural ecosystems and environmental complexes from space-acquired imagery is discussed. With primary emphasis on ERTS-1 imagery, but supported by appropriate aircraft photography as necessary, the objectives are to accomplish the following: (1) Develop and test in a few selected sites and areas of the western United States a standard format for an ecological and land use legend for making natural resource inventories on a simulated global basis. (2) Based on these same limited geographic areas, identify the potentialities and limitations of the legend concept for the recognition and annotation of ecological analogs and environmental complexes. An additional objective is to determine the optimum combination of space photography, aerial photography, ground data, human data analysis, and automatic data analysis for estimating crop yield in the rice growing areas of California and Louisiana.

  14. Electron-rich N-heterocyclic silylene (NHSi)-iron complexes: synthesis, structures, and catalytic ability of an isolable hydridosilylene-iron complex.

    PubMed

    Blom, Burgert; Enthaler, Stephan; Inoue, Shigeyoshi; Irran, Elisabeth; Driess, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    The first electron-rich N-heterocyclic silylene (NHSi)-iron(0) complexes are reported. The synthesis of the starting complex is accomplished by reaction of the electron-rich Fe(0) precursor [(dmpe)2Fe(PMe3)] 1 (dmpe =1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane) with the N-heterocyclic chlorosilylene LSiCl (L = PhC(N(t)Bu)2) 2 to give, via Me3P elimination, the corresponding iron complex [(dmpe)2Fe(←:Si(Cl)L)] 3. Reaction of in situ generated 3 with MeLi afforded [(dmpe)2Fe(←:Si(Me)L)] 4 under salt metathesis reaction, while its reaction with Li[BHEt3] yielded [(dmpe)2Fe(←:Si(H)L)] 5, a rare example of an isolable Si(II) hydride complex and the first such example for iron. All complexes were fully characterized by spectroscopic means and by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. DFT calculations further characterizing the bonding situation between the Si(II) and Fe(0) centers were also carried out, whereby multiple bonding character is detected in all cases (Wiberg Bond Index >1). For the first time, the catalytic activity of a Si(II) hydride complex was investigated. Complex 5 was used as a precatalyst for the hydrosilylation of a variety of ketones in the presence of (EtO)3SiH as a hydridosilane source. In most cases excellent conversions to the corresponding alcohols were obtained after workup. The reaction pathway presumably involves a ketone-assisted 1,2-hydride transfer from the Si(II) to Fe(0) center, as a key elementary step, resulting in a betaine-like silyliumylidene intermediate. The appearance of the latter intermediate is supported by DFT calculations, and a mechanistic proposal for the catalytic process is presented.

  15. Reactive oxygen species are generated by the respiratory complex II--evidence for lack of contribution of the reverse electron flow in complex I.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Rivero-Segura, Nadia A; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Neuzil, Jiri; Ralph, Stephen J; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara

    2013-02-01

    Succinate-driven oxidation via complex II (CII) may have a significant contribution towards the high rates of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mitochondria. Here, we show that the CII Q site inhibitor thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) blocks succinate + rotenone-driven ROS production, whereas the complex III (CIII) Qo inhibitor stigmatellin has no effect, indicating that CII, not CIII, is the ROS-producing site. The complex I (CI) inhibitor rotenone partially reduces the ROS production driven by high succinate levels (5 mm), which is commonly interpreted as being due to inhibition of a reverse electron flow from CII to CI. However, experimental evidence presented here contradicts the model of reverse electron flow. First, ROS levels produced using succinate + rotenone were significantly higher than those produced using glutamate + malate + rotenone. Second, in tumor mitochondria, succinate-driven ROS production was significantly increased (not decreased) by rotenone. Third, in liver mitochondria, rotenone had no effects on succinate-driven ROS production. Fourth, using isolated heart or hepatoma (AS-30D) mitochondria, the CII Qp anti-cancer drug mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate (MitoVES) induced elevated ROS production in the presence of low levels of succinate(0.5 mm), but rotenone had no effect. Using sub-mitochondrial particles, the Cu-based anti-cancer drug Casiopeina II-gly enhanced succinate-driven ROS production. Thus, the present results are inconsistent with and question the interpretation of reverse electron flow from CII to CI and the rotenone effect on ROS production supported by succinate oxidation. Instead, a thermodynamically more favorable explanation is that, in the absence of CIII or complex IV (CIV) inhibitors (which, when added, facilitate reverse electron flow by inducing accumulation of ubiquinol, the CI product), the CII redox centers are the major source of succinate-driven ROS production.

  16. A Theoretical Study of NO2 Complexes with Aluminium and Gallium Based on Topological Analysis of Electron Density and Electron Localization Function

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, Jaroslaw; Latajaka, Zdzislaw

    2000-12-26

    Results of DFT and MP4 calculations on AlNO2 and GaNO2 molecules are presented. One Cs and two C2v structures (two minima and one TS) are found and their energies and vibrational frequencies are reported and discussed. The minima are close in energy and lie ca. 70 kcal mol-1 below reactants (M+NO2). More insight is obtained via topological analysis of electron density and electron localization function (ELF). It is shown that the molecules are bound mainly via electrostatic interactions, and there is a significant charge transfer from metal atom to the NO2 moiety. Detailed analysis of the ELF shows that the loss of stability of gallium complexes with respect to aluminium structures is best explained by (antibonding) influence of gallium semi-cored electrons.

  17. Electron-microprobe study of chromitites associated with alpine ultramafic complexes and some genetic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    Electron-microprobe and petrographic studies of alpine chromite deposits from around the world demonstrate that they are bimodal with respect to the chromic oxide content of their chromite. The two modes occur at 54 ? 4 and 37 ? 3 weight per cent chromic oxide corresponding to chromite designated as high-chromium and high-aluminum chromite respectively. The high-chromium chromite occurs exclusively with highly magnesian olivine (Fo92-97) and some interstitial diopside. The high-aluminum chromite is associated with more ferrous olivine (Fo88-92), diopside, enstatite, and feldspar. The plot of the mole ratios Cr/(Cr+Al+Fe3+) vs. Mg/(Mg+Fe2+) usually presented for alpine chromite is shown to have a high-chromium, high-iron to low-chromium, low-iron trend contrary to that shown by stratiform chromite. This trend is characteristic of alpine type chromite and is termed the alpine trend. However, a trend similar to that for startiform chromite is discernable on the graph for the high-chromium chromite data. This latter trend is well-developed at Red Mountain, Seldovia, Alaska. Analysis of the iron-magnesium distribution coefficient, Kd=(Fe/Mg)ol/(Fe/Mg)ch, between olivine and chromite shows that Kd for the high-chromium chromite from all ultramafic complexes has essentially the same constant value of .05 while the distribution coefficient for the high-aluminum chromite varies with composition of the chromite. These distribution coefficients are also characteristic of alpine-type chromites. The constant value for Kd for the high-chromium chromite and associated high-magnesium olivine in all alpine complexes suggests that they all crystallized under similar physico-chemical conditions. The two types of massive chromite and their associations of silicate minerals suggest the possibility of two populations with different origins. Recrystallization textures associated with the high-aluminum chromite together with field relationships between the gabbro and the chromite pods

  18. Electronic structure determination using an assembly of conventional and synchrotron techniques: The case of a xanthate complex.

    PubMed

    Juncal, Luciana C; Avila, José; Asensio, Maria Carmen; Della Védova, Carlos O; Romano, Rosana M

    2017-03-03

    The electronic properties of the coordination complex nickel (II) bis-n-propylxanthate, Ni(CH3(CH2)2OC(S)S)2, were studied by a combination of complementary experimental (both laboratory and synchrotron based techniques) and theoretical methods. Energy differences between HOMOs and LUMOs were determined from UV-visible spectroscopy. The assignment of the transitions were performed with the aid of TD-DFT calculations and based in symmetry considerations. The analysis of the Raman excitation profiles of selected vibrational modes of the complex, taken in resonance with a particular electronic transition, was found to reinforce the electronic assignment. Experimental binding energies of inner and core electrons were determined by PES measurements. Ni K-edge, S K-edge, Ni L-edge, O K-edge and C K-edge XANES spectra were interpreted in terms of the promotion of core electrons to unoccupied electronic levels. An experimental quantitative molecular orbital diagram was constructed using the information extracted from the different techniques.

  19. Solving structure in the CP29 light harvesting complex with polarization-phased 2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Naomi S.; Davis, Jeffrey A.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2011-01-01

    The CP29 light harvesting complex from green plants is a pigment-protein complex believed to collect, conduct, and quench electronic excitation energy in photosynthesis. We have spectroscopically determined the relative angle between electronic transition dipole moments of its chlorophyll excitation energy transfer pairs in their local protein environments without relying on simulations or an X-ray crystal structure. To do so, we measure a basis set of polarized 2D electronic spectra and isolate their absorptive components on account of the tensor relation between the light polarization sequences used to obtain them. This broadly applicable advance further enhances the acuity of polarized 2D electronic spectroscopy and provides a general means to initiate or feed back on the structural modeling of electronically-coupled chromophores in condensed phase systems, tightening the inferred relations between the spatial and electronic landscapes of ultrafast energy flow. We also discuss the pigment composition of CP29 in the context of light harvesting, energy channeling, and photoprotection within photosystem II. PMID:21321222

  20. Bis(alpha-diimine)iron complexes: electronic structure determination by spectroscopy and broken symmetry density functional theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Muresan, Nicoleta; Lu, Connie C; Ghosh, Meenakshi; Peters, Jonas C; Abe, Megumi; Henling, Lawrence M; Weyhermöller, Thomas; Bill, Eckhard; Wieghardt, Karl

    2008-06-02

    The electronic structure of a family comprising tetrahedral (alpha-diimine)iron dichloride, and tetrahedral bis(alpha-diimine)iron compounds has been investigated by Mossbauer spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and X-ray crystallography. In addition, broken-symmetry density functional theoretical (B3LYP) calculations have been performed. A detailed understanding of the electronic structure of these complexes has been obtained. A paramagnetic (St=2), tetrahedral complex [FeII(4L)2], where (4L)1- represents the diamagnetic monoanion N-tert-butylquinolinylamide, has been synthesized and characterized to serve as a benchmark for a Werner-type complex containing a tetrahedral FeIIN4 geometry and a single high-spin ferrous ion. In contrast to the most commonly used description of the electronic structure of bis(alpha-diimine)iron(0) complexes as low-valent iron(0) species with two neutral alpha-diimine ligands, it is established here that they are, in fact, complexes containing two (alpha-diiminato)1-* pi radical monoanions and a high-spin ferrous ion (in tetrahedral N4 geometry) (SFe=2). Intramolecular antiferromagnetic coupling between the pi radical ligands (Srad=1/2) and the ferrous ion (SFe=2) yields the observed St=1 ground state. The study confirms that alpha-diimines are redox noninnocent ligands with an energetically low-lying antibonding pi* lowest unoccupied molecular orbital which can accept one or two electrons from a transition metal ion. The (alpha-diimine)FeCl2 complexes (St=2) are shown to contain a neutral alpha-diimine ligand, a high spin ferrous ion, and two chloride ligands.

  1. Evidence for the role of cyclic electron flow in photoprotection for oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Ying-Jie; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2016-05-01

    Cyclic electron flow (CEF) alleviates PSII photo-inhibition under high light by at least two different mechanisms: one is liked to thermal energy dissipation (qE) and the other one is independent of qE. However, the latter mechanism is unclear. Because the photodamage to PSII primarily occurred at the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), and the stability of OEC is dependent on proton gradient across thylakoid membrane (ΔpH), we hypothesize that the CEF-dependent generation of ΔpH can alleviate photodamage to OEC. To test this hypothesis, we determined the effects of antimycin A (AA), methyl viologen (MV), chloramphenicol (CM), nigericin (Nig) on PSII activity and the stability of OEC for leaves of a light-demanding tropical tree species Erythrophleum guineense by the analysis of OKJIP chlorophyll a fluorescence transient. After high light treatment, the stronger decrease in Fv/Fm in the AA-, CM-, MV-, and Nig-treated samples was accompanied with larger photo damage of OEC. The AA-treated samples significantly showed lower CEF activity than the H2O-treated samples. Although the AA-treated leaves significantly showed stronger PSII photo-inhibition and photo-damage of OEC compared to the H2O-treated leaves, the value of non-photochemical quenching did not differ between them. Therefore, CEF activity was partly inhibited in the AA-treated samples, and the stronger PSII photo-inhibition in the AA-treated leaves was independent of qE. Taking together, we propose a hypothesis that CEF-dependent generation of ΔpH under high light plays an important role in photoprotection for the OEC activity.

  2. Charting a Course through CORAL: Texas A&M University Libraries' Experience Implementing an Open-Source Electronic Resources Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartnett, Eric; Beh, Eugenia; Resnick, Taryn; Ugaz, Ana; Tabacaru, Simona

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, after two previous unsuccessful attempts at electronic resources management system (ERMS) implementation, Texas A&M University (TAMU) Libraries set out once again to find an ERMS that would fit its needs. After surveying the field, TAMU Libraries selected the University of Notre Dame Hesburgh Libraries-developed, open-source ERMS,…

  3. The BRIGHTEN Program: Implementation and Evaluation of a Program to Bridge Resources of an Interdisciplinary Geriatric Health Team via Electronic Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Erin E.; Lapidos, Stan; Eisenstein, Amy R.; Ivan, Iulia I.; Golden, Robyn L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of the BRIGHTEN Program (Bridging Resources of an Interdisciplinary Geriatric Health Team via Electronic Networking), an interdisciplinary team intervention for assessing and treating older adults for depression in outpatient primary and specialty medical clinics. The BRIGHTEN team collaborates "virtually"…

  4. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  5. Synthesis, electronic structure and catalytic activity of ruthenium-iodo-carbonyl complexes with thioether containing NNS donor ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Subrata; Jana, Mahendra Sekhar; Biswas, Sujan; Sinha, Chittaranjan; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2014-05-01

    The ruthenium carbonyl complexes 1 and 2 with redox noninnocent NNS donor ligand, 1-methyl-2-{(o-thiomethyl)phenylazo}imidazole (L) have been synthesized and characterized by various analytical and spectroscopic (IR, UV-Vis and 1H NMR) techniques. The complexes exhibit a quasi-reversible one electron Ru(II)/Ru(III) oxidation couple at 1.11 V for 1 and 0.76 V for 2 along with two successive one electron ligand reductions. Catalytic activity of the compounds has been investigated to the oxidation of PhCH2OH to PhCHO, 2-butanol (C4H9OH) to 2-butanone, 1-phenylethanol (PhC2H4OH) to acetophenone, cyclopentanol (C5H9OH) to cyclopentanone, cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone, cycloheptanol to cycloheptanone and cycloctanol to cycloctanone using N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMO) as oxidant. The catalytic efficiency of 2 is greater than complex 1 and well correlate with the metal oxidation potential. DFT, NBO and TDDFT calculations in DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d)/lanL2TZ(f) method are employed to interpret the structural and electronic features of the complexes.

  6. Barrier-free intermolecular proton transfer in the uracil-glycine complex induced by excess electron attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutowski, M.; Dąbkowska, I.; Rak, J.; Xu, S.; Nilles, J. M.; Radisic, D.; Bowen, K. H., Jr.

    2002-09-01

    The photoelectron spectra (PES) of anions of uracil-glycine and uracil-phenylalanine complexes reveal broad features with maxima at 1.8 and 2.0 eV. The results of ab initio density functional B3LYP and second order Møller-Plesset theory calculations indicate that the excess electron occupies a π^* orbital localized on uracil. The excess electron attachment to the complex can induce a barrier-free proton transfer (BFPT) from the carboxylic group of glycine to the O8 atom of uracil. As a result, the four most stable structures of the anion of uracil-glycine complex can be characterized as the neutral radical of hydrogenated uracil solvated by the anion of deprotonated glycine. The similarity between the PES spectra for the uracil complexes with glycine and phenylalanine suggests that the BFPT is also operative in the case of the latter anionic species. The BFPT to the O8 atom of uracil may be related to the damage of nucleic acid bases by low energy electrons because the O8 atom is involved in a hydrogen bond with adenine in the standard Watson-Crick pairing scheme.

  7. New aqua N-heterocyclic carbene Ru(II) complexes with two-electron process as selective epoxidation catalysts: an evaluation of geometrical and electronic effects.

    PubMed

    Dakkach, Mohamed; Atlamsani, Ahmed; Parella, Teodor; Fontrodona, Xavier; Romero, Isabel; Rodríguez, Montserrat

    2013-05-06

    New ruthenium complexes with general formula [Ru(II)(T)(CN-Me)X](n+) (X = Cl(-) or H2O; T = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine, trpy, or N,N-bis(2-pyridyl)ethylamine, bpea; CN-Me = N-methyl-N'-2-pyridylimidazolium) have been prepared. The complexes obtained have been characterized in solution by spectroscopic (1D- and 2D-NMR and UV-vis) techniques, mass spectrometry, and elemental analysis. The chloro complexes have also been characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. The redox properties of all the compounds were studied by CV revealing, for the reported Ru-OH2 complexes, bielectronic Ru(IV/II) redox processes throughout a wide pH range. The catalytic activity of aquo complexes was evaluated in the epoxidation of olefins using PhIO as oxidant, displaying in general good yields and high selectivities for the epoxide product. The influence of electronic and geometrical factors on the spectroscopic and electrochemical properties as well as on the catalytic activity is discussed.

  8. A practical approach to temperature effects in dissociative electron attachment cross sections using local complex potential theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Yuji; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki

    2012-09-01

    We propose a practical computational scheme to obtain temperature dependence of dissociative electron attachment cross sections to polyatomic molecules within a local complex potential theory formalism. First we perform quantum path-integral molecular dynamics simulations on the potential energy surface for the neutral molecule in order to sample initial nuclear configurations as well as momenta. Classical trajectories are subsequently integrated on the potential energy surface for the anionic state and survival probabilities are simultaneously calculated along the obtained trajectories. We have applied this simple scheme to dissociative electron attachment processes to H2O and CF3Cl, for which several previous studies are available from both the experimental and theoretical sides.

  9. Dissociative electron attachment to the H2O molecule. II. Nuclear dynamics on coupled electronic surfaces within the local complex potential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, T. N.; McCurdy, C. W.

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of a first-principles study of dissociative electron attachment to H2O . The cross sections were obtained from nuclear dynamics calculations carried out in full dimensionality within the local complex potential model by using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method. The calculations employ our previously obtained global, complex-valued, potential-energy surfaces for the three ( B12 , A12 , and B22 ) electronic Feshbach resonances involved in this process. These three metastable states of H2O- undergo several degeneracies, and we incorporate both the Renner-Teller coupling between the B12 and A12 states as well as the conical intersection between the A12 and B22 states into our treatment. The nuclear dynamics are inherently multidimensional and involve branching between different final product arrangements as well as extensive excitation of the diatomic fragment. Our results successfully mirror the qualitative features of the major fragment channels observed, but are less successful in reproducing the available results for some of the minor channels. We comment on the applicability of the local complex potential model to such a complicated resonant system.

  10. Design of operating rules in complex water resources systems using historical records, expert criteria and fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido-Velazquez, Manuel; Macian-Sorribes, Hector; María Benlliure-Moreno, Jose; Fullana-Montoro, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Water resources systems in areas with a strong tradition in water use are complex to manage by the high amount of constraints that overlap in time and space, creating a complicated framework in which past, present and future collide between them. In addition, it is usual to find "hidden constraints" in system operations, which condition operation decisions being unnoticed by anyone but the river managers and users. Being aware of those hidden constraints requires usually years of experience and a degree of involvement in that system's management operations normally beyond the possibilities of technicians. However, their impact in the management decisions is strongly imprinted in the historical data records available. The purpose of this contribution is to present a methodology capable of assessing operating rules in complex water resources systems combining historical records and expert criteria. Both sources are coupled using fuzzy logic. The procedure stages are: 1) organize expert-technicians preliminary meetings to let the first explain how they manage the system; 2) set up a fuzzy rule-based system (FRB) structure according to the way the system is managed; 3) use the historical records available to estimate the inputs' fuzzy numbers, to assign preliminary output values to the FRB rules and to train and validate these rules; 4) organize expert-technician meetings to discuss the rule structure and the input's quantification, returning if required to the second stage; 5) once the FRB structure is accepted, its output values must be refined and completed with the aid of the experts by using meetings, workshops or surveys; 6) combine the FRB with a Decision Support System (DSS) to simulate the effect of those management decisions; 7) compare its results with the ones offered by the historical records and/or simulation or optimization models; and 8) discuss with the stakeholders the model performance returning, if it's required, to the fifth or the second stage

  11. Synthesis, electronic and ESR spectral studies on copper(II) nitrate complexes with some acylhydrazines and hydrazones.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinod P

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes the preparation of [Cu(bh)2(H2O)2](NO3)2], [Cu(ibh)2(NO3)2], [Cu(ibh)2(H2O)2](NO3)2 and [Cu(iinh)2(NO3)2] (bh = benzoyl hydrazine (C6H5CONHNH2); ibh = isonicotinoyl hydrazine (NC5H4CONHNH2); ibh = isopropanone benzoyl hydrazone (C6H5CONHN=C(CH3)2; iinh = isopropanone isonicotinoyl hydrazone (NC5H4CONHN=C(CH3)2). These copper(II) complexes are characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductances, dehydration studies, ESR, IR and electronic spectral studies. The electronic and ESR spectra indicate that each complex exhibits a six-coordinate tetragonally distorted octahedral geometry in the solid state and in DMSO solution. The ESR spectra of most of the complexes are typically isotropic type at room temperature (300 K) in solid state as well as in DMSO solution. However, all the complexes exhibit invariably axial signals at 77 K in DMSO solution. The trend g(||) > g(perpendicular) > g(e,) observed in all the complexes suggests the presence of an unpaired electron in the d x2-y2 orbital of the Cu(II). The bh and inh ligands bond to Cu(II) through the >C=O and -NH2 groups whereas, ibh and iinh bond through >C=O and >C=N- groups. The IR spectra of bh and ibh complexes also show H-O-H stretching and bending modes of coordinated water.

  12. Charge transfer complex studies between some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and π-electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duymus, Hulya; Arslan, Mustafa; Kucukislamoglu, Mustafa; Zengin, Mustafa

    2006-12-01

    Charge transfer (CT) complexes of some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, naproxen and etodolac which are electron donors with some π-acceptors, such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano- p-benzoquinone (DDQ), p-chloranil ( p-CHL), have been investigated spectrophotometrically in chloroform at 21 °C. The coloured products are measured spectrophotometrically at different wavelength depending on the electronic transition between donors and acceptors. Beer's law is obeyed and colours were produced in non-aqueous media. All complexes were stable at least 2 h except for etodolac with DDQ stable for 5 min. The equilibrium constants of the CT complexes were determined by the Benesi-Hildebrand equation. The thermodynamic parameters Δ H, Δ S, Δ G° were calculated by Van't Hoff equation. Stochiometries of the complexes formed between donors and acceptors were defined by the Job's method of the continuous variation and found in 1:1 complexation with donor and acceptor at the maximum absorption bands in all cases.

  13. Amyloid-beta leads to impaired cellular respiration, energy production and mitochondrial electron chain complex activities in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rhein, V; Baysang, G; Rao, S; Meier, F; Bonert, A; Müller-Spahn, F; Eckert, A

    2009-09-01

    Evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it has been recently proposed that mitochondria are involved in the biochemical pathway by which Abeta can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we investigated the specific effects of Abeta on mitochondrial function under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory functions and energy metabolism were analyzed in control and in human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Mitochondrial respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in vital cells was measured with a high-resolution respirometry system (Oxygraph-2k). In addition, we determined the individual activities of mitochondrial complexes I-IV that compose ETC and ATP cellular levels. While the activities of complexes I and II did not change between cell types, complex IV activity was significantly reduced in APP cells. In contrast, activity of complex III was significantly enhanced in APP cells, as compensatory response in order to balance the defect of complex IV. However, this compensatory mechanism could not prevent the strong impairment of total respiration in vital APP cells. As a result, the respiratory control ratio (state3/state4) together with ATP production decreased in the APP cells in comparison with the control cells. Chronic exposure to soluble Abeta protein may result in an impairment of energy homeostasis due to a decreased respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain which, in turn, may accelerate neurons demise.

  14. ESR, spectroscopic, and quantum-chemical studies on the electronic structures of complexes formed by Cu(I) with radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsan, N.P.; Usov, O.M.; Shokhirev, N.V.; Khmelinskii, I.V.; Plyusnin, V.F.; Bazhin, N.M.

    1986-07-01

    The optical and ESR spectra have been examined for complexes of Cu(I) with various radicals, which contain various numbers of Cl/sup -/ ions in the central-atom coordination sphere. The spin-Hamiltonian parameters have been determined for all these radical complexes, and the observed ESR spectra have been compared with those calculated with allowance for second-order effects. The observed values for the isotropic and anisotropic components of the HFI constant from the central ion have been used to estimate the contributions from the 4s and 3d/sup 2//sub z/ orbitals of the copper ion to the unpaired-electron MO. Quantum-chemical calculations have been performed by the INDO method on the electronic structures and geometries of complexes formed by CH/sub 2/OH with Cu(I) for various Cl/sup -/ contents in the coordination sphere. The radical is coordinated by the ..pi.. orbital on the carbon atom, and the stabilities of the radical complexes decrease as the number of Cl/sup -/ ions in the coordination sphere increases. A geometry close to planar for the CuCl/sub 4//sup 3 -/ fragment in a complex containing four Cl/sup -/ ions.

  15. Pulsed-field ionization electron spectroscopy and binding energies of alkali metal-dimethyl ether and -dimethoxyethane complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohnlein, Bradford R.; Li, Shenggang; Fuller, Jason F.; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2005-07-01

    Lithium and sodium complexes of dimethyl ether (DME) and dimethoxyethane (DXE) were produced by reactions of laser-vaporized metal atoms with organic vapors in a pulsed nozzle cluster source. The mono-ligand complexes were studied by photoionization and pulsed field ionization zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. Vibrationally resolved ZEKE spectra were obtained for Li(DME), Na(DME) and Li(DXE) and a photoionization efficiency spectrum for Na(DXE). The ZEKE spectra were analyzed by comparing with the spectra of other metal-ether complexes and with electronic structure calculations and spectral simulations. Major vibrations measured for the M(DME) (M=Li,Na) ions were M-O and C-O stretches and M-O-C and C-O-C bends. These vibrations and additional O-Li-O and O-C-C-O bends were observed for the Li(DXE) ion. The M(DME) complexes were in C2v symmetry with the metal atom binding to oxygen, whereas Li(DXE) was in a C2 ring configuration with the Li atom attaching to both oxygen atoms. Moreover, the ionization energies of these complexes were measured from the ZEKE or photoionization spectra and bond dissociation energies were derived from a thermodynamic cycle.

  16. Quantum Computational Studies of Electron Transfer in Respiratory Complex III and its Application for Designing New Mitocan Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagras, Muhammad Ahmed

    Electron transfer occurs in many biological systems which are imperative to sustain life; oxidative phosphorylation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and photophosphorylation in photosynthetic and plant cells are well-balanced and complementary processes. Investigating electron transfer in those natural systems provides detailed knowledge of the atomistic events that lead eventually to production of ATP, or harvesting light energy. Ubiquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase complex (also known as bc 1 complex, or respiratory complex III) is a middle player in the electron transport proton pumping orchestra, located in the inner-mitochondrial membrane in eukaryotes or plasma membrane in prokaryotes, which converts the free energy of redox reactions to electrochemical proton gradient across the membrane, following the fundamental chemiosmotic principle discovered by Peter Mitchell 1. In humans, the malfunctioned bc1 complex plays a major role in many neurodegenerative diseases, stress-induced aging, and cancer development, because it produces most of the reactive oxygen species, which are also involved in cellular signaling 2. The mitochondrial bc1 complex has an intertwined dimeric structure comprised of 11 subunits in each monomer, but only three of them have catalytic function, and those are the only domains found in bacterial bc1 complex. The core subunits include: Rieske domain, which incorporates iron-sulfur cluster [2Fe-2S]; trans-membrane cytochrome b domain, incorporating low-potential heme group (heme b L) and high-potential heme group (heme b H); and cytochrome c1 domain, containing heme c1 group and two separate binding sites, Qo (or QP) site where the hydrophobic electron carrier ubihydroquinol QH2 is oxidized, and Qi (or QN) site where ubiquinone molecule Q is reduced 3. Electrons and protons in the bc1 complex flow according to the proton-motive Q-cycle proposed by Mitchell, which includes a unique electron flow bifurcation at the Qo site. At this site, one

  17. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, P G; Dhesi, S S

    2015-03-06

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007-2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described.

  18. Two-electron carbon dioxide reduction catalyzed by rhenium(I) bis(imino)acenaphthene carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Portenkirchner, Engelbert; Kianfar, Elham; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Knör, Günther

    2014-05-01

    Rhenium(I) carbonyl complexes carrying substituted bis(arylimino)acenaphthene ligands (BIAN-R) have been tested as potential catalysts for the two-electron reduction of carbon dioxide. Cyclic voltammetric studies as well as controlled potential electrolysis experiments were performed using CO2-saturated solutions of the complexes in acetonitrile and acetonitrile-water mixtures. Faradaic efficiencies of more than 30 % have been determined for the electrocatalytic production of CO. The effects of ligand substitution patterns and water content of the reaction medium on the catalytic performance of the new catalysts are discussed.

  19. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Radaelli, P. G.; Dhesi, S. S.

    2015-01-26

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007–2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described.

  20. Activated-ion electron transfer dissociation improves the ability of electron transfer dissociation to identify peptides in a complex mixture.

    PubMed

    Ledvina, Aaron R; Beauchene, Nicole A; McAlister, Graeme C; Syka, John E P; Schwartz, Jae C; Griep-Raming, Jens; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J

    2010-12-15

    Using a modified electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-enabled quadrupole linear ion trap (QLT) mass spectrometer, we demonstrate the utility of IR activation concomitant with ETD ion-ion reactions (activated-ion ETD, AI-ETD). Analyzing 12 strong cation exchanged (SCX) fractions of a LysC digest of human cell protein extract using ETD, collision-activated dissociation (CAD), and AI-ETD, we find that AI-ETD generates 13 405 peptide spectral matches (PSMs) at a 1% false-discovery rate (1% FDR), surpassing both ETD (7 968) and CAD (10 904). We also analyze 12 SCX fractions of a tryptic digest of human cell protein extract and find that ETD produces 6 234 PSMs, AI-ETD 9 130 PSMs, and CAD 15 209 PSMs. Compared to ETD with supplemental collisional activation (ETcaD), AI-ETD generates ∼80% more PSMs for the whole cell lysate digested with trypsin and ∼50% more PSMs for the whole cell lysate digested with LysC.

  1. Crucial role of nuclear dynamics for electron injection in a dye–semiconductor complex

    DOE PAGES

    Monti, Adriano; Negre, Christian F. A.; Batista, Victor S.; ...

    2015-06-05

    In this study, we investigate the electron injection from a terrylene-based chromophore to the TiO2 semiconductor bridged by a recently proposed phenyl-amide-phenyl molecular rectifier. The mechanism of electron transfer is studied by means of quantum dynamics simulations using an extended Hückel Hamiltonian. It is found that the inclusion of the nuclear motion is necessary to observe the photoinduced electron transfer. In particular, the fluctuations of the dihedral angle between the terrylene and the phenyl ring modulate the localization and thus the electronic coupling between the donor and acceptor states involved in the injection process. The electron propagation shows characteristic oscillatorymore » features that correlate with interatomic distance fluctuations in the bridge, which are associated with the vibrational modes driving the process. The understanding of such effects is important for the design of functional dyes with optimal injection and rectification properties.« less

  2. Crucial role of nuclear dynamics for electron injection in a dye–semiconductor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Monti, Adriano; Negre, Christian F. A.; Batista, Victor S.; Rego, Luis G. C.; de Groot, Huub J. M.; Buda, Francesco

    2015-06-05

    In this study, we investigate the electron injection from a terrylene-based chromophore to the TiO2 semiconductor bridged by a recently proposed phenyl-amide-phenyl molecular rectifier. The mechanism of electron transfer is studied by means of quantum dynamics simulations using an extended Hückel Hamiltonian. It is found that the inclusion of the nuclear motion is necessary to observe the photoinduced electron transfer. In particular, the fluctuations of the dihedral angle between the terrylene and the phenyl ring modulate the localization and thus the electronic coupling between the donor and acceptor states involved in the injection process. The electron propagation shows characteristic oscillatory features that correlate with interatomic distance fluctuations in the bridge, which are associated with the vibrational modes driving the process. The understanding of such effects is important for the design of functional dyes with optimal injection and rectification properties.

  3. Electron microscopic single particle analysis of a tetrameric RuvA/RuvB/Holliday junction DNA complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mayanagi, Kouta Fujiwara, Yoshie; Miyata, Tomoko; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2008-01-11

    During the late stage of homologous recombination in prokaryotes, RuvA binds to the Holliday junction intermediate and executes branch migration in association with RuvB. The RuvA subunits form two distinct complexes with the Holliday junction: complex I with the single RuvA tetramer on one side of the four way junction DNA, and complex II with two tetramers on both sides. To investigate the functional roles of complexes I and II, we mutated two residues of RuvA (L125D and E126K) to prevent octamer formation. An electron microscopic analysis indicated that the mutant RuvA/RuvB/Holliday junction DNA complex formed the characteristic tripartite structure, with only one RuvA tetramer bound to one side of the Holliday junction, demonstrating the unexpected stability of this complex. The novel bent images of the complex revealed an intriguing morphological similarity to the structure of SV40 large T antigen, which belongs to the same AAA+ family as RuvB.

  4. A multienzyme complex channels substrates and electrons through acetyl-CoA and methane biosynthesis pathways in Methanosarcina.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Dillon J; Catlett, Jennifer; Madayiputhiya, Nandu; Nandakumar, Renu; Lopez, Madeline M; Metcalf, William W; Buan, Nicole R

    2014-01-01

    Multienzyme complexes catalyze important metabolic reactions in many organisms, but little is known about the complexes involved in biological methane production (methanogenesis). A crosslinking-mass spectrometry (XL-MS) strategy was employed to identify proteins associated with coenzyme M-coenzyme B heterodisulfide reductase (Hdr), an essential enzyme in all methane-producing archaea (methanogens). In Methanosarcina acetivorans, Hdr forms a multienzyme complex with acetyl-CoA decarbonylase synthase (ACDS), and F420-dependent methylene-H4MPT reductase (Mer). ACDS is essential for production of acetyl-CoA during growth on methanol, or for methanogenesis from acetate, whereas Mer is essential for methanogenesis from all substrates. Existence of a Hdr:ACDS:Mer complex is consistent with growth phenotypes of ACDS and Mer mutant strains in which the complex samples the redox status of electron carriers and directs carbon flux to acetyl-CoA or methanogenesis. We propose the Hdr:ACDS:Mer complex comprises a special class of multienzyme redox complex which functions as a "biological router" that physically links methanogenesis and acetyl-CoA biosynthesis pathways.

  5. Electronic Structure of a Cu(II)-Alkoxide Complex Modeling Intermediates in Copper-Catalyzed Alcohol Oxidations.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Ellen C; Porter, Thomas R; Barrows, Charles J; Kaminsky, Werner; Mayer, James M; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-03-30

    In the copper-catalyzed oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, a Cu(II)-alkoxide (Cu(II)-OR) intermediate is believed to modulate the αC-H bond strength of the deprotonated substrate to facilitate the oxidation. As a structural model for these intermediates, we characterized the electronic structure of the stable compound Tp(tBu)Cu(II)(OCH2CF3) (Tp(tBu) = hydro-tris(3-tert-butyl-pyrazolyl)borate) and investigated the influence of the trifluoroethoxide ligand on the electronic structure of the complex. The compound exhibits an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum with an unusually large gzz value of 2.44 and a small copper hyperfine coupling Azz of 40 × 10(-4) cm(-1) (120 MHz). Single-crystal electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectra show that the unpaired spin population is highly localized on the copper ion (≈68%), with no more than 15% on the ethoxide oxygen. Electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra show weak ligand-field transitions between 5000 and 12,000 cm(-1) and an intense ethoxide-to-copper charge transfer (LMCT) transition at 24,000 cm(-1), resulting in the red color of this complex. Resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy reveals a Cu-O stretch mode at 592 cm(-1). Quantum chemical calculations support the interpretation and assignment of the experimental data. Compared to known Cu(II)-thiolate and Cu(II)-alkylperoxo complexes from the literature, we found an increased σ interaction in the Cu(II)-OR bond that results in the spectroscopic features. These insights lay the basis for further elucidating the mechanism of copper-catalyzed alcohol oxidations.

  6. Electronic Structure of a CuII-Alkoxide Complex Modeling Intermediates in Copper-Catalyzed Alcohol Oxidations

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Ellen C.; Porter, Thomas R.; Barrows, Charles J.; Kaminsky, Werner; Mayer, James M.; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In the copper-catalyzed oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, a CuII-alkoxide (CuII-OR) intermediate is believed to modulate the αC-H bond strength of the deprotonated substrate to facilitate the oxidation. As a structural model for these intermediates, we characterized the electronic structure of the stable compound TptBuCuII(OCH2CF3) (TptBu = (hydro-tris (3-tert-butyl-pyrazolyl) borate) and investigated the influence of the trifluoroethoxide ligand on the electronic structure of the complex. The compound exhibits an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum with an unusually large gzz value of 2.44 and a small copper hyperfine coupling Azz of 40·10−4 cm−1 (120 MHz). Single-crystal electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectra show that the unpaired spin population is highly localized on the copper ion (≈ 68 %), with no more than 15 % on the ethoxide oxygen. Electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra show weak ligand-field transitions between 5000 and 12000 cm−1 and an intense ethoxide-to-copper charge transfer (LMCT) transition at 24000 cm−1, resulting in the red color of this complex. Resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy reveals a Cu-O stretch mode at 592 cm−1. Quantum chemical calculations support the interpretation and assignment of the experimental data. Compared to known CuII-thiolate and CuII-alkylperoxo complexes from the literature, we found an increased σ interaction in the CuII-OR bond that results in the spectroscopic features. These insights lay the basis for further elucidating the mechanism of copper-catalyzed alcohol oxidations. PMID:26907976

  7. Metalloprotein complexes for the study of electron-transfer reactions. Characterization of diprotein complexes obtained by covalent cross-linking of cytochrome c and plastocyanin with a carbodiimide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J S; Brothers, H M; Neddersen, J P; Peerey, L M; Cotton, T M; Kostić, N M

    1992-01-01

    Cytochrome c (cyt) and zinc cytochrome c (Zncyt) are separately cross-linked to plastocyanin (pc) by the carbodiimide EDC according to a published method. The changes in the protein reduction potentials indicate the presence of approximately two amide cross-links. Chromatography of the diprotein complexes cyt/pc and Zncyt/pc on CM-52 resin yields multiple fractions, whose numbers depend on the eluent. UV-vis, EPR, CD, MCD, resonance Raman, and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectra show that cross-linking does not significantly perturb the heme and blue copper active sites. Degrees of heme exposure show that plastocyanin covers most of the accessible heme edge in cytochrome c. Impossibility of cross-linking cytochrome c to a plastocyanin derivative whose acidic patch had been blocked by chemical modification shows that it is the acidic patch that abuts the heme edge in the covalent complex. The chromatographic fractions of the covalent diprotein complex are structurally similar to one another and to the electrostatic diprotein complex. Isoelectric points show that the fractions differ from one another in the number and distribution of N-acylurea groups, byproducts of the reaction with the carbodiimide. Cytochrome c and plastocyanin are also tethered to each other via lysine residues by N-hydroxysuccinimide diesters. Tethers, unlike direct amide bonds, allow mobility of the cross-linked molecules. Laser-flash-photolysis experiments show that, nonetheless, the intracomplex electron-transfer reaction cyt(II)/pc(II)----cyt(III)/pc(I) is undetectable in complexes of either type. Only the electrostatic diprotein complex, in which protein rearrangement from the docking configuration to the reactive configuration is unrestricted, undergoes this intracomplex reaction at a measurable rate.

  8. Electronic structural changes of Mn in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II during the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Glatzel, Pieter; Schroeder, Henning; Pushkar, Yulia; Boron, Thaddeus; Mukherjee, Shreya; Christou, George; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Messinger, Johannes; Yachandra, Vittal K; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko

    2013-05-20

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosystem II (PS II) was studied in the S0 through S3 states using 1s2p resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy. The spectral changes of the OEC during the S-state transitions are subtle, indicating that the electrons are strongly delocalized throughout the cluster. The result suggests that, in addition to the Mn ions, ligands are also playing an important role in the redox reactions. A series of Mn(IV) coordination complexes were compared, particularly with the PS II S3 state spectrum to understand its oxidation state. We find strong variations of the electronic structure within the series of Mn(IV) model systems. The spectrum of the S3 state best resembles those of the Mn(IV) complexes Mn3(IV)Ca2 and saplnMn2(IV)(OH)2. The current result emphasizes that the assignment of formal oxidation states alone is not sufficient for understanding the detailed electronic structural changes that govern the catalytic reaction in the OEC.

  9. Electron spin relaxation and heterogeneity of the 1:1 α,γ-bisdiphenylene-β-phenylallyl (BDPA)/benzene complex.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Deborah G; Quine, Richard W; Tseitlin, Mark; Weber, Ralph T; Meyer, Virginia; Avery, Azure; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-06-23

    The electron spin-spin relaxation time (T(2)) for the 1:1 crystalline complex of α,γ-bisdiphenylene-β-phenylallyl (BDPA) with benzene was determined by continuous wave (CW) and rapid scan electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). T(2) for individual BDPA particles found by simulation of rapid scan spectra or by simulation of the Lorentzian line shapes of CW spectra were in good agreement. The T(2) for small BDPA particles in air ranged from 80 to 160 ns, which corresponds to peak-to-peak Lorentzian linewidths of 0.82-0.41 G. The removal of oxygen from the samples had a greater impact on the line width for particles that had shorter T(2) in air. Heterogeneity in the g-value was not observed at X-band. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed that the BDPA particles had varying morphology.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, electronic structure and catalytic activity of new ruthenium carbonyl complexes of N-[(2-pyridyl)methylidene]-2-aminothiazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Subhankar; Sarkar, Deblina; Jana, Mahendra Sekhar; Pramanik, Ajoy Kumar; Jana, Subrata; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Reaction of ruthenium carbonyls, [Ru(CO)2Cl2]n/[Ru(CO)4I2] with bidentate Schiffs base ligands derived by the condensation of pyridine-2-carboxaldehyde with 2-aminothiazole in a 1:1 mole ratio in acetonitrile led to the formation of complexes having general formula [Ru(CO)2(L)X2] (X = Cl (1) and I (2)) (L = N-[(2-pyridyl)methylidene]-2-aminothiazole). The compounds have been characterized by various analytical and spectroscopic (IR, electronic and 1H NMR) studies. In acetonitrile solution the complexes exhibit a weak broad metal-ligand to ligand charge transfer (MLLCT) band along with ILCT transitions. The compounds are emissive in room temperature upon excitation in the ILCT band. The complexes exhibit a quasi-reversible one electron Ru(II)/Ru(III) oxidation couple at 1.44 V for 1 and 0.94 V for 2. Catalytic activity of these compounds is investigated to the oxidation of PhCH2OH to PhCHO, 2-butanol (C4H9OH) to 2-butanone, 1-phenylethanol (PhC2H4OH) to acetophenone, cyclopentanol (C5H9OH) to cyclopentanone, cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone, cycloheptanol to cycloheptanone and cycloctanol to cycloctanone using N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMO) as oxidant. The catalytic efficiency of 2 is greater than complex 1 and well correlate with the metal oxidation potential of the complexes. DFT, NBO and TDDFT calculations are employed to explain the structural and electronic features and to support the spectroscopic assignments.

  11. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Spacecraft Circuit Diagnostics by Analog and Complex Signature Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Wade, Raymond P.; Izadnegahdar, Alain

    2011-01-01

    The Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is aimed at developing technologies that will enable space-flight crews to perform in situ component-level repair of electronics on Moon and Mars outposts, where there is no existing infrastructure for logistics spares. These technologies must provide effective repair capabilities yet meet the payload and operational constraints of space facilities. Effective repair depends on a diagnostic capability that is versatile but easy to use by crew members that have limited training in electronics. CLEAR studied two techniques that involve extensive precharacterization of "known good" circuits to produce graphical signatures that provide an easy-to-use comparison method to quickly identify faulty components. Analog Signature Analysis (ASA) allows relatively rapid diagnostics of complex electronics by technicians with limited experience. Because of frequency limits and the growing dependence on broadband technologies, ASA must be augmented with other capabilities. To meet this challenge while preserving ease of use, CLEAR proposed an alternative called Complex Signature Analysis (CSA). Tests of ASA and CSA were used to compare capabilities and to determine if the techniques provided an overlapping or complementary capability. The results showed that the methods are complementary.

  12. Distribution and dynamics of electron transport complexes in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu-Ning

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane represents a system that can carry out both oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration simultaneously. The organization, interactions and mobility of components of these two electron transport pathways are indispensable to the biosynthesis of thylakoid membrane modules and the optimization of bioenergetic electron flow in response to environmental changes. These are of fundamental importance to the metabolic robustness and plasticity of cyanobacteria. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the distribution and dynamics of electron transport components in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes. Global understanding of the principles that govern the dynamic regulation of electron transport pathways in nature will provide a framework for the design and synthetic engineering of new bioenergetic machinery to improve photosynthesis and biofuel production. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26619924

  13. Trinuclear copper complexes with triplesalen ligands: geometric and electronic effects on ferromagnetic coupling via the spin-polarization mechanism.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Thorsten; Heidemeier, Maik; Strautmann, Julia B H; Bögge, Hartmut; Stammler, Anja; Krickemeyer, Erich; Huenerbein, Robert; Grimme, Stefan; Bothe, Eberhard; Bill, Eckhard

    2007-01-01

    A series of trinuclear Cu(II) complexes with the tris(tetradentate) triplesalen ligands H(6)talen, H(6)talen(tBu(2) ), and H(6)talen(NO(2) ), namely [(talen)Cu(II) (3)] (1), [(talen(tBu(2) ))Cu(II) (3)] (2), and [(talen(NO(2) ))Cu(II) (3)] (3), were synthesized and their molecular and electronic structures determined. These triplesalen ligands provide three salen-like coordination environments bridged in a meta-phenylene arrangement by a phloroglucinol backbone. The structure of [(talen)Cu(II) (3)] (1) was communicated recently. The structure of the tert-butyl derivative [(talen(tBu(2) ))Cu(II) (3)] (2) was established in three different solvates. The molecular structures of these trinuclear complexes show notable differences, the most important of which is the degree of ligand folding around the central Cu(II)-phenolate bonds. This folding is symmetric with regard to the central phloroglucinol backbone in two structures, where it gives rise to bowl-shaped overall geometries. For one solvate two trinuclear triplesalen complexes form a supramolecular disk-like arrangement, hosting two dichloromethane molecules like two pearls in an oyster. The FTIR spectra of these complexes indicate the higher effective nuclear charge of Cu(II) in comparison to the trinuclear Ni(II) complexes by the lower C--O and higher C=N stretching frequencies. The UV/Vis/NIR spectra of 1-3 reflect the stronger ligand folding in the tert-butyl complex 2 by an intense phenolate-to-Cu(II) LMCT. This absorption is absent in 1 and is obscured by the nitro chromophore in 3. The more planar molecular structures cause orthogonality of the Cu(II) d(x(2)-y(2) ) orbital and the phenolate O p(z) orbital, which leads to small LMCT dipole strengths. Whereas 1 and 3 exhibit only irreversible oxidations, 2 exhibits a reversible one-electron oxidation at +0.26 V, a reversible two-electron oxidation at +0.59 V, and a reversible one-electron oxidation at +0.81 V versus Fc(+)/Fc. The one-electron oxidized form 2

  14. The ROS production induced by a reverse-electron flux at respiratory-chain complex 1 is hampered by metformin.

    PubMed

    Batandier, Cécile; Guigas, Bruno; Detaille, Dominique; El-Mir, M-Yehia; Fontaine, Eric; Rigoulet, M; Leverve, Xavier M

    2006-02-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was investigated in mitochondria extracted from liver of rats treated with or without metformin, a mild inhibitor of respiratory chain complex 1 used in type 2 diabetes. A high rate of ROS production, fully suppressed by rotenone, was evidenced in non-phosphorylating mitochondria in the presence of succinate as a single complex 2 substrate. This ROS production was substantially lowered by metformin pretreatment and by any decrease in membrane potential (Delta Phi(m)), redox potential (NADH/NAD), or phosphate potential, as induced by malonate, 2,4-dinitrophenol, or ATP synthesis, respectively. ROS production in the presence of glutamate-malate plus succinate was lower than in the presence of succinate alone, but higher than in the presence of glutamate-malate. Moreover, while rotenone both increased and decreased ROS production at complex 1 depending on forward (glutamate-malate) or reverse (succinate) electron flux, no ROS overproduction was evidenced in the forward direction with metformin. Therefore, we propose that reverse electron flux through complex 1 is an alternative pathway, which leads to a specific metformin-sensitive ROS production.

  15. Density functional calculations on electronic circular dichroism spectra of chiral transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Autschbach, Jochen; Jorge, Francisco E; Ziegler, Tom

    2003-05-05

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) has for the first time been applied to the computation of circular dichroism (CD) spectra of transition metal complexes, and a detailed comparison with experimental spectra has been made. Absorption spectra are also reported. Various Co(III) complexes as well as [Rh(en)(3)](3+) are studied in this work. The resulting simulated CD spectra are generally in good agreement with experimental spectra after corrections for systematic errors in a few of the lowest excitation energies are applied. This allows for an interpretation and assignment of the spectra for the whole experimentally accessible energy range (UV/vis). Solvent effects on the excitations are estimated via inclusion of a continuum solvent model. This significantly improves the computed excitation energies for charge-transfer bands for complexes of charge +3, but has only a small effect on those for neutral or singly charged complexes. The energies of the weak d-to-d transitions of the Co complexes are systematically overestimated due to deficiencies of the density functionals. These errors are much smaller for the 4d metal complex. Taking these systematic errors and the effect of a solvent into consideration, TD-DFT computations are demonstrated to be a reliable tool in order to assist with the assignment and interpretation of CD spectra of chiral transition metal complexes.

  16. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, Ezequiel de la; Herrera, Santiago E.; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P.; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Williams, Federico J.

    2015-11-14

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge.

  17. Light-Activated Protein Inhibition through Photoinduced Electron Transfer of a Ruthenium(II)–Cobalt(III) Bimetallic Complex

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Weinberg, David J.; Peterson, Mark D.; Weiss, Emily A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly, the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. These results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers. PMID:25671465

  18. Impact of Electronic Fluctuations and Their Description on the Exciton Dynamics in the Light-Harvesting Complex PE545.

    PubMed

    Aghtar, Mortaza; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Curutchet, Carles; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2017-02-16

    Temperature-dependent fluctuations of both site energies and electronic couplings are known to affect the excitation energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes. Environment effects on such fluctuations as well as possible spatial correlations among them are investigated here in the PE545 complex from cryptophyte algae using ensemble-averaged wave packet dynamics to extract the exciton dynamics. This strategy directly uses the time-dependent fluctuations of the system Hamiltonian, as described by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations performed along a classical MD trajectory. Neither the fluctuations in the couplings nor spatial correlations including cross-correlations between site energies and couplings are found to be important in the exciton dynamics of the complex. This finding does not change if a polarizable embedding is used instead of its electrostatic counterpart. The impact of variations in spectral densities and screening of excitonic couplings based on the electrostatic and polarizable embeddings are discussed as well.

  19. Light-activated protein inhibition through photoinduced electron transfer of a ruthenium(II)–cobalt(III) bimetallic complex

    DOE PAGES

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Weinberg, David J.; Peterson, Mark D.; ...

    2015-02-11

    In this paper, we describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly,more » the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. Finally, these results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers.« less

  20. Light-activated protein inhibition through photoinduced electron transfer of a ruthenium(II)–cobalt(III) bimetallic complex

    SciTech Connect

    Holbrook, Robert J.; Weinberg, David J.; Peterson, Mark D.; Weiss, Emily A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-02-11

    In this paper, we describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly, the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. Finally, these results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers.

  1. Docking stability and electronic structure of azurin-cytochrome c551 complex system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Ayumu; Takamatsu, Yuichiro; Nishikawa, Keigo; Nagao, Hidemi; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi

    We investigate the docking structure between cytochrome c551 and azurin proteins by quantum mechanical calculation and molecular dynamics (MD). A model for the docking structure of the cytochrome-azurin complex is presented. We calculate the charge distribution around the active site for each protein and force field parameters to simulate the complex system by MD. We estimate some physical properties, such as binding free energy and the dynamical cross-correlation map. We discuss the stability of the cytochrome c551-azurin complex system.

  2. Effect of secondary electron emission on nonlinear dust acoustic wave propagation in a complex plasma with negative equilibrium dust charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakta, Subrata; Ghosh, Uttam; Sarkar, Susmita

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of secondary electron emission on nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves in a complex plasma where equilibrium dust charge is negative. The primary electrons, secondary electrons, and ions are Boltzmann distributed, and only dust grains are inertial. Electron-neutral and ion-neutral collisions have been neglected with the assumption that electron and ion mean free paths are very large compared to the plasma Debye length. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic dust charge variations have been separately taken into account. In the case of adiabatic dust charge variation, nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves is governed by the KdV (Korteweg-de Vries) equation, whereas for nonadiabatic dust charge variation, it is governed by the KdV-Burger equation. The solution of the KdV equation gives a dust acoustic soliton, whose amplitude and width depend on the secondary electron yield. Similarly, the KdV-Burger equation provides a dust acoustic shock wave. This dust acoustic shock wave may be monotonic or oscillatory in nature depending on the fact that whether it is dissipation dominated or dispersion dominated. Our analysis shows that secondary electron emission increases nonadiabaticity induced dissipation and consequently increases the monotonicity of the dust acoustic shock wave. Such a dust acoustic shock wave may accelerate charge particles and cause bremsstrahlung radiation in space plasmas whose physical process may be affected by secondary electron emission from dust grains. The effect of the secondary electron emission on the stability of the equilibrium points of the KdV-Burger equation has also been investigated. This equation has two equilibrium points. The trivial equilibrium point with zero potential is a saddle and hence unstable in nature. The nontrivial equilibrium point with constant nonzero potential is a stable node up to a critical value of the wave velocity and a stable focus above it. This critical

  3. Theoretical Studies on Docking Dynamics and Electronic Structure in Metalloprotein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Ayumu; Nishikawa, Keigo; Yamamoto, Tetsunori; Purqon, Acep; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Nagao, Hidemi

    2007-12-01

    An investigating of docking structure and dynamics between metalloprotein is interested from the viewpoint of searching the function of protein. We investigate the cytochrome c551 and azurin complexes by three computational methods, quantum mechanical calculation, docking searching algorism and molecular dynamics simulation. At first we present the docking structure of the cytochrome c551-azurin complexes expected by ZDOCK searching algorism. Quantum chemical calculation is tools to estimate the charge distrubution around the active site for each protein and force field parameters. From these parameters, we reproduce the protein docking dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation. We analyze some physical properties of complex system such as binding free energy, dynamical cross correlation map, and so on. We discuss the docking stability and dynamical effect of the cytochrome c551-azurin complexes.

  4. Complex role of secondary electron emissions in dust grain charging in space environments: measurements on Apollo 11 & 17 dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Mian; Tankosic, Dragana; Spann, James; Leclair, Andre C.

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, by electron/ion collisions, and sec-ondary electron emissions. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding of a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstel-lar medium (ISM), and heliospheric, interplanetary, planetary, and lunar environments. The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynam-ical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron/submicron size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials and theoretical models. In this paper we present experimental results on charging of individual dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust samples by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-400 eV energy range. The charging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of 0.2 to 13 µm diam-eters are discussed in terms of the secondary electron emission (SEE) process, which is found to be a complex charging process at electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with strong parti-cle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between dust charging properties of individual small size dust grains and of bulk materials.

  5. Communications: A model study on the electronic predissociation of the NeBr2 van der Waals complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Sanz, Cristina; Roncero, Octavio; Hernández-Lamoneda, Ramón; Pio, Jordan M.; Taylor, Molly A.; Janda, Kenneth C.

    2010-06-01

    Recently, the predissociation lifetimes of the NeBr2(B) complex for different initial vibrational excitation (10≤v'≤20) have been measured using time-resolved optical pump-probe spectroscopy [Taylor et al., J. Chem. Phys., 132, 104309 (2010)]. In the vibrational interval studied, the vibrational predissociation (VP) proceeds by the transfer of a single vibrational quantum and the lifetimes are expected to decrease smoothly with increasing v', as predicted by the energy gap law. However, the experimental lifetimes show strong oscillations with v', which were attributed to the occurrence of electronic predissociation into two possible dissociative electronic states of Br2(1g,2g), based on a Franck-Condon spectator model. In this work we reproduce the experimental findings by performing full three-dimensional wave packet calculations for the competition of vibrational and electronic predissociation, including the B(0u+), 2g, and C(1u) electronic states. Model potential energy surfaces were used based on previous theoretical simulations of the VP dynamics on the B state and on ab initio calculations on the NeCl2 related system. Thus, only two parameters, the strength of the electronic couplings, are fit to achieve the excellent theoretical/experimental agreement.

  6. Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication, Environmental Protection Agency Number ID4890008952

    SciTech Connect

    Holzemer, Michael J.; Hart, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication for the Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Partial Permit, PER-116. This Permit Reapplication is required by the PER-116 Permit Conditions I.G. and I.H., and must be submitted to the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality in accordance with IDAPA 58.01.05.012 [40 CFR §§ 270.10 and 270.13 through 270.29].

  7. A Cleaner Process for Selective Recovery of Valuable Metals from Electronic Waste of Complex Mixtures of End-of-Life Electronic Products.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi; Xiao, Y; Sietsma, J; Agterhuis, H; Yang, Y

    2015-07-07

    In recent years, recovery of metals from electronic waste within the European Union has become increasingly important due to potential supply risk of strategic raw material and environmental concerns. Electronic waste, especially a mixture of end-of-life electronic products from a variety of sources, is of inherently high complexity in composition, phase, and physiochemical properties. In this research, a closed-loop hydrometallurgical process was developed to recover valuable metals, i.e., copper and precious metals, from an industrially processed information and communication technology waste. A two-stage leaching design of this process was adopted in order to selectively extract copper and enrich precious metals. It was found that the recovery efficiency and extraction selectivity of copper both reached more than 95% by using ammonia-based leaching solutions. A new electrodeposition process has been proven feasible with 90% current efficiency during copper recovery, and the copper purity can reach 99.8 wt %. The residue from the first-stage leaching was screened into coarse and fine fractions. The coarse fraction was returned to be releached for further copper recovery. The fine fraction was treated in the second-stage leaching using sulfuric acid to further concentrate precious metals, which could achieve a 100% increase in their concentrations in the residue with negligible loss into the leaching solution. By a combination of different leaching steps and proper physical separation of light materials, this process can achieve closed-loop recycling of the waste with significant efficiency.

  8. Geometric and electronic structures of the synthetic Mn₄CaO₄ model compound mimicking the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Mitsuo; Isobe, Hiroshi; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2016-04-28

    Water oxidation by photosystem II (PSII) converts light energy into chemical energy with the concomitant production of molecular oxygen, both of which are indispensable for sustaining life on Earth. This reaction is catalyzed by an oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) embedded in the huge PSII complex, and its mechanism remains elusive in spite of the extensive studies of the geometric and electronic structures. In order to elucidate the water-splitting mechanism, synthetic approaches have been extensively employed to mimic the native OEC. Very recently, a synthetic complex [Mn4CaO4(Bu(t)COO)8(py)(Bu(t)COOH)2] (1) closely mimicking the structure of the native OEC was obtained. In this study, we extensively examined the geometric, electronic and spin structures of 1 using the density functional theory method. Our results showed that the geometric structure of 1 can be accurately reproduced by theoretical calculations, and revealed many similarities in the ground valence and spin states between 1 and the native OEC. We also revealed two different valence states in the one-electron oxidized state of 1 (corresponding to the S2 state), which lie in the lower and higher ground spin states (S = 1/2 and S = 5/2), respectively. One remarkable difference between 1 and the native OEC is the presence of a non-negligible antiferromagnetic interaction between the Mn1 and Mn4 sites, which slightly influenced their ground spin structures (spin alignments). The major reason causing the difference can be attributed to the short Mn1-O5 and Mn1-Mn4 distances in 1. The introduction of the missing O4 atom and the reorientation of the Ca coordinating ligands improved the Mn1-O5 and Mn1-Mn4 distances comparable to the native OEC. These modifications will therefore be important for the synthesis of further advanced model complexes more closely mimicking the native OEC beyond 1.

  9. Complex time dependent wave packet technique for thermal equilibrium systems - Electronic spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimers, J. R.; Wilson, K. R.; Heller, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    A time dependent wave packet method is presented for the rapid calculation of the properties of systems in thermal equilibrium and is applied, as an illustration, to electronic spectra. The thawed Gaussian approximation to quantum wave packet dynamics combined with evaluation of the density matrix operator by imaginary time propagation is shown to give exact electronic spectra for harmonic potentials and excellent results for both a Morse potential and for the band contours of the three transitions of the visible electronic absorption spectrum of the iodine molecule. The method, in principle, can be extended to many atoms (e.g., condensed phases) and to other properties (e.g., infrared and Raman spectra and thermodynamic variables).

  10. Electronic and optical response of Ru(II) complexes functionalized by methyl, carboxylate groups: joint theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Tretiak, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    New photovoltaic and photocatalysis applications have been recently proposed based on the hybrid Ru(II)-bipyridine-complex/semiconductor quantum dot systems. In order to attach the complex to the surface of a semiconductor, a linking bridge - a carboxyl group - is added to one or two of the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine ligands. Such changes in the ligand structure, indeed, affect electronic and optical properties and consequently, the charge transfer reactivity of Ru-systems. In this study, we apply both theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze the effects brought by functionalization of bipyridine ligands with the methyl, carboxyl, and carboxilate groups on the electronic structure and optical response of the Ru(II) bipyridine complex. First principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and linear response time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) are used to simulate the ground and excited-state structures of functionalized Ru-complexes in the gas phase, as well as in acetonitrile solution. In addition, an inelaborate Frenkel exciton model is used to explain the optical activity and splitting patterns of the low-energy excited states. All theoretical results nicely complement experimental absorption spectra of Ru-complexes and contribute to their interpretation. We found that the carboxyl group breaks the degeneracy of two low-energy optically bright excited states and red-shifts the absorption spectrum, while leaves ionization and affinity energies of complexes almost unchanged. Experimental studies show a high probability of deprotonation of the carbboxyl group in the Ru-complexes resulted in a slight blue shift and decrease of intensities of the low energy absorption peaks. Comparison of experimental and theoretical linear response spectra of deprotanated complexes demonstrate strong agreement when acetonitrile solvent is used in simulations. A polar solvent is found to play an important role in calculations of optical spectra: it

  11. Different ortho and para electronic effects on hydrolysis and cytotoxicity of diamino bis(phenolato) "salan" Ti(IV) complexes.

    PubMed

    Peri, Dani; Meker, Sigalit; Manna, Cesar M; Tshuva, Edit Y

    2011-02-07

    Bis(isopropoxo) Ti(IV) complexes of diamino bis(phenolato) "salan" ligands were prepared, their hydrolysis in 1:9 water/THF solutions was investigated, and their cytotoxicity toward colon HT-29 and ovarian OVCAR-1 cells was measured. In particular, electronic effects at positions ortho and para to the binding phenolato unit were analyzed. We found that para substituents of different electronic features, including Me, Cl, OMe, and NO(2), have very little influence on hydrolysis rate, and all para-substituted ortho-H complexes hydrolyze slowly to give O-bridged clusters with a t(1/2) of 1-2 h for isopropoxo release. Consequently, no clear cytotoxicity pattern is observed as well, where the largest influence of para substituents appears to be of a steric nature. These complexes exhibit IC(50) values of 2-18 μM toward the cells analyzed, with activity which is mostly higher than those of Cp(2)TiCl(2), (bzac)(2)Ti(OiPr)(2) and cisplatin. On the contrary, major electronic effects are observed for substituents at the ortho position, with an influence that exceeds even that of steric hindrance. Ortho-chloro or -bromo substituted compounds possess extremely high hydrolytic stability where no major isopropoxo release as isopropanol occurs for days. In accordance, very high cytotoxicity toward colon and ovarian cells is observed for ortho-Cl and -Br complexes, with IC(50) values of 1-8 μM, where the most cytotoxic complexes are the ortho-Cl-para-Me and ortho-Br-para-Me derivatives. In this series of ortho-substituted complexes, the halogen radius is of lesser influence both on hydrolysis and on cytotoxicity, while OMe substituents do not impose similar effect of hydrolytic stability and cytotoxicity enhancement. Therefore, hydrolytic stability and cytotoxic activity are clearly intertwined, and thus this family of readily available Ti(IV) salan complexes exhibiting both features in an enhanced manner is highly attractive for further exploration.

  12. Computational studies of the electronic, conductivities, and spectroscopic properties of hydrolysed Ru(II) anticancer complexes.

    PubMed

    Adeniyi, Adebayo A; Ajibade, Peter A

    2013-11-01

    The mechanism of activation of metal-based anticancer agents was reported to be through hydrolysis. In this study, computational method was used to gain insight to the correlation between the chemistry of the hydrolysis and the anticancer activities of selected Ru(II)-based complexes. Interestingly, we observed that the mechanism of activation by hydrolysis and their consequential anticancer activities is associated with favourable thermodynamic changes, higher hyperpolarizability (β), lower band-gap and higher first-order net current. The Fermi contact (FC) and spin dipole (SD) are found to be the two most significant Ramsey terms that determine the spin-spin couplings (J(HZ)) of most of the existing bonds in the complexes. Many of the computed properties give insights into the change in the chemistry of the complexes due to hydrolysis. Besides strong correlations of the computed properties to the anticancer activities of the complexes, using the quantum theory of atoms in a molecule (QTAIM) to analyse the spectroscopic properties shows a stronger correlation between the spectroscopic properties of Ru atom to the reported anticancer activities than the sum over of the spectroscopic properties of all atoms in the complexes.

  13. Computational studies of the electronic, conductivities, and spectroscopic properties of hydrolysed Ru(II) anticancer complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeniyi, Adebayo A.; Ajibade, Peter A.

    2013-11-01

    The mechanism of activation of metal-based anticancer agents was reported to be through hydrolysis. In this study, computational method was used to gain insight to the correlation between the chemistry of the hydrolysis and the anticancer activities of selected Ru(II)-based complexes. Interestingly, we observed that the mechanism of activation by hydrolysis and their consequential anticancer activities is associated with favourable thermodynamic changes, higher hyperpolarizability (β), lower band-gap and higher first-order net current. The Fermi contact (FC) and spin dipole (SD) are found to be the two most significant Ramsey terms that determine the spin-spin couplings (J(HZ)) of most of the existing bonds in the complexes. Many of the computed properties give insights into the change in the chemistry of the complexes due to hydrolysis. Besides strong correlations of the computed properties to the anticancer activities of the complexes, using the quantum theory of atoms in a molecule (QTAIM) to analyse the spectroscopic properties shows a stronger correlation between the spectroscopic properties of Ru atom to the reported anticancer activities than the sum over of the spectroscopic properties of all atoms in the complexes.

  14. Ru-TAP complexes and DNA: from photo-induced electron transfer to gene photo-silencing in living cells.

    PubMed

    Marcélis, Lionel; Moucheron, Cécile; Kirsch-De Mesmaeker, Andrée

    2013-07-28

    In this review, examples of applications of the photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process between photo-oxidizing Ru-TAP (TAP = 1,4,5,8-tetraazaphenanthrene) complexes and DNA or oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) are discussed. Applications using a free Ru-TAP complex (not chemically anchored to an ODN) are first considered. In this case, the PET gives rise to the production of an irreversible adduct of the Ru complex on a guanine (G) base, with formation of a covalent bond. After absorption of a second photon, this adduct can generate a bi-adduct, whereby the same complex binds to a second G moiety. These bi-adduct formations are responsible for photo-cross-linking between two strands of a duplex, each containing a G base, or between two G moieties of a single strand such as a telomeric sequence, as demonstrated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses or mass spectrometry. Scanning force microscopy also allows the detection of such photobridgings with plasmid DNA. Other applications, for example with Ru-ODN, i.e. ODN with chemically anchored Ru-TAP complexes, are also discussed. It is shown that such Ru-ODN probes containing a G base in their own sequences are capable of photo-cross-linking selectively with their targeted complementary sequences, and, in the absence of such targets, they self-photo-inhibit. Such processes are applied successfully in gene photo-silencing of human papillomavirus cancer cells.

  15. Xanthohumol induces generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers apoptosis through inhibition of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Chu, Wei; Wei, Peng; Liu, Ying; Wei, Taotao

    2015-12-01

    Xanthohumol is a prenylflavonoid extracted from hops (Humulus lupulus). It possesses anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and offers therapeutic benefits for treatment of metabolic syndromes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects remain to be elucidated, together with its cellular target. Here, we provide evidence that xanthohumol directly interacts with the mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation, triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, and induces apoptosis. In addition, we show that as a result of the inhibition of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xanthohumol exposure causes a rapid decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, we showed that xanthohumol up-regulates the glycolytic capacity in cells, and thus compensates cellular ATP generation. Dissection of the multiple steps of aerobic respiration by extracellular flux assays revealed that xanthohumol specifically inhibits the activity of mitochondrial complex I, but had little effect on that of complex II, III and IV. Inhibition of complex I by xanthohumol caused the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We also found that isoxanthohumol, the structural isomer of xanthohumol, is inactive to cells, suggesting that the reactive 2-hydroxyl group of xanthohumol is crucial for its targeting to the mitochondrial complex I. Together, the remodeling of cell metabolism revealed here has therapeutic potential for the use of xanthohumol.

  16. Infrared spectra and electronic structure calculations for NN complexes with U, UN, and NUN in solid argon, neon, and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Lester; Wang, Xuefeng; Gong, Yu; Kushto, Gary P; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Gagliardi, Laura

    2014-07-17

    Reactions of laser-ablated U atoms with N2 molecules upon codeposition in excess argon or neon at 4 K gave intense NUN and weak UN absorptions. Annealing produced progressions of new absorptions for the UN2(N2)1,2,3,4,5 and UN(N2)1,2,3,4,5,6 complexes. The neon-to-argon matrix shift decreases with increasing NN ligation and therefore the number of noble gas atoms left in the primary coordination sphere around the NUN molecule. Small matrix shifts are observed when the secondary coordination layers around the primary UN2(N2)1,2,3,4,5 and UN(N2)1,2,3,4,5,6 complexes are changed from neon-to-argon to nitrogen. Electronic structure, energy, and frequency calculations provide support for the identification of these complexes and the characterization of the N≡U≡N and U≡N core molecules as terminal uranium nitrides. Codeposition of U with pure nitrogen produced the saturated U(NN)7 complex, which UV irradiation converted to the NUN(NN)5 complex with slightly lower frequencies than found in solid argon.

  17. Protein Binding and the Electronic Properties of Iron(II) Complexes: An Electrochemical and Optical Investigation of Outer Sphere Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Kylie D.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Sazinsky, Matthew H.; Hartings, Matthew R.; Abajian, Carnie; Georganopoulou, Dimitra; Ratner, Mark A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2010-11-17

    Metalloenzymes and electron transfer proteins influence the electrochemical properties of metal cofactors by controlling the second-sphere environment of the protein active site. Properties that tune this environment include the dielectric constant, templated charge structure, van der Waals interactions, and hydrogen bonds. By systematically varying the binding of a redox-active ligand with a protein, we can evaluate how these noncovalent interactions alter the electronic structure of the bound metal complex. For this study, we employ the well-characterized avidin-biotin conjugate as the protein-ligand system, and have synthesized solvatochromic biotinylated and desthiobiotinylated iron(II) bipyridine tetracyano complexes ([Fe(BMB)(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} (1) and [Fe(DMB)(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} (2)). The binding affinities of 1 and 2 with avidin are 3.5 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} and 1.5 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1}, respectively. The redox potentials of 1 and 2 (333 mV and 330 mV) shift to 193 mV and 203 mV vs Ag/AgCl when the complex is bound to avidin and adsorbed to a monolayer-coated gold electrode. Upon binding to avidin, the MLCT1 band red-shifts 20 nm for 1 and 10 nm for 2. Similarly, the MLCT2 band for 1 red-shifts 7 nm and the band for 2 red-shifts 6 nm. For comparison, the electronic properties of 1 and 2 were investigated in organic solvents, and similar shifts in the MLCT bands and redox potentials were observed. An X-ray crystal structure of 1 bound to avidin was obtained, and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to analyze the protein environment of the protein-bound transition metal complexes. Our studies demonstrate that changes in the binding affinity of a ligand-receptor pair influence the outer-sphere coordination of the ligand, which in turn affects the electronic properties of the bound complex.

  18. Inhibition of electron flow through complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Ray, S; Dutta, S; Halder, J; Ray, M

    1994-10-01

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of Ehrlich-ascites-carcinoma (EAC)-cell mitochondria was tested by using different respiratory substrates, electron donors at different segments of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and site-specific inhibitors to identify the specific respiratory complex which might be involved in the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption by these cells. The results indicate that methylglyoxal strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxo-glutarate and malate plus pyruvate-dependent respiration, whereas, at a much higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit succinate-dependent respiration. Methylglyoxal also fails to inhibit respiration which is initiated by duroquinol, an artificial electron donor. Moreover, methylglyoxal cannot inhibit oxygen consumption when the NNN'N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by-pass is used. The inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is identical on both ADP-stimulated and uncoupler-stimulated respiration. Lactaldehyde, a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of EAC-cell mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal. We suggest that methylglyoxal possibly inhibits the electron flow through complex I of the EAC-cell mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  19. Design of Lewis acid-base complex: enhancing the stability and first hyperpolarizability of large excess electron compound.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fang; Miao, Tifang; Zhou, Zhongjun; Sun, Dengming

    2013-11-01

    In the present paper, a new type of Lewis acid-base complex BX3...Li@Calix[4]pyrrole (X = H and F) was designed and assembled based on electride molecule Li@calix[4]pyrrole (as a Lewis base) and the electron deficient molecule BX3 (as a Lewis acid) by employing quantum mechanical calculation. The new Lewis acid-base complex offers an interesting push-excess electron-pull (P-e-P) framework to enhance the stability and nonlinear optical (NLO) response. To measure the nonlinear optical response, static first hyperpolarizabilities (β 0) are exhibited. Significantly, point-face assembled Lewis acid-base complex BF3...Li@Calix[4]pyrrole (II) has considerable first hyperpolarizabilities (β 0) value (1.4  ×  106 a.u.), which is about 117 times larger than reported 11,721 a.u. of electride Li@Calix[4]pyrrole. Further investigations show that, in BX3...Li@Calix[4]pyrrole with P-e-P framework, a strong charge-transfer transition from the ground state to the excited state contributes to the enhancement of first hyperpolarizability. Theory calculation of enthalpies of reaction (ΔrH0) at 298 K demonstrates that it is feasible to synthetize the complexes BX3...Li@Calix[4]pyrrole. In addition, compared with Li@Calix[4]pyrrole, the vertical ionization potential (VIP) and HOMO-LUMO gap of BX3...Li@Calix[4]pyrrole have obviously increased, due to the introduction of the Lewis acid molecule BX3. The novel Lewis acid-base NLO complex possesses not only a large nonlinear optical response but also higher stability.

  20. Mammalian complex I pumps 4 protons per 2 electrons at high and physiological proton motive force in living cells.

    PubMed

    Ripple, Maureen O; Kim, Namjoon; Springett, Roger

    2013-02-22

    Mitochondrial complex I couples electron transfer between matrix NADH and inner-membrane ubiquinone to the pumping of protons against a proton motive force. The accepted proton pumping stoichiometry was 4 protons per 2 electrons transferred (4H(+)/2e(-)) but it has been suggested that stoichiometry may be 3H(+)/2e(-) based on the identification of only 3 proton pumping units in the crystal structure and a revision of the previous experimental data. Measurement of proton pumping stoichiometry is challenging because, even in isolated mitochondria, it is difficult to measure the proton motive force while simultaneously measuring the redox potentials of the NADH/NAD(+) and ubiquinol/ubiquinone pools. Here we employ a new method to quantify the proton motive force in living cells from the redox poise of the bc(1) complex measured using multiwavelength cell spectroscopy and show that the correct stoichiometry for complex I is 4H(+)/2e(-) in mouse and human cells at high and physiological proton motive force.