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Sample records for component directional signature

  1. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic signature components and controls. 11... SERVICES GENERAL ELECTRONIC RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Signatures § 11.200 Electronic signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1...

  2. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other than...

  3. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other than...

  4. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other than...

  5. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other than...

  6. Characterization of palmprints by wavelet signatures via directional context modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, David

    2004-06-01

    The palmprint is one of the most reliable physiological characteristics that can be used to distinguish between individuals. Current palmprint-based systems are more user friendly, more cost effective, and require fewer data signatures than traditional fingerprint-based identification systems. The principal lines and wrinkles captured in a low-resolution palmprint image provide more than enough information to uniquely identify an individual. This paper presents a palmprint identification scheme that characterizes a palmprint using a set of statistical signatures. The palmprint is first transformed into the wavelet domain, and the directional context of each wavelet subband is defined and computed in order to collect the predominant coefficients of its principal lines and wrinkles. A set of statistical signatures, which includes gravity center, density, spatial dispersivity and energy, is then defined to characterize the palmprint with the selected directional context values. A classification and identification scheme based on these signatures is subsequently developed. This scheme exploits the features of principal lines and prominent wrinkles sufficiently and achieves satisfactory results. Compared with the line-segments-matching or interesting-points-matching based palmprint verification schemes, the proposed scheme uses a much smaller amount of data signatures. It also provides a convenient classification strategy and more accurate identification.

  7. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures? 73.11 Section 73.11 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES; ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION OF FORMS Electronic Signatures § 73.11...

  8. Online signature recognition using principal component analysis and artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seung-Jun; Park, Seung-Je; Baek, Joong-Hwan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for on-line signature recognition using fingertip point in the air from the depth image acquired by Kinect. We extract 10 statistical features from X, Y, Z axis, which are invariant to changes in shifting and scaling of the signature trajectories in three-dimensional space. Artificial neural network is adopted to solve the complex signature classification problem. 30 dimensional features are converted into 10 principal components using principal component analysis, which is 99.02% of total variances. We implement the proposed algorithm and test to actual on-line signatures. In experiment, we verify the proposed method is successful to classify 15 different on-line signatures. Experimental result shows 98.47% of recognition rate when using only 10 feature vectors.

  9. Direct weak localization signature with ultracold atoms: the CBS revival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josse, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold atomic systems in presence of disorder have attracted a lot of interest over the past decade, in particular to study the physics of Anderson localization (AL) in a renewed perspective. Landmark experiments have been demonstrated, in 1D and 3D geometries. However many challenges remain and new ideas have emerged, as for instance the search for original signatures of Anderson localization in momentum space. Here I will describe our progresses along that line where a weak localization effect has been directly observed, i.e. the Coherent Backscattering (CBS) phenomenon. In particular I will report on the recent observation of suppression and revival of CBS when a controlled dephasing kick is applied to the system. This observation demonstrates a novel and general method, introduced by T. Micklitz and coworkers, to study probe phase coherence in disordered systems by manipulating time reversal symmetry.

  10. A reduction in ag/residential signature conflict using principal components analysis of LANDSAT temporal data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. L.; Borden, F. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Methods to accurately delineate the types of land cover in the urban-rural transition zone of metropolitan areas were considered. The application of principal components analysis to multidate LANDSAT imagery was investigated as a means of reducing the overlap between residential and agricultural spectral signatures. The statistical concepts of principal components analysis were discussed, as well as the results of this analysis when applied to multidate LANDSAT imagery of the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.

  11. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... signatures not based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics you...) Electronic signatures based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures based upon biometrics, they must...

  12. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... signatures not based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics you...) Electronic signatures based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures based upon biometrics, they must...

  13. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... signatures not based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics you...) Electronic signatures based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures based upon biometrics, they must...

  14. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... signatures not based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics you...) Electronic signatures based on biometrics. If you use electronic signatures based upon biometrics, they must...

  15. Exploring the molecular mechanisms of Traditional Chinese Medicine components using gene expression signatures and connectivity map.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Minjae; Shin, Jimin; Kim, Hyunmin; Kim, Jihye; Kang, Jaewoo; Tan, Aik Choon

    2018-04-04

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been practiced over thousands of years in China and other Asian countries for treating various symptoms and diseases. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of TCM are poorly understood, partly due to the "multi-component, multi-target" nature of TCM. To uncover the molecular mechanisms of TCM, we perform comprehensive gene expression analysis using connectivity map. We interrogated gene expression signatures obtained 102 TCM components using the next generation Connectivity Map (CMap) resource. We performed systematic data mining and analysis on the mechanism of action (MoA) of these TCM components based on the CMap results. We clustered the 102 TCM components into four groups based on their MoAs using next generation CMap resource. We performed gene set enrichment analysis on these components to provide additional supports for explaining these molecular mechanisms. We also provided literature evidence to validate the MoAs identified through this bioinformatics analysis. Finally, we developed the Traditional Chinese Medicine Drug Repurposing Hub (TCM Hub) - a connectivity map resource to facilitate the elucidation of TCM MoA for drug repurposing research. TCMHub is freely available in http://tanlab.ucdenver.edu/TCMHub. Molecular mechanisms of TCM could be uncovered by using gene expression signatures and connectivity map. Through this analysis, we identified many of the TCM components possess diverse MoAs, this may explain the applications of TCM in treating various symptoms and diseases. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A Method for Improving Hotspot Directional Signatures in BRDF Models Used for MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, Ziti; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Dong, Yadong; Roman, Miguel; Hill, Michael J.; Chen, Jing M.; Wang, Zhuosen; Zhang, Hu; Saenz, Edward; Poudyal, Rajesh; hide

    2016-01-01

    The semi-empirical, kernel-driven, linear RossThick-LiSparseReciprocal (RTLSR) Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model is used to generate the routine MODIS BRDFAlbedo product due to its global applicability and the underlying physics. A challenge of this model in regard to surface reflectance anisotropy effects comes from its underestimation of the directional reflectance signatures near the Sun illumination direction; also known as the hotspot effect. In this study, a method has been developed for improving the ability of the RTLSR model to simulate the magnitude and width of the hotspot effect. The method corrects the volumetric scattering component of the RTLSR model using an exponential approximation of a physical hotspot kernel, which recreates the hotspot magnitude and width using two free parameters (C(sub 1) and C(sub 2), respectively). The approach allows one to reconstruct, with reasonable accuracy, the hotspot effect by adjusting or using the prior values of these two hotspot variables. Our results demonstrate that: (1) significant improvements in capturing hotspot effect can be made to this method by using the inverted hotspot parameters; (2) the reciprocal nature allow this method to be more adaptive for simulating the hotspot height and width with high accuracy, especially in cases where hotspot signatures are available; and (3) while the new approach is consistent with the heritage RTLSR model inversion used to estimate intrinsic narrowband and broadband albedos, it presents some differences for vegetation clumping index (CI) retrievals. With the hotspot-related model parameters determined a priori, this method offers improved performance for various ecological remote sensing applications; including the estimation of canopy structure parameters.

  17. Indirect and Direct Signatures of Young Planets in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Stone, James M.; Dong, Ruobing; Rafikov, Roman; Bai, Xue-Ning

    2015-12-01

    Directly finding young planets around protostars is challenging since protostars are highly variable and obscured by dust. However, young planets will interact with protoplanetary disks, inducing disk features such as gaps, spiral arms, and asymmetric features, which are much easier to be detected. Transitional disks, which are protoplanetary disks with gaps and holes, are excellent candidates for finding young planets. Although these disks have been studied extensively in observations (e.g. using Subaru, VLT, ALMA, EVLA), theoretical models still need to be developed to explain observations. We have constructed numerical simulations, including dust particle dynamics and MHD effects, to study planet-disk interaction, with an emphasis on explaining observations. Our simulations have successfully reproduced spiral arms, gaps and asymmetric features observed in transitional disks. Furthermore, by comparing with observations, we have constrained protoplanetary disk properties and pinpoint potential planets in these disks. We will present progress in constructing global simulations to study transitional disks, including using our recently developed Athena++ code with static-mesh-refinement for MHD. Finally we suggest that accreting circumplanetary disks can release an observable amount of energy and could be the key to detect young planets directly. We will discuss how JWST and next generation telescopes can help to find these young planets with circumplanetary disks.

  18. L1000CDS2: LINCS L1000 characteristic direction signatures search engine.

    PubMed

    Duan, Qiaonan; Reid, St Patrick; Clark, Neil R; Wang, Zichen; Fernandez, Nicolas F; Rouillard, Andrew D; Readhead, Ben; Tritsch, Sarah R; Hodos, Rachel; Hafner, Marc; Niepel, Mario; Sorger, Peter K; Dudley, Joel T; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2016-01-01

    The library of integrated network-based cellular signatures (LINCS) L1000 data set currently comprises of over a million gene expression profiles of chemically perturbed human cell lines. Through unique several intrinsic and extrinsic benchmarking schemes, we demonstrate that processing the L1000 data with the characteristic direction (CD) method significantly improves signal to noise compared with the MODZ method currently used to compute L1000 signatures. The CD processed L1000 signatures are served through a state-of-the-art web-based search engine application called L1000CDS 2 . The L1000CDS 2 search engine provides prioritization of thousands of small-molecule signatures, and their pairwise combinations, predicted to either mimic or reverse an input gene expression signature using two methods. The L1000CDS 2 search engine also predicts drug targets for all the small molecules profiled by the L1000 assay that we processed. Targets are predicted by computing the cosine similarity between the L1000 small-molecule signatures and a large collection of signatures extracted from the gene expression omnibus (GEO) for single-gene perturbations in mammalian cells. We applied L1000CDS 2 to prioritize small molecules that are predicted to reverse expression in 670 disease signatures also extracted from GEO, and prioritized small molecules that can mimic expression of 22 endogenous ligand signatures profiled by the L1000 assay. As a case study, to further demonstrate the utility of L1000CDS 2 , we collected expression signatures from human cells infected with Ebola virus at 30, 60 and 120 min. Querying these signatures with L1000CDS 2 we identified kenpaullone, a GSK3B/CDK2 inhibitor that we show, in subsequent experiments, has a dose-dependent efficacy in inhibiting Ebola infection in vitro without causing cellular toxicity in human cell lines. In summary, the L1000CDS 2 tool can be applied in many biological and biomedical settings, while improving the extraction of

  19. L1000CDS2: LINCS L1000 characteristic direction signatures search engine

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Qiaonan; Reid, St Patrick; Clark, Neil R; Wang, Zichen; Fernandez, Nicolas F; Rouillard, Andrew D; Readhead, Ben; Tritsch, Sarah R; Hodos, Rachel; Hafner, Marc; Niepel, Mario; Sorger, Peter K; Dudley, Joel T; Bavari, Sina; Panchal, Rekha G; Ma’ayan, Avi

    2016-01-01

    The library of integrated network-based cellular signatures (LINCS) L1000 data set currently comprises of over a million gene expression profiles of chemically perturbed human cell lines. Through unique several intrinsic and extrinsic benchmarking schemes, we demonstrate that processing the L1000 data with the characteristic direction (CD) method significantly improves signal to noise compared with the MODZ method currently used to compute L1000 signatures. The CD processed L1000 signatures are served through a state-of-the-art web-based search engine application called L1000CDS2. The L1000CDS2 search engine provides prioritization of thousands of small-molecule signatures, and their pairwise combinations, predicted to either mimic or reverse an input gene expression signature using two methods. The L1000CDS2 search engine also predicts drug targets for all the small molecules profiled by the L1000 assay that we processed. Targets are predicted by computing the cosine similarity between the L1000 small-molecule signatures and a large collection of signatures extracted from the gene expression omnibus (GEO) for single-gene perturbations in mammalian cells. We applied L1000CDS2 to prioritize small molecules that are predicted to reverse expression in 670 disease signatures also extracted from GEO, and prioritized small molecules that can mimic expression of 22 endogenous ligand signatures profiled by the L1000 assay. As a case study, to further demonstrate the utility of L1000CDS2, we collected expression signatures from human cells infected with Ebola virus at 30, 60 and 120 min. Querying these signatures with L1000CDS2 we identified kenpaullone, a GSK3B/CDK2 inhibitor that we show, in subsequent experiments, has a dose-dependent efficacy in inhibiting Ebola infection in vitro without causing cellular toxicity in human cell lines. In summary, the L1000CDS2 tool can be applied in many biological and biomedical settings, while improving the extraction of knowledge

  20. Study of the microdoppler signature of a bicyclist for different directions of approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Hervas, Berta; Maile, Michael; Flores, Benjamin C.

    2015-05-01

    The successful implementation of autonomous driving in an urban setting depends on the ability of the environment perception system to correctly classify vulnerable road users such as pedestrians and bicyclists in dense, complex scenarios. Self-driving vehicles include sensor systems such as cameras, lidars, and radars to enable decision making. Among these systems, radars are particularly relevant due to their operational robustness under adverse weather and night light conditions. Classification of pedestrian and car in urban settings using automotive radar has been widely investigated, suggesting that micro-Doppler signatures are useful for target discrimination. Our objective is to analyze and study the micro-Doppler signature of bicyclists approaching a vehicle from different directions in order to establish the basis of a classification criterion to distinguish bicycles from other targets including clutter. The micro-Doppler signature is obtained by grouping individual reflecting points using a clustering algorithm and observing the evolution of all the points belonging to an object in the Doppler domain over time. A comparison is then made with simulated data that uses a kinematic model of bicyclists' movement. The suitability of the micro-Doppler bicyclist signature as a classification feature is determined by comparing it to those belonging to cars and pedestrians approaching the automotive radar system.

  1. Search for signatures of magnetically-induced alignment in the arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Del Río, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Robledo, C.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tamashiro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tavera Ruiz, C. G.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tiwari, D. K.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of data recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in which we search for groups of directionally-aligned events (or 'multiplets') which exhibit a correlation between arrival direction and the inverse of the energy. These signatures are expected from sets of events coming from the same source after having been deflected by intervening coherent magnetic fields. The observation of several events from the same source would open the possibility to accurately reconstruct the position of the source and also measure the integral of the component of the magnetic field orthogonal to the trajectory of the cosmic rays. We describe the largest multiplets found and compute the probability that they appeared by chance from an isotropic distribution. We find no statistically significant evidence for the presence of multiplets arising from magnetic deflections in the present data.

  2. Search for signatures of magnetically-induced alignment in the arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.

    2011-11-01

    We present the results of an analysis of data recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in which we search for groups of directionally-aligned events (or ''multiplets'') which exhibit a correlation between arrival direction and the inverse of the energy. These signatures are expected from sets of events coming from the same source after having been deflected by intervening coherent magnetic fields. The observation of several events from the same source would open the possibility to accurately reconstruct the position of the source and also measure the integral of the component of the magnetic field orthogonal to the trajectory of themore » cosmic rays. We describe the largest multiplets found and compute the probability that they appeared by chance from an isotropic distribution. We find no statistically significant evidence for the presence of multiplets arising from magnetic deflections in the present data.« less

  3. Comparison of common components analysis with principal components analysis and independent components analysis: Application to SPME-GC-MS volatolomic signatures.

    PubMed

    Bouhlel, Jihéne; Jouan-Rimbaud Bouveresse, Delphine; Abouelkaram, Said; Baéza, Elisabeth; Jondreville, Catherine; Travel, Angélique; Ratel, Jérémy; Engel, Erwan; Rutledge, Douglas N

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this work is to compare a novel exploratory chemometrics method, Common Components Analysis (CCA), with Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Independent Components Analysis (ICA). CCA consists in adapting the multi-block statistical method known as Common Components and Specific Weights Analysis (CCSWA or ComDim) by applying it to a single data matrix, with one variable per block. As an application, the three methods were applied to SPME-GC-MS volatolomic signatures of livers in an attempt to reveal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) markers of chicken exposure to different types of micropollutants. An application of CCA to the initial SPME-GC-MS data revealed a drift in the sample Scores along CC2, as a function of injection order, probably resulting from time-related evolution in the instrument. This drift was eliminated by orthogonalization of the data set with respect to CC2, and the resulting data are used as the orthogonalized data input into each of the three methods. Since the first step in CCA is to norm-scale all the variables, preliminary data scaling has no effect on the results, so that CCA was applied only to orthogonalized SPME-GC-MS data, while, PCA and ICA were applied to the "orthogonalized", "orthogonalized and Pareto-scaled", and "orthogonalized and autoscaled" data. The comparison showed that PCA results were highly dependent on the scaling of variables, contrary to ICA where the data scaling did not have a strong influence. Nevertheless, for both PCA and ICA the clearest separations of exposed groups were obtained after autoscaling of variables. The main part of this work was to compare the CCA results using the orthogonalized data with those obtained with PCA and ICA applied to orthogonalized and autoscaled variables. The clearest separations of exposed chicken groups were obtained by CCA. CCA Loadings also clearly identified the variables contributing most to the Common Components giving separations. The PCA Loadings did not

  4. MiR-133 promotes cardiac reprogramming by directly repressing Snai1 and silencing fibroblast signatures.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Naoto; Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Kazutaka; Sadahiro, Taketaro; Umei, Tomohiko; Isomi, Mari; Nakashima, Hanae; Akiyama, Mizuha; Wada, Rie; Inagawa, Kohei; Nishiyama, Takahiko; Kaneda, Ruri; Fukuda, Toru; Takeda, Shu; Tohyama, Shugo; Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Goshima, Naoki; Aeba, Ryo; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Keiichi; Ieda, Masaki

    2014-07-17

    Fibroblasts can be directly reprogrammed into cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs) by overexpression of cardiac transcription factors or microRNAs. However, induction of functional cardiomyocytes is inefficient, and molecular mechanisms of direct reprogramming remain undefined. Here, we demonstrate that addition of miR-133a (miR-133) to Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT) or GMT plus Mesp1 and Myocd improved cardiac reprogramming from mouse or human fibroblasts by directly repressing Snai1, a master regulator of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. MiR-133 overexpression with GMT generated sevenfold more beating iCMs from mouse embryonic fibroblasts and shortened the duration to induce beating cells from 30 to 10 days, compared to GMT alone. Snai1 knockdown suppressed fibroblast genes, upregulated cardiac gene expression, and induced more contracting iCMs with GMT transduction, recapitulating the effects of miR-133 overexpression. In contrast, overexpression of Snai1 in GMT/miR-133-transduced cells maintained fibroblast signatures and inhibited generation of beating iCMs. MiR-133-mediated Snai1 repression was also critical for cardiac reprogramming in adult mouse and human cardiac fibroblasts. Thus, silencing fibroblast signatures, mediated by miR-133/Snai1, is a key molecular roadblock during cardiac reprogramming. © 2014 The Authors.

  5. MiR-133 promotes cardiac reprogramming by directly repressing Snai1 and silencing fibroblast signatures

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, Naoto; Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Kazutaka; Sadahiro, Taketaro; Umei, Tomohiko; Isomi, Mari; Nakashima, Hanae; Akiyama, Mizuha; Wada, Rie; Inagawa, Kohei; Nishiyama, Takahiko; Kaneda, Ruri; Fukuda, Toru; Takeda, Shu; Tohyama, Shugo; Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Goshima, Naoki; Aeba, Ryo; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Keiichi; Ieda, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblasts can be directly reprogrammed into cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs) by overexpression of cardiac transcription factors or microRNAs. However, induction of functional cardiomyocytes is inefficient, and molecular mechanisms of direct reprogramming remain undefined. Here, we demonstrate that addition of miR-133a (miR-133) to Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT) or GMT plus Mesp1 and Myocd improved cardiac reprogramming from mouse or human fibroblasts by directly repressing Snai1, a master regulator of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. MiR-133 overexpression with GMT generated sevenfold more beating iCMs from mouse embryonic fibroblasts and shortened the duration to induce beating cells from 30 to 10 days, compared to GMT alone. Snai1 knockdown suppressed fibroblast genes, upregulated cardiac gene expression, and induced more contracting iCMs with GMT transduction, recapitulating the effects of miR-133 overexpression. In contrast, overexpression of Snai1 in GMT/miR-133-transduced cells maintained fibroblast signatures and inhibited generation of beating iCMs. MiR-133-mediated Snai1 repression was also critical for cardiac reprogramming in adult mouse and human cardiac fibroblasts. Thus, silencing fibroblast signatures, mediated by miR-133/Snai1, is a key molecular roadblock during cardiac reprogramming. PMID:24920580

  6. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Spacecraft Circuit Diagnostics by Analog and Complex Signature Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Wade, Raymond P.; Izadnegahdar, Alain

    2011-01-01

    The Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is aimed at developing technologies that will enable space-flight crews to perform in situ component-level repair of electronics on Moon and Mars outposts, where there is no existing infrastructure for logistics spares. These technologies must provide effective repair capabilities yet meet the payload and operational constraints of space facilities. Effective repair depends on a diagnostic capability that is versatile but easy to use by crew members that have limited training in electronics. CLEAR studied two techniques that involve extensive precharacterization of "known good" circuits to produce graphical signatures that provide an easy-to-use comparison method to quickly identify faulty components. Analog Signature Analysis (ASA) allows relatively rapid diagnostics of complex electronics by technicians with limited experience. Because of frequency limits and the growing dependence on broadband technologies, ASA must be augmented with other capabilities. To meet this challenge while preserving ease of use, CLEAR proposed an alternative called Complex Signature Analysis (CSA). Tests of ASA and CSA were used to compare capabilities and to determine if the techniques provided an overlapping or complementary capability. The results showed that the methods are complementary.

  7. Directional fractal signature methods for trabecular bone texture in hand radiographs: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, M., E-mail: marcin.wolski@curtin.edu.au; Podsiadlo, P.; Stachowiak, G. W.

    Purpose: To develop directional fractal signature methods for the analysis of trabecular bone (TB) texture in hand radiographs. Problems associated with the small size of hand bones and the orientation of fingers were addressed. Methods: An augmented variance orientation transform (AVOT) and a quadrant rotating grid (QRG) methods were developed. The methods calculate fractal signatures (FSs) in different directions. Unlike other methods they have the search region adjusted according to the size of bone region of interest (ROI) to be analyzed and they produce FSs defined with respect to any chosen reference direction, i.e., they work for arbitrary orientation ofmore » fingers. Five parameters at scales ranging from 2 to 14 pixels (depending on image size and method) were derived from rose plots of Hurst coefficients, i.e., FS in dominating roughness (FS{sub Sta}), vertical (FS{sub V}) and horizontal (FS{sub H}) directions, aspect ratio (StrS), and direction signatures (StdS), respectively. The accuracy in measuring surface roughness and isotropy/anisotropy was evaluated using 3600 isotropic and 800 anisotropic fractal surface images of sizes between 20 × 20 and 64 × 64 pixels. The isotropic surfaces had FDs ranging from 2.1 to 2.9 in steps of 0.1, and the anisotropic surfaces had two dominating directions of 30° and 120°. The methods were used to find differences in hand TB textures between 20 matched pairs of subjects with (cases: approximate Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade ≥2) and without (controls: approximate KL grade <2) radiographic hand osteoarthritis (OA). The OA Initiative public database was used and 20 × 20 pixel bone ROIs were selected on 5th distal and middle phalanges. The performance of the AVOT and QRG methods was compared against a variance orientation transform (VOT) method developed earlier [M. Wolski, P. Podsiadlo, and G. W. Stachowiak, “Directional fractal signature analysis of trabecular bone: evaluation of different methods to detect

  8. Experimental signatures of direct-laser-acceleration-assisted laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. L.; Lemos, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Froula, D. H.; Joshi, C.

    2018-04-01

    The direct laser acceleration (DLA) of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) operating in the forced or quasi-blowout regimes has been investigated through experiment and simulation. When there is a significant overlap between the trapped electrons and the drive laser in a LWFA cavity, the resulting electrons can gain energy from both the LWFA and the DLA mechanisms. Experimental work investigates the properties of the electron beams produced in a LWFA with ionization injection by dispersing those beams in the direction perpendicular to the laser polarization. These electron beams show certain spectral features that are characteristic of DLA. These characteristic features are reproduced using particle-in-cell simulations, where particle tracking was used to elucidate the roles of LWFA and DLA to the energy gain of the electrons in this experimental regime and to demonstrate that such spectral features are definitive signatures of the presence of DLA in LWFA.

  9. A gallery of oil components, their metals and Re-Os signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.

    2016-04-01

    H are part of the equation controlling composition of metal-bearing aqueous fluids siphoned from residual hydrocarbons. The Re-Os isotopic behavior of oil components is generally specific to location and may differ within a single oil field, or even within discrete fractions of a single sample of oil [1]. Different fractions in a crude oil, for example maltenes and asphaltenes, can preserve signatures of unique sources. This should not be surprising, since economic geologists have long called upon meeting and mixing of metal-bearing with sulfur-bearing fluids from different sources. A time-integrated geologic history can also be derived from bitumen veins, with the Re-Os age of the metal source cached in these veins. Preservation of early metal and hydrocarbon history, and intact Re-Os systematics preserved in younger-formed systems have enormous potential for the resource industry. Several examples will be presented. [1] Georgiev, S.V., Stein, H.J., Hannah, J.L., Galimberti, R., Nali, M., Yang, G., and Zimmerman, A. (returned post revision, 11 Jan 2016) Re-Os dating of maltenes and asphaltenes within single samples of crude oils: Geochimica et Comochimica Acta. Supported by a consortium of petroleum companies under the CHRONOS project.

  10. Goal-Directed Aiming: Two Components but Multiple Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Digby; Hansen, Steve; Grierson, Lawrence E. M.; Lyons, James; Bennett, Simon J.; Hayes, Spencer J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the behavioral literature on the control of goal-directed aiming and presents a multiple-process model of limb control. The model builds on recent variants of Woodworth's (1899) two-component model of speed-accuracy relations in voluntary movement and incorporates ideas about dynamic online limb control based on prior…

  11. Direct visualization of clay microfabric signatures driving organic matter preservation in fine-grained sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Kenneth J.; Bennett, Richard H.; Mayer, Lawrence M.; Curry, Ann; Abril, Maritza; Biesiot, Patricia M.; Hulbert, Matthew H.

    2007-04-01

    We employed direct visualization of organic matter (OM) sequestered by microfabric signatures in organo-clay systems to study mechanisms of OM protection. We studied polysaccharides, an abundant class of OM in marine sediments, associated with the nano- and microfabric of clay sediment using a novel application of transmission electron microscopy, histochemical staining (periodic acid-thiosemicarbazide-silver proteinate), and enzymatic digestion techniques. We used two experimental organo-clay sediment environments. First, laboratory-consolidated sediment with 10% chitin (w/w) added was probed for chitin before and after digestion with chitinase. Second, fecal pellets from the polychaete Heteromastus filiformis were used as a natural environment rich in clay and polysaccharides. Sections of this material were probed with silver proteinate for polysaccharides before and after digestion with a mixture of enzymes (amylase, cellulase, chitinase, dextranase, and pectinase). In both environments, chitin or other polysaccharides were found within pores, bridging clay domains, and attached to clay surfaces in undigested samples. Digested samples showed chitin or polysaccharides more closely associated with clay surfaces and in small pores. Our results imply protective roles for both sorption to clay surfaces and encapsulation within clay microfabric signatures.

  12. LL-37 directs macrophage differentiation toward macrophages with a proinflammatory signature.

    PubMed

    van der Does, Anne M; Beekhuizen, Henry; Ravensbergen, Bep; Vos, Tim; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; van Dissel, Jaap T; Drijfhout, Jan W; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Nibbering, Peter H

    2010-08-01

    The human cathelicidin LL-37 has broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. It also participates at the interface of innate and adaptive immunity by chemoattracting immune effector cells, modulating the production of a variety of inflammatory mediators by different cell types, and regulating the differentiation of monocytes into dendritic cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of LL-37 on the differentiation of human monocytes into anti-inflammatory macrophages (MPhi-2; driven by M-CSF) versus proinflammatory macrophages (MPhi-1; driven by GM-CSF) as well as on fully differentiated MPhi-1 and MPhi-2. Results revealed that monocytes cultured with M-CSF in the presence of LL-37 resulted in macrophages displaying a proinflammatory signature, namely, low expression of CD163 and little IL-10 and profound IL-12p40 production on LPS stimulation. The effects of LL-37 on M-CSF-driven macrophage differentiation were dose- and time-dependent with maximal effects observed at 10 microg/ml when the peptide was present from the start of the cultures. The peptide enhanced the GM-CSF-driven macrophage differentiation. Exposure of fully differentiated MPhi-2 to LL-37 for 6 d resulted in macrophages that produced less IL-10 and more IL-12p40 on LPS stimulation than control MPhi-2. In contrast, LL-37 had no effect on fully differentiated MPhi-1. Peptide mapping using a set of 16 overlapping 22-mer peptides covering the complete LL-37 sequence revealed that the C-terminal portion of LL-37 is responsible for directing macrophage differentiation. Our results furthermore indicate that the effects of LL-37 on macrophage differentiation required internalization of the peptide. Together, we conclude that LL-37 directs macrophage differentiation toward macrophages with a proinflammatory signature.

  13. A genome-wide scan for signatures of directional selection in domesticated pigs.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sunjin; Kim, Tae-Hun; Lee, Kyung-Tai; Kwak, Woori; Lee, Taeheon; Lee, Si-Woo; Kim, Myung-Jick; Cho, Kyuho; Kim, Namshin; Chung, Won-Hyong; Sung, Samsun; Park, Taesung; Cho, Seoae; Groenen, Martien Am; Nielsen, Rasmus; Kim, Yuseob; Kim, Heebal

    2015-02-25

    Animal domestication involved drastic phenotypic changes driven by strong artificial selection and also resulted in new populations of breeds, established by humans. This study aims to identify genes that show evidence of recent artificial selection during pig domestication. Whole-genome resequencing of 30 individual pigs from domesticated breeds, Landrace and Yorkshire, and 10 Asian wild boars at ~16-fold coverage was performed resulting in over 4.3 million SNPs for 19,990 genes. We constructed a comprehensive genome map of directional selection by detecting selective sweeps using an F ST-based approach that detects directional selection in lineages leading to the domesticated breeds and using a haplotype-based test that detects ongoing selective sweeps within the breeds. We show that candidate genes under selection are significantly enriched for loci implicated in quantitative traits important to pig reproduction and production. The candidate gene with the strongest signals of directional selection belongs to group III of the metabolomics glutamate receptors, known to affect brain functions associated with eating behavior, suggesting that loci under strong selection include loci involved in behaviorial traits in domesticated pigs including tameness. We show that a significant proportion of selection signatures coincide with loci that were previously inferred to affect phenotypic variation in pigs. We further identify functional enrichment related to behavior, such as signal transduction and neuronal activities, for those targets of selection during domestication in pigs.

  14. Using multi-scale entropy and principal component analysis to monitor gears degradation via the motor current signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouabdi, Salim; Taibi, Mahmoud; Bouras, Slimane; Boutasseta, Nadir

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes an approach for identifying localized gear tooth defects, such as pitting, using phase currents measured from an induction machine driving the gearbox. A new tool of anomaly detection based on multi-scale entropy (MSE) algorithm SampEn which allows correlations in signals to be identified over multiple time scales. The motor current signature analysis (MCSA) in conjunction with principal component analysis (PCA) and the comparison of observed values with those predicted from a model built using nominally healthy data. The Simulation results show that the proposed method is able to detect gear tooth pitting in current signals.

  15. Automatic and Direct Identification of Blink Components from Scalp EEG

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wanzeng; Zhou, Zhanpeng; Hu, Sanqing; Zhang, Jianhai; Babiloni, Fabio; Dai, Guojun

    2013-01-01

    Eye blink is an important and inevitable artifact during scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) recording. The main problem in EEG signal processing is how to identify eye blink components automatically with independent component analysis (ICA). Taking into account the fact that the eye blink as an external source has a higher sum of correlation with frontal EEG channels than all other sources due to both its location and significant amplitude, in this paper, we proposed a method based on correlation index and the feature of power distribution to automatically detect eye blink components. Furthermore, we prove mathematically that the correlation between independent components and scalp EEG channels can be translating directly from the mixing matrix of ICA. This helps to simplify calculations and understand the implications of the correlation. The proposed method doesn't need to select a template or thresholds in advance, and it works without simultaneously recording an electrooculography (EOG) reference. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can automatically recognize eye blink components with a high accuracy on entire datasets from 15 subjects. PMID:23959240

  16. Signatures of Earth-scattering in the direct detection of Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, Bradley J.; Catena, Riccardo; Kouvaris, Chris, E-mail: bkavanagh@lpthe.jussieu.fr, E-mail: catena@chalmers.se, E-mail: kouvaris@cp3.sdu.dk

    Direct detection experiments search for the interactions of Dark Matter (DM) particles with nuclei in terrestrial detectors. But if these interactions are sufficiently strong, DM particles may scatter in the Earth, affecting their distribution in the lab. We present a new analytic calculation of this 'Earth-scattering' effect in the regime where DM particles scatter at most once before reaching the detector. We perform the calculation self-consistently, taking into account not only those particles which are scattered away from the detector, but also those particles which are deflected towards the detector. Taking into account a realistic model of the Earth andmore » allowing for a range of DM-nucleon interactions, we present the EARTHSHADOW code, which we make publicly available, for calculating the DM velocity distribution after Earth-scattering. Focusing on low-mass DM, we find that Earth-scattering reduces the direct detection rate at certain detector locations while increasing the rate in others. The Earth's rotation induces a daily modulation in the rate, which we find to be highly sensitive to the detector latitude and to the form of the DM-nucleon interaction. These distinctive signatures would allow us to unambiguously detect DM and perhaps even identify its interactions in regions of the parameter space within the reach of current and future experiments.« less

  17. Deep-water measurements of container ship radiated noise signatures and directionality.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Martin; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2017-09-01

    Underwater radiated noise from merchant ships was measured opportunistically from multiple spatial aspects to estimate signature source levels and directionality. Transiting ships were tracked via the Automatic Identification System in a shipping lane while acoustic pressure was measured at the ships' keel and beam aspects. Port and starboard beam aspects were 15°, 30°, and 45° in compliance with ship noise measurements standards [ANSI/ASA S12.64 (2009) and ISO 17208-1 (2016)]. Additional recordings were made at a 10° starboard aspect. Source levels were derived with a spherical propagation (surface-affected) or a modified Lloyd's mirror model to account for interference from surface reflections (surface-corrected). Ship source depths were estimated from spectral differences between measurements at different beam aspects. Results were exemplified with a 4870 and a 10 036 twenty-foot equivalent unit container ship at 40%-56% and 87% of service speeds, respectively. For the larger ship, opportunistic ANSI/ISO broadband levels were 195 (surface-affected) and 209 (surface-corrected) dB re 1 μPa 2 1 m. Directionality at a propeller blade rate of 8 Hz exhibited asymmetries in stern-bow (<6 dB) and port-starboard (<9 dB) direction. Previously reported broadband levels at 10° aspect from McKenna, Ross, Wiggins, and Hildebrand [(2012b). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 131, 92-103] may be ∼12 dB lower than respective surface-affected ANSI/ISO standard derived levels.

  18. Direct detection signatures of self-interacting dark matter with a light mediator

    DOE PAGES

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2015-10-27

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) is a simple and well-motivated scenario that could explain long-standing puzzles in structure formation on small scales. If the required self-interaction arises through a light mediator (with mass ~ 10 MeV) in the dark sector, this new particle must be unstable to avoid overclosing the universe. The decay of the light mediator could happen due to a weak coupling of the hidden and visible sectors, providing new signatures for direct detection experiments. The SIDM nuclear recoil spectrum is more peaked towards low energies compared to the usual case of contact interactions, because the mediator mass ismore » comparable to the momentum transfer of nuclear recoils. We show that the SIDM signal could be distinguished from that of DM particles with contact interactions by considering the time-average energy spectrum in experiments employing different target materials, or the average and modulated spectra in a single experiment. Using current limits from LUX and SuperCDMS, we also derive strong bounds on the mixing parameter between hidden and visible sector.« less

  19. Raman signatures of ferroic domain walls captured by principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Nataf, G F; Barrett, N; Kreisel, J; Guennou, M

    2018-01-24

    Ferroic domain walls are currently investigated by several state-of-the art techniques in order to get a better understanding of their distinct, functional properties. Here, principal component analysis (PCA) of Raman maps is used to study ferroelectric domain walls (DWs) in LiNbO 3 and ferroelastic DWs in NdGaO 3 . It is shown that PCA allows us to quickly and reliably identify small Raman peak variations at ferroelectric DWs and that the value of a peak shift can be deduced-accurately and without a priori-from a first order Taylor expansion of the spectra. The ability of PCA to separate the contribution of ferroelastic domains and DWs to Raman spectra is emphasized. More generally, our results provide a novel route for the statistical analysis of any property mapped across a DW.

  20. Direct modeling parameter signature analysis and failure mode prediction of physical systems using hybrid computer optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, R. L.; Duvoisin, P. F.; Asthana, A.; Mather, T. W.

    1971-01-01

    High speed automated identification and design of dynamic systems, both linear and nonlinear, are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on developing hardware and techniques which are applicable to practical problems. The basic modeling experiment and new results are described. Using the improvements developed successful identification of several systems, including a physical example as well as simulated systems, was obtained. The advantages of parameter signature analysis over signal signature analysis in go-no go testing of operational systems were demonstrated. The feasibility of using these ideas in failure mode prediction in operating systems was also investigated. An improved digital controlled nonlinear function generator was developed, de-bugged, and completely documented.

  1. Signature of Two-Component Advective Flow in several Black Hole candidates obtained through time-of-arrival analysis of RXTE/ASM Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2018-05-01

    We study several Galactic black hole candidates using long-time RXTE/ASM X-ray data to search for telltale signatures of differences in viscous timescales in the two components used in the Two-Component Advective Flow (TCAF) paradigm. In high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) mainly winds are accreted. This nearly inviscid and dominant sub-Keplerian flow falls almost freely towards the black hole. A standard Keplerian disc can form out of this sub-Keplerian matter in presence of a significant viscosity and could be small in size. However, in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), highly viscous and larger Keplerian accretion disc is expected to form inside the sub-Keplerian disc due to the Roche-lobe overflow. Due to two viscous timescales in these two components, it is expected to have a larger lag between the times-of-arrival of these components in LMXBs than that in HMXBs. Direct cross-correlation between the photon fluxes will not reveal this lag since they lack linear dependence; however, they are coupled through the viscous processes which bring in both matter. To quantify the aforesaid time lag, we introduce an index (Θ), which is a proxy of the usual photon index (Γ). Thus, when Θ, being dynamically responsive to both fluxes, is considered as a reference, the arrival time lag between the two fluxes in LMXBs is found to be much larger than that in HMXBs. Our result establishes the presence of two dynamical components in accretion and shows that the Keplerian disc size indeed is smaller in HMXBs as compared to that in LMXBs.

  2. Terrestrial and Martian weathering signatures of xenon components in shergottite mineral separates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Ocker, K. D.; Crowther, S. A.; Burgess, R.; Gilmour, J. D.

    2010-08-01

    Xenon-isotopic ratios, step-heating release patterns, and gas concentrations of mineral separates from Martian shergottites Roberts Massif (RBT) 04262, Dar al Gani (DaG) 489, Shergotty, and Elephant Moraine (EET) 79001 lithology B are reported. Concentrations of Martian atmospheric xenon are similar in mineral separates from all meteorites, but more weathered samples contain more terrestrial atmospheric xenon. The distributions of xenon from the Martian and terrestrial atmospheres among minerals in any one sample are similar, suggesting similarities in the processes by which they were acquired. However, in opaque and maskelynite fractions, Martian atmospheric xenon is released at higher temperatures than terrestrial atmospheric xenon. It is suggested that both Martian and terrestrial atmospheric xenon were initially introduced by weathering (low temperature alteration processes). However, the Martian component was redistributed by shock, accounting for its current residence in more retentive sites. The presence or absence of detectable 129Xe from the Martian atmosphere in mafic minerals may correspond to the extent of crustal contamination of the rock's parent melt. Variable contents of excess 129Xe contrast with previously reported consistent concentrations of excess 40Ar, suggesting distinct sources contributed these gases to the parent magma.

  3. Directed self-assembly of mesoscopic components for led applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, Anton

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) constitute a rapidly evolving and fast growing technology that promises to replace incandescent bulbs and compact fluorescent lights in many illumination applications. Large-area LED luminaires have a capability to transform lighting by providing a venue for development of smart lighting systems with additional benefits, such as visible light communications, sensing, health and productivity improvement through color temperature control, capability of creating "virtual sky" ceiling, and many others. The objective of this work is to explore directed self-assembly (DSA) approaches suitable for cost-effective assembly of large amount of LEDs and other mesoscopic (i.e. millimeter and sub-millimeter) electronic components and thus to enable manufacturing of smart lighting luminaires. Existing alternative approaches for assembly of semiconductor dies are examined including transfer printing, laser-assisted die transfer, and various directed self-assembly approaches using shape-recognition, magnetic and capillary forces, etc. After comparing their advantages and limitations, we developed two approaches to magnetic force-assisted DSA of LEDs on a large-area substrate in liquid and air medium. The first approach involves pick-up of buoyant and magnetic dies from the liquid surface onto the flexible substrate in a roll-to-roll process. The possibility of high-speed assembly of LED dies is demonstrated, but with a low yield due to the influence of the capillary force of the carrier liquid and the difficulty in ensuring reliable supply of dies to the assembly interface. To overcome the aforementioned challenges this process was modified to assemble the dies by sinking them onto the receiving substrate with a stencil mask on top, demonstrating LED assembly with a very low error rate but at a lower speed. A solder-assisted self-alignment is used to further improve placement precision and to ensure the proper orientation of the dies. The second

  4. Bi-Directional Communication: A Critical Component of HAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Known problems with automation include lack of mode awareness, automation brittleness, and risk of miscalibrated trust. Human-Autonomy Teaming (HAT) is essential for improving these problems. This presentation outlines critical components for Human-Autonomy Teaming.

  5. The Metadiscourse Component: Understanding Writing about Reading Directives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crismore, Avon

    One of the most important functions for metadiscourse (reading directives) is to serve as textual relevance cues. Readers must use metadiscourse to determine the specific task or communicative context for understanding the total meaning of a text. Some of the more common types of metadiscourse include (1) hedges--words used to convey a note of…

  6. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A.J., E-mail: b.a.j.roelen@uu.nl

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatinmore » and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.« less

  7. Genomic architecture of habitat-related divergence and signature of directional selection in the body shapes of Gnathopogon fishes.

    PubMed

    Kakioka, Ryo; Kokita, Tomoyuki; Kumada, Hiroki; Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Okuda, Noboru

    2015-08-01

    Evolution of ecomorphologically relevant traits such as body shapes is important to colonize and persist in a novel environment. Habitat-related adaptive divergence of these traits is therefore common among animals. We studied the genomic architecture of habitat-related divergence in the body shape of Gnathopogon fishes, a novel example of lake-stream ecomorphological divergence, and tested for the action of directional selection on body shape differentiation. Compared to stream-dwelling Gnathopogon elongatus, the sister species Gnathopogon caerulescens, exclusively inhabiting a large ancient lake, had an elongated body, increased proportion of the caudal region and small head, which would be advantageous in the limnetic environment. Using an F2 interspecific cross between the two Gnathopogon species (195 individuals), quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis with geometric morphometric quantification of body shape and restriction-site associated DNA sequencing-derived markers (1622 loci) identified 26 significant QTLs associated with the interspecific differences of body shape-related traits. These QTLs had small to moderate effects, supporting polygenic inheritance of the body shape-related traits. Each QTL was mostly located on different genomic regions, while colocalized QTLs were detected for some ecomorphologically relevant traits that are proxy of body and caudal peduncle depths, suggesting different degree of modularity among traits. The directions of the body shape QTLs were mostly consistent with the interspecific difference, and QTL sign test suggested a genetic signature of directional selection in the body shape divergence. Thus, we successfully elucidated the genomic architecture underlying the adaptive changes of the quantitative and complex morphological trait in a novel system. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Indirect and direct signatures of Higgs portal decaying vector dark matter for positron excess in cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Seungwon; Ko, P.; Park, Wan-Il

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the indirect signatures of the Higgs portal U(1){sub X} vector dark matter (VDM) X{sub μ} from both its pair annihilation and decay. The VDM is stable at renormalizable level by Z{sub 2} symmetry, and thermalized by Higgs-portal interactions. It can also decay by some nonrenormalizable operators with very long lifetime at cosmological time scale. If dim-6 operators for VDM decays are suppressed by 10{sup 16} GeV scale, the lifetime of VDM with mass ∼ 2 TeV is just right for explaining the positron excess in cosmic ray observed by PAMELA and AMS02 Collaborations. The VDM decaying into μ{supmore » +}μ{sup −} can fit the data, evading various constraints on cosmic rays. We give one UV-complete model as an example. This scenario for Higgs portal decaying VDM with mass around ∼ 2 TeV can be tested by DM direct search at XENON1T, and also at the future colliders by measuring the Higgs self-couplings.« less

  9. HOTCFGM-2D: A Coupled Higher-Order Theory for Cylindrical Structural Components with Bi-Directionally Components with Bi-Directionally Graded Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this two-year project was to develop and deliver to the NASA-Glenn Research Center a two-dimensional higher-order theory, and related computer codes, for the analysis and design of cylindrical functionally graded materials/structural components for use in advanced aircraft engines (e.g., combustor linings, rotor disks, heat shields, brisk blades). To satisfy this objective, two-dimensional version of the higher-order theory, HOTCFGM-2D, and four computer codes based on this theory, for the analysis and design of structural components functionally graded in the radial and circumferential directions were developed in the cylindrical coordinate system r-Theta-z. This version of the higher-order theory is a significant generalization of the one-dimensional theory, HOTCFGM-1D, developed during the FY97 for the analysis and design of cylindrical structural components with radially graded microstructures. The generalized theory is applicable to thin multi-phased composite shells/cylinders subjected to steady-state thermomechanical, transient thermal and inertial loading applied uniformly along the axial direction such that the overall deformation is characterized by a constant average axial strain. The reinforcement phases are uniformly distributed in the axial direction, and arbitrarily distributed in the radial and circumferential direction, thereby allowing functional grading of the internal reinforcement in the r-Theta plane. The four computer codes fgmc3dq.cylindrical.f, fgmp3dq.cylindrical.f, fgmgvips3dq.cylindrical.f, and fgmc3dq.cylindrical.transient.f are research-oriented codes for investigating the effect of functionally graded architectures, as well as the properties of the multi-phase reinforcement, in thin shells subjected to thermomechanical and inertial loading, on the internal temperature, stress and (inelastic) strain fields. The reinforcement distribution in the radial and circumferential directions is specified by the user. The thermal

  10. Wheat signature modeling and analysis for improved training statistics: Supplement. Simulated LANDSAT wheat radiances and radiance components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Cicone, R. C.; Gleason, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Simulated scanner system data values generated in support of LACIE (Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment) research and development efforts are presented. Synthetic inband (LANDSAT) wheat radiances and radiance components were computed and are presented for various wheat canopy and atmospheric conditions and scanner view geometries. Values include: (1) inband bidirectional reflectances for seven stages of wheat crop growth; (2) inband atmospheric features; and (3) inband radiances corresponding to the various combinations of wheat canopy and atmospheric conditions. Analyses of these data values are presented in the main report.

  11. 3-component beamforming analysis of ambient seismic noise field for Love and Rayleigh wave source directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juretzek, Carina; Hadziioannou, Céline

    2014-05-01

    Our knowledge about common and different origins of Love and Rayleigh waves observed in the microseism band of the ambient seismic noise field is still limited, including the understanding of source locations and source mechanisms. Multi-component array methods are suitable to address this issue. In this work we use a 3-component beamforming algorithm to obtain source directions and polarization states of the ambient seismic noise field within the primary and secondary microseism bands recorded at the Gräfenberg array in southern Germany. The method allows to distinguish between different polarized waves present in the seismic noise field and estimates Love and Rayleigh wave source directions and their seasonal variations using one year of array data. We find mainly coinciding directions for the strongest acting sources of both wave types at the primary microseism and different source directions at the secondary microseism.

  12. Virtual directions in paleomagnetism: A global and rapid approach to evaluate the NRM components.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramón, Maria J.; Pueyo, Emilio L.; Oliva-Urcia, Belén; Larrasoaña, Juan C.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a method and software to process demagnetization data for a rapid and integrative estimation of characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) components. The virtual directions (VIDI) of a paleomagnetic site are “all” possible directions that can be calculated from a given demagnetization routine of “n” steps (being m the number of specimens in the site). If the ChRM can be defined for a site, it will be represented in the VIDI set. Directions can be calculated for successive steps using principal component analysis, both anchored to the origin (resultant virtual directions RVD; m * (n2+n)/2) and not anchored (difference virtual directions DVD; m * (n2-n)/2). The number of directions per specimen (n2) is very large and will enhance all ChRM components with noisy regions where two components were fitted together (mixing their unblocking intervals). In the same way, resultant and difference virtual circles (RVC, DVC) are calculated. Virtual directions and circles are a global and objective approach to unravel different natural remanent magnetization (NRM) components for a paleomagnetic site without any assumption. To better constrain the stable components, some filters can be applied, such as establishing an upper boundary to the MAD, removing samples with anomalous intensities, or stating a minimum number of demagnetization steps (objective filters) or selecting a given unblocking interval (subjective but based on the expertise). On the other hand, the VPD program also allows the application of standard approaches (classic PCA fitting of directions a circles) and other ancillary methods (stacking routine, linearity spectrum analysis) giving an objective, global and robust idea of the demagnetization structure with minimal assumptions. Application of the VIDI method to natural cases (outcrops in the Pyrenees and u-channel data from a Roman dam infill in northern Spain) and their comparison to other approaches (classic end-point, demagnetization

  13. Highly Enantioselective Three-Component Direct Mannich Reactions of Unfunctionalized Ketones Catalyzed by Bifunctional Organocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qunsheng; Zhao, John Cong-Gui

    2013-01-01

    A highly stereoselective three-component direct Mannich reaction between aromatic aldehydes, p-toluenesulfonamide, and unfunctionalized ketones was achieved through an enolate mechanism for the first time with a bifunctional quinidine thiourea catalyst. The corresponding N-tosylated β-aminoketones were obtained in high yields and excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities (up to >99:1 dr and >99% ee). PMID:23343472

  14. Unique Biofilm Signature, Drug Susceptibility and Decreased Virulence in Drosophila through the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Two-Component System PprAB

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, Caroline; Bernard, Christophe S.; Calderon, Virginie; Ewald, Friederike; Plésiat, Patrick; Nguyen, Cathy; Grunwald, Didier; Attree, Ina; Jeannot, Katy; Fauvarque, Marie-Odile

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm is considered as a particular lifestyle helping cells to survive hostile environments triggered by a variety of signals sensed and integrated through adequate regulatory pathways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium causing severe infections in humans, forms biofilms and is a fantastic example for fine-tuning of the transition between planktonic and community lifestyles through two-component systems (TCS). Here we decipher the regulon of the P. aeruginosa response regulator PprB of the TCS PprAB. We identified genes under the control of this TCS and once this pathway is activated, analyzed and dissected at the molecular level the PprB-dependent phenotypes in various models. The TCS PprAB triggers a hyper-biofilm phenotype with a unique adhesive signature made of BapA adhesin, a Type 1 secretion system (T1SS) substrate, CupE CU fimbriae, Flp Type IVb pili and eDNA without EPS involvement. This unique signature is associated with drug hyper-susceptibility, decreased virulence in acutely infected flies and cytotoxicity toward various cell types linked to decreased Type III secretion (T3SS). Moreover, once the PprB pathway is activated, decreased virulence in orally infected flies associated with enhanced biofilm formation and dissemination defect from the intestinal lumen toward the hemolymph compartment is reported. PprB may thus represent a key bacterial adaptation checkpoint of multicellular and aggregative behavior triggering the production of a unique matrix associated with peculiar antibiotic susceptibility and attenuated virulence, a particular interesting breach for therapeutic intervention to consider in view of possible eradication of P. aeruginosa biofilm-associated infections. PMID:23209420

  15. Directly reconstructing principal components of heterogeneous particles from cryo-EM images.

    PubMed

    Tagare, Hemant D; Kucukelbir, Alp; Sigworth, Fred J; Wang, Hongwei; Rao, Murali

    2015-08-01

    Structural heterogeneity of particles can be investigated by their three-dimensional principal components. This paper addresses the question of whether, and with what algorithm, the three-dimensional principal components can be directly recovered from cryo-EM images. The first part of the paper extends the Fourier slice theorem to covariance functions showing that the three-dimensional covariance, and hence the principal components, of a heterogeneous particle can indeed be recovered from two-dimensional cryo-EM images. The second part of the paper proposes a practical algorithm for reconstructing the principal components directly from cryo-EM images without the intermediate step of calculating covariances. This algorithm is based on maximizing the posterior likelihood using the Expectation-Maximization algorithm. The last part of the paper applies this algorithm to simulated data and to two real cryo-EM data sets: a data set of the 70S ribosome with and without Elongation Factor-G (EF-G), and a data set of the influenza virus RNA dependent RNA Polymerase (RdRP). The first principal component of the 70S ribosome data set reveals the expected conformational changes of the ribosome as the EF-G binds and unbinds. The first principal component of the RdRP data set reveals a conformational change in the two dimers of the RdRP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Directly Reconstructing Principal Components of Heterogeneous Particles from Cryo-EM Images

    PubMed Central

    Tagare, Hemant D.; Kucukelbir, Alp; Sigworth, Fred J.; Wang, Hongwei; Rao, Murali

    2015-01-01

    Structural heterogeneity of particles can be investigated by their three-dimensional principal components. This paper addresses the question of whether, and with what algorithm, the three-dimensional principal components can be directly recovered from cryo-EM images. The first part of the paper extends the Fourier slice theorem to covariance functions showing that the three-dimensional covariance, and hence the principal components, of a heterogeneous particle can indeed be recovered from two-dimensional cryo-EM images. The second part of the paper proposes a practical algorithm for reconstructing the principal components directly from cryo-EM images without the intermediate step of calculating covariances. This algorithm is based on maximizing the (posterior) likelihood using the Expectation-Maximization algorithm. The last part of the paper applies this algorithm to simulated data and to two real cryo-EM data sets: a data set of the 70S ribosome with and without Elongation Factor-G (EF-G), and a data set of the inluenza virus RNA dependent RNA Polymerase (RdRP). The first principal component of the 70S ribosome data set reveals the expected conformational changes of the ribosome as the EF-G binds and unbinds. The first principal component of the RdRP data set reveals a conformational change in the two dimers of the RdRP. PMID:26049077

  17. BioJS DAGViewer: A reusable JavaScript component for displaying directed graphs

    PubMed Central

    Micklem, Gos

    2014-01-01

    Summary: The DAGViewer BioJS component is a reusable JavaScript component made available as part of the BioJS project and intended to be used to display graphs of structured data, with a particular emphasis on Directed Acyclic Graphs (DAGs). It enables users to embed representations of graphs of data, such as ontologies or phylogenetic trees, in hyper-text documents (HTML). This component is generic, since it is capable (given the appropriate configuration) of displaying any kind of data that is organised as a graph. The features of this component which are useful for examining and filtering large and complex graphs are described. Availability: http://github.com/alexkalderimis/dag-viewer-biojs; http://github.com/biojs/biojs; http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.8303. PMID:24627804

  18. An improved principal component analysis based region matching method for fringe direction estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, A.; Quan, C.

    2018-04-01

    The principal component analysis (PCA) and region matching combined method is effective for fringe direction estimation. However, its mask construction algorithm for region matching fails in some circumstances, and the algorithm for conversion of orientation to direction in mask areas is computationally-heavy and non-optimized. We propose an improved PCA based region matching method for the fringe direction estimation, which includes an improved and robust mask construction scheme, and a fast and optimized orientation-direction conversion algorithm for the mask areas. Along with the estimated fringe direction map, filtered fringe pattern by automatic selective reconstruction modification and enhanced fast empirical mode decomposition (ASRm-EFEMD) is used for Hilbert spiral transform (HST) to demodulate the phase. Subsequently, windowed Fourier ridge (WFR) method is used for the refinement of the phase. The robustness and effectiveness of proposed method are demonstrated by both simulated and experimental fringe patterns.

  19. On the direct detection of multi-component dark matter: sensitivity studies and parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Scaffidi, Andre; White, Martin; Williams, Anthony G.

    2017-11-01

    We study the case of multi-component dark matter, in particular how direct detection signals are modified in the presence of several stable weakly-interacting-massive particles. Assuming a positive signal in a future direct detection experiment, stemming from two dark matter components, we study the region in parameter space where it is possible to distinguish a one from a two-component dark matter spectrum. First, we leave as free parameters the two dark matter masses and show that the two hypotheses can be significantly discriminated for a range of dark matter masses with their splitting being the critical factor. We then investigate how including the effects of different interaction strengths, local densities or velocity dispersions for the two components modifies these conclusions. We also consider the case of isospin-violating couplings. In all scenarios, we show results for various types of nuclei both for elastic spin-independent and spin-dependent interactions. Finally, assuming that the two-component hypothesis is confirmed, we quantify the accuracy with which the parameters can be extracted and discuss the different degeneracies that occur. This includes studying the case in which only a single experiment observes a signal, and also the scenario of having two signals from two different experiments, in which case the ratios of the couplings to neutrons and protons may also be extracted.

  20. Observations of a bi-directional lightning leader producing an M-component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotovsky, D. A.; Uman, M. A.; Wilkes, R.; Carvalho, F. L.; Jordan, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    Lightning discharges to ground often exhibit millisecond-scale surges in the continuing currents following return strokes, called M-components. Relatively little is known regarding the source of M-component charge and the mechanisms by which that charge is transferred to ground. In this work, we seek to directly address these questions by presenting correlated high-speed video and Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) observations of a bi-directional leader that resulted in an M-component occurring in a rocket-and-wire triggered lightning flash. The observed leader initiated in the decayed remnants of a positive leader channel that had traversed virgin air approximately 90 msec prior. Three-dimensional locations and speeds of the photographed bi-directional leader and M-component processes are calculated by mapping video images to the observed LMA channel geometry. Both ends of the bi-directional leader exhibited speeds on the order of 2 x106 m sec-1 over 570 meters of the visible channel. Propagation of the luminosity wave from the in-cloud leader to ground ( 8.8 km channel length) exhibited appreciable dispersion, with rise-times (10-90%) increasing from 330 to 410 μsec and pulse-widths (half-maximum) increasing from 380 to 810 μsec - the M-component current pulse measured at ground-level exhibited a rise-time of 290 μsec and a pulse-width of 770 μsec. Group velocities of the luminosity wave have been calculated as a function of frequency, increasing from 2 x107 to 6 x107 m sec-1 over the dominant signal bandwidth (DC to 2 kHz). Additionally, multiple waves of luminosity are observed within the in-cloud channel, indicating nuanced wave phenomena possibly associated with reflection from the end of the leader channel and attachment with the main lightning channel carrying continuing current to ground.

  1. Direct Visualization of Short Transverse Relaxation Time Component (ViSTa)

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Hong; Bilello, Michel; Schindler, Matthew; Markowitz, Clyde E.; Detre, John A.; Lee, Jongho

    2013-01-01

    White matter of the brain has been demonstrated to have multiple relaxation components. Among them, the short transverse relaxation time component (T2 < 40 ms; T2* < 25 ms at 3T) has been suggested to originate from myelin water whereas long transverse relaxation time components have been associated with axonal and/or interstitial water. In myelin water imaging, T2 or T2* signal decay is measured to estimate myelin water fraction based on T2 or T2* differences among the water components. This method has been demonstrated to be sensitive to demyelination in the brain but suffers from low SNR and image artifacts originating from ill-conditioned multi-exponential fitting. In this study, a novel approach that selectively acquires short transverse relaxation time signal is proposed. The method utilizes a double inversion RF pair to suppress a range of long T1 signal. This suppression leaves short T2* signal, which has been suggested to have short T1, as the primary source of the image. The experimental results confirms that after suppression of long T1 signals, the image is dominated by short T2* in the range of myelin water, allowing us to directly visualize the short transverse relaxation time component in the brain. Compared to conventional myelin water imaging, this new method of direct visualization of short relaxation time component (ViSTa) provides high quality images. When applied to multiple sclerosis patients, chronic lesions show significantly reduced signal intensity in ViSTa images suggesting sensitivity to demyelination. PMID:23796545

  2. Multiple sound source localization using gammatone auditory filtering and direct sound componence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huaiyu; Cao, Li

    2017-06-01

    In order to research multiple sound source localization with room reverberation and background noise, we analyze the shortcomings of traditional broadband MUSIC and ordinary auditory filtering based broadband MUSIC method, then a new broadband MUSIC algorithm with gammatone auditory filtering of frequency component selection control and detection of ascending segment of direct sound componence is proposed. The proposed algorithm controls frequency component within the interested frequency band in multichannel bandpass filter stage. Detecting the direct sound componence of the sound source for suppressing room reverberation interference is also proposed, whose merits are fast calculation and avoiding using more complex de-reverberation processing algorithm. Besides, the pseudo-spectrum of different frequency channels is weighted by their maximum amplitude for every speech frame. Through the simulation and real room reverberation environment experiments, the proposed method has good performance. Dynamic multiple sound source localization experimental results indicate that the average absolute error of azimuth estimated by the proposed algorithm is less and the histogram result has higher angle resolution.

  3. Modelling temporal variance of component temperatures and directional anisotropy over vegetated canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Zunjian; du, yongming; li, hua

    2016-04-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) as a key variable plays an important role on hydrological, meteorology and climatological study. Thermal infrared directional anisotropy is one of essential factors to LST retrieval and application on longwave radiance estimation. Many approaches have been proposed to estimate directional brightness temperatures (DBT) over natural and urban surfaces. While less efforts focus on 3-D scene and the surface component temperatures used in DBT models are quiet difficult to acquire. Therefor a combined 3-D model of TRGM (Thermal-region Radiosity-Graphics combined Model) and energy balance method is proposed in the paper for the attempt of synchronously simulation of component temperatures and DBT in the row planted canopy. The surface thermodynamic equilibrium can be final determined by the iteration strategy of TRGM and energy balance method. The combined model was validated by the top-of-canopy DBTs using airborne observations. The results indicated that the proposed model performs well on the simulation of directional anisotropy, especially the hotspot effect. Though we find that the model overestimate the DBT with Bias of 1.2K, it can be an option as a data reference to study temporal variance of component temperatures and DBTs when field measurement is inaccessible

  4. Combinational Circuit Obfuscation Through Power Signature Manipulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Algorithm produced by SID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Appendix B . Power Signature Estimation Results 2 . . . . . . . . . . 85 B .1 Power...Signature for c264 Circuit Variant per Algorithm produced by SPICE Simulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 B .2 Power Signature for c5355 and c499...Smart SSR selecting rear level components and gates with 1000 iterations . . . . . . . . . 84 B .1. Power Signature for c264 By Random Sequence

  5. EON: a component-based approach to automation of protocol-directed therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Musen, M A; Tu, S W; Das, A K; Shahar, Y

    1996-01-01

    Provision of automated support for planning protocol-directed therapy requires a computer program to take as input clinical data stored in an electronic patient-record system and to generate as output recommendations for therapeutic interventions and laboratory testing that are defined by applicable protocols. This paper presents a synthesis of research carried out at Stanford University to model the therapy-planning task and to demonstrate a component-based architecture for building protocol-based decision-support systems. We have constructed general-purpose software components that (1) interpret abstract protocol specifications to construct appropriate patient-specific treatment plans; (2) infer from time-stamped patient data higher-level, interval-based, abstract concepts; (3) perform time-oriented queries on a time-oriented patient database; and (4) allow acquisition and maintenance of protocol knowledge in a manner that facilitates efficient processing both by humans and by computers. We have implemented these components in a computer system known as EON. Each of the components has been developed, evaluated, and reported independently. We have evaluated the integration of the components as a composite architecture by implementing T-HELPER, a computer-based patient-record system that uses EON to offer advice regarding the management of patients who are following clinical trial protocols for AIDS or HIV infection. A test of the reuse of the software components in a different clinical domain demonstrated rapid development of a prototype application to support protocol-based care of patients who have breast cancer. PMID:8930854

  6. Hybrid optical (freeform) components--functionalization of nonplanar optical surfaces by direct picosecond laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Roman; Kampmann, Ronald; Stoebenau, Sebastian; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    The performance of optical systems is typically improved by increasing the number of conventionally fabricated optical components (spheres, aspheres, and gratings). This approach is automatically connected to a system enlargement, as well as potentially higher assembly and maintenance costs. Hybrid optical freeform components can help to overcome this trade-off. They merge several optical functions within fewer but more complex optical surfaces, e.g., elements comprising shallow refractive/reflective and high-frequency diffractive structures. However, providing the flexibility and precision essential for their realization is one of the major challenges in the field of optical component fabrication. In this article we present tailored integrated machining techniques suitable for rapid prototyping as well as the fabrication of molding tools for low-cost mass replication of hybrid optical freeform components. To produce the different feature sizes with optical surface quality, we successively combine mechanical machining modes (ultraprecision micromilling and fly cutting) with precisely aligned direct picosecond laser ablation in an integrated fabrication approach. The fabrication accuracy and surface quality achieved by our integrated fabrication approach are demonstrated with profilometric measurements and experimental investigations of the optical performance.

  7. Direct Machining of Low-Loss THz Waveguide Components With an RF Choke.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Samantha M; Nanni, Emilio A; Temkin, Richard J

    2014-12-01

    We present results for the successful fabrication of low-loss THz metallic waveguide components using direct machining with a CNC end mill. The approach uses a split-block machining process with the addition of an RF choke running parallel to the waveguide. The choke greatly reduces coupling to the parasitic mode of the parallel-plate waveguide produced by the split-block. This method has demonstrated loss as low as 0.2 dB/cm at 280 GHz for a copper WR-3 waveguide. It has also been used in the fabrication of 3 and 10 dB directional couplers in brass, demonstrating excellent agreement with design simulations from 240-260 GHz. The method may be adapted to structures with features on the order of 200 μm.

  8. Laser alchemy: direct writing of multifunctional components in a glass chip with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yang; Lin, Jintian; Cheng, Ya

    2013-12-01

    Recently, hybrid integration of multifunctional micro-components for creating complex, intelligent micro/nano systems has attracted significant attention. These micro-/nano-systems have important applications in a variety of areas, such as healthcare, environment, communication, national security, and so on. However, fabrication of micro/nano systems incorporated with different functions is still a challenging task, which generally requires fabrication of discrete microcomponents beforehand followed by assembly and packaging procedures. Furthermore, current micro-/nano-fabrication techniques are mainly based on the well-established planar lithographic approach, which suffer from severe issues in producing three dimensional (3D) structures with complex geometries and arbitrary configurations. In recent years, the rapid development of femtosecond laser machining technology has enabled 3D direct fabrication and integration of multifunctional components, such as microfluidics, microoptics, micromechanics, microelectronics, etc., into single substrates. In this invited talk, we present our recent progress in this active area. Particularly, we focus on fabrication of 3D micro- and nanofluidic devices and 3D high-Q microcavities in glass substrates by femtosecond laser direct writing.

  9. Directing folding pathways for multi-component DNA origami nanostructures with complex topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, A. E.; Zhou, L.; Kolliopoulos, V.; Su, H.-J.; Castro, C. E.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular self-assembly has become a well-established technique to design complex nanostructures and hierarchical mesoscale assemblies. The typical approach is to design binding complementarity into nucleotide or amino acid sequences to achieve the desired final geometry. However, with an increasing interest in dynamic nanodevices, the need to design structures with motion has necessitated the development of multi-component structures. While this has been achieved through hierarchical assembly of similar structural units, here we focus on the assembly of topologically complex structures, specifically with concentric components, where post-folding assembly is not feasible. We exploit the ability to direct folding pathways to program the sequence of assembly and present a novel approach of designing the strand topology of intermediate folding states to program the topology of the final structure, in this case a DNA origami slider structure that functions much like a piston-cylinder assembly in an engine. The ability to program the sequence and control orientation and topology of multi-component DNA origami nanostructures provides a foundation for a new class of structures with internal and external moving parts and complex scaffold topology. Furthermore, this work provides critical insight to guide the design of intermediate states along a DNA origami folding pathway and to further understand the details of DNA origami self-assembly to more broadly control folding states and landscapes.

  10. Increased dermal collagen bundle alignment in systemic sclerosis is associated with a cell migration signature and role of Arhgdib in directed fibroblast migration on aligned ECMs

    PubMed Central

    Lafyatis, Robert; Burkly, Linda C.

    2017-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a devastating disease affecting the skin and internal organs. Dermal fibrosis manifests early and Modified Rodnan Skin Scores (MRSS) correlate with disease progression. Transcriptomics of SSc skin biopsies suggest the role of the in vivo microenvironment in maintaining the pathological myofibroblasts. Therefore, defining the structural changes in dermal collagen in SSc patients could inform our understanding of fibrosis pathogenesis. Here, we report a method for quantitative whole-slide image analysis of dermal collagen from SSc patients, and our findings of more aligned dermal collagen bundles in diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc) patients. Using the bleomycin-induced mouse model of SSc, we identified a distinct high dermal collagen bundle alignment gene signature, characterized by a concerted upregulation in cell migration, adhesion, and guidance pathways, and downregulation of spindle, replication, and cytokinesis pathways. Furthermore, increased bundle alignment induced a cell migration gene signature in fibroblasts in vitro, and these cells demonstrated increased directed migration on aligned ECM fibers that is dependent on expression of Arhgdib (Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 2). Our results indicate that increased cell migration is a cellular response to the increased collagen bundle alignment featured in fibrotic skin. Moreover, many of the cell migration genes identified in our study are shared with human SSc skin and may be new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28662216

  11. Progesterone Directly and Rapidly Inhibits GnRH Neuronal Activity via Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1

    PubMed Central

    Bashour, Nicholas Michael

    2012-01-01

    GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, being an integral component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Progesterone (P4), a steroid hormone, modulates reproductive behavior and is associated with rapid changes in GnRH secretion. However, a direct action of P4 on GnRH neurons has not been previously described. Receptors in the progestin/adipoQ receptor family (PAQR), as well as progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PgRMC1) and its partner serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E (nexin, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1) mRNA binding protein 1 (SERBP1), have been shown to mediate rapid progestin actions in various tissues, including the brain. This study shows that PgRMC1 and SERBP1, but not PAQR, are expressed in prenatal GnRH neurons. Expression of PgRMC1 and SERBP1 was verified in adult mouse GnRH neurons. To investigate the effect of P4 on GnRH neuronal activity, calcium imaging was used on primary GnRH neurons maintained in explants. Application of P4 significantly decreased the activity of GnRH neurons, independent of secretion of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic and glutamatergic input, suggesting a direct action of P4 on GnRH neurons. Inhibition was not blocked by RU486, an antagonist of the classic nuclear P4 receptor. Inhibition was also maintained after uncoupling of the inhibitory regulative G protein (Gi/o), the signal transduction pathway used by PAQR. However, AG-205, a PgRMC1 ligand and inhibitor, blocked the rapid P4-mediated inhibition, and inhibition of protein kinase G, thought to be activated downstream of PgRMC1, also blocked the inhibitory activity of P4. These data show for the first time that P4 can act directly on GnRH neurons through PgRMC1 to inhibit neuronal activity. PMID:22822163

  12. NEET-AMM Final Technical Report on Laser Direct Manufacturing (LDM) for Nuclear Power Components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Scott; Baca, Georgina; O'Connor, Michael

    2015-12-31

    Final technical report summarizes the program progress and technical accomplishments of the Laser Direct Manufacturing (LDM) for Nuclear Power Components project. A series of experiments varying build process parameters (scan speed and laser power) were conducted at the outset to establish the optimal build conditions for each of the alloys. Fabrication was completed in collaboration with Quad City Manufacturing Laboratory (QCML). The density of all sample specimens was measured and compared to literature values. Optimal build process conditions giving fabricated part densities close to literature values were chosen for making mechanical test coupons. Test coupons whose principal axis is onmore » the x-y plane (perpendicular to build direction) and on the z plane (parallel to build direction) were built and tested as part of the experimental build matrix to understand the impact of the anisotropic nature of the process.. Investigations are described 316L SS, Inconel 600, 718 and 800 and oxide dispersion strengthed 316L SS (Yttria) alloys.« less

  13. Residual stress evaluation of components produced via direct metal laser sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Kemerling, Brandon; Lippold, John C.; Fancher, Christopher M.

    Direct metal laser sintering is an additive manufacturing process which is capable of fabricating three-dimensional components using a laser energy source and metal powder particles. Despite the numerous benefits offered by this technology, the process maturity is low with respect to traditional subtractive manufacturing methods. Relationships between key processing parameters and final part properties are generally lacking and require further development. In this study, residual stresses were evaluated as a function of key process variables. The variables evaluated included laser scan strategy and build plate preheat temperature. Residual stresses were measured experimentally via neutron diffraction and computationally via finite elementmore » analysis. Good agreement was shown between the experimental and computational results. Results showed variations in the residual stress profile as a function of laser scan strategy. Compressive stresses were dominant along the build height (z) direction, and tensile stresses were dominant in the x and y directions. Build plate preheating was shown to be an effective method for alleviating residual stress due to the reduction in thermal gradient.« less

  14. Residual stress evaluation of components produced via direct metal laser sintering

    DOE PAGES

    Kemerling, Brandon; Lippold, John C.; Fancher, Christopher M.; ...

    2018-03-22

    Direct metal laser sintering is an additive manufacturing process which is capable of fabricating three-dimensional components using a laser energy source and metal powder particles. Despite the numerous benefits offered by this technology, the process maturity is low with respect to traditional subtractive manufacturing methods. Relationships between key processing parameters and final part properties are generally lacking and require further development. In this study, residual stresses were evaluated as a function of key process variables. The variables evaluated included laser scan strategy and build plate preheat temperature. Residual stresses were measured experimentally via neutron diffraction and computationally via finite elementmore » analysis. Good agreement was shown between the experimental and computational results. Results showed variations in the residual stress profile as a function of laser scan strategy. Compressive stresses were dominant along the build height (z) direction, and tensile stresses were dominant in the x and y directions. Build plate preheating was shown to be an effective method for alleviating residual stress due to the reduction in thermal gradient.« less

  15. Three-dimensional integration of microoptical components buried inside photosensitive glass by femtosecond laser direct writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongke; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2007-12-01

    We report the three-dimensional (3D) integration of microoptical components such as microlenses, micromirrors and optical waveguides in a single glass chip by femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing. First, two types of microoptical lenses were fabricated inside photosensitive Foturan glass by forming hollow microstructures using fs laser direct writing followed by thermal treatment, successive wet etching and additional annealing. One type of lens is the cylindrical microlens with a curvature radius R of 1.0 mm, and the other is the plano-convex microlens with radius R of 0.75 mm. Subsequently, by the continuous procedure of hollow microstructure fabrication, a micromirror was integrated with the plano-convex microlens in the single glass chip. Further integration of waveguides was performed by internal refractive index modification using fs laser direct writing after the hollow structure fabrication of the microlens and the micromirror. A demonstration of the laser beam transmission in the integrated optical microdevice shows that the 3D integration of waveguides with a micromirror and a microoptical lens in a single glass chip is highly effective for light beam guiding and focusing.

  16. 30 CFR 75.703 - Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures of related detached components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 75.703 Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures of related detached components. [Statutory Provisions] The frames of all offtrack direct-current machines and...

  17. 30 CFR 75.703 - Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures of related detached components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 75.703 Grounding offtrack direct-current machines and the enclosures of related detached components. [Statutory Provisions] The frames of all offtrack direct-current machines and...

  18. The anterior component of occlusal force revisited: direct measurement and theoretical considerations.

    PubMed

    Al Qassar, Sarmad S Salih; Mavragani, Maria; Psarras, Vasilis; Halazonetis, Demetrios J

    2016-04-01

    The anterior component of occlusal force (ACF), considered to result from the mesial inclination of teeth relative to the occlusal plane, has been estimated by indirectly measuring contact point tightness (CPT) through interproximal insertion of metal strips. ACF has been observed concurrently with a posterior component, whose theoretical origin is difficult to explain. Evaluate ACF by measuring CPT directly, and integrate current data to propose a theoretical basis for ACF. The sample comprised 14 females (age: 22.3±2.8) and 16 males (age: 20.8±2.5). Our device consisted of two force sensors: one for measuring maximum bite force (MBF) (overall thickness: 4mm), and one for measuring CPT directly (0.2mm thick), inserted between the lower first molar and second premolar. ACF was computed as the difference in CPT between the biting (at 75 per cent of MBF) and non-biting conditions. Averages of MBF, CPT, and ACF were 666.67 [standard deviation (SD): 36.06], 6.74 (SD: 1.17), and 20.59 (SD: 4.60) N, respectively. ACF, CPT, and MBF were higher in males by approximately 28, 18 and 7 per cent, respectively. A positive correlation was observed between ACF and MBF (R (2): 0.64). CPT was also significantly correlated to MBF (R (2): 0.40). Biomechanical analysis indicates that previously offered explanations do not unriddle the concurrent increase of CPT at anterior and posterior contact points. ACF was related to bite force by a logarithmic model. We speculate that CPT increases during biting through a combination of mesial tipping of teeth and mandibular bending. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Low loss photonic components in high index bismuth borate glass by femtosecond laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weijia; Corbari, Costantino; Kazansky, Peter G; Sakaguchi, Koichi; Carvalho, Isabel C S

    2008-09-29

    Single mode, low loss waveguides were fabricated in high index bismuth borate glass by femtosecond laser direct writing. A specific set of writing parameters leading to waveguides perfectly mode matched to standard single-mode fibers at 1.55 microm with an overall insertion loss of approximately 1 dB and with propagation loss below 0.2 dB/cm was identified. Photonic components such as Y-splitters and directional couplers were also demonstrated. A close agreement between their performances and theoretical predictions based upon the characterization of the waveguide properties is shown. Finally, the nonlinear refractive index of the waveguides has been measured to be 6.6 x 10(-15) cm(2)/W by analyzing self-phase modulation of the propagating femtosecond laser pulse at the wavelength of 1.46 microm. Broadening of the transmitted light source as large as 500 nm was demonstrated through a waveguide with the length of 1.8 cm.

  20. On the microstructure analysis of FSW joints of aluminium components made via direct metal laser sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherillo, Fabio; Astarita, Antonello; di Martino, Daniela; Contaldi, Vincenzo; di Matteo, Luca; di Petta, Paolo; Casarin, Renzo; Squillace, Antonino; Langella, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM), applied to metal industry, is a family of processes that allow complex shape components to be realized from raw materials in the form of powders. The compaction of the powders can be achieved by local melting of the powder bed or by solid state sintering. Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) is an additive manufacturing process in which a focalized laser beam is the heat source that allows the powders to be compacted. By DMLS it is possible to realize complex shape components. One of the limits of DMLS, as for every additive layer manufacturing techniques, is the unfeasibility to realize large dimension parts. Due to this limit the study of joining process of parts made via ALM is of great interest. One of the most promising options is the Friction Stir Welding (FSW), a solid state welding technique that has been proven to be very effective in the welding of metals difficult to weld, above all aluminium alloys. Since FSW is a solid-state technique, the microstructure of the various zone of the weld bead depends not only by the process itself but also by the parent microstruct ure of the parts to be welded. Furthermore, parts made of aluminium alloy via DMLS have a particular microstructure that is the result of repeated severe thermal cycles. In the present work the authors, starting from the description of the parent microstructure of parts made of AlSi10Mg aluminium alloy, study the microstructure evolution occurred within the joint made by Friction Stir Welding, analysing in details the microstructure of the main well recognized zone of the weld bead. The structure of the parent material is characterized by the presence of melting pools with a very fine microstructure. In the joint the recrystallization, the grain refinement and, above all, the redistribution of intermetallic phases occurs, resulting in an homogenization of the microstructure and in an increase of micro hardness.

  1. An Evaluation of Semiempirical Models for Partitioning Photosynthetically Active Radiation Into Diffuse and Direct Beam Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliphant, Andrew J.; Stoy, Paul C.

    2018-03-01

    Photosynthesis is more efficient under diffuse than direct beam photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) per unit PAR, but diffuse PAR is infrequently measured at research sites. We examine four commonly used semiempirical models (Erbs et al., 1982, https://doi.org/10.1016/0038-092X(82)90302-4; Gu et al., 1999, https://doi.org/10.1029/1999JD901068; Roderick, 1999, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0168-1923(99)00028-3; Weiss & Norman, 1985, https://doi.org/10.1016/0168-1923(85)90020-6) that partition PAR into diffuse and direct beam components based on the negative relationship between atmospheric transparency and scattering of PAR. Radiation observations at 58 sites (140 site years) from the La Thuille FLUXNET data set were used for model validation and coefficient testing. All four models did a reasonable job of predicting the diffuse fraction of PAR (ϕ) at the 30 min timescale, with site median r2 values ranging between 0.85 and 0.87, model efficiency coefficients (MECs) between 0.62 and 0.69, and regression slopes within 10% of unity. Model residuals were not strongly correlated with astronomical or standard meteorological variables. We conclude that the Roderick (1999, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0168-1923(99)00028-3) and Gu et al. (1999, https://doi.org/10.1029/1999JD901068) models performed better overall than the two older models. Using the basic form of these models, the data set was used to find both individual site and universal model coefficients that optimized predictive accuracy. A new universal form of the model is presented in section 5 that increased site median MEC to 0.73. Site-specific model coefficients increased median MEC further to 0.78, indicating usefulness of local/regional training of coefficients to capture the local distributions of aerosols and cloud types.

  2. Structural characterization of biomedical Co-Cr-Mo components produced by direct metal laser sintering.

    PubMed

    Barucca, G; Santecchia, E; Majni, G; Girardin, E; Bassoli, E; Denti, L; Gatto, A; Iuliano, L; Moskalewicz, T; Mengucci, P

    2015-03-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technique to manufacture complex functional mechanical parts from a computer-aided design (CAD) model. Usually, the mechanical components produced by this procedure show higher residual porosity and poorer mechanical properties than those obtained by conventional manufacturing techniques. In this work, a Co-Cr-Mo alloy produced by DMLS with a composition suitable for biomedical applications was submitted to hardness measurements and structural characterization. The alloy showed a hardness value remarkably higher than those commonly obtained for the same cast or wrought alloys. In order to clarify the origin of this unexpected result, the sample microstructure was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and energy dispersive microanalysis (EDX). For the first time, a homogeneous microstructure comprised of an intricate network of thin ε (hcp)-lamellae distributed inside a γ (fcc) phase was observed. The ε-lamellae grown on the {111}γ planes limit the dislocation slip inside the γ (fcc) phase, causing the measured hardness increase. The results suggest possible innovative applications of the DMLS technique to the production of mechanical parts in the medical and dental fields. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Direct writing of fiber optic components in photonic crystal fibers and other specialty fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Luis Andre; Sezerman, Omur; Best, Garland; Ng, Mi Li; Kane, Saidou

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond direct laser writing has recently shown great potential for the fabrication of complex integrated devices in the cladding of optical fibers. Such devices have the advantage of requiring no bulk optical components and no breaks in the fiber path, thus reducing the need for complicated alignment, eliminating contamination, and increasing stability. This technology has already found applications using combinations of Bragg gratings, interferometers, and couplers for the fabrication of optical filters, sensors, and power monitors. The femtosecond laser writing method produces a local modification of refractive index through non-linear absorption of the ultrafast laser pulses inside the dielectric material of both the core and cladding of the fiber. However, fiber geometries that incorporate air or hollow structures, such as photonic crystal fibers (PCFs), still present a challenge since the index modification regions created by the writing process cannot be generated in the hollow regions of the fiber. In this work, the femtosecond laser method is used together with a pre-modification method that consists of partially collapsing the hollow holes using an electrical arc discharge. The partial collapse of the photonic band gap structure provides a path for femtosecond laser written waveguides to couple light from the core to the edge of the fiber for in-line power monitoring. This novel approach is expected to have applications in other specialty fibers such as suspended core fibers and can open the way for the integration of complex devices and facilitate miniaturization of optical circuits to take advantage of the particular characteristics of the PCFs.

  4. Direct observation of self-energy signatures of the resonant collective mode in Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 + δ

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, Daixiang; Kaminski, Adam; Gu, Genda

    Here, we use high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the resonant, collective excitation mode in the superconducting state of Bi2212. By collecting very high-quality data we found noteworthy features in the self-energy in the antinodal region, where the interaction of electrons with the mode is the strongest. This interaction leads to a pronounced peak in the scattering rate and we demonstrate that this feature is directly responsible for the well-known peak-dip-hump structure in cuprates. By studying how the weight of this peak changes with temperature we unequivocally demonstrate that interaction of electrons with the resonant mode in cuprates vanishes atmore » T c and is very much localized in the momentum space close to the antinode. These findings present a consistent picture of line shape and self-energy signatures of the electron-boson coupling in cuprates and resolve long-standing controversy surrounding this issue. The momentum dependence of the strength of electron-mode interaction enables development of quantitative theory of this phenomenon in cuprates.« less

  5. Direct observation of self-energy signatures of the resonant collective mode in Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 + δ

    DOE PAGES

    Mou, Daixiang; Kaminski, Adam; Gu, Genda

    2017-05-01

    Here, we use high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the resonant, collective excitation mode in the superconducting state of Bi2212. By collecting very high-quality data we found noteworthy features in the self-energy in the antinodal region, where the interaction of electrons with the mode is the strongest. This interaction leads to a pronounced peak in the scattering rate and we demonstrate that this feature is directly responsible for the well-known peak-dip-hump structure in cuprates. By studying how the weight of this peak changes with temperature we unequivocally demonstrate that interaction of electrons with the resonant mode in cuprates vanishes atmore » T c and is very much localized in the momentum space close to the antinode. These findings present a consistent picture of line shape and self-energy signatures of the electron-boson coupling in cuprates and resolve long-standing controversy surrounding this issue. The momentum dependence of the strength of electron-mode interaction enables development of quantitative theory of this phenomenon in cuprates.« less

  6. Signature Verification Based on Handwritten Text Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viriri, Serestina; Tapamo, Jules-R.

    Signatures continue to be an important biometric trait because it remains widely used primarily for authenticating the identity of human beings. This paper presents an efficient text-based directional signature recognition algorithm which verifies signatures, even when they are composed of special unconstrained cursive characters which are superimposed and embellished. This algorithm extends the character-based signature verification technique. The experiments carried out on the GPDS signature database and an additional database created from signatures captured using the ePadInk tablet, show that the approach is effective and efficient, with a positive verification rate of 94.95%.

  7. Direct and inverse auger processes in InAs nanocrystals: can the decay signature of a trion be mistaken for carrier multiplication?

    PubMed

    Califano, Marco

    2009-09-22

    A complete and detailed theoretical investigation of the main processes involved in the controversial detection and quantification of carrier multiplication (CM) is presented, providing a coherent and comprehensive picture of excited state relaxation in InAs nanocrystals (NCs). The observed rise and decay times of the 1S transient bleach are reproduced, in the framework of the Auger model, using an atomistic semiempirical pseudopotential method, achieving excellent agreement with experiment. The CM time constants for small core-only and core/shell nanocrystals are obtained as a function of the excitation energy, assuming an impact-ionization-like process. The resulting lifetimes at energies close to the observed CM onset are consistent with the upper limits deduced experimentally from PbSe and CdSe samples. Most interestingly, as the Auger recombination lifetimes calculated for charged excitons are found to be of a similar order of magnitude to those computed for biexcitons, both species are expected to exhibit the fast decay component in NC population dynamics so far attributed exclusively to the presence of biexcitons and therefore identified as the signature of CM occurrence in high-energy low-pump-fluence spectroscopic studies. However, the ratio between trions and biexcitons time constants is found to be larger than the typical experimental accuracy. It is therefore concluded that, in InAs NCs, it should be experimentally possible to discriminate between the two species and that the origin of the observed discrepancies in CM yields is unlikely to lay in the presence of charged excitons.

  8. Phenotypic Robustness and the Assortativity Signature of Human Transcription Factor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pechenick, Dov A.; Payne, Joshua L.; Moore, Jason H.

    2014-01-01

    Many developmental, physiological, and behavioral processes depend on the precise expression of genes in space and time. Such spatiotemporal gene expression phenotypes arise from the binding of sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) to DNA, and from the regulation of nearby genes that such binding causes. These nearby genes may themselves encode TFs, giving rise to a transcription factor network (TFN), wherein nodes represent TFs and directed edges denote regulatory interactions between TFs. Computational studies have linked several topological properties of TFNs — such as their degree distribution — with the robustness of a TFN's gene expression phenotype to genetic and environmental perturbation. Another important topological property is assortativity, which measures the tendency of nodes with similar numbers of edges to connect. In directed networks, assortativity comprises four distinct components that collectively form an assortativity signature. We know very little about how a TFN's assortativity signature affects the robustness of its gene expression phenotype to perturbation. While recent theoretical results suggest that increasing one specific component of a TFN's assortativity signature leads to increased phenotypic robustness, the biological context of this finding is currently limited because the assortativity signatures of real-world TFNs have not been characterized. It is therefore unclear whether these earlier theoretical findings are biologically relevant. Moreover, it is not known how the other three components of the assortativity signature contribute to the phenotypic robustness of TFNs. Here, we use publicly available DNaseI-seq data to measure the assortativity signatures of genome-wide TFNs in 41 distinct human cell and tissue types. We find that all TFNs share a common assortativity signature and that this signature confers phenotypic robustness to model TFNs. Lastly, we determine the extent to which each of the four components of

  9. Tissue signature characterisation of diffusion tensor abnormalities in cerebral gliomas.

    PubMed

    Price, Stephen J; Peña, Alonso; Burnet, Neil G; Jena, Raj; Green, Hadrian A L; Carpenter, T Adrian; Pickard, John D; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2004-10-01

    The inherent invasiveness of malignant cells is a major determinant of the poor prognosis of cerebral gliomas. Diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) can identify white matter abnormalities in gliomas that are not seen on conventional imaging. By breaking down DTI into its isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) components, we can determine tissue diffusion "signatures". In this study we have characterised these abnormalities in peritumoural white matter tracts. Thirty-five patients with cerebral gliomas and seven normal volunteers were imaged with DTI and T2-weighted sequences at 3 T. Displaced, infiltrated and disrupted white matter tracts were identified using fractional anisotropy (FA) maps and directionally encoded colour maps and characterised using tissue signatures. The diffusion tissue signatures were normal in ROIs where the white matter was displaced. Infiltrated white matter was characterised by an increase in the isotropic component of the tensor (p) and a less marked reduction of the anisotropic component (q). In disrupted white matter tracts, there was a marked reduction in q and increase in p. The direction of water diffusion was grossly abnormal in these cases. Diffusion tissue signatures may be a useful method of assessing occult white matter infiltration. Copyright 2004 Springer-Verlag

  10. Stigma-reducing components in direct-to-consumer prescription ads: onset controllability, offset controllability, and recategorization.

    PubMed

    An, Soontae; Kang, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed direct-to-consumer (DTC) print ads for stigmatized illnesses from 1998 to 2008. Attribution theory and recategorization theory were used as theoretical frames to assess whether those DTC ads contained message components to reduce stigma. DTC ads for 10 stigmatized illnesses in National Geographic, Better Homes and Gardens, Ladies' Home Journal, and Time were analyzed for the presence of onset controllability, offset controllability, and recategorization. Results showed that only 3.7% of ads offered the three message components together and, in fact, 21% of the ads did not contain any of the stigma-reducing message elements. Recategorization cue was the most prevalent component, while cues for onset and offset controllability were relatively less frequent, indicating the lack of educational components. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  11. Data-Based Locally Directed Evaluation of Vocational Education Programs. Component 3. Assessing Student Career Interests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Program of Vocational Education.

    Part of a system by which local education agency (LEA) personnel may evaluate secondary and postsecondary vocational education programs, this third of eight components focuses on assessment of student career interests. Procedures covered include determination of the student population to be surveyed, selection of the instrument, and discrepancy…

  12. Skin and muscle components of forearm blood flow in directly heated resting man.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detry, J.-M. R.; Brengelmann, G. L.; Rowell, L. B.; Wyss, C.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in forearm muscle blood flow (FMBF) during direct whole-body heating were measured in 17 normal subjects using three different methods. We conclude that FMBF is not increased by direct whole-body heating. Since renal and splanchnic blood flow fall 30% under these conditions, maximal total skin blood flow in 12 previously studied subjects can be estimated from the rise in cardiac output to be 7.6 L/min (3.0-11.1 L/min).

  13. Bi-directional exchange of membrane components occurs during co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells and nucleus pulposus cells.

    PubMed

    Strassburg, Sandra; Hodson, Nigel W; Hill, Patrick I; Richardson, Stephen M; Hoyland, Judith A

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapies have been proposed as novel treatments for intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. We have previously demonstrated that when MSCs are co-cultured with nucleus pulposus (NP) cells with direct cell-cell contact, they differentiate along the NP lineage and simultaneously stimulate the degenerate NP cell population to regain a normal (non-degenerate) phenotype, an effect which requires cell-cell communication. However, the mechanisms by which NP cells and MSCs interact in this system are currently unclear. Thus, in this study we investigated a range of potential mechanisms for exchange of cellular components or information that may direct these changes, including cell fusion, gap-junctional communication and exchange of membrane components by direct transfer or via microvesicle formation. Flow cytometry of fluorescently labeled MSCs and NP cells revealed evidence of some cell fusion and formation of gapjunctions, although at the three timepoints studied these phenomena were detectable only in a small proportion of cells. While these mechanisms may play a role in cell-cell communication, the data suggests they are not the predominant mechanism of interaction. However, flow cytometry of fluorescently dual-labeled cells showed that extensive bi-directional transfer of membrane components is operational during direct co-culture of MSCs and NP cells. Furthermore, there was also evidence for secretion and internalization of membrane-bound microvesicles by both cell types. Thus, this study highlights bi-directional intercellular transfer of membrane components as a possible mechanism of cellular communication between MSC and NP cells.

  14. Impact of multi-component diffusion in turbulent combustion using direct numerical simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Bruno, Claudio; Sankaran, Vaidyanathan; Kolla, Hemanth; ...

    2015-08-28

    This study presents the results of DNS of a partially premixed turbulent syngas/air flame at atmospheric pressure. The objective was to assess the importance and possible effects of molecular transport on flame behavior and structure. To this purpose DNS were performed at with two proprietary DNS codes and with three different molecular diffusion transport models: fully multi-component, mixture averaged, and imposing the Lewis number of all species to be unity.

  15. Direct enantioselective three-component synthesis of optically active propargylamines in water.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Mutsuyo; Hara, Yoshichika; Ohnuki, Tohru; Nakamura, Shuichi

    2014-07-14

    An enantioselective three-component reaction of aldehydes, amines, and alkynes in water by using a bis(imidazoline)-Cu(I) catalysts having a hydrophobic substituent and sodium dodecyl sulfate as a surfactant was developed. The reaction was applied to a broad range of aldehydes and alkynes to give optically active propargylamines with excellent yields (up to 99 %) and enantiomeric excesses (up to 99 % ee). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Air conditioning system and component therefore distributing air flow from opposite directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D.; Bauer, H. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The air conditioning system comprises a plurality of separate air conditioning units coupled to a common supply duct such that air may be introduced into the supply duct in two opposite flow directions. A plurality of outlets such as registers or auxiliary or branch ducts communicate with the supply duct and valve means are disposed in the supply duct at at least some of the outlets for automatically channelling a controllable amount of air from the supply duct to the associated outlet regardless of the direction of air flow within the supply duct. The valve means comprises an automatic air volume control apparatus for distribution within the air supply duct into which air may be introduced from two opposite directions. The apparatus incorporates a freely swinging movable vane in the supply duct to automatically channel into the associated outlet only the deflected air flow which has the higher relative pressure.

  17. Variance components for direct and maternal effects on body weights of Katahdin lambs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The aim of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for BW in Katahdin lambs. Six animal models were used to study direct and maternal effects on birth (BWT), weaning (WWT) and postweaning (PWWT) weights using 41,066 BWT, 33,980 WWT, and 22,793 PWWT records collected over 17 yr in 100 flocks. F...

  18. Radio signature of magnetic reconnection and bi-directional shock waves in a flare-CME event on April 15, 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guang-Li

    2003-03-01

    A flare-CME event on April 15, 1998 is studied with data of Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters (NoRP) and Heliograph (NoRH), the radio spectrometers of Chinese National Astronomical Observatories (1.0-2.0 GHz and 2.6-2.8 GHz), and the Astrophysical Institute of Postdam (200-800 MHz), as well as the data of YOHKOH, SOHO, BATSE, and GOES. There were strong fluctuations superposed on the initial phase of the BATSE hard X-ray burst, and the radio burst at 1.0-2.0 GHz with a group of type III-like positive and negative frequency drift pairs, which may be interpreted as the process of magnetic reconnection or particle acceleration in corona. A type II-like burst with a series of pulsations at 200-800 MHz followed the maximum phase of the radio and hard X-ray burst, and slowly drifted to lower frequencies with typical zebra feature. After 10 min of that, a similar dynamic spectrum was recorded at 2.6-3.8 GHz, where the type II-like signal drifted to higher frequencies with a series of pulsations and zebra structures. The polarization sense was strongly RCP at 2.6-3.8 GHz, and weakly LCP at 1.0-2.0 GHz, which was confirmed by the observations of NoRP. The radiation mechanism of these pulsations may be caused by the electron cyclotron maser instability. The local magnetic field strength and source height are estimated based on the gyro-synchrotron second harmonic emission. The ambient plasma density is calculated from the YOHKOH/SXT data. The ratio between the electron plasma frequency and gyro-frequency is around 1.3, which corresponds to the reversal value from extraordinary mode (LCP) to ordinary mode (RCP). Moreover, both the time scale and the modularity of an individual pulse increase statistically with the increase in the burst flux, which may be explained by the acceleration process of non-thermal electrons in the shock wave-fronts propagated upward and downward. Therefore, the radio observations may provide an important signature that flare and CME are triggered

  19. Multi-Component Molecular-Level Body Composition Reference Methods: Evolving Concepts and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Heymsfield, Steven B.; Ebbeling, Cara B.; Zheng, Jolene; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Strauss, Boyd J.; Silva, Analiza M.; Ludwig, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Excess adiposity is the main phenotypic feature that defines human obesity and that plays a pathophysiological role in most chronic diseases. Measuring the amount of fat mass present is thus a central aspect of studying obesity at the individual and population levels. Nevertheless, a consensus is lacking among investigators on a single accepted “reference” approach for quantifying fat mass in vivo. While the research community generally relies on the multicomponent body-volume class of “reference” models for quantifying fat mass, no definable guide discerns among different applied equations for partitioning the four (fat, water, protein, and mineral mass) or more quantified components, standardizes “adjustment” or measurement system approaches for model-required labeled water dilution volumes and bone mineral mass estimates, or firmly establishes the body temperature at which model physical properties are assumed. The resulting differing reference strategies for quantifying body composition in vivo leads to small but under some circumstances important differences in the amount of measured body fat. Recent technological advances highlight opportunities to expand model applications to new subject groups and measured components such as total body protein. The current report reviews the historical evolution of multicomponent body volume-based methods in the context of prevailing uncertainties and future potential. PMID:25645009

  20. Microwave Photonic Architecture for Direction Finding of LPI Emitters: Front End Analog Circuit Design and Component Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    design to control the phase shifters was complex, and the calibration process was time consuming. During the redesign process, we carried out...signals in time domain with a maximum sampling frequency of 20 Giga samples per second. In the previous tests of the design , the performance of...PHOTONIC ARCHITECTURE FOR DIRECTION FINDING OF LPI EMITTERS: FRONT-END ANALOG CIRCUIT DESIGN AND COMPONENT CHARACTERIZATION by Chew K. Tan

  1. Effect of Binding Components in Complex Sample Matrices on Recovery in Direct Immersion Solid-Phase Microextraction: Friends or Foe?

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Nazmul; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2018-02-20

    The development of matrix compatible coatings for solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has enabled direct extraction of analytes from complex sample matrices. The direct immersion (DI) mode of SPME when utilized in conjunction with such extraction phases facilitates extraction of a wide range of analytes from complex matrices without the incurrence of fouling or coating saturation. In this work, mathematical models and computational simulations were employed to investigate the effect of binding components present in complex samples on the recovery of small molecules varying in logP for extractions carried out using the direct immersion approach. The presented findings corroborate that the studied approach indeed enables the extraction of both polar and nonpolar analytes from complex matrices, provided a suitable sorbent is employed. Further results indicated that, in certain cases, the kinetics of extraction of a given analyte in its free form might be dependent on the desorption kinetics of their bound form from matrix components, which might lower total recoveries of analytes with high affinity for the matrix. However, the binding of analytes to matrix components also enables SPME to extract a balanced quantity of different logP analytes, facilitated by multiphase equilibria, with a single extraction device.

  2. The 'not-so-strange' body in the mirror: A principal components analysis of direct and mirror self-observation.

    PubMed

    Jenkinson, Paul M; Preston, Catherine

    2017-02-01

    In this study we adopted a psychometric approach to examine how the body is subjectively experienced in a mirror. One hundred and twenty-four healthy participants viewed their body for five minutes directly or via a mirror, and then completed a 20-item questionnaire designed to capture subjective experiences of the body. PCA revealed a two-component structure for both direct and mirror conditions, comprising body evaluations (and alienation) and unusual feelings and perceptions. The relationship between these components and pre-existing tendencies for appearance anxiety, body dysmorphic-type beliefs, dissociative symptomatology, self-objectification and delusion ideation further supported the similarity between direct and mirror conditions; however, the occurrence of strange experiences like those reported to occur during prolonged face viewing was not confirmed. These results suggest that, despite obvious differences in visual feedback, observing the body via a mirror (as an outside observer) is subjectively equivalent to observing the body directly (from our own viewpoint). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Three-dimensional direct laser written graphitic electrical contacts to randomly distributed components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorin, Bryce; Parkinson, Patrick; Scully, Patricia

    2018-04-01

    The development of cost-effective electrical packaging for randomly distributed micro/nano-scale devices is a widely recognized challenge for fabrication technologies. Three-dimensional direct laser writing (DLW) has been proposed as a solution to this challenge, and has enabled the creation of rapid and low resistance graphitic wires within commercial polyimide substrates. In this work, we utilize the DLW technique to electrically contact three fully encapsulated and randomly positioned light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in a one-step process. The resolution of the contacts is in the order of 20 μ m, with an average circuit resistance of 29 ± 18 kΩ per LED contacted. The speed and simplicity of this technique is promising to meet the needs of future microelectronics and device packaging.

  4. In-situ Condition Monitoring of Components in Small Modular Reactors Using Process and Electrical Signature Analysis. Final report, volume 1. Development of experimental flow control loop, data analysis and plant monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, Belle; Hines, J. Wesley; Damiano, Brian

    The research and development under this project was focused on the following three major objectives: Objective 1: Identification of critical in-vessel SMR components for remote monitoring and development of their low-order dynamic models, along with a simulation model of an integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR). Objective 2: Development of an experimental flow control loop with motor-driven valves and pumps, incorporating data acquisition and on-line monitoring interface. Objective 3: Development of stationary and transient signal processing methods for electrical signatures, machinery vibration, and for characterizing process variables for equipment monitoring. This objective includes the development of a data analysis toolbox. Themore » following is a summary of the technical accomplishments under this project: - A detailed literature review of various SMR types and electrical signature analysis of motor-driven systems was completed. A bibliography of literature is provided at the end of this report. Assistance was provided by ORNL in identifying some key references. - A review of literature on pump-motor modeling and digital signal processing methods was performed. - An existing flow control loop was upgraded with new instrumentation, data acquisition hardware and software. The upgrading of the experimental loop included the installation of a new submersible pump driven by a three-phase induction motor. All the sensors were calibrated before full-scale experimental runs were performed. - MATLAB-Simulink model of a three-phase induction motor and pump system was completed. The model was used to simulate normal operation and fault conditions in the motor-pump system, and to identify changes in the electrical signatures. - A simulation model of an integral PWR (iPWR) was updated and the MATLAB-Simulink model was validated for known transients. The pump-motor model was interfaced with the iPWR model for testing the impact of primary flow perturbations (upsets

  5. Maternal components of RNA-directed DNA methylation are required for seed development in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Grover, Jeffrey W; Kendall, Timmy; Baten, Abdul; Burgess, Diane; Freeling, Michael; King, Graham J; Mosher, Rebecca A

    2018-05-01

    Small RNAs trigger repressive DNA methylation at thousands of transposable elements in a process called RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). The molecular mechanism of RdDM is well characterized in Arabidopsis, yet the biological function remains unclear, as loss of RdDM in Arabidopsis causes no overt defects, even after generations of inbreeding. It is known that 24 nucleotide Pol IV-dependent siRNAs, the hallmark of RdDM, are abundant in flowers and developing seeds, indicating that RdDM might be important during reproduction. Here we show that, unlike Arabidopsis, mutations in the Pol IV-dependent small RNA pathway cause severe and specific reproductive defects in Brassica rapa. High rates of abortion occur when seeds have RdDM mutant mothers, but not when they have mutant fathers. Although abortion occurs after fertilization, RdDM function is required in maternal somatic tissue, not in the female gametophyte or the developing zygote, suggesting that siRNAs from the maternal soma might function in filial tissues. We propose that recently outbreeding species such as B. rapa are key to understanding the role of RdDM during plant reproduction. © 2018 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Stationary Wavelet-based Two-directional Two-dimensional Principal Component Analysis for EMG Signal Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yi; Sun, Shanlin; Xie, Hong-Bo

    2017-06-01

    Discrete wavelet transform (WT) followed by principal component analysis (PCA) has been a powerful approach for the analysis of biomedical signals. Wavelet coefficients at various scales and channels were usually transformed into a one-dimensional array, causing issues such as the curse of dimensionality dilemma and small sample size problem. In addition, lack of time-shift invariance of WT coefficients can be modeled as noise and degrades the classifier performance. In this study, we present a stationary wavelet-based two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis (SW2D2PCA) method for the efficient and effective extraction of essential feature information from signals. Time-invariant multi-scale matrices are constructed in the first step. The two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis then operates on the multi-scale matrices to reduce the dimension, rather than vectors in conventional PCA. Results are presented from an experiment to classify eight hand motions using 4-channel electromyographic (EMG) signals recorded in healthy subjects and amputees, which illustrates the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed method for biomedical signal analysis.

  7. A New Approach to Threshold Attribute Based Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by developments in attribute based encryption and signatures, there has recently been a spurtof progress in the direction of threshold ...attribute based signatures (t-ABS). In this work we propose anovel approach to construct threshold attribute based signatures inspired by ring signatures...Thresholdattribute based signatures, dened by a (t; n) threshold predicate, ensure that the signer holds atleastt out of a specied set of n attributes

  8. [Theoretical modeling and experimental research on direct compaction characteristics of multi-component pharmaceutical powders based on the Kawakita equation].

    PubMed

    Si, Guo-Ning; Chen, Lan; Li, Bao-Guo

    2014-04-01

    Base on the Kawakita powder compression equation, a general theoretical model for predicting the compression characteristics of multi-components pharmaceutical powders with different mass ratios was developed. The uniaxial flat-face compression tests of powder lactose, starch and microcrystalline cellulose were carried out, separately. Therefore, the Kawakita equation parameters of the powder materials were obtained. The uniaxial flat-face compression tests of the powder mixtures of lactose, starch, microcrystalline cellulose and sodium stearyl fumarate with five mass ratios were conducted, through which, the correlation between mixture density and loading pressure and the Kawakita equation curves were obtained. Finally, the theoretical prediction values were compared with experimental results. The analysis showed that the errors in predicting mixture densities were less than 5.0% and the errors of Kawakita vertical coordinate were within 4.6%, which indicated that the theoretical model could be used to predict the direct compaction characteristics of multi-component pharmaceutical powders.

  9. The Staphylococcus aureus Two-Component System AgrAC Displays Four Distinct Genomic Arrangements That Delineate Genomic Virulence Factor Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Kumari S.; Mih, Nathan; Monk, Jonathan; Kavvas, Erol; Yurkovich, James T.; Sakoulas, George; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2018-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) consist of a histidine kinase and a response regulator. Here, we evaluated the conservation of the AgrAC TCS among 149 completely sequenced Staphylococcus aureus strains. It is composed of four genes: agrBDCA. We found that: (i) AgrAC system (agr) was found in all but one of the 149 strains, (ii) the agr positive strains were further classified into four agr types based on AgrD protein sequences, (iii) the four agr types not only specified the chromosomal arrangement of the agr genes but also the sequence divergence of AgrC histidine kinase protein, which confers signal specificity, (iv) the sequence divergence was reflected in distinct structural properties especially in the transmembrane region and second extracellular binding domain, and (v) there was a strong correlation between the agr type and the virulence genomic profile of the organism. Taken together, these results demonstrate that bioinformatic analysis of the agr locus leads to a classification system that correlates with the presence of virulence factors and protein structural properties. PMID:29887846

  10. Direct transcriptional activation of BT genes by NLP transcription factors is a key component of the nitrate response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeo; Maekawa, Shugo; Konishi, Mineko; Yoshioka, Nozomi; Sasaki, Yuki; Maeda, Haruna; Ishida, Tetsuya; Kato, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Junji; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2017-01-29

    Nitrate modulates growth and development, functioning as a nutrient signal in plants. Although many changes in physiological processes in response to nitrate have been well characterized as nitrate responses, the molecular mechanisms underlying the nitrate response are not yet fully understood. Here, we show that NLP transcription factors, which are key regulators of the nitrate response, directly activate the nitrate-inducible expression of BT1 and BT2 encoding putative scaffold proteins with a plant-specific domain structure in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, the 35S promoter-driven expression of BT2 partially rescued growth inhibition caused by reductions in NLP activity in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, simultaneous disruption of BT1 and BT2 affected nitrate-dependent lateral root development. These results suggest that direct activation of BT1 and BT2 by NLP transcriptional activators is a key component of the molecular mechanism underlying the nitrate response in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The direct assignment option as a modular design component: an example for the setting of two predefined subgroups.

    PubMed

    An, Ming-Wen; Lu, Xin; Sargent, Daniel J; Mandrekar, Sumithra J

    2015-01-01

    A phase II design with an option for direct assignment (stop randomization and assign all patients to experimental treatment based on interim analysis, IA) for a predefined subgroup was previously proposed. Here, we illustrate the modularity of the direct assignment option by applying it to the setting of two predefined subgroups and testing for separate subgroup main effects. We power the 2-subgroup direct assignment option design with 1 IA (DAD-1) to test for separate subgroup main effects, with assessment of power to detect an interaction in a post-hoc test. Simulations assessed the statistical properties of this design compared to the 2-subgroup balanced randomized design with 1 IA, BRD-1. Different response rates for treatment/control in subgroup 1 (0.4/0.2) and in subgroup 2 (0.1/0.2, 0.4/0.2) were considered. The 2-subgroup DAD-1 preserves power and type I error rate compared to the 2-subgroup BRD-1, while exhibiting reasonable power in a post-hoc test for interaction. The direct assignment option is a flexible design component that can be incorporated into broader design frameworks, while maintaining desirable statistical properties, clinical appeal, and logistical simplicity.

  12. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark [Alamo, CA; Gosnell, Tom B [Moraga, CA; Ham, Cheryl [Livermore, CA; Perkins, Dwight [Livermore, CA; Wong, James [Dublin, CA

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  13. Uncovering potential anti-neuroinflammatory components of Modified Wuziyanzong Prescription through a target-directed molecular docking fingerprint strategy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinfeng; Wang, Jinlong; Lu, Yingyuan; Zhao, Shaoyang; Yu, Qian; Wang, Xuemei; Tu, Pengfei; Zeng, Kewu; Jiang, Yong

    2018-05-01

    Neuroinflammation is a main factor in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease. Our previous studies indicated that the modified Wuziyanzong Prescription (MWP) can suppress neuroinflammatory responses via nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathways. However, the anti-neuroinflammatory components of MWP remain unclear. Herein, a target-directed molecular docking fingerprint (TMDF) strategy, via integrating the chemical profiling and molecular docking approaches, was developed to identify the potential anti-neuroinflammatory components of MWP. First, as many as 120 possible structures, including 49 flavonoids, 28 phenylpropionic acids, 18 amides, 10 carotenoids, eight phenylethanoid glycosides, four lignans, two iridoids, and one triterpenoid were deduced by the source attribution and structural classification-assisted strategy. Then, their geometries were docked against five major targets of the NF-κB and MAPKs signaling cascades, including p38-α, IKKβ, ERK1, ERK2, and TRAF6. The docking results revealed diverse contributions of different components towards the protein targets. Collectively, prenylated flavonoids showed intensive or moderate anti-neuroinflammatory activities, while phenylpropanoids, amides, phenylethanoid glycosides, lignans, and triterpenoids exhibited moderate or weak anti-neuroinflammatory effects. The anti-neuroinflammatory activities of four retrieved prenylated flavonoids were tested by Western blotting assay, and the results mostly agreed with those predicted by the docking method. These gained information demonstrates that the established TMDF strategy could be a rapid and feasible methodology to investigate the potential active components in herbal compound prescriptions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Factor analysis as a tool for spectral line component separation 21cm emission in the direction of L1780

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, L. V.; Mattila, K.; Haikala, L.; Balazs, L. G.

    1992-01-01

    The spectra of the 21cm HI radiation from the direction of L1780, a small high-galactic latitude dark/molecular cloud, were analyzed by multivariate methods. Factor analysis was performed on HI (21cm) spectra in order to separate the different components responsible for the spectral features. The rotated, orthogonal factors explain the spectra as a sum of radiation from the background (an extended HI emission layer), and from the L1780 dark cloud. The coefficients of the cloud-indicator factors were used to locate the HI 'halo' of the molecular cloud. Our statistically derived 'background' and 'cloud' spectral profiles, as well as the spatial distribution of the HI halo emission distribution were compared to the results of a previous study which used conventional methods analyzing nearly the same data set.

  15. Acoustic signature of thunder from seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappus, Mary E.; Vernon, Frank L.

    1991-06-01

    Thunder, the sound wave through the air associated with lightning, transfers sufficient energy to the ground to trigger seismometers set to record regional earthquakes. The acoustic signature recorded on seismometers, in the form of ground velocity as a function of time, contains the same type features as pressure variations recorded with microphones in air. At a seismic station in Kislovodsk, USSR, a nearly direct lightning strike caused electronic failure of borehole instruments while leaving a brief impulsive acoustic signature on the surface instruments. The peak frequency of 25-55 Hz is consistent with previously published values for cloud-to-ground lightning strikes, but spectra from this station are contaminated by very strong wind noise in this band. A thunderstorm near a similar station in Karasu triggered more than a dozen records of individual lightning strikes during a 2-hour period. The spectra for these events are fairly broadband, with peaks at low frequencies, varying from 6 to 13 Hz. The spectra were all computed by multitaper analysis, which deals appropriately with the nonstationary thunder signal. These independent measurements of low-frequency peaks corroborate the occasional occurrences in traditional microphone records, but a theory concerning the physical mechanism to account for them is still in question. Examined separately, the individual claps in each record have similar frequency distributions, discounting a need for multiple mechanisms to explain different phases of the thunder sequence. Particle motion, determined from polarization analysis of the three-component records, is predominantly vertical downward, with smaller horizontal components indicative of the direction to the lightning bolt. In three of the records the azimuth to the lightning bolt changes with time, confirming a significant horizontal component to the lightning channel itself.

  16. Ballistic Signature Identification System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The first phase of a research project directed toward development of a high speed automatic process to be used to match gun barrel signatures imparted to fired bullets was documented. An optical projection technique has been devised to produce and photograph a planar image of the entire signature, and the phototransparency produced is subjected to analysis using digital Fourier transform techniques. The success of this approach appears to be limited primarily by the accuracy of the photographic step since no significant processing limitations have been encountered.

  17. Deconvolution enhanced direction of arrival estimation using one- and three-component seismic arrays applied to ocean induced microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, M.; Reading, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.; Gibbons, S. J.

    2016-07-01

    Microseisms in the period of 2-10 s are generated in deep oceans and near coastal regions. It is common for microseisms from multiple sources to arrive at the same time at a given seismometer. It is therefore desirable to be able to measure multiple slowness vectors accurately. Popular ways to estimate the direction of arrival of ocean induced microseisms are the conventional (fk) or adaptive (Capon) beamformer. These techniques give robust estimates, but are limited in their resolution capabilities and hence do not always detect all arrivals. One of the limiting factors in determining direction of arrival with seismic arrays is the array response, which can strongly influence the estimation of weaker sources. In this work, we aim to improve the resolution for weaker sources and evaluate the performance of two deconvolution algorithms, Richardson-Lucy deconvolution and a new implementation of CLEAN-PSF. The algorithms are tested with three arrays of different aperture (ASAR, WRA and NORSAR) using 1 month of real data each and compared with the conventional approaches. We find an improvement over conventional methods from both algorithms and the best performance with CLEAN-PSF. We then extend the CLEAN-PSF framework to three components (3C) and evaluate 1 yr of data from the Pilbara Seismic Array in northwest Australia. The 3C CLEAN-PSF analysis is capable in resolving a previously undetected Sn phase.

  18. Lesson 6: Signature Validation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Checklist items 13 through 17 are grouped under the Signature Validation Process, and represent CROMERR requirements that the system must satisfy as part of ensuring that electronic signatures it receives are valid.

  19. Electronic Signature Policy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Establishes the United States Environmental Protection Agency's approach to adopting electronic signature technology and best practices to ensure electronic signatures applied to official Agency documents are legally valid and enforceable

  20. Signatures support program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Chadwick T.

    2009-05-01

    The Signatures Support Program (SSP) leverages the full spectrum of signature-related activities (collections, processing, development, storage, maintenance, and dissemination) within the Department of Defense (DOD), the intelligence community (IC), other Federal agencies, and civil institutions. The Enterprise encompasses acoustic, seismic, radio frequency, infrared, radar, nuclear radiation, and electro-optical signatures. The SSP serves the war fighter, the IC, and civil institutions by supporting military operations, intelligence operations, homeland defense, disaster relief, acquisitions, and research and development. Data centers host and maintain signature holdings, collectively forming the national signatures pool. The geographically distributed organizations are the authoritative sources and repositories for signature data; the centers are responsible for data content and quality. The SSP proactively engages DOD, IC, other Federal entities, academia, and industry to locate signatures for inclusion in the distributed national signatures pool and provides world-wide 24/7 access via the SSP application.

  1. Estimates of direct and maternal (co)variance components as well as genetic parameters of growth traits in Nellore sheep.

    PubMed

    I, Satish Kumar; C, Vijaya Kumar; G, Gangaraju; Nath, Sapna; A K, Thiruvenkadan

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, (co)variance components and genetic parameters in Nellore sheep were obtained by restricted maximum likelihood (REML) method using six different animal models with various combinations of direct and maternal genetic effects for birth weight (BW), weaning weight (WW), 6-month weight (6MW), 9-month weight (9MW) and 12-month weight (YW). Evaluated records of 2075 lambs descended from 69 sires and 478 dams over a period of 8 years (2007-2014) were collected from the Livestock Research Station, Palamaner, India. Lambing year, sex of lamb, season of lambing and parity of dam were the fixed effects in the model, and ewe weight was used as a covariate. Best model for each trait was determined by log-likelihood ratio test. Direct heritability for BW, WW, 6MW, 9MW and YW were 0.08, 0.03, 0.12, 0.16 and 0.10, respectively, and their corresponding maternal heritabilities were 0.07, 0.10, 0.09, 0.08 and 0.11. The proportions of maternal permanent environment variance to phenotypic variance (Pe 2 ) were 0.07, 0.10, 0.07, 0.06 and 0.10 for BW, WW, 6MW, 9MW and YW, respectively. The estimates of direct genetic correlations among the growth traits were positive and ranged from 0.44(BW-WW) to 0.96(YW-9MW), and the estimates of phenotypic and environmental correlations were found to be lower than those of genetic correlations. Exclusion of maternal effects in the model resulted in biased estimates of genetic parameters in Nellore sheep. Hence, to implement optimum breeding strategies for improvement of traits in Nellore sheep, maternal effects should be considered.

  2. Unconditionally Secure Blind Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Yuki; Seito, Takenobu; Shikata, Junji; Matsumoto, Tsutomu

    The blind signature scheme introduced by Chaum allows a user to obtain a valid signature for a message from a signer such that the message is kept secret for the signer. Blind signature schemes have mainly been studied from a viewpoint of computational security so far. In this paper, we study blind signatures in unconditional setting. Specifically, we newly introduce a model of unconditionally secure blind signature schemes (USBS, for short). Also, we propose security notions and their formalization in our model. Finally, we propose a construction method for USBS that is provably secure in our security notions.

  3. Use of electrospray ionization ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry and principal component analysis to directly distinguish monosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Xia, Bing; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Xin; Xiao, Juan; Liu, Qing; Gu, Yucheng; Ding, Lisheng

    2012-06-15

    Carbohydrates are good source of drugs and play important roles in metabolism processes and cellular interactions in organisms. Distinguishing monosaccharide isomers in saccharide derivates is an important and elementary work in investigating saccharides. It is important to develop a fast, simple and direct method for this purpose, which is described in this study. Stock solutions of monosaccharide with a concentration of 400 μM and sodium chloride at a concentration of 10 μM were made in water/methanol (50:50, v/v). The samples were subjected to electrospray ionization ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and the detected [2M + Na - H(2)O](+) ions were further investigated by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), followed by applying principal component analysis (PCA) on the obtained MS/MS data sets. The MS/MS spectra of the [2M + Na - H(2)O](+) ions at m/z 365 for hexoses and m/z 305 for pentoses yielded unambiguous fragment patterns, while rhamnose can be directly identified by its ESI-MS [M + Na](+) ion at m/z 187. PCA showed clustering of MS/MS data of identical monosaccharide samples obtained from different experiments. By using this method, the monosaccharide in daucosterol hydrolysate was successfully identified. A new strategy was developed for differentiation of the monosaccharides using ESI-MS/MS and PCA. In MS/MS spectra, the [2M + Na - H(2)O](+) ions yielded unambiguous distinction. PCA of the archived MS/MS data sets was applied to demonstrate the spatial resolution of the studied samples. This method presented a simple and reliable way for distinguishing monosaccharides by ESI-MS/MS. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Real Traceable Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Sherman S. M.

    Traceable signature scheme extends a group signature scheme with an enhanced anonymity management mechanism. The group manager can compute a tracing trapdoor which enables anyone to test if a signature is signed by a given misbehaving user, while the only way to do so for group signatures requires revealing the signer of all signatures. Nevertheless, it is not tracing in a strict sense. For all existing schemes, T tracing agents need to recollect all N' signatures ever produced and perform RN' “checks” for R revoked users. This involves a high volume of transfer and computations. Increasing T increases the degree of parallelism for tracing but also the probability of “missing” some signatures in case some of the agents are dishonest.

  5. Method of obtaining graphene and graphene-based electronic components and circuits with pencil directly on paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailian, Aram; Mailian, Manvel; Shmavonyan, Gagik

    2014-03-01

    An easy method of obtaining graphene and graphene-based electronic components and circuits by drawing lines or repeatedly rubbing any type of graphite rod along the same path directly on paper and other insulating substrates is suggested. The structure containing rubbed-off layers behaves like a semiconducting material. The surface of the structure demonstrates ordered and oriented character containing few layer graphene. The carrier mobility is anisotropic through the thickness of the structure with the highest value of ~ 104 cm2/V .sec at the surface. Raman spectra of the structures in the near IR at excitation wavelength of 976 nm (1.27 eV) are registered. The observed phenomenon is universal, does not depend on the material of the substrate and could find a widespread application. For example, the junction between two rubbed off layers with different mobilities exhibits a non-Ohmic behavior. I-V characteristic of the junction is symmetrically curved with respect to 0 V. The greater is the difference between the carrier mobility, the higher is the curvature. The dynamic accumulation of the carriers in both sides of the junction creates a barrier responsible for non-Ohmic behavior.

  6. From Principal Component to Direct Coupling Analysis of Coevolution in Proteins: Low-Eigenvalue Modes are Needed for Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Cocco, Simona; Monasson, Remi; Weigt, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Various approaches have explored the covariation of residues in multiple-sequence alignments of homologous proteins to extract functional and structural information. Among those are principal component analysis (PCA), which identifies the most correlated groups of residues, and direct coupling analysis (DCA), a global inference method based on the maximum entropy principle, which aims at predicting residue-residue contacts. In this paper, inspired by the statistical physics of disordered systems, we introduce the Hopfield-Potts model to naturally interpolate between these two approaches. The Hopfield-Potts model allows us to identify relevant ‘patterns’ of residues from the knowledge of the eigenmodes and eigenvalues of the residue-residue correlation matrix. We show how the computation of such statistical patterns makes it possible to accurately predict residue-residue contacts with a much smaller number of parameters than DCA. This dimensional reduction allows us to avoid overfitting and to extract contact information from multiple-sequence alignments of reduced size. In addition, we show that low-eigenvalue correlation modes, discarded by PCA, are important to recover structural information: the corresponding patterns are highly localized, that is, they are concentrated in few sites, which we find to be in close contact in the three-dimensional protein fold. PMID:23990764

  7. Potential of direct metal deposition technology for manufacturing thick functionally graded coatings and parts for reactors components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Laget, B.; Smurov, I.

    2009-03-01

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D deposition process arising from laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection to refine or refurbish parts. Recently DMD has been extended to manufacture large-size near-net-shape components. When applied for manufacturing new parts (or their refinement), DMD can provide tailored thermal properties, high corrosion resistance, tailored tribology, multifunctional performance and cost savings due to smart material combinations. In repair (refurbishment) operations, DMD can be applied for parts with a wide variety of geometries and sizes. In contrast to the current tool repair techniques such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), metal inert gas (MIG) and plasma welding, laser cladding technology by DMD offers a well-controlled heat-treated zone due to the high energy density of the laser beam. In addition, this technology may be used for preventative maintenance and design changes/up-grading. One of the advantages of DMD is the possibility to build functionally graded coatings (from 1 mm thickness and higher) and 3D multi-material objects (for example, 100 mm-sized monolithic rectangular) in a single-step manufacturing cycle by using up to 4-channel powder feeder. Approved materials are: Fe (including stainless steel), Ni and Co alloys, (Cu,Ni 10%), WC compounds, TiC compounds. The developed coatings/parts are characterized by low porosity (<1%), fine microstructure, and their microhardness is close to the benchmark value of wrought alloys after thermal treatment (Co-based alloy Stellite, Inox 316L, stainless steel 17-4PH). The intended applications concern cooling elements with complex geometry, friction joints under high temperature and load, light-weight mechanical support structures, hermetic joints, tubes with complex geometry, and tailored inside and outside surface properties, etc.

  8. Signature simulation of mixed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Tyler D.; Salvaggio, Carl

    2015-05-01

    Soil target signatures vary due to geometry, chemical composition, and scene radiometry. Although radiative transfer models and function-fit physical models may describe certain targets in limited depth, the ability to incorporate all three signature variables is difficult. This work describes a method to simulate the transient signatures of soil by first considering scene geometry synthetically created using 3D physics engines. Through the assignment of spectral data from the Nonconventional Exploitation Factors Data System (NEFDS), the synthetic scene is represented as a physical mixture of particles. Finally, first principles radiometry is modeled using the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model. With DIRSIG, radiometric and sensing conditions were systematically manipulated to produce and record goniometric signatures. The implementation of this virtual goniometer allows users to examine how a target bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) will change with geometry, composition, and illumination direction. By using 3D computer graphics models, this process does not require geometric assumptions that are native to many radiative transfer models. It delivers a discrete method to circumnavigate the significant cost of time and treasure associated with hardware-based goniometric data collections.

  9. Method and apparatus for sensing a desired component of an incident magnetic field using magneto resistive elements biased in different directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing a desired component of a magnetic field using an isotropic magnetoresistive material. This is preferably accomplished by providing a bias field that is parallel to the desired component of the applied magnetic field. The bias field is applied in a first direction relative to a first set of magnetoresistive sensor elements, and in an opposite direction relative to a second set of magnetoresistive sensor elements. In this configuration, the desired component of the incident magnetic field adds to the bias field incident on the first set of magnetoresistive sensor elements, and subtracts from the bias field incident on the second set of magnetoresistive sensor elements. The magnetic field sensor may then sense the desired component of the incident magnetic field by simply sensing the difference in resistance of the first set of magnetoresistive sensor elements and the second set of magnetoresistive sensor elements.

  10. Data-Based Locally Directed Evaluation of Vocational Education Programs. Component 5. Analysis of Community Resources Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Program of Vocational Education.

    Part of a system by which local education agency (LEA) personnel may evaluate secondary and postsecondary vocational education programs, this fifth of eight components focuses on an analysis of the utilization of community resources. Utilization of the component is designed to open communication channels among all segments of the community so that…

  11. Gravitational and Dynamic Components of Muscle Torque Underlie Tonic and Phasic Muscle Activity during Goal-Directed Reaching.

    PubMed

    Olesh, Erienne V; Pollard, Bradley S; Gritsenko, Valeriya

    2017-01-01

    Human reaching movements require complex muscle activations to produce the forces necessary to move the limb in a controlled manner. How gravity and the complex kinetic properties of the limb contribute to the generation of the muscle activation pattern by the central nervous system (CNS) is a long-standing and controversial question in neuroscience. To tackle this issue, muscle activity is often subdivided into static and phasic components. The former corresponds to posture maintenance and transitions between postures. The latter corresponds to active movement production and the compensation for the kinetic properties of the limb. In the present study, we improved the methodology for this subdivision of muscle activity into static and phasic components by relating them to joint torques. Ten healthy subjects pointed in virtual reality to visual targets arranged to create a standard center-out reaching task in three dimensions. Muscle activity and motion capture data were synchronously collected during the movements. The motion capture data were used to calculate postural and dynamic components of active muscle torques using a dynamic model of the arm with 5 degrees of freedom. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was then applied to muscle activity and the torque components, separately, to reduce the dimensionality of the data. Muscle activity was also reconstructed from gravitational and dynamic torque components. Results show that the postural and dynamic components of muscle torque represent a significant amount of variance in muscle activity. This method could be used to define static and phasic components of muscle activity using muscle torques.

  12. Gravitational and Dynamic Components of Muscle Torque Underlie Tonic and Phasic Muscle Activity during Goal-Directed Reaching

    PubMed Central

    Olesh, Erienne V.; Pollard, Bradley S.; Gritsenko, Valeriya

    2017-01-01

    Human reaching movements require complex muscle activations to produce the forces necessary to move the limb in a controlled manner. How gravity and the complex kinetic properties of the limb contribute to the generation of the muscle activation pattern by the central nervous system (CNS) is a long-standing and controversial question in neuroscience. To tackle this issue, muscle activity is often subdivided into static and phasic components. The former corresponds to posture maintenance and transitions between postures. The latter corresponds to active movement production and the compensation for the kinetic properties of the limb. In the present study, we improved the methodology for this subdivision of muscle activity into static and phasic components by relating them to joint torques. Ten healthy subjects pointed in virtual reality to visual targets arranged to create a standard center-out reaching task in three dimensions. Muscle activity and motion capture data were synchronously collected during the movements. The motion capture data were used to calculate postural and dynamic components of active muscle torques using a dynamic model of the arm with 5 degrees of freedom. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was then applied to muscle activity and the torque components, separately, to reduce the dimensionality of the data. Muscle activity was also reconstructed from gravitational and dynamic torque components. Results show that the postural and dynamic components of muscle torque represent a significant amount of variance in muscle activity. This method could be used to define static and phasic components of muscle activity using muscle torques. PMID:29018339

  13. Nitrogen isotopic signatures in the Acapulco meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgeon, G.; Marti, K.

    1991-01-01

    N isotopic abundances are reported for a bulk sample of the unique meteorite Acapulco. Although the mineral chemistry indicates a high degree of recrystallization under redox conditions between those of H and E chondrites (Palme et al., 1981), the presence of two distinct N isotopic signatures shows that the carriers of these N components were not equilibrated. In stepwise pyrolysis, the larger (65 percent) N component is released mostly below 1000 C and reveals a signature of delta(N-15) = 8.9 + or - 1.2 per mil, which is within the range observed in chondrites. A second 'light' component appears above 1000 C and has a signature of delta(N-15) less than or equal to -110.5 + or - 4.0 per mil (uncorrected for spallation N-15).

  14. Assessing plant water relations based on hidden in formation in the hyper-spectral signatures: Parameterization of olive leaf P-V curve and estimation of water potential components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe; Jones, Hamlyn G.

    2015-04-01

    The Soil Plant Atmosphere Continuum (SPAC) is characterized by complex structures and biophysical processes acting over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Additionally, in olive grove systems, the plant adaptive strategies to respond to soil water-limited conditions make the system even more complex. One of the greatest challenges in hydrological research is to quantify changing plant water relations. A promising new technology is provided by the advent of new field spectroscopy detectors, characterized by very high resolution over the spectral range between 300 and 2500 nm, allowing the detection of narrow reflectance or absorptance peaks, to separate close lying peaks and to discover new information, hidden at lower resolutions. The general objective of the present research was to investigate a range of plant state function parameters in a non-destructive and repeatable manner and to improve methodologies aimed to parameterize hydrological models describing the entire SPAC, or each single compartment (soil or plant). We have investigated the use of hyperspectral sensing for the parameterization of the hydraulic pressure-volume curve (P-V) for olive leaf and for the indirect estimation of the two principal leaf water potential components, i.e. turgor and osmotic potentials. Experiments were carried out on an olive grove in Sicily, during the mature phase of the first vegetative flush. Leaf spectral signatures and associated P-V measurements were acquired on olive leaves collected from well-irrigated plants and from plants maintained under moderate or severe water stress. Leaf spectral reflectance was monitored with a FieldSpec 4 spectro-radiometer (Analytical Spectral Device, Inc.), in a range of wavelengths from VIS to SWIR (350-2500 nm), with sampling intervals of 1.4 nm and 2.0 nm, respectively in the regions from 350 to 1000 nm and from 1000 to 2500 nm. Measurements required the use of contact probe and leaf clip (Analytical Spectral Device, Inc

  15. Chemical and Physical Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Cliff, John B.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.

    Chemical and physical signatures for microbial forensics John Cliff and Helen Kreuzer-Martin, eds. Humana Press Chapter 1. Introduction: Review of history and statement of need. Randy Murch, Virginia Tech Chapter 2. The Microbe: Structure, morphology, and physiology of the microbe as they relate to potential signatures of growth conditions. Joany Jackman, Johns Hopkins University Chapter 3. Science for Forensics: Special considerations for the forensic arena - quality control, sample integrity, etc. Mark Wilson (retired FBI): Western Carolina University Chapter 4. Physical signatures: Light and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gravimetry etc. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Laboratory Chapter 5. Lipids: FAME,more » PLFA, steroids, LPS, etc. James Robertson, Federal Bureau of Investigation Chapter 6. Carbohydrates: Cell wall components, cytoplasm components, methods Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina School of Medicine David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 7. Peptides: Peptides, proteins, lipoproteins David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 8. Elemental content: CNOHPS (treated in passing), metals, prospective cell types John Cliff, International Atomic Energy Agency Chapter 9. Isotopic signatures: Stable isotopes C,N,H,O,S, 14C dating, potential for heavy elements. Helen Kreuzer-Martin, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michaele Kashgarian, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chapter 10. Extracellular signatures: Cellular debris, heme, agar, headspace, spent media, etc Karen Wahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 11. Data Reduction and Integrated Microbial Forensics: Statistical concepts, parametric and multivariate statistics, integrating signatures Kristin Jarman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory« less

  16. Digital Signature Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassler, Vesna; Biely, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Digital Signature Project that was developed in Austria to establish an infrastructure for applying smart card-based digital signatures in banking and electronic-commerce applications. Discusses the need to conform to international standards, an international certification infrastructure, and security features for a public directory…

  17. Test Directions as a Critical Component of Test Design: Best Practices and the Impact of Examinee Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Joni M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of test directions is to familiarize examinees with a test so that they respond to items in the manner intended. However, changes in educational measurement as well as the U.S. student population present new challenges to test directions and increase the impact that differential familiarity could have on the validity of test score…

  18. 75 FR 64309 - Components for Evaluation of Direct-Reading Monitors for Gases and Vapors and Addendum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... Direct-Reading Monitors for Gases and Vapors: Hazard Detection in First Responder Environments.'' The.../docket/review/docket220 . The document expands the 1995 method development and evaluation experimental... evaluating direct-reading monitors for hazard detection in First Responder environments. The 1995 document...

  19. An archaeal genomic signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, D. E.; Overbeek, R.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  20. Signature extension studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. K.; Thomas, G. S.; Nalepka, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    The importance of specific spectral regions to signature extension is explored. In the recent past, the signature extension task was focused on the development of new techniques. Tested techniques are now used to investigate this spectral aspect of the large area survey. Sets of channels were sought which, for a given technique, were the least affected by several sources of variation over four data sets and yet provided good object class separation on each individual data set. Using sets of channels determined as part of this study, signature extension was accomplished between data sets collected over a six-day period and over a range of about 400 kilometers.

  1. Neural networks with excitatory and inhibitory components: Direct and inverse problems by a mean-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Volo, Matteo; Burioni, Raffaella; Casartelli, Mario; Livi, Roberto; Vezzani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of networks with inhibitory and excitatory leak-integrate-and-fire neurons with short-term synaptic plasticity in the presence of depressive and facilitating mechanisms. The dynamics is analyzed by a heterogeneous mean-field approximation, which allows us to keep track of the effects of structural disorder in the network. We describe the complex behavior of different classes of excitatory and inhibitory components, which give rise to a rich dynamical phase diagram as a function of the fraction of inhibitory neurons. Using the same mean-field approach, we study and solve a global inverse problem: reconstructing the degree probability distributions of the inhibitory and excitatory components and the fraction of inhibitory neurons from the knowledge of the average synaptic activity field. This approach unveils new perspectives on the numerical study of neural network dynamics and the possibility of using these models as a test bed for the analysis of experimental data.

  2. Digital signature feasibility study

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the advantages and disadvantages of using digital signatures to assist the Arizona Department of Transportation in conducting business. The Department is evaluating the potential of performing more electronic t...

  3. Observational Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is often referred to as the primary source of energy release during solar flares. Directly observing reconnection occurring in the solar atmosphere, however, is not trivial considering that the scale size of the diffusion region is magnitudes smaller than the observational capabilities of current instrumentation, and coronal magnetic field measurements are not currently sufficient to capture the process. Therefore, predicting and studying observationally feasible signatures of the precursors and consequences of reconnection is necessary for guiding and verifying the simulations that dominate our understanding. I will present a set of such observations, particularly in connection with long-duration solar events, and compare them with recent simulations and theoretical predictions.

  4. DOPPLER SIGNATURES OF THE ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION ON HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Showman, Adam P.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2013-01-01

    The meteorology of hot Jupiters has been characterized primarily with thermal measurements, but recent observations suggest the possibility of directly detecting the winds by observing the Doppler shift of spectral lines seen during transit. Motivated by these observations, we show how Doppler measurements can place powerful constraints on the meteorology. We show that the atmospheric circulation-and Doppler signature-of hot Jupiters splits into two regimes. Under weak stellar insolation, the day-night thermal forcing generates fast zonal jet streams from the interaction of atmospheric waves with the mean flow. In this regime, air along the terminator (as seen during transit) flows towardmore » Earth in some regions and away from Earth in others, leading to a Doppler signature exhibiting superposed blueshifted and redshifted components. Under intense stellar insolation, however, the strong thermal forcing damps these planetary-scale waves, inhibiting their ability to generate jets. Strong frictional drag likewise damps these waves and inhibits jet formation. As a result, this second regime exhibits a circulation dominated by high-altitude, day-to-night airflow, leading to a predominantly blueshifted Doppler signature during transit. We present state-of-the-art circulation models including non-gray radiative transfer to quantify this regime shift and the resulting Doppler signatures; these models suggest that cool planets like GJ 436b lie in the first regime, HD 189733b is transitional, while planets hotter than HD 209458b lie in the second regime. Moreover, we show how the amplitude of the Doppler shifts constrains the strength of frictional drag in the upper atmospheres of hot Jupiters. If due to winds, the {approx}2 km s{sup -1} blueshift inferred on HD 209458b may require drag time constants as short as 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} s, possibly the result of Lorentz-force braking on this planet's hot dayside.« less

  5. KEA-71 Smart Current Signature Sensor (SCSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development and uses of the Smart Current Signature Sensor (SCSS), also known as the Valve Health Monitor (VHM) system. SCSS provides a way to not only monitor real-time the valve's operation in a non invasive manner, but also to monitor its health (Fault Detection and Isolation) and identify potential faults and/or degradation in the near future (Prediction/Prognosis). This technology approach is not only applicable for solenoid valves, and it could be extrapolated to other electrical components with repeatable electrical current signatures such as motors.

  6. α-Unsubstituted Pyrroles by NHC-Catalyzed Three-Component Coupling: Direct Synthesis of a Versatile Atorvastatin Derivative.

    PubMed

    Fleige, Mirco; Glorius, Frank

    2017-08-10

    A practical one-pot cascade reaction protocol provides direct access to valuable 1,2,4-trisubstituted pyrroles. The process involves an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-catalyzed Stetter-type hydroformylation using glycolaldehyde dimer as a novel C1 building-block, followed by a Paal-Knorr condensation with primary amines. The reaction makes use of simple and commercially available starting-materials and catalyst, an important feature regarding applicability and utility. Low catalyst loading under mild reaction conditions afforded a variety of 1,2,4-substituted pyrroles in a transition-metal-free reaction with high step economy and good yields. This methodology is applied in the synthesis of a versatile Atorvastatin precursor, in which a variety of modifications at the pyrrole core structure are possible. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Directed Vertical Diffusion of Photovoltaic Active Layer Components into Porous ZnO-Based Cathode Buffer Layers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jia-Jhen; Yang, Tsung-Yu; Lan, Yi-Kang; Wu, Wei-Ru; Su, Chun-Jen; Weng, Shih-Chang; Yamada, Norifumi L; Su, An-Chung; Jeng, U-Ser

    2018-04-01

    Cathode buffer layers (CBLs) can effectively further the efficiency of polymer solar cells (PSCs), after optimization of the active layer. Hidden between the active layer and cathode of the inverted PSC device configuration is the critical yet often unattended vertical diffusion of the active layer components across CBL. Here, a novel methodology of contrast variation with neutron and anomalous X-ray reflectivity to map the multicomponent depth compositions of inverted PSCs, covering from the active layer surface down to the bottom of the ZnO-based CBL, is developed. Uniquely revealed for a high-performance model PSC are the often overlooked porosity distributions of the ZnO-based CBL and the differential diffusions of the polymer PTB7-Th and fullerene derivative PC 71 BM of the active layer into the CBL. Interface modification of the ZnO-based CBL with fullerene derivative PCBEOH for size-selective nanochannels can selectively improve the diffusion of PC 71 BM more than that of the polymer. The deeper penetration of PC 71 BM establishes a gradient distribution of fullerene derivatives over the ZnO/PCBE-OH CBL, resulting in markedly improved electron mobility and device efficiency of the inverted PSC. The result suggests a new CBL design concept of progressive matching of the conduction bands. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Uncertainty in hydrological signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Hilary; Westerberg, Ida

    2015-04-01

    Information that summarises the hydrological behaviour or flow regime of a catchment is essential for comparing responses of different catchments to understand catchment organisation and similarity, and for many other modelling and water-management applications. Such information types derived as an index value from observed data are known as hydrological signatures, and can include descriptors of high flows (e.g. mean annual flood), low flows (e.g. mean annual low flow, recession shape), the flow variability, flow duration curve, and runoff ratio. Because the hydrological signatures are calculated from observed data such as rainfall and flow records, they are affected by uncertainty in those data. Subjective choices in the method used to calculate the signatures create a further source of uncertainty. Uncertainties in the signatures may affect our ability to compare different locations, to detect changes, or to compare future water resource management scenarios. The aim of this study was to contribute to the hydrological community's awareness and knowledge of data uncertainty in hydrological signatures, including typical sources, magnitude and methods for its assessment. We proposed a generally applicable method to calculate these uncertainties based on Monte Carlo sampling and demonstrated it for a variety of commonly used signatures. The study was made for two data rich catchments, the 50 km2 Mahurangi catchment in New Zealand and the 135 km2 Brue catchment in the UK. For rainfall data the uncertainty sources included point measurement uncertainty, the number of gauges used in calculation of the catchment spatial average, and uncertainties relating to lack of quality control. For flow data the uncertainty sources included uncertainties in stage/discharge measurement and in the approximation of the true stage-discharge relation by a rating curve. The resulting uncertainties were compared across the different signatures and catchments, to quantify uncertainty

  9. Practical quantum digital signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-03-01

    Guaranteeing nonrepudiation, unforgeability as well as transferability of a signature is one of the most vital safeguards in today's e-commerce era. Based on fundamental laws of quantum physics, quantum digital signature (QDS) aims to provide information-theoretic security for this cryptographic task. However, up to date, the previously proposed QDS protocols are impractical due to various challenging problems and most importantly, the requirement of authenticated (secure) quantum channels between participants. Here, we present the first quantum digital signature protocol that removes the assumption of authenticated quantum channels while remaining secure against the collective attacks. Besides, our QDS protocol can be practically implemented over more than 100 km under current mature technology as used in quantum key distribution.

  10. Resolvability of regional density structure and the road to direct density inversion - a principal-component approach to resolution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płonka, Agnieszka; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Lateral density variations are the source of mass transport in the Earth at all scales, acting as drivers of convective motion. However, the density structure of the Earth remains largely unknown since classic seismic observables and gravity provide only weak constraints with strong trade-offs. Current density models are therefore often based on velocity scaling, making strong assumptions on the origin of structural heterogeneities, which may not necessarily be correct. Our goal is to assess if 3D density structure may be resolvable with emerging full-waveform inversion techniques. We have previously quantified the impact of regional-scale crustal density structure on seismic waveforms with the conclusion that reasonably sized density variations within the crust can leave a strong imprint on both travel times and amplitudes, and, while this can produce significant biases in velocity and Q estimates, the seismic waveform inversion for density may become feasible. In this study we perform principal component analyses of sensitivity kernels for P velocity, S velocity, and density. This is intended to establish the extent to which these kernels are linearly independent, i.e. the extent to which the different parameters may be constrained independently. We apply the method to data from 81 events around the Iberian Penninsula, registered in total by 492 stations. The objective is to find a principal kernel which would maximize the sensitivity to density, potentially allowing for as independent as possible density resolution. We find that surface (mosty Rayleigh) waves have significant sensitivity to density, and that the trade-off with velocity is negligible. We also show the preliminary results of the inversion.

  11. Factor models for cancer signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel method for extracting cancer signatures by applying statistical risk models (http://ssrn.com/abstract=2732453) from quantitative finance to cancer genome data. Using 1389 whole genome sequenced samples from 14 cancers, we identify an ;overall; mode of somatic mutational noise. We give a prescription for factoring out this noise and source code for fixing the number of signatures. We apply nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to genome data aggregated by cancer subtype and filtered using our method. The resultant signatures have substantially lower variability than those from unfiltered data. Also, the computational cost of signature extraction is cut by about a factor of 10. We find 3 novel cancer signatures, including a liver cancer dominant signature (96% contribution) and a renal cell carcinoma signature (70% contribution). Our method accelerates finding new cancer signatures and improves their overall stability. Reciprocally, the methods for extracting cancer signatures could have interesting applications in quantitative finance.

  12. Vibration signature analysis of multistage gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Tu, Y. K.; Savage, M.; Townsend, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented for multistage multimesh gear transmission systems. The analysis predicts the overall system dynamics and the transmissibility to the gear box or the enclosed structure. The modal synthesis approach of the analysis treats the uncoupled lateral/torsional model characteristics of each stage or component independently. The vibration signature analysis evaluates the global dynamics coupling in the system. The method synthesizes the interaction of each modal component or stage with the nonlinear gear mesh dynamics and the modal support geometry characteristics. The analysis simulates transient and steady state vibration events to determine the resulting torque variations, speeds, changes, rotor imbalances, and support gear box motion excitations. A vibration signature analysis examines the overall dynamic characteristics of the system, and the individual model component responses. The gear box vibration analysis also examines the spectral characteristics of the support system.

  13. Current signature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M. (Inventor); Lucena, Angel (Inventor); Ihlefeld, Curtis (Inventor); Burns, Bradley (Inventor); Bassignani, Karin E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A solenoid health monitoring system uses a signal conditioner and controller assembly in one embodiment that includes analog circuitry and a DSP controller. The analog circuitry provides signal conditioning to the low-level raw signal coming from a signal acquisition assembly. Software running in a DSP analyzes the incoming data (recorded current signature) and determines the state of the solenoid whether it is energized, de-energized, or in a transitioning state. In one embodiment, the software identifies key features in the current signature during the transition phase and is able to determine the health of the solenoid.

  14. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  15. Two Components of the RNA-Directed DNA Methylation Pathway Associate with MORC6 and Silence Loci Targeted by MORC6 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhang-Wei; Zhou, Jin-Xing; Huang, Huan-Wei; Li, Yong-Qiang; Shao, Chang-Rong; Li, Lin; Cai, Tao; Chen, She

    2016-01-01

    The SU(VAR)3-9 homolog SUVH9 and the double-stranded RNA-binding protein IDN2 were thought to be components of an RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway in Arabidopsis. We previously found that SUVH9 interacts with MORC6 but how the interaction contributes to transcriptional silencing remains elusive. Here, our genetic analysis indicates that SUVH2 and SUVH9 can either act in the same pathway as MORC6 or act synergistically with MORC6 to mediate transcriptional silencing. Moreover, we demonstrate that IDN2 interacts with MORC6 and mediates the silencing of a subset of MORC6 target loci. Like SUVH2, SUVH9, and IDN2, other RdDM components including Pol IV, Pol V, RDR2, and DRM2 are also required for transcriptional silencing at a subset of MORC6 target loci. MORC6 was previously shown to mediate transcriptional silencing through heterochromatin condensation. We demonstrate that the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex components SWI3B, SWI3C, and SWI3D interact with MORC6 as well as with SUVH9 and then mediate transcriptional silencing. These results suggest that the RdDM components are involved not only in DNA methylation but also in MORC6-mediated heterochromatin condensation. This study illustrates how DNA methylation is linked to heterochromatin condensation and thereby enhances transcriptional silencing at methylated genomic regions. PMID:27171427

  16. A Signature Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiles, Robin V.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses Dr. Amalia Amaki and her approach to art as her signature style by turning everyday items into fine art. Amaki is an assistant professor of art, art history, and Black American studies at the University of Delaware. She loves taking unexpected an object and redefining it in the context of art--like a button, a fan, a faded…

  17. The effects of extrinsic motivation on signature authorship opinions in forensic signature blind trials.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Tahnee N; Found, Bryan; Ballantyne, Kaye N; Rogers, Doug

    2014-03-01

    Expertise studies in forensic handwriting examination involve comparisons of Forensic Handwriting Examiners' (FHEs) opinions with lay-persons on blind tests. All published studies of this type have reported real and demonstrable skill differences between the specialist and lay groups. However, critics have proposed that any difference shown may be indicative of a lack of motivation on the part of lay participants, rather than a real difference in skill. It has been suggested that qualified FHEs would be inherently more motivated to succeed in blinded validation trials, as their professional reputations could be at risk, should they perform poorly on the task provided. Furthermore, critics suggest that lay-persons would be unlikely to be highly motivated to succeed, as they would have no fear of negative consequences should they perform badly. In an effort to investigate this concern, a blind signature trial was designed and administered to forty lay-persons. Participants were required to compare known (exemplar) signatures of an individual to questioned signatures and asked to express an opinion regarding whether the writer of the known signatures wrote each of the questioned signatures. The questioned signatures comprised a mixture of genuine, disguised and simulated signatures. The forty participants were divided into two separate groupings. Group 'A' were requested to complete the trial as directed and were advised that for each correct answer they would be financially rewarded, for each incorrect answer they would be financially penalized, and for each inconclusive opinion they would receive neither penalty nor reward. Group 'B' was requested to complete the trial as directed, with no mention of financial recompense or penalty. The results of this study do not support the proposition that motivation rather than skill difference is the source of the statistical difference in opinions between individuals' results in blinded signature proficiency trials. Crown

  18. Numerical prediction of meteoric infrasound signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Brown, Peter G.

    2017-06-01

    We present a thorough validation of a computational approach to predict infrasonic signatures of centimeter-sized meteoroids. This is the first direct comparison of computational results with well-calibrated observations that include trajectories, optical masses and ground pressure signatures. We assume that the energy deposition along the meteor trail is dominated by atmospheric drag and simulate a steady, inviscid flow of air in thermochemical equilibrium to compute a near-body pressure signature of the meteoroid. This signature is then propagated through a stratified and windy atmosphere to the ground using a methodology from aircraft sonic-boom analysis. The results show that when the source of the signature is the cylindrical Mach-cone, the simulations closely match the observations. The prediction of the shock rise-time, the zero-peak amplitude of the waveform and the duration of the positive pressure phase are consistently within 10% of the measurements. Uncertainty in primarily the shape of the meteoroid results in a poorer prediction of the trailing part of the waveform. Overall, our results independently verify energy deposition estimates deduced from optical observations.

  19. Free-Space Quantum Signatures Using Heterodyne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croal, Callum; Peuntinger, Christian; Heim, Bettina; Khan, Imran; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd; Wallden, Petros; Andersson, Erika; Korolkova, Natalia

    2016-09-01

    Digital signatures guarantee the authorship of electronic communications. Currently used "classical" signature schemes rely on unproven computational assumptions for security, while quantum signatures rely only on the laws of quantum mechanics to sign a classical message. Previous quantum signature schemes have used unambiguous quantum measurements. Such measurements, however, sometimes give no result, reducing the efficiency of the protocol. Here, we instead use heterodyne detection, which always gives a result, although there is always some uncertainty. We experimentally demonstrate feasibility in a real environment by distributing signature states through a noisy 1.6 km free-space channel. Our results show that continuous-variable heterodyne detection improves the signature rate for this type of scheme and therefore represents an interesting direction in the search for practical quantum signature schemes. For transmission values ranging from 100% to 10%, but otherwise assuming an ideal implementation with no other imperfections, the signature length is shorter by a factor of 2 to 10. As compared with previous relevant experimental realizations, the signature length in this implementation is several orders of magnitude shorter.

  20. Free-Space Quantum Signatures Using Heterodyne Measurements.

    PubMed

    Croal, Callum; Peuntinger, Christian; Heim, Bettina; Khan, Imran; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd; Wallden, Petros; Andersson, Erika; Korolkova, Natalia

    2016-09-02

    Digital signatures guarantee the authorship of electronic communications. Currently used "classical" signature schemes rely on unproven computational assumptions for security, while quantum signatures rely only on the laws of quantum mechanics to sign a classical message. Previous quantum signature schemes have used unambiguous quantum measurements. Such measurements, however, sometimes give no result, reducing the efficiency of the protocol. Here, we instead use heterodyne detection, which always gives a result, although there is always some uncertainty. We experimentally demonstrate feasibility in a real environment by distributing signature states through a noisy 1.6 km free-space channel. Our results show that continuous-variable heterodyne detection improves the signature rate for this type of scheme and therefore represents an interesting direction in the search for practical quantum signature schemes. For transmission values ranging from 100% to 10%, but otherwise assuming an ideal implementation with no other imperfections, the signature length is shorter by a factor of 2 to 10. As compared with previous relevant experimental realizations, the signature length in this implementation is several orders of magnitude shorter.

  1. Monotop signature from the supersymmetric t t¯ H channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Dorival; Sakurai, Kazuki; Takeuchi, Michihisa

    2016-10-01

    We point out that a distinctive monotop signature is present in natural supersymmetry scenarios when a scalar top quark and Higgsinos are almost mass degenerate. This signature originates from a supersymmetric counterpart of the t t ¯H process, i.e. p p →t ˜t h ˜. Unlike monojet signatures exploiting initial state radiation, this channel can be regarded as a clear signature of a light stop and Higgsinos, allowing a direct probe of the stop and neutralino sectors. The production rate of this channel largely depends on the up-type Higgsino components in the neutralinos while the stop sector is sensitive to angular distributions of the top-quark's decay products. We develop an optimal search strategy to capture the supersymmetric t t ¯ H process and find that a high luminosity LHC can probe the stop and Higgsino sectors with mt˜1≲380 GeV and mt˜1-mχ˜1 0≲mW . Additionally, we propose a kinematic variable with which one can measure the stop mixing in this channel.

  2. A stock market forecasting model combining two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis and radial basis function neural network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaiqing; Yang, Jie; Miller, David J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and implement a hybrid model combining two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis ((2D)2PCA) and a Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) to forecast stock market behavior. First, 36 stock market technical variables are selected as the input features, and a sliding window is used to obtain the input data of the model. Next, (2D)2PCA is utilized to reduce the dimension of the data and extract its intrinsic features. Finally, an RBFNN accepts the data processed by (2D)2PCA to forecast the next day's stock price or movement. The proposed model is used on the Shanghai stock market index, and the experiments show that the model achieves a good level of fitness. The proposed model is then compared with one that uses the traditional dimension reduction method principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA). The empirical results show that the proposed model outperforms the PCA-based model, as well as alternative models based on ICA and on the multilayer perceptron.

  3. A Stock Market Forecasting Model Combining Two-Directional Two-Dimensional Principal Component Analysis and Radial Basis Function Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaiqing; Yang, Jie; Miller, David J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and implement a hybrid model combining two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis ((2D)2PCA) and a Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) to forecast stock market behavior. First, 36 stock market technical variables are selected as the input features, and a sliding window is used to obtain the input data of the model. Next, (2D)2PCA is utilized to reduce the dimension of the data and extract its intrinsic features. Finally, an RBFNN accepts the data processed by (2D)2PCA to forecast the next day's stock price or movement. The proposed model is used on the Shanghai stock market index, and the experiments show that the model achieves a good level of fitness. The proposed model is then compared with one that uses the traditional dimension reduction method principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA). The empirical results show that the proposed model outperforms the PCA-based model, as well as alternative models based on ICA and on the multilayer perceptron. PMID:25849483

  4. In-situ acoustic signature monitoring in additive manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Lucas W.; Taheri, Hossein; Bigelow, Timothy A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Faierson, Eric J.

    2018-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapidly maturing process for the production of complex metallic, ceramic, polymeric, and composite components. The processes used are numerous, and with the complex geometries involved this can make quality control and standardization of the process and inspection difficult. Acoustic emission measurements have been used previously to monitor a number of processes including machining and welding. The authors have identified acoustic signature measurement as a potential means of monitoring metal additive manufacturing processes using process noise characteristics and those discrete acoustic emission events characteristic of defect growth, including cracks and delamination. Results of acoustic monitoring for a metal additive manufacturing process (directed energy deposition) are reported. The work investigated correlations between acoustic emissions and process noise with variations in machine state and deposition parameters, and provided proof of concept data that such correlations do exist.

  5. Detection and Identification of Acoustic Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    represent complex scenarios such as urban scenes with multiple sources in the soundscape and significant amount of reverberation and diffraction effects... soundscape . In either case it is necessary to understand that the probability of detection is a function of both the vehicle acoustic signature and...the acoustic masking component, or soundscape . And that both signals must be defined in greater depth than overall level, or average frequency

  6. Holographic signatures of cosmological singularities.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Netta; Hertog, Thomas; Horowitz, Gary T

    2014-09-19

    To gain insight into the quantum nature of cosmological singularities, we study anisotropic Kasner solutions in gauge-gravity duality. The dual description of the bulk evolution towards the singularity involves N=4 super Yang-Mills theory on the expanding branch of deformed de Sitter space and is well defined. We compute two-point correlators of Yang-Mills operators of large dimensions using spacelike geodesics anchored on the boundary. The correlators show a strong signature of the singularity around horizon scales and decay at large boundary separation at different rates in different directions. More generally, the boundary evolution exhibits a process of particle creation similar to that in inflation. This leads us to conjecture that information on the quantum nature of cosmological singularities is encoded in long-wavelength features of the boundary wave function.

  7. Thermal signature identification system (TheSIS): a spread spectrum temperature cycling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Scott

    2015-03-01

    NASA GSFC's Thermal Signature Identification System (TheSIS) 1) measures the high order dynamic responses of optoelectronic components to direct sequence spread-spectrum temperature cycling, 2) estimates the parameters of multiple autoregressive moving average (ARMA) or other models the of the responses, 3) and selects the most appropriate model using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Using the AIC-tested model and parameter vectors from TheSIS, one can 1) select high-performing components on a multivariate basis, i.e., with multivariate Figures of Merit (FOMs), 2) detect subtle reversible shifts in performance, and 3) investigate irreversible changes in component or subsystem performance, e.g. aging. We show examples of the TheSIS methodology for passive and active components and systems, e.g. fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) and DFB lasers with coupled temperature control loops, respectively.

  8. An Overview of ARL’s Multimodal Signatures Database and Web Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    ActiveX components, which hindered distribution due to license agreements and run-time license software to use such components. g. Proprietary...Overview The database consists of multimodal signature data files in the HDF5 format. Generally, each signature file contains all the ancillary...only contains information in the database, Web interface, and signature files that is releasable to the public. The Web interface consists of static

  9. Predictions of runoff signatures in ungauged basins: Austrian case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viglione, A.; Parajka, J.; Salinas, J.; Rogger, M.; Sivapalan, M.; Bloeschl, G.

    2012-12-01

    Runoff variability can be broken up into several components, each of them meaningful of a certain class of applications of societal relevance: annual runoff, seasonal runoff, flow duration curve, low flows, floods and hydrographs. We call them runoff signatures and we view them as a manifestation of catchment functioning at different time scales, as emergent properties of the complex systems that catchments are. Just as a medical doctor has many different options for studying the state and functioning of a patient, we can infer the state and functioning of a catchment observing its runoff signatures. But what can we do in the absence of runoff data? This study aims to understand how well one can predict runoff signatures in ungauged catchments. The comparison across signatures is based on one consistent data set (Austria) and one regionalisation method (Top-Kriging) in order to explore the relative performance of the predictions of each of the signatures. Results indicate that the performance, assessed by cross-validation, is best for annual and seasonal runoff, it degrades as one moves to low flows and floods and goes up again to high values for runoff hydrographs. Also, dedicated regionalisation methods, i.e. focusing on particular signatures and their characteristics, provide better predictions of the signatures than regionalisation of the entire hydrograph. These results suggest that the use of signatures in the calibration or assessment of process models can be valuable, in that this can lead to models predicting runoff correctly for the right reasons.

  10. Analyses of the wood preservative component N-cyclohexyl-diazeniumdioxide in impregnated pine sapwood by direct thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jüngel, Peter; de Koning, Sjaak; Brinkman, Udo A Th; Melcher, Eckhard

    2002-04-12

    Investigations concerning the qualitative and quantitative determination of the organic wood preservative component N-cyclohexyl-diazeniumdioxide (HDO) in treated timber were carried out by means of direct thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DTD-GC-MS). It could be shown that the identification of HDO in treated pine sapwood (Pinus sylyestris L.) is relatively simple using this analytical technique. Quantification of this active ingredient can be carried out using the peak area of the specific mass fragment m/z 114. A calibration curve with a high correlation coefficient was obtained in the range from 40 to 550 mg HDO per kg timber. Furthermore it can be deduced that the results obtained are characterised by an excellent reproducibility with standard deviations ranging from 5 to 10% in general. For the chosen experimental set up a detection limit of 4 mg HDO per kg treated pine sapwood was calculated, although merely 20% of the active ingredient was desorbed.

  11. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K(p110alpha)) directly regulates key components of the Z-disc and cardiac structure.

    PubMed

    Waardenberg, Ashley J; Bernardo, Bianca C; Ng, Dominic C H; Shepherd, Peter R; Cemerlang, Nelly; Sbroggiò, Mauro; Wells, Christine A; Dalrymple, Brian P; Brancaccio, Mara; Lin, Ruby C Y; McMullen, Julie R

    2011-09-02

    Maintenance of cardiac structure and Z-disc signaling are key factors responsible for protecting the heart in a setting of stress, but how these processes are regulated is not well defined. We recently demonstrated that PI3K(p110α) protects the heart against myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to determine whether PI3K(p110α) directly regulates components of the Z-disc and cardiac structure. To address this question, a unique three-dimensional virtual muscle model was applied to gene expression data from transgenic mice with increased or decreased PI3K(p110α) activity under basal conditions (sham) and in a setting of myocardial infarction to display the location of structural proteins. Key findings from this analysis were then validated experimentally. The three-dimensional virtual muscle model visually highlighted reciprocally regulated transcripts associated with PI3K activation that encoded key components of the Z-disc and costamere, including melusin. Studies were performed to assess whether PI3K and melusin interact in the heart. Here, we identify a novel melusin-PI3K interaction that generates lipid kinase activity. The direct impact of PI3K(p110α) on myocyte structure was assessed by treating neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with PI3K(p110α) inhibitors and examining the myofiber morphology of hearts from PI3K transgenic mice. Results demonstrate that PI3K is critical for myofiber maturation and Z-disc alignment. In summary, PI3K regulates the expression of genes essential for cardiac structure and Z-disc signaling, interacts with melusin, and is critical for Z-disc alignment.

  12. Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase (PI3K(p110α)) Directly Regulates Key Components of the Z-disc and Cardiac Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Waardenberg, Ashley J.; Bernardo, Bianca C.; Ng, Dominic C. H.; Shepherd, Peter R.; Cemerlang, Nelly; Sbroggiò, Mauro; Wells, Christine A.; Dalrymple, Brian P.; Brancaccio, Mara; Lin, Ruby C. Y.; McMullen, Julie R.

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance of cardiac structure and Z-disc signaling are key factors responsible for protecting the heart in a setting of stress, but how these processes are regulated is not well defined. We recently demonstrated that PI3K(p110α) protects the heart against myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to determine whether PI3K(p110α) directly regulates components of the Z-disc and cardiac structure. To address this question, a unique three-dimensional virtual muscle model was applied to gene expression data from transgenic mice with increased or decreased PI3K(p110α) activity under basal conditions (sham) and in a setting of myocardial infarction to display the location of structural proteins. Key findings from this analysis were then validated experimentally. The three-dimensional virtual muscle model visually highlighted reciprocally regulated transcripts associated with PI3K activation that encoded key components of the Z-disc and costamere, including melusin. Studies were performed to assess whether PI3K and melusin interact in the heart. Here, we identify a novel melusin-PI3K interaction that generates lipid kinase activity. The direct impact of PI3K(p110α) on myocyte structure was assessed by treating neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with PI3K(p110α) inhibitors and examining the myofiber morphology of hearts from PI3K transgenic mice. Results demonstrate that PI3K is critical for myofiber maturation and Z-disc alignment. In summary, PI3K regulates the expression of genes essential for cardiac structure and Z-disc signaling, interacts with melusin, and is critical for Z-disc alignment. PMID:21757757

  13. Predictors of the Aspiration Component Success of a Direct Aspiration First Pass Technique (ADAPT) for the Endovascular Treatment of Stroke Reperfusion Strategy in Anterior Circulation Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Raphaël; Redjem, Hocine; Ciccio, Gabriele; Smajda, Stanislas; Desilles, Jean-Philippe; Orng, Eliane; Taylor, Guillaume; Drumez, Elodie; Fahed, Robert; Labreuche, Julien; Mazighi, Mikael; Lapergue, Bertrand; Piotin, Michel

    2017-06-01

    A direct aspiration first pass technique (ADAPT) has been reported to be fast, safe, and effective for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this study is to determine the preoperative factors that affect success of the aspiration component of the technique in ischemic stroke patients with large vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation. We enrolled all 347 consecutive patients with anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke admitted for mechanical thrombectomy at our institution from August 2013 to October 2015 and treated by ADAPT for the endovascular treatment of stroke. Baseline and procedural characteristics, modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction scores, and 3-month modified Rankin Scale were captured and analyzed. Among the 347 patients (occlusion sites: middle cerebral artery=200, 58%; internal carotid artery Siphon=89, 25%; Tandem=58, 17%), aspiration component led to successful reperfusion (modified thrombolysis in cerebral infarction 2b/3 scores) in 55.6% (193/347 patients), stent retrievers were required in 40%, and a total successful final reperfusion rate of 83% (288/347) was achieved. Overall, procedural complications occurred in 13.3% of patients (48/347). Modified Rankin Scale score of 0 to 2 at 90 days was reported in 45% (144/323). Only 2 factors positively influenced the success of the aspiration component: an isolated middle cerebral artery occlusion ( P <0.001) and a shorter time from stroke onset to clot contact ( P =0.018). In this large retrospective study, ADAPT was shown to be safe and effective for anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke with a final successful reperfusion achieved in 83%. The site of arterial occlusion and delay of the procedure were predictors for reperfusion. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02523261, NCT02678169, and NCT02466893. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Modem Signature Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    AD-A127 993 MODEM SIGNATURE ANALISIS (U) PAR TECHNOLOGY CORP NEW / HARTFORD NY V EDWARDS ET AL. OCT 82 RADC-TR-82-269 F30602-80-C-0264 NCLASSIFIED F/G...as an indication of the class clustering and separation between different classes in the modem data base. It is apparent from the projection that the...that as the clusters disperse, the likelihood of a sample crossing the boundary into an adjacent region and causing a symbol decision error increases. As

  15. Using SpaceClaim/TD Direct for Modeling Components with Complex Geometries for the Thermal Desktop-Based Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabanich, William

    2014-01-01

    SpaceClaim/TD Direct has been used extensively in the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) thermal model. This paper outlines the workflow for that aspect of the task and includes proposed best practices and lessons learned. The ASRG thermal model was developed to predict component temperatures and power output and to provide insight into the prime contractors thermal modeling efforts. The insulation blocks, heat collectors, and cold side adapter flanges (CSAFs) were modeled with this approach. The model was constructed using mostly TD finite difference (FD) surfaces solids. However, some complex geometry could not be reproduced with TD primitives while maintaining the desired degree of geometric fidelity. Using SpaceClaim permitted the import of original CAD files and enabled the defeaturing repair of those geometries. TD Direct (a SpaceClaim add-on from CRTech) adds features that allowed the mark-up of that geometry. These so-called mark-ups control how finite element (FE) meshes were generated and allowed the tagging of features (e.g. edges, solids, surfaces). These tags represent parameters that include: submodels, material properties, material orienters, optical properties, and radiation analysis groups. TD aliases were used for most tags to allow analysis to be performed with a variety of parameter values. Domain-tags were also attached to individual and groups of surfaces and solids to allow them to be used later within TD to populate objects like, for example, heaters and contactors. These tools allow the user to make changes to the geometry in SpaceClaim and then easily synchronize the mesh in TD without having to redefine these objects each time as one would if using TD Mesher.The use of SpaceClaim/TD Direct has helped simplify the process for importing existing geometries and in the creation of high fidelity FE meshes to represent complex parts. It has also saved time and effort in the subsequent analysis.

  16. Using SpaceClaimTD Direct for Modeling Components with Complex Geometries for the Thermal Desktop-Based Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabanich, William A., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    SpaceClaim/TD Direct has been used extensively in the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) thermal model. This paper outlines the workflow for that aspect of the task and includes proposed best practices and lessons learned. The ASRG thermal model was developed to predict component temperatures and power output and to provide insight into the prime contractor's thermal modeling efforts. The insulation blocks, heat collectors, and cold side adapter flanges (CSAFs) were modeled with this approach. The model was constructed using mostly TD finite difference (FD) surfaces/solids. However, some complex geometry could not be reproduced with TD primitives while maintaining the desired degree of geometric fidelity. Using SpaceClaim permitted the import of original CAD files and enabled the defeaturing/repair of those geometries. TD Direct (a SpaceClaim add-on from CRTech) adds features that allowed the "mark-up" of that geometry. These so-called "mark-ups" control how finite element (FE) meshes are to be generated through the "tagging" of features (e.g. edges, solids, surfaces). These tags represent parameters that include: submodels, material properties, material orienters, optical properties, and radiation analysis groups. TD aliases were used for most tags to allow analysis to be performed with a variety of parameter values. "Domain-tags" were also attached to individual and groups of surfaces and solids to allow them to be used later within TD to populate objects like, for example, heaters and contactors. These tools allow the user to make changes to the geometry in SpaceClaim and then easily synchronize the mesh in TD without having to redefine the objects each time as one would if using TDMesher. The use of SpaceClaim/TD Direct helps simplify the process for importing existing geometries and in the creation of high fidelity FE meshes to represent complex parts. It also saves time and effort in the subsequent analysis.

  17. Experimental Studies of Selected Aqueous Electrochemical Systems Relevant for Materials Processing in the Fabrications of Microelectronic Components and Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xingzhao

    to probe the underlying function of the incipient hydrous oxide of Ni in promoting the catalytic properties of this metal in an alkaline medium. The experiments reported here use time-resolved Fourier-transform electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (FT-EIS), strategically coupled with scan-rate controlled voltammetry. The results suggest that the incipient hydrous oxide Ni(OH)ad formed at the onset of hypophosphite oxidation catalytically promotes the latter's precursor de-hydrogenation step. While voltammetry provides suggestive evidence for these Ni(OH)ad induced effects, the FT-EIS data serve to gather more direct signatures of the catalytic function of Ni(OH)ad. The mechanism of energy conversion in a direct glycerol fuel cell (DGFC) is governed by the anode-supported heterogeneous steps of glycerol electro-oxidation. In aerated alkaline electrolytes, glycerol also participates in a base catalyzed process, which can release certain species mixing with the anode catalyzed surface products. As a result, selective probing of the surface catalytic reactions involving such systems can be difficult. The present work addresses this issue for a gold anode by using the analytical capability of cyclic voltammetry (CV). In addition, surface plasmon resonance measurements are used to optically probe the adsorption characteristics of the electrolyte species. The net exchange current of the oxidation process and the transfer coefficient of the rate determining step are evaluated by analyzing the CV data. The interfacial reactions and their products on Au are identified by measuring the number of electrons released during the electro-oxidation of glycerol. The results indicate that these reactions are facilitated by the surface bound hydroxyl species on Au (chemisorbed OH-- and faradaically formed Au-OH). By comparing the findings for stationary and rotating electrodes, it is shown that, convective mass transport is critical to maintaining efficient progression of the

  18. Principal component directed partial least squares analysis for combining nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry data in metabolomics: application to the detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Haiwei; Pan, Zhengzheng; Xi, Bowei; Asiago, Vincent; Musselman, Brian; Raftery, Daniel

    2011-02-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two most commonly used analytical tools in metabolomics, and their complementary nature makes the combination particularly attractive. A combined analytical approach can improve the potential for providing reliable methods to detect metabolic profile alterations in biofluids or tissues caused by disease, toxicity, etc. In this paper, (1)H NMR spectroscopy and direct analysis in real time (DART)-MS were used for the metabolomics analysis of serum samples from breast cancer patients and healthy controls. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the NMR data showed that the first principal component (PC1) scores could be used to separate cancer from normal samples. However, no such obvious clustering could be observed in the PCA score plot of DART-MS data, even though DART-MS can provide a rich and informative metabolic profile. Using a modified multivariate statistical approach, the DART-MS data were then reevaluated by orthogonal signal correction (OSC) pretreated partial least squares (PLS), in which the Y matrix in the regression was set to the PC1 score values from the NMR data analysis. This approach, and a similar one using the first latent variable from PLS-DA of the NMR data resulted in a significant improvement of the separation between the disease samples and normals, and a metabolic profile related to breast cancer could be extracted from DART-MS. The new approach allows the disease classification to be expressed on a continuum as opposed to a binary scale and thus better represents the disease and healthy classifications. An improved metabolic profile obtained by combining MS and NMR by this approach may be useful to achieve more accurate disease detection and gain more insight regarding disease mechanisms and biology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Pose-oblivious shape signature.

    PubMed

    Gal, Ran; Shamir, Ariel; Cohen-Or, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A 3D shape signature is a compact representation for some essence of a shape. Shape signatures are commonly utilized as a fast indexing mechanism for shape retrieval. Effective shape signatures capture some global geometric properties which are scale, translation, and rotation invariant. In this paper, we introduce an effective shape signature which is also pose-oblivious. This means that the signature is also insensitive to transformations which change the pose of a 3D shape such as skeletal articulations. Although some topology-based matching methods can be considered pose-oblivious as well, our new signature retains the simplicity and speed of signature indexing. Moreover, contrary to topology-based methods, the new signature is also insensitive to the topology change of the shape, allowing us to match similar shapes with different genus. Our shape signature is a 2D histogram which is a combination of the distribution of two scalar functions defined on the boundary surface of the 3D shape. The first is a definition of a novel function called the local-diameter function. This function measures the diameter of the 3D shape in the neighborhood of each vertex. The histogram of this function is an informative measure of the shape which is insensitive to pose changes. The second is the centricity function that measures the average geodesic distance from one vertex to all other vertices on the mesh. We evaluate and compare a number of methods for measuring the similarity between two signatures, and demonstrate the effectiveness of our pose-oblivious shape signature within a 3D search engine application for different databases containing hundreds of models.

  20. Secure quantum signatures: a practical quantum technology (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Erika

    2016-10-01

    Modern cryptography encompasses much more than encryption of secret messages. Signature schemes are widely used to guarantee that messages cannot be forged or tampered with, for example in e-mail, software updates and electronic commerce. Messages are also transferrable, which distinguishes digital signatures from message authentication. Transferability means that messages can be forwarded; in other words, that a sender is unlikely to be able to make one recipient accept a message which is subsequently rejected by another recipient if the message is forwarded. Similar to public-key encryption, the security of commonly used signature schemes relies on the assumed computational difficulty of problems such as finding discrete logarithms or factoring large primes. With quantum computers, such assumptions would no longer be valid. Partly for this reason, it is desirable to develop signature schemes with unconditional or information-theoretic security. Quantum signature schemes are one possible solution. Similar to quantum key distribution (QKD), their unconditional security relies only on the laws of quantum mechanics. Quantum signatures can be realized with the same system components as QKD, but are so far less investigated. This talk aims to provide an introduction to quantum signatures and to review theoretical and experimental progress so far.

  1. Signatures of Mechanosensitive Gating.

    PubMed

    Morris, Richard G

    2017-01-10

    The question of how mechanically gated membrane channels open and close is notoriously difficult to address, especially if the protein structure is not available. This perspective highlights the relevance of micropipette-aspirated single-particle tracking-used to obtain a channel's diffusion coefficient, D, as a function of applied membrane tension, σ-as an indirect assay for determining functional behavior in mechanosensitive channels. While ensuring that the protein remains integral to the membrane, such methods can be used to identify not only the gating mechanism of a protein, but also associated physical moduli, such as torsional and dilational rigidity, which correspond to the protein's effective shape change. As an example, three distinct D-versus-σ "signatures" are calculated, corresponding to gating by dilation, gating by tilt, and gating by a combination of both dilation and tilt. Both advantages and disadvantages of the approach are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Signature CERN-URSS

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2017-12-09

    Le DG W.Jentschke souhaite la bienvenue à l'assemblée et aux invités pour la signature du protocole entre le Cern et l'URSS qui est un événement important. C'est en 1955 que 55 visiteurs soviétiques ont visité le Cern pour la première fois. Le premier DG au Cern, F.Bloch, et Mons.Amaldi sont aussi présents. Tandis que le discours anglais de W.Jentschke est traduit en russe, le discours russe de Mons.Morozov est traduit en anglais.

  3. CellNetVis: a web tool for visualization of biological networks using force-directed layout constrained by cellular components.

    PubMed

    Heberle, Henry; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Telles, Guilherme P; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Minghim, Rosane

    2017-09-13

    The advent of "omics" science has brought new perspectives in contemporary biology through the high-throughput analyses of molecular interactions, providing new clues in protein/gene function and in the organization of biological pathways. Biomolecular interaction networks, or graphs, are simple abstract representations where the components of a cell (e.g. proteins, metabolites etc.) are represented by nodes and their interactions are represented by edges. An appropriate visualization of data is crucial for understanding such networks, since pathways are related to functions that occur in specific regions of the cell. The force-directed layout is an important and widely used technique to draw networks according to their topologies. Placing the networks into cellular compartments helps to quickly identify where network elements are located and, more specifically, concentrated. Currently, only a few tools provide the capability of visually organizing networks by cellular compartments. Most of them cannot handle large and dense networks. Even for small networks with hundreds of nodes the available tools are not able to reposition the network while the user is interacting, limiting the visual exploration capability. Here we propose CellNetVis, a web tool to easily display biological networks in a cell diagram employing a constrained force-directed layout algorithm. The tool is freely available and open-source. It was originally designed for networks generated by the Integrated Interactome System and can be used with networks from others databases, like InnateDB. CellNetVis has demonstrated to be applicable for dynamic investigation of complex networks over a consistent representation of a cell on the Web, with capabilities not matched elsewhere.

  4. Analysis of an Indirect Neutron Signature for Enhanced UF6 Cylinder Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Smith, Leon E.

    2017-02-21

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) currently uses handheld gamma-ray spectrometers combined with ultrasonic wall-thickness gauges to verify the declared enrichment of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders. The current method provides relatively low accuracy for the assay of 235U enrichment, especially for natural and depleted UF6. Furthermore, the current method provides no capability to assay the absolute mass of 235U in the cylinder due to the localized instrument geometry and limited penetration of the 186-keV gamma-ray signature from 235U. Also, the current verification process is a time-consuming component of on-site inspections at uranium enrichment plants. Toward the goal of a more-capablemore » cylinder assay method, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed the hybrid enrichment verification array (HEVA). HEVA measures both the traditional 186-keV direct signature and a non-traditional, high-energy neutron-induced signature (HEVANT). HEVANT enables full-volume assay of UF6 cylinders by exploiting the relatively larger mean free paths of the neutrons emitted from the UF6. In this work, Monte Carlo modeling is used as the basis for characterizing HEVANT in terms of the individual contributions to HEVANT from nuclides and hardware components. Monte Carlo modeling is also used to quantify the intrinsic efficiency of HEVA for neutron detection in a cylinder-assay geometry. Modeling predictions are validated against neutron-induced gamma-ray spectra from laboratory measurements and a relatively large population of Type 30B cylinders spanning a range of enrichments. Implications of the analysis and findings on the viability of HEVA for cylinder verification are discussed, such as the resistance of the HEVANT signature to manipulation by the nearby placement of neutron-conversion materials.« less

  5. Mechanistic considerations on the wavelength-dependent variations of UVR genotoxicity and mutagenesis in skin: the discrimination of UVA-signature from UV-signature mutation.

    PubMed

    Ikehata, Hironobu

    2018-05-31

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) predominantly induces UV-signature mutations, C → T and CC → TT base substitutions at dipyrimidine sites, in the cellular and skin genome. I observed in our in vivo mutation studies of mouse skin that these UVR-specific mutations show a wavelength-dependent variation in their sequence-context preference. The C → T mutation occurs most frequently in the 5'-TCG-3' sequence regardless of the UVR wavelength, but is recovered more preferentially there as the wavelength increases, resulting in prominent occurrences exclusively in the TCG sequence in the UVA wavelength range, which I will designate as a "UVA signature" in this review. The preference of the UVB-induced C → T mutation for the sequence contexts shows a mixed pattern of UVC- and UVA-induced mutations, and a similar pattern is also observed for natural sunlight, in which UVB is the most genotoxic component. In addition, the CC → TT mutation hardly occurs at UVA1 wavelengths, although it is detected rarely but constantly in the UVC and UVB ranges. This wavelength-dependent variation in the sequence-context preference of the UVR-specific mutations could be explained by two different photochemical mechanisms of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation. The UV-signature mutations observed in the UVC and UVB ranges are known to be caused mainly by CPDs produced through the conventional singlet/triplet excitation of pyrimidine bases after the direct absorption of the UVC/UVB photon energy in those bases. On the other hand, a novel photochemical mechanism through the direct absorption of the UVR energy to double-stranded DNA, which is called "collective excitation", has been proposed for the UVA-induced CPD formation. The UVA photons directly absorbed by DNA produce CPDs with a sequence context preference different from that observed for CPDs caused by the UVC/UVB-mediated singlet/triplet excitation, causing CPD formation preferentially at thymine-containing dipyrimidine

  6. Cell short circuit, preshort signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, C.

    1980-01-01

    Short-circuit events observed in ground test simulations of DSCS-3 battery in-orbit operations are analyzed. Voltage signatures appearing in the data preceding the short-circuit event are evaluated. The ground test simulation is briefly described along with performance during reconditioning discharges. Results suggest that a characteristic signature develops prior to a shorting event.

  7. Thermal Signature Identification System (TheSIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Scott; Bean, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We characterize both nonlinear and high order linear responses of fiber-optic and optoelectronic components using spread spectrum temperature cycling methods. This Thermal Signature Identification System (TheSIS) provides much more detail than conventional narrowband or quasi-static temperature profiling methods. This detail allows us to match components more thoroughly, detect subtle reversible shifts in performance, and investigate the cause of instabilities or irreversible changes. In particular, we create parameterized models of athermal fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), delay line interferometers (DLIs), and distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, then subject the alternative models to selection via the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Detailed pairing of components, e.g. FBGs, is accomplished by means of weighted distance metrics or norms, rather than on the basis of a single parameter, such as center wavelength.

  8. Metabolomic signature of brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Renu; Caflisch, Laura; Lodi, Alessia; Brenner, Andrew J; Tiziani, Stefano

    2017-11-01

    Despite advances in surgery and adjuvant therapy, brain tumors represent one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality and morbidity in both adults and children. Gliomas constitute about 60% of all cerebral tumors, showing varying degrees of malignancy. They are difficult to treat due to dismal prognosis and limited therapeutics. Metabolomics is the untargeted and targeted analyses of endogenous and exogenous small molecules, which charact erizes the phenotype of an individual. This emerging "omics" science provides functional readouts of cellular activity that contribute greatly to the understanding of cancer biology including brain tumor biology. Metabolites are highly informative as a direct signature of biochemical activity; therefore, metabolite profiling has become a promising approach for clinical diagnostics and prognostics. The metabolic alterations are well-recognized as one of the key hallmarks in monitoring disease progression, therapy, and revealing new molecular targets for effective therapeutic intervention. Taking advantage of the latest high-throughput analytical technologies, that is, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS), metabolomics is now a promising field for precision medicine and drug discovery. In the present report, we review the application of metabolomics and in vivo metabolic profiling in the context of adult gliomas and paediatric brain tumors. Analytical platforms such as high-resolution (HR) NMR, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging and high- and low-resolution MS are discussed. Moreover, the relevance of metabolic studies in the development of new therapeutic strategies for treatment of gliomas are reviewed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    PubMed Central

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  10. Signatures of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.; MaNGA-GMOS Team

    2017-01-01

    Feedback from actively accreting SMBHs (Active Galactic Nuclei, AGN) is now widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. Many attempts at finding a conclusive observational proof that AGN may be able to quench star formation and regulate the host galaxies' growth have shown that this problem is highly complex.I will present results from several projects that focus on understanding the power, reach and impact of feedback processes exerted by AGN. I will describe recent efforts in our group of relating feedback signatures to the specific star formation rate in their host galaxies, where our results are consistent with the AGN having a `negative' impact through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history (Wylezalek+2016a,b). Furthermore, I will show that powerful AGN-driven winds can be easily hidden and not be apparent in the integrated spectrum of the galaxy. This implies that large IFU surveys, such as the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, might uncover many previously unknown AGN and outflows that are potentially very relevant for understanding the role of AGN in galaxy evolution (Wylezalek+2016c)!

  11. Development of an in-situ multi-component reinforced Al-based metal matrix composite by direct metal laser sintering technique — Optimization of process parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Subrata Kumar, E-mail: subratagh82@gmail.com; Bandyopadhyay, Kaushik; Saha, Partha

    2014-07-01

    In the present investigation, an in-situ multi-component reinforced aluminum based metal matrix composite was fabricated by the combination of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis and direct metal laser sintering process. The different mixtures of Al, TiO{sub 2} and B{sub 4}C powders were used to initiate and maintain the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis by laser during the sintering process. It was found from the X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy that the reinforcements like Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TiB{sub 2} were formed in the composite. The scanning electron microscopy revealed the distribution of the reinforcement phases in the composite and phase identities.more » The variable parameters such as powder layer thickness, laser power, scanning speed, hatching distance and composition of the powder mixture were optimized for higher density, lower porosity and higher microhardness using Taguchi method. Experimental investigation shows that the density of the specimen mainly depends upon the hatching distance, composition and layer thickness. On the other hand, hatching distance, layer thickness and laser power are the significant parameters which influence the porosity. The composition, laser power and layer thickness are the key influencing parameters for microhardness. - Highlights: • The reinforcements such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TiB{sub 2} were produced in Al-MMC through SHS. • The density is mainly influenced by the material composition and hatching distance. • Hatching distance is the major influencing parameter on porosity. • The material composition is the significant parameter to enhance the microhardness. • The SEM micrographs reveal the distribution of TiC, TiB{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the composite.« less

  12. Early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) for severe sepsis/septic shock: which components of treatment are more difficult to implement in a community-based emergency department?

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Rory; Morales, Javier; Jule, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) has been shown to reduce mortality in patients with severe sepsis/septic shock, however, implementation of this protocol in the emergency department (ED) is sometimes difficult. We evaluated our sepsis protocol to determine which EGDT elements were more difficult to implement in our community-based ED. This was a non-concurrent cohort study of adult patients entered into a sepsis protocol at a single community hospital from July 2008 to March 2009. Charts were reviewed for the following process measures: a predefined crystalloid bolus, antibiotic administration, central venous catheter insertion, central venous pressure measurement, arterial line insertion, vasopressor utilization, central venous oxygen saturation measurement, and use of a standardized order set. We also compared the individual component adherence with survival to hospital discharge. A total of 98 patients presented over a 9-month period. Measures with the highest adherence were vasopressor administration (79%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 69-89%) and antibiotic use (78%; 95% CI 68-85%). Measures with the lowest adherence included arterial line placement (42%; 95% CI 32-52%), central venous pressure measurement (27%; 95% CI 18-36%), and central venous oxygen saturation measurement (15%; 95% CI 7-23%). Fifty-seven patients survived to hospital discharge (Mortality: 33%). The only element of EDGT to demonstrate a statistical significance in patients surviving to hospital discharge was the crystalloid bolus (79% vs. 46%) (respiratory rate [RR] = 1.76, 95% CI 1.11-2.58). In our community hospital, arterial line placement, central venous pressure measurement, and central venous oxygen saturation measurement were the most difficult elements of EGDT to implement. Patients who survived to hospital discharge were more likely to receive the crystalloid bolus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Electrical Signatures of Ethanol-Liquid Mixtures: Implications for Monitoring Biofuels Migration in the Subsurface

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol (EtOH), an emerging contaminant with potential direct and indirect environmental effects, poses threats to water supplies when spilled in large volumes. A series of experiments was directed at understanding the electrical geophysical signatures arising from groundwater co...

  14. Intrusion detection using secure signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Trent Darnel; Haile, Jedediah

    A method and device for intrusion detection using secure signatures comprising capturing network data. A search hash value, value employing at least one one-way function, is generated from the captured network data using a first hash function. The presence of a search hash value match in a secure signature table comprising search hash values and an encrypted rule is determined. After determining a search hash value match, a decryption key is generated from the captured network data using a second hash function, a hash function different form the first hash function. One or more of the encrypted rules of themore » secure signatures table having a hash value equal to the generated search hash value are then decrypted using the generated decryption key. The one or more decrypted secure signature rules are then processed for a match and one or more user notifications are deployed if a match is identified.« less

  15. A New Method to Quantify the Isotopic Signature of Leaf Transpiration: Implications for Landscape-Scale Evapotranspiration Partitioning Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Good, S. P.; Caylor, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    Characterizing the constituent components of evapotranspiration is crucial to better understand ecosystem-level water budgets and water use dynamics. Isotope based evapotranspiration partitioning methods are promising but their utility lies in the accurate estimation of the isotopic composition of underlying transpiration and evaporation. Here we report a new method to quantify the isotopic signature of leaf transpiration under field conditions. This method utilizes a commercially available laser-based isotope analyzer and a transparent leaf chamber, modified from Licor conifer leaf chamber. The method is based on the water mass balance in ambient air and leaf transpired air. We verified the method using “artificial leaves” and glassline extracted samples. The method provides a new and direct way to estimate leaf transpiration isotopic signatures and it has wide applications in ecology, hydrology and plant physiology.

  16. A Signature Pedagogy for Leadership Education: Preparing Principals through Participatory Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sappington, Neil; Baker, Paul J.; Gardner, Dianne; Pacha, Joe

    2010-01-01

    This study proposes participatory action research as a signature pedagogy for principal preparation programs. Signature pedagogies bring professional knowledge and core values together in distinctive teaching and learning arrangements. A rationale and learning results are presented that describe key components of action research intended to help…

  17. Infra-sound Signature of Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Badillo, E.; Johnson, J.; Edens, H. E.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    We have analyzed thunder from over 200 lightning flashes to determine which part of thunder comes from the gas dynamic expansion of portions of the rapidly heated lightning channel and which from electrostatic field changes. Thunder signals were recorded by a ~1500 m network of 3 to 4 4-element microphone deployed in the Magdalena mountains of New Mexico in the summers of 2011 and 2012. The higher frequency infra-sound and audio-range portion of thunder is thought to come from the gas dynamic expansion, and the electrostatic mechanism gives rise to a signature infra-sound pulse peaked at a few Hz. More than 50 signature infra-sound pulses were observed in different portions of the thunder signal, with no preference towards the beginning or the end of the signal. Detection of the signature pulse occurs sometimes only for one array and sometimes for several arrays, which agrees with the theory that the pulse is highly directional (i.e., the recordings have to be in a specific position with respect to the cloud generating the pulse to be able to detect it). The detection of these pulses under quiet wind conditions by different acoustic arrays corroborates the electrostatic mechanism originally proposed by Wilson [1920], further studied by Dessler [1973] and Few [1985], observed by Bohannon [1983] and Balachandran [1979, 1983], and recently analyzed by Pasko [2009]. Pasko employed a model to explain the electrostatic-to-acoustic energy conversion and the initial compression waves in observed infrasonic pulses, which agrees with the observations we have made. We present thunder samples that exhibit signature infra-sound pulses at different times and acoustic source reconstruction to demonstrate the beaming effect.

  18. Ballastic signature identification systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reich, A.; Hine, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results are described of an attempt to establish a uniform procedure for documenting (recording) expended bullet signatures as effortlessly as possible and to build a comprehensive library of these signatures in a form that will permit the automated comparison of a new suspect bullet with the prestored library. The ultimate objective is to achieve a standardized format that will permit nationwide interaction between police departments, crime laboratories, and other interested law enforcement agencies.

  19. Lewis base-catalyzed three-component Strecker reaction on water. An efficient manifold for the direct alpha-cyanoamination of ketones and aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Acosta, Fabio; Santos-Expósito, Alicia; de Armas, Pedro; García-Tellado, Fernando

    2009-11-28

    The first three-component organocatalyzed Strecker reaction operating on water has been developed. The manifold utilizes ketones (aldehydes) as the starting carbonyl component, aniline as the primary amine, acetyl cyanide as the cyanide source and N,N-dimethylcyclohexylamine as the catalyst.

  20. Infrared Spectral Signatures for Io's Dark and Green Spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granahan, J. C.; Fanale, F. P.; Carlson, R.; Smythe, W. D.

    2001-01-01

    This spectral study of Io identifies the infrared components of the visible spectral units (green and dark) as identified by Galileo. The green units possess sulfur dioxide and the dark units are associated with infrared thermal signatures. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. 1 CFR 18.7 - Signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signature. 18.7 Section 18.7 General Provisions... PREPARATION AND TRANSMITTAL OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.7 Signature. The original and each duplicate original... stamped beneath the signature. Initialed or impressed signatures will not be accepted. Documents submitted...

  2. 21 CFR 11.50 - Signature manifestations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature manifestations. 11.50 Section 11.50 Food... RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Records § 11.50 Signature manifestations. (a) Signed electronic...: (1) The printed name of the signer; (2) The date and time when the signature was executed; and (3...

  3. Simulating realistic predator signatures in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Diet estimation is an important field within quantitative ecology, providing critical insights into many aspects of ecology and community dynamics. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is a prominent method of diet estimation, particularly for marine mammal and bird species. Investigators using QFASA commonly use computer simulation to evaluate statistical characteristics of diet estimators for the populations they study. Similar computer simulations have been used to explore and compare the performance of different variations of the original QFASA diet estimator. In both cases, computer simulations involve bootstrap sampling prey signature data to construct pseudo-predator signatures with known properties. However, bootstrap sample sizes have been selected arbitrarily and pseudo-predator signatures therefore may not have realistic properties. I develop an algorithm to objectively establish bootstrap sample sizes that generates pseudo-predator signatures with realistic properties, thereby enhancing the utility of computer simulation for assessing QFASA estimator performance. The algorithm also appears to be computationally efficient, resulting in bootstrap sample sizes that are smaller than those commonly used. I illustrate the algorithm with an example using data from Chukchi Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their marine mammal prey. The concepts underlying the approach may have value in other areas of quantitative ecology in which bootstrap samples are post-processed prior to their use.

  4. Identifying prognostic signature in ovarian cancer using DirGenerank

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Yong; Chen, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Xiong-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Identifying the prognostic genes in cancer is essential not only for the treatment of cancer patients, but also for drug discovery. However, it's still a big challenge to select the prognostic genes that can distinguish the risk of cancer patients across various data sets because of tumor heterogeneity. In this situation, the selected genes whose expression levels are statistically related to prognostic risks may be passengers. In this paper, based on gene expression data and prognostic data of ovarian cancer patients, we used conditional mutual information to construct gene dependency network in which the nodes (genes) with more out-degrees have more chances to be the modulators of cancer prognosis. After that, we proposed DirGenerank (Generank in direct netowrk) algorithm, which concerns both the gene dependency network and genes’ correlations to prognostic risks, to identify the gene signature that can predict the prognostic risks of ovarian cancer patients. Using ovarian cancer data set from TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) as training data set, 40 genes with the highest importance were selected as prognostic signature. Survival analysis of these patients divided by the prognostic signature in testing data set and four independent data sets showed the signature can distinguish the prognostic risks of cancer patients significantly. Enrichment analysis of the signature with curated cancer genes and the drugs selected by CMAP showed the genes in the signature may be drug targets for therapy. In summary, we have proposed a useful pipeline to identify prognostic genes of cancer patients. PMID:28615526

  5. Realization of quantum digital signatures without the requirement of quantum memory.

    PubMed

    Collins, Robert J; Donaldson, Ross J; Dunjko, Vedran; Wallden, Petros; Clarke, Patrick J; Andersson, Erika; Jeffers, John; Buller, Gerald S

    2014-07-25

    Digital signatures are widely used to provide security for electronic communications, for example, in financial transactions and electronic mail. Currently used classical digital signature schemes, however, only offer security relying on unproven computational assumptions. In contrast, quantum digital signatures offer information-theoretic security based on laws of quantum mechanics. Here, security against forging relies on the impossibility of perfectly distinguishing between nonorthogonal quantum states. A serious drawback of previous quantum digital signature schemes is that they require long-term quantum memory, making them impractical at present. We present the first realization of a scheme that does not need quantum memory and which also uses only standard linear optical components and photodetectors. In our realization, the recipients measure the distributed quantum signature states using a new type of quantum measurement, quantum state elimination. This significantly advances quantum digital signatures as a quantum technology with potential for real applications.

  6. Realization of Quantum Digital Signatures without the Requirement of Quantum Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Robert J.; Donaldson, Ross J.; Dunjko, Vedran; Wallden, Petros; Clarke, Patrick J.; Andersson, Erika; Jeffers, John; Buller, Gerald S.

    2014-07-01

    Digital signatures are widely used to provide security for electronic communications, for example, in financial transactions and electronic mail. Currently used classical digital signature schemes, however, only offer security relying on unproven computational assumptions. In contrast, quantum digital signatures offer information-theoretic security based on laws of quantum mechanics. Here, security against forging relies on the impossibility of perfectly distinguishing between nonorthogonal quantum states. A serious drawback of previous quantum digital signature schemes is that they require long-term quantum memory, making them impractical at present. We present the first realization of a scheme that does not need quantum memory and which also uses only standard linear optical components and photodetectors. In our realization, the recipients measure the distributed quantum signature states using a new type of quantum measurement, quantum state elimination. This significantly advances quantum digital signatures as a quantum technology with potential for real applications.

  7. Determination of community structure through deconvolution of PLFA-FAME signature of mixed population.

    PubMed

    Dey, Dipesh K; Guha, Saumyen

    2007-02-15

    Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) as biomarkers are well established in the literature. A general method based on least square approximation (LSA) was developed for the estimation of community structure from the PLFA signature of a mixed population where biomarker PLFA signatures of the component species were known. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) standards were used as species analogs and mixture of the standards as representative of the mixed population. The PLFA/FAME signatures were analyzed by gas chromatographic separation, followed by detection in flame ionization detector (GC-FID). The PLFAs in the signature were quantified as relative weight percent of the total PLFA. The PLFA signatures were analyzed by the models to predict community structure of the mixture. The LSA model results were compared with the existing "functional group" approach. Both successfully predicted community structure of mixed population containing completely unrelated species with uncommon PLFAs. For slightest intersection in PLFA signatures of component species, the LSA model produced better results. This was mainly due to inability of the "functional group" approach to distinguish the relative amounts of the common PLFA coming from more than one species. The performance of the LSA model was influenced by errors in the chromatographic analyses. Suppression (or enhancement) of a component's PLFA signature in chromatographic analysis of the mixture, led to underestimation (or overestimation) of the component's proportion in the mixture by the model. In mixtures of closely related species with common PLFAs, the errors in the common components were adjusted across the species by the model.

  8. Graph Analytics for Signature Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2013-06-01

    Within large amounts of seemingly unstructured data it can be diffcult to find signatures of events. In our work we transform unstructured data into a graph representation. By doing this we expose underlying structure in the data and can take advantage of existing graph analytics capabilities, as well as develop new capabilities. Currently we focus on applications in cybersecurity and communication domains. Within cybersecurity we aim to find signatures for perpetrators using the pass-the-hash attack, and in communications we look for emails or phone calls going up or down a chain of command. In both of these areas, and inmore » many others, the signature we look for is a path with certain temporal properties. In this paper we discuss our methodology for finding these temporal paths within large graphs.« less

  9. Signature Pedagogy: A Literature Review of Social Studies and Technology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Dennis; Eno, Jenni

    2012-01-01

    A literature review of 121 peer-reviewed articles, books, and conference proceedings was conducted to determine the signature pedagogies of social studies education and technology integration. The authors found that the signature social studies pedagogy is based on two primary instructional models: direct-instruction and inquiry-based,…

  10. Metabolic Signature of Electrosurgical Liver Dissection

    PubMed Central

    von Schönfels, Witigo; von Kampen, Oliver; Patsenker, Eleonora; Stickel, Felix; Schniewind, Bodo; Hinz, Sebastian; Ahrens, Markus; Balschun, Katharina; Egberts, Jan-Hendrik; Richter, Klaus; Landrock, Andreas; Sipos, Bence; Will, Olga; Huebbe, Patrizia; Schreiber, Stefan; Nothnagel, Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Rimbach, Gerald; Becker, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims High frequency electrosurgery has a key role in the broadening application of liver surgery. Its molecular signature, i.e. the metabolites evolving from electrocauterization which may inhibit hepatic wound healing, have not been systematically studied. Methods Human liver samples were thus obtained during surgery before and after electrosurgical dissection and subjected to a two-stage metabolomic screening experiment (discovery sample: N = 18, replication sample: N = 20) using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results In a set of 208 chemically defined metabolites, electrosurgical dissection lead to a distinct metabolic signature resulting in a separation in the first two dimensions of a principal components analysis. Six metabolites including glycolic acid, azelaic acid, 2-n-pentylfuran, dihydroactinidiolide, 2-butenal and n-pentanal were consistently increased after electrosurgery meeting the discovery (p<2.0×10−4) and the replication thresholds (p<3.5×10−3). Azelaic acid, a lipid peroxidation product from the fragmentation of abundant sn-2 linoleoyl residues, was most abundant and increased 8.1-fold after electrosurgical liver dissection (preplication = 1.6×10−4). The corresponding phospholipid hexadecyl azelaoyl glycerophosphocholine inhibited wound healing and tissue remodelling in scratch- and proliferation assays of hepatic stellate cells and cholangiocytes, and caused apoptosis dose-dependently in vitro, which may explain in part the tissue damage due to electrosurgery. Conclusion Hepatic electrosurgery generates a metabolic signature with characteristic lipid peroxidation products. Among these, azelaic acid shows a dose-dependent toxicity in liver cells and inhibits wound healing. These observations potentially pave the way for pharmacological intervention prior liver surgery to modify the metabolic response and prevent postoperative complications. PMID:24058442

  11. Dual function seal: visualized digital signature for electronic medical record systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao-Chang; Hou, Ting-Wei; Chiang, Tzu-Chiang

    2012-10-01

    Digital signature is an important cryptography technology to be used to provide integrity and non-repudiation in electronic medical record systems (EMRS) and it is required by law. However, digital signatures normally appear in forms unrecognizable to medical staff, this may reduce the trust from medical staff that is used to the handwritten signatures or seals. Therefore, in this paper we propose a dual function seal to extend user trust from a traditional seal to a digital signature. The proposed dual function seal is a prototype that combines the traditional seal and digital seal. With this prototype, medical personnel are not just can put a seal on paper but also generate a visualized digital signature for electronic medical records. Medical Personnel can then look at the visualized digital signature and directly know which medical personnel generated it, just like with a traditional seal. Discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is used as an image processing method to generate a visualized digital signature, and the peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) is calculated to verify that distortions of all converted images are beyond human recognition, and the results of our converted images are from 70 dB to 80 dB. The signature recoverability is also tested in this proposed paper to ensure that the visualized digital signature is verifiable. A simulated EMRS is implemented to show how the visualized digital signature can be integrity into EMRS.

  12. Spatial and temporal variability of hyperspectral signatures of terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. F.; Perovich, D. K.; Koenig, G. G.

    2008-04-01

    Electromagnetic signatures of terrain exhibit significant spatial heterogeneity on a range of scales as well as considerable temporal variability. A statistical characterization of the spatial heterogeneity and spatial scaling algorithms of terrain electromagnetic signatures are required to extrapolate measurements to larger scales. Basic terrain elements including bare soil, grass, deciduous, and coniferous trees were studied in a quasi-laboratory setting using instrumented test sites in Hanover, NH and Yuma, AZ. Observations were made using a visible and near infrared spectroradiometer (350 - 2500 nm) and hyperspectral camera (400 - 1100 nm). Results are reported illustrating: i) several difference scenes; ii) a terrain scene time series sampled over an annual cycle; and iii) the detection of artifacts in scenes. A principal component analysis indicated that the first three principal components typically explained between 90 and 99% of the variance of the 30 to 40-channel hyperspectral images. Higher order principal components of hyperspectral images are useful for detecting artifacts in scenes.

  13. Textural signatures for wetland vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, R. I.; Marcellus, K. L.

    1973-01-01

    This investigation indicates that unique textural signatures do exist for specific wetland communities at certain times in the growing season. When photographs with the proper resolution are obtained, the textural features can identify the spectral features of the vegetation community seen with lower resolution mapping data. The development of a matrix of optimum textural signatures is the goal of this research. Seasonal variations of spectral and textural features are particularly important when performing a vegetations analysis of fresh water marshes. This matrix will aid in flight planning, since expected seasonal variations and resolution requirements can be established prior to a given flight mission.

  14. Concerning the Motion and Orientation of Flux Transfer Events Produced by Component and Antiparallel Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Lin, R.-Q.

    2011-01-01

    We employ the Cooling et al. (2001) model to predict the location, orientation, motion, and signatures of flux transfer events (FTEs) generated at the solstices and equinoxes along extended subsolar component and high ]latitude antiparallel reconnection curves for typical solar wind plasma conditions and various interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) strengths and directions. In general, events generated by the two mechanisms maintain the strikingly different orientations they begin with as they move toward the terminator in opposite pairs of magnetopause quadrants. The curves along which events generated by component reconnection form bow toward the winter cusp. Events generated by antiparallel reconnection form on the equatorial magnetopause during intervals of strongly southward IMF orientation during the equinoxes, form in the winter hemisphere and only reach the dayside equatorial magnetopause during the solstices when the IMF strength is very large and the IMF points strongly southward, never reach the equatorial dayside magnetopause when the IMF has a substantial dawnward or duskward component, and never reach the equatorial flank magnetopause during intervals of northward and dawnward or duskward IMF orientation. Magnetosheath magnetic fields typically have strong components transverse to events generated by component reconnection but only weak components transverse to the axes of events generated by antiparallel reconnection. As a result, much stronger bipolar magnetic field signatures normal to the nominal magnetopause should accompany events generated by component reconnection. The results presented in this paper suggest that events generated by component reconnection predominate on the dayside equatorial and flank magnetopause for most solar wind conditions.

  15. Five Guidelines for Selecting Hydrological Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, H. K.; Westerberg, I.; Branger, F.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrological signatures are index values derived from observed or modeled series of hydrological data such as rainfall, flow or soil moisture. They are designed to extract relevant information about hydrological behavior, such as to identify dominant processes, and to determine the strength, speed and spatiotemporal variability of the rainfall-runoff response. Hydrological signatures play an important role in model evaluation. They allow us to test whether particular model structures or parameter sets accurately reproduce the runoff generation processes within the watershed of interest. Most modeling studies use a selection of different signatures to capture different aspects of the catchment response, for example evaluating overall flow distribution as well as high and low flow extremes and flow timing. Such studies often choose their own set of signatures, or may borrow subsets of signatures used in multiple other works. The link between signature values and hydrological processes is not always straightforward, leading to uncertainty and variability in hydrologists' signature choices. In this presentation, we aim to encourage a more rigorous approach to hydrological signature selection, which considers the ability of signatures to represent hydrological behavior and underlying processes for the catchment and application in question. To this end, we propose a set of guidelines for selecting hydrological signatures. We describe five criteria that any hydrological signature should conform to: Identifiability, Robustness, Consistency, Representativeness, and Discriminatory Power. We describe an example of the design process for a signature, assessing possible signature designs against the guidelines above. Due to their ubiquity, we chose a signature related to the Flow Duration Curve, selecting the FDC mid-section slope as a proposed signature to quantify catchment overall behavior and flashiness. We demonstrate how assessment against each guideline could be used to

  16. Mass spectrometry detection and imaging of inorganic and organic explosive device signatures using desorption electro-flow focusing ionization.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas P; Sisco, Edward

    2014-08-05

    We demonstrate the coupling of desorption electro-flow focusing ionization (DEFFI) with in-source collision induced dissociation (CID) for the mass spectrometric (MS) detection and imaging of explosive device components, including both inorganic and organic explosives and energetic materials. We utilize in-source CID to enhance ion collisions with atmospheric gas, thereby reducing adducts and minimizing organic contaminants. Optimization of the MS signal response as a function of in-source CID potential demonstrated contrasting trends for the detection of inorganic and organic explosive device components. DEFFI-MS and in-source CID enabled isotopic and molecular speciation of inorganic components, providing further physicochemical information. The developed system facilitated the direct detection and chemical mapping of trace analytes collected with Nomex swabs and spatially resolved distributions within artificial fingerprints from forensic lift tape. The results presented here provide the forensic and security sectors a powerful tool for the detection, chemical imaging, and inorganic speciation of explosives device signatures.

  17. Using Radiative Signatures to Diagnose the Cause of Warming Associated with the Californian Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.; Yin, D.; Roderick, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    California recently experienced among the worst droughts of the last century, with unprecedented precipitation deficits and record high temperatures. The dry conditions caused severe water shortages in one of the economically most important agricultural regions of the US, particularly in the Central Valley. It has been hypothesized that anthropogenic warming is increasing the likelihood of such extreme droughts in California, or more specifically, that these drought conditions are a consequence of warmer temperatures from the enhanced greenhouse effect. Process studies suggest, however, that increased temperatures during droughts are mostly a consequence of reduced evaporative cooling resulting from the reduction in precipitation. Here we use surface radiation components from NASA's Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy Systems (CERES), climatic data and direct flux tower measurements to investigate the cause of warming associated with the recent Californian Drought. Based on radiative signatures and surface energy balance we show that the warmer temperatures were not associated with an enhanced greenhouse effect by anthropogenic warming. The radiative signature showed decreased longwave downward radiation during the water years 2013-2014 compared to the decadal mean of 2001-2012. Instead, increased solar downward radiation in combination with reduced evaporative cooling from water deficits enhanced surface temperatures and sensible heat transfer to the atmosphere. We conclude that the drought was not directly associated with warming by increased longwave downward radiation, and that there is no simple relation between warmer surface temperatures and drought.

  18. Cytoplasmic flows as signatures for the mechanics of mitotic positioning

    PubMed Central

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Rahimian, Abtin; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The proper positioning of mitotic spindle in the single-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is achieved initially by the migration and rotation of the pronuclear complex (PNC) and its two associated astral microtubules (MTs). Pronuclear migration produces global cytoplasmic flows that couple the mechanics of all MTs, the PNC, and the cell periphery with each other through their hydrodynamic interactions (HIs). We present the first computational study that explicitly accounts for detailed HIs between the cytoskeletal components and demonstrate the key consequences of HIs for the mechanics of pronuclear migration. First, we show that, because of HIs between the MTs, the cytoplasm-filled astral MTs behave like a porous medium, with its permeability decreasing with increasing the number of MTs. We then directly study the dynamics of PNC migration under various force-transduction models, including the pushing or pulling of MTs at the cortex and the pulling of MTs by cytoplasmically bound force generators. Although achieving proper position and orientation on reasonable time scales does not uniquely choose a model, we find that each model produces a different signature in its induced cytoplasmic flow. We suggest that cytoplasmic flows can be used to differentiate between mechanisms. PMID:28331070

  19. Effect of shading intensity on morphological and color traits, and chemical components of new tea (Camellia sinensis L.) shoots under direct covering cultivation.

    PubMed

    Sano, Tomohito; Horie, Hideki; Matsunaga, Akiko; Hirono, Yuhei

    2018-05-02

    Use of covering cultivation to shade tea (Camellia sinensis L.) trees to produce high-quality, high-priced green tea has recently increased in Japan. Knowledge of shading effects on morphological and color traits, and chemical components of new tea shoots is important for product quality and productivity. We assessed these traits of tea shoots and their relationships under covering cultivation of various radiation intensities. Leaf thickness, LMA (leaf mass per area), and leaf density of new tea leaves were smaller under covering culture than under open-field culture. SPAD values and chlorophyll contents were larger under covering culture than under open culture. The derived exponential equation for estimating chlorophyll contents from SPAD values was improved by considering leaf thickness. Covering culture decreased EC (epicatechin) and EGC (epigallocatechin) contents, and increased theanine and caffeine contents. Principal component analysis on shoot and leaf traits indicated that LMA, and chlorophyll, EC, and EGC contents were strongly associated with shading effects. Morphological and color traits, and chemical components of new tea shoots and leaves varied depending on radiation intensity, shoot growth, and cropping season. These findings are useful for covering cultivation with high quality and high productivity in tea gardens. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of host response signatures of infection.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Biological weapons of mass destruction and emerging infectious diseases represent a serious and growing threat to our national security. Effective response to a bioattack or disease outbreak critically depends upon efficient and reliable distinguishing between infected vs healthy individuals, to enable rational use of scarce, invasive, and/or costly countermeasures (diagnostics, therapies, quarantine). Screening based on direct detection of the causative pathogen can be problematic, because culture- and probe-based assays are confounded by unanticipated pathogens (e.g., deeply diverged, engineered), and readily-accessible specimens (e.g., blood) often contain little or no pathogen, particularly at pre-symptomatic stages of disease. Thus, in addition to themore » pathogen itself, one would like to detect infection-specific host response signatures in the specimen, preferably ones comprised of nucleic acids (NA), which can be recovered and amplified from tiny specimens (e.g., fingerstick draws). Proof-of-concept studies have not been definitive, however, largely due to use of sub-optimal sample preparation and detection technologies. For purposes of pathogen detection, Sandia has developed novel molecular biology methods that enable selective isolation of NA unique to, or shared between, complex samples, followed by identification and quantitation via Second Generation Sequencing (SGS). The central hypothesis of the current study is that variations on this approach will support efficient identification and verification of NA-based host response signatures of infectious disease. To test this hypothesis, we re-engineered Sandia's sophisticated sample preparation pipelines, and developed new SGS data analysis tools and strategies, in order to pioneer use of SGS for identification of host NA correlating with infection. Proof-of-concept studies were carried out using specimens drawn from pathogen-infected non-human primates (NHP). This work provides a strong foundation

  1. Disaster relief through composite signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Chadwick T.; Hyde, Brian; Carpenter, Tom; Nichols, Steve

    2012-06-01

    A composite signature is a group of signatures that are related in such a way to more completely or further define a target or operational endeavor at a higher fidelity. This paper builds on previous work developing innovative composite signatures associated with civil disasters, including physical, chemical and pattern/behavioral. For the composite signature approach to be successful it requires effective data fusion and visualization. This plays a key role in both preparedness and the response and recovery which are critical to saving lives. Visualization tools enhance the overall understanding of the crisis by pulling together and analyzing the data, and providing a clear and complete analysis of the information to the organizations/agencies dependant on it for a successful operation. An example of this, Freedom Web, is an easy-to-use data visualization and collaboration solution for use in homeland security, emergency preparedness, situational awareness, and event management. The solution provides a nationwide common operating picture for all levels of government through a web based, map interface. The tool was designed to be utilized by non-geospatial experts and is easily tailored to the specific needs of the users. Consisting of standard COTS and open source databases and a web server, users can view, edit, share, and highlight information easily and quickly through a standard internet browser.

  2. Topological Signatures for Population Admixture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Topological Signatures for Population AdmixtureDeniz Yorukoglu1, Filippo Utro1, David Kuhn2, Saugata Basu3 and Laxmi Parida1* Abstract Background: As populations with multi-linear transmission (i.e., mixing of genetic material from two parents, say) evolve over generations, the genetic transmission...

  3. Signature Pedagogy in Theatre Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornetsky, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Critique in undergraduate theatre programs is at the heart of training actors at all levels. It is accepted as the signature pedagogy and is practiced in multiple ways. This essay defines critique and presents the case for why it is used as the single most important way that performers come to understand the language, values, and discourse of the…

  4. Invisibly Sanitizable Digital Signature Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Kunihiko; Hanaoka, Goichiro; Imai, Hideki

    A digital signature does not allow any alteration of the document to which it is attached. Appropriate alteration of some signed documents, however, should be allowed because there are security requirements other than the integrity of the document. In the disclosure of official information, for example, sensitive information such as personal information or national secrets is masked when an official document is sanitized so that its nonsensitive information can be disclosed when it is requested by a citizen. If this disclosure is done digitally by using the current digital signature schemes, the citizen cannot verify the disclosed information because it has been altered to prevent the leakage of sensitive information. The confidentiality of official information is thus incompatible with the integrity of that information, and this is called the digital document sanitizing problem. Conventional solutions such as content extraction signatures and digitally signed document sanitizing schemes with disclosure condition control can either let the sanitizer assign disclosure conditions or hide the number of sanitized portions. The digitally signed document sanitizing scheme we propose here is based on the aggregate signature derived from bilinear maps and can do both. Moreover, the proposed scheme can sanitize a signed document invisibly, that is, no one can distinguish whether the signed document has been sanitized or not.

  5. Analysis of dissolved organic carbon concentration and 13C isotopic signature by TOC-IRMS - assessment of analytical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cerli, Chiara; Federherr, Eugen; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopes provide a powerful tool to assess carbon pools and their dynamics. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) has been recognized to play an important role in ecosystem functioning and carbon cycling and has therefore gained increased research interest. However, direct measurement of 13C isotopic signature of carbon in the dissolved phase is technically challenging particularly using high temperature combustion. Until recently, mainly custom-made systems existed which were modified for coupling of TOC instruments with IRMS for simultaneous assessment of C content and isotopic signature. The variety of coupled systems showed differences in their analytical performances. For analysis of DOC high temperature combustion is recognized as best performing method, owing to its high efficiency of conversion to CO2 also for highly refractory components (e.g. humic, fulvic acids) present in DOC and soil extracts. Therefore, we tested high temperature combustion TOC coupled to IRMS (developed by Elementar Group) for bulk measurements of DOC concentration and 13C signature. The instruments are coupled via an Interface to exchange the carrier gas from O2 to He and to concentrate the derived CO2 for the isotope measurement. Analytical performance of the system was assessed for a variety of organic compounds characterized by different stability and complexity, including humic acid and DOM. We tested injection volumes between 0.2-3 ml, thereby enabling measurement of broad concentration ranges. With an injection volume of 0.5 ml (n=3, preceded by 1 discarded injection), DOC and 13C signatures for concentrations between 5-150 mg C/L were analyzed with high precision (standard deviation (SD) predominantly <0.1‰), good accuracy and linearity (overall SD <0.9‰). For the same settings, slightly higher variation in precision was observed among the lower concentration range and depending upon specific system conditions. Differences in 13C signatures of about 50‰ among

  6. Why the Simple View of Reading Is Not Simplistic: Unpacking Component Skills of Reading Using a Direct and Indirect Effect Model of Reading (DIER)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young-Suk Grace

    2017-01-01

    Pathways of relations of language, cognitive, and literacy skills (i.e., working memory, vocabulary, grammatical knowledge, inference, comprehension monitoring, word reading, and listening comprehension) to reading comprehension were examined by comparing four variations of direct and indirect effects model of reading. Results from 350…

  7. The signature of a black hole transit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Joseph F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper considers the possibility of identifying a black hole on the basis of the detection of some unique effect occurring during the transit of a black hole across the stellar disk of a companion star in a binary system. The results of Monte-Carlo calculations show that the amplitude of the photometric and polarimetric light curves in a typical X-ray binary is too small to be observed with present instrumentation, but that a black hole transit might be detectable in a binary having a large separation of the components. No binary system suggested as containing a stellar-mass-sized black hole is a like candidate to exhibit an observable transit signature, with the possible exception of X Persei/4U0352+30 described by White et al. (1976).

  8. Lesson 5: Defining Valid Electronic Signatures

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A valid electronic signature on an electronic document is one that is created with an electronic signature device that is uniquely entitled to a signatory, not compromised, and used by a signatory who is authorized to sign the electronic document.

  9. Single phase bi-directional AC-DC converter with reduced passive components size and common mode electro-magnetic interference

    DOEpatents

    Mi, Chris; Li, Siqi

    2017-01-31

    A bidirectional AC-DC converter is presented with reduced passive component size and common mode electro-magnetic interference. The converter includes an improved input stage formed by two coupled differential inductors, two coupled common and differential inductors, one differential capacitor and two common mode capacitors. With this input structure, the volume, weight and cost of the input stage can be reduced greatly. Additionally, the input current ripple and common mode electro-magnetic interference can be greatly attenuated, so lower switching frequency can be adopted to achieve higher efficiency.

  10. Exploring hydrocarbon-bearing shale formations with multi-component seismic technology and evaluating direct shear modes produced by vertical-force sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, Engin

    It is essential to understand natural fracture systems embedded in shale-gas reservoirs and the stress fields that influence how induced fractures form in targeted shale units. Multicomponent seismic technology and elastic seismic stratigraphy allow geologic formations to be better images through analysis of different S-wave modes as well as the P-wave mode. Significant amounts of energy produced by P-wave sources radiate through the Earth as downgoing SV-wave energy. A vertical-force source is an effective source for direct SV radiation and provides a pure shear-wave mode (SV-SV) that should reveal crucial information about geologic surfaces located in anisotropic media. SV-SV shear wave modes should carry important information about petrophysical characteristics of hydrocarbon systems that cannot be obtained using other elastic-wave modes. Regardless of the difficulties of extracting good-quality SV-SV signal, direct shear waves as well as direct P and converted S energy should be accounted for in 3C seismic studies. Acquisition of full-azimuth seismic data and sampling data at small intervals over long offsets are required for detailed anisotropy analysis. If 3C3D data can be acquired with improved signal-to-noise ratio, more uniform illumination of targets, increased lateral resolution, more accurate amplitude attributes, and better multiple attenuation, such data will have strong interest by the industry. The objectives of this research are: (1) determine the feasibility of extracting direct SV-SV common-mid-point sections from 3-C seismic surveys, (2) improve the exploration for stratigraphic traps by developing systematic relationship between petrophysical properties and combinations of P and S wave modes, (3) create compelling examples illustrating how hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs in low-permeable rocks (particularly anisotropic shale formations) can be better characterized using different Swave modes (P-SV, SV-SV) in addition to the conventional P

  11. Signature molecular descriptor : advanced applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.

    In this work we report on the development of the Signature Molecular Descriptor (or Signature) for use in the solution of inverse design problems as well as in highthroughput screening applications. The ultimate goal of using Signature is to identify novel and non-intuitive chemical structures with optimal predicted properties for a given application. We demonstrate this in three studies: green solvent design, glucocorticoid receptor ligand design and the design of inhibitors for Factor XIa. In many areas of engineering, compounds are designed and/or modified in incremental ways which rely upon heuristics or institutional knowledge. Often multiple experiments are performed andmore » the optimal compound is identified in this brute-force fashion. Perhaps a traditional chemical scaffold is identified and movement of a substituent group around a ring constitutes the whole of the design process. Also notably, a chemical being evaluated in one area might demonstrate properties very attractive in another area and serendipity was the mechanism for solution. In contrast to such approaches, computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) looks to encompass both experimental and heuristic-based knowledge into a strategy that will design a molecule on a computer to meet a given target. Depending on the algorithm employed, the molecule which is designed might be quite novel (re: no CAS registration number) and/or non-intuitive relative to what is known about the problem at hand. While CAMD is a fairly recent strategy (dating to the early 1980s), it contains a variety of bottlenecks and limitations which have prevented the technique from garnering more attention in the academic, governmental and industrial institutions. A main reason for this is how the molecules are described in the computer. This step can control how models are developed for the properties of interest on a given problem as well as how to go from an output of the algorithm to an actual chemical structure. This report

  12. 25 CFR 213.10 - Lessor's signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lessor's signature. 213.10 Section 213.10 Indians BUREAU... MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING How to Acquire Leases § 213.10 Lessor's signature... thumbprint which shall be designated as “right” or “left” thumbmark. Such signatures must be witnessed by two...

  13. 7 CFR 97.155 - Signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signatures. 97.155 Section 97.155 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION Attorneys and Agents § 97.155 Signatures. Every document filed by an attorney or agent representing an applicant or party to a proceeding in the Office shall bear the signature...

  14. 17 CFR 12.12 - Signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature. 12.12 Section 12.12... General Information and Preliminary Consideration of Pleadings § 12.12 Signature. (a) By whom. All... document on behalf of another person. (b) Effect. The signature on any document of any person acting either...

  15. 27 CFR 17.6 - Signature authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature authority. 17.6... PRODUCTS General Provisions § 17.6 Signature authority. No claim, bond, tax return, or other required... other proper notification of signature authority has been filed with the TTB office where the required...

  16. 7 CFR 718.9 - Signature requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signature requirements. 718.9 Section 718.9... MULTIPLE PROGRAMS General Provisions § 718.9 Signature requirements. (a) When a program authorized by this chapter or Chapter XIV of this title requires the signature of a producer; landowner; landlord; or tenant...

  17. A near-infrared reflectance spectroscopic method for the direct analysis of several fodder-related chemical components in drumstick (Moringa oleifera Lam.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; Li, Shuqi; Lin, Mengfei; Yang, Endian; Chen, Xiaoyang

    2018-05-01

    The drumstick tree has traditionally been used as foodstuff and fodder in several countries. Due to its high nutritional value and good biomass production, interest in this plant has increased in recent years. It has therefore become important to rapidly and accurately evaluate drumstick quality. In this study, we addressed the optimization of Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to analyze crude protein, crude fat, crude fiber, iron (Fe), and potassium (K) in a variety of drumstick accessions (N = 111) representing different populations, cultivation programs, and climates. Partial least-squares regression with internal cross-validation was used to evaluate the models and identify possible spectral outliers. The calibration statistics for these fodder-related chemical components suggest that NIRS can predict these parameters in a wide range of drumstick types with high accuracy. The NIRS calibration models developed in this study will be useful in predicting drumstick forage quality for these five quality parameters.

  18. Direct study of minor extra-virgin olive oil components without any sample modification. 1H NMR multisupression experiment: A powerful tool.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; Goicoechea, Encarnación; Guillén, María D

    2017-08-01

    Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ( 1 H NMR) was employed to study monovarietal commercial Spanish extra-virgin olive oils (EVOO) (Arbequina, Arroniz, Cornicabra, Hojiblanca and Picual). Each sample was analyzed by a standard pulse and by an experiment suppressing the main lipid signals, enabling the detection of signals of minor components. The aim was to determine the possibilities of both 1 H NMR approaches to characterize EVOO composition, focusing on acyl groups, squalene, sterols, triterpene acids/esters, fatty alcohols, wax esters and phenols (lignans, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, oleocanthal, oleacein, oleokoronal, oleomissional, ligstrodials and oleuropeindials), and to determine hydrolysis and oxidation levels. The signal assignments (in deuterated chloroform) are thoroughly described, identifying for the first time those of the protons of esters of phytol and of geranylgeraniol. Correct signal assignment is fundamental for obtaining sound results when interpreting statistical data from metabolomic studies of EVOO composition and adulteration, making it possible to differentiate and classify oils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterizing Resident Space Object Earthshine Signature Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cor, Jared D.

    There are three major sources of illumination on objects in the near Earth space environment: Sunshine, Moonshine, and Earthshine. For objects in this environment (satellites, orbital debris, etc.) known as Resident Space Objects (RSOs), the sun and the moon have consistently small illuminating solid angles and can be treated as point sources; this makes their incident illumination easily modeled. The Earth on the other hand has a large illuminating solid angle, is heterogeneous, and is in a constant state of change. The objective of this thesis was to characterize the impact and variability of observed RSO Earthshine on apparent magnitude signatures in the visible optical spectral region. A key component of this research was creating Earth object models incorporating the reflectance properties of the Earth. Two Earth objects were created: a homogeneous diffuse Earth object and a time sensitive heterogeneous Earth object. The homogeneous diffuse Earth object has a reflectance equal to the average global albedo, a standard model used when modeling Earthshine. The time sensitive heterogeneous Earth object was created with two material maps representative of the dynamic reflectance of the surface of the earth, and a shell representative of the atmosphere. NASA's Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Earth observing satellite product libraries, MCD43C1 global surface BRDF map and MOD06 global fractional cloud map, were utilized to create the material maps, and a hybridized version of the Empirical Line Method (ELM) was used to create the atmosphere. This dynamic Earth object was validated by comparing simulated color imagery of the Earth to that taken by: NASAs Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) located on the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), and by MODIS located on the Terra satellite. The time sensitive heterogeneous Earth object deviated from MODIS imagery by a spectral radiance root mean square error (RMSE) of +/-14.86 [watts/m. 2sr

  20. Statistical partitioning of a three-year time series of direct urban net CO2 flux measurements into biogenic and anthropogenic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzer, Olaf; McFadden, Joseph P.

    2017-12-01

    Eddy covariance flux measurements are increasingly used to quantify the net carbon dioxide exchange (FC) in urban areas. FC represents the sum of anthropogenic emissions, biogenic carbon release from plant and soil respiration, and carbon uptake by plant photosynthesis. When FC is measured in natural ecosystems, partitioning into respiration and photosynthesis is a well-established procedure. In contrast, few studies have partitioned FC at urban flux tower sites due to the difficulty of accounting for the temporal and spatial variability of the multiple sources and sinks. Here, we partitioned a three-year time series of flux measurements from a suburban neighborhood of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA. We segregated FC into one subset that captured fluxes from a residential neighborhood and into another subset that covered a golf course. For both land use types we modeled anthropogenic flux components based on winter data and extrapolated them to the growing season, to estimate gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco) at half-hourly, daily, monthly and annual scales. During the growing season, GPP had the largest magnitude (up to - 9.83 g C m-2 d-1) of any component CO2 flux, biogenic or anthropogenic, and both GPP and Reco were more dynamic seasonally than anthropogenic fluxes. Owing to the balancing of Reco against GPP, and the limitations of the growing season in a cold temperate climate zone, the net biogenic flux was only 1.5%-4.5% of the anthropogenic flux in the dominant residential land use type, and between 25%-31% of the anthropogenic flux in highly managed greenspace. Still, the vegetation sink at our site was stronger than net anthropogenic emissions on 16-20 days over the residential area and on 66-91 days over the recreational area. The reported carbon flux sums and dynamics are a critical step toward developing models of urban CO2 fluxes within and across cities that differ in vegetation cover.

  1. Quantification Of Fire Signatures For Practical Spacecraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Tomasek, Aaron J.

    2003-01-01

    The overall objective of this project is to measure the fire signatures of typical spacecraft materials in 1-g and determine how these signatures may be altered in a microgravity environment. During this project, we will also develop a test technique to obtain representative low-gravity signatures. The specific tasks that will be accomplished to achieve these objectives are to: (1) measure the time history of various fire signatures of typical spacecraft materials in 1-g at varying heating rates, temperatures, convective velocities, and oxygen concentrations, (2) conduct tests in the Zero-Gravity Facility at NASA John H. Glenn Research Center to investigate the manner that a microgravity environment alters the fire signature,(3) compare 0-g and 1-g time histories and determine if 0-g data exhibits the same dependence on the test parameters as experienced in 1-g (4) develop a 1-g test technique by which 0-g fire signatures can be measured. The proposed study seeks to investigate the differences in the identities and relative concentrations of the volatiles produced by pyrolyzing and/or smoldering materials between normal gravity and microgravity environments. Test materials will be representative of typical spacecraft materials and, where possible, will be tested in appropriate geometries. Wire insulation materials of Teflon, polyimide, silicone, and PVC will be evaluated using either cylindrical samples or actual wire insulation. Other materials such as polyurethane, polyimide, melamine, and silicone-based foams will be tested using cylindrical samples, in addition to fabric materials, such as Nomex. Electrical components, such as resistors, capacitors, circuit board will also be tested.

  2. Geometrical dart infrared polarization signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Gareth D.; Jordan, David L.

    1996-06-01

    The 8 - 12 micrometer polarization signatures of diffuse and specular aluminum geometrical darts were analyzed outdoors using a polarization sensitive thermal imager. Results of the degree and plane of polarization are presented for different thermal imager gain bands and weather conditions during a two week period. The 0 degree, 45 degree, 90 degree and 135 degree polarizer orientations were thermally calibrated and the S1 and S2 Stokes parameters shown as radiometric temperature differences. The effect on the polarization signatures of range is considered for these targets at 100 m and 370 m. A comparison of the degree of polarization to changes in the emission/reflection balance and to variations in the dart's complex refractive index is made.

  3. Polarization signatures of airborne particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Prashant; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2013-07-01

    Exploratory research has been conducted with the aim of completely determining the polarization signatures of selected particulates as a function of wavelength. This may lead to a better understanding of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and such materials, perhaps leading to the point detection of bio-aerosols present in the atmosphere. To this end, a polarimeter capable of measuring the complete Mueller matrix of highly scattering samples in transmission and reflection (with good spectral resolution from 300 to 1100 nm) has been developed. The polarization properties of Bacillus subtilis (surrogate for anthrax spore) are compared to ambient particulate matter species such as pollen, dust, and soot. Differentiating features in the polarization signatures of these samples have been identified, thus demonstrating the potential applicability of this technique for the detection of bio-aerosol in the ambient atmosphere.

  4. Nonlinear control of magnetic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemoczynski, Bogdan

    Magnetic properties of ferrite structures are known to cause fluctuations in Earth's magnetic field around the object. These fluctuations are known as the object's magnetic signature and are unique based on the object's geometry and material. It is a common practice to neutralize magnetic signatures periodically after certain time intervals, however there is a growing interest to develop real time degaussing systems for various applications. Development of real time degaussing system is a challenging problem because of magnetic hysteresis and difficulties in measurement or estimation of near-field flux data. The goal of this research is to develop a real time feedback control system that can be used to minimize magnetic signatures for ferrite structures. Experimental work on controlling the magnetic signature of a cylindrical steel shell structure with a magnetic disturbance provided evidence that the control process substantially increased the interior magnetic flux. This means near field estimation using interior sensor data is likely to be inaccurate. Follow up numerical work for rectangular and cylindrical cross sections investigated variations in shell wall flux density under a variety of ambient excitation and applied disturbances. Results showed magnetic disturbances could corrupt interior sensor data and magnetic shielding due to the shell walls makes the interior very sensitive to noise. The magnetic flux inside the shell wall showed little variation due to inner disturbances and its high base value makes it less susceptible to noise. This research proceeds to describe a nonlinear controller to use the shell wall data as an input. A nonlinear plant model of magnetics is developed using a constant tau to represent domain rotation lag and a gain function k to describe the magnetic hysteresis curve for the shell wall. The model is justified by producing hysteresis curves for multiple materials, matching experimental data using a particle swarm algorithm, and

  5. Developments in Signature Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, L. B.; Dominski, Marty

    1993-01-01

    Developments in the adaptive process control technique known as Signature Process Control for Advanced Composites (SPCC) are described. This computer control method for autoclave processing of composites was used to develop an optimum cure cycle for AFR 700B polyamide and for an experimental poly-isoimide. An improved process cycle was developed for Avimid N polyamide. The potential for extending the SPCC technique to pre-preg quality control, press modeling, pultrusion and RTM is briefly discussed.

  6. Sea Surface Signature of Tropical Cyclones Using Microwave Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    due to the ionosphere and troposphere, which have to be compensated for, and components due to the galactic and cosmic background radiation those...and corrections for sun glint, galactic and cosmic background radiation, and Stokes effects of the ionosphere. The accuracy of a given retrieval...RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) Sea surface signature of tropical cyclones using microwave remote sensing Bumjun Kil

  7. Microbial Lifestyle and Genome Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Chitra; Paul, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Microbes are known for their unique ability to adapt to varying lifestyle and environment, even to the extreme or adverse ones. The genomic architecture of a microbe may bear the signatures not only of its phylogenetic position, but also of the kind of lifestyle to which it is adapted. The present review aims to provide an account of the specific genome signatures observed in microbes acclimatized to distinct lifestyles or ecological niches. Niche-specific signatures identified at different levels of microbial genome organization like base composition, GC-skew, purine-pyrimidine ratio, dinucleotide abundance, codon bias, oligonucleotide composition etc. have been discussed. Among the specific cases highlighted in the review are the phenomena of genome shrinkage in obligatory host-restricted microbes, genome expansion in strictly intra-amoebal pathogens, strand-specific codon usage in intracellular species, acquisition of genome islands in pathogenic or symbiotic organisms, discriminatory genomic traits of marine microbes with distinct trophic strategies, and conspicuous sequence features of certain extremophiles like those adapted to high temperature or high salinity. PMID:23024607

  8. Selection signatures in Shetland ponies.

    PubMed

    Frischknecht, M; Flury, C; Leeb, T; Rieder, S; Neuditschko, M

    2016-06-01

    Shetland ponies were selected for numerous traits including small stature, strength, hardiness and longevity. Despite the different selection criteria, Shetland ponies are well known for their small stature. We performed a selection signature analysis including genome-wide SNPs of 75 Shetland ponies and 76 large-sized horses. Based upon this dataset, we identified a selection signature on equine chromosome (ECA) 1 between 103.8 Mb and 108.5 Mb. A total of 33 annotated genes are located within this interval including the IGF1R gene at 104.2 Mb and the ADAMTS17 gene at 105.4 Mb. These two genes are well known to have a major impact on body height in numerous species including humans. Homozygosity mapping in the Shetland ponies identified a region with increased homozygosity between 107.4 Mb and 108.5 Mb. None of the annotated genes in this region have so far been associated with height. Thus, we cannot exclude the possibility that the identified selection signature on ECA1 is associated with some trait other than height, for which Shetland ponies were selected. © 2016 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  9. Nonlinear analysis of dynamic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, S.; Fallah, A.; Towhidkhah, F.

    2013-12-01

    Signature is a long trained motor skill resulting in well combination of segments like strokes and loops. It is a physical manifestation of complex motor processes. The problem, generally stated, is that how relative simplicity in behavior emerges from considerable complexity of perception-action system that produces behavior within an infinitely variable biomechanical and environmental context. To solve this problem, we present evidences which indicate that motor control dynamic in signing process is a chaotic process. This chaotic dynamic may explain a richer array of time series behavior in motor skill of signature. Nonlinear analysis is a powerful approach and suitable tool which seeks for characterizing dynamical systems through concepts such as fractal dimension and Lyapunov exponent. As a result, they can be analyzed in both horizontal and vertical for time series of position and velocity. We observed from the results that noninteger values for the correlation dimension indicates low dimensional deterministic dynamics. This result could be confirmed by using surrogate data tests. We have also used time series to calculate the largest Lyapunov exponent and obtain a positive value. These results constitute significant evidence that signature data are outcome of chaos in a nonlinear dynamical system of motor control.

  10. Field signature for apparently superluminal particle motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Martin

    2015-05-01

    In the context of Stueckelberg's covariant symplectic mechanics, Horwitz and Aharonovich [1] have proposed a simple mechanism by which a particle traveling below light speed almost everywhere may exhibit a transit time that suggests superluminal motion. This mechanism, which requires precise measurement of the particle velocity, involves a subtle perturbation affecting the particle's recorded time coordinate caused by virtual pair processes. The Stueckelberg framework is particularly well suited to such problems, because it permits pair creation/annihilation at the classical level. In this paper, we study a trajectory of the type proposed by Horwitz and Aharonovich, and derive the Maxwell 4-vector potential associated with the motion. We show that the resulting fields carry a signature associated with the apparent superluminal motion, providing an independent test for the mechanism that does not require direct observation of the trajectory, except at the detector.

  11. Genetic signatures of natural selection in a model invasive ascidian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yaping; Chen, Yiyong; Yi, Changho; Fong, Jonathan J.; Kim, Won; Rius, Marc; Zhan, Aibin

    2017-03-01

    Invasive species represent promising models to study species’ responses to rapidly changing environments. Although local adaptation frequently occurs during contemporary range expansion, the associated genetic signatures at both population and genomic levels remain largely unknown. Here, we use genome-wide gene-associated microsatellites to investigate genetic signatures of natural selection in a model invasive ascidian, Ciona robusta. Population genetic analyses of 150 individuals sampled in Korea, New Zealand, South Africa and Spain showed significant genetic differentiation among populations. Based on outlier tests, we found high incidence of signatures of directional selection at 19 loci. Hitchhiking mapping analyses identified 12 directional selective sweep regions, and all selective sweep windows on chromosomes were narrow (~8.9 kb). Further analyses indentified 132 candidate genes under selection. When we compared our genetic data and six crucial environmental variables, 16 putatively selected loci showed significant correlation with these environmental variables. This suggests that the local environmental conditions have left significant signatures of selection at both population and genomic levels. Finally, we identified “plastic” genomic regions and genes that are promising regions to investigate evolutionary responses to rapid environmental change in C. robusta.

  12. Genetic signatures of natural selection in a model invasive ascidian

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yaping; Chen, Yiyong; Yi, Changho; Fong, Jonathan J.; Kim, Won; Rius, Marc; Zhan, Aibin

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species represent promising models to study species’ responses to rapidly changing environments. Although local adaptation frequently occurs during contemporary range expansion, the associated genetic signatures at both population and genomic levels remain largely unknown. Here, we use genome-wide gene-associated microsatellites to investigate genetic signatures of natural selection in a model invasive ascidian, Ciona robusta. Population genetic analyses of 150 individuals sampled in Korea, New Zealand, South Africa and Spain showed significant genetic differentiation among populations. Based on outlier tests, we found high incidence of signatures of directional selection at 19 loci. Hitchhiking mapping analyses identified 12 directional selective sweep regions, and all selective sweep windows on chromosomes were narrow (~8.9 kb). Further analyses indentified 132 candidate genes under selection. When we compared our genetic data and six crucial environmental variables, 16 putatively selected loci showed significant correlation with these environmental variables. This suggests that the local environmental conditions have left significant signatures of selection at both population and genomic levels. Finally, we identified “plastic” genomic regions and genes that are promising regions to investigate evolutionary responses to rapid environmental change in C. robusta. PMID:28266616

  13. In situ manufacture of magnetic tunnel junctions by a direct-write process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzi, Barry N.; Riazanova, Anastasia V.; Dan Dahlberg, E.; Belova, Lyubov M.

    2014-06-01

    In situ construction of Co/SiO2/Co magnetic tunnel junctions using direct-write electron-beam-induced deposition is described. Proof-of-concept devices were built layer by layer depositing the specific components one at a time, allowing device manufacture using a strictly additive process. The devices exhibit a magnetic tunneling signature which agrees qualitatively with the Slonczewski model of magnetic tunneling.

  14. Spectral signature selection for mapping unvegetated soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, G. A.; Petersen, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    Airborne multispectral scanner data covering the wavelength interval from 0.40-2.60 microns were collected at an altitude of 1000 m above the terrain in southeastern Pennsylvania. Uniform training areas were selected within three sites from this flightline. Soil samples were collected from each site and a procedure developed to allow assignment of scan line and element number from the multispectral scanner data to each sampling location. These soil samples were analyzed on a spectrophotometer and laboratory spectral signatures were derived. After correcting for solar radiation and atmospheric attenuation, the laboratory signatures were compared to the spectral signatures derived from these same soils using multispectral scanner data. Both signatures were used in supervised and unsupervised classification routines. Computer-generated maps using the laboratory and multispectral scanner derived signatures resulted in maps that were similar to maps resulting from field surveys. Approximately 90% agreement was obtained between classification maps produced using multispectral scanner derived signatures and laboratory derived signatures.

  15. Injuries to law enforcement officers: the backface signature injury.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Marianne; Bir, Cynthia

    2008-01-15

    In today's law enforcement community, one of the most vital tools an officer can possess is personal body armor. However, a recent Department of Justice investigation has raised important questions regarding the protection actually afforded officers through the use of personal body armor, and the current test methods used to assess the armor. Test results show that most Zylon-containing vests showed deformations in excess of the 0101.04 Standard's 44 mm backface signature limit. Such increased deformation can lead to serious injuries, including backface signature injuries, which have occurred in the field. Although the vest is successful in containing the round, it is not effectively dissipating the energy enough to prevent large amounts of vest deformation at the area of impact. Therefore, open, penetrating wounds occur even though the bullet did not penetrate the vest. The objective of the current study was to further define the backface signature injury through the use of case studies and laboratory experiments. Following the case study investigation, backface signature testing was conducted using a clay medium based on the NIJ 0101.04 Standard. The final component of this research involved the use of post-mortem human specimens (PMHS) for further investigation of the backface signature injury. Although the underlying cause of backface signature injuries is unknown, energy density is likely to play a role in the mechanism. Energy density (E/a) is defined as the energy per unit area and has been previously used in less lethal skin penetration research. Further research into the underlying causes of backface signature injuries is necessary. In addition to armor testing, the study of law enforcement personnel who have been shot while wearing soft body armor is also a valuable tool for determining the effectiveness of certification standards. Finally, it is important for medical personnel to recognize the backface signature injury and document this as a type of

  16. Direct characterization of the energy level alignments and molecular components in an organic hetero-junction by integrated photoemission spectroscopy and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Shin, Weon-Ho; Bulliard, Xavier; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Seyun; Chung, Jae Gwan; Kim, Yongsu; Heo, Sung; Kim, Seong Heon

    2016-08-26

    A novel, direct method for the characterization of the energy level alignments at bulk-heterojunction (BHJ)/electrode interfaces on the basis of electronic spectroscopy measurements is proposed. The home-made in situ photoemission system is used to perform x-ray/ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS/UPS), reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) and inverse photoemission spectroscopy of organic-semiconductors (OSCs) deposited onto a Au substrate. Through this analysis system, we are able to obtain the electronic structures of a boron subphthalocyanine chloride:fullerene (SubPC:C60) BHJ and those of the separate OSC/electrode structures (SubPC/Au and C60/Au). Morphology and chemical composition analyses confirm that the original SubPC and C60 electronic structures remain unchanged in the electrodes prepared. Using this technique, we ascertain that the position and area of the nearest peak to the Fermi energy (EF = 0 eV) in the UPS (REELS) spectra of SubPC:C60 BHJ provide information on the highest occupied molecular orbital level (optical band gap) and combination ratio of the materials, respectively. Thus, extracting the adjusted spectrum from the corresponding SubPC:C60 BHJ UPS (REELS) spectrum reveals its electronic structure, equivalent to that of the C60 materials. This novel analytical approach allows complete energy-level determination for each combination ratio by separating its electronic structure information from the BHJ spectrum.

  17. The nucleoid-associated protein Fis directly modulates the synthesis of cellulose, an essential component of pellicle-biofilms in the phytopathogenic bacterium Dickeya dadantii.

    PubMed

    Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Zghidi-Abouzid, Ouafa; Effantin, Géraldine; Lejeune, Philippe; Reverchon, Sylvie; Nasser, William

    2012-10-01

    Bacteria use biofilm structures to colonize surfaces and to survive in hostile conditions, and numerous bacteria produce cellulose as a biofilm matrix polymer. Hence, expression of the bcs operon, responsible for cellulose biosynthesis, must be finely regulated in order to allow bacteria to adopt the proper surface-associated behaviours. Here we show that in the phytopathogenic bacterium, Dickeya dadantii, production of cellulose is required for pellicle-biofilm formation and resistance to chlorine treatments. Expression of the bcs operon is growth phase-regulated and is stimulated in biofilms. Furthermore, we unexpectedly found that the nucleoid-associated protein and global regulator of virulence functions, Fis, directly represses bcs operon expression by interacting with an operator that is absent from the bcs operon of animal pathogenic bacteria and the plant pathogenic bacterium Pectobacterium. Moreover, production of cellulose enhances plant surface colonization by D. dadantii. Overall, these data suggest that cellulose production and biofilm formation may be important factors for surface colonization by D. dadantii and its subsequent survival in hostile environments. This report also presents a new example of how bacteria can modulate the action of a global regulator to co-ordinate basic metabolism, virulence and modifications of lifestyle. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Air-gun signature modelling considering the influence of mechanical structure factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guofa; Liu, Zhao; Wang, Jianhua; Cao, Mingqiang

    2014-04-01

    In marine seismic prospecting, as the air-gun array is usually composed of different types of air-guns, the signature modelling of different air-guns is particularly important to the array design. Different types of air-guns have different mechanical structures, which directly or indirectly affect the signatures. In order to simulate the influence of the mechanical structure, five parameters—the throttling constant, throttling power law exponent, mass release efficiency, fluid viscosity and heat transfer coefficient—are used in signature modelling. Through minimizing the energy relative error between the simulated and the measured signatures by the simulated annealing method, the five optimal parameters can be estimated. The method is tested in a field experiment, and the consistency between the simulated and the measured signatures is improved with the optimal parameters.

  19. Remotely sensed and laboratory spectral signatures of an ocean-dumped acid waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Collins, V. G.

    1977-01-01

    An ocean-dumped acid waste plume was studied by using a rapid scanning spectrometer to remotely measure ocean radiance from a helicopter. The results of these studies are presented and compared with results from sea truth samples and laboratory experiments. An ocean spectral reflectance signature and a laboratory spectral transmission signature were established for the iron-acid waste pollutant. The spectrally and chemically significant component of the acid waste pollutant was determined to be ferric iron.

  20. Gut microbiota signatures of longevity.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanli; Hua, Yutong; Zeng, Bo; Ning, Ruihong; Li, Ying; Zhao, Jiangchao

    2016-09-26

    An aging global population poses substantial challenges to society [1]. Centenarians are a model for healthy aging because they have reached the extreme limit of life by escaping, surviving, or delaying chronic diseases [2]. The genetics of centenarians have been extensively examined [3], but less is known about their gut microbiotas. Recently, Biagi et al.[4] characterized the gut microbiota in Italian centenarians and semi-supercentenarians. Here, we compare the gut microbiota of Chinese long-living people with younger age groups, and with the results from the Italian population [4], to identify gut-microbial signatures of healthy aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mutational signatures associated with tobacco smoking in human cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Ju, Young Seok; Haase, Kerstin; ...

    2016-11-04

    Tobacco smoking increases the risk of at least 17 classes of cancer. Here, we analyzed somatic mutations and DNA methylation in 5,243 cancers of types for which tobacco smoking confers an elevated risk. Smoking is associated with increased mutation burdens of multiple distinct mutational signatures, which contribute to different extents in different cancers. One of these signatures, mainly found in cancers derived from tissues directly exposed to tobacco smoke, is attributable to misreplication of DNA damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Others likely reflect indirect activation of DNA edi ting by APOBEC cytidine deaminases and of an endogenous clock-like mutational process.more » Smoking is associated with limited differences in methylation. The results are consistent with the proposition that smoking increases cancer risk by increasing the somatic mutation load, although direct evidence for this mechanism is lacking in some smoking-related cancer types.« less

  2. Mutational signatures associated with tobacco smoking in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Ju, Young Seok; Haase, Kerstin

    Tobacco smoking increases the risk of at least 17 classes of cancer. Here, we analyzed somatic mutations and DNA methylation in 5,243 cancers of types for which tobacco smoking confers an elevated risk. Smoking is associated with increased mutation burdens of multiple distinct mutational signatures, which contribute to different extents in different cancers. One of these signatures, mainly found in cancers derived from tissues directly exposed to tobacco smoke, is attributable to misreplication of DNA damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Others likely reflect indirect activation of DNA edi ting by APOBEC cytidine deaminases and of an endogenous clock-like mutational process.more » Smoking is associated with limited differences in methylation. The results are consistent with the proposition that smoking increases cancer risk by increasing the somatic mutation load, although direct evidence for this mechanism is lacking in some smoking-related cancer types.« less

  3. Gene-expression signatures of Atlantic salmon's plastic life cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aubin-Horth, N.; Letcher, B.H.; Hofmann, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    How genomic expression differs as a function of life history variation is largely unknown. Atlantic salmon exhibits extreme alternative life histories. We defined the gene-expression signatures of wild-caught salmon at two different life stages by comparing the brain expression profiles of mature sneaker males and immature males, and early migrants and late migrants. In addition to life-stage-specific signatures, we discovered a surprisingly large gene set that was differentially regulated-at similar magnitudes, yet in opposite direction-in both life history transitions. We suggest that this co-variation is not a consequence of many independent cellular and molecular switches in the same direction but rather represents the molecular equivalent of a physiological shift orchestrated by one or very few master regulators. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene-expression signatures of Atlantic salmon's plastic life cycle.

    PubMed

    Aubin-Horth, Nadia; Letcher, Benjamin H; Hofmann, Hans A

    2009-09-15

    How genomic expression differs as a function of life history variation is largely unknown. Atlantic salmon exhibits extreme alternative life histories. We defined the gene-expression signatures of wild-caught salmon at two different life stages by comparing the brain expression profiles of mature sneaker males and immature males, and early migrants and late migrants. In addition to life-stage-specific signatures, we discovered a surprisingly large gene set that was differentially regulated-at similar magnitudes, yet in opposite direction-in both life history transitions. We suggest that this co-variation is not a consequence of many independent cellular and molecular switches in the same direction but rather represents the molecular equivalent of a physiological shift orchestrated by one or very few master regulators.

  5. ADAGE signature analysis: differential expression analysis with data-defined gene sets.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jie; Huyck, Matthew; Hu, Dongbo; Zelaya, René A; Hogan, Deborah A; Greene, Casey S

    2017-11-22

    Gene set enrichment analysis and overrepresentation analyses are commonly used methods to determine the biological processes affected by a differential expression experiment. This approach requires biologically relevant gene sets, which are currently curated manually, limiting their availability and accuracy in many organisms without extensively curated resources. New feature learning approaches can now be paired with existing data collections to directly extract functional gene sets from big data. Here we introduce a method to identify perturbed processes. In contrast with methods that use curated gene sets, this approach uses signatures extracted from public expression data. We first extract expression signatures from public data using ADAGE, a neural network-based feature extraction approach. We next identify signatures that are differentially active under a given treatment. Our results demonstrate that these signatures represent biological processes that are perturbed by the experiment. Because these signatures are directly learned from data without supervision, they can identify uncurated or novel biological processes. We implemented ADAGE signature analysis for the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. For the convenience of different user groups, we implemented both an R package (ADAGEpath) and a web server ( http://adage.greenelab.com ) to run these analyses. Both are open-source to allow easy expansion to other organisms or signature generation methods. We applied ADAGE signature analysis to an example dataset in which wild-type and ∆anr mutant cells were grown as biofilms on the Cystic Fibrosis genotype bronchial epithelial cells. We mapped active signatures in the dataset to KEGG pathways and compared with pathways identified using GSEA. The two approaches generally return consistent results; however, ADAGE signature analysis also identified a signature that revealed the molecularly supported link between the MexT regulon and Anr. We designed

  6. Uncovering the Hidden Molecular Signatures of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    that! synergy! between! the! oncogene!MET!and!loss!of!p53!(tumor! protein !p53)!lead!to!a!tumor!phenotype!that! reflects! the! human! claudinDlow...membrane! protein ! levels! increase! continuously! in! accordance.! This! increase! has! been! directly! linked! to! a! corresponding! change! in...the!ESR! protein ! (Figure!1).!Alternatively,!a!signature!may! order!patients!in!such!a!way!that!associations!can!be!made!with!a!variety!of!other

  7. Hot gas path component

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Kottilingam, Srikanth Chandrudu; Porter, Christopher Donald

    Various embodiments of the disclosure include a turbomachine component. and methods of forming such a component. Some embodiments include a turbomachine component including: a first portion including at least one of a stainless steel or an alloy steel; and a second portion joined with the first portion, the second portion including a nickel alloy including an arced cooling feature extending therethrough, the second portion having a thermal expansion coefficient substantially similar to a thermal expansion coefficient of the first portion, wherein the arced cooling feature is located within the second portion to direct a portion of a coolant to amore » leakage area of the turbomachine component.« less

  8. How can the English-language scientific literature be made more accessible to non-native speakers? Journals should allow greater use of referenced direct quotations in 'component-oriented' scientific writing.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    In scientific writing, although clarity and precision of language are vital to effective communication, it seems undeniable that content is more important than form. Potentially valuable knowledge should not be excluded from the scientific literature merely because the researchers lack advanced language skills. Given that global scientific literature is overwhelmingly in the English-language, this presents a problem for non-native speakers. My proposal is that scientists should be permitted to construct papers using a substantial number of direct quotations from the already-published scientific literature. Quotations would need to be explicitly referenced so that the original author and publication should be given full credit for creating such a useful and valid description. At the extreme, this might result in a paper consisting mainly of a 'mosaic' of quotations from the already existing scientific literature, which are linked and extended by relatively few sentences comprising new data or ideas. This model bears some conceptual relationship to the recent trend in computing science for component-based or component-oriented software engineering - in which new programs are constructed by reusing programme components, which may be available in libraries. A new functionality is constructed by linking-together many pre-existing chunks of software. I suggest that journal editors should, in their instructions to authors, explicitly allow this 'component-oriented' method of constructing scientific articles; and carefully describe how it can be accomplished in such a way that proper referencing is enforced, and full credit is allocated to the authors of the reused linguistic components.

  9. Theoretical Characterizaiton of Visual Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinski, D. O.; Chase, G. M.; di Nallo, O. E.; Scales, A. N.; Vanderley, D. L.; Byrd, E. F. C.

    2015-05-01

    We are investigating the accuracy of theoretical models used to predict the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared spectra, as well as other properties, of product materials ejected from the muzzle of currently fielded systems. Recent advances in solid propellants has made the management of muzzle signature (flash) a principle issue in weapons development across the calibers. A priori prediction of the electromagnetic spectra of formulations will allow researchers to tailor blends that yield desired signatures and determine spectrographic detection ranges. Quantum chemistry methods at various levels of sophistication have been employed to optimize molecular geometries, compute unscaled vibrational frequencies, and determine the optical spectra of specific gas-phase species. Electronic excitations are being computed using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT). A full statistical analysis and reliability assessment of computational results is currently underway. A comparison of theoretical results to experimental values found in the literature is used to assess any affects of functional choice and basis set on calculation accuracy. The status of this work will be presented at the conference. Work supported by the ARL, DoD HPCMP, and USMA.

  10. Search for Olivine Spectral Signatures on the Surface of Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palomba, E.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Farina, M.; Frigeri, A.; Longobardo, A.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of olivines on Vesta were first postulated from traditional petrogenetic models which suggest the formation of olivine as lower crustal cumulates. An indirect confirmation is given by their presence as a minor component in some samples of diogenite meteorites, the harzburgitic diogenites and the dunitic diogenites, and as olivine mineral clasts in howardites. Another indication for this mineral was given by interpretations of groundbased and Hubble Space Telescope observations that suggested the presence of local olivine-bearing units on the surface of Vesta. The VIR instrument onboard the DAWN mission has been mapping Vesta since July 2011. VIR acquired hyperspectral images of Vesta s surface in the wavelength range from 0.25 to 5.1 m during Approach, Survey and High Altitude Mapping (HAMO) orbits that allowed a 2/3 of the entire asteroid surface to be mapped. The VIR operative spectral interval, resolution and coverage is suitable for the detection and mapping of any olivine rich regions that may occur on the Vesta surface. The abundance of olivine in diogenites is typically lower than 10% but some samples richer in olivine are known. However, we do not expect to have extensive exposures of olivine-rich material on Vesta. Moreover, the partial overlap of olivine and pyroxene spectral signatures will make olivine difficult to detect. Different spectral parameters have been used to map olivine on extraterrestrial bodies, and here we discuss the different approaches used, and develop new ones specifically for Vesta. Our new methods are based on combinations of the spectral parameters relative to the 1 and 2 micron bands (the most prominent spectral features of Vesta surface in the visible and the infrared), such as band center locations, band depths, band areas, band area ratios. Before the direct application to the VIR data, the efficiency of each approach is evaluated by means of analysis of laboratory spectra of HED meteorites, pyroxenes, olivines

  11. Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems

    DOEpatents

    EerNisse, Errol P.; Land, Cecil E.; Snelling, Jay B.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

  12. Secure Obfuscation for Encrypted Group Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hongfei; Liu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, group signature techniques are widely used in constructing privacy-preserving security schemes for various information systems. However, conventional techniques keep the schemes secure only in normal black-box attack contexts. In other words, these schemes suppose that (the implementation of) the group signature generation algorithm is running in a platform that is perfectly protected from various intrusions and attacks. As a complementary to existing studies, how to generate group signatures securely in a more austere security context, such as a white-box attack context, is studied in this paper. We use obfuscation as an approach to acquire a higher level of security. Concretely, we introduce a special group signature functionality-an encrypted group signature, and then provide an obfuscator for the proposed functionality. A series of new security notions for both the functionality and its obfuscator has been introduced. The most important one is the average-case secure virtual black-box property w.r.t. dependent oracles and restricted dependent oracles which captures the requirement of protecting the output of the proposed obfuscator against collision attacks from group members. The security notions fit for many other specialized obfuscators, such as obfuscators for identity-based signatures, threshold signatures and key-insulated signatures. Finally, the correctness and security of the proposed obfuscator have been proven. Thereby, the obfuscated encrypted group signature functionality can be applied to variants of privacy-preserving security schemes and enhance the security level of these schemes. PMID:26167686

  13. Characteristic vector analysis as a technique for signature extraction of remote ocean color data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grew, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Characteristic vector analysis is being used to extract spectral signatures of suspended matter in the ocean from remote ocean color data collected with MOCS (Multichannel Ocean Color Sensor), a multispectral scanner. Spectral signatures appear to be obtainable either directly from characteristic vectors or through a transformation of these eigenvectors. Quantification of the suspended matter associated with each resulting signature seems feasible using associated coefficients generated by the technique. This paper presents eigenvectors associated with algae, 'sediment', acid waste, sewage sludge, and oil. The results suggest an efficient method of transmitting from satellites multispectral data of pollution in our oceans.

  14. How to Assess the Signature of the Data: Catchments and Aquifers as Input Processing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischeid, G.

    2010-12-01

    It has been argued recently that hydrological models should not only mimic observed data, but should reproduce the signatures of the data appropriately. However, there is no consent how these signatures could be assessed. In general, hydrological models aim at predicting groundwater head dynamics or hydrograph response to input signals (e.g., groundwater recharge, effective rain), based on information about structural properties of the system, like e.g., transmissivity fields, soil hydraulic conductivity, or size of the catchment water storage. That approach usually faces substantial spatial heterogeneities and nonlinear feedbacks. Here, an alternative approach is suggested for characterizing catchments or aquifers as input signal processing systems. The concept was developed for remote areas where direct anthropogenic effects (groundwater withdrawal, injection wells, etc.), plant water uptake and evaporation from groundwater and streams are negligible. Then, any increase of groundwater head or discharge is related to a corresponding input signal, i.e., groundwater recharge or effective rainfall. That signal propagates through the system and is increasingly attenuated and decelerated with increasing flowpath length. This attenuation differs from simple low-pass-filtering. E.g., different input signals propagate at different velocities, depending on rainfall intensity, antecedent soil moisture, etc. The new approach is based on a principal component analysis of time series of groundwater or lake water level, soil water content, or discharge at different sites. This information is used to for assessing the functional properties of the system rather than its structural heterogeneity at different measurement sites, and to assess first order controls on its spatial patterns. Thus, hydrologic measurements provide a mean to measure the functional properties of the system. It is suggested to use this as signatures of the data. In a next step, model structure can be

  15. Fluid signatures of rotational discontinuities at Earth's magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Fluid signatures in the MHD approximation at rotational discontinuities (RD) of finite width called rotational shear layers (RSL) are examined for general flow and magnetic geometries. Analytical and geometrical arguments illustrate that the fluid speed can either go up or down across an RSL for a fixed normal mass flux. The speed profile may or may not be monotonic depending on the boundary conditions. The flow velocity may or may not be field aligned or ""jetting'' as a result of traversing the RSL. In general, significant ""convection'' is expected in the layer. The observable signatures of (MHD) RSL's depend on 7 (boundary condition) parameters are (1) the mass density, (2 to 5) the incident normal and transverse components of the magnetic field and fluid velocity, (6) the angle epsilon between the incident tangential flow velocity and tangential magnetic field, and (7) the size of the magnetic angular rotation implemented by the layer delta phi.

  16. Distinguishing signatures of determinism and stochasticity in spiking complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Aragoneses, Andrés; Rubido, Nicolás; Tiana-Alsina, Jordi; Torrent, M. C.; Masoller, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    We describe a method to infer signatures of determinism and stochasticity in the sequence of apparently random intensity dropouts emitted by a semiconductor laser with optical feedback. The method uses ordinal time-series analysis to classify experimental data of inter-dropout-intervals (IDIs) in two categories that display statistically significant different features. Despite the apparent randomness of the dropout events, one IDI category is consistent with waiting times in a resting state until noise triggers a dropout, and the other is consistent with dropouts occurring during the return to the resting state, which have a clear deterministic component. The method we describe can be a powerful tool for inferring signatures of determinism in the dynamics of complex systems in noisy environments, at an event-level description of their dynamics.

  17. Early forest fire detection using principal component analysis of infrared video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghri, John A.; Radjabi, Ryan; Jacobs, John T.

    2011-09-01

    A land-based early forest fire detection scheme which exploits the infrared (IR) temporal signature of fire plume is described. Unlike common land-based and/or satellite-based techniques which rely on measurement and discrimination of fire plume directly from its infrared and/or visible reflectance imagery, this scheme is based on exploitation of fire plume temporal signature, i.e., temperature fluctuations over the observation period. The method is simple and relatively inexpensive to implement. The false alarm rate is expected to be lower that of the existing methods. Land-based infrared (IR) cameras are installed in a step-stare-mode configuration in potential fire-prone areas. The sequence of IR video frames from each camera is digitally processed to determine if there is a fire within camera's field of view (FOV). The process involves applying a principal component transformation (PCT) to each nonoverlapping sequence of video frames from the camera to produce a corresponding sequence of temporally-uncorrelated principal component (PC) images. Since pixels that form a fire plume exhibit statistically similar temporal variation (i.e., have a unique temporal signature), PCT conveniently renders the footprint/trace of the fire plume in low-order PC images. The PC image which best reveals the trace of the fire plume is then selected and spatially filtered via simple threshold and median filter operations to remove the background clutter, such as traces of moving tree branches due to wind.

  18. Brain components

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  19. Metabolic Signatures of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Martin T.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Djukovic, Danijel; Hoffman, Noah G.; Raftery, Daniel; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by shifts in the vaginal microbiota from Lactobacillus dominant to a microbiota with diverse anaerobic bacteria. Few studies have linked specific metabolites with bacteria found in the human vagina. Here, we report dramatic differences in metabolite compositions and concentrations associated with BV using a global metabolomics approach. We further validated important metabolites using samples from a second cohort of women and a different platform to measure metabolites. In the primary study, we compared metabolite profiles in cervicovaginal lavage fluid from 40 women with BV and 20 women without BV. Vaginal bacterial representation was determined using broad-range PCR with pyrosequencing and concentrations of bacteria by quantitative PCR. We detected 279 named biochemicals; levels of 62% of metabolites were significantly different in women with BV. Unsupervised clustering of metabolites separated women with and without BV. Women with BV have metabolite profiles marked by lower concentrations of amino acids and dipeptides, concomitant with higher levels of amino acid catabolites and polyamines. Higher levels of the signaling eicosanoid 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), a biomarker for inflammation, were noted in BV. Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii exhibited similar metabolite correlation patterns, which were distinct from correlation patterns exhibited by BV-associated bacteria. Several metabolites were significantly associated with clinical signs and symptoms (Amsel criteria) used to diagnose BV, and no metabolite was associated with all four clinical criteria. BV has strong metabolic signatures across multiple metabolic pathways, and these signatures are associated with the presence and concentrations of particular bacteria. PMID:25873373

  20. 21 CFR 11.70 - Signature/record linking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature/record linking. 11.70 Section 11.70 Food... RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Records § 11.70 Signature/record linking. Electronic signatures and handwritten signatures executed to electronic records shall be linked to their respective...

  1. E-learning platform for automated testing of electronic circuits using signature analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherghina, Cǎtǎlina; Bacivarov, Angelica; Bacivarov, Ioan C.; Petricǎ, Gabriel

    2016-12-01

    Dependability of electronic circuits can be ensured only through testing of circuit modules. This is done by generating test vectors and their application to the circuit. Testability should be viewed as a concerted effort to ensure maximum efficiency throughout the product life cycle, from conception and design stage, through production to repairs during products operating. In this paper, is presented the platform developed by authors for training for testability in electronics, in general and in using signature analysis method, in particular. The platform allows highlighting the two approaches in the field namely analog and digital signature of circuits. As a part of this e-learning platform, it has been developed a database for signatures of different electronic components meant to put into the spotlight different techniques implying fault detection, and from this there were also self-repairing techniques of the systems with this kind of components. An approach for realizing self-testing circuits based on MATLAB environment and using signature analysis method is proposed. This paper analyses the benefits of signature analysis method and simulates signature analyzer performance based on the use of pseudo-random sequences, too.

  2. Comparing performance of standard and iterative linear unmixing methods for hyperspectral signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gault, Travis R.; Jansen, Melissa E.; DeCoster, Mallory E.; Jansing, E. David; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    Linear unmixing is a method of decomposing a mixed signature to determine the component materials that are present in sensor's field of view, along with the abundances at which they occur. Linear unmixing assumes that energy from the materials in the field of view is mixed in a linear fashion across the spectrum of interest. Traditional unmixing methods can take advantage of adjacent pixels in the decomposition algorithm, but is not the case for point sensors. This paper explores several iterative and non-iterative methods for linear unmixing, and examines their effectiveness at identifying the individual signatures that make up simulated single pixel mixed signatures, along with their corresponding abundances. The major hurdle addressed in the proposed method is that no neighboring pixel information is available for the spectral signature of interest. Testing is performed using two collections of spectral signatures from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory's Signatures Database software (SigDB): a hand-selected small dataset of 25 distinct signatures from a larger dataset of approximately 1600 pure visible/near-infrared/short-wave-infrared (VIS/NIR/SWIR) spectra. Simulated spectra are created with three and four material mixtures randomly drawn from a dataset originating from SigDB, where the abundance of one material is swept in 10% increments from 10% to 90%with the abundances of the other materials equally divided amongst the remainder. For the smaller dataset of 25 signatures, all combinations of three or four materials are used to create simulated spectra, from which the accuracy of materials returned, as well as the correctness of the abundances, is compared to the inputs. The experiment is expanded to include the signatures from the larger dataset of almost 1600 signatures evaluated using a Monte Carlo scheme with 5000 draws of three or four materials to create the simulated mixed signatures. The spectral similarity of the inputs to the

  3. Heart energy signature spectrogram for cardiovascular diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kudriavtsev, Vladimir; Polyshchuk, Vladimir; Roy, Douglas L

    2007-01-01

    A new method and application is proposed to characterize intensity and pitch of human heart sounds and murmurs. Using recorded heart sounds from the library of one of the authors, a visual map of heart sound energy was established. Both normal and abnormal heart sound recordings were studied. Representation is based on Wigner-Ville joint time-frequency transformations. The proposed methodology separates acoustic contributions of cardiac events simultaneously in pitch, time and energy. The resolution accuracy is superior to any other existing spectrogram method. The characteristic energy signature of the innocent heart murmur in a child with the S3 sound is presented. It allows clear detection of S1, S2 and S3 sounds, S2 split, systolic murmur, and intensity of these components. The original signal, heart sound power change with time, time-averaged frequency, energy density spectra and instantaneous variations of power and frequency/pitch with time, are presented. These data allow full quantitative characterization of heart sounds and murmurs. High accuracy in both time and pitch resolution is demonstrated. Resulting visual images have self-referencing quality, whereby individual features and their changes become immediately obvious. PMID:17480232

  4. A neural signature of the unique hues

    PubMed Central

    Forder, Lewis; Bosten, Jenny; He, Xun; Franklin, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Since at least the 17th century there has been the idea that there are four simple and perceptually pure “unique” hues: red, yellow, green, and blue, and that all other hues are perceived as mixtures of these four hues. However, sustained scientific investigation has not yet provided solid evidence for a neural representation that separates the unique hues from other colors. We measured event-related potentials elicited from unique hues and the ‘intermediate’ hues in between them. We find a neural signature of the unique hues 230 ms after stimulus onset at a post-perceptual stage of visual processing. Specifically, the posterior P2 component over the parieto-occipital lobe peaked significantly earlier for the unique than for the intermediate hues (Z = −2.9, p = 0.004). Having identified a neural marker for unique hues, fundamental questions about the contribution of neural hardwiring, language and environment to the unique hues can now be addressed. PMID:28186142

  5. 5 CFR 850.106 - Electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electronic signatures. 850.106 Section... (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION General Provisions § 850.106 Electronic signatures. (a) Subject to any provisions prescribed by the Director under § 850.104— (1) An electronic communication may be...

  6. 5 CFR 850.106 - Electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electronic signatures. 850.106 Section... (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION General Provisions § 850.106 Electronic signatures. (a) Subject to any provisions prescribed by the Director under § 850.104— (1) An electronic communication may be...

  7. 5 CFR 850.106 - Electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electronic signatures. 850.106 Section... (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION General Provisions § 850.106 Electronic signatures. (a) Subject to any provisions prescribed by the Director under § 850.104— (1) An electronic communication may be...

  8. 5 CFR 850.106 - Electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic signatures. 850.106 Section... (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION General Provisions § 850.106 Electronic signatures. (a) Subject to any provisions prescribed by the Director under § 850.104— (1) An electronic communication may be...

  9. 5 CFR 850.106 - Electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electronic signatures. 850.106 Section... (CONTINUED) ELECTRONIC RETIREMENT PROCESSING General Provisions § 850.106 Electronic signatures. (a) Subject to any provisions prescribed by the Director under § 850.104— (1) An electronic communication may be...

  10. 15 CFR 908.16 - Signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signature. 908.16 Section 908.16 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC... SUBMITTING REPORTS ON WEATHER MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES § 908.16 Signature. All reports filed with the National...

  11. Does Social Work Have a Signature Pedagogy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earls Larrison, Tara; Korr, Wynne S.

    2013-01-01

    This article contributes to discourse on signature pedagogy by reconceptualizing how our pedagogies are understood and defined for social work education. We critique the view that field education is social work's signature pedagogy and consider what pedagogies are distinct about the teaching and learning of social work. Using Shulman's…

  12. 12 CFR 269b.731 - Signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signature. 269b.731 Section 269b.731 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM CHARGES OF UNFAIR LABOR PRACTICES General Rules § 269b.731 Signature. The original of each document filed shall be...

  13. The Pedagogic Signature of the Teaching Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiel, Ewald; Lerche, Thomas; Kollmannsberger, Markus; Oubaid, Viktor; Weiss, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Lee S. Shulman deplores that the field of education as a profession does not have a pedagogic signature, which he characterizes as a synthesis of cognitive, practical and moral apprenticeship. In this context, the following study has three goals: 1) In the first theoretical part, the basic problems of constructing a pedagogic signature are…

  14. 48 CFR 4.102 - Contractor's signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contractor's signature. 4.102 Section 4.102 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contract Execution 4.102 Contractor's signature. (a) Individuals. A contract with an...

  15. Generation of signature databases with fast codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Robert A.; Woodling, Arthur E.; Brazzell, James S.

    1990-09-01

    Using the FASTSIG signature code to generate optical signature databases for the Ground-based Surveillance and Traking System (GSTS) Program has improved the efficiency of the database generation process. The goal of the current GSTS database is to provide standardized, threat representative target signatures that can easily be used for acquisition and trk studies, discrimination algorithm development, and system simulations. Large databases, with as many as eight interpolalion parameters, are required to maintain the fidelity demands of discrimination and to generalize their application to other strateg systems. As the need increases for quick availability of long wave infrared (LWIR) target signatures for an evolving design4o-threat, FASTSIG has become a database generation alternative to using the industry standard OptiCal Signatures Code (OSC). FASTSIG, developed in 1985 to meet the unique strategic systems demands imposed by the discrimination function, has the significant advantage of being a faster running signature code than the OSC, typically requiring two percent of the cpu time. It uses analytical approximations to model axisymmetric targets, with the fidelity required for discrimination analysis. Access of the signature database is accomplished through use of the waveband integration and interpolation software, INTEG and SIGNAT. This paper gives details of this procedure as well as sample interpolated signatures and also covers sample verification by comparison to the OSC, in order to establish the fidelity of the FASTSIG generated database.

  16. Dance Critique as Signature Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    The curriculum of preprofessional university degree programs in dance typically comprise four components: theory and history, dance technique, creative process, and performance. This article focuses on critique in the modern dance technique and choreography components of the dance curriculum. Bachelor of Fine Arts programs utilize critique as a…

  17. The topographic signature of anthropogenic geomorphic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarolli, P.; Sofia, G.

    2014-12-01

    Within an abiotic-dominated context, geomorphologic patterns and dynamics are single expressions of trade-offs between the physical resistance forces, and the mechanical and chemical forces related to climate and erosion. Recently, however, it has become essential for the geomorphological community to take into account also biota as a fundamental geomorphologic agent acting from local to regional scales. However, while there is a recent flourishing literature about the impacts of vegetation on geomorphic processes, the study of anthropogenic pressure on geomorphology is still at its early stages. Humans are indeed among the most prominent geomorphic agents, redistributing land surface, and causing drastic changes to the geomorphic organization of the landscape (e.g. intensive agriculture, urbanization), with direct consequences on land degradation and watershed response. The reconstruction or identification of artificial or anthropogenic topographies, therefore, provides a mechanism for quantifying anthropogenic changes to the landscape systems in the context of the Anthropocene epoch. High-resolution topographic data derived from the recent remote sensing technologies (e.g. lidar, SAR, SfM), offer now new opportunities to recognize better understand geomorphic processes from topographic signatures, especially in engineered landscapes where the direct anthropic alteration of processes is significant. It is possible indeed to better recognize human-induced geomorphic and anthropogenic features (e.g. road networks, agricultural terraces), and the connected erosion. The study presented here may allow improved understanding and targeted mitigation of the processes driving geomorphic changes during urban development and help guide future research directions for development-based watershed studies. Human society is deeply affecting the environment with consequences on the landscape. It is therefore fundamental to establish greater management control over the Earth

  18. A relativistic signature in large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Bertacca, Daniele; Bruni, Marco; Koyama, Kazuya; Maartens, Roy; Matarrese, Sabino; Sasaki, Misao; Verde, Licia; Wands, David

    2016-09-01

    In General Relativity, the constraint equation relating metric and density perturbations is inherently nonlinear, leading to an effective non-Gaussianity in the dark matter density field on large scales-even if the primordial metric perturbation is Gaussian. Intrinsic non-Gaussianity in the large-scale dark matter overdensity in GR is real and physical. However, the variance smoothed on a local physical scale is not correlated with the large-scale curvature perturbation, so that there is no relativistic signature in the galaxy bias when using the simplest model of bias. It is an open question whether the observable mass proxies such as luminosity or weak lensing correspond directly to the physical mass in the simple halo bias model. If not, there may be observables that encode this relativistic signature.

  19. Experimental measurement-device-independent quantum digital signatures.

    PubMed

    Roberts, G L; Lucamarini, M; Yuan, Z L; Dynes, J F; Comandar, L C; Sharpe, A W; Shields, A J; Curty, M; Puthoor, I V; Andersson, E

    2017-10-23

    The development of quantum networks will be paramount towards practical and secure telecommunications. These networks will need to sign and distribute information between many parties with information-theoretic security, requiring both quantum digital signatures (QDS) and quantum key distribution (QKD). Here, we introduce and experimentally realise a quantum network architecture, where the nodes are fully connected using a minimum amount of physical links. The central node of the network can act either as a totally untrusted relay, connecting the end users via the recently introduced measurement-device-independent (MDI)-QKD, or as a trusted recipient directly communicating with the end users via QKD. Using this network, we perform a proof-of-principle demonstration of QDS mediated by MDI-QKD. For that, we devised an efficient protocol to distil multiple signatures from the same block of data, thus reducing the statistical fluctuations in the sample and greatly enhancing the final QDS rate in the finite-size scenario.

  20. Noble Gas signatures of Enhanced Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P. H.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Tyne, R. L.; Hillegonds, D.; Byrne, D. J.; Landon, M. K.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Noble gases are powerful tracers of fluids from various oil and gas production activities in hydrocarbon reservoirs and nearby groundwater. Non-radiogenic noble gases are introduced into undisturbed oil and natural gas reservoirs through exchange with formation waters [1-3]. Reservoirs with extensive hydraulic fracturing, injection for enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and/or waste disposal also show evidence for a component of noble gases introduced from air [4]. Isotopic and elemental ratios of noble gases can be used to 1) assess the migration history of the injected and formation fluids, and 2) determine the extent of exchange between multiphase fluids in different reservoirs. We present noble gas isotope and abundance data from casing, separator and injectate gases of the Lost Hills and Fruitvale oil fields in the San Joaquin basin, California. Samples were collected as part of the California State Water Resource Control Board's Oil and Gas Regional Groundwater Monitoring Program. Lost Hills (n=7) and Fruitvale (n=2) gases are geochemically distinct and duplicate samples are highly reproducible. Lost Hills casing gas samples were collected from areas where EOR and hydraulic fracturing has occurred in the past several years, and from areas where EOR is absent. The Fruitvale samples were collected from a re-injection port. All samples are radiogenic in their He isotopes, typical of a crustal environment, and show enrichments in heavy noble gases, resulting from preferential adsorption on sediments. Fruitvale samples reflect air-like surface conditions, with higher air-derived noble gas concentrations. Lost Hills gases show a gradation from pristine crustal signatures - indicative of closed-system exchange with formation fluids - to strongly air-contaminated signatures in the EOR region. Pristine samples can be used to determine the extent of hydrocarbon exchange with fluids, whereas samples with excess air can be used to quantify the extent of EOR. Determining noble

  1. 48 CFR 804.101 - Contracting officer's signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... signature. 804.101 Section 804.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contract Execution 804.101 Contracting officer's signature. (a) If a... signature. ...

  2. Mitigating flood exposure: Reducing disaster risk and trauma signature.

    PubMed

    Shultz, James M; McLean, Andrew; Herberman Mash, Holly B; Rosen, Alexa; Kelly, Fiona; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Youngs, Georgia A; Jensen, Jessica; Bernal, Oscar; Neria, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. In 2011, following heavy winter snowfall, two cities bordering two rivers in North Dakota, USA faced major flood threats. Flooding was foreseeable and predictable although the extent of risk was uncertain. One community, Fargo, situated in a shallow river basin, successfully mitigated and prevented flooding. For the other community, Minot, located in a deep river valley, prevention was not possible and downtown businesses and one-quarter of the homes were inundated, in the city's worst flood on record. We aimed at contrasting the respective hazards, vulnerabilities, stressors, psychological risk factors, psychosocial consequences, and disaster risk reduction strategies under conditions where flood prevention was, and was not, possible. Methods . We applied the "trauma signature analysis" (TSIG) approach to compare the hazard profiles, identify salient disaster stressors, document the key components of disaster risk reduction response, and examine indicators of community resilience. Results . Two demographically-comparable communities, Fargo and Minot, faced challenging river flood threats and exhibited effective coordination across community sectors. We examined the implementation of disaster risk reduction strategies in situations where coordinated citizen action was able to prevent disaster impact (hazard avoidance) compared to the more common scenario when unpreventable disaster strikes, causing destruction, harm, and distress. Across a range of indicators, it is clear that successful mitigation diminishes both physical and psychological impact, thereby reducing the trauma signature of the event. Conclusion . In contrast to experience of historic flooding in Minot, the city of Fargo succeeded in reducing the trauma signature by way of reducing risk through mitigation.

  3. Energetic particle signatures of satellites and rings in Neptune's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Stone, E. C.

    1992-01-01

    The cosmic ray system on Voyager 2 found a trapped radiation environment in Neptune's inner magnetosphere which is controlled primarily by absorption at the rings and satellite surfaces. The intensity of electrons with kinetic energies approximately greater than 1 MeV shows particularly strong and narrow signatures associated with absorption by the satellite 1989N1 at an orbital radius of 4.75 Neptune radii. Closer to the planet are several signatures of the inner satellites and rings. Absorption limits the intensity of the inner radiation belt sufficiently for the maximum intensity to occur outside the orbit of 1989N1 at a magnetic L shell of about 7. Radial profiles of the electron phase space density show that electrons diffuse inward from a source in the outer magnetosphere. Many of the inward-diffusing electrons are absorbed upon reaching a satellite orbital radius, but the finite absorption efficiency allows some of the electrons to pass by unaffected. The locations of the satellite and ring signatures also provide constraints on the nondipolar components of the planetary magnetic field.

  4. On the information content of hydrological signatures and their relationship to catchment attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addor, Nans; Clark, Martyn P.; Prieto, Cristina; Newman, Andrew J.; Mizukami, Naoki; Nearing, Grey; Le Vine, Nataliya

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological signatures, which are indices characterizing hydrologic behavior, are increasingly used for the evaluation, calibration and selection of hydrological models. Their key advantage is to provide more direct insights into specific hydrological processes than aggregated metrics (e.g., the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency). A plethora of signatures now exists, which enable characterizing a variety of hydrograph features, but also makes the selection of signatures for new studies challenging. Here we propose that the selection of signatures should be based on their information content, which we estimated using several approaches, all leading to similar conclusions. To explore the relationship between hydrological signatures and the landscape, we extended a previously published data set of hydrometeorological time series for 671 catchments in the contiguous United States, by characterizing the climatic conditions, topography, soil, vegetation and stream network of each catchment. This new catchment attributes data set will soon be in open access, and we are looking forward to introducing it to the community. We used this data set in a data-learning algorithm (random forests) to explore whether hydrological signatures could be inferred from catchment attributes alone. We find that some signatures can be predicted remarkably well by random forests and, interestingly, the same signatures are well captured when simulating discharge using a conceptual hydrological model. We discuss what this result reveals about our understanding of hydrological processes shaping hydrological signatures. We also identify which catchment attributes exert the strongest control on catchment behavior, in particular during extreme hydrological events. Overall, climatic attributes have the most significant influence, and strongly condition how well hydrological signatures can be predicted by random forests and simulated by the hydrological model. In contrast, soil characteristics at the

  5. Discrete Neural Signatures of Basic Emotions.

    PubMed

    Saarimäki, Heini; Gotsopoulos, Athanasios; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Lampinen, Jouko; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Hari, Riitta; Sams, Mikko; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2016-06-01

    Categorical models of emotions posit neurally and physiologically distinct human basic emotions. We tested this assumption by using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) to classify brain activity patterns of 6 basic emotions (disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, anger, and surprise) in 3 experiments. Emotions were induced with short movies or mental imagery during functional magnetic resonance imaging. MVPA accurately classified emotions induced by both methods, and the classification generalized from one induction condition to another and across individuals. Brain regions contributing most to the classification accuracy included medial and inferior lateral prefrontal cortices, frontal pole, precentral and postcentral gyri, precuneus, and posterior cingulate cortex. Thus, specific neural signatures across these regions hold representations of different emotional states in multimodal fashion, independently of how the emotions are induced. Similarity of subjective experiences between emotions was associated with similarity of neural patterns for the same emotions, suggesting a direct link between activity in these brain regions and the subjective emotional experience. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor Charles H. Kruger, with Dr. Christophe O. Laux as Associate Investigator. The goal of this research was to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this end, spectral measurements and modeling were made of the radiation emitted between 2.4 and 5.5 micrometers by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3000 K. The objective was to examine the spectral emission of air species including nitric oxide, atomic oxygen and nitrogen lines, molecular and atomic continua, as well as secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperatures, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8x10(exp -4).

  7. Observational Signatures of Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Einaudi, G.; Ugarte-Urra, I.; Warren, H. P.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Velli, M.; Taylor, B.

    2016-12-01

    Recent research on observational signatures of turbulent heating of a coronal loop will be discussed. The evolution of the loop is is studied by means of numericalsimulations of the fully compressible three-dimensionalmagnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. HYPERION calculates the full energy cycle involving footpoint convection, magnetic reconnection,nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation.The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are convected by random photospheric motions. As a consequence the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is non-uniformly distributed so that only a fraction of thecoronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales which, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of the simulated loop is multi-thermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands arescattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Typical simulated coronal loops are 50000 km length and have axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 Tesla.To connect these simulations to observations the computed numberdensities and temperatures are used to synthesize the intensities expected inemission lines typically observed with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer(EIS) on Hinode. These intensities are then employed to compute differentialemission measure distributions, which are found to be very similar to those derivedfrom observations of solar active regions.

  8. (abstract) Topographic Signatures in Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.; Evans, Diane L.

    1996-01-01

    Topographic information is required for many Earth Science investigations. For example, topography is an important element in regional and global geomorphic studies because it reflects the interplay between the climate-driven processes of erosion and the tectonic processes of uplift. A number of techniques have been developed to analyze digital topographic data, including Fourier texture analysis. A Fourier transform of the topography of an area allows the spatial frequency content of the topography to be analyzed. Band-pass filtering of the transform produces images representing the amplitude of different spatial wavelengths. These are then used in a multi-band classification to map units based on their spatial frequency content. The results using a radar image instead of digital topography showed good correspondence to a geologic map, however brightness variations in the image unrelated to topography caused errors. An additional benefit to the use of Fourier band-pass images for the classification is that the textural signatures of the units are quantative measures of the spatial characteristics of the units that may be used to map similar units in similar environments.

  9. Human relevance of an in vitro gene signature in HaCaT for skin sensitization.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Jochem W; Hodemaekers, Henny; Reus, Astrid A; Maas, Wilfred J M; van Loveren, Henk; Ezendam, Janine

    2015-02-01

    The skin sensitizing potential of chemicals is mainly assessed using animal methods, such as the murine local lymph node assay. Recently, an in vitro assay based on a gene expression signature in the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line was proposed as an alternative to these animal methods. Here, the human relevance of this gene signature is assessed through exposure of freshly isolated human skin to the chemical allergens dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and diphenylcyclopropenone (DCP). In human skin, the gene signature shows similar direction of regulation as was previously observed in vitro, suggesting that the molecular processes that drive expression of these genes are similar between the HaCaT cell line and freshly isolated skin, providing evidence for the human relevance of the gene signature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The standoff aerosol active signature testbed (SAAST) at MIT Lincoln Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jonathan M.; Aldridge, John C.

    2005-11-01

    Standoff LIDAR detection of BW agents depends on accurate knowledge of the infrared and ultraviolet optical elastic scatter (ES) and ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF) signatures of bio-agents and interferents. MIT Lincoln Laboratory has developed the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST) for measuring ES cross sections from BW simulants and interferents at all angles including 180º (direct backscatter). Measurements of interest include the dependence of the ES and UVF signatures on several spore production parameters including growth medium, sporulation protocol, washing protocol, fluidizing additives, and degree of aggregation. Using SAAST, we have made measurements of the ES signature of Bacillus globigii (atropheaus, Bg) spores grown under different growth methods. We have also investigated one common interferent (Arizona Test Dust). Future samples will include pollen and diesel exhaust. This paper presents the details of the SAAST apparatus along with the results of recent measurements.

  11. Comparison of transcriptomic signature of post-Chernobyl and postradiotherapy thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Ory, Catherine; Ugolin, Nicolas; Hofman, Paul; Schlumberger, Martin; Likhtarev, Illya A; Chevillard, Sylvie

    2013-11-01

    We previously identified two highly discriminating and predictive radiation-induced transcriptomic signatures by comparing series of sporadic and postradiotherapy thyroid tumors (322-gene signature), and by reanalyzing a previously published data set of sporadic and post-Chernobyl thyroid tumors (106-gene signature). The aim of the present work was (i) to compare the two signatures in terms of gene expression deregulations and molecular features/pathways, and (ii) to test the capacity of the postradiotherapy signature in classifying the post-Chernobyl series of tumors and reciprocally of the post-Chernobyl signature in classifying the postradiotherapy-induced tumors. We now explored if postradiotherapy and post-Chernobyl papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC) display common molecular features by comparing molecular pathways deregulated in the two tumor series, and tested the potential of gene subsets of the postradiotherapy signature to classify the post-Chernobyl series (14 sporadic and 12 post-Chernobyl PTC), and reciprocally of gene subsets of the post-Chernobyl signature to classify the postradiotherapy series (15 sporadic and 12 postradiotherapy PTC), by using conventional principal component analysis. We found that the five genes common to the two signatures classified the learning/training tumors (used to search these signatures) of both the postradiotherapy (seven PTC) and the post-Chernobyl (six PTC) thyroid tumor series as compared with the sporadic tumors (seven sporadic PTC in each series). Importantly, these five genes were also effective for classifying independent series of postradiotherapy (five PTC) and post-Chernobyl (six PTC) tumors compared to independent series of sporadic tumors (eight PTC and six PTC respectively; testing tumors). Moreover, part of each postradiotherapy (32 genes) and post-Chernobyl signature (16 genes) cross-classified the respective series of thyroid tumors. Finally, several molecular pathways deregulated in post

  12. Collider Signal II:. Missing ET Signatures and Dark Matter Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard

    2010-08-01

    These lectures give an overview of aspects of missing ET signatures from new physics at the LHC, along with their important connection to dark matter physics. Mostly, I will concentrate on supersymmetric (SUSY) sources of ɆT, but will also mention Little Higgs models with T-parity (LHT) and universal extra dimensions (UED) models with KK-parity. Lecture 1 covers SUSY basics, model building and spectra computation. Lecture 2 addresses sparticle production and decay mechanisms at hadron colliders and event generation. Lecture 3 covers SUSY signatures at LHC, along with LHT and UED signatures for comparison. In Lecture 4, I address the dark matter connection, and how direct and indirect dark matter searches, along with LHC collider searches, may allow us to both discover and characterize dark matter in the next several years. Finally, the interesting scenario of Yukawa-unified SUSY is examined; this case works best if the dark matter turns out to be a mixture of axion/axino states, rather than neutralinos.

  13. Observable Signatures of Energy Release in Braided Coronal Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Pontin, D. I.; Janvier, M.; Tiwari, S. K.

    We examine the turbulent relaxation of solar coronal loops containing non-trivial field line braiding. Such field line tangling in the corona has long been postulated in the context of coronal heating models. We focus on the observational signatures of energy release in such braided magnetic structures using MHD simulations and forward modeling tools. The aim is to answer the following question: if energy release occurs in a coronal loop containing braided magnetic flux, should we expect a clearly observable signature in emissions? We demonstrate that the presence of braided magnetic field lines does not guarantee a braided appearance to themore » observed intensities. Observed intensities may—but need not necessarily—reveal the underlying braided nature of the magnetic field, depending on the degree and pattern of the field line tangling within the loop. However, in all cases considered, the evolution of the braided loop is accompanied by localized heating regions as the loop relaxes. Factors that may influence the observational signatures are discussed. Recent high-resolution observations from Hi-C have claimed the first direct evidence of braided magnetic fields in the corona. Here we show that both the Hi-C data and some of our simulations give the appearance of braiding at a range of scales.« less

  14. 17 CFR 232.302 - Signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) must be in typed form rather than manual format. Signatures in an HTML document that are not required may, but are not required to, be presented in an HTML graphic or image file within the electronic...

  15. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  16. Epigenetic Signatures of Cigarette Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Joehanes, Roby; Just, Allan C.; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Pilling, Luke C.; Reynolds, Lindsay M.; Mandaviya, Pooja R.; Guan, Weihua; Xu, Tao; Elks, Cathy E.; Aslibekyan, Stella; Moreno-Macias, Hortensia; Smith, Jennifer A.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Dhingra, Radhika; Yousefi, Paul; Pankow, James S.; Kunze, Sonja; Shah, Sonia; McRae, Allan F.; Lohman, Kurt; Sha, Jin; Absher, Devin M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zhao, Wei; Demerath, Ellen W.; Bressler, Jan; Grove, Megan L.; Huan, Tianxiao; Liu, Chunyu; Mendelson, Michael M.; Yao, Chen; Kiel, Douglas P.; Peters, Annette; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Visscher, Peter M.; Wray, Naomi R.; Starr, John M.; Ding, Jingzhong; Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Zhi, Degui; Barrdahl, Myrto; Vineis, Paolo; Ambatipudi, Srikant; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Schwartz, Joel; Colicino, Elena; Hou, Lifang; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Turner, Stephen T.; Ware, Erin B.; Smith, Alicia K.; Klengel, Torsten; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Taylor, Kent D.; Gharib, Sina A.; Swenson, Brenton R.; Liang, Liming; DeMeo, Dawn L.; O'Connor, George T.; Herceg, Zdenko; Ressler, Kerry J.; Conneely, Karen N.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Melzer, David; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Romieu, Isabelle; Arnett, Donna K.; Ong, Ken K.; Liu, Yongmei; Waldenberger, Melanie; Deary, Ian J.; Fornage, Myriam; Levy, Daniel; London, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background DNA methylation leaves a long-term signature of smoking exposure and is one potential mechanism by which tobacco exposure predisposes to adverse health outcomes, such as cancers, osteoporosis, lung, and cardiovascular disorders. Methods and Results To comprehensively determine the association between cigarette smoking and DNA methylation, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation assessed using the Illumina BeadChip 450K array on 15,907 blood derived DNA samples from participants in 16 cohorts (including 2,433 current, 6,518 former, and 6,956 never smokers). Comparing current versus never smokers, 2,623 CpG sites (CpGs), annotated to 1,405 genes, were statistically significantly differentially methylated at Bonferroni threshold of p<1×10−7 (18,760 CpGs at False Discovery Rate (FDR)<0.05). Genes annotated to these CpGs were enriched for associations with several smoking-related traits in genome-wide studies including pulmonary function, cancers, inflammatory diseases and heart disease. Comparing former versus never smokers, 185 of the CpGs that differed between current and never smokers were significant p<1×10−7 (2,623 CpGs at FDR<0.05), indicating a pattern of persistent altered methylation, with attenuation, after smoking cessation. Transcriptomic integration identified effects on gene expression at many differentially methylated CpGs. Conclusions Cigarette smoking has a broad impact on genome-wide methylation that, at many loci, persists many years after smoking cessation. Many of the differentially methylated genes were novel genes with respect to biologic effects of smoking, and might represent therapeutic targets for prevention or treatment of tobacco-related diseases. Methylation at these sites could also serve as sensitive and stable biomarkers of lifetime exposure to tobacco smoke. PMID:27651444

  17. Epigenetic Signatures of Cigarette Smoking.

    PubMed

    Joehanes, Roby; Just, Allan C; Marioni, Riccardo E; Pilling, Luke C; Reynolds, Lindsay M; Mandaviya, Pooja R; Guan, Weihua; Xu, Tao; Elks, Cathy E; Aslibekyan, Stella; Moreno-Macias, Hortensia; Smith, Jennifer A; Brody, Jennifer A; Dhingra, Radhika; Yousefi, Paul; Pankow, James S; Kunze, Sonja; Shah, Sonia H; McRae, Allan F; Lohman, Kurt; Sha, Jin; Absher, Devin M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zhao, Wei; Demerath, Ellen W; Bressler, Jan; Grove, Megan L; Huan, Tianxiao; Liu, Chunyu; Mendelson, Michael M; Yao, Chen; Kiel, Douglas P; Peters, Annette; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Visscher, Peter M; Wray, Naomi R; Starr, John M; Ding, Jingzhong; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Wareham, Nicholas J; Irvin, Marguerite R; Zhi, Degui; Barrdahl, Myrto; Vineis, Paolo; Ambatipudi, Srikant; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Schwartz, Joel; Colicino, Elena; Hou, Lifang; Vokonas, Pantel S; Hernandez, Dena G; Singleton, Andrew B; Bandinelli, Stefania; Turner, Stephen T; Ware, Erin B; Smith, Alicia K; Klengel, Torsten; Binder, Elisabeth B; Psaty, Bruce M; Taylor, Kent D; Gharib, Sina A; Swenson, Brenton R; Liang, Liming; DeMeo, Dawn L; O'Connor, George T; Herceg, Zdenko; Ressler, Kerry J; Conneely, Karen N; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Kardia, Sharon L R; Melzer, David; Baccarelli, Andrea A; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Romieu, Isabelle; Arnett, Donna K; Ong, Ken K; Liu, Yongmei; Waldenberger, Melanie; Deary, Ian J; Fornage, Myriam; Levy, Daniel; London, Stephanie J

    2016-10-01

    DNA methylation leaves a long-term signature of smoking exposure and is one potential mechanism by which tobacco exposure predisposes to adverse health outcomes, such as cancers, osteoporosis, lung, and cardiovascular disorders. To comprehensively determine the association between cigarette smoking and DNA methylation, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation assessed using the Illumina BeadChip 450K array on 15 907 blood-derived DNA samples from participants in 16 cohorts (including 2433 current, 6518 former, and 6956 never smokers). Comparing current versus never smokers, 2623 cytosine-phosphate-guanine sites (CpGs), annotated to 1405 genes, were statistically significantly differentially methylated at Bonferroni threshold of P<1×10 -7 (18 760 CpGs at false discovery rate <0.05). Genes annotated to these CpGs were enriched for associations with several smoking-related traits in genome-wide studies including pulmonary function, cancers, inflammatory diseases, and heart disease. Comparing former versus never smokers, 185 of the CpGs that differed between current and never smokers were significant P<1×10 -7 (2623 CpGs at false discovery rate <0.05), indicating a pattern of persistent altered methylation, with attenuation, after smoking cessation. Transcriptomic integration identified effects on gene expression at many differentially methylated CpGs. Cigarette smoking has a broad impact on genome-wide methylation that, at many loci, persists many years after smoking cessation. Many of the differentially methylated genes were novel genes with respect to biological effects of smoking and might represent therapeutic targets for prevention or treatment of tobacco-related diseases. Methylation at these sites could also serve as sensitive and stable biomarkers of lifetime exposure to tobacco smoke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Radar signatures of road vehicles: airborne SAR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palubinskas, G.; Runge, H.; Reinartz, P.

    2005-10-01

    The German radar satellite TerraSAR-X is a high resolution, dual receive antenna SAR satellite, which will be launched in spring 2006. Since it will have the capability to measure the velocity of moving targets, the acquired interferometric data can be useful for traffic monitoring applications on a global scale. DLR has started already the development of an automatic and operational processing system which will detect cars, measure their speed and assign them to a road. Statistical approaches are used to derive the vehicle detection algorithm, which require the knowledge of the radar signatures of vehicles, especially under consideration of the geometry of the radar look direction and the vehicle orientation. Simulation of radar signatures is a very difficult task due to the lack of realistic models of vehicles. In this paper the radar signatures of the parking cars are presented. They are estimated experimentally from airborne E-SAR X-band data, which have been collected during flight campaigns in 2003-2005. Several test cars of the same type placed in carefully selected orientation angles and several over-flights with different heading angles made it possible to cover the whole range of aspect angles from 0° to 180°. The large synthetic aperture length or beam width angle of 7° can be divided into several looks. Thus processing of each look separately allows to increase the angle resolution. Such a radar signature profile of one type of vehicle over the whole range of aspect angles in fine resolution can be used further for the verification of simulation studies and for the performance prediction for traffic monitoring with TerraSAR-X.

  19. Signature scheme based on bilinear pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Rui Y.; Geng, Yong J.

    2013-03-01

    An identity-based signature scheme is proposed by using bilinear pairs technology. The scheme uses user's identity information as public key such as email address, IP address, telephone number so that it erases the cost of forming and managing public key infrastructure and avoids the problem of user private generating center generating forgery signature by using CL-PKC framework to generate user's private key.

  20. Signature-based store checking buffer

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  1. Research Plan for Fire Signatures and Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the prevention, suppression, and detection of fires aboard a spacecraft is presented. The topics include: 1) Fire Prevention, Detection, and Suppression Sub-Element Products; 2) FPDS Organizing Questions; 3) FPDS Organizing Questions; 4) Signatures, Sensors, and Simulations; 5) Quantification of Fire and Pre-Fire Signatures; 6) Smoke; 7) DAFT Hardware; 8) Additional Benefits of DAFT; 9) Development and Characterization of Sensors 10) Simulation of the Transport of Smoke and Fire Precursors; and 11) FPDS Organizing Questions.

  2. Offline signature verification using convolution Siamese network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zi-Jian; Yin, Fei; Wu, Yi-Chao; Liu, Cheng-Lin

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents an offline signature verification approach using convolutional Siamese neural network. Unlike the existing methods which consider feature extraction and metric learning as two independent stages, we adopt a deepleaning based framework which combines the two stages together and can be trained end-to-end. The experimental results on two offline public databases (GPDSsynthetic and CEDAR) demonstrate the superiority of our method on the offline signature verification problem.

  3. Molecular signatures in Arabidopsis thaliana in response to insect attack and bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Barah, Pankaj; Winge, Per; Kusnierczyk, Anna; Tran, Diem Hong; Bones, Atle M

    2013-01-01

    Under the threat of global climatic change and food shortages, it is essential to take the initiative to obtain a comprehensive understanding of common and specific defence mechanisms existing in plant systems for protection against different types of biotic invaders. We have implemented an integrated approach to analyse the overall transcriptomic reprogramming and systems-level defence responses in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana henceforth) during insect Brevicoryne brassicae (B. brassicae henceforth) and bacterial Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (P. syringae henceforth) attacks. The main aim of this study was to identify the attacker-specific and general defence response signatures in A. thaliana when attacked by phloem-feeding aphids or pathogenic bacteria. The obtained annotated networks of differentially expressed transcripts indicated that members of transcription factor families, such as WRKY, MYB, ERF, BHLH and bZIP, could be crucial for stress-specific defence regulation in Arabidopsis during aphid and P. syringae attack. The defence response pathways, signalling pathways and metabolic processes associated with aphid attack and P. syringae infection partially overlapped. Components of several important biosynthesis and signalling pathways, such as salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene (ET) and glucosinolates, were differentially affected during the two the treatments. Several stress-regulated transcription factors were known to be associated with stress-inducible microRNAs. The differentially regulated gene sets included many signature transcription factors, and our co-expression analysis showed that they were also strongly co-expressed during 69 other biotic stress experiments. Defence responses and functional networks that were unique and specific to aphid or P. syringae stresses were identified. Furthermore, our analysis revealed a probable link between biotic stress and microRNAs in Arabidopsis and

  4. Unambiguous Signature of the Berry Phase in Intense Laser Dissociation of Diatomic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Bouakline, Foudhil

    2018-05-03

    We report strong evidence of Berry phase effects in intense laser dissociation of D 2 + molecules, manifested as Aharonov-Bohm-like oscillations in the photofragment angular distribution (PAD). Our calculations show that this interference pattern strongly depends on the parity of the diatom initial rotational state, (-1) j . Indeed, the PAD local maxima (minima) observed in one case ( j odd) correspond to local minima (maxima) in the other case ( j even). Using simple topological arguments, we clearly show that such interference conversion is a direct signature of the Berry phase. The sole effect of the latter on the rovibrational wave function is a sign change of the relative phase between two interfering components, which wind in opposite senses around a light-induced conical intersection (LICI). Therefore, encirclement of the LICI leads to constructive ( j odd) or destructive ( j even) self-interference of the initial nuclear wavepacket in the dissociative limit. To corroborate our theoretical findings, we suggest an experiment of strong-field indirect dissociation of D 2 + molecules, comparing the PAD of the ortho and para molecular species in directions nearly perpendicular to the laser polarization axis.

  5. Investigating the Global Dispersal of Chickens in Prehistory Using Ancient Mitochondrial DNA Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Alice A.; Athens, J. Stephen; Bryant, David; Carson, Mike; Emery, Kitty; deFrance, Susan; Higham, Charles; Huynen, Leon; Intoh, Michiko; Jones, Sharyn; Kirch, Patrick V.; Ladefoged, Thegn; McCoy, Patrick; Morales-Muñiz, Arturo; Quiroz, Daniel; Reitz, Elizabeth; Robins, Judith; Walter, Richard; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Data from morphology, linguistics, history, and archaeology have all been used to trace the dispersal of chickens from Asian domestication centers to their current global distribution. Each provides a unique perspective which can aid in the reconstruction of prehistory. This study expands on previous investigations by adding a temporal component from ancient DNA and, in some cases, direct dating of bones of individual chickens from a variety of sites in Europe, the Pacific, and the Americas. The results from the ancient DNA analyses of forty-eight archaeologically derived chicken bones provide support for archaeological hypotheses about the prehistoric human transport of chickens. Haplogroup E mtDNA signatures have been amplified from directly dated samples originating in Europe at 1000 B.P. and in the Pacific at 3000 B.P. indicating multiple prehistoric dispersals from a single Asian centre. These two dispersal pathways converged in the Americas where chickens were introduced both by Polynesians and later by Europeans. The results of this study also highlight the inappropriate application of the small stretch of D-loop, traditionally amplified for use in phylogenetic studies, to understanding discrete episodes of chicken translocation in the past. The results of this study lead to the proposal of four hypotheses which will require further scrutiny and rigorous future testing. PMID:22848352

  6. Investigating the global dispersal of chickens in prehistory using ancient mitochondrial DNA signatures.

    PubMed

    Storey, Alice A; Athens, J Stephen; Bryant, David; Carson, Mike; Emery, Kitty; deFrance, Susan; Higham, Charles; Huynen, Leon; Intoh, Michiko; Jones, Sharyn; Kirch, Patrick V; Ladefoged, Thegn; McCoy, Patrick; Morales-Muñiz, Arturo; Quiroz, Daniel; Reitz, Elizabeth; Robins, Judith; Walter, Richard; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Data from morphology, linguistics, history, and archaeology have all been used to trace the dispersal of chickens from Asian domestication centers to their current global distribution. Each provides a unique perspective which can aid in the reconstruction of prehistory. This study expands on previous investigations by adding a temporal component from ancient DNA and, in some cases, direct dating of bones of individual chickens from a variety of sites in Europe, the Pacific, and the Americas. The results from the ancient DNA analyses of forty-eight archaeologically derived chicken bones provide support for archaeological hypotheses about the prehistoric human transport of chickens. Haplogroup E mtDNA signatures have been amplified from directly dated samples originating in Europe at 1000 B.P. and in the Pacific at 3000 B.P. indicating multiple prehistoric dispersals from a single Asian centre. These two dispersal pathways converged in the Americas where chickens were introduced both by Polynesians and later by Europeans. The results of this study also highlight the inappropriate application of the small stretch of D-loop, traditionally amplified for use in phylogenetic studies, to understanding discrete episodes of chicken translocation in the past. The results of this study lead to the proposal of four hypotheses which will require further scrutiny and rigorous future testing.

  7. Kinematics of Signature Writing in Healthy Aging*

    PubMed Central

    Caligiuri, Michael P.; Kim, Chi; Landy, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    Forensic document examiners (FDE) called upon to distinguish a genuine from a forged signature of an elderly person are often required to consider the question of age-related deterioration and whether the available exemplars reliably capture the natural effects of aging of the original writer. An understanding of the statistical relationship between advanced age and handwriting movements can reduce the uncertainty that may exist in an examiner’s approach to questioned signatures formed by elderly writers. The primary purpose of this study was to systematically examine age-related changes in signature kinematics in healthy writers. Forty-two healthy subjects between the ages of 60–91 years participated in this study. Signatures were recorded using a digitizing tablet and commercial software was used to examine the temporal and spatial stroke kinematics and pen pressure. Results indicated that vertical stroke duration and dysfluency increased with age, whereas vertical stroke amplitude and velocity decreased with age. Pen pressure decreased with age. We found that a linear model characterized the best-fit relationship between advanced age and handwriting movement parameters for signature formation. Male writers exhibited stronger age effects than female writers, especially for pen pressure and stroke dysfluency. The present study contributes to an understanding of how advanced age alters signature formation in otherwise healthy adults. PMID:24673648

  8. Peripheral Blood Signatures of Lead Exposure

    PubMed Central

    LaBreche, Heather G.; Meadows, Sarah K.; Nevins, Joseph R.; Chute, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Current evidence indicates that even low-level lead (Pb) exposure can have detrimental effects, especially in children. We tested the hypothesis that Pb exposure alters gene expression patterns in peripheral blood cells and that these changes reflect dose-specific alterations in the activity of particular pathways. Methodology/Principal Finding Using Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 arrays, we examined gene expression changes in the peripheral blood of female Balb/c mice following exposure to per os lead acetate trihydrate or plain drinking water for two weeks and after a two-week recovery period. Data sets were RMA-normalized and dose-specific signatures were generated using established methods of supervised classification and binary regression. Pathway activity was analyzed using the ScoreSignatures module from GenePattern. Conclusions/Significance The low-level Pb signature was 93% sensitive and 100% specific in classifying samples a leave-one-out crossvalidation. The high-level Pb signature demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity in the leave-one-out crossvalidation. These two signatures exhibited dose-specificity in their ability to predict Pb exposure and had little overlap in terms of constituent genes. The signatures also seemed to reflect current levels of Pb exposure rather than past exposure. Finally, the two doses showed differential activation of cellular pathways. Low-level Pb exposure increased activity of the interferon-gamma pathway, whereas high-level Pb exposure increased activity of the E2F1 pathway. PMID:21829687

  9. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers EVIDENCE FOR A DIRECT PATHWAY BETWEEN THE 4′-AMINOPYRIMIDINE N1′ ATOMS

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy

    2010-11-03

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4{prime}-aminopyrimidine N1{prime} atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu{sup 571}, Glu{sup 235}, and Glu{sup 237}) and Arg{sup 606} resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. (1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding inmore » the second active center was affected. (2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. (3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. (4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu{sup 235} makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu{sup 571} residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time.« less

  10. The PorX Response Regulator of the Porphyromonas gingivalis PorXY Two-Component System Does Not Directly Regulate the Type IX Secretion Genes but Binds the PorL Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Maxence S.; Durand, Eric; Cascales, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a versatile multi-protein complex restricted to bacteria of the Bacteriodetes phylum and responsible for the secretion or cell surface exposition of diverse proteins that participate to S-layer formation, gliding motility or pathogenesis. The T9SS is poorly characterized but a number of proteins involved in the assembly of the secretion apparatus in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis have been identified based on genome substractive analyses. Among these proteins, PorY, and PorX encode typical two-component system (TCS) sensor and CheY-like response regulator respectively. Although the porX and porY genes do not localize at the same genetic locus, it has been proposed that PorXY form a bona fide TCS. Deletion of porX in P. gingivalis causes a slight decrease of the expression of a number of other T9SS genes, including sov, porT, porP, porK, porL, porM, porN, and porY. Here, we show that PorX and the soluble cytoplasmic domain of PorY interact. Using electrophoretic mobility shift, DNA-protein co-purification and heterologous host expression assays, we demonstrate that PorX does not bind T9SS gene promoters and does not directly regulate expression of the T9SS genes. Finally, we show that PorX interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of PorL, a component of the T9SS membrane core complex and propose that the CheY-like PorX protein might be involved in the dynamics of the T9SS. PMID:27630829

  11. Induced Polarization Signature of Biofilms in Porous Media: From Laboratory Experiments to Theoretical Developments and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Atekwana, Estella; Patrauchan, Marianna; Revil, Andre

    2016-10-04

    Bioremediation strategies for mitigating the transport of heavy metals and radionuclides in subsurface sediments have largely targeted the use of dissimilatory metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Growth and metabolic activities from these organisms can significantly influence biogeochemical processes, including mineral dissolution/precipitation, fluctuating pH and redox potential (Eh) values, development of biofilms, and decreasing hydraulic conductivity. The Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) technique has emerged as the technique most sensitive to the presence of microbial cells and biofilms in porous media; yet it is often difficult to unambiguously distinguish the impact of multiple and often competing processes that occur during in-situ biostimulation activitiesmore » on the SIP signatures. The main goal of our project is to quantitatively characterize major components within bacterial biofilms (cells, DNA, metals, metabolites etc.) contributing to detectable SIP signatures. We specifically: (i) evaluated the contribution of biofilm components to SIP signatures, (ii) determined the contribution of biogenic minerals commonly found in biofilms to SIP signatures, (iii) determined if the SIP signatures can be used to quantify the rates of biofilm formation, (iv) developed models and a fundamental understanding of potential underlying polarization mechanisms at low frequencies (<40 kHz) resulting from the presence of microbial cells and biofilms« less

  12. NRPD4, a protein related to the RPB4 subunit of RNA polymerase II, is a component of RNA polymerases IV and V and is required for RNA-directed DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin-Jian; Hsu, Yi-Feng; Pontes, Olga; Zhu, Jianhua; Lu, Jian; Bressan, Ray A.; Pikaard, Craig; Wang, Co-Shine; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2009-01-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is an RNAi-based mechanism for establishing transcriptional gene silencing in plants. The plant-specific RNA polymerases IV and V are required for the generation of 24-nucleotide (nt) siRNAs and for guiding sequence-specific DNA methylation by the siRNAs, respectively. However, unlike the extensively studied multisubunit Pol II, our current knowledge about Pol IV and Pol V is restricted to only the two largest subunits NRPD1a/NRPD1 and NRPD1b/NRPE1 and the one second-largest subunit NRPD2a. It is unclear whether other subunits may be required for the functioning of Pol IV and Pol V in RdDM. From a genetic screen for second-site suppressors of the DNA demethylase mutant ros1, we identified a new component (referred to as RDM2) as well as seven known components (NRPD1, NRPE1, NRPD2a, AGO4, HEN1, DRD1, and HDA6) of the RdDM pathway. The differential effects of the mutations on two mechanistically distinct transcriptional silencing reporters suggest that RDM2, NRPD1, NRPE1, NRPD2a, HEN1, and DRD1 function only in the siRNA-dependent pathway of transcriptional silencing, whereas HDA6 and AGO4 have roles in both siRNA-dependent and -independent pathways of transcriptional silencing. In the rdm2 mutants, DNA methylation and siRNA accumulation were reduced substantially at loci previously identified as endogenous targets of Pol IV and Pol V, including 5S rDNA, MEA-ISR, AtSN1, AtGP1, and AtMU1. The amino acid sequence of RDM2 is similar to that of RPB4 subunit of Pol II, but we show evidence that RDM2 has diverged significantly from RPB4 and cannot function in Pol II. An association of RDM2 with both NRPD1 and NRPE1 was observed by coimmunoprecipitation and coimmunolocalization assays. Our results show that RDM2/NRPD4/NRPE4 is a new component of the RdDM pathway in Arabidopsis and that it functions as part of Pol IV and Pol V. PMID:19204117

  13. NRPD4, a Protein Related to the RPB4 Subunit of RNA Polymerase II, is a Component of RNA Polymerases IV and V and is Required for RNA-directed DNA methylation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xin-Jian; Hsu, Yi-Feng; Pontes, Olga

    2009-01-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is an RNAi-based mechanism for establishing transcriptional gene silencing in plants. The plant-specific RNA polymerases IV and V are required for the generation of 24-nucleotide (nt) siRNAs and for guiding sequence-specific DNA methylation by the siRNAs, respectively. However, unlike the extensively studied multisubunit Pol II, our current knowledge about Pol IV and Pol V is restricted to only the two largest subunits NRPD1a/NRPD1 and NRPD1b/NRPE1 and the one second-largest subunit NRPD2a. It is unclear whether other subunits may be required for the functioning of Pol IV and Pol V in RdDM. From a genetic screen formore » second-site suppressors of the DNA demethylase mutant ros1, we identified a new component (referred to as RDM2) as well as seven known components (NRPD1, NRPE1, NRPD2a, AGO4, HEN1, DRD1, and HDA6) of the RdDM pathway. The differential effects of the mutations on two mechanistically distinct transcriptional silencing reporters suggest that RDM2, NRPD1, NRPE1, NRPD2a, HEN1, and DRD1 function only in the siRNA-dependent pathway of transcriptional silencing, whereas HDA6 and AGO4 have roles in both siRNA-dependent and -independent pathways of transcriptional silencing. In the rdm2 mutants, DNA methylation and siRNA accumulation were reduced substantially at loci previously identified as endogenous targets of Pol IV and Pol V, including 5S rDNA, MEA-ISR, AtSN1, AtGP1, and AtMU1. The amino acid sequence of RDM2 is similar to that of RPB4 subunit of Pol II, but we show evidence that RDM2 has diverged significantly from RPB4 and cannot function in Pol II. An association of RDM2 with both NRPD1 and NRPE1 was observed by coimmunoprecipitation and coimmunolocalization assays. Our results show that RDM2/NRPD4/NRPE4 is a new component of the RdDM pathway in Arabidopsis and that it functions as part of Pol IV and Pol V.« less

  14. Quantum Signature of Analog Hawking Radiation in Momentum Space.

    PubMed

    Boiron, D; Fabbri, A; Larré, P-É; Pavloff, N; Westbrook, C I; Ziń, P

    2015-07-10

    We consider a sonic analog of a black hole realized in the one-dimensional flow of a Bose-Einstein condensate. Our theoretical analysis demonstrates that one- and two-body momentum distributions accessible by present-day experimental techniques provide clear direct evidence (i) of the occurrence of a sonic horizon, (ii) of the associated acoustic Hawking radiation, and (iii) of the quantum nature of the Hawking process. The signature of the quantum behavior persists even at temperatures larger than the chemical potential.

  15. Synthesis of optical polarization signatures of military aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Walter G.; Duggin, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Focal plane wide band IR imagery will be compared with visual wide band focal plane digital imagery of a camouflaged B-52 bomber. Extreme enhancement is possible using digital polarized imagery. The experimental observations will be compared to theoretical calculations and modeling result of both specular and shadowed areas to allow extrapolations to the synthesis of the optical polarization signatures of other aircraft. The relationship of both the specular and the shadowed areas to surface structure, orientation, specularlity, roughness, shadowing and the complex index of refraction will be illustrated. The imagery was obtained in two plane-polarized directions. Many aircraft locations were measured as well as sky background.

  16. Mutational Signature Mark Cancer’s Smoking Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Ludmil

    A broad computational study of cancer genome sequences by Los Alamos National Laboratory with the UK’s Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and other collaborators identifies telltale mutational signatures associated with smoking tobacco. The research demonstrates, for the first time, that smoking increases cancer risk by causing somatic mutations in tissues directly and indirectly exposed to tobacco smoke. The international study was published in the November 4 issue of Science. The analysis shows that tobacco smoking causes mutations leading to cancer by multiple distinct mechanisms, including by damaging DNA in organs and by speeding up a mutational cellular clock.

  17. 47 CFR 54.680 - Validity of electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Validity of electronic signatures. 54.680... Validity of electronic signatures. (a) For the purposes of this subpart, an electronic signature (defined by the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act, as an electronic sound, symbol, or...

  18. 47 CFR 54.419 - Validity of electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Validity of electronic signatures. 54.419... electronic signatures. (a) For the purposes of this subpart, an electronic signature, defined by the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act, as an electronic sound, symbol, or process...

  19. 47 CFR 54.419 - Validity of electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Validity of electronic signatures. 54.419... electronic signatures. (a) For the purposes of this subpart, an electronic signature, defined by the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act, as an electronic sound, symbol, or process...

  20. 47 CFR 54.680 - Validity of electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Validity of electronic signatures. 54.680... Validity of electronic signatures. (a) For the purposes of this subpart, an electronic signature (defined by the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act, as an electronic sound, symbol, or...

  1. 47 CFR 54.419 - Validity of electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Validity of electronic signatures. 54.419... electronic signatures. (a) For the purposes of this subpart, an electronic signature, defined by the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act, as an electronic sound, symbol, or process...

  2. 25 CFR 82.7 - Notarization of petition signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notarization of petition signatures. 82.7 Section 82.7... signatures. (a) Signatures to a petition must be authenticated in one of the following ways: (1) Through having each signer subscribe or acknowledge his/her signature before a notary public; (2) Through having...

  3. Carbonate “clumped” isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    SciTech Connect

    Kimball, Justine; Eagle, Robert; Dunbar, Robert

    different calibrations. The offset between the corals of different mineralogy is in the same direction as published theoretical predictions for the offset between calcite and aragonite although the magnitude of the offset is different. One possibility is that the deep-sea coral results reflect high-Mg and aragonite crystals attaining nominal mineral equilibrium clumped isotope signatures due to conditions of extremely slow growth. In that case, a possible explanation for the attainment of disequilibrium bulk isotope signatures and equilibrium clumped isotope signatures by deep-sea corals is that extraordinarily slow growth rates can promote the occurrence of isotopic reordering in the interfacial region of growing crystals. We also cannot rule out a component of a biological “vital effect” influencing clumped isotope signatures in one or both orders of coral. Based on published experimental data and theoretical calculations, these biological vital effects could arise from kinetic isotope effects due to the source of carbon used for calcification, temperature- and pH-dependent rates of CO 2 hydration and/or hydroxylation, calcifying fluid pH, the activity of carbonic anhydrase, the residence time of dissolved inorganic carbon in the calcifying fluid, and calcification rate. A third possible explanation is the occurrence of variable acid digestion fractionation factors. Although a recent study has suggested that dolomite, calcite, and aragonite may have similar clumped isotope acid digestion fractionation factors, the influence of acid digestion kinetics on Δ 47 is a subject that warrants further investigation.« less

  4. Carbonate “clumped” isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    DOE PAGES

    Kimball, Justine; Eagle, Robert; Dunbar, Robert

    2016-12-12

    different calibrations. The offset between the corals of different mineralogy is in the same direction as published theoretical predictions for the offset between calcite and aragonite although the magnitude of the offset is different. One possibility is that the deep-sea coral results reflect high-Mg and aragonite crystals attaining nominal mineral equilibrium clumped isotope signatures due to conditions of extremely slow growth. In that case, a possible explanation for the attainment of disequilibrium bulk isotope signatures and equilibrium clumped isotope signatures by deep-sea corals is that extraordinarily slow growth rates can promote the occurrence of isotopic reordering in the interfacial region of growing crystals. We also cannot rule out a component of a biological “vital effect” influencing clumped isotope signatures in one or both orders of coral. Based on published experimental data and theoretical calculations, these biological vital effects could arise from kinetic isotope effects due to the source of carbon used for calcification, temperature- and pH-dependent rates of CO 2 hydration and/or hydroxylation, calcifying fluid pH, the activity of carbonic anhydrase, the residence time of dissolved inorganic carbon in the calcifying fluid, and calcification rate. A third possible explanation is the occurrence of variable acid digestion fractionation factors. Although a recent study has suggested that dolomite, calcite, and aragonite may have similar clumped isotope acid digestion fractionation factors, the influence of acid digestion kinetics on Δ 47 is a subject that warrants further investigation.« less

  5. Stromal signatures in endometrioid endometrial carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Iñigo; Catasus, Lluis; D' Angelo, Emanuela; Mozos, Ana; Pedrola, Nuria; Bértolo, Cristina; Ferrer, Irene; Zannoni, Gian Franco; West, Robert B; van de Rijn, Matt; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Prat, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    The pattern of myometrial invasion in endometrioid endometrial carcinomas varies considerably; ie, from widely scattered glands and cell nests, often associated with a fibromyxoid stromal reaction (desmoplasia) and/or a lymphocytic infiltrate, to invasive glands with little or no stromal response. Recently, two distinct stromal signatures derived from a macrophage response (colony-stimulating factor 1, CSF1) and a fibroblastic response (desmoid-type fibromatosis, DTF) were identified in breast carcinomas and correlated with clinicopathologic features including outcome. In this study, we explored whether these stromal signatures also apply to endometrioid carcinomas and how their expression patterns correlated with morphologic changes. We studied the stromal signatures both by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in 98 primary endometrioid carcinomas with (87 cases) and without (11 cases) myometrial invasion as well as in the corresponding regional lymph nodes metatases of 9 myoinvasive tumors. Desmoplasia correlated positively with the DTF expression signature. Likewise, mononuclear infiltrates were found in the stroma of tumors expressing CSF1. Twenty-four out of eighty-seven (27%) myoinvasive endometrioid carcinomas were positive for the macrophage signature and thirteen out of eighty-seven (15%) expressed the fibroblast signature. Eleven additional cases were positive for both DTF and CSF1 signatures (11/87; 13%). However, over half of the cases (39/87; 45%) and the majority of the non-myoinvasive tumors (8/11; 73%) failed to express any of the two stromal signatures. The macrophage response (CSF1) was associated with higher tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, and PIK3CA mutations (P<0.05). There was a concordance in the expression of the CSF1 signature in the primary tumors and their corresponding lymph node metastases. This study is the first characterization of stromal signatures in endometrioid carcinomas. Our findings shed new light on the

  6. Transcriptomic signatures in cartilage ageing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Age is an important factor in the development of osteoarthritis. Microarray studies provide insight into cartilage aging but do not reveal the full transcriptomic phenotype of chondrocytes such as small noncoding RNAs, pseudogenes, and microRNAs. RNA-Seq is a powerful technique for the interrogation of large numbers of transcripts including nonprotein coding RNAs. The aim of the study was to characterise molecular mechanisms associated with age-related changes in gene signatures. Methods RNA for gene expression analysis using RNA-Seq and real-time PCR analysis was isolated from macroscopically normal cartilage of the metacarpophalangeal joints of eight horses; four young donors (4 years old) and four old donors (>15 years old). RNA sequence libraries were prepared following ribosomal RNA depletion and sequencing was undertaken using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Differentially expressed genes were defined using Benjamini-Hochberg false discovery rate correction with a generalised linear model likelihood ratio test (P < 0.05, expression ratios ± 1.4 log2 fold-change). Ingenuity pathway analysis enabled networks, functional analyses and canonical pathways from differentially expressed genes to be determined. Results In total, the expression of 396 transcribed elements including mRNAs, small noncoding RNAs, pseudogenes, and a single microRNA was significantly different in old compared with young cartilage (± 1.4 log2 fold-change, P < 0.05). Of these, 93 were at higher levels in the older cartilage and 303 were at lower levels in the older cartilage. There was an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage derived from older donors compared with young donors. In addition, there was a reduction in Wnt signalling in ageing cartilage. Conclusion There was an age-related dysregulation of matrix, anabolic and catabolic

  7. Oscillatory EEG signatures of postponed somatosensory decisions.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Simon; Herding, Jan; Blankenburg, Felix

    2018-05-02

    In recent electroencephalography (EEG) studies, the vibrotactile frequency comparison task has been used to study oscillatory signatures of perceptual decision making in humans, revealing a choice-selective modulation of premotor upper beta band power shortly before decisions were reported. Importantly, these studies focused on decisions that were (1) indicated immediately after stimulus presentation, and (2) for which a direct motor mapping was provided. Here, we investigated whether the putative beta band choice signal also extends to postponed decisions, and how such a decision signal might be influenced by a response mapping that is dissociated from a specific motor command. We recorded EEG data in two separate experiments, both employing the vibrotactile frequency comparison task with delayed decision reports. In the first experiment, delayed choices were associated with a fixed motor mapping, whereas in the second experiment, choices were mapped onto a color code concealing a specific motor response until the end of the delay phase. In between stimulus presentations, as well as after the second stimulus, prefrontal beta band power indexed stimulus information held in working memory. Beta band power also encoded choices during the response delay, notably, in different cortical areas depending on the provided response mapping. In particular, when decisions were associated with a specific motor mapping, choices were represented in premotor cortices, whereas the color mapping resulted in a choice-selective modulation of beta band power in parietal cortices. Together, our findings imply that how a choice is expressed (i.e., the decision consequence) determines where in the cortical sensorimotor hierarchy an according decision signal is processed. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Specificity in ROS Signaling and Transcript Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Vaahtera, Lauri; Brosché, Mikael; Wrzaczek, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules in plants, are involved in developmental control and stress adaptation. ROS production can trigger broad transcriptional changes; however, it is not clear how specificity in transcriptional regulation is achieved. Recent Advances: A large collection of public transcriptome data from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is available for analysis. These data can be used for the analysis of biological processes that are associated with ROS signaling and for the identification of suitable transcriptional indicators. Several online tools, such as Genevestigator and Expression Angler, have simplified the task to analyze, interpret, and visualize this wealth of data. Critical Issues: The analysis of the exact transcriptional responses to ROS requires the production of specific ROS in distinct subcellular compartments with precise timing, which is experimentally difficult. Analyses are further complicated by the effect of ROS production in one subcellular location on the ROS accumulation in other compartments. In addition, even subtle differences in the method of ROS production or treatment can lead to significantly different outcomes when various stimuli are compared. Future Directions: Due to the difficulty of inducing ROS production specifically with regard to ROS type, subcellular localization, and timing, we propose that the concept of a “ROS marker gene” should be re-evaluated. We suggest guidelines for the analysis of transcriptional data in ROS signaling. The use of “ROS signatures,” which consist of a set of genes that together can show characteristic and indicative responses, should be preferred over the use of individual marker genes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1422–1441. PMID:24180661

  9. Does Twitter trigger bursts in signature collections?

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Kami, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kenji; Miyano, Satoru; Yuji, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    The quantification of social media impacts on societal and political events is a difficult undertaking. The Japanese Society of Oriental Medicine started a signature-collecting campaign to oppose a medical policy of the Government Revitalization Unit to exclude a traditional Japanese medicine, "Kampo," from the public insurance system. The signature count showed a series of aberrant bursts from November 26 to 29, 2009. In the same interval, the number of messages on Twitter including the keywords "Signature" and "Kampo," increased abruptly. Moreover, the number of messages on an Internet forum that discussed the policy and called for signatures showed a train of spikes. In order to estimate the contributions of social media, we developed a statistical model with state-space modeling framework that distinguishes the contributions of multiple social media in time-series of collected public opinions. We applied the model to the time-series of signature counts of the campaign and quantified contributions of two social media, i.e., Twitter and an Internet forum, by the estimation. We found that a considerable portion (78%) of the signatures was affected from either of the social media throughout the campaign and the Twitter effect (26%) was smaller than the Forum effect (52%) in total, although Twitter probably triggered the initial two bursts of signatures. Comparisons of the estimated profiles of the both effects suggested distinctions between the social media in terms of sustainable impact of messages or tweets. Twitter shows messages on various topics on a time-line; newer messages push out older ones. Twitter may diminish the impact of messages that are tweeted intermittently. The quantification of social media impacts is beneficial to better understand people's tendency and may promote developing strategies to engage public opinions effectively. Our proposed method is a promising tool to explore information hidden in social phenomena.

  10. Fission Signatures for Nuclear Material Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi

    2009-06-01

    Detection and interdiction of nuclear materials in all forms of transport is one of the most critical security issues facing the United States and the rest of the civilized world. Naturally emitted gamma rays by these materials, while abundant and detectable when unshielded, are low in energy and readily shielded. X-ray radiography is useful in detecting the possible presence of shielding material. Positive detection of concealed nuclear materials requires methods which unequivocally detect specific attributes of the materials. These methods typically involve active interrogation by penetrating radiation of neutrons, photons or other particles. Fortunately, nuclear materials, probed by various types of radiation, yield very unique and often strong signatures. Paramount among them are the detectable fission signatures, namely prompt neutrons and gamma rays, and delayed neutrons gamma rays. Other useful signatures are the nuclear states excited by neutrons, via inelastic scattering, or photons, via nuclear resonance fluorescence and absorption. The signatures are very different in magnitude, level of specificity, ease of excitation and detection, signal to background ratios, etc. For example, delayed neutrons are very unique to the fission process, but are scarce, have low energy, and hence are easily absorbed. Delayed gamma rays are more abundant but "featureless", and have a higher background from natural sources and more importantly, from activation due to the interrogation sources. The prompt fission signatures need to be measured in the presence of the much higher levels of probing radiation. This requires taking special measures to look for the signatures, sometimes leading to a significant sensitivity loss or a complete inability to detect them. Characteristic gamma rays induced in nuclear materials reflecting their nuclear structure, while rather unique, require very high intensity of interrogation radiation and very high resolution in energy and/or time. The

  11. Electronic warfare microwave components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosby, L. A.

    1984-09-01

    The current and projected state-of-the-art for electronic warfare (EW) microwave components is reviewed, with attention given to microwave components used extensively in EW systems for reconnaissance, threat warning, direction finding, and repeater jamming. It is emphasized that distributed EW systems must be able to operate from manned tactical and strategic platforms, with requirements including remote aerospace and space elements, as well as the need for expandable devices for detection, location, and denial/deception functions. EW coordination, or battle management, across a distributed system is a rapidly emerging requirement that must be integrated into current and projected command-and-control programs.

  12. Quality of signatures. [spectral signatures of winter wheat grown in Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, E. P. F.

    1974-01-01

    Three conclusions are drawn on the usability, inherent variations, and noise aspects of the spectral signatures processed from data collected by the Field Signature Acquisition System (FSAS). Conclusions are based on the spectral data collected from winter wheat of the 1972/73 season, grown at Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas.

  13. Liverome: a curated database of liver cancer-related gene signatures with self-contained context information.

    PubMed

    Lee, Langho; Wang, Kai; Li, Gang; Xie, Zhi; Wang, Yuli; Xu, Jiangchun; Sun, Shaoxian; Pocalyko, David; Bhak, Jong; Kim, Chulhong; Lee, Kee-Ho; Jang, Ye Jin; Yeom, Young Il; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Hwang, Seungwoo

    2011-11-30

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. A number of molecular profiling studies have investigated the changes in gene and protein expression that are associated with various clinicopathological characteristics of HCC and generated a wealth of scattered information, usually in the form of gene signature tables. A database of the published HCC gene signatures would be useful to liver cancer researchers seeking to retrieve existing differential expression information on a candidate gene and to make comparisons between signatures for prioritization of common genes. A challenge in constructing such database is that a direct import of the signatures as appeared in articles would lead to a loss or ambiguity of their context information that is essential for a correct biological interpretation of a gene's expression change. This challenge arises because designation of compared sample groups is most often abbreviated, ad hoc, or even missing from published signature tables. Without manual curation, the context information becomes lost, leading to uninformative database contents. Although several databases of gene signatures are available, none of them contains informative form of signatures nor shows comprehensive coverage on liver cancer. Thus we constructed Liverome, a curated database of liver cancer-related gene signatures with self-contained context information. Liverome's data coverage is more than three times larger than any other signature database, consisting of 143 signatures taken from 98 HCC studies, mostly microarray and proteome, and involving 6,927 genes. The signatures were post-processed into an informative and uniform representation and annotated with an itemized summary so that all context information is unambiguously self-contained within the database. The signatures were further informatively named and meaningfully organized according to ten functional categories for guided browsing. Its web interface enables a

  14. Polycomb repressive complex 2 epigenomic signature defines age-associated hypermethylation and gene expression changes

    PubMed Central

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G

    2015-01-01

    Although age-associated gene expression and methylation changes have been reported throughout the literature, the unifying epigenomic principles of aging remain poorly understood. Recent explosion in availability and resolution of functional/regulatory genome annotation data (epigenomic data), such as that provided by the ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics projects, provides an opportunity for the identification of epigenomic mechanisms potentially altered by age-associated differentially methylated regions (aDMRs) and regulatory signatures in the promoters of age-associated genes (aGENs). In this study we found that aDMRs and aGENs identified in multiple independent studies share a common Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 signature marked by EZH2, SUZ12, CTCF binding sites, repressive H3K27me3, and activating H3K4me1 histone modification marks, and a “poised promoter” chromatin state. This signature is depleted in RNA Polymerase II-associated transcription factor binding sites, activating H3K79me2, H3K36me3, H3K27ac marks, and an “active promoter” chromatin state. The PRC2 signature was shown to be generally stable across cell types. When considering the directionality of methylation changes, we found the PRC2 signature to be associated with aDMRs hypermethylated with age, while hypomethylated aDMRs were associated with enhancers. In contrast, aGENs were associated with the PRC2 signature independently of the directionality of gene expression changes. In this study we demonstrate that the PRC2 signature is the common epigenomic context of genomic regions associated with hypermethylation and gene expression changes in aging. PMID:25880792

  15. Definition of Contravariant Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-moa; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we have reviewed the basics of tensor analysis in an attempt to clarify some misconceptions regarding contravariant and covariant vector components as used in fluid dynamics. We have indicated that contravariant components are components of a given vector expressed as a unique combination of the covariant base vector system and, vice versa, that the covariant components are components of a vector expressed with the contravariant base vector system. Mathematically, expressing a vector with a combination of base vector is a decomposition process for a specific base vector system. Hence, the contravariant velocity components are decomposed components of velocity vector along the directions of coordinate lines, with respect to the covariant base vector system. However, the contravariant (and covariant) components are not physical quantities. Their magnitudes and dimensions are controlled by their corresponding covariant (and contravariant) base vectors.

  16. The Relationship of Magnetotail Flow Bursts and Ground Onset Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepko, Larry; Spanswick, Emma; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Donovan, Eric

    2010-01-01

    It has been known for decades that auroral substorm onset occurs on (or at least near) the most equatorward auroral arc, which is thought to map to the near geosynchronous region. The lack of auroral signatures poleward of this arc prior to onset has been a major criticism of flow-burst driven models of substorm onset. The combined THEMIS 5 spacecraft in-situ and ground array measurements provide an unprecedented opportunity to examine the causal relationship between midtail plasma flows, aurora, and ground magnetic signatures. I first present an event from 2008 using multi-spectral all sky imager data from Gillam and in-situ data from THEMIS. The multispectral data indicate an equatorward moving auroral form prior to substorm onset. When this forms reaches the most equatorward arc, the arc brightens and an auroral substorm begins. The THEMIS data show fast Earthward flows prior to onset as well. I discuss further the association of flow bursts and Pi2 pulsations, in the con text of the directly-driven Pi2 model. This model directly links flows and Pi2 pulsations, providing an important constraint on substorm onset theories.

  17. Simplifying BRDF input data for optical signature modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Tomas; Pohl, Anna; Fagerström, Jan

    2017-05-01

    Scene simulations of optical signature properties using signature codes normally requires input of various parameterized measurement data of surfaces and coatings in order to achieve realistic scene object features. Some of the most important parameters are used in the model of the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) and are normally determined by surface reflectance and scattering measurements. Reflectance measurements of the spectral Directional Hemispherical Reflectance (DHR) at various incident angles can normally be performed in most spectroscopy labs, while measuring the BRDF is more complicated or may not be available at all in many optical labs. We will present a method in order to achieve the necessary BRDF data directly from DHR measurements for modeling software using the Sandford-Robertson BRDF model. The accuracy of the method is tested by modeling a test surface by comparing results from using estimated and measured BRDF data as input to the model. These results show that using this method gives no significant loss in modeling accuracy.

  18. A Novel Quantum Proxy Blind Signature Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Xie, Shu-Cui; Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2017-05-01

    A novel quantum proxy blind signature scheme is proposed. In this scheme, a special type of non-maximally entangled three-qubit state is introduced as a quantum channel, which can realize perfect teleportation. The message sender U blinds his message by means of preparing two groups of non-orthogonal single-photon states. According to the original signer Charlie's delegation message, the proxy signer Alice generates a corresponding signature. The arbitrator Trent can help the receiver Bob verify the signature, and also prevent Bob from doing any damage. The above-mentioned advantages make this scheme different from some existing schemes. It is showed that our scheme has the properties of undeniability, unforgeability, blindness, untraceability. Moreover, it is free from intercept-resend attack.

  19. Estimating physiological skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We describe an approach for estimating human skin parameters, such as melanosome concentration, collagen concentration, oxygen saturation, and blood volume, using hyperspectral radiometric measurements (signatures) obtained from in vivo skin. We use a computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel equations. This model forward maps the skin parameters to a corresponding multiband reflectance spectra. Machine-learning-based regression is used to generate the inverse map, and hence estimate skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures. We test our methods using synthetic and in vivo skin signatures obtained in the visible through the short wave infrared domains from 24 patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian, and African American ethnicities. Performance validation shows promising results: good agreement with the ground truth and well-established physiological precepts. These methods have potential use in the characterization of skin abnormalities and in minimally-invasive prescreening of malignant skin cancers.

  20. A possible signature of annihilating dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Man Ho

    2018-02-01

    In this article, we report a new signature of dark matter annihilation based on the radio continuum data of NGC 1569 galaxy detected in the past few decades. After eliminating the thermal contribution of the radio signal, an abrupt change in the spectral index is shown in the radio spectrum. Previously, this signature was interpreted as an evidence of convective outflow of cosmic ray. However, we show that the cosmic ray contribution is not enough to account for the observed radio flux. We then discover that if dark matter annihilates via the 4-e channel with the thermal relic cross-section, the electrons and positrons produced would emit a strong radio flux which can provide an excellent agreement with the observed signature. The best-fitting dark matter mass is 25 GeV.

  1. Explosives Detection: Exploitation of the Physical Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David

    2010-10-01

    Explosives based terrorism is an ongoing threat that is evolving with respect to implementation, configuration and materials used. There are a variety of devices designed to detect explosive devices, however, each technology has limitations and operational constraints. A full understanding of the signatures available for detection coupled with the array of detection choices can be used to develop a conceptual model of an explosives screening operation. Physics based sensors provide a robust approach to explosives detection, typically through the identification of anomalies, and are currently used for screening in airports around the world. The next generation of detectors for explosives detection will need to be more sensitive and selective, as well as integrate seamlessly with devices focused on chemical signatures. An appreciation for the details of the physical signature exploitation in cluttered environments with time, space, and privacy constraints is necessary for effective explosives screening of people, luggage, cargo, and vehicles.

  2. Separation of Doppler radar-based respiratory signatures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee Siong; Pathirana, Pubudu N; Evans, Robin J; Steinfort, Christopher L

    2016-08-01

    Respiration detection using microwave Doppler radar has attracted significant interest primarily due to its unobtrusive form of measurement. With less preparation in comparison with attaching physical sensors on the body or wearing special clothing, Doppler radar for respiration detection and monitoring is particularly useful for long-term monitoring applications such as sleep studies (i.e. sleep apnoea, SIDS). However, motion artefacts and interference from multiple sources limit the widespread use and the scope of potential applications of this technique. Utilising the recent advances in independent component analysis (ICA) and multiple antenna configuration schemes, this work investigates the feasibility of decomposing respiratory signatures into each subject from the Doppler-based measurements. Experimental results demonstrated that FastICA is capable of separating two distinct respiratory signatures from two subjects adjacent to each other even in the presence of apnoea. In each test scenario, the separated respiratory patterns correlate closely to the reference respiration strap readings. The effectiveness of FastICA in dealing with the mixed Doppler radar respiration signals confirms its applicability in healthcare applications, especially in long-term home-based monitoring as it usually involves at least two people in the same environment (i.e. two people sleeping next to each other). Further, the use of FastICA to separate involuntary movements such as the arm swing from the respiratory signatures of a single subject was explored in a multiple antenna environment. The separated respiratory signal indeed demonstrated a high correlation with the measurements made by a respiratory strap used currently in clinical settings.

  3. Magnetic signature of daily sampled urban atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Matzka, Jürgen; Davila, Alfonso Fernández; Petersen, Nikolai

    The magnetic signature of two sets of daily sampled particulate matter (PM) collected in Munich, Germany, were examined and compared to variations in other pollution data and meteorological data using principal component analysis. The magnetic signature arising from the magnetic minerals in the PM was examined using a fast and highly sensitive magnetic remanence measurement. The longest data set studied was 160 days, significantly longer than that of similar magnetic PM studies improving the statistical robustness. It was found that the variations in the mass-dependent magnetic parameters displayed a complicated relationship governed by both the meteorological conditions and the PM loading rate, whereas mineralogy/grain-size-dependent magnetic parameters displayed little variation. A six-fold increase in the number of vehicles passing the sampling locations only doubled the magnetic remanence of the samples, suggesting that the measured magnetic signature is in addition strongly influenced by dispersion rates. At both localities the saturation isothermal remanent magnetisation (SIRM) was found to be strongly correlated with the PM mass, and it is suggested that measuring SIRM as a proxy for PM monitoring is a viable alternative to magnetic susceptibility when the samples are magnetically too weak. The signal was found to be dominated by magnetite-like grains less than 100 nm in diameter which is thought to be derived primarily from vehicles. Such small grains are known to be particularly dangerous to humans. There was also evidence to suggest from magnetic stability parameters that the magnetite-like grains were covered with an oxidised rim. The concentration of magnetic PM was in the range of 0.3-0.5% by mass.

  4. Spatial and Temporal Signatures of Flux Transfer Events in Global Simulations of Magnetopause Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Sibeck, David Gary; Hesse, Michael; Berrios, David; Rastaetter, Lutz; Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, Tamas I.

    2011-01-01

    Flux transfer events (FTEs) were originally identified by transient bipolar variations of the magnetic field component normal to the nominal magnetopause centered on enhancements in the total magnetic field strength. Recent Cluster and THEMIS multi-point measurements provided a wide range of signatures that are interpreted as evidence for FTE passage (e.g., crater FTE's, traveling magnetic erosion regions). We use the global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code BATS-R-US developed at the University of Michigan to model the global three-dimensional structure and temporal evolution of FTEs during multi-spacecraft magnetopause crossing events. Comparison of observed and simulated signatures and sensitivity analysis of the results to the probe location will be presented. We will demonstrate a variety of observable signatures in magnetic field profile that depend on space probe location with respect to the FTE passage. The global structure of FTEs will be illustrated using advanced visualization tools developed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

  5. Proteomics assisted profiling of antimicrobial peptide signatures from black pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    PubMed

    Umadevi, P; Soumya, M; George, Johnson K; Anandaraj, M

    2018-05-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides are the interesting source of studies in defense response as they are essential components of innate immunity which exert rapid defense response. In spite of abundant reports on the isolation of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from many sources, the profile of AMPs expressed/identified from single crop species under certain stress/physiological condition is still unknown. This work describes the AMP signature profile of black pepper and their expression upon Phytophthora infection using label-free quantitative proteomics strategy. The differential expression of 24 AMPs suggests that a combinatorial strategy is working in the defense network. The 24 AMP signatures belonged to the cationic, anionic, cysteine-rich and cysteine-free group. As the first report on the possible involvement of AMP signature in Phytophthora infection, our results offer a platform for further study on regulation, evolutionary importance and exploitation of theses AMPs as next generation molecules against pathogens.

  6. Does Twitter Trigger Bursts in Signature Collections?

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Kami, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kenji; Miyano, Satoru; Yuji, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The quantification of social media impacts on societal and political events is a difficult undertaking. The Japanese Society of Oriental Medicine started a signature-collecting campaign to oppose a medical policy of the Government Revitalization Unit to exclude a traditional Japanese medicine, “Kampo,” from the public insurance system. The signature count showed a series of aberrant bursts from November 26 to 29, 2009. In the same interval, the number of messages on Twitter including the keywords “Signature” and “Kampo,” increased abruptly. Moreover, the number of messages on an Internet forum that discussed the policy and called for signatures showed a train of spikes. Methods and Findings In order to estimate the contributions of social media, we developed a statistical model with state-space modeling framework that distinguishes the contributions of multiple social media in time-series of collected public opinions. We applied the model to the time-series of signature counts of the campaign and quantified contributions of two social media, i.e., Twitter and an Internet forum, by the estimation. We found that a considerable portion (78%) of the signatures was affected from either of the social media throughout the campaign and the Twitter effect (26%) was smaller than the Forum effect (52%) in total, although Twitter probably triggered the initial two bursts of signatures. Comparisons of the estimated profiles of the both effects suggested distinctions between the social media in terms of sustainable impact of messages or tweets. Twitter shows messages on various topics on a time-line; newer messages push out older ones. Twitter may diminish the impact of messages that are tweeted intermittently. Conclusions The quantification of social media impacts is beneficial to better understand people’s tendency and may promote developing strategies to engage public opinions effectively. Our proposed method is a promising tool to explore

  7. Attack and improvements of fair quantum blind signature schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiangfu; Qiu, Daowen

    2013-06-01

    Blind signature schemes allow users to obtain the signature of a message while the signer learns neither the message nor the resulting signature. Therefore, blind signatures have been used to realize cryptographic protocols providing the anonymity of some participants, such as: secure electronic payment systems and electronic voting systems. A fair blind signature is a form of blind signature which the anonymity could be removed with the help of a trusted entity, when this is required for legal reasons. Recently, a fair quantum blind signature scheme was proposed and thought to be safe. In this paper, we first point out that there exists a new attack on fair quantum blind signature schemes. The attack shows that, if any sender has intercepted any valid signature, he (she) can counterfeit a valid signature for any message and can not be traced by the counterfeited blind signature. Then, we construct a fair quantum blind signature scheme by improved the existed one. The proposed fair quantum blind signature scheme can resist the preceding attack. Furthermore, we demonstrate the security of the proposed fair quantum blind signature scheme and compare it with the other one.

  8. Cryptanalysis of the Quantum Group Signature Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke-Jia; Sun, Ying; Song, Ting-Ting; Zuo, Hui-Juan

    2013-11-01

    Recently, the researches of quantum group signature (QGS) have attracted a lot of attentions and some typical protocols have been designed for e-payment system, e-government, e-business, etc. In this paper, we analyze the security of the quantum group signature with the example of two novel protocols. It can be seen that both of them cannot be implemented securely since the arbitrator cannot solve the disputes fairly. In order to show that, some possible attack strategies, which can be used by the malicious participants, are proposed. Moreover, the further discussions of QGS are presented finally, including some insecurity factors and improved ideas.

  9. Characterization of marine macroalgae by fluorescence signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topinka, J. A.; Bellows, W. Korjeff; Yentsch, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of distinguishing macroalgal classes by their fluorescence signatures was investigated using narrow-waveband light to excite groups of accessory pigments in brown, red, and green macroalgae and measuring fluorescence emission at 685 nm. Results obtained on 20 marine macroalgae field-collected samples showed that fluorescence excitation signatures were relatively uniform within phylogenetic classes but were substantially different for different classes. It is suggested that it may be possible to characterize the type and the abundance of subtidal macroalgae from low-flying aircraft using existing laser-induced fluorescence methodology.

  10. Transient thermal camouflage and heat signature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tian-Zhi; Su, Yishu; Xu, Weikai; Yang, Xiao-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Thermal metamaterials have been proposed to manipulate heat flux as a new way to cloak or camouflage objects in the infrared world. To date, however, thermal metamaterials only operate in the steady-state and exhibit detectable, transient heat signatures. In this letter, the theoretical basis for a thermal camouflaging technique with controlled transient diffusion is presented. This technique renders an object invisible in real time. More importantly, the thermal camouflaging device instantaneously generates a pre-designed heat signature and behaves as a perfect thermal illusion device. A metamaterial coating with homogeneous and isotropic thermal conductivity, density, and volumetric heat capacity was fabricated and very good camouflaging performance was achieved.

  11. Robust MOE Detector for DS-CDMA Systems with Signature Waveform Mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsui-Tsai

    In this letter, a decision-directed MOE detector with excellent robustness against signature waveform mismatch is proposed for DS-CDMA systems. Both the theoretic analysis and computer simulation results demonstrate that the proposed detector can provide better SINR performance than that of conventional detectors.

  12. 37 CFR 1.4 - Nature of correspondence and signature requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... personally signed, in permanent dark ink or its equivalent, by that person; or (ii) Be a direct or indirect... EFS-Web customization. (4) Certifications. (i) Section 11.18 certifications: The presentation to the... signature personally signed in permanent dark ink or its equivalent by that person. (f) When a document that...

  13. 37 CFR 1.4 - Nature of correspondence and signature requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... personally signed, in permanent dark ink or its equivalent, by that person; or (ii) Be a direct or indirect... EFS-Web customization. (4) Certifications—(i) Section 11.18 certifications. The presentation to the... signed in permanent dark ink or its equivalent: (1) Correspondence requiring a person's signature and...

  14. 37 CFR 1.4 - Nature of correspondence and signature requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... personally signed, in permanent dark ink or its equivalent, by that person; or (ii) Be a direct or indirect... EFS-Web customization. (4) Certifications. (i) Section 11.18 certifications: The presentation to the... signature personally signed in permanent dark ink or its equivalent by that person. (f) When a document that...

  15. 37 CFR 1.4 - Nature of correspondence and signature requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... personally signed, in permanent dark ink or its equivalent, by that person; or (ii) Be a direct or indirect... EFS-Web customization. (4) Certifications. (i) Section 11.18 certifications: The presentation to the... signature personally signed in permanent dark ink or its equivalent by that person. (f) When a document that...

  16. Selection signature analysis in Holstein cattle identified genes known to affect reproduction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using direct comparison of 45,878 SNPs between a group of Holstein cattle unselected since 1964 and contemporary Holsteins that on average take 30 days longer for successful conception than the 1964 Holsteins, we conducted selection signature analyses to identify genomic regions associated with dair...

  17. Interpretation of F-106B in-flight lightning signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, T. F.; Grothaus, M. G.; Wen, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Various characteristics of the electromagnetic data obtained on a NASA F-106B aircraft during direct lightning strikes are presented. Time scales of interest range from 10 ns to 400 microsecond. The following topics are discussed: (1) Lightning current, I, measured directly versus I obtained from computer integration of measured I-dot; (2) A method of compensation for the low frequency cutoff of the current transformer used to measure I; (3) Properties of fast pulses observed in the lightning time-derivative waveforms; (4) The characteristic D-dot signature of the F-106B aircraft; (5) An RC-discharge interpretation for some lightning waveforms; (6) A method for inferring the locations of lightning channel attachment points on the aircraft by using B-dot data; (7) Simple, approximate relationships between D-dot and I-dot and between B and I; and (8) Estimates of energy, charge, voltage, and resistance for a particular lightning event.

  18. Spintronic signatures of Klein tunneling in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yunkun; Tan, Yaohua; Ghosh, Avik W.

    2017-11-01

    Klein tunneling, the perfect transmission of normally incident Dirac electrons across a potential barrier, has been widely studied in graphene and explored to design switches, albeit indirectly. We show an alternative way to directly measure Klein tunneling for spin-momentum locked electrons crossing a PN junction along a three-dimensional topological insulator surface. In these topological insulator PN junctions (TIPNJs), the spin texture and momentum distribution of transmitted electrons can be measured electrically using a ferromagnetic probe for varying gate voltages and angles of current injection. Based on transport models across a TIPNJ, we show that the asymmetry in the potentiometric signal between PP and PN junctions and its overall angular dependence serve as a direct signature of Klein tunneling.

  19. Binding Affinity prediction with Property Encoded Shape Distribution signatures

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sourav; Krein, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of the molecular signatures known as “Property-Encoded Shape Distributions” (PESD) together with standard Support Vector Machine (SVM) techniques to produce validated models that can predict the binding affinity of a large number of protein ligand complexes. This “PESD-SVM” method uses PESD signatures that encode molecular shapes and property distributions on protein and ligand surfaces as features to build SVM models that require no subjective feature selection. A simple protocol was employed for tuning the SVM models during their development, and the results were compared to SFCscore – a regression-based method that was previously shown to perform better than 14 other scoring functions. Although the PESD-SVM method is based on only two surface property maps, the overall results were comparable. For most complexes with a dominant enthalpic contribution to binding (ΔH/-TΔS > 3), a good correlation between true and predicted affinities was observed. Entropy and solvent were not considered in the present approach and further improvement in accuracy would require accounting for these components rigorously. PMID:20095526

  20. Modelling of mid-infrared interferometric signature of hot exozodiacal dust emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchschlager, Florian; Wolf, Sebastian; Brunngräber, Robert; Matter, Alexis; Krivov, Alexander V.; Labdon, Aaron

    2018-01-01

    Hot exozodiacal dust emission was detected in recent surveys around two dozen main-sequence stars at distances of less than 1 au using the H- and K-band interferometry. Due to the high contrast as well as the small angular distance between the circumstellar dust and the star, direct observation of this dust component is challenging. An alternative way to explore the hot exozodiacal dust is provided by mid-infrared interferometry. We analyse the L, M and N bands interferometric signature of this emission in order to find stronger constraints for the properties and the origin of the hot exozodiacal dust. Considering the parameters of nine debris disc systems derived previously, we model the discs in each of these bands. We find that the M band possesses the best conditions to detect hot dust emission, closely followed by L and N bands. The hot dust in three systems - HD 22484 (10 Tau), HD 102647 (β Leo) and HD 177724 (ζ Aql) - shows a strong signal in the visibility functions, which may even allow one to constrain the dust location. In particular, observations in the mid-infrared could help to determine whether the dust piles up at the sublimation radius or is located at radii up to 1 au. In addition, we explore observations of the hot exozodiacal dust with the upcoming mid-infrared interferometer Multi AperTure mid-Infrared SpectroScopic Experiment (MATISSE) at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer.

  1. Electromagnetic Signatures of SMBH Coalescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    When two supermassive black holes (SMBHs) approach within 1-10 mpc, gravitational wave (GW) losses begin to dominate the evolution of the binary, pushing the system to merge in a relatively small time. During this final inspiral regime, the system will emit copious energy in GWs, which should be directly detectable by pulsar timing arrays and space-based interferometers. At the same time, any gas or stars in the immediate vicinity of the merging 5MBHs can get heated and produce bright electromagnetic (EM) counterparts to the GW signals. We present here a number of possible mechanisms by which simultaneous EM and GW signals will yield valuable new information about galaxy evolution, accretion disk dynamics, and fundamental physics in the most extreme gravitational fields.

  2. Selection signature in domesticated animals.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhang-yuan; He, Xiao-yun; Wang, Xiang-yu; Guo, Xiao-fei; Cao, Xiao-han; Hu, Wen-ping; Di, Ran; Liu, Qiu-yue; Chu, Ming-xing

    2016-12-20

    Domesticated animals play an important role in the life of humanity. All these domesticated animals undergo same process, first domesticated from wild animals, then after long time natural and artificial selection, formed various breeds that adapted to the local environment and human needs. In this process, domestication, natural and artificial selection will leave the selection signal in the genome. The research on these selection signals can find functional genes directly, is one of the most important strategies in screening functional genes. The current studies of selection signal have been performed in pigs, chickens, cattle, sheep, goats, dogs and other domestic animals, and found a great deal of functional genes. This paper provided an overview of the types and the detected methods of selection signal, and outlined researches of selection signal in domestic animals, and discussed the key issues in selection signal analysis and its prospects.

  3. Joint Estimation of Time-Frequency Signature and DOA Based on STFD for Multicomponent Chirp Signals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziyue; Liu, Congfeng

    2014-01-01

    In the study of the joint estimation of time-frequency signature and direction of arrival (DOA) for multicomponent chirp signals, an estimation method based on spatial time-frequency distributions (STFDs) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, array signal model for multicomponent chirp signals is presented and then array processing is applied in time-frequency analysis to mitigate cross-terms. According to the results of the array processing, Hough transform is performed and the estimation of time-frequency signature is obtained. Subsequently, subspace method for DOA estimation based on STFD matrix is achieved. Simulation results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

  4. Potentiality for obtaining poria disease signatures in the Oregon Cascades from orbital altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wear, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A prime photographic signature indicator of an important forest disease was identified in valuable Douglas-fir stands of the Pacific Northwest. The disease signature was verified by a multidisciplinary team of scientists to be the direct result of the Poria weirii root-rot syndrome in the Douglas-fir and hemlock stands of the high Cascades in Oregon. It is readily discernible on small-scale suborbital photography and has good potential for detection from earth-orbiting satellites or remote sensing platforms.

  5. Joint Estimation of Time-Frequency Signature and DOA Based on STFD for Multicomponent Chirp Signals

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ziyue; Liu, Congfeng

    2014-01-01

    In the study of the joint estimation of time-frequency signature and direction of arrival (DOA) for multicomponent chirp signals, an estimation method based on spatial time-frequency distributions (STFDs) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, array signal model for multicomponent chirp signals is presented and then array processing is applied in time-frequency analysis to mitigate cross-terms. According to the results of the array processing, Hough transform is performed and the estimation of time-frequency signature is obtained. Subsequently, subspace method for DOA estimation based on STFD matrix is achieved. Simulation results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. PMID:27382610

  6. Detecting particle dark matter signatures by cross-correlating γ-ray anisotropies with weak lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camera, S.; Fornasa, M.; Fornengo, N.; Regis, M.

    2016-05-01

    The underlying nature of dark matter still represents one of the fundamental questions in contemporary cosmology. Although observations well agree with its description in terms of a new fundamental particle, neither direct nor indirect signatures of its particle nature have been detected so far, despite a strong experimental effort. Similarly, particle accelerators have hitherto failed at producing dark matter particles in collider physics experiments. Here, we illustrate how the cross-correlation between anisotropies in the diffuse γ-ray background and weak gravitational lensing effects represents a novel promising way in the quest of detecting particle dark matter signatures.

  7. Signature modelling and radiometric rendering equations in infrared scene simulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willers, Cornelius J.; Willers, Maria S.; Lapierre, Fabian

    2011-11-01

    The development and optimisation of modern infrared systems necessitates the use of simulation systems to create radiometrically realistic representations (e.g. images) of infrared scenes. Such simulation systems are used in signature prediction, the development of surveillance and missile sensors, signal/image processing algorithm development and aircraft self-protection countermeasure system development and evaluation. Even the most cursory investigation reveals a multitude of factors affecting the infrared signatures of realworld objects. Factors such as spectral emissivity, spatial/volumetric radiance distribution, specular reflection, reflected direct sunlight, reflected ambient light, atmospheric degradation and more, all affect the presentation of an object's instantaneous signature. The signature is furthermore dynamically varying as a result of internal and external influences on the object, resulting from the heat balance comprising insolation, internal heat sources, aerodynamic heating (airborne objects), conduction, convection and radiation. In order to accurately render the object's signature in a computer simulation, the rendering equations must therefore account for all the elements of the signature. In this overview paper, the signature models, rendering equations and application frameworks of three infrared simulation systems are reviewed and compared. The paper first considers the problem of infrared scene simulation in a framework for simulation validation. This approach provides concise definitions and a convenient context for considering signature models and subsequent computer implementation. The primary radiometric requirements for an infrared scene simulator are presented next. The signature models and rendering equations implemented in OSMOSIS (Belgian Royal Military Academy), DIRSIG (Rochester Institute of Technology) and OSSIM (CSIR & Denel Dynamics) are reviewed. In spite of these three simulation systems' different application focus

  8. Combining Gene Signatures Improves Prediction of Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xi; Naume, Bjørn; Langerød, Anita; Frigessi, Arnoldo; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Lingjærde, Ole Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background Several gene sets for prediction of breast cancer survival have been derived from whole-genome mRNA expression profiles. Here, we develop a statistical framework to explore whether combination of the information from such sets may improve prediction of recurrence and breast cancer specific death in early-stage breast cancers. Microarray data from two clinically similar cohorts of breast cancer patients are used as training (n = 123) and test set (n = 81), respectively. Gene sets from eleven previously published gene signatures are included in the study. Principal Findings To investigate the relationship between breast cancer survival and gene expression on a particular gene set, a Cox proportional hazards model is applied using partial likelihood regression with an L2 penalty to avoid overfitting and using cross-validation to determine the penalty weight. The fitted models are applied to an independent test set to obtain a predicted risk for each individual and each gene set. Hierarchical clustering of the test individuals on the basis of the vector of predicted risks results in two clusters with distinct clinical characteristics in terms of the distribution of molecular subtypes, ER, PR status, TP53 mutation status and histological grade category, and associated with significantly different survival probabilities (recurrence: p = 0.005; breast cancer death: p = 0.014). Finally, principal components analysis of the gene signatures is used to derive combined predictors used to fit a new Cox model. This model classifies test individuals into two risk groups with distinct survival characteristics (recurrence: p = 0.003; breast cancer death: p = 0.001). The latter classifier outperforms all the individual gene signatures, as well as Cox models based on traditional clinical parameters and the Adjuvant! Online for survival prediction. Conclusion Combining the predictive strength of multiple gene signatures improves prediction of breast

  9. Experimental study of ELF signatures developed by ballistic missile launch

    SciTech Connect

    Peglow, S.G.; Rynne, T.M.

    1993-04-08

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore, CA) and SARA, Inc. participated in the ATMD missile launch activities that occurred at WSMR during January 1993. These tests involved the launch of Lance missiles with a subsequent direction of F-15Es into the launch area for subsequent detection and simulated destruction of redeployed missile launchers, LLNL and SARA deployed SARN`s ELF sensors and various data acquisition systems for monitoring of basic phenomena. On 25 January 1993, a single missile launch allowed initial measurements of the phenomena and an assessment of appropriate sensor sensitivity settings as well as the appropriateness of the sensor deploymentmore » sites (e.g., with respect to man-made ELF sources such as power distributions and communication lines). On 27 January 1993, a measurement of a double launch of Lance missiles was performed. This technical report covers the results of the analysis of latter measurements. An attempt was made to measure low frequency electromagnetic signatures that may be produced during a missile launch. Hypothetical signature production mechanisms include: (1) Perturbations of the earth geo-potential during the launch of the missile. This signature may arise from the interaction of the ambient electric field with the conducting body of the missile as well as the partially ionized exhaust plume. (2) Production of spatial, charge sources from triboelectric-like mechanisms. Such effects may occur during the initial interaction of the missile plume with the ground material and lead to an initial {open_quotes}spike{close_quotes} output, Additionally, there may exist charge transfer mechanisms produced during the exhausting of the burnt fuel oxidizer.« less

  10. Observational signatures of self-destructive civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Adam; Forgan, Duncan; James, Jack O'malley

    2016-10-01

    We address the possibility that intelligent civilizations that destroy themselves could present signatures observable by humanity. Placing limits on the number of self-destroyed civilizations in the Milky Way has strong implications for the final three terms in Drake's Equation, and would allow us to identify which classes of solution to Fermi's Paradox fit with the evidence (or lack thereof). Using the Earth as an example, we consider a variety of scenarios in which humans could extinguish their own technological civilization. Each scenario presents some form of observable signature that could be probed by astronomical campaigns to detect and characterize extrasolar planetary systems. Some observables are unlikely to be detected at interstellar distances, but some scenarios are likely to produce significant changes in atmospheric composition that could be detected serendipitously with next-generation telescopes. In some cases, the timing of the observation would prove crucial to detection, as the decay of signatures is rapid compared with humanity's communication lifetime. In others, the signatures persist on far longer timescales.

  11. Piezoelectric sensor pen for dynamic signature verification

    SciTech Connect

    EerNisse, E.P.; Land, C.E.; Snelling, J.B.

    The concept of using handwriting dynamics for electronic identification is discussed. A piezoelectric sensor pen for obtaining the pen point dynamics during writing is described. Design equations are derived and details of an operating device are presented. Typical output waveforms are shown to demonstrate the operation of the pen and to show the dissimilarities between dynamics of a genuine signature and an attempted forgery.

  12. Neutral signature Walker-CSI metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A.; Musoke, N.

    2015-03-01

    We will construct explicit examples of four-dimensional neutral signature Einstein Walker spaces for which all of the polynomial scalar curvature invariants are constant. We show that these Einstein Walker spaces are Kundt. We then investigate the mathematical properties of the spaces, including holonomy and universality.

  13. Hyperspectral signature analysis of skin parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Garza, Luis; Kang, Sewon; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    The temporal analysis of changes in biological skin parameters, including melanosome concentration, collagen concentration and blood oxygenation, may serve as a valuable tool in diagnosing the progression of malignant skin cancers and in understanding the pathophysiology of cancerous tumors. Quantitative knowledge of these parameters can also be useful in applications such as wound assessment, and point-of-care diagnostics, amongst others. We propose an approach to estimate in vivo skin parameters using a forward computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel Equations. We use this model to map the skin parameters to their corresponding hyperspectral signature. We then use machine learning based regression to develop an inverse map from hyperspectral signatures to skin parameters. In particular, we employ support vector machine based regression to estimate the in vivo skin parameters given their corresponding hyperspectral signature. We build on our work from SPIE 2012, and validate our methodology on an in vivo dataset. This dataset consists of 241 signatures collected from in vivo hyperspectral imaging of patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian and African American ethnicities. In addition, we also extend our methodology past the visible region and through the short-wave infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. We find promising results when comparing the estimated skin parameters to the ground truth, demonstrating good agreement with well-established physiological precepts. This methodology can have potential use in non-invasive skin anomaly detection and for developing minimally invasive pre-screening tools.

  14. Simplified models for displaced dark matter signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmueller, Oliver; De Roeck, Albert; Hahn, Kristian

    We propose a systematic programme to search for long-lived neutral particle signatures through a minimal set of displaced =E T searches (dMETs). Here, our approach is to extend the well-established dark matter simpli ed models to include displaced vertices. The dark matter simplified models are used to describe the primary production vertex. A displaced secondary vertex, characterised by the mass of the long-lived particle and its lifetime, is added for the displaced signature. We show how these models can be motivated by, and mapped onto, complete models such as gauge-mediated SUSY breaking and models of neutral naturalness. We also outlinemore » how this approach may be used to extend other simplified models to incorporate displaced signatures and to characterise searches for longlived charged particles. Displaced vertices are a striking signature which is often virtually background free, and thus provide an excellent target for the high-luminosity run of the Large Hadron Collider. The proposed models and searches provide a first step towards a systematic broadening of the displaced dark matter search programme.« less

  15. Exploring Signature Pedagogies in Undergraduate Leadership Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the instructional strategies most frequently used by leadership educators who teach academic credit-bearing undergraduate leadership studies courses through a national survey and identifies signature pedagogies within the leadership discipline. Findings from this study suggest that class discussion--whether in the form of…

  16. The Pedagogic Signature of Special Needs Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiß, Sabine; Kollmannsberger, Markus; Lerche, Thomas; Oubaid, Viktor; Kiel, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the following study is to identify a pedagogic signature, according to LS Shulman, for working with students who have special educational needs. Special educational needs are defined as significant limitations in personal development and learning which require particular educational measures beyond regular education. The development of…

  17. Science of Land Target Spectral Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-03

    F. Meriaudeau, T. Downey , A. Wig , A. Passian, M. Buncick, T.L. Ferrell, Fiber optic sensor based on gold island plasmon resonance , Sensors and...processing, detection algorithms, sensor fusion, spectral signature modeling Dr. J. Michael Cathcart Georgia Tech Research Corporation Office of...target detection and sensor fusion. The phenomenology research continued to focus on spectroscopic soil measurements, optical property analyses, field

  18. Simplified models for displaced dark matter signatures

    DOE PAGES

    Buchmueller, Oliver; De Roeck, Albert; Hahn, Kristian; ...

    2017-09-18

    We propose a systematic programme to search for long-lived neutral particle signatures through a minimal set of displaced =E T searches (dMETs). Here, our approach is to extend the well-established dark matter simpli ed models to include displaced vertices. The dark matter simplified models are used to describe the primary production vertex. A displaced secondary vertex, characterised by the mass of the long-lived particle and its lifetime, is added for the displaced signature. We show how these models can be motivated by, and mapped onto, complete models such as gauge-mediated SUSY breaking and models of neutral naturalness. We also outlinemore » how this approach may be used to extend other simplified models to incorporate displaced signatures and to characterise searches for longlived charged particles. Displaced vertices are a striking signature which is often virtually background free, and thus provide an excellent target for the high-luminosity run of the Large Hadron Collider. The proposed models and searches provide a first step towards a systematic broadening of the displaced dark matter search programme.« less

  19. 76 FR 30542 - Adult Signature Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ...[supreg]. USPS[supreg]-approved PC Postage[supreg] (registered end- users only). Permit imprint, if the.... Permit imprint, if the customer electronically submits postage statements and mailing documentation. d... mailpieces (not bearing a permit imprint) with Adult Signature at a Post Office lobby drop, collection box...

  20. Momentum signatures of the Anderson transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjib, Ghosh

    This thesis explores for possible signatures of Anderson localization and the Anderson metal-insulator transition (MIT) in momentum space. We find that an initial plane-wave propagating in a disordered medium exhibits a diffusive background and two interference peaks, the coherent backscattering (CBS) and the coherent forward scattering (CFS) peaks in the momentum distribution. We show, the signatures of Anderson localization and the Anderson transition are encoded in the dynamical properties of the two interference peaks, CBS and CFS. We develop finite-time scaling theory for the angular width of the CBS peak and in the height of the CFS peak. We demonstrate how to extract properties like critical exponent, the mobility edge and signatures of multifractality from this finite-time analysis. These momentum space signatures of the Anderson transition are novel and they promise to be experimental observables for wide range of systems, from cold atoms to classical waves or any wave systems where the momentum distribution is accessible.

  1. Water quality parameter measurement using spectral signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Regression analysis is applied to the problem of measuring water quality parameters from remote sensing spectral signature data. The equations necessary to perform regression analysis are presented and methods of testing the strength and reliability of a regression are described. An efficient algorithm for selecting an optimal subset of the independent variables available for a regression is also presented.

  2. Negative obstacle detection by thermal signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthies, Larry; Rankin, A.

    2003-01-01

    Detecting negative obstacles (ditches, potholes, and other depressions) is one of the most difficult problems in perception for autonomous, off-road navigation. Past work has largely relied on range imagery, because that is based on the geometry of the obstacle, is largely insensitive to illumination variables, and because there have not been other reliable alternatives. However, the visible aspect of negative obstacles shrinks rapidly with range, making them impossible to detect in time to avoid them at high speed. To relive this problem, we show that the interiors of negative obstacles generally remain warmer than the surrounding terrain throughout the night, making thermal signature a stable property for night-time negative obstacle detection. Experimental results to date have achieved detection distances 45% greater by using thermal signature than by using range data alone. Thermal signature is the first known observable with potential to reveal a deep negative obstacle without actually seeing far into it. Modeling solar illumination has potential to extend the usefulness of thermal signature through daylight hours.

  3. General NMSSM signatures at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiner, H. K.; Staub, F.; Vicente, A.

    2013-02-01

    We study the possible LHC collider signatures in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. The general next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model consists of 29 supersymmetric particles which can be mass ordered in 29!≃9×1030 ways. To reduce the number of hierarchies to a more manageable amount we assume a degeneracy of the sfermions of the first two generations with the same quantum numbers. Further assumptions about the neutralino and chargino masses leave 15 unrelated parameters. We check all 15!≈1012 relevant mass orderings for the dominant decay chains and the corresponding collider signatures at the LHC. As preferred signatures, we consider charged leptons, missing transverse momentum, jets, and W, Z or Higgs bosons. We present the results for three different choices of the singlet to Higgs coupling λ: (a) small, O(λ)O(Ytop). We compare these three scenarios with the MSSM expectations as well as among each other. We also mention a possible mass hierarchy leading to seven jets plus one lepton signatures at the LHC and comment briefly on the consequence of possible R-parity violation.

  4. Acquisition and deconvolution of seismic signals by different methods to perform direct ground-force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletto, Flavio; Schleifer, Andrea; Zgauc, Franco; Meneghini, Fabio; Petronio, Lorenzo

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of a novel borehole-seismic experiment in which we used different types of onshore-transient-impulsive and non-impulsive-surface sources together with direct ground-force recordings. The ground-force signals were obtained by baseplate load cells located beneath the sources, and by buried soil-stress sensors installed in the very shallow-subsurface together with accelerometers. The aim was to characterize the source's emission by its complex impedance, function of the near-field vibrations and soil stress components, and above all to obtain appropriate deconvolution operators to remove the signature of the sources in the far-field seismic signals. The data analysis shows the differences in the reference measurements utilized to deconvolve the source signature. As downgoing waves, we process the signals of vertical seismic profiles (VSP) recorded in the far-field approximation by an array of permanent geophones cemented at shallow-medium depth outside the casing of an instrumented well. We obtain a significant improvement in the waveform of the radiated seismic-vibrator signals deconvolved by ground force, similar to that of the seismograms generated by the impulsive sources, and demonstrates that the results obtained by different sources present low values in their repeatability norm. The comparison evidences the potentiality of the direct ground-force measurement approach to effectively remove the far-field source signature in VSP onshore data, and to increase the performance of permanent acquisition installations for time-lapse application purposes.

  5. Dynamical Signatures of Living Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the main challenges in modeling living systems is to distinguish a random walk of physical origin (for instance, Brownian motions) from those of biological origin and that will constitute the starting point of the proposed approach. As conjectured, the biological random walk must be nonlinear. Indeed, any stochastic Markov process can be described by linear Fokker-Planck equation (or its discretized version), only that type of process has been observed in the inanimate world. However, all such processes always converge to a stable (ergodic or periodic) state, i.e., to the states of a lower complexity and high entropy. At the same time, the evolution of living systems directed toward a higher level of complexity if complexity is associated with a number of structural variations. The simplest way to mimic such a tendency is to incorporate a nonlinearity into the random walk; then the probability evolution will attain the features of diffusion equation: the formation and dissipation of shock waves initiated by small shallow wave disturbances. As a result, the evolution never "dies:" it produces new different configurations which are accompanied by an increase or decrease of entropy (the decrease takes place during formation of shock waves, the increase-during their dissipation). In other words, the evolution can be directed "against the second law of thermodynamics" by forming patterns outside of equilibrium in the probability space. Due to that, a specie is not locked up in a certain pattern of behavior: it still can perform a variety of motions, and only the statistics of these motions is constrained by this pattern. It should be emphasized that such a "twist" is based upon the concept of reflection, i.e., the existence of the self-image (adopted from psychology). The model consists of a generator of stochastic processes which represents the motor dynamics in the form of nonlinear random walks, and a simulator of the nonlinear version of the diffusion

  6. Global simulation of flux transfer events: Generation mechanism and spacecraft signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeder, J.

    We use global MHD simulations of Earth's magnetosphere to show that for southward IMF conditions: a) steady reconnection preferentially occurs without FTEs when the stagnation flow line nearly coincides with the X-line location, which requires small dipole tilt and nearly due southward IMF, b) FTEs occur when the flow/field symmetry is broken, which requires either a large dipole tilt and/or a substantial east-west component of the IMF, c) the predicted spacecraft signature and the repetition frequency of FTEs in the simulations agrees very well with typical observations, lending credibility to the the model, d) the fundamental process that leads to FTE formation is multiple X-line formation caused by the flow and field patterns in the magnetosheath and requires no intrinsic plasma property variations like variable resistivity, e) if the dipole tilt breaks the symmetry FTEs occur only in the winter hemisphere whereas the reconnection signatures in the summer hemisphere are steady with no bipolar FTE-like signatures, f) if the IMF east-west field component breaks the symmetry FTEs occur in both hemispheres but are least likely observed near the subsolar point, and g) FTE formation depends on sufficient resolution and low diffusion in the model. Too coarse resolution and/or too high diffusivity lead to flow-through reconnection signatures that appear unphysical given the frequent observation of FTEs.

  7. Apparatus for remotely handling components

    DOEpatents

    Szkrybalo, Gregory A.; Griffin, Donald L.

    1994-01-01

    The inventive apparatus for remotely handling bar-like components which define a longitudinal direction includes a gripper mechanism for gripping the component including first and second gripper members longitudinally fixedly spaced from each other and oriented parallel to each other in planes transverse to the longitudinal direction. Each gripper member includes a jaw having at least one V-groove with opposing surfaces intersecting at a base and extending radially relative to the longitudinal direction for receiving the component in an open end between the opposing surfaces. The V-grooves on the jaw plate of the first and second gripper members are aligned in the longitudinal direction to support the component in the first and second gripper members. A jaw is rotatably mounted on and a part of each of the first and second gripper members for selectively assuming a retracted mode in which the open end of the V-groove is unobstructed and active mode in which the jaw spans the open end of the V-groove in the first and second gripper members. The jaw has a locking surface for contacting the component in the active mode to secure the component between the locking surface of the jaw and the opposing surfaces of the V-groove. The locking surface has a plurality of stepped portions, each defining a progressively decreasing radial distance between the base of the V-groove and the stepped portion opposing the base to accommodate varying sizes of components.

  8. Fire Signatures of Materials Used in Spacecraft Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Christina

    2003-01-01

    The focus of my work this summer was fire safety, specifically determining fire signatures from the combustion of materials commonly found in the construction of spacecraft. This project was undertaken with the aim of addressing concerns for health and safety onboard spacecraft. Under certain conditions, burning electronics produce surprisingly large amounts of acrid smoke, release fine airborne particles and expel condensable aerosols. Similarly, some wire insulation and packing material evolves smoke when in contact with a hot surface. In the limited, enclosed space available on spacecraft, these combustion products may pose a nuisance at the very least - at worst, a hazard to health or equipment. There is also a concern for fire safety in early detection on spacecraft. Our goal for the summer was to determine the most effective methods to test the materials, develop a protocol for sampling, and generate samples for analysis. We restricted our testing to electronic components, packaging and insulation materials, and wire insulation materials.

  9. An electrophysiological signature for proactive interference resolution in working memory.

    PubMed

    Du, Yingchun; Xiao, Zhuangwei; Song, Yan; Fan, Silu; Wu, Renhua; Zhang, John X

    2008-08-01

    We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to study the temporal dynamics of proactive interference in working memory. Participants performed a Sternberg item-recognition task to determine whether a probe was in a target memory set. Familiar negative probes were found to be more difficult to reject than less familiar ones. A fronto-central N2 component peaking around 300 ms post-probe-onset differentiated among target probes, familiar and less familiar non-target probes. The study identifies N2 as the ERP signature for proactive interference resolution. It also indicates that the resolution process occurs in the same time window as target/non-target discrimination and provides the first piece of electrophysiological evidence supporting a recent interference resolution model based on localization data [Jonides, J., Nee, D.E., 2006. Brain mechanisms of proactive interference in working memory. Neuroscience 139, 181-193].

  10. The cerebral signature for pain perception and its modulation.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Irene; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2007-08-02

    Our understanding of the neural correlates of pain perception in humans has increased significantly since the advent of neuroimaging. Relating neural activity changes to the varied pain experiences has led to an increased awareness of how factors (e.g., cognition, emotion, context, injury) can separately influence pain perception. Tying this body of knowledge in humans to work in animal models of pain provides an opportunity to determine common features that reliably contribute to pain perception and its modulation. One key system that underpins the ability to change pain intensity is the brainstem's descending modulatory network with its pro- and antinociceptive components. We discuss not only the latest data describing the cerebral signature of pain and its modulation in humans, but also suggest that the brainstem plays a pivotal role in gating the degree of nociceptive transmission so that the resultant pain experienced is appropriate for the particular situation of the individual.

  11. Methods and apparatus for multi-parameter acoustic signature inspection

    DOEpatents

    Diaz, Aaron A [Richland, WA; Samuel, Todd J [Pasco, WA; Valencia, Juan D [Kennewick, WA; Gervais, Kevin L [Richland, WA; Tucker, Brian J [Pasco, WA; Kirihara, Leslie J [Richland, WA; Skorpik, James R [Kennewick, WA; Reid, Larry D [Benton City, WA; Munley, John T [Benton City, WA; Pappas, Richard A [Richland, WA; Wright, Bob W [West Richland, WA; Panetta, Paul D [Richland, WA; Thompson, Jason S [Richland, WA

    2007-07-24

    A multiparameter acoustic signature inspection device and method are described for non-invasive inspection of containers. Dual acoustic signatures discriminate between various fluids and materials for identification of the same.

  12. 76 FR 411 - Regulatory Guidance Concerning Electronic Signatures and Documents

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... Concerning Electronic Signatures and Documents AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of regulatory guidance. SUMMARY: FMCSA issues regulatory guidance concerning the... regulatory guidance concerning the use of electronic signatures and documents to comply with FMCSA...

  13. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Signature Identification Software

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, C.

    2009-03-17

    This is an extendable open-source Loop-mediated isothermal AMPlification (LAMP) signature design program called LAVA (LAMP Assay Versatile Analysis). LAVA was created in response to limitations of existing LAMP signature programs.

  14. Specific signature of seismic shaking in landslide catalogues: Case of the Chichi earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Patrick; Rault, Claire; Marc, Odin; Hovius, Niels

    2017-04-01

    The 1999 Chichi earthquake triggered 10 000 landslides in its epicentral area. In addition to coseismic landsliding, directly induced by the shaking, the hillslopes response extended to several years after the main shock, during which landslide susceptibility remained higher than during the pre-seismic period. We attribute this elevated rate to weakening effects caused by the shaking. The characteristics of the coseismic landslide catalogues (clustering, slope and azimuth distribution) bears the signature of the seismic triggering. Extended landslide mapping (1994-2004) allows to track changes in these signatures in order to better interpret them. We present a summary of the change of these signatures through time and space. At the scale of the epicentral area, we show that coseismic landslide clustering did clearly occur along the fault where the shaking is strong. In 3 sub-catchments of the Choshui river, a finer analysis of the landslide time series reveals a mixed signature of both geology and shaking. Pre-quake rain-induced landslides preferentially occurred down slope and along the bedding planes while coseismic landslides locate higher in the landscape, on slopes strongly affected by site effects. However, during the post seismic period, the signature of the shaking is not present while landslide rate remains high, suggesting that weakening effects seemed homogeneously distributed in the landscape.

  15. Specific Signature of Seismic Shaking in Landslide Inventories: Case of the Chichi Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, P.; Rault, C.; Marc, O.; Hovius, N.

    2017-12-01

    The 1999 Chichi earthquake triggered 10 000 landslides in its epicentral area. In addition to coseismic landsliding, directly induced by the shaking, the hillslopes response extended to several years after the main shock, during which landslide susceptibility remained higher than during the pre-seismic period. We attribute this elevated rate to weakening effects caused by the shaking. The characteristics of the coseismic landslide catalogues (clustering,slope and azimuth distribution) bears the signature of the seismic triggering. Extended landslide mapping (1994-2004) allows to track changes in these signatures in order to better interpret them. We present a summary of the change of these signatures through time and space. At the scale of the epicentral area, we show that coseismic landslide clustering did clearly occur along the fault where the shaking is strong. In 3 sub-catchments of the Choshui river, a finer analysis of the landslide time series reveals a mixed signature of both geology and shaking. Pre-quake rain-induced landslides preferentially occurred down slope and along the bedding planes while coseismic landslides locate higher in the landscape, on slopes strongly affected by site effects. However, during the post seismic period, the signature of the shaking is not present while landslide rate remains high, suggesting that weakening effects seemed homogeneously distributed in the landscape.

  16. Landscape cultivation alters δ30Si signature in terrestrial ecosystems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandevenne, F. I.; Delvaux, C.; Huyghes, H.; Ronchi, B.; Govers, G.; Barão, A. L.; Clymans, W.; Meire, P.; André, L.; Struyf, E.

    2014-12-01

    Despite increasing recognition of the importance of biological Si cycling in controlling dissolved Si (DSi) in soil and stream water, effects of human cultivation on the Si cycle remain poorly understood. Sensitive tracer techniques to identify and quantify Si in the soil-plant-water system could be highly relevant in addressing these uncertainties. Stable Si isotopes are promising tools to define Si sources and sinks along the ecosystem flow path, as intense fractionation occurs during chemical weathering and uptake of dissolved Si in plants. Yet they remain underexploited in the end product of the soil-plant system: the soil water. Here, stable Si isotope ratios (δ30Si) of dissolved Si in soil water were measured along a land use gradient (continuous forest, continuous pasture, young cropland and continuous cropland) with similar parent material (loess) and homogenous bulk mineralogical and climatological properties (Belgium). Soil water δ30Si signatures are clearly separated along the gradient, with highest average signatures in continuous cropland (+1.61‰), intermediate in pasture (+1.05‰) and young cropland (+0.89 ‰) and lowest in forest soil water (+0.62‰). Our data do not allow distinguishing biological from pedogenic/lithogenic processes, but point to a strong interaction of both. We expect that increasing export of light isotopes in disturbed land uses (i.e. through agricultural harvest), and higher recycling of 28Si and elevated weathering intensity (including clay dissolution) in forest systems will largely determine soil water δ30Si signatures of our systems. Our results imply that soil water δ30Si signature is biased through land management before it reaches rivers and coastal zones, where other fractionation processes take over (e.g. diatom uptake and reverse weathering in floodplains). In particular, a direct role of agriculture systems in lowering export Si fluxes towards rivers and coastal systems has been shown. Stable Si isotopes have

  17. Landscape cultivation alters δ30Si signature in terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandevenne, Floor; Delvaux, Claire; Hughes, Harold; Ronchi, Benedicta; Clymans, Wim; Barao, Ana Lucia; Govers, Gerard; Cornelis, Jean Thomas; André, Luc; Struyf, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Despite increasing recognition of the importance of biological Si cycling in controlling dissolved Si (DSi) in soil and stream water, effects of human cultivation on the Si cycle remain poorly understood. Sensitive tracer techniques to identify and quantify Si in the soil-plant-water system could be highly relevant in addressing these uncertainties. Stable Si isotopes are promising tools to define Si sources and sinks along the ecosystem flow path, as intense fractionation occurs during chemical weathering and uptake of dissolved Si in plants. Yet they remain underexploited in the end product of the soil-plant system: the soil water. Here, stable Si isotope ratios (δ30Si) of dissolved Si in soil water were measured along a land use gradient (continuous forest, continuous pasture, young cropland and continuous cropland) with similar parent material (loess) and homogenous bulk mineralogical and climatological (Belgium). Soil water δ30Si signatures are clearly separated along the gradient, with highest average signatures in continuous cropland (+1.61%), intermediate in pasture (+1.05%) and young cropland (+0.89%) and lowest in forest soil water (+0.62%). Our data do not allow distinguishing biological from pedogenic/lithogenic processes, but point to a strong interaction of both. We expect that increasing export of light isotopes in disturbed land uses (i.e. through agricultural harvest), and higher recycling of 28Si and elevated weathering intensity (including clay dissolution) in forest systems will largely determine soil water δ30Si signatures of our systems. Our results imply that soil water δ30Si signature is biased through land management before it reaches rivers and coastal zones, where other fractionation processes take over (e.g. diatom uptake and reverse weathering in floodplains). In particular, a direct role of agriculture systems in lowering export Si fluxes towards rivers and coastal systems has been shown. Stable Si isotopes have a large potential

  18. Secreted primary human malignant mesothelioma exosome signature reflects oncogenic cargo

    PubMed Central

    Greening, David W.; Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Robinson, Bruce W. S.; Dick, Ian M.; Creaney, Jenette; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly-aggressive heterogeneous malignancy, typically diagnosed at advanced stage. An important area of mesothelioma biology and progression is understanding intercellular communication and the contribution of the secretome. Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles shown to shuttle cellular cargo and direct intercellular communication in the tumour microenvironment, facilitate immunoregulation and metastasis. In this study, quantitative proteomics was used to investigate MM-derived exosomes from distinct human models and identify select cargo protein networks associated with angiogenesis, metastasis, and immunoregulation. Utilising bioinformatics pathway/network analyses, and correlation with previous studies on tumour exosomes, we defined a select mesothelioma exosomal signature (mEXOS, 570 proteins) enriched in tumour antigens and various cancer-specific signalling (HPGD/ENO1/OSMR) and secreted modulators (FN1/ITLN1/MAMDC2/PDGFD/GBP1). Notably, such circulating cargo offers unique insights into mesothelioma progression and tumour microenvironment reprogramming. Functionally, we demonstrate that oncogenic exosomes facilitate the migratory capacity of fibroblast/endothelial cells, supporting the systematic model of MM progression associated with vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. We provide biophysical and proteomic characterisation of exosomes, define a unique oncogenic signature (mEXOS), and demonstrate the regulatory capacity of exosomes in cell migration/tube formation assays. These findings contribute to understanding tumour-stromal crosstalk in the context of MM, and potential new diagnostic and therapeutic extracellular targets. PMID:27605433

  19. A Neural Signature Encoding Decisions under Perceptual Ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sai; Yu, Rongjun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract People often make perceptual decisions with ambiguous information, but it remains unclear whether the brain has a common neural substrate that encodes various forms of perceptual ambiguity. Here, we used three types of perceptually ambiguous stimuli as well as task instructions to examine the neural basis for both stimulus-driven and task-driven perceptual ambiguity. We identified a neural signature, the late positive potential (LPP), that encoded a general form of stimulus-driven perceptual ambiguity. In addition to stimulus-driven ambiguity, the LPP was also modulated by ambiguity in task instructions. To further specify the functional role of the LPP and elucidate the relationship between stimulus ambiguity, behavioral response, and the LPP, we employed regression models and found that the LPP was specifically associated with response latency and confidence rating, suggesting that the LPP encoded decisions under perceptual ambiguity. Finally, direct behavioral ratings of stimulus and task ambiguity confirmed our neurophysiological findings, which could not be attributed to differences in eye movements either. Together, our findings argue for a common neural signature that encodes decisions under perceptual ambiguity but is subject to the modulation of task ambiguity. Our results represent an essential first step toward a complete neural understanding of human perceptual decision making. PMID:29177189

  20. Identification of a transcriptional signature for the wound healing continuum

    PubMed Central

    Peake, Matthew A; Caley, Mathew; Giles, Peter J; Wall, Ivan; Enoch, Stuart; Davies, Lindsay C; Kipling, David; Thomas, David W; Stephens, Phil

    2014-01-01

    There is a spectrum/continuum of adult human wound healing outcomes ranging from the enhanced (nearly scarless) healing observed in oral mucosa to scarring within skin and the nonhealing of chronic skin wounds. Central to these outcomes is the role of the fibroblast. Global gene expression profiling utilizing microarrays is starting to give insight into the role of such cells during the healing process, but no studies to date have produced a gene signature for this wound healing continuum. Microarray analysis of adult oral mucosal fibroblast (OMF), normal skin fibroblast (NF), and chronic wound fibroblast (CWF) at 0 and 6 hours post-serum stimulation was performed. Genes whose expression increases following serum exposure in the order OMF < NF < CWF are candidates for a negative/impaired healing phenotype (the dysfunctional healing group), whereas genes with the converse pattern are potentially associated with a positive/preferential healing phenotype (the enhanced healing group). Sixty-six genes in the enhanced healing group and 38 genes in the dysfunctional healing group were identified. Overrepresentation analysis revealed pathways directly and indirectly associated with wound healing and aging and additional categories associated with differentiation, development, and morphogenesis. Knowledge of this wound healing continuum gene signature may in turn assist in the therapeutic assessment/treatment of a patient's wounds. PMID:24844339

  1. A Neural Signature Encoding Decisions under Perceptual Ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sai; Yu, Rongjun; Wang, Shuo

    2017-01-01

    People often make perceptual decisions with ambiguous information, but it remains unclear whether the brain has a common neural substrate that encodes various forms of perceptual ambiguity. Here, we used three types of perceptually ambiguous stimuli as well as task instructions to examine the neural basis for both stimulus-driven and task-driven perceptual ambiguity. We identified a neural signature, the late positive potential (LPP), that encoded a general form of stimulus-driven perceptual ambiguity. In addition to stimulus-driven ambiguity, the LPP was also modulated by ambiguity in task instructions. To further specify the functional role of the LPP and elucidate the relationship between stimulus ambiguity, behavioral response, and the LPP, we employed regression models and found that the LPP was specifically associated with response latency and confidence rating, suggesting that the LPP encoded decisions under perceptual ambiguity. Finally, direct behavioral ratings of stimulus and task ambiguity confirmed our neurophysiological findings, which could not be attributed to differences in eye movements either. Together, our findings argue for a common neural signature that encodes decisions under perceptual ambiguity but is subject to the modulation of task ambiguity. Our results represent an essential first step toward a complete neural understanding of human perceptual decision making.

  2. 17 CFR 1.4 - Use of electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Use of electronic signatures... REGULATIONS UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Definitions § 1.4 Use of electronic signatures. For purposes of... pool participant or a client of a commodity trading advisor, an electronic signature executed by the...

  3. 40 CFR 262.25 - Electronic manifest signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electronic manifest signatures. 262.25... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.25 Electronic manifest signatures. Electronic signature methods for the e-Manifest system shall: (a) Be a legally valid and...

  4. 17 CFR 1.4 - Use of electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of electronic signatures... REGULATIONS UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Definitions § 1.4 Use of electronic signatures. For purposes of... broker, a pool participant or a client of a commodity trading advisor, an electronic signature executed...

  5. 17 CFR 1.4 - Use of electronic signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Use of electronic signatures... REGULATIONS UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Definitions § 1.4 Use of electronic signatures. For purposes of... pool participant or a client of a commodity trading advisor, an electronic signature executed by the...

  6. 40 CFR 263.25 - Electronic manifest signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electronic manifest signatures. 263.25 Section 263.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... Recordkeeping § 263.25 Electronic manifest signatures. (a) Electronic manifest signatures shall meet the...

  7. 17 CFR 230.471 - Signatures to amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signatures to amendments. 230... RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 Amendments; Withdrawals § 230.471 Signatures to amendments... signed, such document shall be manually signed, or signed using either typed signatures or duplicated or...

  8. 32 CFR 842.6 - Signature on the claim form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Signature on the claim form. 842.6 Section 842.6... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS General Information § 842.6 Signature on the claim form. The claimant or authorized agent... authorized agent signing for a claimant shows, after the signature, the title or capacity and attaches...

  9. 29 CFR 102.116 - Signature of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Signature of orders. 102.116 Section 102.116 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD RULES AND REGULATIONS, SERIES 8 Certification and Signature of Documents § 102.116 Signature of orders. The executive secretary or the associate executive...

  10. 31 CFR 321.19 - Certification of signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification of signatures. 321.19... From Erroneous Payments § 321.19 Certification of signatures. The regulations in this subpart shall, to... signatures by an officer or designated employee of any financial institution authorized to certify requests...

  11. 17 CFR 230.402 - Number of copies; binding; signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...; signatures. 230.402 Section 230.402 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION...; binding; signatures. (a) Three copies of the complete registration statement, including exhibits and all... bound and may contain facsimile versions of manual signatures in accordance with paragraph (e) of this...

  12. 14 CFR 49.13 - Signatures and acknowledgements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signatures and acknowledgements. 49.13... RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.13 Signatures and acknowledgements. (a) Each signature on a conveyance must be in ink. (b) Paragraphs (b) through (f) of § 47.13 of this...

  13. 48 CFR 204.101 - Contracting officer's signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contracting officer's signature. 204.101 Section 204.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... officer's signature. Follow the procedures at PGI 204.101 for signature of contract documents. [71 FR 9268...

  14. Signature Pedagogies in Support of Teachers' Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Melissa; Patton, Kevin; O'Sullivan, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Signature pedagogies [Shulman, L. 2005. "Signature pedagogies in the professions." "Daedalus" 134 (3): 52--59.] are a focus of teacher educators seeking to improve teaching and teacher education. The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary common language of signature pedagogies for teacher professional development…

  15. 21 CFR 1309.32 - Application forms; contents; signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application forms; contents; signature. 1309.32... Application forms; contents; signature. (a) Any person who is required to be registered pursuant to § 1309.21... this paragraph and shall contain the signature of the individual being authorized to sign the...

  16. 22 CFR 92.28 - Signature of affiant on affidavit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature of affiant on affidavit. 92.28 Section 92.28 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES NOTARIAL AND RELATED SERVICES Specific Notarial Acts § 92.28 Signature of affiant on affidavit. The signature of the affiant is...

  17. 37 CFR 2.74 - Form and signature of amendment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Form and signature of... signature of amendment. (a) Form of Amendment. Amendments should be set forth clearly and completely... record. (b) Signature. A request for amendment of an application must be signed by the applicant, someone...

  18. Can specific transcriptional regulators assemble a universal cancer signature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Janine; Isik, Zerrin; Pilarsky, Christian; Schroeder, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Recently, there is a lot of interest in using biomarker signatures derived from gene expression data to predict cancer progression. We assembled signatures of 25 published datasets covering 13 types of cancers. How do these signatures compare with each other? On one hand signatures answering the same biological question should overlap, whereas signatures predicting different cancer types should differ. On the other hand, there could also be a Universal Cancer Signature that is predictive independently of the cancer type. Initially, we generate signatures for all datasets using classical approaches such as t-test and fold change and then, we explore signatures resulting from a network-based method, that applies the random surfer model of Google's PageRank algorithm. We show that the signatures as published by the authors and the signatures generated with classical methods do not overlap - not even for the same cancer type - whereas the network-based signatures strongly overlap. Selecting 10 out of 37 universal cancer genes gives the optimal prediction for all cancers thus taking a first step towards a Universal Cancer Signature. We furthermore analyze and discuss the involved genes in terms of the Hallmarks of cancer and in particular single out SP1, JUN/FOS and NFKB1 and examine their specific role in cancer progression.

  19. Inverted Signature Trees and Text Searching on CD-ROMs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Lorraine K. D.; Tharp, Alan L.

    1989-01-01

    Explores the new storage technology of optical data disks and introduces a data structure, the inverted signature tree, for storing data on optical data disks for efficient text searching. The inverted signature tree approach is compared to the use of text signatures and the B+ tree. (22 references) (Author/CLB)

  20. 17 CFR 201.65 - Identity and signature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Identity and signature. 201.65... of 1934 § 201.65 Identity and signature. Applications pursuant to this subpart may omit the identity, mailing address, and signature of the applicant; provided, that such identity, mailing address and...

  1. The Global Signature of Ocean Wave Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portilla-Yandún, Jesús

    2018-01-01

    A global atlas of ocean wave spectra is developed and presented. The development is based on a new technique for deriving wave spectral statistics, which is applied to the extensive ERA-Interim database from European Centre of Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Spectral statistics is based on the idea of long-term wave systems, which are unique and distinct at every geographical point. The identification of those wave systems allows their separation from the overall spectrum using the partition technique. Their further characterization is made using standard integrated parameters, which turn out much more meaningful when applied to the individual components than to the total spectrum. The parameters developed include the density distribution of spectral partitions, which is the main descriptor; the identified wave systems; the individual distribution of the characteristic frequencies, directions, wave height, wave age, seasonal variability of wind and waves; return periods derived from extreme value analysis; and crossing-sea probabilities. This information is made available in web format for public use at http://www.modemat.epn.edu.ec/#/nereo. It is found that wave spectral statistics offers the possibility to synthesize data while providing a direct and comprehensive view of the local and regional wave conditions.

  2. Supernova signatures of neutrino mass ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholberg, Kate

    2018-01-01

    A suite of detectors around the world is poised to measure the flavor-energy-time evolution of the ten-second burst of neutrinos from a core-collapse supernova occurring in the Milky Way or nearby. Next-generation detectors to be built in the next decade will have enhanced flavor sensitivity and statistics. Not only will the observation of this burst allow us to peer inside the dense matter of the extreme event and learn about the collapse processes and the birth of the remnant, but the neutrinos will bring information about neutrino properties themselves. This review surveys some of the physical signatures that the currently-unknown neutrino mass pattern will imprint on the observed neutrino events at Earth, emphasizing the most robust and least model-dependent signatures of mass ordering.

  3. Phenotypic signatures arising from unbalanced bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cheemeng; Smith, Robert Phillip; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Schwartz, Russell; You, Lingchong

    2014-08-01

    Fluctuations in the growth rate of a bacterial culture during unbalanced growth are generally considered undesirable in quantitative studies of bacterial physiology. Under well-controlled experimental conditions, however, these fluctuations are not random but instead reflect the interplay between intra-cellular networks underlying bacterial growth and the growth environment. Therefore, these fluctuations could be considered quantitative phenotypes of the bacteria under a specific growth condition. Here, we present a method to identify "phenotypic signatures" by time-frequency analysis of unbalanced growth curves measured with high temporal resolution. The signatures are then applied to differentiate amongst different bacterial strains or the same strain under different growth conditions, and to identify the essential architecture of the gene network underlying the observed growth dynamics. Our method has implications for both basic understanding of bacterial physiology and for the classification of bacterial strains.

  4. Entanglement as a signature of quantum chaos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Ghose, Shohini; Sanders, Barry C; Hu, Bambi

    2004-01-01

    We explore the dynamics of entanglement in classically chaotic systems by considering a multiqubit system that behaves collectively as a spin system obeying the dynamics of the quantum kicked top. In the classical limit, the kicked top exhibits both regular and chaotic dynamics depending on the strength of the chaoticity parameter kappa in the Hamiltonian. We show that the entanglement of the multiqubit system, considered for both the bipartite and the pairwise entanglement, yields a signature of quantum chaos. Whereas bipartite entanglement is enhanced in the chaotic region, pairwise entanglement is suppressed. Furthermore, we define a time-averaged entangling power and show that this entangling power changes markedly as kappa moves the system from being predominantly regular to being predominantly chaotic, thus sharply identifying the edge of chaos. When this entangling power is averaged over all states, it yields a signature of global chaos. The qualitative behavior of this global entangling power is similar to that of the classical Lyapunov exponent.

  5. Dilatonic imprints on exact gravitational wave signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Fiona; KubizÅák, David; Mann, Robert B.

    2018-05-01

    By employing the moduli space approximation, we analytically calculate the gravitational wave signatures emitted upon the merger of two extremally charged dilatonic black holes. We probe several values of the dilatonic coupling constant a , and find significant departures from the Einstein-Maxwell (a =0 ) counterpart studied in [Phys. Rev. D 96, 061501 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevD.96.061501]. For (low-energy) string theory black holes (a =1 ) there are no coalescence orbits and only a memory effect is observed, whereas for an intermediate value of the coupling (a =1 /√{3 } ) the late-time merger signature becomes exponentially suppressed, compared to the polynomial decay in the a =0 case without a dilaton. Such an imprint shows a clear difference between the case with and without a scalar field (as, for example, predicted by string theory) in black hole mergers.

  6. Developing a Predictive Capability for Bioluminescence Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    dinoflagellates, common unicellular plankton that are also known to form red tides. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence is stimulated by flow stress of...bioluminescence signature of a moving object depends on the bioluminescence potential of the organisms (related to their species abundance), the...WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City, FL 32407 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  7. Developing a Predictive Capability for Bioluminescence Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    sources of bioluminescence are dinoflagellates, common unicellular plankton that are also known to form red tides. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence is...to locate their prey. The bioluminescence signature of a moving object depends on the bioluminescence potential of the organisms (related to...characteristics of the source organisms and the measurement of their bioluminescence by ocean Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public

  8. Developing a Predictive Capability for Bioluminescence Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    sources of bioluminescence are dinoflagellates, common unicellular plankton that are also known to form red tides. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence is...wakes to locate their prey. The bioluminescence signature of a moving object depends on the bioluminescence potential of the organisms (related...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of California, San Diego,Scripps Institution of Oceanography,La Jolla,CA,92093-0202 8

  9. Developing a Predictive Capability for Bioluminescence Signatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    sources of bioluminescence are dinoflagellates, common unicellular plankton that are also known to form red tides. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence is...wakes to locate their prey. The bioluminescence signature of a moving object depends on the bioluminescence potential of the organisms (related to...AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of California, San

  10. Global Isotopic Signatures of Oceanic Island Basalts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    and the__ WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION August 1991 ©Lynn A. Oschmann 1991 The author hereby grants to MIT, WHOI, and the U.S. Government...Massachusetts Institute of Technology! Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Certified 1W ___ ____________________ Dr. Staidlc\\ R. I L, rt Senior Scientik, Woods ...Institute of T’echnology! Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution 3 GLOBAL ISOTOPIC SIGNATURES OF OCEANIC ISLAND BASALTS by LYNN A. OSCHMANN Submitted to the

  11. The Observable Signatures of GRB Cocoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2017-01-01

    As a long gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet propagates within the stellar atmosphere it creates a cocoon composed of an outer Newtonian shocked stellar material and an inner (possibly relativistic) shocked jet. The jet deposits {10}51{--}{10}52 erg into this cocoon. This is comparable to the energies of the GRB and of the accompanying supernova, yet the cocoon’s signature has been largely ignored. The cocoon radiates a fraction of this energy as it expands, following the breakout from the star, and later as it interacts with the surrounding matter. We explore the possible signatures of this emission and outline a framework to calculate them from the conditions of the cocoon at the time of the jet breakout. The cocoon signature depends strongly on the, currently unknown, mixing between the shocked jet and shocked stellar material. With no mixing the γ-ray emission from the cocoon is so bright that it should have been already detected. The lack of such detections indicates that some mixing must take place. For partial and full mixing the expected signals are weaker than regular GRB afterglows. However, the latter are highly beamed while the former are wider. Future optical, UV, and X-ray transient searches, like LSST, ZTF, ULTRASAT, ISS-Lobster, and others, will most likely detect such signals, providing a wealth of information on the progenitors and jets of GRBs. While we focus on long GRBs, analogous (but weaker) cocoons may arise in short GRBs. Their signatures might be the most promising electromagnetic counterparts for gravitational wave signals from compact binary mergers.

  12. Phycoerythrin Signatures in the Littoral Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-30

    grey-green pigment allophycocyanin alsways present in the core of the PBS and the blue-green pigment phycocyanin (PC) always present in the proximal...and different spectral forms of Synechococcus can be obtained from optical data, particularly hyperspectral data. IMPACT/ APPLICATION It is commonly...projects, “Spectral Signatures of Optical Processes” (NRL 6.1 core funding) and “ Applications of the SeaWiFS for coastal monitoring of harmful algal

  13. Limits and signatures of relativistic spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsever, Ulvi; Wilkinson, Steven

    2018-01-01

    While special relativity imposes an absolute speed limit at the speed of light, our Universe is not empty Minkowski spacetime. The constituents that fill the interstellar/intergalactic vacuum, including the cosmic microwave background photons, impose a lower speed limit on any object travelling at relativistic velocities. Scattering of cosmic microwave photons from an ultra-relativistic object may create radiation with a characteristic signature allowing the detection of such objects at large distances.

  14. Identity-Based Verifiably Encrypted Signatures without Random Oracles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Wu, Qianhong; Qin, Bo

    Fair exchange protocol plays an important role in electronic commerce in the case of exchanging digital contracts. Verifiably encrypted signatures provide an optimistic solution to these scenarios with an off-line trusted third party. In this paper, we propose an identity-based verifiably encrypted signature scheme. The scheme is non-interactive to generate verifiably encrypted signatures and the resulting encrypted signature consists of only four group elements. Based on the computational Diffie-Hellman assumption, our scheme is proven secure without using random oracles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first identity-based verifiably encrypted signature scheme provably secure in the standard model.

  15. On psychoanalytic supervision as signature pedagogy.

    PubMed

    Watkins, C Edward

    2014-04-01

    What is signature pedagogy in psychoanalytic education? This paper examines that question, considering why psychoanalytic supervision best deserves that designation. In focusing on supervision as signature pedagogy, I accentuate its role in building psychoanalytic habits of mind, habits of hand, and habits of heart, and transforming theory and self-knowledge into practical product. Other facets of supervision as signature pedagogy addressed in this paper include its features of engagement, uncertainty, formation, and pervasiveness, as well as levels of surface, deep, and implicit structure. Epistemological, ontological, and axiological in nature, psychoanalytic supervision engages trainees in learning to do, think, and value what psychoanalytic practitioners in the field do, think, and value: It is, most fundamentally, professional preparation for competent, "good work." In this paper, effort is made to shine a light on and celebrate the pivotal role of supervision in "making" or developing budding psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychotherapists. Now over a century old, psychoanalytic supervision remains unparalleled in (1) connecting and integrating conceptualization and practice, (2) transforming psychoanalytic theory and self-knowledge into an informed analyzing instrument, and (3) teaching, transmitting, and perpetuating the traditions, practice, and culture of psychoanalytic treatment.

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of nitroaromatic landmine signature explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.; Manrique-Bastidas, Cesar A.; Blanco, Alejandro; Primera, Oliva M.; Pacheco, Leonardo C.; Castillo-Chara, Jairo; Castro, Miguel E.; Mina, Nairmen

    2004-09-01

    TNT and DNT are important explosives used as base charges of landmines and other explosive devices. They are often combined with RDX in specific explosive formulations. Their detection in vapor phase as well as in soil in contact with the explosives is important in landmine detection technology. The spectroscopic signatures of nitroaromatic compounds in neat forms: crystals, droplets, and recrystallized samples were determined by Raman Microspectroscopy (RS), Fourier Transform Infrared Microscopy (FTIR) and Fiber Optics Coupled - Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FOC-FTIR) using a grazing angle (GA) probe. TNT exhibits a series of characteristic bands: vibrational signatures, which allow its detection in soil. The spectroscopic signature of neat TNT is dominated by strong bands about 1380 and 2970 cm-1. The intensity and position of these bands were found remarkably different in soil samples spiked with TNT. The 1380 cm-1 band is split into a number of bands in that region. The 2970 cm-1 band is reduced in intensity and new bands are observed about 2880 cm-1. The results are consistent with a different chemical environment of TNT in soil as compared to neat TNT. Interactions were found to be dependent on the physical source of the explosive. In the case of DNT-sand interactions, shifts in vibrational frequencies of the explosives as well as the substrates were found.

  17. Mirage: a visible signature evaluation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culpepper, Joanne B.; Meehan, Alaster J.; Shao, Q. T.; Richards, Noel

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the Mirage visible signature evaluation tool, designed to provide a visible signature evaluation capability that will appropriately reflect the effect of scene content on the detectability of targets, providing a capability to assess visible signatures in the context of the environment. Mirage is based on a parametric evaluation of input images, assessing the value of a range of image metrics and combining them using the boosted decision tree machine learning method to produce target detectability estimates. It has been developed using experimental data from photosimulation experiments, where human observers search for vehicle targets in a variety of digital images. The images used for tool development are synthetic (computer generated) images, showing vehicles in many different scenes and exhibiting a wide variation in scene content. A preliminary validation has been performed using k-fold cross validation, where 90% of the image data set was used for training and 10% of the image data set was used for testing. The results of the k-fold validation from 200 independent tests show a prediction accuracy between Mirage predictions of detection probability and observed probability of detection of r(262) = 0:63, p < 0:0001 (Pearson correlation) and a MAE = 0:21 (mean absolute error).

  18. Visual signature reduction of unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Z. W.; Ma, Z. X.; Jayawijayaningtiyas; Ngoh, J. H. H.

    2016-10-01

    With the emergence of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in multiple tactical defence missions, there was a need for an efficient visual signature suppression system for a more efficient stealth operation. One of our studies experimentally investigated the visual signature reduction of UAVs achieved through an active camouflage system. A prototype was constructed with newly developed operating software, Cloak, to provide active camouflage to the UAV model. The reduction of visual signature was analysed. Tests of the devices mounted on UAVs were conducted in another study. A series of experiments involved testing of the concept as well as the prototype. The experiments were conducted both in the laboratory and under normal environmental conditions. Results showed certain degrees of blending with the sky to create a camouflage effect. A mini-UAV made mostly out of transparent plastic was also designed and fabricated. Because of the transparency of the plastic material, the visibility of this UAV in the air is very small, and therefore the UAV is difficult to be detected. After re-designs and tests, eventually a practical system to reduce the visibility of UAVs viewed by human observers from the ground was developed. The system was evaluated during various outdoor tests. The scene target-to-background lightness contrast and the scene target-to-background colour contrast of the adaptive control system prototype were smaller than 10% at a stand-off viewing distance of 20-50 m.

  19. SIGNATURES OF LONG-LIVED SPIRAL PATTERNS

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Garcia, Eric E.; Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A., E-mail: ericmartinez@inaoep.mx, E-mail: martinez@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: r.gonzalez@crya.unam.mx

    2013-03-10

    Azimuthal age/color gradients across spiral arms are a signature of long-lived spirals. From a sample of 19 normal (or weakly barred) spirals where we have previously found azimuthal age/color gradient candidates, 13 objects were further selected if a two-armed grand-design pattern survived in a surface density stellar mass map. Mass maps were obtained from optical and near-infrared imaging, by comparison with a Monte Carlo library of stellar population synthesis models that allowed us to obtain the mass-to-light ratio in the J band, (M/L){sub J}, as a function of (g - i) versus (i - J) color. The selected spirals weremore » analyzed with Fourier methods in search of other signatures of long-lived modes related to the gradients, such as the gradient divergence toward corotation, and the behavior of the phase angle of the two-armed spiral in different wavebands, as expected from theory. The results show additional signatures of long-lived spirals in at least 50% of the objects.« less

  20. Measurement-device-independent quantum digital signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthoor, Ittoop Vergheese; Amiri, Ryan; Wallden, Petros; Curty, Marcos; Andersson, Erika

    2016-08-01

    Digital signatures play an important role in software distribution, modern communication, and financial transactions, where it is important to detect forgery and tampering. Signatures are a cryptographic technique for validating the authenticity and integrity of messages, software, or digital documents. The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. Quantum digital signatures (QDS), on the other hand, provide information-theoretic security based on the laws of quantum physics. Recent work on QDS Amiri et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 032325 (2016);, 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032325 Yin, Fu, and Zeng-Bing, Phys. Rev. A 93, 032316 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032316 shows that such schemes do not require trusted quantum channels and are unconditionally secure against general coherent attacks. However, in practical QDS, just as in quantum key distribution (QKD), the detectors can be subjected to side-channel attacks, which can make the actual implementations insecure. Motivated by the idea of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), we present a measurement-device-independent QDS (MDI-QDS) scheme, which is secure against all detector side-channel attacks. Based on the rapid development of practical MDI-QKD, our MDI-QDS protocol could also be experimentally implemented, since it requires a similar experimental setup.

  1. Periodicity Signatures of Lightcurves of Active Comets in Non-Principal-Axis Rotational States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Mueller, Beatrice E. A.; Barrera, Jose G.

    2016-10-01

    There are two comets (1P/Halley, 103P/Hartley 2) that are unambiguously in non-principal-axis (NPA) rotational states in addition to a few more comets that are candidates for NPA rotation. Considering this fact, and the ambiguities associated with how to accurately interpret the periodicity signatures seen in lightcurves of active comets, we have started an investigation to identify and characterize the periodicity signatures present in simulated lightcurves of active comets. We carried out aperture photometry of simulated cometary comae to generate model lightcurves and analyzed them with Fourier techniques to identify their periodicity signatures. These signatures were then compared with the input component periods of the respective NPA rotational states facilitating the identification of how these periodicity signatures are related to different component periods of the NPA rotation. Ultimately, we also expect this study to shed light on why only a small fraction of periodic comets is in NPA rotational states, whereas theory indicates a large fraction of them should be in NPA states (e.g., Jewitt 1999, EMP, 79, 35). We explore the parameter space with respect to different rotational states, different orientations for the total rotational angular momentum vector, and different locations on the nucleus for the source region(s). As for special cases, we also investigate potential NPA rotational states representative of comet 103P/Hartley2, the cometary target of the EPOXI mission. The initial results from our investigation will be presented at the meeting. The NASA DDAP Program supports this work through grant NNX15AL66G.

  2. Seismic signature analysis for discrimination of people from animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damarla, Thyagaraju; Mehmood, Asif; Sabatier, James M.

    2013-05-01

    Cadence analysis has been the main focus for discriminating between the seismic signatures of people and animals. However, cadence analysis fails when multiple targets are generating the signatures. We analyze the mechanism of human walking and the signature generated by a human walker, and compare it with the signature generated by a quadruped. We develop Fourier-based analysis to differentiate the human signatures from the animal signatures. We extract a set of basis vectors to represent the human and animal signatures using non-negative matrix factorization, and use them to separate and classify both the targets. Grazing animals such as deer, cows, etc., often produce sporadic signals as they move around from patch to patch of grass and one must characterize them so as to differentiate their signatures from signatures generated by a horse steadily walking along a path. These differences in the signatures are used in developing a robust algorithm to distinguish the signatures of animals from humans. The algorithm is tested on real data collected in a remote area.

  3. Isotopic source signatures for atmospheric lead: the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollhöfer, A.; Rosman, K. J. R.

    2000-10-01

    Aerosols collected between 1994 and 1999 at more than 70 different sites affecting the Southern Hemisphere have been measured for their 206Pb/ 207Pb, 208Pb/ 207Pb and 206Pb/ 204Pb ratios and Pb concentrations. Lower ratios are found at the southern tips of Africa, Australia and South America probably due to the supply of alkyllead from a common supplier such as Associated Octel. The ratios increase in a northerly direction probably due to a changing market share in alkyllead or an increasing industrial Pb contribution. The geographical variations in isotopic signatures made it possible to broadly characterize the different regions that influence the Southern Hemisphere. Brazil and Argentina exhibited 206Pb/ 207Pb, 208Pb/ 207Pb and 206Pb/ 204Pb ratios in aerosols of 1.141-1.184, 2.416-2.442 and 17.77-18.57, respectively. Mexican aerosols had values of 1.188-1.197, 2.452-2.463 and 18.46-18.73. Aerosols sampled in Chile had low ratios in the South of 1.063-1.094, 2.337-2.373 and 16.46-17.13 which increased in a northerly direction. Emissions from South Africa were characterized by ratios 1.067-1.090, 2.340-2.358 and 16.53-16.99. In 1994-1995 Australia and New Zealand had ratios of 1.060-1.193, 2.324-2.445 and 16.08-18.54. In 1997 however, the range was narrower: 1.072-1.112, 2.342-2.398 and 16.55-17.36, respectively. These isotopic signatures are potentially useful for tracing sources of pollution and the movement of air-masses on a global scale.

  4. Modeling the Lexical Morphology of Western Handwritten Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Cabrera, Moises; Ferrer, Miguel A.; Morales, Aythami

    2015-01-01

    A handwritten signature is the final response to a complex cognitive and neuromuscular process which is the result of the learning process. Because of the many factors involved in signing, it is possible to study the signature from many points of view: graphologists, forensic experts, neurologists and computer vision experts have all examined them. Researchers study written signatures for psychiatric, penal, health and automatic verification purposes. As a potentially useful, multi-purpose study, this paper is focused on the lexical morphology of handwritten signatures. This we understand to mean the identification, analysis, and description of the signature structures of a given signer. In this work we analyze different public datasets involving 1533 signers from different Western geographical areas. Some relevant characteristics of signature lexical morphology have been selected, examined in terms of their probability distribution functions and modeled through a General Extreme Value distribution. This study suggests some useful models for multi-disciplinary sciences which depend on handwriting signatures. PMID:25860942

  5. A Secure and Efficient Threshold Group Signature Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yansheng; Wang, Xueming; Qiu, Gege

    The paper presents a secure and efficient threshold group signature scheme aiming at two problems of current threshold group signature schemes: conspiracy attack and inefficiency. Scheme proposed in this paper takes strategy of separating designed clerk who is responsible for collecting and authenticating each individual signature from group, the designed clerk don't participate in distribution of group secret key and has his own public key and private key, designed clerk needs to sign part information of threshold group signature after collecting signatures. Thus verifier has to verify signature of the group after validating signature of the designed clerk. This scheme is proved to be secure against conspiracy attack at last and is more efficient by comparing with other schemes.

  6. Glove-based approach to online signature verification.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Nidal S; Sayeed, Shohel; Ellis, Grant A

    2008-06-01

    Utilizing the multiple degrees of freedom offered by the data glove for each finger and the hand, a novel on-line signature verification system using the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) numerical tool for signature classification and verification is presented. The proposed technique is based on the Singular Value Decomposition in finding r singular vectors sensing the maximal energy of glove data matrix A, called principal subspace, so the effective dimensionality of A can be reduced. Having modeled the data glove signature through its r-principal subspace, signature authentication is performed by finding the angles between the different subspaces. A demonstration of the data glove is presented as an effective high-bandwidth data entry device for signature verification. This SVD-based signature verification technique is tested and its performance is shown to be able to recognize forgery signatures with a false acceptance rate of less than 1.2%.

  7. TRANSITION-REGION/CORONAL SIGNATURES AND MAGNETIC SETTING OF SUNSPOT PENUMBRAL JETS: HINODE (SOT/FG), Hi-C, AND SDO/AIA OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2016-01-10

    Penumbral microjets (PJs) are transient narrow bright features in the chromosphere of sunspot penumbrae, first characterized by Katsukawa et al. using the Ca ii H-line filter on Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). It was proposed that the PJs form as a result of reconnection between two magnetic components of penumbrae (spines and interspines), and that they could contribute to the transition region (TR) and coronal heating above sunspot penumbrae. We propose a modified picture of formation of PJs based on recent results on the internal structure of sunspot penumbral filaments. Using data of a sunspot from Hinode/SOT, High Resolution Coronalmore » Imager, and different passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we examine whether PJs have signatures in the TR and corona. We find hardly any discernible signature of normal PJs in any AIA passbands, except for a few of them showing up in the 1600 Å images. However, we discovered exceptionally stronger jets with similar lifetimes but bigger sizes (up to 600 km wide) occurring repeatedly in a few locations in the penumbra, where evidence of patches of opposite-polarity fields in the tails of some penumbral filaments is seen in Stokes-V images. These tail PJs do display signatures in the TR. Whether they have any coronal-temperature plasma is unclear. We infer that none of the PJs, including the tail PJs, directly heat the corona in active regions significantly, but any penumbral jet might drive some coronal heating indirectly via the generation of Alfvén waves and/or braiding of the coronal field.« less

  8. STIS RECORDS A BLACK HOLE'S SIGNATURE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The colorful 'zigzag' on the right is not the work of a flamboyant artist, but the signature of a supermassive black hole in the center of galaxy M84, discovered by Hubble Space Telescope's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The image on the left, taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary and Camera 2 shows the core of the galaxy where the suspected black hole dwells. Astronomers mapped the motions of gas in the grip of the black hole's powerful gravitational pull by aligning the STIS's spectroscopic slit across the nucleus in a single exposure. The STIS data on the right shows the rotational motion of stars and gas along the slit. The change in wavelength records whether an object is moving toward or away from the observer. The larger the excursion from the centerline -- as seen as a green and yellow picture element (pixels) along the center strip, the greater the rotational velocity. If no black hole were present, the line would be nearly vertical across the scan. Instead, STIS's detector found the S-shape at the center of this scan, indicating a rapidly swirling disk of trapped material encircling the black hole. Along the S-shape from top to bottom, velocities skyrocket as seen in the rapid, dramatic swing to the left (blueshifted or approaching gas), then the region in the center simultaneously records the enormous speeds of the gas both approaching and receding for orbits in the immediate vicinity of the black hole, and then an equivalent swing from the right, back to the center line. STIS measures a velocity of 880,000 miles per hour (400 kilometers per second) within 26 light-years of the galaxy's center, where the black hole dwells. This motion allowed astronomers to calculate that the black hole contains at least 300 million solar masses. (Just as the mass of our Sun can be calculated from the orbital radii and speeds of the planets.) This observation demonstrates a direct connection between a supermassive black hole and activity (such as radio

  9. Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN; Seiber, Larry E [Oak Ridge, TN; Marlino, Laura D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN

    2007-09-11

    The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

  10. Optimized Kernel Entropy Components.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Verdiguier, Emma; Laparra, Valero; Jenssen, Robert; Gomez-Chova, Luis; Camps-Valls, Gustau

    2017-06-01

    This brief addresses two main issues of the standard kernel entropy component analysis (KECA) algorithm: the optimization of the kernel decomposition and the optimization of the Gaussian kernel parameter. KECA roughly reduces to a sorting of the importance of kernel eigenvectors by entropy instead of variance, as in the kernel principal components analysis. In this brief, we propose an extension of the KECA method, named optimized KECA (OKECA), that directly extracts the optimal features retaining most of the data entropy by means of compacting the information in very few features (often in just one or two). The proposed method produces features which have higher expressive power. In particular, it is based on the independent component analysis framework, and introduces an extra rotation to the eigen decomposition, which is optimized via gradient-ascent search. This maximum entropy preservation suggests that OKECA features are more efficient than KECA features for density estimation. In addition, a critical issue in both the methods is the selection of the kernel parameter, since it critically affects the resulting performance. Here, we analyze the most common kernel length-scale selection criteria. The results of both the methods are illustrated in different synthetic and real problems. Results show that OKECA returns projections with more expressive power than KECA, the most successful rule for estimating the kernel parameter is based on maximum likelihood, and OKECA is more robust to the selection of the length-scale parameter in kernel density estimation.

  11. Relation of laboratory and remotely sensed spectral signatures of ocean-dumped acid waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.

    1978-01-01

    Results of laboratory transmission and remotely sensed ocean upwelled spectral signatures of acid waste ocean water solutions are presented. The studies were performed to establish ocean-dumped acid waste spectral signatures and to relate them to chemical and physical interactions occurring in the dump plume. The remotely sensed field measurements and the laboratory measurements were made using the same rapid-scanning spectrometer viewing a dump plume and with actual acid waste and ocean water samples, respectively. Laboratory studies showed that the signatures were produced by soluble ferric iron being precipitated in situ as ferric hydroxide upon dilution with ocean water. Sea-truth water samples were taken and analyzed for pertinent major components of the acid waste. Relationships were developed between the field and laboratory data both for spectral signatures and color changes with concentration. The relationships allow for the estimation of concentration of the indicator iron from remotely sensed spectral data and the laboratory transmission concentration data without sea-truth samples.

  12. Topographic Signatures of Meandering Rivers with Differences in Outer Bank Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S. A.; Belmont, P.

    2014-12-01

    Within a given valley setting, interactions between river hydraulics, sediment, topography, and vegetation determine attributes of channel morphology, including planform, width and depth, slope, and bed and bank properties. These feedbacks also govern river behavior, including migration and avulsion. Bank cohesion, from the addition of fine sediment and/or vegetation has been recognized in flume experiments as a necessary component to create and maintain a meandering channel planform. Greater bank cohesion slows bank erosion, limiting the rate at which a river can adjust laterally and preventing so-called "runaway widening" to a braided state. Feedbacks of bank cohesion on channel hydraulics and sediment transport may thus produce distinct topographic signatures, or patterns in channel width, depth, and point bar transverse slope. We expect that in bends of greater outer bank cohesion the channel will be narrower, deeper, and bars will have greater transverse slopes. Only recently have we recognized that biotic processes may imprint distinct topographic signatures on the landscape. This study explores topographic signatures of three US rivers: the lower Minnesota River, near Mankato, MN, the Le Sueur River, south central MN, and the Fall River, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO. Each of these rivers has variability in outer bank cohesion, quantified based on geotechnical and vegetation properties, and in-channel topography, which was derived from rtkGPS and acoustic bathymetry surveys. We present methods for incorporating biophysical feedbacks into geomorphic transport laws so that models can better simulate the spatial patterns and variability of topographic signatures.

  13. High order statistical signatures from source-driven measurements of subcritical fissile systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattingly, John Kelly

    1998-11-01

    This research focuses on the development and application of high order statistical analyses applied to measurements performed with subcritical fissile systems driven by an introduced neutron source. The signatures presented are derived from counting statistics of the introduced source and radiation detectors that observe the response of the fissile system. It is demonstrated that successively higher order counting statistics possess progressively higher sensitivity to reactivity. Consequently, these signatures are more sensitive to changes in the composition, fissile mass, and configuration of the fissile assembly. Furthermore, it is shown that these techniques are capable of distinguishing the response of the fissile system to the introduced source from its response to any internal or inherent sources. This ability combined with the enhanced sensitivity of higher order signatures indicates that these techniques will be of significant utility in a variety of applications. Potential applications include enhanced radiation signature identification of weapons components for nuclear disarmament and safeguards applications and augmented nondestructive analysis of spent nuclear fuel. In general, these techniques expand present capabilities in the analysis of subcritical measurements.

  14. A 6-gene signature identifies four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There are currently three postulated genomic subtypes of the childhood tumour neuroblastoma (NB); Type 1, Type 2A, and Type 2B. The most aggressive forms of NB are characterized by amplification of the oncogene MYCN (MNA) and low expression of the favourable marker NTRK1. Recently, mutations or high expression of the familial predisposition gene Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) was associated to unfavourable biology of sporadic NB. Also, various other genes have been linked to NB pathogenesis. Results The present study explores subgroup discrimination by gene expression profiling using three published microarray studies on NB (47 samples). Four distinct clusters were identified by Principal Components Analysis (PCA) in two separate data sets, which could be verified by an unsupervised hierarchical clustering in a third independent data set (101 NB samples) using a set of 74 discriminative genes. The expression signature of six NB-associated genes ALK, BIRC5, CCND1, MYCN, NTRK1, and PHOX2B, significantly discriminated the four clusters (p < 0.05, one-way ANOVA test). PCA clusters p1, p2, and p3 were found to correspond well to the postulated subtypes 1, 2A, and 2B, respectively. Remarkably, a fourth novel cluster was detected in all three independent data sets. This cluster comprised mainly 11q-deleted MNA-negative tumours with low expression of ALK, BIRC5, and PHOX2B, and was significantly associated with higher tumour stage, poor outcome and poor survival compared to the Type 1-corresponding favourable group (INSS stage 4 and/or dead of disease, p < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). Conclusions Based on expression profiling we have identified four molecular subgroups of neuroblastoma, which can be distinguished by a 6-gene signature. The fourth subgroup has not been described elsewhere, and efforts are currently made to further investigate this group's specific characteristics. PMID:21492432

  15. Electroencephalogram signatures of loss and recovery of consciousness from propofol

    PubMed Central

    Purdon, Patrick L.; Pierce, Eric T.; Mukamel, Eran A.; Prerau, Michael J.; Walsh, John L.; Wong, Kin Foon K.; Salazar-Gomez, Andres F.; Harrell, Priscilla G.; Sampson, Aaron L.; Cimenser, Aylin; Ching, ShiNung; Kopell, Nancy J.; Tavares-Stoeckel, Casie; Habeeb, Kathleen; Merhar, Rebecca; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-01-01

    Unconsciousness is a fundamental component of general anesthesia (GA), but anesthesiologists have no reliable ways to be certain that a patient is unconscious. To develop EEG signatures that track loss and recovery of consciousness under GA, we recorded high-density EEGs in humans during gradual induction of and emergence from unconsciousness with propofol. The subjects executed an auditory task at 4-s intervals consisting of interleaved verbal and click stimuli to identify loss and recovery of consciousness. During induction, subjects lost responsiveness to the less salient clicks before losing responsiveness to the more salient verbal stimuli; during emergence they recovered responsiveness to the verbal stimuli before recovering responsiveness to the clicks. The median frequency and bandwidth of the frontal EEG power tracked the probability of response to the verbal stimuli during the transitions in consciousness. Loss of consciousness was marked simultaneously by an increase in low-frequency EEG power (<1 Hz), the loss of spatially coherent occipital alpha oscillations (8–12 Hz), and the appearance of spatially coherent frontal alpha oscillations. These dynamics reversed with recovery of consciousness. The low-frequency phase modulated alpha amplitude in two distinct patterns. During profound unconsciousness, alpha amplitudes were maximal at low-frequency peaks, whereas during the transition into and out of unconsciousness, alpha amplitudes were maximal at low-frequency nadirs. This latter phase–amplitude relationship predicted recovery of consciousness. Our results provide insights into the mechanisms of propofol-induced unconsciousness, establish EEG signatures of this brain state that track transitions in consciousness precisely, and suggest strategies for monitoring the brain activity of patients receiving GA. PMID:23487781

  16. A gene-signature progression approach to identifying candidate small-molecule cancer therapeutics with connectivity mapping.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qing; Kim, Chang-Sik; Hamilton, Peter W; Zhang, Shu-Dong

    2016-05-11

    Gene expression connectivity mapping has gained much popularity recently with a number of successful applications in biomedical research testifying its utility and promise. Previously methodological research in connectivity mapping mainly focused on two of the key components in the framework, namely, the reference gene expression profiles and the connectivity mapping algorithms. The other key component in this framework, the query gene signature, has been left to users to construct without much consensus on how this should be done, albeit it has been an issue most relevant to end users. As a key input to the connectivity mapping process, gene signature is crucially important in returning biologically meaningful and relevant results. This paper intends to formulate a standardized procedure for constructing high quality gene signatures from a user's perspective. We describe a two-stage process for making quality gene signatures using gene expression data as initial inputs. First, a differential gene expression analysis comparing two distinct biological states; only the genes that have passed stringent statistical criteria are considered in the second stage of the process, which involves ranking genes based on statistical as well as biological significance. We introduce a "gene signature progression" method as a standard procedure in connectivity mapping. Starting from the highest ranked gene, we progressively determine the minimum length of the gene signature that allows connections to the reference profiles (drugs) being established with a preset target false discovery rate. We use a lung cancer dataset and a breast cancer dataset as two case studies to demonstrate how this standardized procedure works, and we show that highly relevant and interesting biological connections are returned. Of particular note is gefitinib, identified as among the candidate therapeutics in our lung cancer case study. Our gene signature was based on gene expression data from Taiwan

  17. AdaBoost-based on-line signature verifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Yasunori; Muramatsu, Daigo; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2005-03-01

    Authentication of individuals is rapidly becoming an important issue. The authors previously proposed a Pen-input online signature verification algorithm. The algorithm considers a writer"s signature as a trajectory of pen position, pen pressure, pen azimuth, and pen altitude that evolve over time, so that it is dynamic and biometric. Many algorithms have been proposed and reported to achieve accuracy for on-line signature verification, but setting the threshold value for these algorithms is a problem. In this paper, we introduce a user-generic model generated by AdaBoost, which resolves this problem. When user- specific models (one model for each user) are used for signature verification problems, we need to generate the models using only genuine signatures. Forged signatures are not available because imposters do not give forged signatures for training in advance. However, we can make use of another's forged signature in addition to the genuine signatures for learning by introducing a user generic model. And Adaboost is a well-known classification algorithm, making final decisions depending on the sign of the output value. Therefore, it is not necessary to set the threshold value. A preliminary experiment is performed on a database consisting of data from 50 individuals. This set consists of western-alphabet-based signatures provide by a European research group. In this experiment, our algorithm gives an FRR of 1.88% and an FAR of 1.60%. Since no fine-tuning was done, this preliminary result looks very promising.

  18. Spatial and temporal diet segregation in northern fulmars Fulmarus glacialis breeding in Alaska: Insights from fatty acid signatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, S.W.; Iverson, S.J.; Springer, A.M.; Hatch, Shyla A.

    2009-01-01

    Northern fulmars Fulmarus glacialis in the North Pacific Ocean are opportunistic, generalist predators, yet their diets are poorly described; thus, relationships of fulmars to supporting food webs, their utility as indicators of variability in forage fish abundances, and their sensitivity to ecosystem change are not known. We employed fatty acid (FA) signature analysis of adipose tissue from adults (n = 235) and chicks (n = 33) to compare spatial, temporal, and age-related variation in diets of fulmars breeding at 3 colonies in Alaska. FA signatures of adult fulmars differed between colonies within years, and between seasons at individual colonies. Seasonal and spatial differences in signatures were greater than interannual differences at all colonies. Differences in FA signatures reflect differences in diets, probably because the breeding colonies are located in distinct ecoregions which create unique habitats for prey assemblages, and because interannual variation in the physical environment affects the availability of forage species. Differences between FA signatures of adults and chicks in 2003 and 2004 suggest that adults fed chicks different prey than they consumed themselves. Alternatively, if adults relied on the same prey as those fed to chicks, the differences in signatures could have resulted from partial digestion of prey items by adults before chicks were fed, or direct metabolism of FAs by chicks for tissue synthesis before FAs could be deposited into adipose tissue. ?? Inter-Research 2009.

  19. Optical Signatures of Coupled Quantum Dots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-03

    Optical Signatures of Coupled Quantum Dots E. A. Stinaff,1 M. Scheibner,1 A. S . Bracker,1 I. V. Ponomarev,1 V. L. Korenev ,2 M. E. Ware,1 M. F. Doty,1...possibility of optically coupling quantum dots for application in quantum information processing. S emiconductor approaches to quantum information can...REPORTS 3 FEBRUARY 2006 VOL 311 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org636 o n A ug us t 1 4, 2 00 7 w w w . s ci en ce m ag .o rg D ow nl oa de d fr om Report

  20. Sweet Structural Signatures Unveiled in Ketohexoses.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Celina; Peña, Isabel; Mata, Santiago; Alonso, José L

    2016-11-14

    The conformational behaviour of naturally occurring ketohexoses has been revealed in a supersonic expansion by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy coupled with a laser ablation source. Three, two and one conformers of d-tagatose, d-psicose and l-sorbose, respectively, have been identified by their rotational constants extracted from the analysis of the spectra. Singular structural signatures involving the hydroxyl groups OH (1) and OH (2) have been disentangled from the intricate intramolecular hydrogen bond networks stabilising the most abundant conformers. The present results place the old Shallenberger and Kier sweetness theories on a firmer footing. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Gravitational Wave Signatures of Crystalline Color Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lap-Ming

    Deconfined quark matter may exist in a crystalline color-superconducing phase in the interiors of compact stars. One of the special properties of this exotic phase of matter is that it is extremely rigid and the corresponding shear modulus can be up to 1000 times larger than that of the neutron-star crust. In this paper, we review how the extreme rigidity of this crystalline phase of quark matter can lead to unique gravitational-wave signatures that may be detectable by the current or the next-generation gravitational-wave detectors.

  2. Oil pollution signatures by remote sensing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catoe, C. E.; Mclean, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the possibility of developing an effective remote sensing system for oil pollution monitoring which would be capable of detecting oil films on water, mapping the areal extent of oil slicks, measuring slick thickness, and identifying the oil types. In the spectral regions considered (ultraviolet, visible, infrared, microwave, and radar), the signatures were sufficiently unique when compared to the background so that it was possible to detect and map oil slicks. Both microwave and radar techniques are capable of operating in adverse weather. Fluorescence techniques show promise in identifying oil types. A multispectral system will be required to detect oil, map its distribution, estimate film thickness, and characterize the oil pollutant.

  3. THREE-COMPONENT BOREHOLE MAGNETOMETER PROBE FOR MINERAL INVESTIGATIONS AND GEOLOGIC RESEARCH.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, James H.; Olson, Gary G.

    1985-01-01

    A small-diameter three-component fluxgate magnetometer probe with gyroscopic and inclinometer orientation has been developed to meet U. S. Geological Survey design and performance specifications for measurement of the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field in vertical and inclined boreholes. The orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer elements have a measurement resolution of 10 nanoteslas (nT) and a range of plus or minus 80,000 nT. The gyroscope has an effective resolution of one degree, and the orthogonal inclinometers, 0. 1 degree. The magnetometer probe has been field tested in several holes drilled through volcanic rocks in Nevada. Results indicate that reversals of polarization can be detected, and some rock units in this area appear to be characterized by unique magnetic signatures.

  4. Gene-expression signatures of Atlantic salmon’s plastic life cycle

    PubMed Central

    Aubin-Horth, Nadia; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Hofmann, Hans A.

    2009-01-01

    How genomic expression differs as a function of life history variation is largely unknown. Atlantic salmon exhibits extreme alternative life histories. We defined the gene-expression signatures of wild-caught salmon at two different life stages by comparing the brain expression profiles of mature sneaker males and immature males, and early migrants and late migrants. In addition to life-stage-specific signatures, we discovered a surprisingly large gene set that was differentially regulated - at similar magnitudes, yet in opposite direction - in both life history transitions. We suggest that this co-variation is not a consequence of many independent cellular and molecular switches in the same direction but rather represents the molecular equivalent of a physiological shift orchestrated by one or very few master regulators. PMID:19401203

  5. Longitudinal changes in young children’s 0–100 to 0–1000 number-line error signatures

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Robert A.; Paul, Jacob M.; Butterworth, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We use a latent difference score (LDS) model to examine changes in young children’s number-line (NL) error signatures (errors marking numbers on a NL) over 18 months. A LDS model (1) overcomes some of the inference limitations of analytic models used in previous research, and in particular (2) provides a more reliable test of hypotheses about the meaning and significance of changes in NL error signatures over time and task. The NL error signatures of 217 6-year-olds’ (on test occasion one) were assessed three times over 18 months, along with their math ability on two occasions. On the first occasion (T1) children completed a 0–100 NL task; on the second (T2) a 0–100 NL and a 0–1000 NL task; on the third (T3) occasion a 0–1000 NL task. On the third and fourth occasions (T3 and T4), children completed mental calculation tasks. Although NL error signatures changed over time, these were predictable from other NL task error signatures, and predicted calculation accuracy at T3, as well as changes in calculation between T3 and T4. Multiple indirect effects (change parameters) showed that associations between initial NL error signatures (0–100 NL) and later mental calculation ability were mediated by error signatures on the 0–1000 NL task. The pattern of findings from the LDS model highlight the value of identifying direct and indirect effects in characterizing changing relationships in cognitive representations over task and time. Substantively, they support the claim that children’s NL error signatures generalize over task and time and thus can be used to predict math ability. PMID:26029152

  6. Signatures of fractional exclusion statistics in the spectroscopy of quantum Hall droplets.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Nigel R; Simon, Steven H

    2015-03-13

    We show how spectroscopic experiments on a small Laughlin droplet of rotating bosons can directly demonstrate Haldane fractional exclusion statistics of quasihole excitations. The characteristic signatures appear in the single-particle excitation spectrum. We show that the transitions are governed by a "many-body selection rule" which allows one to relate the number of allowed transitions to the number of quasihole states on a finite geometry. We illustrate the theory with numerically exact simulations of small numbers of particles.

  7. Asian Eocene monsoons as revealed by leaf architectural signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Robert A.; Yang, Jian; Herman, Alexei B.; Kodrul, Tatiana; Maslova, Natalia; Spicer, Teresa E. V.; Aleksandrova, Galina; Jin, Jianhua

    2016-09-01

    The onset and development of the Asian monsoon systems is a topic that has attracted considerable research effort but proxy data limitations, coupled with a diversity of definitions and metrics characterizing monsoon phenomena, have generated much debate. Failure of geological proxies to yield metrics capable of distinguishing between rainfall seasonality induced by migrations of the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) from that attributable to topographically modified seasonal pressure reversals has frustrated attempts to understand mechanisms underpinning monsoon development and dynamics. Here we circumvent the use of such single climate parameter metrics in favor of detecting directly the distinctive attributes of different monsoon regimes encoded in leaf fossils. Leaf form adapts to the prevailing climate, particularly under the extreme seasonal stresses imposed by monsoons, so it is likely that fossil leaves carry a unique signature of past monsoon regimes. Leaf form trait spectra obtained from fossils from Eocene basins in southern China were compared with those seen in modern leaves growing under known climate regimes. The fossil leaf trait spectra, including those derived from previously published fossil floras from northwestern India, were most similar to those found in vegetation exposed to the modern Indonesia-Australia Monsoon (I-AM), which is largely a product of seasonal migrations of the ITCZ. The presence of this distinctive leaf physiognomic signature suggests that although a monsoon climate existed in Eocene time across southern Asia the characteristics of the modern topographically-enhanced South Asia Monsoon had yet to develop. By the Eocene leaves in South Asia had become well adapted to an I-AM type regime across many taxa and points to the existence of a pervasive monsoon climate prior to the Eocene. No fossil trait spectra typical of exposure to the modern East Asia monsoon were seen, suggesting the effects of this system in southern

  8. Oxygen Isotope Signatures of Biogenic Manganese(III/IV) Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, K. M.; Hansel, C. M.; Wankel, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxide minerals are pervasive throughout a number of surface earth environments as rock varnishes, ferromanganese nodules, crusts around deep-sea vents, and cave deposits among many other marine, freshwater, and terrestrial deposits. Mn(III,IV) oxides are also among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in surface earth environments and are crucial to understanding the fate of organic matter in sedimentary environments. The precipitation of Mn oxide minerals proceeds via both abiotic and biotic oxidation pathways, the latter due to the indirect or direct activity of Mn(II)- oxidizing microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi. Although the precipitation of Mn oxides is believed to be primarily controlled by Mn(II)-oxidizing organisms in most surface earth environments, confirmation of this generally held notion has remained illusive and limits our understanding of their formation on Earth and beyond (e.g., Mars). Previous work provided evidence that O atom incorporation by specific Mn oxidation pathways may exhibit unique and predictable isotopic fractionation. In this study, we expand upon this evidence by measuring the oxygen isotope signature of several biogenic and abiogenic Mn oxide minerals synthesized under a range of oxygen-18 labeled water. These results allow us to determine the relative amount oxygen atoms derived from water and molecular oxygen that are incorporated in the oxide and shed light on corresponding isotope fractionation factors. Additionally, we show that, once precipitated, Mn oxide isotope signatures are robust with respect to aqueous oxygen isotope exchange. The study provides a foundation on which to study and interpret Mn oxides in natural environments and determine which environmental controls may govern Mn(II) oxidation.

  9. Mapping target signatures via partial unmixing of AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boardman, Joseph W.; Kruse, Fred A.; Green, Robert O.

    1995-01-01

    A complete spectral unmixing of a complicated AVIRIS scene may not always be possible or even desired. High quality data of spectrally complex areas are very high dimensional and are consequently difficult to fully unravel. Partial unmixing provides a method of solving only that fraction of the data inversion problem that directly relates to the specific goals of the investigation. Many applications of imaging spectrometry can be cast in the form of the following question: 'Are my target signatures present in the scene, and if so, how much of each target material is present in each pixel?' This is a partial unmixing problem. The number of unmixing endmembers is one greater than the number of spectrally defined target materials. The one additional endmember can be thought of as the composite of all the other scene materials, or 'everything else'. Several workers have proposed partial unmixing schemes for imaging spectrometry data, but each has significant limitations for operational application. The low probability detection methods described by Farrand and Harsanyi and the foreground-background method of Smith et al are both examples of such partial unmixing strategies. The new method presented here builds on these innovative analysis concepts, combining their different positive attributes while attempting to circumvent their limitations. This new method partially unmixes AVIRIS data, mapping apparent target abundances, in the presence of an arbitrary and unknown spectrally mixed background. It permits the target materials to be present in abundances that drive significant portions of the scene covariance. Furthermore it does not require a priori knowledge of the background material spectral signatures. The challenge is to find the proper projection of the data that hides the background variance while simultaneously maximizing the variance amongst the targets.

  10. Observation of Signatures of Meteoroidal Water in the Lunar Exosphere by the LADEE NMS Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benna, M.; Elphic, R. C.; Hurley, D.; Stubbs, T. J.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    During its seven months in orbit, the Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) of the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Mission measured the composition and variability of the tenuous lunar atmosphere. These measurements led to the detection of signatures of water group neutrals (H2O and/or OH) in the exosphere of the Moon. The signature of water has been measured as sporadic, short-lived signal increases above instrument background levels. The NMS data show that the occurrence rate of the high signal water "spikes" is correlated with periods of major annual meteoroid streams. Moreover, the daily water detection rate is in agreement with the expected evolution of the incoming meteoroidal impact flux at the Moon. Monte Carlo modeling of the evolution of vaporized water indicates that the signatures detected by the NMS instrument are commensurate in size and distribution of the energetic fraction of the vapors released by impacts that occurred near the location of the spacecraft. These measurements provide the first direct constraints on the contribution of meteoroid-delivered water to the sequestered ice in the permanently shadow regions of the lunar poles. They also provide a new technique for real-time observations of meteoroid impacts on airless bodies of the solar system through the detection of their associated volatile signatures.

  11. Micro-Doppler analysis of multiple frequency continuous wave radar signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Michael G.; Rogers, Robert L.

    2007-04-01

    Micro-Doppler refers to Doppler scattering returns produced by non rigid-body motion. Micro-Doppler gives rise to many detailed radar image features in addition to those associated with bulk target motion. Targets of different classes (for example, humans, animals, and vehicles) produce micro-Doppler images that are often distinguishable even by nonexpert observers. Micro-Doppler features have great potential for use in automatic target classification algorithms. Although the potential benefit of using micro-Doppler in classification algorithms is high, relatively little experimental (non-synthetic) micro-Doppler data exists. Much of the existing experimental data comes from highly cooperative targets (human or vehicle targets directly approaching the radar). This research involved field data collection and analysis of micro-Doppler radar signatures from non-cooperative targets. The data was collected using a low cost Xband multiple frequency continuous wave (MFCW) radar with three transmit frequencies. The collected MFCW radar signatures contain data from humans, vehicles, and animals. The presented data includes micro-Doppler signatures previously unavailable in the literature such as crawling humans and various animal species. The animal micro-Doppler signatures include deer, dog, and goat datasets. This research focuses on the analysis of micro-Doppler from noncooperative targets approaching the radar at various angles, maneuvers, and postures.

  12. Geochemical signature of permanent and ephemeral thermal springs in Val di Cornia, Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierotti, Lisa; Pennisi, Maddalena; Muti, Antonio; Gherardi, Fabrizio

    2014-05-01

    thermal springs. Based on these data, the main recharge area has been hypothesized in correspondence of outcropping carbonate formations in the hilly region NE of the area under study. The lack of tritium (3H) at Bagnarello suggests the existence of long underground residence times for the hydrothermal component, whereas the presence of measurable amounts of tritium at Calidario indicate the contribution of rapidly infiltrating meteoric waters. The 87Sr/86Sr ratio of ephemeral and permanent thermal springs (below 0.70804), significantly lower than local Ca-HCO3 groundwaters (0.70889), indicates a prolonged interaction with Mesozoic carbonate and evaporitic formations (0.70789). The δ34S-SO4 signature (+15.4o) mirrors the isotopic composition of local evaporites, reinforcing on the hypothesis of extensive thermal circulation through the Tuscan Nappe. Overall, the geochemical signature of the thermal springs of the Campiglia Marittima hydrothermal spring appears stable over the period 1984-present. Geochemical data support a regional groundwater circulation scheme where thermal waters move along a preferential NE-SW direction, flow at different depths within Mesozoic carbonate and evaporite formations, and emerge in correspondence of main faults.

  13. Observational signatures of past mass-exchange episodes in massive binaries: the case of LSS 3074

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raucq, F.; Gosset, E.; Rauw, G.; Manfroid, J.; Mahy, L.; Mennekens, N.; Vanbeveren, D.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The role of mass and momentum exchanges in close massive binaries is very important in the subsequent evolution of the components. Such exchanges produce several observational signatures such as asynchronous rotation and altered chemical compositions, that remain after the stars detach again. Aims: We investigated these effects for the close O-star binary LSS 3074 (O4 f + O6-7:(f):), which is a good candidate for a past Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) episode because of its very short orbital period, P = 2.185 days, and the luminosity classes of both components. Methods: We determined a new orbital solution for the system. We studied the photometric light curves to determine the inclination of the orbit and Roche lobe filling factors of both stars. Using phase-resolved spectroscopy, we performed the disentangling of the optical spectra of the two stars. We then analysed the reconstructed primary and secondary spectra with the CMFGEN model atmosphere code to determine stellar parameters, such as the effective temperatures and surface gravities, and to constrain the chemical composition of the components. Results: We confirm the apparent low stellar masses and radii reported in previous studies. We also find a strong overabundance in nitrogen and a strong carbon and oxygen depletion in both primary and secondary atmospheres, together with a strong enrichment in helium of the primary star. Conclusions: We propose several possible evolutionary pathways through a RLOF process to explain the current parameters of the system. We confirm that the system is apparently in overcontact configuration and has lost a significant portion of its mass to its surroundings. We suggest that some of the discrepancies between the spectroscopic and photometric properties of LSS 3074 could stem from the impact of a strong radiation pressure of the primary. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile) and the Cerro Tololo Inter

  14. Signature program: a platform of basket trials.

    PubMed

    Slosberg, Eric D; Kang, Barinder P; Peguero, Julio; Taylor, Matthew; Bauer, Todd M; Berry, Donald A; Braiteh, Fadi; Spira, Alexander; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Stein, Steven; Piha-Paul, Sarina A; Salvado, August

    2018-04-20

    Investigating targeted therapies can be challenging due to diverse tumor mutations and slow patient accrual for clinical studies. The Signature Program is a series of 8 phase 2, agent-specific basket protocols using a rapid study start-up approach involving no predetermined study sites. Each protocol evaluated 1 agent (buparlisib, dovitinib, binimetinib, encorafenib, sonidegib, BGJ398, ceritinib, or ribociclib) in patients with solid or hematologic malignancies and an actionable mutation. The primary endpoint of each study was the clinical benefit rate (ie, complete or partial response, or stable disease) at 16 weeks. A total of 192 individual sites were opened in the United States, with a median start-up time of 3.6 weeks. The most common tumor types among the 595 treated patients were colorectal (9.2%), non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma (9.1%), and ovarian (8.4%). Frequent genetic alterations were in PIK3CA , RAS , p16 , and PTEN . Overall, 30 partial or complete responses were observed with 6 compounds in 16 tumor types. The Signature Program presents a unique and successful approach for rapid signal finding across multiple tumors and allowed various agents to be evaluated in patients with rare alterations. Incorporating these program features in conventional studies could lead to improved trial efficiencies and patient outcomes.

  15. Chameleon dark energy models with characteristic signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gannouji, Radouane; Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3, Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8601; Moraes, Bruno

    2010-12-15

    In chameleon dark energy models, local gravity constraints tend to rule out parameters in which observable cosmological signatures can be found. We study viable chameleon potentials consistent with a number of recent observational and experimental bounds. A novel chameleon field potential, motivated by f(R) gravity, is constructed where observable cosmological signatures are present both at the background evolution and in the growth rate of the perturbations. We study the evolution of matter density perturbations on low redshifts for this potential and show that the growth index today {gamma}{sub 0} can have significant dispersion on scales relevant for large scale structures.more » The values of {gamma}{sub 0} can be even smaller than 0.2 with large variations of {gamma} on very low redshifts for the model parameters constrained by local gravity tests. This gives a possibility to clearly distinguish these chameleon models from the {Lambda}-cold-dark-matter ({Lambda}CDM) model in future high-precision observations.« less

  16. Corticosteroid receptors adopt distinct cyclical transcriptional signatures.

    PubMed

    Le Billan, Florian; Amazit, Larbi; Bleakley, Kevin; Xue, Qiong-Yao; Pussard, Eric; Lhadj, Christophe; Kolkhof, Peter; Viengchareun, Say; Fagart, Jérôme; Lombès, Marc

    2018-05-07

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are two closely related hormone-activated transcription factors that regulate major pathophysiologic functions. High homology between these receptors accounts for the crossbinding of their corresponding ligands, MR being activated by both aldosterone and cortisol and GR essentially activated by cortisol. Their coexpression and ability to bind similar DNA motifs highlight the need to investigate their respective contributions to overall corticosteroid signaling. Here, we decipher the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that underlie selective effects of MRs and GRs on shared genomic targets in a human renal cellular model. Kinetic, serial, and sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation approaches were performed on the period circadian protein 1 ( PER1) target gene, providing evidence that both receptors dynamically and cyclically interact at the same target promoter in a specific and distinct transcriptional signature. During this process, both receptors regulate PER1 gene by binding as homo- or heterodimers to the same promoter region. Our results suggest a novel level of MR-GR target gene regulation, which should be considered for a better and integrated understanding of corticosteroid-related pathophysiology.-Le Billan, F., Amazit, L., Bleakley, K., Xue, Q.-Y., Pussard, E., Lhadj, C., Kolkhof, P., Viengchareun, S., Fagart, J., Lombès, M. Corticosteroid receptors adopt distinct cyclical transcriptional signatures.

  17. Signatures of microevolutionary processes in phylogenetic patterns.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carolina L N; Lemos-Costa, Paula; Marquitti, Flavia M D; Fernandes, Lucas D; Ramos, Marlon F; Schneider, David M; Martins, Ayana B; Aguiar, Marcus A M

    2018-06-23

    Phylogenetic trees are representations of evolutionary relationships among species and contain signatures of the processes responsible for the speciation events they display. Inferring processes from tree properties, however, is challenging. To address this problem we analysed a spatially-explicit model of speciation where genome size and mating range can be controlled. We simulated parapatric and sympatric (narrow and wide mating range, respectively) radiations and constructed their phylogenetic trees, computing structural properties such as tree balance and speed of diversification. We showed that parapatric and sympatric speciation are well separated by these structural tree properties. Balanced trees with constant rates of diversification only originate in sympatry and genome size affected both the balance and the speed of diversification of the simulated trees. Comparison with empirical data showed that most of the evolutionary radiations considered to have developed in parapatry or sympatry are in good agreement with model predictions. Even though additional forces other than spatial restriction of gene flow, genome size, and genetic incompatibilities, do play a role in the evolution of species formation, the microevolutionary processes modeled here capture signatures of the diversification pattern of evolutionary radiations, regarding the symmetry and speed of diversification of lineages.

  18. Novel signatures of cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bozóky, Benedek; Savchenko, Andrii; Csermely, Péter; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Dúl, Zoltán; Pontén, Fredrik; Székely, László; Klein, George

    2013-07-15

    Increasing evidence indicates the importance of the tumor microenvironment, in particular cancer-associated fibroblasts, in cancer development and progression. In our study, we developed a novel, visually based method to identify new immunohistochemical signatures of these fibroblasts. The method employed a protein list based on 759 protein products of genes identified by RNA profiling from our previous study, comparing fibroblasts with differential growth-modulating effect on human cancers cells, and their first neighbors in the human protein interactome. These 2,654 proteins were analyzed in the Human Protein Atlas online database by comparing their immunohistochemical expression patterns in normal versus tumor-associated fibroblasts. Twelve new proteins differentially expressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts were identified (DLG1, BHLHE40, ROCK2, RAB31, AZI2, PKM2, ARHGAP31, ARHGAP26, ITCH, EGLN1, RNF19A and PLOD2), four of them can be connected to the Rho kinase signaling pathway. They were further analyzed in several additional tumor stromata and revealed that the majority showed congruence among the different tumors. Many of them were also positive in normal myofibroblast-like cells. The new signatures can be useful in immunohistochemical analysis of different tumor stromata and may also give us an insight into the pathways activated in them in their true in vivo context. The method itself could be used for other similar analysis to identify proteins expressed in other cell types in tumors and their surrounding microenvironment. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  19. Flavorful Z‧ signatures at LHC and ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Long; Okada, Nobuchika

    2008-10-01

    There are lots of new physics models which predict an extra neutral gauge boson, referred as Z‧-boson. In a certain class of these new physics models, the Z‧-boson has flavor-dependent couplings with the fermions in the Standard Model (SM). Based on a simple model in which couplings of the SM fermions in the third generation with the Z‧-boson are different from those of the corresponding fermions in the first two generations, we study the signatures of Z‧-boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). We show that at the LHC, the Z‧-boson with mass around 1 TeV can be produced through the Drell-Yan processes and its dilepton decay modes provide us clean signatures not only for the resonant production of Z‧-boson but also for flavor-dependences of the production cross sections. We also study fermion pair productions at the ILC involving the virtual Z‧-boson exchange. Even though the center-of-energy of the ILC is much lower than a Z‧-boson mass, the angular distributions and the forward-backward asymmetries of fermion pair productions show not only sizable deviations from the SM predictions but also significant flavor-dependences.

  20. Cosmological Signatures of a Mirror Twin Higgs

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, Zackaria; Curtin, David; Geller, Michael

    We explore the cosmological signatures associated with the twin baryons, electrons, photons and neutrinos in the Mirror Twin Higgs framework. We consider a scenario in which the twin baryons constitute a subcomponent of dark matter, and the contribution of the twin photon and neutrinos to dark radiation is suppressed due to late asymmetric reheating, but remains large enough to be detected in future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. We show that this framework can lead to distinctive signals in large scale structure and in the cosmic microwave background. Baryon acoustic oscillations in the mirror sector prior to recombination lead tomore » a suppression of structure on large scales, and leave a residual oscillatory pattern in the matter power spectrum. This pattern depends sensitively on the relative abundances and ionization energies of both twin hydrogen and helium, and is therefore characteristic of this class of models. Although both mirror photons and neutrinos constitute dark radiation in the early universe, their effects on the CMB are distinct. This is because prior to recombination the twin neutrinos free stream, while the twin photons are prevented from free streaming by scattering off twin electrons. In the Mirror Twin Higgs framework the relative contributions of these two species to the energy density in dark radiation is predicted, leading to testable effects in the CMB. These highly distinctive cosmological signatures may allow this class of models to be discovered, and distinguished from more general dark sectors.« less