Science.gov

Sample records for component failure rates

  1. Saturn component failure rate and failure rate modifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Failure mode frequency ratios, environmental adjustment factors, and failure rates for mechanical and electromechanical component families are presented. The failure rates and failure rate modifiers resulted from a series of studies whose purpose was to provide design, tests, reliability, and systems engineers with accurate, up-to-date failure rate information. The results of the studies were achieved through an extensive engineering analysis of the Saturn Program test data and Unsatisfactory Condition Reports (UCR's) and the application of mathematical techniques developed for the studies.

  2. Comparison of Tritium Component Failure Rate Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2004-09-01

    Published failure rate values from the US Tritium Systems Test Assembly, the Japanese Tritium Process Laboratory, the German Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, and the Joint European Torus Active Gas Handling System have been compared. This comparison is on a limited set of components, but there is a good variety of data sets in the comparison. The data compared reasonably well. The most reasonable failure rate values are recommended for use on next generation tritium handling system components, such as those in the tritium plant systems for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the tritium fuel systems of inertial fusion facilities, such as the US National Ignition Facility. These data and the comparison results are also shared with the International Energy Agency cooperative task on fusion component failure rate data.

  3. Failure Rate Data Analysis for High Technology Components

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2007-07-01

    Understanding component reliability helps designers create more robust future designs and supports efficient and cost-effective operations of existing machines. The accelerator community can leverage the commonality of its high-vacuum and high-power systems with those of the magnetic fusion community to gain access to a larger database of reliability data. Reliability studies performed under the auspices of the International Energy Agency are the result of an international working group, which has generated a component failure rate database for fusion experiment components. The initial database work harvested published data and now analyzes operating experience data. This paper discusses the usefulness of reliability data, describes the failure rate data collection and analysis effort, discusses reliability for components with scarce data, and points out some of the intersections between magnetic fusion experiments and accelerators.

  4. Selected component failure rate values from fusion safety assessment tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1998-09-01

    This report is a compilation of component failure rate and repair rate values that can be used in magnetic fusion safety assessment tasks. Several safety systems are examined, such as gas cleanup systems and plasma shutdown systems. Vacuum system component reliability values, including large vacuum chambers, have been reviewed. Values for water cooling system components have also been reported here. The report concludes with the examination of some equipment important to personnel safety, atmospheres, combustible gases, and airborne releases of radioactivity. These data should be useful to system designers to calculate scoping values for the availability and repair intervals for their systems, and for probabilistic safety or risk analysts to assess fusion systems for safety of the public and the workers.

  5. Selected Component Failure Rate Values from Fusion Safety Assessment Tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles

    1998-09-01

    This report is a compilation of component failure rate and repair rate values that can be used in magnetic fusion safety assessment tasks. Several safety systems are examined, such as gas cleanup systems and plasma shutdown systems. Vacuum system component reliability values, including large vacuum chambers, have been reviewed. Values for water cooling system components have also been reported here. The report concludes with the examination of some equipment important to personnel safety, atmospheres, combustible gases, and airborne releases of radioactivity. These data should be useful to system designers to calculate scoping values for the availability and repair intervals for their systems, and for probabilistic safety or risk analysts to assess fusion systems for safety of the public and the workers.

  6. Component Failure Rate Data Sources for Probabilistic Safety and Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Eide

    2010-09-01

    Probabilistic safety methods are being used in several industries, including chemical, manufacturing, and energy. When performing reliability studies or using probabilistic safety approaches, a basic need arises for input data on failure rates of the mechanical, electrical, instrumentation and control, and other components that comprise the engineering systems in the facility. Some companies have many types of data stored and can retrieve these in-house data for such uses. Other companies hire consultants to perform safety assessments; the consulting firms often use their own data bases. For those analysts who do not have either of those options available, this paper presents some data sources that are retrievable from the literature. These data sources have been evaluated with a basic rating of usefulness for analysis work, and each has a description of what data can be found in the citation that can be used to support assessments in industry. The accessibility of data documents via the internet is also described.

  7. Estimation procedures to measure and monitor failure rates of components during thermal-vacuum testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. E.; Kruger, R.

    1980-01-01

    Estimation procedures are described for measuring component failure rates, for comparing the failure rates of two different groups of components, and for formulating confidence intervals for testing hypotheses (based on failure rates) that the two groups perform similarly or differently. Appendix A contains an example of an analysis in which these methods are applied to investigate the characteristics of two groups of spacecraft components. The estimation procedures are adaptable to system level testing and to monitoring failure characteristics in orbit.

  8. ESTIMATION OF FAILURE RATES OF DIGITAL COMPONENTS USING A HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN METHOD.

    SciTech Connect

    YUE, M.; CHU, T.L.

    2006-01-30

    One of the greatest challenges in evaluating reliability of digital I&C systems is how to obtain better failure rate estimates of digital components. A common practice of the digital component failure rate estimation is attempting to use empirical formulae to capture the impacts of various factors on the failure rates. The applicability of an empirical formula is questionable because it is not based on laws of physics and requires good data, which is scarce in general. In this study, the concept of population variability of the Hierarchical Bayesian Method (HBM) is applied to estimating the failure rate of a digital component using available data. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation is used to implement the HBM. Results are analyzed and compared by selecting different distribution types and priors distributions. Inspired by the sensitivity calculations and based on review of analytic derivations, it seems reasonable to suggest avoiding the use of gamma distribution in two-stage Bayesian analysis and HBM analysis.

  9. Investigation of component failure rates for pulsed versus steady state tokamak operation

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-07-01

    This report presents component failure rate data sources applicable to magnetic fusion systems, and defines multiplicative factors to adjust these data for specific use on magnetic fusion experiment designs. The multipliers address both long pulse and steady state tokamak operation. Thermal fatigue and radiation damage are among the leading reasons for large multiplier values in pulsed operation applications. Field failure rate values for graphite protective tiles are presented, and beryllium tile failure rates in laboratory testing are also given. All of these data can be used for reliability studies, safety analyses, design tradeoff studies, and risk assessments.

  10. Component failure-rate data with potential applicability to the hot experimental facility. Technical information

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, A.H.

    1980-12-01

    A literature search, that was aided by computer searches of a number of data bases, resulted in the compilation of approximately 1223 pieces of component failure-rate data under 136 subject categories. The data bank can be provided upon request as a punched-card deck or on magnetic tape.

  11. Component failure data handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Gentillon, C.D.

    1991-04-01

    This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

  12. Correlation study between vibrational environmental and failure rates of civil helicopter components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alaniz, O.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of two selected helicopter types, namely, the Models 206A/B and 212, is reported. An analysis of the available vibration and reliability data for these two helicopter types resulted in the selection of ten components located in five different areas of the helicopter and consisting primarily of instruments, electrical components, and other noncritical flight hardware. The potential for advanced technology in suppressing vibration in helicopters was assessed. The are still several unknowns concerning both the vibration environment and the reliability of helicopter noncritical flight components. Vibration data for the selected components were either insufficient or inappropriate. The maintenance data examined for the selected components were inappropriate due to variations in failure mode identification, inconsistent reporting, or inaccurate informaton.

  13. Component failure data handbook. Technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Gentillon, C.D.

    1991-04-01

    This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

  14. A PROPOSED METHOD FOR ESTIMATING FAILURE RATES OF DEGRADED PASSIVE COMPONENTS IN THE NRC SIGNIFICANCE DETERMINATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Ivans, William J.; Lowry, Peter P.

    2013-11-01

    This paper outlines a methodology for estimation of the incremental core damage frequency associated with the degradation of passive components with a view to its application in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's significance determination process. The method involves use of simplified physics-based models of materials degradation and the probabilistic comparison of transient loads with deteriorating system capacities.

  15. Failure Analysis of Ceramic Components

    SciTech Connect

    B.W. Morris

    2000-06-29

    Ceramics are being considered for a wide range of structural applications due to their low density and their ability to retain strength at high temperatures. The inherent brittleness of monolithic ceramics requires a departure from the deterministic design philosophy utilized to analyze metallic structural components. The design program ''Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life'' (CARES/LIFE) developed by NASA Lewis Research Center uses a probabilistic approach to predict the reliability of monolithic components under operational loading. The objective of this study was to develop an understanding of the theories used by CARES/LIFE to predict the reliability of ceramic components and to assess the ability of CARES/LIFE to accurately predict the fast fracture behavior of monolithic ceramic components. A finite element analysis was performed to determine the temperature and stress distribution of a silicon carbide O-ring under diametral compression. The results of the finite element analysis were supplied as input into CARES/LIFE to determine the fast fracture reliability of the O-ring. Statistical material strength parameters were calculated from four-point flexure bar test data. The predicted reliability showed excellent correlation with O-ring compression test data indicating that the CARES/LIFE program can be used to predict the reliability of ceramic components subjected to complicated stress states using material properties determined from simple uniaxial tensile tests.

  16. Development of Nonelectronic Part Cyclic Failure Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    for a short duration. The dc operation allows the current to build up to rated value during energization with no overshoot. Protective devices, such...failures/ houL 4.3 Part Classes and Failure Rates To update Sections 2.9, 2.10, and 2.11 of MIL-HDBK-217B, failure rate mathematical models and base

  17. GENERIC, COMPONENT FAILURE DATA BASE FOR LIGHT WATER AND LIQUID SODIUM REACTOR PRAs

    SciTech Connect

    S. A. Eide; S. V. Chmielewski; T. D. Swantz

    1990-02-01

    A comprehensive generic component failure data base has been developed for light water and liquid sodium reactor probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) . The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) and the Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO) data bases were used to generate component failure rates . Using this approach, most of the failure rates are based on actual plant data rather than existing estimates .

  18. Tritium Waste Treatment System component failure data analysis from June 18, 1984--December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C. ); Stolpe Gavett, M.A. )

    1990-09-01

    This document gives the failure rates for the major tritium-bearing components in the Tritium Waste Treatment System at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly, which is a fusion research and technology facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The failure reports, component populations, and operating demands/hours are given in this report, and sample calculations for binomial demand failure rates and poisson hourly failure rates are given in the appendices. The failure rates for tritium-bearing components were on the order of the screening failure rate values suggested for fusion reliability and risk analyses. More effort should be directed toward collecting and analyzing fusion component failure data, since accurate failure rates are necessary to refine reliability and risk analyses. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant failure rate database

    SciTech Connect

    Alber, T.G.; Hunt, C.R.; Fogarty, S.P.; Wilson, J.R.

    1995-08-01

    This report represents the first major upgrade to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) Failure Rate Database. This upgrade incorporates additional site-specific and generic data while improving on the previous data reduction techniques. In addition, due to a change in mission at the ICPP, the status of certain equipment items has changed from operating to standby or off-line. A discussion of how this mission change influenced the relevance of failure data also has been included. This report contains two data sources: the ICPP Failure Rate Database and a generic failure rate database. A discussion is presented on the approaches and assumptions used to develop the data in the ICPP Failure Rate Database. The generic database is included along with a short discussion of its application. A brief discussion of future projects recommended to strengthen and lend credibility to the ICPP Failure Rate Database also is included.

  20. Statistical relation between single- and multiple-component failures

    SciTech Connect

    Teichmann, T.; Papazoglou, I.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the results of some investigations of the statistical (and to some degree the qualitative) relation between single and multiple component failure events at US operating nuclear plants. The objectives of the investigations were to establish whether: multiple component failures could be attributed to random coincidences of single independent failures; there was any clear cut qualitative connection between the two type of failures; and there were any quantitative statistical parameters that related the two types of failure.

  1. Study on failure analysis of array chip components in IRFPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaonan; He, Yingjie; Li, Jinping

    2016-10-01

    Infrared focal plane array detector has advantages of strong anti-interference ability and high sensitivity. Its size, weight and power dissipation has been noticeably decreased compared to the conventional infrared imaging system. With the development of the detector manufacture technology and the cost reduction, IRFPA detector has been widely used in the military and commercial fields. Due to the restricting of array chip manufacturing process and material defects, the fault phenomenon such as cracking, bad pixel and abnormal output was showed during the test, which restricts the performance of the infrared detector imaging system, and these effects are gradually intensified with the expanding of the focal plane array size and the shrinking of the pixel size. Based on the analysis of the test results for the infrared detector array chip components, the fault phenomenon was classified. The main cause of the chip component failure is chip cracking, bad pixel and abnormal output. The reason of the failure has been analyzed deeply. According to analyze the mechanism of the failure, a series of measures which contain filtrating materials and optimizing the manufacturing process of array chip components were used to improve the performance of the chip components and the test pass rate, which is used to meet the needs of the detector performance.

  2. SCADA alarms processing for wind turbine component failure detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, E.; Reder, M.; Melero, J. J.

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbine failure and downtime can often compromise the profitability of a wind farm due to their high impact on the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Early detection of failures can facilitate the changeover from corrective maintenance towards a predictive approach. This paper presents a cost-effective methodology to combine various alarm analysis techniques, using data from the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system, in order to detect component failures. The approach categorises the alarms according to a reviewed taxonomy, turning overwhelming data into valuable information to assess component status. Then, different alarms analysis techniques are applied for two purposes: the evaluation of the SCADA alarm system capability to detect failures, and the investigation of the relation between components faults being followed by failure occurrences in others. Various case studies are presented and discussed. The study highlights the relationship between faulty behaviour in different components and between failures and adverse environmental conditions.

  3. Using Dynamic Master Logic Diagram for component partial failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, T.; Modarres, M.

    1996-12-01

    A methodology using the Dynamic Master Logic Diagram (DMLD) for the evaluation of component partial failure is presented. Since past PRAs have not focused on partial failure effects, the reliability of components are only based on the binary state assumption, i.e. defining a component as fully failed or functioning. This paper is to develop an approach to predict and estimate the component partial failure on the basis of the fuzzy state assumption. One example of the application of this methodology with the reliability function diagram of a centrifugal pump is presented.

  4. Stochastic Models for Common Failures of Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    common cause model, NUREG /CR-1401, 1980. [3] Church, J. D. and Harris, B., The estimation of reliability from stress- strength relationship...Fachband 2/1, 1980. [11] Lewis, H. W., Chairman, Risk Assessment Review Group Report to the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG /CR-0400, 1978. [12...Regulatory Commission, P.R.A. Procedures Guide, NUREG / CR-2300, 1983. [18] Vesely, W. E., Estimating Common Cause Failure Probabilities in Reliability and

  5. Acute Failure of a Glenoid Component in Anatomic Shoulder Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, III, Norman D.

    2016-01-01

    Glenoid loosening is the most common cause of failure in primary total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and often occurs years after the initial surgery. It is rare for a glenoid component to fail acutely. Several case reports of complete glenoid dissociation appear in the literature. It is important to report these failures to identify technical errors or component design flaws to improve outcomes in TSA. In this case report, we present an unrecognized acute failure of a cemented hybrid glenoid component at the time of surgery. PMID:27555976

  6. Component criticality in failure cascade processes of network systems.

    PubMed

    Zio, Enrico; Sansavini, Giovanni

    2011-08-01

    In this work, specific indicators are used to characterize the criticality of components in a network system with respect to their contribution to failure cascade processes. A realistic-size network is considered as reference case study. Three different models of cascading failures are analyzed, differing both on the failure load distribution logic and on the cascade triggering event. The criticality indicators are compared to classical measures of topological centrality to identify the one most characteristic of the cascade processes considered.

  7. Solder Reflow Failures in Electronic Components During Manual Soldering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander; Greenwell, Chris; Felt, Frederick

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the solder reflow failures in electronic components that occur during manual soldering. It discusses the specifics of manual-soldering-induced failures in plastic devices with internal solder joints. The failure analysis turned up that molten solder had squeezed up to the die surface along the die molding compound interface, and the dice were not protected with glassivation allowing solder to short gate and source to the drain contact. The failure analysis concluded that the parts failed due to overheating during manual soldering.

  8. Microcircuit Device Reliability. Digital Failure Rate Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    dfc ^MlM "" ■ ’’ •""" DIGITAL DEVICE DATA VARIOUS TTL t MANUFACTURER OPERATIONAL TYPE RELIABILITt ANALYSIS...Analysis Center I $ ^: io Microcircuit Device Reliability DIGITAL FAILURE RATE DATA t - D D Summer 1981 Prepared by: Reliability Analysis...Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited .. .11 ■■’■’■’■.■^"■i;>;->k:.v.v^-:.-.,-,->■’^ ■.■»[ >** T *»,*-’,>;’ * ’^ ■ t , ■ A

  9. Cyclic plasticity and failure of structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalev, I.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical approach for low-cycle fatigue prediction is presented. The approach combines a cyclic plasticity model with the finite element method and a damage accumulation criterion for ductile metals. The cyclic plasticity model is based on the concept of the combination of several yield surfaces. The surfaces are related to the material uniaxial stress-strain curve idealized by piecewise linear segments. The damage criterion is based on the Coffin-Manson formulae modified for the mean stress variation effect. It is extended to the multiaxial varying stress-strain field and applied for both the crack initiation and the crack growth processes. The stable slow crack growth rate is approximated by the damage accumulation gradient computed from the cracked finite element models. This procedure requires fatigue testing data of only smooth specimens under constant strain amplitudes. The present approach is illustrated by numerical examples of an aircraft wing stiffened panel subjected to compression, which causes material yielding and residual tension.

  10. Assessment of hoist failure rate for Payload Transporter III

    SciTech Connect

    Demmie, P.N.

    1994-02-01

    Assessment of the hoist failure rate for the Payload Transporter Type III (PT-III) hoist was completed as one of the ground transportation tasks for the Minuteman II (MMIII) Weapon System Safety Assessment. The failures of concern are failures that lead to dropping a reentry system (RS) during hoist operations in a silo or the assembly, storage, and inspection building for a MMIII wing. After providing a brief description of the PT-III hoist system, the author summarizes his search for historical data from industry and the military services for failures of electric hoist systems. Since such information was not found, the strategy for assessing a failure rate was to consider failure mechanisms which lead to load-drop accidents, estimate their rates, and sum the rates for the PT-III hoist failure rate. The author discusses failure mechanisms and describes his assessment of a chain failure rate that is based on data from destructive testing of a chain of the type used for the PT-III hoist and projected usage rates for hoist operations involving the RS. The main result provides upper bounds for chain failure rates that are based on these data. No test data were found to estimate failure rates due to mechanisms other than chain failure. The author did not attempt to quantify the effects of human factors on the PT-III hoist failure rate.

  11. Deriving Function-failure Similarity Information for Failure-free Rotorcraft Component Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Rory A.; Stone, Robert B.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Performance and safety are the top concerns of high-risk aerospace applications at NASA. Eliminating or reducing performance and safety problems can be achieved with a thorough understanding of potential failure modes in the design that lead to these problems. The majority of techniques use prior knowledge and experience as well as Failure Modes and Effects as methods to determine potential failure modes of aircraft. The aircraft design needs to be passed through a general technique to ensure that every potential failure mode is considered, while avoiding spending time on improbable failure modes. In this work, this is accomplished by mapping failure modes to certain components, which are described by their functionality. In turn, the failure modes are then linked to the basic functions that are carried within the components of the aircraft. Using the technique proposed in this paper, designers can examine the basic functions, and select appropriate analyses to eliminate or design out the potential failure modes. This method was previously applied to a simple rotating machine test rig with basic functions that are common to a rotorcraft. In this paper, this technique is applied to the engine and power train of a rotorcraft, using failures and functions obtained from accident reports and engineering drawings.

  12. Accelerating failure rate of the ASR total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Langton, D J; Jameson, S S; Joyce, T J; Gandhi, J N; Sidaginamale, R; Mereddy, P; Lord, J; Nargol, A V F

    2011-08-01

    There is widespread concern regarding the incidence of adverse soft-tissue reactions after metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacement. Recent National Joint Registry data have shown clear differences in the rates of failure of different designs of hip resurfacing. Our aim was to update the failure rates related to metal debris for the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR). A total of 505 of these were implanted. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a failure rate of 25% at six years for the ASR resurfacing and of 48.8% for the ASR total hip replacement (THR). Of 257 patients with a minimum follow-up of two years, 67 (26.1%) had a serum cobalt concentration which was greater than 7 μg/l. Co-ordinate measuring machine analysis of revised components showed that all patients suffering adverse tissue reactions in the resurfacing group had abnormal wear of the bearing surfaces. Six THR patients had relatively low rates of articular wear, but were found to have considerable damage at the trunion-taper interface. Our results suggest that wear at the modular junction is an important factor in the development of adverse tissue reactions after implantation of a large-diameter MoM THR.

  13. Effect of Component Failures on Economics of Distributed Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, Barry T.

    2012-02-02

    This report describes an applied research program to assess the realistic costs of grid connected photovoltaic (PV) installations. A Board of Advisors was assembled that included management from the regional electric power utilities, as well as other participants from companies that work in the electric power industry. Although the program started with the intention of addressing effective load carrying capacity (ELCC) for utility-owned photovoltaic installations, results from the literature study and recommendations from the Board of Advisors led investigators to the conclusion that obtaining effective data for this analysis would be difficult, if not impossible. The effort was then re-focused on assessing the realistic costs and economic valuations of grid-connected PV installations. The 17 kW PV installation on the University of Hartford's Lincoln Theater was used as one source of actual data. The change in objective required a more technically oriented group. The re-organized working group (changes made due to the need for more technically oriented participants) made site visits to medium-sized PV installations in Connecticut with the objective of developing sources of operating histories. An extensive literature review helped to focus efforts in several technical and economic subjects. The objective of determining the consequences of component failures on both generation and economic returns required three analyses. The first was a Monte-Carlo-based simulation model for failure occurrences and the resulting downtime. Published failure data, though limited, was used to verify the results. A second model was developed to predict the reduction in or loss of electrical generation related to the downtime due to these failures. Finally, a comprehensive economic analysis, including these failures, was developed to determine realistic net present values of installed PV arrays. Two types of societal benefits were explored, with quantitative valuations developed for

  14. Reduction of LNG operator error and equipment failure rates. Topical report, 20 April 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Atallah, S.; Shah, J.N.; Betti, M.

    1990-04-01

    Tables summarizing human error rates and equipment failure frequencies applicable to the LNG industry are presented. Improved training, better supervision, emergency response drills and improved panel design were methods recommended for reducing human error rates. Outright scheduled replacement of critical components, regular inspection and maintenance, and the use of redundant components were reviewed as means for reducing equipment failure rates. The effect of reducing human error and equipment failure rates on the frequency of overfilling an LNG tank were examined. In addition, guidelines for estimating the cost and benefits of these mitigation measures were considered.

  15. Product component genealogy modeling and field-failure prediction

    SciTech Connect

    King, Caleb; Hong, Yili; Meeker, William Q.

    2016-04-13

    Many industrial products consist of multiple components that are necessary for system operation. There is an abundance of literature on modeling the lifetime of such components through competing risks models. During the life-cycle of a product, it is common for there to be incremental design changes to improve reliability, to reduce costs, or due to changes in availability of certain part numbers. These changes can affect product reliability but are often ignored in system lifetime modeling. By incorporating this information about changes in part numbers over time (information that is readily available in most production databases), better accuracy can be achieved in predicting time to failure, thus yielding more accurate field-failure predictions. This paper presents methods for estimating parameters and predictions for this generational model and a comparison with existing methods through the use of simulation. Our results indicate that the generational model has important practical advantages and outperforms the existing methods in predicting field failures.

  16. Assessing Wind Farm Reliability Using Weather Dependent Failure Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G.; McMillan, D.

    2014-06-01

    Using reliability data comprising of two modern, large scale wind farm sites and wind data from two onsite met masts, a model is developed which calculates wind speed dependant failure rates which are used to populate a Markov Chain. Monte Carlo simulation is then exercised to simulate three wind farms which are subjected to controlled wind speed conditions from three separate potential UK sites. The model then calculates and compares wind farm reliability due to corrective maintenance and component failure rates influenced by the wind speed of each of the sites. Results show that the components affected most by changes in average daily wind speed are the control system and the yaw system. A comparison between this model and a more simple estimation of site yield is undertaken. The model takes into account the effects of the wind speed on the cost of operation and maintenance and also includes the impact of longer periods of downtime in the winter months and shorter periods in the summer. By taking these factors into account a more detailed site assessment can be undertaken. There is significant value to this model for operators and manufacturers.

  17. Nonoperating Failure Rates for Avionics Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    ENVIRONMENTAL MITDK-1B RA7324 LC.76.1 OPERATING NONOPERATING DUIAION DUTY CYCLE METHOD METHOD FAILURES SAILURES ANALYSIS IMO)I OP NERO NOP NOP AOP AAOP A...Reliability and Maintainability Sym- posium, Wash., DC, January 1975. 21. Balaban, H.S. , Guidelines for Application of Warranties to Air Force

  18. Product component genealogy modeling and field-failure prediction

    DOE PAGES

    King, Caleb; Hong, Yili; Meeker, William Q.

    2016-04-13

    Many industrial products consist of multiple components that are necessary for system operation. There is an abundance of literature on modeling the lifetime of such components through competing risks models. During the life-cycle of a product, it is common for there to be incremental design changes to improve reliability, to reduce costs, or due to changes in availability of certain part numbers. These changes can affect product reliability but are often ignored in system lifetime modeling. By incorporating this information about changes in part numbers over time (information that is readily available in most production databases), better accuracy can bemore » achieved in predicting time to failure, thus yielding more accurate field-failure predictions. This paper presents methods for estimating parameters and predictions for this generational model and a comparison with existing methods through the use of simulation. Our results indicate that the generational model has important practical advantages and outperforms the existing methods in predicting field failures.« less

  19. Catastrophic failure of a low profile metal-backed glenoid component after total shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Vuillermin, Carley B.; Trump, Mark E.; Barwood, Shane A.; Hoy, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The longevity of the glenoid component in total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) continues to be problematic. All polyethylene glenoid components have been most widely used, but loosening rates with time and the need for revision has resulted in high-profile metal-backed components with the potential for a more stable prosthesis bone interface and liner exchange. High revision rates in the high profile metal backed designs led us to evaluate a low profile metal backed component. Aims: To examine the rate and mode of failure of a TSA in a single surgeon consecutive series that has been identified by the Australian National Joint Replacement Registry to have a higher than anticipated rate of revision. Materials and Methods: This is a single surgeon retrospective consecutive series of 51 arthroplasties undertaken in 50 patients (18 males and 32 females) with an average age of 70.4 ears (range 51-90) and mean follow-up of 5.5 years (range 3.7-8.1). Results: We observed a very high (29%) rate of revision of the metal-backed glenoid components in this series. The primary mode of failure was glenoid baseplate nonintegration which with a well-fixed central cage screw led to bone resorption and implant breakage or disassembly. Conclusion: Analysis of the mode of failure of implants identified by robust registries is essential for the development of new prostheses and the pursuit of prosthesis longevity. This low profile metal backed prosthesis has been withdrawn, but without a published mechanism of failure. We feel that any prosthesis withdrawal should be accompanied by appropriate published mechanisms to prevent future component design errors based on similar design problems. PMID:26622128

  20. Heartbeat Model for Component Failure in Simulation of Plant Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    R. W. Youngblood; R. R. Nourgaliev; D. L. Kelly; C. L. Smith; T-N. Dinh

    2011-03-01

    As part of the Department of Energy’s “Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program” (LWRSP), tools and methodology for risk-informed characterization of safety margin are being developed for use in supporting decision-making on plant life extension after the first license renewal. Beginning with the traditional discussion of “margin” in terms of a “load” (a physical challenge to system or component function) and a “capacity” (the capability of that system or component to accommodate the challenge), we are developing the capability to characterize realistic probabilistic load and capacity spectra, reflecting both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in system behavior. This way of thinking about margin comports with work done in the last 10 years. However, current capabilities to model in this way are limited: it is currently possible, but difficult, to validly simulate enough time histories to support quantification in realistic problems, and the treatment of environmental influences on reliability is relatively artificial in many existing applications. The INL is working on a next-generation safety analysis capability (widely referred to as “R7”) that will enable a much better integration of reliability-related and phenomenology-related aspects of margin. In this paper, we show how to implement cumulative damage (“heartbeat”) models for component reliability that lend themselves naturally to being included as part of the phenomenology simulation. Implementation of this modeling approach relies on the way in which the phenomenology simulation implements its dynamic time step management. Within this approach, component failures influence the phenomenology, and the phenomenology influences the component failures.

  1. Spacecraft Parachute Recovery System Testing from a Failure Rate Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Christine E.

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft parachute recovery systems, especially those with a parachute cluster, require testing to identify and reduce failures. This is especially important when the spacecraft in question is human-rated. Due to the recent effort to make spaceflight affordable, the importance of determining a minimum requirement for testing has increased. The number of tests required to achieve a mature design, with a relatively constant failure rate, can be estimated from a review of previous complex spacecraft recovery systems. Examination of the Apollo parachute testing and the Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster recovery chute system operation will clarify at which point in those programs the system reached maturity. This examination will also clarify the risks inherent in not performing a sufficient number of tests prior to operation with humans on-board. When looking at complex parachute systems used in spaceflight landing systems, a pattern begins to emerge regarding the need for a minimum amount of testing required to wring out the failure modes and reduce the failure rate of the parachute system to an acceptable level for human spaceflight. Not only a sufficient number of system level testing, but also the ability to update the design as failure modes are found is required to drive the failure rate of the system down to an acceptable level. In addition, sufficient data and images are necessary to identify incipient failure modes or to identify failure causes when a system failure occurs. In order to demonstrate the need for sufficient system level testing prior to an acceptable failure rate, the Apollo Earth Landing System (ELS) test program and the Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System failure history will be examined, as well as some experiences in the Orion Capsule Parachute Assembly System will be noted.

  2. Markov and semi-Markov processes as a failure rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabski, Franciszek

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the reliability function is defined by the stochastic failure rate process with a non negative and right continuous trajectories. Equations for the conditional reliability functions of an object, under assumption that the failure rate is a semi-Markov process with an at most countable state space are derived. A proper theorem is presented. The linear systems of equations for the appropriate Laplace transforms allow to find the reliability functions for the alternating, the Poisson and the Furry-Yule failure rate processes.

  3. Proportional and scale change models to project failures of mechanical components with applications to space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taneja, Vidya S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we develop the mathematical theory of proportional and scale change models to perform reliability analysis. The results obtained will be applied for the Reaction Control System (RCS) thruster valves on an orbiter. With the advent of extended EVA's associated with PROX OPS (ISSA & MIR), and docking, the loss of a thruster valve now takes on an expanded safety significance. Previous studies assume a homogeneous population of components with each component having the same failure rate. However, as various components experience different stresses and are exposed to different environments, their failure rates change with time. In this paper we model the reliability of a thruster valves by treating these valves as a censored repairable system. The model for each valve will take the form of a nonhomogeneous process with the intensity function that is either treated as a proportional hazard model, or a scale change random effects hazard model. Each component has an associated z, an independent realization of the random variable Z from a distribution G(z). This unobserved quantity z can be used to describe heterogeneity systematically. For various models methods for estimating the model parameters using censored data will be developed. Available field data (from previously flown flights) is from non-renewable systems. The estimated failure rate using such data will need to be modified for renewable systems such as thruster valve.

  4. Component Labeling Algorithm For Video Rate Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Ohta, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Masumi; Shirai, Yoshio

    1987-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a raster scanning algorithm for component labeling, which enables processing under pipeline architecture. In the raster scanning algorithm, labels are provisionally assigned to each pixel of components and, at the same time, the connectivities of labels are detected at first scan. Those labels are classified into groups based on the connectivities. Finally provisional labels are updated using the result of classification and a unique label is assigned to each pixel of components. However, in the conventional algorithm, the classification process needs a vast number of operations. This prevents realizing pipeline processing. We have developed a method of preprocessing to reduce the number of provisional labels, which limits the number of label connectivities. We have also developed a new classification method whose operation is proportionate to only the number of label connectivities itself. We have made experiments with computer simulation to verify this algorithm. The experimental results show that we can process 512 x 512 x 8 bit images at video rate(1/30 sec. per 1 image) when this algorithm is implemented on hardware.

  5. Cascading failures in interdependent networks with finite functional components.

    PubMed

    Di Muro, M A; Buldyrev, S V; Stanley, H E; Braunstein, L A

    2016-10-01

    We present a cascading failure model of two interdependent networks in which functional nodes belong to components of size greater than or equal to s. We find theoretically and via simulation that in complex networks with random dependency links the transition is first order for s≥3 and continuous for s=2. We also study interdependent lattices with a distance constraint r in the dependency links and find that increasing r moves the system from a regime without a phase transition to one with a second-order transition. As r continues to increase, the system collapses in a first-order transition. Each regime is associated with a different structure of domain formation of functional nodes.

  6. Cascading failures in interdependent networks with finite functional components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Muro, M. A.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Stanley, H. E.; Braunstein, L. A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a cascading failure model of two interdependent networks in which functional nodes belong to components of size greater than or equal to s . We find theoretically and via simulation that in complex networks with random dependency links the transition is first order for s ≥3 and continuous for s =2 . We also study interdependent lattices with a distance constraint r in the dependency links and find that increasing r moves the system from a regime without a phase transition to one with a second-order transition. As r continues to increase, the system collapses in a first-order transition. Each regime is associated with a different structure of domain formation of functional nodes.

  7. The research on aging failure rate and optimization estimation of protective relay under haze conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-kang; Zhou, Meng-ran; Yang, Jie; Zhou, Pei-qiang; Xie, Ying

    2017-01-01

    In the fog and haze, the air contains large amounts of H2S, SO2, SO3 and other acids, air conductivity is greatly improved, the relative humidity is also greatly increased, Power transmission lines and electrical equipment in such an environment will increase in the long-running failure ratedecrease the sensitivity of the detection equipment, impact protection device reliability. Weibull distribution is widely used in component failure distribution fitting. It proposes a protection device aging failure rate estimation method based on the least squares method and the iterative method,.Combined with a regional power grid statistics, computing protective equipment failure rate function. Binding characteristics of electrical equipment operation status under haze conditions, optimization methods, get more in line with aging protection equipment failure under conditions of haze characteristics.

  8. Ventricular rate control of atrial fibrillation in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rienstra, Michiel; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2013-10-01

    In the last few years, there has been a major shift in the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the setting of hear failure (HF), from rhythm to ventricular rate control in most patients with both conditions. In this article, the authors focus on ventricular rate control and discuss the indications; the optimal ventricular rate-control target, including detailed results of the Rate Control Efficacy in Permanent Atrial Fibrillation: a Comparison Between Lenient versus Strict Rate Control II (RACE II) study; and the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options to control the ventricular rate during AF in the setting of HF.

  9. On rate-state and Coulomb failure models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Beeler, N.; Blanpied, M.

    2000-01-01

    We examine the predictions of Coulomb failure stress and rate-state frictional models. We study the change in failure time (clock advance) Δt due to stress step perturbations (i.e., coseismic static stress increases) added to "background" stressing at a constant rate (i.e., tectonic loading) at time t0. The predictability of Δt implies a predictable change in seismicity rate r(t)/r0, testable using earthquake catalogs, where r0 is the constant rate resulting from tectonic stressing. Models of r(t)/r0, consistent with general properties of aftershock sequences, must predict an Omori law seismicity decay rate, a sequence duration that is less than a few percent of the mainshock cycle time and a return directly to the background rate. A Coulomb model requires that a fault remains locked during loading, that failure occur instantaneously, and that Δt is independent of t0. These characteristics imply an instantaneous infinite seismicity rate increase of zero duration. Numerical calculations of r(t)/r0 for different state evolution laws show that aftershocks occur on faults extremely close to failure at the mainshock origin time, that these faults must be "Coulomb-like," and that the slip evolution law can be precluded. Real aftershock population characteristics also may constrain rate-state constitutive parameters; a may be lower than laboratory values, the stiffness may be high, and/or normal stress may be lower than lithostatic. We also compare Coulomb and rate-state models theoretically. Rate-state model fault behavior becomes more Coulomb-like as constitutive parameter a decreases relative to parameter b. This is because the slip initially decelerates, representing an initial healing of fault contacts. The deceleration is more pronounced for smaller a, more closely simulating a locked fault. Even when the rate-state Δt has Coulomb characteristics, its magnitude may differ by some constant dependent on b. In this case, a rate-state model behaves like a modified

  10. Using Generic Data to Establish Dormancy Failure Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reistle, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Many hardware items are dormant prior to being operated. The dormant period might be especially long, for example during missions to the moon or Mars. In missions with long dormant periods the risk incurred during dormancy can exceed the active risk contribution. Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) need to account for the dormant risk contribution as well as the active contribution. A typical method for calculating a dormant failure rate is to multiply the active failure rate by a constant, the dormancy factor. For example, some practitioners use a heuristic and divide the active failure rate by 30 to obtain an estimate of the dormant failure rate. To obtain a more empirical estimate of the dormancy factor, this paper uses the recently updated database NPRD-2011 [1] to arrive at a set of distributions for the dormancy factor. The resulting dormancy factor distributions are significantly different depending on whether the item is electrical, mechanical, or electro-mechanical. Additionally, this paper will show that using a heuristic constant fails to capture the uncertainty of the possible dormancy factors.

  11. 33 CFR 159.67 - Electrical component ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electrical component ratings. 159... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.67 Electrical component ratings. Electrical components must have current and voltage ratings equal to or greater than...

  12. 33 CFR 159.67 - Electrical component ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electrical component ratings. 159... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.67 Electrical component ratings. Electrical components must have current and voltage ratings equal to or greater than...

  13. 33 CFR 159.67 - Electrical component ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electrical component ratings. 159... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.67 Electrical component ratings. Electrical components must have current and voltage ratings equal to or greater than...

  14. 33 CFR 159.67 - Electrical component ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electrical component ratings. 159... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.67 Electrical component ratings. Electrical components must have current and voltage ratings equal to or greater than...

  15. 33 CFR 159.67 - Electrical component ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electrical component ratings. 159... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.67 Electrical component ratings. Electrical components must have current and voltage ratings equal to or greater than...

  16. Fatigue failure of metal components as a factor in civil aircraft accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holshouser, W. L.; Mayner, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    A review of records maintained by the National Transportation Safety Board showed that 16,054 civil aviation accidents occurred in the United States during the 3-year period ending December 31, 1969. Material failure was an important factor in the cause of 942 of these accidents. Fatigue was identified as the mode of the material failures associated with the cause of 155 accidents and in many other accidents the records indicated that fatigue failures might have been involved. There were 27 fatal accidents and 157 fatalities in accidents in which fatigue failures of metal components were definitely identified. Fatigue failures associated with accidents occurred most frequently in landing-gear components, followed in order by powerplant, propeller, and structural components in fixed-wing aircraft and tail-rotor and main-rotor components in rotorcraft. In a study of 230 laboratory reports on failed components associated with the cause of accidents, fatigue was identified as the mode of failure in more than 60 percent of the failed components. The most frequently identified cause of fatigue, as well as most other types of material failures, was improper maintenance (including inadequate inspection). Fabrication defects, design deficiencies, defective material, and abnormal service damage also caused many fatigue failures. Four case histories of major accidents are included in the paper as illustrations of some of the factors invovled in fatigue failures of aircraft components.

  17. High rate fabrication of compression molded components

    DOEpatents

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Dykstra, William C.; Smith, Glen L.; Miller, Robert J.

    2016-04-19

    A method for fabricating a thermoplastic composite component comprises inductively heating a thermoplastic pre-form with a first induction coil by inducing current to flow in susceptor wires disposed throughout the pre-form, inductively heating smart susceptors in a molding tool to a leveling temperature with a second induction coil by applying a high-strength magnetic field having a magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors, shaping the magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors to flow substantially parallel to a molding surface of the smart susceptors, placing the heated pre-form between the heated smart susceptors; and applying molding pressure to the pre-form to form the composite component.

  18. Estimating distributions with increasing failure rate in an imperfect repair model.

    PubMed

    Kvam, Paul H; Singh, Harshinder; Whitaker, Lyn R

    2002-03-01

    A failed system is repaired minimally if after failure, it is restored to the working condition of an identical system of the same age. We extend the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of a system's lifetime distribution function to test units that are known to have an increasing failure rate. Such items comprise a significant portion of working components in industry. The order-restricted MLE is shown to be consistent. Similar results hold for the Brown-Proschan imperfect repair model, which dictates that a failed component is repaired perfectly with some unknown probability, and is otherwise repaired minimally. The estimators derived are motivated and illustrated by failure data in the nuclear industry. Failure times for groups of emergency diesel generators and motor-driven pumps are analyzed using the order-restricted methods. The order-restricted estimators are consistent and show distinct differences from the ordinary MLEs. Simulation results suggest significant improvement in reliability estimation is available in many cases when component failure data exhibit the IFR property.

  19. Number and placement of control system components considering possible failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carignan, C. R.; Vandervelde, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    A decision making methodology is presented which is intended to be useful in the early stages of system design, before a control system is designed in detail. The methodology accounts for the likelihood of failure among the sensors and actuators in a control system. A method to compute the degree of controllability and degree of observability of a system for a given set of actuators and sensors is also presented.

  20. Assessment of failure of cemented polyethylene acetabular component due to bone remodeling: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajesh

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study is to determine failure of the cemented polyethylene acetabular component, which might occur due to excessive bone resorption, cement-bone interface debonding and fatigue failure of the cement mantle. Three-dimensional finite element models of intact and implanted pelvic bone were developed and bone remodeling algorithm was implemented for present analysis. Soderberg fatigue failure diagram was used for fatigue assessment of the cement mantle. Hoffman failure criterion was considered for prediction of cement-bone interface debonding. Results indicate fatigue failure of the cement mantle and implant-bone interface debonding might not occur due to bone remodeling.

  1. Modified iterative aggregation procedure for maintenance optimisation of multi-component systems with failure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuoqi; Wu, Su; Lee, Seungchul; Ni, Jun

    2014-12-01

    This paper studies maintenance policies for multi-component systems which have failure interaction among their components. Component failure might accelerate deterioration processes or induce instantaneous failures of the remaining components. We formulate this maintenance problem as a Markov decision process (MDP) with an objective of minimising a total discounted maintenance cost. However, the action set and state space in MDP exponentially grow as the number of components increases. This makes traditional approaches computationally intractable. To deal with this curse of dimensionality, a modified iterative aggregation procedure (MIAP) is proposed. We mathematically prove that iterations in MIAP guarantee the convergence and the policy obtained is optimal. Numerical case studies find that failure interaction should not be ignored in a maintenance policy decision making and the proposed MIAP is faster and requires less computational memory size than that of linear programming.

  2. Use of All-polyethylene Tibial Components in Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Increases the Risk of Early Failure.

    PubMed

    Koh, In Jun; Suhl, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Min Woo; Kim, Man Soo; Choi, Keun Young; In, Yong

    2017-01-13

    All-polyethylene (all-poly) tibial designs in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) have been reconsidered with excellent clinical outcomes, survivorship, and cost-effectiveness. However, whether all-poly tibial components provided comparable results to metal-backed modular components during unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) remains unclear. This study compared the clinical outcomes and prevalence of early failure between all-poly and metal-backed modular components in UKA. We retrospectively reviewed the records and radiographs of 101 consecutive UKAs. In total, 51 UKAs were performed using all-poly tibial components; 50 others used metal-backed modular components. Clinical and radiographic outcomes, adaptive bone remodeling assessed by radiographic bone density, and early failure prevalence rates were compared. Despite a lack of group differences in clinical and radiographic outcomes (p > 0.1 in all comparisons), adaptive bone remodeling at 2 years after surgery of all-poly UKAs was more progressive compared with metal-backed UKAs (1.2 in all-poly UKA group vs. 0.9 in metal-backed UKA group, p < 0.001). In addition, 6 of 51 all-poly UKAs failed within 2 years postoperatively, whereas no metal-backed UKAs failed (11% in all-poly UKA group vs. 0% in metal-backed UKA group, p = 0.027). All-poly tibial component use during UKA increased the risk of early failure, which may be due to a failure in tibial loading distribution.

  3. Optimal Aircraft Control Upset Recovery With and Without Component Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Dean W.; Moerder, Daniel D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper treats the problem of recovering sustainable nondescending (safe) flight in a transport aircraft after one or more of its control effectors fail. Such recovery can be a challenging goal for many transport aircraft currently in the operational fleet for two reasons. First, they have very little redundancy in their means of generating control forces and moments. These aircraft have, as primary control surfaces, a single rudder and pairwise elevators and aileron/spoiler units that provide yaw, pitch, and roll moments with sufficient bandwidth to be used in stabilizing and maneuvering the airframe. Beyond this, throttling the engines can provide additional moments, but on a much slower time scale. Other aerodynamic surfaces, such as leading and trailing edge flaps, are only intended to be placed in a position and left, and are, hence, very slow-moving. Because of this, loss of a primary control surface strongly degrades the controllability of the vehicle, particularly when the failed effector becomes stuck in a non-neutral position where it exerts a disturbance moment that must be countered by the remaining operating effectors. The second challenge in recovering safe flight is that these vehicles are not agile, nor can they tolerate large accelerations. This is of special importance when, at the outset of the recovery maneuver, the aircraft is flying toward the ground, as is frequently the case when there are major control hardware failures. Recovery of safe flight is examined in this paper in the context of trajectory optimization. For a particular transport aircraft, and a failure scenario inspired by an historical air disaster, recovery scenarios are calculated with and without control surface failures, to bring the aircraft to safe flight from the adverse flight condition that it had assumed, apparently as a result of contact with a vortex from a larger aircraft's wake. An effort has been made to represent relevant airframe dynamics, acceleration limits

  4. Component duration and relative response rates in multiple schedules.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todorov, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Pigeons were trained on a multiple variable-interval 30-sec, variable interval 90-sec schedule with each component presented alternately for an equal duration. This duration of exposure was varied from 5 to 300 sec. The rate of response in the variable-interval 30-sec component relative to the rate of response in the variable-interval 90-sec component was studied. Results are plotted and discussed.

  5. Scaling law of average failure rate and steady-state rate in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Shengwang; Liu, Chao; Wang, Yingchong; Chang, Fuqing

    2017-03-01

    The evolution properties in the steady stage of a rock specimen are reflective of the damage or weakening growth within and thus are used to determine whether an unstable transition occurs. In this paper, we report the experimental results for rock (granite and marble) specimens tested at room temperature and room humidity under three typical loading modes: quasi-static monotonic loading, brittle creep, and brittle creep relaxation. Deformed rock specimens in current experiments exhibit an apparent steady stage characterized by a nearly constant evolution rate, which dominates the lifetime of the rock specimens. The average failure rate presents a common power-law relationship with the evolution rate in the steady stage, although the exponent is different for different loading modes. The results indicate that a lower ratio of the slope of the secondary stage with respect to the average rate of the entire lifetime implies a more brittle failure.

  6. Voltage stress effects on microcircuit accelerated life test failure rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of Arrhenius and Eyring reaction rate models for describing microcircuit aging characteristics as a function of junction temperature and applied voltage was evaluated. The results of a matrix of accelerated life tests with a single metal oxide semiconductor microcircuit operated at six different combinations of temperature and voltage were used to evaluate the models. A total of 450 devices from two different lots were tested at ambient temperatures between 200 C and 250 C and applied voltages between 5 Vdc and 15 Vdc. A statistical analysis of the surface related failure data resulted in bimodal failure distributions comprising two lognormal distributions; a 'freak' distribution observed early in time, and a 'main' distribution observed later in time. The Arrhenius model was shown to provide a good description of device aging as a function of temperature at a fixed voltage. The Eyring model also appeared to provide a reasonable description of main distribution device aging as a function of temperature and voltage. Circuit diagrams are shown.

  7. Application of Function-Failure Similarity Method to Rotorcraft Component Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Rory A.; Stone, Robert E.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Performance and safety are the top concerns of high-risk aerospace applications at NASA. Eliminating or reducing performance and safety problems can be achieved with a thorough understanding of potential failure modes in the designs that lead to these problems. The majority of techniques use prior knowledge and experience as well as Failure Modes and Effects as methods to determine potential failure modes of aircraft. During the design of aircraft, a general technique is needed to ensure that every potential failure mode is considered, while avoiding spending time on improbable failure modes. In this work, this is accomplished by mapping failure modes to specific components, which are described by their functionality. The failure modes are then linked to the basic functions that are carried within the components of the aircraft. Using this technique, designers can examine the basic functions, and select appropriate analyses to eliminate or design out the potential failure modes. The fundamentals of this method were previously introduced for a simple rotating machine test rig with basic functions that are common to a rotorcraft. In this paper, this technique is applied to the engine and power train of a rotorcraft, using failures and functions obtained from accident reports and engineering drawings.

  8. In-vessel ITER tubing failure rates for selected materials and coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.D.; Cadwallader, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    Several materials have been suggested for fabrication of ITER in-vessel coolant tubing: beryllium, copper, Inconel, niobium, stainless steel, titanium, and vanadium. This report generates failure rates for the materials to identify the best performer from an operational safety and availability perspective. Coolant types considered in this report are helium gas, liquid lithium, liquid sodium, and water. Failure rates for the materials are generated by including the influence of ITER`s operating environment and anticipated tubing failure mechanisms with industrial operating experience failure rates. The analyses define tubing failure mechanisms for ITER as: intergranular attack, flow erosion, helium induced swelling, hydrogen damage, neutron irradiation embrittlement, cyclic fatigue, and thermal cycling. K-factors, multipliers, are developed to model each failure mechanism and are applied to industrial operating experience failure rates to generate tubing failure rates for ITER. The generated failure rates identify the best performer by its expected reliability. With an average leakage failure rate of 3.1e-10(m-hr){sup {minus}1}and an average rupture failure rate of 3.1e-11(m-hr){sup {minus}1}, titanium proved to be the best performer of the tubing materials. The failure rates generated in this report are intended to serve as comparison references for design safety and optimization studies. Actual material testing and analyses are required to validate the failure rates.

  9. Development of KSC program for investigating and generating field failure rates. Reliability handbook for ground support equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. E.; Kallmeyer, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Field failure rates and confidence factors are presented for 88 identifiable components of the ground support equipment at the John F. Kennedy Space Center. For most of these, supplementary information regarding failure mode and cause is tabulated. Complete reliability assessments are included for three systems, eight subsystems, and nine generic piece-part classifications. Procedures for updating or augmenting the reliability results are also included.

  10. Reproducibility of heart rate turbulence indexes in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    D'Addio, Gianni; Cesarelli, Mario; Corbi, Graziamaria; Romano, Maria; Furgi, Giuseppe; Ferrara, Nicola; Rengo, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular oscillations following spontaneous ventricular premature complexes (VPC) are characterized by a short-term heart rate fluctuation known as heart rate turbulence (HRT) described by the so-called turbulence onset (TO) and slope (TS). Despite a recent written consensus on the standard of HRT measurement, reproducibility data are lacking. Aim of the paper was a reproducibility study of HRT indexes in heart failure patients (HF). Eleven HF patients underwent two 24h ECG Holter recordings, spaced 7 ± 5 days. A paired t test was used to assess the clinical stability of patients during the study period and the number of PVC in Holter recordings' couples. Both TO and TS indexes were calculated for each isolated VPC, and due to their skewed distribution, reproducibility of median and mean TO and TS was studied by Bland-Altman technique. Results showed that median HRT indexes might be preferred to commonly suggested mean values and that, although TO showed lower bias value than TS, TS can be considered much more reproducible than TO, comparing limits of agreements with normal values. This preliminary results suggest the use of medians instead of mean HRT indexes values and a reliability of the turbulence slope greater than the turbulence onset index.

  11. Component duration and relative response rates in multiple schedules1

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, João Claudio

    1972-01-01

    Pigeons were trained on a multiple variable-interval 30-sec, variable-interval 90-sec schedule with each component presented alternately for an equal (on the average) duration. This average duration of exposure to each component was varied from 5 to 300 sec. The main concern was with rate of response in the variable-interval 30-sec component relative to rate of response in the variable-interval 90-sec component. In all cases, rate of response was higher in the variable-interval 30 sec component, but the discrepancy in the rate produced by the two schedules tended to be greatest when the duration of component presentation was brief. The mean proportion of responses emitted during the variable-interval 30-sec component (responses in variable-interval 30-sec component divided by total responses) varied from about 0.60 to 0.71, where 0.75 would be expected on the basis of a matching rule, and 0.59 was that obtained by Lander and Irwin (1968). These results are in agreement with data reported by Shimp and Wheatley (1971) from a similar experiment. PMID:16811566

  12. Modeling Stress Strain Relationships and Predicting Failure Probabilities For Graphite Core Components

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, Stephen

    2013-09-09

    This project will implement inelastic constitutive models that will yield the requisite stress-strain information necessary for graphite component design. Accurate knowledge of stress states (both elastic and inelastic) is required to assess how close a nuclear core component is to failure. Strain states are needed to assess deformations in order to ascertain serviceability issues relating to failure, e.g., whether too much shrinkage has taken place for the core to function properly. Failure probabilities, as opposed to safety factors, are required in order to capture the bariability in failure strength in tensile regimes. The current stress state is used to predict the probability of failure. Stochastic failure models will be developed that can accommodate possible material anisotropy. This work will also model material damage (i.e., degradation of mechanical properties) due to radiation exposure. The team will design tools for components fabricated from nuclear graphite. These tools must readily interact with finite element software--in particular, COMSOL, the software algorithm currently being utilized by the Idaho National Laboratory. For the eleastic response of graphite, the team will adopt anisotropic stress-strain relationships available in COMSO. Data from the literature will be utilized to characterize the appropriate elastic material constants.

  13. Analytical Method to Evaluate Failure Potential During High-Risk Component Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; Stone, Robert B.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Communicating failure mode information during design and manufacturing is a crucial task for failure prevention. Most processes use Failure Modes and Effects types of analyses, as well as prior knowledge and experience, to determine the potential modes of failures a product might encounter during its lifetime. When new products are being considered and designed, this knowledge and information is expanded upon to help designers extrapolate based on their similarity with existing products and the potential design tradeoffs. This paper makes use of similarities and tradeoffs that exist between different failure modes based on the functionality of each component/product. In this light, a function-failure method is developed to help the design of new products with solutions for functions that eliminate or reduce the potential of a failure mode. The method is applied to a simplified rotating machinery example in this paper, and is proposed as a means to account for helicopter failure modes during design and production, addressing stringent safety and performance requirements for NASA applications.

  14. A probabilisitic based failure model for components fabricated from anisotropic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chengfeng

    The nuclear moderator for high temperature nuclear reactors are fabricated from graphite. During reactor operations graphite components are subjected to complex stress states arising from structural loads, thermal gradients, neutron irradiation damage, and seismic events. Graphite is a quasi-brittle material. Two aspects of nuclear grade graphite, i.e., material anisotropy and different behavior in tension and compression, are explicitly accounted for in this effort. Fracture mechanic methods are useful for metal alloys, but they are problematic for anisotropic materials with a microstructure that makes it difficult to identify a "critical" flaw. In fact cracking in a graphite core component does not necessarily result in the loss of integrity of a nuclear graphite core assembly. A phenomenological failure criterion that does not rely on flaw detection has been derived that accounts for the material behaviors mentioned. The probability of failure of components fabricated from graphite is governed by the scatter in strength. The design protocols being proposed by international code agencies recognize that design and analysis of reactor core components must be based upon probabilistic principles. The reliability models proposed herein for isotropic graphite and graphite that can be characterized as being transversely isotropic are another set of design tools for the next generation very high temperature reactors (VHTR) as well as molten salt reactors. The work begins with a review of phenomenologically based deterministic failure criteria. A number of this genre of failure models are compared with recent multiaxial nuclear grade failure data. Aspects in each are shown to be lacking. The basic behavior of different failure strengths in tension and compression is exhibited by failure models derived for concrete, but attempts to extend these concrete models to anisotropy were unsuccessful. The phenomenological models are directly dependent on stress invariants. A set of

  15. U.S. Heart Failure Rates on the Rise

    MedlinePlus

    ... who are at increased risk for heart failure. Cardiovascular disease includes all types of heart disease, high blood ... than one-third of adults (92 million) have cardiovascular disease. In 2014, nearly 808,000 Americans died from ...

  16. Smooth Nonparametric Estimation of the Failure Rate Function and its First Two Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshkin, G. M.

    2016-10-01

    The class of nonparametric estimators of kernel type is considered for the unknown failure rate function and its derivatives. The convergence of the suggested estimations in distribution and in the mean square sense to the unknown failure rate function and its derivatives is proved. The interval estimator of the failure rate function is constructed. Advantages of the nonparametric estimators in comparison with the parametric algorithms are discussed. The suggested estimators of the failure rate function can be used to solve problems of exploitation reliability of complex physical, technical, and software systems under uncertainty conditions.

  17. (n, N) type maintenance policy for multi-component systems with failure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuoqi; Wu, Su; Li, Binfeng; Lee, Seungchul

    2015-04-01

    This paper studies maintenance policies for multi-component systems in which failure interactions and opportunistic maintenance (OM) involve. This maintenance problem can be formulated as a Markov decision process (MDP). However, since an action set and state space in MDP exponentially expand as the number of components increase, traditional approaches are computationally intractable. To deal with curse of dimensionality, we decompose such a multi-component system into mutually influential single-component systems. Each single-component system is formulated as an MDP with the objective of minimising its long-run average maintenance cost. Under some reasonable assumptions, we prove the existence of the optimal (n, N) type policy for a single-component system. An algorithm to obtain the optimal (n, N) type policy is also proposed. Based on the proposed algorithm, we develop an iterative approximation algorithm to obtain an acceptable maintenance policy for a multi-component system. Numerical examples find that failure interactions and OM pose significant effects on a maintenance policy.

  18. A study of Mariner 10 flight experiences and some flight piece part failure rate computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    The problems and failures encountered in Mariner flight are discussed and the data available through a quantitative accounting of all electronic piece parts on the spacecraft are summarized. It also shows computed failure rates for electronic piece parts. It is intended that these computed data be used in the continued updating of the failure rate base used for trade-off studies and predictions for future JPL space missions.

  19. Derivation of Failure Rates and Probability of Failures for the International Space Station Probabilistic Risk Assessment Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitali, Roberto; Lutomski, Michael G.

    2004-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) International Space Station (ISS) Program uses Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) as part of its Continuous Risk Management Process. It is used as a decision and management support tool to not only quantify risk for specific conditions, but more importantly comparing different operational and management options to determine the lowest risk option and provide rationale for management decisions. This paper presents the derivation of the probability distributions used to quantify the failure rates and the probability of failures of the basic events employed in the PRA model of the ISS. The paper will show how a Bayesian approach was used with different sources of data including the actual ISS on orbit failures to enhance the confidence in results of the PRA. As time progresses and more meaningful data is gathered from on orbit failures, an increasingly accurate failure rate probability distribution for the basic events of the ISS PRA model can be obtained. The ISS PRA has been developed by mapping the ISS critical systems such as propulsion, thermal control, or power generation into event sequences diagrams and fault trees. The lowest level of indenture of the fault trees was the orbital replacement units (ORU). The ORU level was chosen consistently with the level of statistically meaningful data that could be obtained from the aerospace industry and from the experts in the field. For example, data was gathered for the solenoid valves present in the propulsion system of the ISS. However valves themselves are composed of parts and the individual failure of these parts was not accounted for in the PRA model. In other words the failure of a spring within a valve was considered a failure of the valve itself.

  20. High Strain-Rate and Quasi-Static Ductile Failure Mechanisms in Porous Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    detailed understanding of the interrelated physical mechanisms that can result in ductile material failure in rate-dependent porous crystalline materials subjected...strains and slip-rates, and hydrostatic stresses on failure paths and ligament damage in face centered cubic (f.c.c.) crystalline materials have been

  1. A Mixed Methods Explanatory Study of the Failure/Drop Rate for Freshman STEM Calculus Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthley, Mary

    2013-01-01

    In a national context of high failure rates in freshman calculus courses, the purpose of this study was to understand who is struggling, and why. High failure rates are especially alarming given a local environment where students have access to a variety of academic, and personal, assistance. The sample consists of students at Colorado State…

  2. Clinical evaluation of the failure rates of metallic brackets

    PubMed Central

    ROMANO, Fábio Lourenço; CORRER, Américo Bortolazzo; CORRER-SOBRINHO, Lourenço; MAGNANI, Maria Beatriz Borges de Araújo; RUELLAS, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the bonding of metallic orthodontic brackets with different adhesive systems. Material and Methods Twenty patients (10.5-15.1 years old) who had sought corrective orthodontic treatment at a University Orthodontic Clinic were evaluated. Brackets were bonded from the right second premolar to the left second premolar in the upper and lower arches using: Orthodontic Concise, conventional Transbond XT, Transbond XT without primer, and Transbond XT associated with Transbond Plus Self-etching Primer (TPSEP). The 4 adhesive systems were used in all patients using a split-mouth design; each adhesive system was used in one quadrant of each dental arch, so that each group of 5 patients received the same bonding sequence. Initial archwires were inserted 1 week after bracket bonding. The number of bracket failures for each adhesive system was quantified over a 6-month period. Results The number of debonded brackets was: 8- Orthodontic Concise, 2- conventional Transbond XT, 9- Transbond XT without primer, and 1- Transbond XT + TPSEP. By using the Kaplan-Meier methods, statistically significant differences were found between the materials (p=0.0198), and the Logrank test identified these differences. Conventional Transbond XT and Transbond XT + TPSEP adhesive systems were statistically superior to Orthodontic Concise and Transbond XT without primer (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the dental arches (upper and lower), between the dental arch sides (right and left), and among the quadrants. Conclusions The largest number of bracket failures occurred with Orthodontic Concise and Transbond XT without primer systems and few bracket failures occurred with conventional Transbond XT and Transbond XT+TPSEP. More bracket failures were observed in the posterior region compared with the anterior region. PMID:22666842

  3. Microstructures, Forming Limit and Failure Analyses of Inconel 718 Sheets for Fabrication of Aerospace Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajun Prasad, K.; Panda, Sushanta Kumar; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Sen, Mainak; Murty, S. V. S. Naryana; Sharma, Sharad Chandra

    2017-02-01

    Recently, aerospace industries have shown increasing interest in forming limits of Inconel 718 sheet metals, which can be utilised in designing tools and selection of process parameters for successful fabrication of components. In the present work, stress-strain response with failure strains was evaluated by uniaxial tensile tests in different orientations, and two-stage work-hardening behavior was observed. In spite of highly preferred texture, tensile properties showed minor variations in different orientations due to the random distribution of nanoprecipitates. The forming limit strains were evaluated by deforming specimens in seven different strain paths using limiting dome height (LDH) test facility. Mostly, the specimens failed without prior indication of localized necking. Thus, fracture forming limit diagram (FFLD) was evaluated, and bending correction was imposed due to the use of sub-size hemispherical punch. The failure strains of FFLD were converted into major-minor stress space (σ-FFLD) and effective plastic strain-stress triaxiality space (ηEPS-FFLD) as failure criteria to avoid the strain path dependence. Moreover, FE model was developed, and the LDH, strain distribution and failure location were predicted successfully using above-mentioned failure criteria with two stages of work hardening. Fractographs were correlated with the fracture behavior and formability of sheet metal.

  4. A stochastic node-failure network with individual tolerable error rate at multiple sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cheng-Fu; Lin, Yi-Kuei

    2014-05-01

    Many enterprises consider several criteria during data transmission such as availability, delay, loss, and out-of-order packets from the service level agreements (SLAs) point of view. Hence internet service providers and customers are gradually focusing on tolerable error rate in transmission process. The internet service provider should provide the specific demand and keep a certain transmission error rate by their SLAs to each customer. This paper is mainly to evaluate the system reliability that the demand can be fulfilled under the tolerable error rate at all sinks by addressing a stochastic node-failure network (SNFN), in which each component (edge or node) has several capacities and a transmission error rate. An efficient algorithm is first proposed to generate all lower boundary points, the minimal capacity vectors satisfying demand and tolerable error rate for all sinks. Then the system reliability can be computed in terms of such points by applying recursive sum of disjoint products. A benchmark network and a practical network in the United States are demonstrated to illustrate the utility of the proposed algorithm. The computational complexity of the proposed algorithm is also analyzed.

  5. Vacuum Bellows, Vacuum Piping, Cryogenic Break, and Copper Joint Failure Rate Estimates for ITER Design Use

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2010-06-01

    The ITER international project design teams are working to produce an engineering design in preparation for construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak. During the course of this work, questions have arisen in regard to safety barriers and equipment reliability as important facets of system design. The vacuum system designers have asked several questions about the reliability of vacuum bellows and vacuum piping. The vessel design team has asked about the reliability of electrical breaks and copper-copper joints used in cryogenic piping. Research into operating experiences of similar equipment has been performed to determine representative failure rates for these components. The following chapters give the research results and the findings for vacuum system bellows, power plant stainless steel piping (amended to represent vacuum system piping), cryogenic system electrical insulating breaks, and copper joints.

  6. In-Vessel Coil Material Failure Rate Estimates for ITER Design Use

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2013-01-01

    The ITER international project design teams are working to produce an engineering design for construction of this large tokamak fusion experiment. One of the design issues is ensuring proper control of the fusion plasma. In-vessel magnet coils may be needed for plasma control, especially the control of edge localized modes (ELMs) and plasma vertical stabilization (VS). These coils will be lifetime components that reside inside the ITER vacuum vessel behind the blanket modules. As such, their reliability is an important design issue since access will be time consuming if any type of repair were necessary. The following chapters give the research results and estimates of failure rates for the coil conductor and jacket materials to be used for the in-vessel coils. Copper and CuCrZr conductors, and stainless steel and Inconel jackets are examined.

  7. Optical Methods For Automatic Rating Of Engine Test Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, James R.; Moss, Brian C.

    1989-03-01

    In recent years, increasing commercial and legislative pressure on automotive engine manufacturers, including increased oil drain intervals, cleaner exhaust emissions and high specific power outputs, have led to increasing demands on lubricating oil performance. Lubricant performance is defined by bench engine tests run under closely controlled conditions. After test, engines are dismantled and the parts rated for wear and accumulation of deposit. This rating must be consistently carried out in laboratories throughout the world in order to ensure lubricant quality meeting the specified standards. To this end, rating technicians evaluate components, following closely defined procedures. This process is time consuming, inaccurate and subject to drift, requiring regular recalibration of raters by means of international rating workshops. This paper describes two instruments for automatic rating of engine parts. The first uses a laser to determine the degree of polishing of the engine cylinder bore, caused by the reciprocating action of piston. This instrument has been developed to prototype stage by the NDT Centre at Harwell under contract to Exxon Chemical, and is planned for production within the next twelve months. The second instrument uses red and green filtered light to determine the type, quality and position of deposit formed on the piston surfaces. The latter device has undergone feasibility study, but no prototype exists.

  8. Damage mechanisms and failure modes of cortical bone under components of physiological loading.

    PubMed

    George, W T; Vashishth, D

    2005-09-01

    Fatigue damage development in cortical bone was investigated in vitro under different mechanical components of physiological loading including tension, compression, and torsion. During each test, stress and strain data were collected continuously to monitor and statistically determine the occurrence of the primary, secondary, and tertiary stages associated with fatigue and/or creep failure of bone. The resultant microdamage and failure modes were identified by histological and fractographic analysis, respectively. The tensile group demonstrated Mode I cracking and the three classic stages of fatigue and creep suggesting a low crack initiation threshold, steady crack propagation and final failure by coalescence of microcracks. In contrast, the compressive group displayed Mode II cracking and a two-stage fatigue behavior with limited creep suggesting a high crack initiation threshold followed by a sudden fracture. The torsion group also displayed a two-stage fatigue profile but demonstrated extensive damage from mixed mode (Modes II and III) microcracking and predominant time-dependent damage. Thus, fatigue behavior of bone was found to be uniquely related to the individual mechanical components of physiological loading and the latter determined the specific damage mechanisms associated with fatigue fracture.

  9. Determining Oxidation Rates in Multi-component Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, A. M.; Weitkamp, E. A.; Huff Hartz, K. E.; Robinson, A. L.; Donahue, N. M.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol composition influences the kinetics of condensed-phase organic species, making extrapolation of rate constants from single-component systems to atmospherically-relevant mixtures difficult. Using a mixed-phase relative rate constants approach, we have overcome this difficulty, obtaining heterogeneous oxidation rate constants for each species in several multi-component organic mixtures. We have also derived a compound- specific uptake coefficient that relates these rate constants to previous uptake measurements. In the ozonolysis of model meat-cooking mixtures, we observe significant decay of saturated and unsaturated acids and sterols. By relating the observed decomposition of condensed-phase species to that of gas-phase standards, we track the evolution of effective rate constants for oleic acid and palmitoleic acid oxidation as the aerosol is chemically processed. Each decreases by nearly a factor of ten over the course of an experiment. Rate constants also depend strongly on aerosol composition, changing by more than an order of magnitude with increasing mixture complexity. To compare these results with previous results, we have derived a compound-specific uptake coefficient (γi' for condensed-phase species i), which describes the kinetics of reactive uptake in mixtures and can be meaningfully related to the traditional uptake coefficient. We express uptake in terms of the concentrations of condensed-phase species, and to do so accurately, we use alkanoic acids to correct the decay of reactive alkenoic acids for secondary chemistry. This correction is incorporated into the definition of γi', and in terms of γi', the standard uptake coefficient can be written as: γ=∑χiγi', where χi is the mass fraction of species i and the summation is over all oxidized species. By using condensed-phase decay to calculate the uptake, we have apportioned reactive uptake among responsible species. This provides information not only about the potential of a particle

  10. Stress Analysis of B-52B and B-52H Air-Launching Systems Failure-Critical Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2005-01-01

    The operational life analysis of any airborne failure-critical structural component requires the stress-load equation, which relates the applied load to the maximum tangential tensile stress at the critical stress point. The failure-critical structural components identified are the B-52B Pegasus pylon adapter shackles, B-52B Pegasus pylon hooks, B-52H airplane pylon hooks, B-52H airplane front fittings, B-52H airplane rear pylon fitting, and the B-52H airplane pylon lower sway brace. Finite-element stress analysis was performed on the said structural components, and the critical stress point was located and the stress-load equation was established for each failure-critical structural component. The ultimate load, yield load, and proof load needed for operational life analysis were established for each failure-critical structural component.

  11. The impact of vaccine failure rate on epidemic dynamics in responsive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu-Hao; Juang, Jonq

    2015-04-01

    An SIS model based on the microscopic Markov-chain approximation is considered in this paper. It is assumed that the individual vaccination behavior depends on the contact awareness, local and global information of an epidemic. To better simulate the real situation, the vaccine failure rate is also taken into consideration. Our main conclusions are given in the following. First, we show that if the vaccine failure rate α is zero, then the epidemic eventually dies out regardless of what the network structure is or how large the effective spreading rate and the immunization response rates of an epidemic are. Second, we show that for any positive α, there exists a positive epidemic threshold depending on an adjusted network structure, which is only determined by the structure of the original network, the positive vaccine failure rate and the immunization response rate for contact awareness. Moreover, the epidemic threshold increases with respect to the strength of the immunization response rate for contact awareness. Finally, if the vaccine failure rate and the immunization response rate for contact awareness are positive, then there exists a critical vaccine failure rate αc > 0 so that the disease free equilibrium (DFE) is stable (resp., unstable) if α < αc (resp., α > αc). Numerical simulations to see the effectiveness of our theoretical results are also provided.

  12. Failure Predictions for VHTR Core Components using a Probabilistic Contiuum Damage Mechanics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, Alex

    2013-10-30

    The proposed work addresses the key research need for the development of constitutive models and overall failure models for graphite and high temperature structural materials, with the long-term goal being to maximize the design life of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). To this end, the capability of a Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) model, which has been used successfully for modeling fracture of virgin graphite, will be extended as a predictive and design tool for the core components of the very high- temperature reactor (VHTR). Specifically, irradiation and environmental effects pertinent to the VHTR will be incorporated into the model to allow fracture of graphite and ceramic components under in-reactor conditions to be modeled explicitly using the finite element method. The model uses a combined stress-based and fracture mechanics-based failure criterion, so it can simulate both the initiation and propagation of cracks. Modern imaging techniques, such as x-ray computed tomography and digital image correlation, will be used during material testing to help define the baseline material damage parameters. Monte Carlo analysis will be performed to address inherent variations in material properties, the aim being to reduce the arbitrariness and uncertainties associated with the current statistical approach. The results can potentially contribute to the current development of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes for the design and construction of VHTR core components.

  13. Optimized Treatment and Heart Rate Reduction in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Irineu Blanco; Del Carlo, Carlos Henrique; Pereira-Barretto, Antônio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is a syndrome that leads to poor outcome in advanced forms. The neurohormonal blockade modifies this natural history; however, it is often suboptimal. Objective The aim of this study is to assess at what percentage cardiologists used to treating HF can prescribe target doses of drugs of proven efficacy. Methods A total of 104 outpatients with systolic dysfunction were consecutively enrolled, all under stabilized treatment. Demographic and treatment data were evaluated and the doses achieved were verified. The findings are shown as percentages and correlations are made between different variables. Results The mean age of patients was 64.1 ± 14.2 years, with SBP =115.4 ± 15.3, HR = 67.8 ± 9.4 bpm, weight = 76.0 ± 17.0 kg and sinus rhythm (90.4%). As for treatment, 93.3% received a RAS blocker (ACEI 52.9%), all received beta-blockers (BB), the most often prescribed being carvedilol (92.3%). As for the doses: 97.1% of those receiving an ARB were below the optimal dose and of those who received ACEI, 52.7% received an optimized dose. As for the BB, target doses were prescribed to 76.0% of them. In this group of patients, most with BB target dose, it can be seen that 36.5% had HR ≥ 70 bpm in sinus rhythm. Conclusion Cardiologists used to treating HF can prescribe target doses of ACEI and BB to most patients. Even though they receive the recommended doses, about one third of patients persists with HR > 70 bpm and should have their treatment optimized. PMID:24100693

  14. Influence of enamel preservation on failure rates of porcelain laminate veneers.

    PubMed

    Gurel, Galip; Sesma, Newton; Calamita, Marcelo A; Coachman, Christian; Morimoto, Susana

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the failure rates of porcelain laminate veneers (PLVs) and the influence of clinical parameters on these rates in a retrospective survey of up to 12 years. Five hundred eighty laminate veneers were bonded in 66 patients. The following parameters were analyzed: type of preparation (depth and margin), crown lengthening, presence of restoration, diastema, crowding, discoloration, abrasion, and attrition. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression modeling was used to determine which factors would predict PLV failure. Forty-two veneers (7.2%) failed in 23 patients, and an overall cumulative survival rate of 86% was observed. A statistically significant association was noted between failure and the limits of the prepared tooth surface (margin and depth). The most frequent failure type was fracture (n = 20). The results revealed no significant influence of crown lengthening apically, presence of restoration, diastema, discoloration, abrasion, or attrition on failure rates. Multivariable analysis (Cox regression model) also showed that PLVs bonded to dentin and teeth with preparation margins in dentin were approximately 10 times more likely to fail than PLVs bonded to enamel. Moreover, coronal crown lengthening increased the risk of PLV failure by 2.3 times. A survival rate of 99% was observed for veneers with preparations confined to enamel and 94% for veneers with enamel only at the margins. Laminate veneers have high survival rates when bonded to enamel and provide a safe and predictable treatment option that preserves tooth structure.

  15. Reducing the failure rate in introductory physics classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saul, Jeff; Coulombe, Patrick; Lindell, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Calculus-based introductory physics courses are often among the most difficult at many colleges and universities. With the national movement to increase STEM majors, the introductory calculus-based courses need to be less of a weed-out course and more of a course that propels students forward into successful majors. This talk discusses two approaches to reduce DFW rates and improve student retention: studio courses and parachute courses. Studio courses integrate lecture/laboratory into one course where the primary mode of instruction is small group activities. Typically, any students enrolled in the college or university can enroll in a studio version of the course. Parachute courses on the other hand, focus on the poor performing students. Designed so that students not doing well in an introductory physics course can switch into the parachute class mid-semester without harm to their GPA. In addition, the parachute course focuses on helping students build the knowledge and skills necessary for success when retaking the calculus-based Physics course. The studio course format has been found to reduce DFW rates at several universities by 40-60% compared with separate lecture and laboratory format versions of the same courses, while parachutes courses were less successful. At one university, the parachute course succeeded in helping 80% of students maintain their GPA, but only helped 20% successfully pass the calculus-based physics course.

  16. Risk assessment of component failure modes and human errors using a new FMECA approach: application in the safety analysis of HDR brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Giardina, M; Castiglia, F; Tomarchio, E

    2014-12-01

    Failure mode, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) is a safety technique extensively used in many different industrial fields to identify and prevent potential failures. In the application of traditional FMECA, the risk priority number (RPN) is determined to rank the failure modes; however, the method has been criticised for having several weaknesses. Moreover, it is unable to adequately deal with human errors or negligence. In this paper, a new versatile fuzzy rule-based assessment model is proposed to evaluate the RPN index to rank both component failure and human error. The proposed methodology is applied to potential radiological over-exposure of patients during high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. The critical analysis of the results can provide recommendations and suggestions regarding safety provisions for the equipment and procedures required to reduce the occurrence of accidental events.

  17. Failure rate of inferior alveolar nerve block among dental students and interns

    PubMed Central

    AlHindi, Maryam; Rashed, Bayan; AlOtaibi, Noura

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report the failure rate of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) among dental students and interns, causes of failure, investigate awareness of different IANB techniques, and to report IANB-associated complications. Methods: A 3-page questionnaire containing 13 questions was distributed to a random sample of 350 third to fifth years students and interns at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on January 2011. It included demographic questions (age, gender, and academic level) and questions on IANB failure frequency and reasons, actions taken to overcome the failure, and awareness of different anesthetic techniques, supplementary techniques, and complications. Results: Of the 250 distributed questionnaires, 238 were returned (68% response rate). Most (85.7%) of surveyed sample had experienced IANB failure once or twice. The participants attributed the failures most commonly (66.45%) to anatomical variations. The most common alternative technique used was intraligamentary injection (57.1%), although 42.8% of the sample never attempted any alternatives. Large portion of the samples stated that they either lacked both knowledge of and training for other techniques (44.9%), or that they had knowledge of them but not enough training to perform them (45.8%). Conclusion: To decrease IANB failure rates for dental students and interns, knowledge of landmarks, anatomical variation and their training in alternatives to IANB, such as the Gow-Gates and Akinosi techniques, both theoretically and clinically in the dental curriculum should be enhanced. PMID:26739980

  18. Pitfalls and Precautions When Using Predicted Failure Data for Quantitative Analysis of Safety Risk for Human Rated Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Glen S.; Hark, Frank; Stott, James

    2016-01-01

    Launch vehicle reliability analysis is largely dependent upon using predicted failure rates from data sources such as MIL-HDBK-217F. Reliability prediction methodologies based on component data do not take into account risks attributable to manufacturing, assembly, and process controls. These sources often dominate component level reliability or risk of failure probability. While consequences of failure is often understood in assessing risk, using predicted values in a risk model to estimate the probability of occurrence will likely underestimate the risk. Managers and decision makers often use the probability of occurrence in determining whether to accept the risk or require a design modification. Due to the absence of system level test and operational data inherent in aerospace applications, the actual risk threshold for acceptance may not be appropriately characterized for decision making purposes. This paper will establish a method and approach to identify the pitfalls and precautions of accepting risk based solely upon predicted failure data. This approach will provide a set of guidelines that may be useful to arrive at a more realistic quantification of risk prior to acceptance by a program.

  19. A Study to Compare the Failure Rates of Current Space Shuttle Ground Support Equipment with the New Pathfinder Equipment and Investigate the Effect that the Proposed GSE Infrastructure Upgrade Might Have to Reduce GSE Infrastructure Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Barbara J.

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to compare the current Space Shuttle Ground Support Equipment (GSE) infrastructure with the proposed GSE infrastructure upgrade modification. The methodology will include analyzing the first prototype installation equipment at Launch PAD B called the "Pathfinder". This study will begin by comparing the failure rate of the current components associated with the "Hardware interface module (HIM)" at the Kennedy Space Center to the failure rate of the neW Pathfinder components. Quantitative data will be gathered specifically on HIM components and the PAD B Hypergolic Fuel facility and Hypergolic Oxidizer facility areas which has the upgraded pathfinder equipment installed. The proposed upgrades include utilizing industrial controlled modules, software, and a fiber optic network. The results of this study provide evidence that there is a significant difference in the failure rates of the two studied infrastructure equipment components. There is also evidence that the support staff for each infrastructure system is not equal. A recommendation to continue with future upgrades is based on a significant reduction of failures in the new' installed ground system components.

  20. Development of KSC program for investigating and generating field failure rates. Volume 2: Recommended format for reliability handbook for ground support equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. E.; Kallmeyer, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Field failure rates and confidence factors are presented for 88 identifiable components of the ground support equipment at the John F. Kennedy Space Center. For most of these, supplementary information regarding failure mode and cause is tabulated. Complete reliability assessments are included for three systems, eight subsystems, and nine generic piece-part classifications. Procedures for updating or augmenting the reliability results presented in this handbook are also included.

  1. Extremely high fracture rate of a modular acetabular component with a sandwich polyethylene ceramic insertion for THA: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Jörn; Bader, Rainer; Schroeder, Bettina; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2009-09-01

    Improvements of ceramic components and design changes have reduced failure rates over the past 30 years in total hip arthroplasty. We present a series of n = 11 cases with ceramic failure out of n = 113 implantations, from which n = 66 were ceramic-on-ceramic (n = 50 with ceramic insert with sandwich in polyethylene and n = 16 with directly fixed ceramic inlay) and n = 47 ceramic on polyethylene bearings, between 1999 and 2001 after introduction of a new implantation system to the market. The overall fracture rate of ceramic for the whole series (n = 113) was 9.7%. For the combination ceramic head with UHMW-PE (n = 47) the fracture rate was 2.1%. For the combination ceramic with ceramic (n = 66) the fracture rate was 15.2%. For the combination ceramic with ceramic sandwich in PE (n = 50) the failure rate was 18%. Only three patients experienced a trauma. Demography of patients (age, gender, body weight and BMI) was not statistically different between patients with failed ceramics and the rest of the patients making patient-specific risk factors unlikely to be an explanation for the failures. Retrospective X-ray analysis of the cup positioning did not show significant difference between failed and non-failed implants in terms of mean cup inclination and version making also operation-specific factors unlikely to be the only reason of this high failure rate. Therefore, manufacturer-specific factors such as design features may have contributed to this high failure rate. Further analysis of the whole series with biomechanical testing of the retrieved material needs to be performed.

  2. Crop failure rates in a geoengineered climate: impact of climate change and marine cloud brightening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, B.; Challinor, A.; Nicklin, K.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of geoengineering on crops has to date been studied by examining mean yields. We present the first work focusing on the rate of crop failures under a geoengineered climate. We investigate the impact of a future climate and a potential geoengineering scheme on the number of crop failures in two regions, Northeastern China and West Africa. Climate change associated with a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide increases the number of crop failures in Northeastern China while reducing the number of crop failures in West Africa. In both regions marine cloud brightening is likely to reduce the number crop failures, although it is more effective at reducing mild crop failure than severe crop failure. We find that water stress, rather than heat stress, is the main cause of crop failure in current, future and geoengineered climates. This demonstrates the importance of irrigation and breeding for tolerance to water stress as adaptation methods in all futures. Analysis of global rainfall under marine cloud brightening has the potential to significantly reduce the impact of climate change on global wheat and groundnut production.

  3. An Efficient Implementation of Fixed Failure-Rate Ratio Test for GNSS Ambiguity Resolution.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanqing; Verhagen, Sandra; Wu, Jie

    2016-06-23

    Ambiguity Resolution (AR) plays a vital role in precise GNSS positioning. Correctly-fixed integer ambiguities can significantly improve the positioning solution, while incorrectly-fixed integer ambiguities can bring large positioning errors and, therefore, should be avoided. The ratio test is an extensively used test to validate the fixed integer ambiguities. To choose proper critical values of the ratio test, the Fixed Failure-rate Ratio Test (FFRT) has been proposed, which generates critical values according to user-defined tolerable failure rates. This contribution provides easy-to-implement fitting functions to calculate the critical values. With a massive Monte Carlo simulation, the functions for many different tolerable failure rates are provided, which enriches the choices of critical values for users. Moreover, the fitting functions for the fix rate are also provided, which for the first time allows users to evaluate the conditional success rate, i.e., the success rate once the integer candidates are accepted by FFRT. The superiority of FFRT over the traditional ratio test regarding controlling the failure rate and preventing unnecessary false alarms is shown by a simulation and a real data experiment. In the real data experiment with a baseline of 182.7 km, FFRT achieved much higher fix rates (up to 30% higher) and the same level of positioning accuracy from fixed solutions as compared to the traditional critical value.

  4. An Efficient Implementation of Fixed Failure-Rate Ratio Test for GNSS Ambiguity Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yanqing; Verhagen, Sandra; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ambiguity Resolution (AR) plays a vital role in precise GNSS positioning. Correctly-fixed integer ambiguities can significantly improve the positioning solution, while incorrectly-fixed integer ambiguities can bring large positioning errors and, therefore, should be avoided. The ratio test is an extensively used test to validate the fixed integer ambiguities. To choose proper critical values of the ratio test, the Fixed Failure-rate Ratio Test (FFRT) has been proposed, which generates critical values according to user-defined tolerable failure rates. This contribution provides easy-to-implement fitting functions to calculate the critical values. With a massive Monte Carlo simulation, the functions for many different tolerable failure rates are provided, which enriches the choices of critical values for users. Moreover, the fitting functions for the fix rate are also provided, which for the first time allows users to evaluate the conditional success rate, i.e., the success rate once the integer candidates are accepted by FFRT. The superiority of FFRT over the traditional ratio test regarding controlling the failure rate and preventing unnecessary false alarms is shown by a simulation and a real data experiment. In the real data experiment with a baseline of 182.7 km, FFRT achieved much higher fix rates (up to 30% higher) and the same level of positioning accuracy from fixed solutions as compared to the traditional critical value. PMID:27347949

  5. "Failure Is a Major Component of Learning Anything": The Role of Failure in the Development of STEM Professionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Amber; Maltese, Adam

    2016-12-01

    The term failure typically evokes negative connotations in educational settings and is likely to be accompanied by negative emotional states, low sense of confidence, and lack of persistence. These negative emotional and behavioral states may factor into an individual not pursuing a degree or career in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM). This is of particular concern considering the low number of women and underrepresented minorities pursing and working in a STEM field. Utilizing interview data with professionals across STEM, we sought to understand the role failure played in the persistence of individuals who enter and pursue paths toward STEM-related careers. Findings highlighted how participants' experiences with failure (1) shaped their outlooks or views of failure, (2) shaped their trajectories within STEM, and (3) provided them with additional skills or qualities. A few differences based on participants' sex, field, and highest degree also manifested in our analysis. We expect the results from this study to add research-based results to the current conversation around whether experiences with failure should be part of formal and informal educational settings and standards-based practices.

  6. "Failure Is a Major Component of Learning Anything": The Role of Failure in the Development of STEM Professionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Amber; Maltese, Adam

    2017-04-01

    The term failure typically evokes negative connotations in educational settings and is likely to be accompanied by negative emotional states, low sense of confidence, and lack of persistence. These negative emotional and behavioral states may factor into an individual not pursuing a degree or career in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM). This is of particular concern considering the low number of women and underrepresented minorities pursing and working in a STEM field. Utilizing interview data with professionals across STEM, we sought to understand the role failure played in the persistence of individuals who enter and pursue paths toward STEM-related careers. Findings highlighted how participants' experiences with failure (1) shaped their outlooks or views of failure, (2) shaped their trajectories within STEM, and (3) provided them with additional skills or qualities. A few differences based on participants' sex, field, and highest degree also manifested in our analysis. We expect the results from this study to add research-based results to the current conversation around whether experiences with failure should be part of formal and informal educational settings and standards-based practices.

  7. Metallic wear debris sensors: promising developments in failure prevention for wind turbine gearsets and similar components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poley, Jack; Dines, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Wind turbines are frequently located in remote, hard-to-reach locations, making it difficult to apply traditional oil analysis sampling of the machine's critical gearset at timely intervals. Metal detection sensors are excellent candidates for sensors designed to monitor machine condition in vivo. Remotely sited components, such as wind turbines, therefore, can be comfortably monitored from a distance. Online sensor technology has come of age with products now capable of identifying onset of wear in time to avoid or mitigate failure. Online oil analysis is now viable, and can be integrated with onsite testing to vet sensor alarms, as well as traditional oil analysis, as furnished by offsite laboratories. Controlled laboratory research data were gathered from tests conducted on a typical wind turbine gearbox, wherein total ferrous particle measurement and metallic particle counting were employed and monitored. The results were then compared with a physical inspection for wear experienced by the gearset. The efficacy of results discussed herein strongly suggests the viability of metallic wear debris sensors in today's wind turbine gearsets, as correlation between sensor data and machine trauma were very good. By extension, similar components and settings would also seem amenable to wear particle sensor monitoring. To our knowledge no experiments such as described herein, have previously been conducted and published.

  8. Pitfalls and Precautions When Using Predicted Failure Data for Quantitative Analysis of Safety Risk for Human Rated Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Glen S.; Hark, Frank; Stott, James

    2016-01-01

    Launch vehicle reliability analysis is largely dependent upon using predicted failure rates from data sources such as MIL-HDBK-217F. Reliability prediction methodologies based on component data do not take into account system integration risks such as those attributable to manufacturing and assembly. These sources often dominate component level risk. While consequence of failure is often understood, using predicted values in a risk model to estimate the probability of occurrence may underestimate the actual risk. Managers and decision makers use the probability of occurrence to influence the determination whether to accept the risk or require a design modification. The actual risk threshold for acceptance may not be fully understood due to the absence of system level test data or operational data. This paper will establish a method and approach to identify the pitfalls and precautions of accepting risk based solely upon predicted failure data. This approach will provide a set of guidelines that may be useful to arrive at a more realistic quantification of risk prior to acceptance by a program.

  9. Probabilistic exposure assessment model to estimate aseptic-UHT product failure rate.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Laure; Albert, Isabelle; Magras, Catherine; Johnson, Nicholas Brian; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2015-01-02

    Aseptic-Ultra-High-Temperature (UHT) products are manufactured to be free of microorganisms capable of growing in the food at normal non-refrigerated conditions at which the food is likely to be held during manufacture, distribution and storage. Two important phases within the process are widely recognised as critical in controlling microbial contamination: the sterilisation steps and the following aseptic steps. Of the microbial hazards, the pathogen spore formers Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus cereus are deemed the most pertinent to be controlled. In addition, due to a relatively high thermal resistance, Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores are considered a concern for spoilage of low acid aseptic-UHT products. A probabilistic exposure assessment model has been developed in order to assess the aseptic-UHT product failure rate associated with these three bacteria. It was a Modular Process Risk Model, based on nine modules. They described: i) the microbial contamination introduced by the raw materials, either from the product (i.e. milk, cocoa and dextrose powders and water) or the packaging (i.e. bottle and sealing component), ii) the sterilisation processes, of either the product or the packaging material, iii) the possible recontamination during subsequent processing of both product and packaging. The Sterility Failure Rate (SFR) was defined as the sum of bottles contaminated for each batch, divided by the total number of bottles produced per process line run (10(6) batches simulated per process line). The SFR associated with the three bacteria was estimated at the last step of the process (i.e. after Module 9) but also after each module, allowing for the identification of modules, and responsible contamination pathways, with higher or lower intermediate SFR. The model contained 42 controlled settings associated with factory environment, process line or product formulation, and more than 55 probabilistic inputs corresponding to inputs with variability

  10. Six-month bracket failure rate evaluation of a self-etching primer.

    PubMed

    Elekdag-Turk, Selma; Isci, Devrim; Turk, Tamer; Cakmak, Fethiye

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical performance of a self-etching primer (SEP) with a conventional two-step etch and primer [conventional method (CM)]. The chair time required for bonding was also evaluated. Thirty-seven patients (14 males and 23 females) with a mean age of 16 years 5 months were included in the study. Six hundred and seventy-two brackets were bonded by one operator using a split-mouth design, with either SEP (Transbond Plus) or CM (Transbond XT). Bracket failure rates were estimated with respect to bonding procedure, dental arch, type of tooth (incisor, canine, and premolar), and gender. The results were evaluated using the chi-square test. The survival rate of the brackets was estimated with Kaplan-Meier analysis. Bracket survival distributions with respect to bonding procedure, dental arch, type of tooth, and patient gender were compared with a log-rank test. Bond failure interface was determined with the adhesive remnant index (ARI). The failure rates were 0.6 per cent for both bonding procedures. The failure and survival rates did not show significant differences between the bonding procedures, upper and lower dental arches, or gender. However, premolar brackets displayed a higher bond failure rate and a lower survival rate than incisor and canine brackets (P < 0.05). The mean bracket bonding time per tooth with SEP was significantly shorter than with CM (P < 0.001). No significant difference was observed for the ARI scores (P > 0.05). The results of this in vivo, randomized, cross-mouth clinical trial demonstrated a high survival rate with Transbond Plus. This finding indicates that SEP can be effectively used for bonding of orthodontic brackets.

  11. Creating a Learning Flow: A Hybrid Course Model for High-Failure-Rate Math Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Katherine; Zweier, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Higher education in the United States is facing a failure-rate crisis in entry-level mathematics courses. In this article, the authors describe an innovative, technology-enhanced hybrid course model that has significantly improved course completion and content mastery outcomes in general education (GE) mathematics courses. The model relies on five…

  12. [The exercise training restores the heart rate variability in heart failure patients. A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Segovia, Victoria; Manterola, Carlos; González, Marcelo; Rodríguez-Núñez, Iván

    2017-01-05

    Cardiovascular diseases are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the general population. In this sense the autonomic imbalance is the cornerstone of the physiopathology underlying the development of these diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of exercise training on heart rate variability (HRV) in adult patients with chronic heart failure.

  13. A Micromechanics Based Constitutive Model For Brittle Failure at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, H. S.; Rosakis, A.; Sammis, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis [1] and generalized by Desh- pande and Evans [2] has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an ex- perimentally motivated new crack growth (damage evo- lution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative. Incorporating this feature produces strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive re- sponse. The model is also experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over strain rates ranging from ˜ 10-6 to 103 s-1. Model parameters determined from from quasi-static experiments were used to predict the failure strength at higher loading rates. Agreement with experimental results was excellent.

  14. Rate-weakening friction characterizes both slow sliding and catastrophic failure of landslides

    PubMed Central

    Handwerger, Alexander L.; Rempel, Alan W.; Skarbek, Rob M.; Roering, Joshua J.; Hilley, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Catastrophic landslides cause billions of dollars in damages and claim thousands of lives annually, whereas slow-moving landslides with negligible inertia dominate sediment transport on many weathered hillslopes. Surprisingly, both failure modes are displayed by nearby landslides (and individual landslides in different years) subjected to almost identical environmental conditions. Such observations have motivated the search for mechanisms that can cause slow-moving landslides to transition via runaway acceleration to catastrophic failure. A similarly diverse range of sliding behavior, including earthquakes and slow-slip events, occurs along tectonic faults. Our understanding of these phenomena has benefitted from mechanical treatments that rely upon key ingredients that are notably absent from previous landslide descriptions. Here, we describe landslide motion using a rate- and state-dependent frictional model that incorporates a nonlocal stress balance to account for the elastic response to gradients in slip. Our idealized, one-dimensional model reproduces both the displacement patterns observed in slow-moving landslides and the acceleration toward failure exhibited by catastrophic events. Catastrophic failure occurs only when the slip surface is characterized by rate-weakening friction and its lateral dimensions exceed a critical nucleation length h* that is shorter for higher effective stresses. However, landslides that are extensive enough to fall within this regime can nevertheless slide slowly for months or years before catastrophic failure. Our results suggest that the diversity of slip behavior observed during landslides can be described with a single model adapted from standard fault mechanics treatments. PMID:27573836

  15. Rate-weakening friction characterizes both slow sliding and catastrophic failure of landslides.

    PubMed

    Handwerger, Alexander L; Rempel, Alan W; Skarbek, Rob M; Roering, Joshua J; Hilley, George E

    2016-09-13

    Catastrophic landslides cause billions of dollars in damages and claim thousands of lives annually, whereas slow-moving landslides with negligible inertia dominate sediment transport on many weathered hillslopes. Surprisingly, both failure modes are displayed by nearby landslides (and individual landslides in different years) subjected to almost identical environmental conditions. Such observations have motivated the search for mechanisms that can cause slow-moving landslides to transition via runaway acceleration to catastrophic failure. A similarly diverse range of sliding behavior, including earthquakes and slow-slip events, occurs along tectonic faults. Our understanding of these phenomena has benefitted from mechanical treatments that rely upon key ingredients that are notably absent from previous landslide descriptions. Here, we describe landslide motion using a rate- and state-dependent frictional model that incorporates a nonlocal stress balance to account for the elastic response to gradients in slip. Our idealized, one-dimensional model reproduces both the displacement patterns observed in slow-moving landslides and the acceleration toward failure exhibited by catastrophic events. Catastrophic failure occurs only when the slip surface is characterized by rate-weakening friction and its lateral dimensions exceed a critical nucleation length [Formula: see text] that is shorter for higher effective stresses. However, landslides that are extensive enough to fall within this regime can nevertheless slide slowly for months or years before catastrophic failure. Our results suggest that the diversity of slip behavior observed during landslides can be described with a single model adapted from standard fault mechanics treatments.

  16. Flow and failure of an aluminium alloy from low to high temperature and strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Rafael; Cendón, David; Gálvez, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical behaviour of an aluminium alloy is presented in this paper. The study has been carried out to analyse the flow and failure of the aluminium alloy 7075-T73. An experimental study has been planned performing tests of un-notched and notched tensile specimens at low strain rates using a servo-hydraulic machine. High strain rate tests have been carried out using the same geometry in a Hopkinson Split Tensile Bar. The dynamic experiments at low temperature were performed using a cryogenic chamber, and the high temperature ones with a furnace, both incorporated to the Hopkinson bar. Testing temperatures ranged from - 50 ∘C to 100 ∘C and the strain rates from 10-4 s-1 to 600 s-1. The material behaviour was modelled using the Modified Johnson-Cook model and simulated using LS-DYNA. The results show that the Voce type of strain hardening is the most accurate for this material, while the traditional Johnson-Cook is not enough accurate to reproduce the necking of un-notched specimens. The failure criterion was obtained by means of the numerical simulations using the analysis of the stress triaxiality versus the strain to failure. The diameters at the failure time were measured using the images taken with an image camera, and the strain to failure was computed for un-notched and notched specimens. The numerical simulations show that the analysis of the evolution of the stress triaxiality is crucial to achieve accurate results. A material model using the Modified Johnson-Cook for flow and failure is proposed.

  17. Drug eluting biliary stents to decrease stent failure rates: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shatzel, Joseph; Kim, Jisoo; Sampath, Kartik; Syed, Sharjeel; Saad, Jennifer; Hussain, Zilla H; Mody, Kabir; Pipas, J Marc; Gordon, Stuart; Gardner, Timothy; Rothstein, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting is clinically effective in relieving both malignant and non-malignant obstructions. However, there are high failure rates associated with tumor ingrowth and epithelial overgrowth as well as internally from biofilm development and subsequent clogging. Within the last decade, the use of prophylactic drug eluting stents as a means to reduce stent failure has been investigated. In this review we provide an overview of the current research on drug eluting biliary stents. While there is limited human trial data regarding the clinical benefit of drug eluting biliary stents in preventing stent obstruction, recent research suggests promise regarding their safety and potential efficacy. PMID:26839648

  18. Twelve-month bracket failure rate with amorphous calcium phosphate bonding system.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Shaza M; El Banna, Mai S; Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the survival rate of orthodontic brackets over a 12-month period using amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) bonding system with a conventional adhesive (CA). In 30 patients with a mean age of 15 years 7 months, one operator bonded 138 brackets with a split-mouth design, using a resin-based CA and ACP-containing adhesive. The survival rate of the brackets was estimated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Bracket survival distributions with respect to bonding procedure, dental arch, type of tooth (incisor, canine, and premolar), and patients' gender were compared using the log-rank test. The bond failure interface was determined using the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). The bond failure rates of the CA and ACP-containing adhesive were 2.67 and 3.8 per cent, respectively. There was no significant difference between the failure rates of ACP and CA-bonded systems (P > 0.05). Survival rates did not show significant differences between the upper and lower dental arches (P > 0.05). Lower survival rates were found for canine and premolar teeth than incisors (P < 0.05). Bond failure rates were higher for males than females (P < 0.05). There was a significant difference for ARI scores between the adhesive materials (P = 0.028); more of the ACP-based adhesive was left on the tooth at debond. ACP-containing adhesive can be effectively used to bond orthodontic brackets and can serve as a practicable alternative to the conventional bonding adhesives.

  19. Experimental Study of Solder/Copper Interface Failure Under Varying Strain Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    subjected to dynamic axial loads at strain rates between 10.0 s-1 and 0.05 s-1. The copper is alloy 101 and the lead-free solder has a composition of 96...OF SOLDER/COPPER INTERFACE FAILURE UNDER VARYING STRAIN RATES by Andrew Michael Luteran March 2011 Thesis Advisor: Young W. Kwon Second...tin and 4% silver. The tests results revealed that as the strain rate increases so do the ultimate and yield strengths but the elastic modulus

  20. Gamete cytogenetic study in couples with implantation failure: aneuploidy rate is increased in both couple members

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, I.; Molina-Gomes, D.; Wainer, R.; Bergere, M.; Albert, M.; Bailly, M.; de Mazancourt, P.; Selva, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Implantation failure is known to be associated with an increased risk of aneuploidy in embryos, a situation leading to a pre-implantation genetic screening, not allowed in different countries like France. Our aim was to evaluate the gamete aneuploidy incidence in this context, using first polar body and spermatozoa aneuploidy screening. Methods Three groups were considered: 11 couples with pregnancy obtained after IVF for female infertility (group 1); 20 couples with pregnancy obtained after IVF for male infertility (group 2); and 35 couples with implantation failure (group 3). In group 3, 28 couples treated by ICSI volunteered for first polar body analysis (PB1). Results Spermatozoa aneuploidy rate was increased in groups 2 (1.6%) and 3 (2.1%) in comparison to group 1 (0.6%). PB1 aneuploidy rate was 35.4% in group 3. Finally, eight couples (32%) had no particular chromosomal risk in gametes, 15/25 (60%) presented an increased spermatic (>2%) or oocyte (>1/3) aneuploidy rate, and 2/25 (8%) had both. Conclusion Those results confirm that implantation failure has a heterogeneous origin, that gamete chromosome abnormality rate is one of the major contributing factors, and that 1st Polar body and spermatozoa aneuploidy screening or pre-implantation genetics screening may be indicated for these couples. PMID:18972203

  1. Relationship between Sponsorship and Failure Rate of Dental Implants: A Systematic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Popelut, Antoine; Valet, Fabien; Fromentin, Olivier; Thomas, Aurélie; Bouchard, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background The number of dental implant treatments increases annually. Dental implants are manufactured by competing companies. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis have shown a clear association between pharmaceutical industry funding of clinical trials and pro-industry results. So far, the impact of industry sponsorship on the outcomes and conclusions of dental implant clinical trials has never been explored. The aim of the present study was to examine financial sponsorship of dental implant trials, and to evaluate whether research funding sources may affect the annual failure rate. Methods and Findings A systematic approach was used to identify systematic reviews published between January 1993 and December 2008 that specifically deal with the length of survival of dental implants. Primary articles were extracted from these reviews. The failure rate of the dental implants included in the trials was calculated. Data on publication year, Impact Factor, prosthetic design, periodontal status reporting, number of dental implants included in the trials, methodological quality of the studies, presence of a statistical advisor, and financial sponsorship were extracted by two independent reviewers (kappa  = 0.90; CI95% [0.77–1.00]). Univariate quasi-Poisson regression models and multivariate analysis were used to identify variables that were significantly associated with failure rates. Five systematic reviews were identified from which 41 analyzable trials were extracted. The mean annual failure rate estimate was 1.09%.(CI95% [0.84–1.42]). The funding source was not reported in 63% of the trials (26/41). Sixty-six percent of the trials were considered as having a risk of bias (27/41). Given study age, both industry associated (OR = 0.21; CI95% [0.12–0.38]) and unknown funding source trials (OR = 0.33; (CI95% [0.21–0.51]) had a lower annual failure rates compared with non-industry associated trials. A conflict of interest statement was disclosed in 2

  2. Rate dependent response and failure of a ductile epoxy and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Rae, Philip J; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Stahl, David B

    2010-01-01

    An extensive characterization suite has been performed on the response and failure of a ductile epoxy 55A and uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite of IM7 fibers in 55A resin from the quasistatic to shock regime. The quasistatic and intermediate strain rate response, including elastic modulus, yield and failure have are characterized by quasistatic, SHPB, and DMA measurements as a function of fiber orientation and temperature. The high strain rate shock effect of fiber orientation in the composite and response of the pure resin are presented for plate impact experiments. It has previously been shown that at lower impact velocities the shock velocity is strongly dependent on fiber orientation but at higher impact velocity the in-plane and through thickness Hugoniots converge. The current results are compared with previous studies of the shock response of carbon fiber composites with more conventional brittle epoxy matrices. The spall response of the composite is measured and compared with quasistatic fracture toughness measurements.

  3. Deformation and failure of OFHC copper under high strain rate shear compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Andrew; Testa, Gabriel; Bonora, Nicola; Iannitti, Gianluca; Persechino, Italo; Colliander, Magnus Hörnqvist

    2017-01-01

    Hat-shaped specimen geometries were developed to generate high strain, high-strain-rates deformation under prescribed conditions. These geometries offer also the possibility to investigate the occurrence of ductile rupture under low or negative stress triaxiality, where most failure models fail. In this work, three tophat geometries were designed, by means of extensive numerical simulation, to obtain desired stress triaxiality values within the shear region that develops across the ligament. Material failure was simulated using the Continuum Damage Model (CDM) formulation with a unilateral condition for damage accumulation and validated by comparing with quasi-static and high strain rate compression tests results on OFHC copper. Preliminary results seem to indicate that ductile tearing initiates at the specimen corner location where positive stress triaxiality occurs because of local rotation and eventually propagates along the ligament.

  4. Rabies Vaccination: Higher Failure Rates in Imported Dogs than in those Vaccinated in Italy.

    PubMed

    Rota Nodari, E; Alonso, S; Mancin, M; De Nardi, M; Hudson-Cooke, S; Veggiato, C; Cattoli, G; De Benedictis, P

    2017-03-01

    The current European Union (EU) legislation decrees that pets entering the EU from a rabies-infected third country have to obtain a satisfactory virus-neutralizing antibody level, while those moving within the EU require only rabies vaccination as the risk of moving a rabid pet within the EU is considered negligible. A number of factors driving individual variations in dog vaccine response have been previously reported, including a high rate of vaccine failure in puppies, especially those subject to commercial transport. A total of 21 001 observations collected from dogs (2006-2012) vaccinated in compliance with the current EU regulations were statistically analysed to assess the effect of different risk factors related to rabies vaccine efficacy. Within this framework, we were able to compare the vaccination failure rate in a group of dogs entering the Italian border from EU and non-EU countries to those vaccinated in Italy prior to international travel. Our analysis identified that cross-breeds and two breed categories showed high vaccine success rates, while Beagles and Boxers were the least likely to show a successful response to vaccination (88.82% and 90.32%, respectively). Our analysis revealed diverse performances among the commercially available vaccines, in terms of serological peak windows, and marked differences according to geographical area. Of note, we found a higher vaccine failure rate in imported dogs (13.15%) than in those vaccinated in Italy (5.89%). Our findings suggest that the choice of vaccine may influence the likelihood of an animal achieving a protective serological level and that time from vaccination to sampling should be considered when interpreting serological results. A higher vaccine failure in imported compared to Italian dogs highlights the key role that border controls still have in assessing the full compliance of pet movements with EU legislation to minimize the risk of rabies being reintroduced into a disease-free area.

  5. Analysis of field usage failure rate data for plastic encapsulated solid state devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Survey and questionnaire techniques were used to gather data from users and manufacturers on the failure rates in the field of plastic encapsulated semiconductors. It was found that such solid state devices are being successfully used by commercial companies which impose certain screening and qualification procedures. The reliability of these semiconductors is now adequate to support their consideration in NASA systems, particularly in low cost systems. The cost of performing necessary screening for NASA applications was assessed.

  6. Rate-weakening friction characterizes both slow sliding and catastrophic failure of landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handwerger, Alexander L.; Rempel, Alan W.; Skarbek, Rob M.; Roering, Joshua J.; Hilley, George E.

    2016-09-01

    Catastrophic landslides cause billions of dollars in damages and claim thousands of lives annually, whereas slow-moving landslides with negligible inertia dominate sediment transport on many weathered hillslopes. Surprisingly, both failure modes are displayed by nearby landslides (and individual landslides in different years) subjected to almost identical environmental conditions. Such observations have motivated the search for mechanisms that can cause slow-moving landslides to transition via runaway acceleration to catastrophic failure. A similarly diverse range of sliding behavior, including earthquakes and slow-slip events, occurs along tectonic faults. Our understanding of these phenomena has benefitted from mechanical treatments that rely upon key ingredients that are notably absent from previous landslide descriptions. Here, we describe landslide motion using a rate- and state-dependent frictional model that incorporates a nonlocal stress balance to account for the elastic response to gradients in slip. Our idealized, one-dimensional model reproduces both the displacement patterns observed in slow-moving landslides and the acceleration toward failure exhibited by catastrophic events. Catastrophic failure occurs only when the slip surface is characterized by rate-weakening friction and its lateral dimensions exceed a critical nucleation length h*h* that is shorter for higher effective stresses. However, landslides that are extensive enough to fall within this regime can nevertheless slide slowly for months or years before catastrophic failure. Our results suggest that the diversity of slip behavior observed during landslides can be described with a single model adapted from standard fault mechanics treatments.

  7. The Relationships between Support System Failures and College Students' Ratings of Self and Family: Do They Vary across Family Configuration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Thomas S.

    1993-01-01

    College students (n=130) described support system failures they encountered during childhood and adolescence through responses on Personal History Inventory and ratings of self and family on Personal Attribute Inventory. Found significant direct relationships between level of support system failures and negativeness expressed in ratings of both…

  8. Clinical evaluation of the failure rate of metallic brackets bonded with orthodontic composites.

    PubMed

    Romano, Fábio Lourenço; Valério, Rodrigo Alexandre; Gomes-Silva, Jaciara Miranda; Ferreira, José Tarcísio Lima; Faria, Gisele; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate in vivo the failure rate of metallic brackets bonded with two orthodontic composites. Nineteen patients with ages ranging from 10.5 to 38.7 years needing corrective orthodontic treatment were selected for study. The enamel surfaces from second premolars to second premolars were treated with Transbond Plus-Self Etching Primer (3M Unitek). Next, 380 orthodontic brackets were bonded on maxillary and mandibular teeth, as follows: 190 with Transbond XT composite (3M Unitek) (control) and 190 with Transbond Plus Color Change (3M Unitek) (experimental) in contralateral quadrants. The bonded brackets were light cured for 40 s, and initial alignment archwires were inserted. Bond failure rates were recorded over a six-month period. At the end of the evaluation, six bond failures occurred, three for each composite. Kaplan-Meyer method and log-rank test (Mantel-Cox) was used for statistical analysis, and no statistically significant difference was found between the materials (p=0.999). Both Transbond XT and Transbond Plus Color Change composites had low debonding rates over the study period.

  9. Effects of strain rate and confining pressure on the deformation and failure of shale

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.M. ); Sheppard, M.C. ); Houwen, O.H. )

    1991-06-01

    Previous work on shale mechanical properties has focused on the slow deformation rates appropriate to wellbore deformation. Deformation of shale under a drill bit occurs at a very high rate, and the failure properties of the rock under these conditions are crucial in determining bit performance and in extracting lithology and pore-pressure information from drilling parameters. Triaxial tests were performed on two nonswelling shales under a wide range of strain rates and confining and pore pressures. At low strain rates, when fluid is relatively free to move within the shale, shale deformation and failure are governed by effective stress or pressure (i.e., total confining pressure minus pore pressure), as is the case for ordinary rock. If the pore pressure in the shale is high, increasing the strain rate beyond about 0.1%/sec causes large increases in the strength and ductility of the shale. Total pressure begins to influence the strength. At high stain rates, the influence of effective pressure decreases, except when it is very low (i.e., when pore pressure is very high); ductility then rises rapidly. This behavior is opposite that expected in ordinary rocks. This paper briefly discusses the reasons for these phenomena and their impact on wellbore and drilling problems.

  10. Helium release rates and ODH calculations from RHIC magnet cooling line failure

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, could discharge cold helium into the RHIC tunnel and cause an Oxygen Deficiency Hazard (ODH) problem. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the insulating vacuum volumes and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces are included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Results, including helium discharge rates, helium inventory loss, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the RHIC tunnel area, are reported. Good agreement had been achieved when comparing the simulation results, a RHIC sector depressurization test measurement, and some simple analytical calculations.

  11. Ambulatory heart rate range predicts mode-specific mortality and hospitalisation in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Cubbon, Richard M; Ruff, Naomi; Groves, David; Eleuteri, Antonio; Denby, Christine; Kearney, Lorraine; Ali, Noman; Walker, Andrew M N; Jamil, Haqeel; Gierula, John; Gale, Chris P; Batin, Phillip D; Nolan, James; Shah, Ajay M; Fox, Keith A A; Sapsford, Robert J; Witte, Klaus K; Kearney, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to define the prognostic value of the heart rate range during a 24 h period in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods Prospective observational cohort study of 791 patients with CHF associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Mode-specific mortality and hospitalisation were linked with ambulatory heart rate range (AHRR; calculated as maximum minus minimum heart rate using 24 h Holter monitor data, including paced and non-sinus complexes) in univariate and multivariate analyses. Findings were then corroborated in a validation cohort of 408 patients with CHF with preserved or reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Results After a mean 4.1 years of follow-up, increasing AHRR was associated with reduced risk of all-cause, sudden, non-cardiovascular and progressive heart failure death in univariate analyses. After accounting for characteristics that differed between groups above and below median AHRR using multivariate analysis, AHRR remained strongly associated with all-cause mortality (HR 0.991/bpm increase in AHRR (95% CI 0.999 to 0.982); p=0.046). AHRR was not associated with the risk of any non-elective hospitalisation, but was associated with heart-failure-related hospitalisation. AHRR was modestly associated with the SD of normal-to-normal beats (R2=0.2; p<0.001) and with peak exercise-test heart rate (R2=0.33; p<0.001). Analysis of the validation cohort revealed AHRR to be associated with all-cause and mode-specific death as described in the derivation cohort. Conclusions AHRR is a novel and readily available prognosticator in patients with CHF, which may reflect autonomic tone and exercise capacity. PMID:26674986

  12. A Procedure for Modeling Structural Component/Attachment Failure Using Transient Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn C. (Technical Monitor)

    2007-01-01

    Structures often comprise smaller substructures that are connected to each other or attached to the ground by a set of finite connections. Under static loading one or more of these connections may exceed allowable limits and be deemed to fail. Of particular interest is the structural response when a connection is severed (failed) while the structure is under static load. A transient failure analysis procedure was developed by which it is possible to examine the dynamic effects that result from introducing a discrete failure while a structure is under static load. The failure is introduced by replacing a connection load history by a time-dependent load set that removes the connection load at the time of failure. The subsequent transient response is examined to determine the importance of the dynamic effects by comparing the structural response with the appropriate allowables. Additionally, this procedure utilizes a standard finite element transient analysis that is readily available in most commercial software, permitting the study of dynamic failures without the need to purchase software specifically for this purpose. The procedure is developed and explained, demonstrated on a simple cantilever box example, and finally demonstrated on a real-world example, the American Airlines Flight 587 (AA587) vertical tail plane (VTP).

  13. Failure behavior of generic metallic and composite aircraft structural components under crash loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.; Robinson, Martha P.

    1990-01-01

    Failure behavior results are presented from crash dynamics research using concepts of aircraft elements and substructure not necessarily designed or optimized for energy absorption or crash loading considerations. To achieve desired new designs incorporating improved energy absorption capabilities often requires an understanding of how more conventional designs behave under crash loadings. Experimental and analytical data are presented which indicate some general trends in the failure behavior of a class of composite structures including individual fuselage frames, skeleton subfloors with stringers and floor beams without skin covering, and subfloors with skin added to the frame-stringer arrangement. Although the behavior is complex, a strong similarity in the static/dynamic failure behavior among these structures is illustrated through photographs of the experimental results and through analytical data of generic composite structural models.

  14. Detecting application-level failures in component-based internet services.

    PubMed

    Kiciman, Emre; Fox, Armando

    2005-09-01

    Most Internet services (e-commerce, search engines, etc.) suffer faults. Quickly detecting these faults can be the largest bottleneck in improving availability of the system. We present Pinpoint, a methodology for automating fault detection in Internet services by: 1) observing low-level internal structural behaviors of the service; 2) modeling the majority behavior of the system as correct; and 3) detecting anomalies in these behaviors as possible symptoms of failures. Without requiring any a priori application-specific information, Pinpoint correctly detected 89%-96% of major failures in our experiments, as compared with 20%-70% detected by current application-generic techniques.

  15. Simulated Hail Ice Mechanical Properties and Failure Mechanism at Quasi-Static Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Jonathan M.

    Hail is a significant threat to aircraft both on the ground and in the air. Aeronautical engineers are interested in better understanding the properties of hail to improve the safety of new aircraft. However, the failure mechanism and mechanical properties of hail, as opposed to clear ice, are not well understood. A literature review identifies basic mechanical properties of ice and a failure mechanism based upon the state of stress within an ice sphere is proposed. To better understand the properties of Simulated Hail Ice (SHI), several tests were conducted using both clear and cotton fiber reinforced ice. Pictures were taken to show the internal crystal structure of SHI. SHI crush tests were conducted to identify the overall force-displacement trends at various quasi-static strain rates. High speed photography was also used to visually track the failure mechanism of spherical SHI. Compression tests were done to measure the compression strength of SHI and results were compared to literature data. Fracture toughness tests were conducted to identify the crack resistance of SHI. Results from testing clear ice samples were successfully compared to previously published literature data to instill confidence in the testing methods. The methods were subsequently used to test and characterize the cotton fiber reinforced ice.

  16. Scheduling Maintenance Operations Which Cause Age-Dependent Failure Rate Changes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    ENGI.. UNCLASSIFIED B EBRAHIMIAN ET AL I JUN 83 F/G 5/1 NLmEEmmEEmmmmEE EEIhEIIhEEIII EEIIIIIIIEIIIE EIIIEIIIIIIIEE IEEIhIhEIhEIhE EIIIEEEEEIhIhE...OPERATIONS WHICH CAUSE AGE-DEPENDENT FAILURE RATE CHANGES BY BEHNAM EBRAHIMIAN AND LEONARD SHAW Prepared for Office of Naval Research Contract N00014-75-C-0858... EBRAHIMIAN AND LEONARD SHAW Prepared for Office of Naval Research Contract N00014-75-C-0858 Report No. POLY EE/CS 83-002 Polytechnic Institute of New York

  17. Predictions and Experimental Microstructural Characterization of High Strain Rate Failure Modes in Layered Aluminum Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanikar, Prasenjit

    Different aluminum alloys can be combined, as composites, for tailored dynamic applications. Most investigations pertaining to metallic alloy layered composites, however, have been based on quasi-static approaches. The dynamic failure of layered metallic composites, therefore, needs to be characterized in terms of strength, toughness, and fracture response. A dislocation-density based crystalline plasticity formulation, finite-element techniques, rational crystallographic orientation relations and a new fracture methodology were used to predict the failure modes associated with the high strain rate behavior of aluminum layered composites. Two alloy layers, a high strength alloy, aluminum 2195, and an aluminum alloy 2139, with high toughness, were modeled with representative microstructures that included precipitates, dispersed particles, and different grain boundary (GB) distributions. The new fracture methodology, based on an overlap method and phantom nodes, is used with a fracture criteria specialized for fracture on different cleavage planes. One of the objectives of this investigation, therefore, was to determine the optimal arrangements of the 2139 and 2195 aluminum alloys for a metallic layered composite that would combine strength, toughness and fracture resistance for high strain-rate applications. Different layer arrangements were investigated for high strain-rate applications, and the optimal arrangement was with the high toughness 2139 layer on the bottom, which provided extensive shear strain localization, and the high strength 2195 layer on the top for high strength resistance. The layer thickness of the bottom high toughness layer also affected the bending behavior of the roll-boned interface and the potential delamination of the layers. Shear strain localization, dynamic cracking and delamination were the mutually competing failure mechanisms for the layered metallic composite, and control of these failure modes can be optimized for high strain-rate

  18. Rating Scale Items: A Brief Review of Nomenclature, Components, and Formatting to Inform the Development of Direct Behavior Rating (DBR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christ, Theodore J.; Boice, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Ratings scales are a common component of many multisource, multimethod frameworks for socioemotional and behavior assessment of children. There is a modest literature base to support the use of attitudinal, behavioral, and personality rating scales. Much of that historic literature focuses on the characteristics and interpretations of specific…

  19. A Further Study of Productive Failure in Mathematical Problem Solving: Unpacking the Design Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapur, Manu

    2011-01-01

    This paper replicates and extends my earlier work on productive failure in mathematical problem solving (Kapur, doi:10.1007/s11251-009-9093-x, 2009). One hundred and nine, seventh-grade mathematics students taught by the same teacher from a Singapore school experienced one of three learning designs: (a) traditional lecture and practice (LP), (b)…

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Heart Rate Variability and Baroreflex Sensitivity in Rats with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Sharon Del Bem Velloso; da Silva, Luiz Eduardo Virgilio; Lataro, Renata Maria; Silva, Carlos Alberto Aguiar; de Oliveira, Luciano Fonseca Lemos; de Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira; Simões, Marcus Vinicius; da Silva Meirelles, Lindolfo; Fazan, Rubens

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure induced by myocardial infarct (MI) attenuates the heart rate variability (HRV) and baroreflex sensitivity, which are important risk factors for life-threatening cardiovascular events. Therapies with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown promising results after MI. However, the effects of MSCs on hemodynamic (heart rate and arterial pressure) variability and baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure (CHF) following MI have not been evaluated thus far. Male Wistar rats received MSCs or saline solution intravenously 1 week after ligation of the left coronary artery. Control (noninfarcted) rats were also evaluated. MI size was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was evaluated using radionuclide ventriculography. Four weeks after MSC injection, the animals were anesthetized and instrumented for chronic ECG recording and catheters were implanted in the femoral artery to record arterial pressure. Arterial pressure and HRVs were determined in time and frequency domain (spectral analysis) while HRV was also examined using nonlinear methods: DFA (detrended fluctuation analysis) and sample entropy. The initial MI size was the same among all infarcted rats but was reduced by MSCs. CHF rats exhibited increased myocardial interstitial collagen and sample entropy combined with the attenuation of the following cardiocirculatory parameters: DFA indices, LVEF, baroreflex sensitivity, and HRV. Nevertheless, MSCs hampered all these alterations, except the LVEF reduction. Therefore, 4 weeks after MSC therapy was applied to CHF rats, MI size and myocardial interstitial fibrosis decreased, while baroreflex sensitivity and HRV improved. PMID:26059001

  1. A component-level failure detection and identification algorithm based on open-loop and closed-loop state estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Seung-Han; Cho, Young Man; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2013-04-01

    This study presents a component-level failure detection and identification (FDI) algorithm for a cascade mechanical system subsuming a plant driven by an actuator unit. The novelty of the FDI algorithm presented in this study is that it is able to discriminate failure occurring in the actuator unit, the sensor measuring the output of the actuator unit, and the plant driven by the actuator unit. The proposed FDI algorithm exploits the measurement of the actuator unit output together with its estimates generated by open-loop (OL) and closed-loop (CL) estimators to enable FDI at the component's level. In this study, the OL estimator is designed based on the system identification of the actuator unit. The CL estimator, which is guaranteed to be stable against variations in the plant, is synthesized based on the dynamics of the entire cascade system. The viability of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated using a hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HILS), which shows that it can detect and identify target failures reliably in the presence of plant uncertainties.

  2. SU-E-T-495: Neutron Induced Electronics Failure Rate Analysis for a Single Room Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, N; DeWees, T; Klein, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the failure rate as a function of neutron dose of the range modulator's servo motor controller system (SMCS) while shielded with Borated Polyethylene (BPE) and unshielded in a single room proton accelerator. Methods: Two experimental setups were constructed using two servo motor controllers and two motors. Each SMCS was then placed 30 cm from the end of the plugged proton accelerator applicator. The motor was then turned on and observed from outside of the vault while being irradiated to known neutron doses determined from bubble detector measurements. Anytime the motor deviated from the programmed motion a failure was recorded along with the delivered dose. The experiment was repeated using 9 cm of BPE shielding surrounding the SMCS. Results: Ten SMCS failures were recorded in each experiment. The dose per monitor unit for the unshielded SMCS was 0.0211 mSv/MU and 0.0144 mSv/MU for the shielded SMCS. The mean dose to produce a failure for the unshielded SMCS was 63.5 ± 58.3 mSv versus 17.0 ±12.2 mSv for the shielded. The mean number of MUs between failures were 2297 ± 1891 MU for the unshielded SMCS and 2122 ± 1523 MU for the shielded. A Wilcoxon Signed Ranked test showed the dose between failures were significantly different (P value = 0.044) while the number of MUs between failures were not (P value = 1.000). Statistical analysis determined a SMCS neutron dose of 5.3 mSv produces a 5% chance of failure. Depending on the workload and location of the SMCS, this failure rate could impede clinical workflow. Conclusion: BPE shielding was shown to not reduce the average failure of the SMCS and relocation of the system outside of the accelerator vault was required to lower the failure rate enough to avoid impeding clinical work flow.

  3. Aging behavior, reliability, and failure physics of GaN-based optoelectronic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanoni, Enrico; Meneghini, Matteo; Meneghesso, Gaudenzio; De Santi, Carlo; La Grassa, Marco; Buffolo, Matteo; Trivellin, Nicola; Monti, Desiree

    2016-03-01

    This paper critically reviews the most relevant failure modes and mechanisms of InGaN LEDs for lighting application. At chip level, both the epitaxial heterostructure and the ohmic contacts may be affected. This may result in: (i) the formation of defects within the active region, resulting in the increase of non-radiative recombination and leakage current, (ii) the reduction of the injection efficiency consequent to increased trap-assisted tunneling, (iii) the degradation of contact resistance with increase of forward voltage. Package-related failures - not described in this paper - include (iv) thermally-activated degradation processes, affecting the yellow phosphors, the plastic package or the encapsulating materials and (v) darkening of the Ag package reflective coating, the latter due to chemical reaction with contaminants as Cl or S. In order to enucleate and study the different physical failure mechanisms governing device degradation, single quantum well (SQW) blue LEDs, InGaN laser structures and commercially-available white LEDs to high temperature and/or high current density have been submitted to accelerated testing at high temperature and high current density.

  4. Unique failure behavior of metal/composite aircraft structural components under crash type loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.

    1990-01-01

    Failure behavior results are presented on some of the crash dynamics research conducted with concepts of aircraft elements and substructure which have not necessarily been designed or optimized for energy absorption or crash loading considerations. To achieve desired new designs which incorporate improved energy absorption capabilities often requires an understanding of how more conventional designs behave under crash type loadings. Experimental and analytical data are presented which indicate some general trends in the failure behavior of a class of composite structures which include individual fuselage frames, skeleton subfloors with stringers and floor beams but without skin covering, and subfloors with skin added to the frame-stringer arrangement. Although the behavior is complex, a strong similarity in the static/dynamic failure behavior among these structures is illustrated through photographs of the experimental results and through analytical data of generic composite structural models. It is believed that the thread of similarity in behavior is telling the designer and dynamists a great deal about what to expect in the crash behavior of these structures and can guide designs for improving the energy absorption and crash behavior of such structures.

  5. An Efficient Method to Calculate the Failure Rate of Dynamic Systems with Random Parameters using the Total Probability Theorem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-12

    using a vibratory system . Our approach can be easily extended to non-stationary Gaussian input processes. Introduction The response of a vibratory...Page 1 of 9 15IDM-0105 An Efficient Method to Calculate the Failure Rate of Dynamic Systems with Random Parameters using the Total Probability...failure rate of a linear vibratory system with random parameters excited by stationary Gaussian processes. The response of such a system is non

  6. Skeletal muscle electrical stimulation improves baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability in heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Lazzarotto Rucatti, Ananda; Jaenisch, Rodrigo Boemo; Rossato, Douglas Dalcin; Bonetto, Jéssica Hellen Poletto; Ferreira, Janaína; Xavier, Leder Leal; Sonza, Anelise; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation (ES) on the arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and cardiovascular autonomic control in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF). Male Wistar rats were designated to one of four groups: placebo sham (P-Sham, n=9), ES sham (ES-Sham, n=9), placebo CHF (P-CHF, n=9) or ES CHF (ES-CHF, n=9). The ES was adjusted at a low frequency (30 Hz), duration of 250 μs, with hold and rest time of 8s (4 weeks, 30 min/day, 5 times/week). It was applied on the gastrocnemius muscle with intensity to produce a visible muscle contraction. The rats assigned to the placebo groups performed the same procedures with the equipment turned off. The two-way ANOVA and the post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls tests (P<0.05) were used to data comparison. The BRS was higher in ES-Sham group compared to the P-Sham group and the ES-CHF group compared to the P-CHF group. ES was able to decrease heart rate sympatho-vagal modulation and peripheral sympathetic modulation in ES-CHF compared to P-CHF group. Interestingly, heart rate sympatho-vagal modulation was similar between ES-CHF and P-Sham groups. Thus, ES enhances heart rate parasympathetic modulation on heart failure (ES-CHF) compared to placebo (P-CHF), with consequent decrease of sympatho-vagal balance in the ES-CHF group compared to the P-CHF. The results show that a 4 week ES protocol in CHF rats enhances arterial BRS and cardiovascular autonomic control.

  7. Estimation of waste component-specific landfill decay rates using laboratory-scale decomposition data.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz, Florentino B; Barlaz, Morton A

    2010-06-15

    The current methane generation model used by the U.S. EPA (Landfill Gas Emissions Model) treats municipal solid waste (MSW) as a homogeneous waste with one decay rate. However, component-specific decay rates are required to evaluate the effects of changes in waste composition on methane generation. Laboratory-scale rate constants, k(lab), for the major biodegradable MSW components were used to derive field-scale decay rates (k(field)) for each waste component using the assumption that the average of the field-scale decay rates for each waste component, weighted by its composition, is equal to the bulk MSW decay rate. For an assumed bulk MSW decay rate of 0.04 yr(-1), k(field) was estimated to be 0.298, 0.171, 0.015, 0.144, 0.033, 0.02, 0.122, and 0.029 yr(-1), for grass, leaves, branches, food waste, newsprint, corrugated containers, coated paper, and office paper, respectively. The effect of landfill waste diversion programs on methane production was explored to illustrate the use of component-specific decay rates. One hundred percent diversion of yard waste and food waste reduced the year 20 methane production rate by 45%. When a landfill gas collection schedule was introduced, collectable methane was most influenced by food waste diversion at years 10 and 20 and paper diversion at year 40.

  8. Generating parity relations for detecting and identifying control system component failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Velder, Wallace E.; Massoumnia, Mohammad-Ali

    1988-01-01

    The monitoring of control system sensors and actuators for failures is presently undertaken by means of an exceptionally simple form of generalized parity relations based on a discrete-time model of the dynamics of linear, time-invariant systems. These generalized parity relations are constructed by recourse to a transfer matrix-description of the system that is additionally useful in the interpretation of their properties. Attention is given to a novel method for constructing the parity relation of minimum length that depends on the output of only a single sensor.

  9. Optimization of pharmacotherapy in chronic heart failure: is heart rate adequately addressed?

    PubMed

    Franke, Jennifer; Wolter, Jan Sebastian; Meme, Lillian; Keppler, Jeannette; Tschierschke, Ramon; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the use of beta-blockers in chronic heart failure (CHF) and the extent of heart rate reduction achieved in clinical practice and to determine differences in outcome of patients who fulfilled select inclusion criteria of the SHIFT study according to resting heart rate modulated by beta-blocker therapy. We evaluated an all-comer population of our dedicated CHF outpatient clinic between 2006 and 2010. For inclusion, individually optimized doses of guideline-recommended pharmacotherapy including beta-blockers had to be maintained for at least 3 months and routine follow-up performed at our outpatient CHF-clinic thereafter. Treatment dosages of beta-blockers, and demographic and clinical profiles including resting heart rate were assessed. The outcome of patients who fulfilled select inclusion criteria of the SHIFT study (left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤35 %, sinus rhythm, NYHA II-IV) and were followed-up for at least 1 year was stratified according to resting heart rates: ≥75 versus <75 bpm and ≥70 versus <70 bpm. The composite primary endpoint was defined as all-cause death or hospital admission for worsening heart failure during 12-month follow-up. In total, 3,181 patients were assessed in regard to treatment dosages of beta-blockers, and demographic and clinical profiles including resting heart rate. Of the overall studied population, 443 patients fulfilled all inclusion criteria and entered outcome analysis. Median observation time of survivors was 27.5 months with 1,039.7 observation-years in total. Up-titration to at least half the evidence-based target dose of beta-blockers was achieved in 69 % and full up-titration in 29 % of these patients. Patients with increased heart rates were younger, more often male, exhibited a higher NYHA functional class and lower LVEF. The primary endpoint occurred in 21 % of patients in the ≥70 bpm group versus 9 % of patients in the group with heart rates <70

  10. Potential radiological exposure rates resulting from hypothetical dome failure at Tank W-10

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The main plant area at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contains 12 buried Gunite tanks that were used for the storage and transfer of liquid radioactive waste. Although the tanks are no longer in use, they are known to contain some residual contaminated sludges and liquids. In the event of an accidental tank dome failure, however unlikely, the liquids, sludges, and radioactive contaminants within the tank walls themselves could create radiation fields and result in above-background exposures to workers nearby. This Technical Memorandum documents a series of calculations to estimate potential radiological exposure rates and total exposures to workers in the event of a hypothetical collapse of a Gunite tank dome. Calculations were performed specifically for tank W-10 because it contains the largest radioactivity inventory (approximately half of the total activity) of all the Gunite tanks. These calculations focus only on external, direct gamma exposures for prescribed, hypothetical exposure scenarios and do not address other possible tank failure modes or routes of exposure. The calculations were performed with established, point-kernel gamma ray modeling codes.

  11. Rate-dependent activation failure in isolated cardiac cells and tissue due to Na+ channel block

    PubMed Central

    Spindler, Anthony J.; Paterson, David; Noble, Denis

    2015-01-01

    While it is well established that class-I antiarrhythmics block cardiac sodium channels, the mechanism of action of therapeutic levels of these drugs is not well understood. Using a combination of mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments, we studied the failure of activation of action potentials in single ventricular cells and in tissue caused by Na+ channel block. Our computations of block and unblock of sodium channels by a theoretical class-Ib antiarrhythmic agent predict differences in the concentrations required to cause activation failure in single cells as opposed to multicellular preparations. We tested and confirmed these in silico predictions with in vitro experiments on isolated guinea-pig ventricular cells and papillary muscles stimulated at various rates (2–6.67 Hz) and exposed to various concentrations (5 × 10−6 to 500 × 10−6 mol/l) of lidocaine. The most salient result was that whereas large doses (5 × 10−4 mol/l or higher) of lidocaine were required to inhibit action potentials temporarily in single cells, much lower doses (5 × 10−6 mol/l), i.e., therapeutic levels, were sufficient to have the same effect in papillary muscles: a hundredfold difference. Our experimental results and mathematical analysis indicate that the syncytial nature of cardiac tissue explains the effects of clinically relevant doses of Na+ channel blockers. PMID:26342072

  12. Allograft tissue irradiation and failure rate after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Dashe, Jesse; Parisien, Robert L; Cusano, Antonio; Curry, Emily J; Bedi, Asheesh; Li, Xinning

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft irradiation is effective for sterility without compromising graft integrity and increasing failure rate. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane, and Google. The following search terms were used: “Gamma irradiation AND anterior cruciate ligament AND allograft” with a return of 30 items. Filters used included: English language, years 1990-2015. There were 6 hits that were not reviewed, as there were only abstracts available. Another 5 hits were discarded, as they did not pertain to the topic of interest. There were 9 more articles that were excluded: Three studies were performed on animals and 6 studies were meta-analyses. Therefore, a total of 10 articles were applicable to review. RESULTS: There is a delicate dosing crossover where gamma irradiation is both effective for sterility without catastrophically compromising the structural integrity of the graft. Of note, low dose irradiation is considered less than 2.0 Mrad, moderate dose is between 2.1-2.4 Mrad, and high dose is greater than or equal to 2.5 Mrad. Based upon the results of the literature search, the optimal threshold for sterilization was found to be sterilization at less than 2.2 Mrad of gamma irradiation with the important caveat of being performed at low temperatures. The graft selection process also must include thorough donor screening and testing as well as harvesting the tissue in a sterile fashion. Utilization of higher dose (≥ 2.5 Mrad) of irradiation causes greater allograft tissue laxity that results in greater graft failure rate clinically in patients after ACL reconstruction. CONCLUSION: Allograft ACL graft gamma irradiated with less than 2.2 Mrad appears to be a reasonable alternative to autograft for patients above 25 years of age. PMID:27335815

  13. Identifying Differences Between Biochemical Failure and Cure: Incidence Rates and Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank A.; Shah, Chirag; Kestin, Larry; Ghilezan, Mihai; Krauss, Daniel; Ye Hong; Brabbins, Donald; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2011-11-15

    Background: Patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer were evaluated to estimate the length of time required to document biochemical cure (BC) after treatment and the variables associated with long-term treatment efficacy. Patients and Methods: 2,100 patients received RT alone for localized prostate carcinoma (external-beam RT, n = 1,504; brachytherapy alone, n = 241; or brachytherapy + pelvic radiation, n = 355). The median external-beam dose was 68.4 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Biochemical failure (BF) was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Results: Biochemical failure was experienced by 685 patients (32.6%). The median times to BF for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 6.0, 5.6, and 4.5 years respectively (p < 0.001). The average annual incidence rates of BF for years 1-5, 5-10,11-15, and 16-20 in low-risk patients were 2.0%, 2.0%, 0.3%, and 0.06% (p < 0.001); for intermediate-risk patients, 4%, 3%, 0.3%, and 0% (p < 0.001); and for high-risk patients, 10.0%, 5.0%, 0.3%, and 0.3% (p < 0.001). After 5 years of treatment, 36.9% of all patients experienced BF. The percentage of total failures occurring during years 1-5, 5-10, 11-15, and 16-20 were 48.7%, 43.5%, 6.5%, and 1.3% for low-risk patients; 64.0%, 32.2%, 3.8%, and 0% for intermediate-risk patients; and 71.9%, 25.9%, 1.1%, and 1.1% for high-risk patients, respectively. Increasing time to nadir was associated with increased time to BF. On multivariate analysis, factors significantly associated with 10-year BC included prostate-specific antigen nadir and time to nadir. Conclusions: The incidence rates for BF did not plateau until later than 10 years after treatment, suggesting that extended follow-up time is required to monitor patients after treatment. Prostate-specific antigen nadir and time to nadir have the strongest association with long-term BC.

  14. Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire Utility in Prediction of 30-Day Readmission Rate in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Junhong; Zhu, Xiang; Malhotra, Divyanshu; Li, Shenjing; Virkram, Fnu; Chada, Aditya; Jiang, Haibing

    2016-01-01

    Background. Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common diagnoses associated with hospital readmission. We designed this prospective study to evaluate whether Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) score is associated with 30-day readmission in patients hospitalized with decompensated HF. Methods and Results. We enrolled 240 patients who met the study criteria. Forty-eight (20%) patients were readmitted for decompensated HF within thirty days of hospital discharge, and 192 (80%) patients were not readmitted. Compared to readmitted patients, nonreadmitted patients had a higher average KCCQ score (40.8 versus 32.6, P = 0.019) before discharge. Multivariate analyses showed that a high KCCQ score was associated with low HF readmission rate (adjusted OR = 0.566, P = 0.022). The c-statistic for the base model (age + gender) was 0.617. The combination of home medication and lab tests on the base model resulted in an integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) increase of 3.9%. On that basis, the KCQQ further increased IDI of 2.7%. Conclusions. The KCCQ score determined before hospital discharge was significantly associated with 30-day readmission rate in patients with HF, which may provide a clinically useful measure and could significantly improve readmission prediction reliability when combined with other clinical components. PMID:27872790

  15. The Effect of Sensor Failure on the Attitude and Rate Estimation of MAP Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    2003-01-01

    This work describes two algorithms for computing the angular rate and attitude in case of a gyro and a Star Tracker failure in the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) satellite, which was placed in the L2 parking point from where it collects data to determine the origin of the universe. The nature of the problem is described, two algorithms are suggested, an observability study is carried out and real MAP data are used to determine the merit of the algorithms. It is shown that one of the algorithms yields a good estimate of the rates but not of the attitude whereas the other algorithm yields a good estimate of the rate as well as two of the three attitude angles. The estimation of the third angle depends on the initial state estimate. There is a contradiction between this result and the outcome of the observability analysis. An explanation of this contradiction is given in the paper. Although this work treats a particular spacecraft, its conclusions are more general.

  16. Systematic Characterization of Component Failures for the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, P.I.

    1999-08-01

    A fusion reactor will be a fairly complex system consisting of many components. All the components are required to work in order to produce a plasma and control it. Some of the components will be large, and for economic reasons there will not be spares for all components. It is therefore important to have a system whereby troubles are communicated, recorded and analyzed. Such a trouble report system has been in place at the DIII-D tokamak facility for many years. The purpose of the system is to easily facilitate communication between the people that discover problems and those that fix the problems. The trouble sheets are logged into a computer database that is used to characterize the kind of problems that the facility experiences, and determine which equipment, software, or human errors are causing significant downtime. The information is also used to evaluate whether sufficient maintenance is done to the equipment and to provide a basis for replacing it. The original system was based on paper forms. About a year ago the system was changed to a web-based system. In the new system a trouble report is filled out using a web browser, and the information is emailed to the repair personnel and managers as soon as the form is submitted through the web. The paper will discuss the problems experienced at the DIII-D facility, and how the information is used to adjust the preventive maintenance schedule.

  17. Heart rate variability (HRV) in kidney failure: measurement and consequences of reduced HRV.

    PubMed

    Ranpuria, Reena; Hall, Martica; Chan, Chris T; Unruh, Mark

    2008-02-01

    A common cause of death in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on dialysis is sudden cardiac death (SCD). Compared to the general population, the percentage of cardiovascular deaths that are attributed to SCD is higher in patients treated by dialysis. While coronary artery disease (CAD) is the predominant cause of SCD in dialysis patients, reduced heart rate variability (HRV) may play a role in the higher risk of SCD among other risk factors. HRV refers to beat-to-beat alterations in heart rate as measured by periodic variation in the R-R interval. HRV provides a non-invasive method for investigating autonomic input into the heart. It quantifies the amount by which the R-R interval or heart rate changes from one cardiac cycle to the next. The autonomic nervous system transmits impulses from the central nervous system to peripheral organs and is responsible for controlling the heart rate, blood pressure and respiratory activity. In normal individuals, without cardiac disease, the heart rate has a high degree of beat-to-beat variability. HRV fluctuates with respiration: it increases with inspiration and decreases with expiration and is primarily mediated by parasympathetic activity. HRV has been used to evaluate and quantify the cardiac risk associated with a variety of conditions including cardiac disorders, stroke, multiple sclerosis and diabetes. In this narrative review, we will examine the association between HRV and SCD. This report explains the measurement of HRV and the consequences of reduced HRV in the general population and dialysis patients. Lastly, this review will outline the possible use of HRV as a clinical predictor for SCD in the dialysis population. The current understanding of SCD based on HRV findings among the ESRD population support the use of more aggressive treatment of CAD; greater use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and beta-blockers and more frequent and/or nocturnal haemodialysis

  18. Failure of Ductile Materials and Components at High Rates of Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-16

    a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM- YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES...theoretical effort in understanding the localization of plastic defor- mation has been based on Hill’s general theory of bifurcation. A summary of this... theory has been given by Hill (Muskhelishvili Anniversary Volume 1961). Hill and Hutchinson (Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 1975) have

  19. A mesoscopic reaction rate model for shock initiation of multi-component PBX explosives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y R; Duan, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Ou, Z C; Huang, F L

    2016-11-05

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a three-term mesoscopic reaction rate model that consists of a hot-spot ignition, a low-pressure slow burning and a high-pressure fast reaction terms for shock initiation of multi-component Plastic Bonded Explosives (PBX). Thereinto, based on the DZK hot-spot model for a single-component PBX explosive, the hot-spot ignition term as well as its reaction rate is obtained through a "mixing rule" of the explosive components; new expressions for both the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term are also obtained by establishing the relationships between the reaction rate of the multi-component PBX explosive and that of its explosive components, based on the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term of a mesoscopic reaction rate model. Furthermore, for verification, the new reaction rate model is incorporated into the DYNA2D code to simulate numerically the shock initiation process of the PBXC03 and the PBXC10 multi-component PBX explosives, and the numerical results of the pressure histories at different Lagrange locations in explosive are found to be in good agreements with previous experimental data.

  20. Failure stress criterion for adhesively bonded joint at different strain rates by using dynamic Arcan test device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Ludovic; Bourel, Benjamin; Lauro, Franck; Haugou, Gregory; Leconte, Nicolas; Carrere, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the failure criterion evolution of assembly bonded with a strain rate dependent adhesive. A new modified ARCAN device is then designed to obtain the average stress at failure under different loading angles and for strain up to 350 s-1. Tests are performed on a hydraulic jack machine and a Digital Image Correlation measurement is used to control the opening and the sliding displacements of the two substrates.

  1. Using Roadside Billboard Posters to Increase Admission Rates to Problem Gambling Services: Reflections on Failure.

    PubMed

    Calderwood, Kimberly A; Wellington, William J

    2015-07-01

    Based on the stimulus-response model of advertising, this study sought to increase admission rates to a local problem gambling service (PGS) in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, by adding a series of locally based 10 foot by 20 foot roadside billboard posters to PGS's existing communications tools for a 24-week period. Using proof of performance reports, a pre-post survey of new callers to PGS, a website visit counter, and a media awareness survey, the findings showed that at least some individuals were influenced by billboard exposure, but admission rates continued to decline during the billboard campaign period. While one possible explanation for the communications failure was that the whole PGS communications campaign was below the minimal threshold for communications perception, another possible explanation is that the stimulus-response model of advertising used may not have been appropriate for such advertising that targets behavior change. Reflections on using an information-processing model instead of a stimulus-response model, and considerations of a two-step flow of communication, are provided. Recommendations are made regarding matching communications messages to stages of behavior change, use of online promotion, and strategies for future research.

  2. Typical-use contraceptive failure rates in 43 countries with Demographic and Health Survey data: summary of a detailed report

    PubMed Central

    Polis, Chelsea B.; Bradley, Sarah E.K.; Bankole, Akinrinola; Onda, Tsuyoshi; Croft, Trevor; Singh, Susheela

    2016-01-01

    Background While most unintended pregnancies occur because couples do not use contraception, contraceptive failure is also an important underlying cause. However, few recent studies outside of the United States have estimated contraceptive failure rates, and most such studies have been restricted to married women, to a limited number of countries and to 12-month failure rate estimates. Methods Using self-reported data from 43 countries with Demographic and Health Survey data, we estimated typical-use contraceptive failure rates for seven contraceptive methods at 12, 24 and 36 months of use. We provide a median estimate for each method across 43 countries overall, in seven subregions and in individual countries. We assess differences by various demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Estimates are not corrected for potential errors in retrospective reporting contraceptive use or potential underreporting of abortion, which may vary by country and subgroups within countries. Results Across all included countries, reported 12-month typical-use failure rates were lowest for users of longer-acting methods such as implants (0.6 failures per 100 episodes of use), intrauterine devices (1.4) and injectables (1.7); intermediate for users of short-term resupply methods such as oral contraceptive pills (5.5) and male condoms (5.4); and highest for users of traditional methods such as withdrawal (13.4) or periodic abstinence (13.9), a group largely using calendar rhythm. Conclusions Our findings help us to highlight those methods, subregions and population groups that may be in need of particular attention for improvements in policies and programs to address higher contraceptive failure rates. PMID:27018154

  3. Review and Analysis of Existing Mobile Phone Apps to Support Heart Failure Symptom Monitoring and Self-Care Management Using the Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS)

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Mathew S; Reading, Meghan; Hiraldo, Grenny; Hickey, Kathleen T; Iribarren, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure is the most common cause of hospital readmissions among Medicare beneficiaries and these hospitalizations are often driven by exacerbations in common heart failure symptoms. Patient collaboration with health care providers and decision making is a core component of increasing symptom monitoring and decreasing hospital use. Mobile phone apps offer a potentially cost-effective solution for symptom monitoring and self-care management at the point of need. Objective The purpose of this review of commercially available apps was to identify and assess the functionalities of patient-facing mobile health apps targeted toward supporting heart failure symptom monitoring and self-care management. Methods We searched 3 Web-based mobile app stores using multiple terms and combinations (eg, “heart failure,” “cardiology,” “heart failure and self-management”). Apps meeting inclusion criteria were evaluated using the Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS), IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics functionality scores, and Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA) guidelines for nonpharmacologic management. Apps were downloaded and assessed independently by 2-4 reviewers, interclass correlations between reviewers were calculated, and consensus was met by discussion. Results Of 3636 potentially relevant apps searched, 34 met inclusion criteria. Most apps were excluded because they were unrelated to heart failure, not in English or Spanish, or were games. Interrater reliability between reviewers was high. AskMD app had the highest average MARS total (4.9/5). More than half of the apps (23/34, 68%) had acceptable MARS scores (>3.0). Heart Failure Health Storylines (4.6) and AskMD (4.5) had the highest scores for behavior change. Factoring MARS, functionality, and HFSA guideline scores, the highest performing apps included Heart Failure Health Storylines, Symple, ContinuousCare Health App, WebMD, and AskMD. Peer-reviewed publications were identified

  4. The Creeping Pearl: Why Has the Rate of Contraceptive Failure Increased in Clinical Trials of Combined Hormonal Contraceptive Pills?

    PubMed Central

    Trussell, James; Portman, David

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite several drawbacks, the Pearl Index continues to be the most widely used statistical measure of contraceptive failure. However, Pearl indices reported in studies of newer hormonal contraceptives appear to be increasing. STUDY DESIGN We searched PubMed and MIS databases for prospective trials evaluating oral contraceptive (OC) efficacy to examine potential factors that could contribute to increasing Pearl indices. RESULTS Numerous potential factors were identified, including an increased rate of failures of newer OCs, deficiencies in methods of calculating contraceptive failure rates, differences in study design and changes in patient populations resulting in increased rates of contraceptive failures due to the inappropriate or inconsistent use of the method. CONCLUSIONS The two most likely important contributors to the increase in Pearl indices are more frequent pregnancy testing with more sensitive tests and less adherent study populations. Because study populations appear to be increasingly representative of the likely actual users once the product is marketed, we can expect to see even higher failure rates in ongoing and future studies. This result poses challenges for companies and regulatory agencies. PMID:23683581

  5. Prognostic significance of heart rate turbulence parameters in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study is aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of heart rate turbulence (HRT) parameters in predicting the prognosis in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods From June 2011 to December 2012, a total of 104 CHF patients and 30 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. We obtained a 24-hour Holter ECG recording to assess the HRT parameters, included turbulence onset (TO), turbulence slope (TS), standard deviation of N-N intervals (SDNN), and resting heart rate (RHR). The relationships between HRT parameters and the prognosis of CHF patients were determined. Results The assessment follow-up period lasted until January 31, 2013. The overall mortality of CHF patients was 9.6% (10/104). Our results revealed that CHF patients had higher levels of TO than those of healthy subjects, but the TS levels of CHF patients were lower than that of the control group. CHF patients with NYHA grade IV had higher HRT1/2 rate than those with NYHA grade II/III. There were statistical differences in TS, LVEF, SDNN and RHR between the non-deteriorating group and the non-survivor group. Significant differences in TS among the three groups were also found. Furthermore, CHF patients in the non-survivor group had lower levels of TS than those in the deteriorating group. Correlation analyses indicated that TO negatively correlate with SDNN, while TS positively correlated with SDNN and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). We also observed negative correlations between TS and left ventricular end-diastolic cavity dimension (LVEDD), RHR, homocysteine (Hcy) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Multivariate Cox regression analysis further confirmed that LVEF (≤30%), HRT2, SDNN and RHR were independent risk factors which can indicate poor prognosis in CHF patients. Conclusions Our findings indicate that HRT may have good clinical predictive value in patients with CHF. Thus, quantifying HRT parameters could be a useful tool for predicting mortality in CHF

  6. A method for intermediate strain rate compression testing and study of compressive failure mechanism of Mg-Al-Zn alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Luong, Dung D.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2011-05-01

    Obtaining meaningful information from the test results is a challenge in the split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) test method if the specimen does not fail during the test. Although SHPB method is now widely used for high strain rate testing, this limitation has made it difficult to use it for characterization of materials in the intermediate strain rate range (typically 10-1000 s-1). In the present work, a method is developed to characterize materials in the intermediate strain rate range using SHPB setup. In this method, the specimen is repeatedly tested under compression at a given strain rate until failure is achieved. The stress-strain graphs obtained from each test cycle are used to plot the master stress-strain graph for that strain rate. This method is used to study the strain rate dependence of compressive response of a Mg-Al-Zn alloy in the intermediate strain rate range. A remarkable difference is observed in the failure mechanism of the alloy under quasi-static and intermediate strain rate compression. Matrix cracking is the main failure mechanism under quasi-static compression, whereas shattering of intermetallic precipitates, along with plastic deformation of the matrix, is discovered to become prominent as the strain rate is increased.

  7. High-rate laser metal deposition of Inconel 718 component using low heat-input approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, C. Y.; Scudamore, R. J.; Allen, J.

    Currently many aircraft and aero engine components are machined from billets or oversize forgings. This involves significant cost, material wastage, lead-times and environmental impacts. Methods to add complex features to another component or net-shape surface would offer a substantial cost benefit. Laser Metal Deposition (LMD), currently being applied to the repair of worn or damaged aero engine components, was attempted in this work as an alternative process route, to build features onto a base component, because of its low heat input capability. In this work, low heat input and high-rate deposition was developed to deposit Inconel 718 powder onto thin plates. Using the optimised process parameters, a number of demonstrator components were successfully fabricated.

  8. Digitally modulated bit error rate measurement system for microwave component evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, Mary Jo W.; Budinger, James M.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed a unique capability for evaluation of the microwave components of a digital communication system. This digitally modulated bit-error-rate (BER) measurement system (DMBERMS) features a continuous data digital BER test set, a data processor, a serial minimum shift keying (SMSK) modem, noise generation, and computer automation. Application of the DMBERMS has provided useful information for the evaluation of existing microwave components and of design goals for future components. The design and applications of this system for digitally modulated BER measurements are discussed.

  9. The Performance of Short-Term Heart Rate Variability in the Detection of Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Allan Kardec; Ohnishi, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a cardiac disease associated with the decreasing capacity of the cardiac output. It has been shown that the CHF is the main cause of the cardiac death around the world. Some works proposed to discriminate CHF subjects from healthy subjects using either electrocardiogram (ECG) or heart rate variability (HRV) from long-term recordings. In this work, we propose an alternative framework to discriminate CHF from healthy subjects by using HRV short-term intervals based on 256 RR continuous samples. Our framework uses a matching pursuit algorithm based on Gabor functions. From the selected Gabor functions, we derived a set of features that are inputted into a hybrid framework which uses a genetic algorithm and k-nearest neighbour classifier to select a subset of features that has the best classification performance. The performance of the framework is analyzed using both Fantasia and CHF database from Physionet archives which are, respectively, composed of 40 healthy volunteers and 29 subjects. From a set of nonstandard 16 features, the proposed framework reaches an overall accuracy of 100% with five features. Our results suggest that the application of hybrid frameworks whose classifier algorithms are based on genetic algorithms has outperformed well-known classifier methods. PMID:27891509

  10. Deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate associated with heart failure with high discriminating performance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Jin, Xian; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Qiang; Yin, Guizhi; Lu, Yi; Xiao, Hongbing; Chen, Yueguang; Zhang, Dadong

    2016-03-23

    Accurate measurements of autonomic nerve regulation in heart failure (HF) were unresolved. The discriminating performance of deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate in HF was evaluated in 130 HF patients and 212 controls. Acceleration capacity and deceleration capacity were independent risk factors for HF in males, evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis, with odds ratios (ORs) of 5.94 and 0.13, respectively. Acceleration capacity was also an independent risk factor for HF in females, with an OR of 8.58. Deceleration capacity was the best cardiac electrophysiological index to classify HF in males, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.88. Deceleration capacity was the best classification factor of HF in females with an AUC of 0.97, significantly higher than even left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Acceleration capacity also showed high performance in classifying HF in males (0.84) and females (0.92). The cut-off values of deceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were 4.55 ms and 4.85 ms, respectively. The cut-off values of acceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were -6.15 ms and -5.75 ms, respectively. Our study illustrates the role of acceleration and deceleration capacity measurements in the neuro-pathophysiology of HF.

  11. Deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate associated with heart failure with high discriminating performance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Jin, Xian; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Qiang; Yin, Guizhi; Lu, Yi; Xiao, Hongbing; Chen, Yueguang; Zhang, Dadong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurements of autonomic nerve regulation in heart failure (HF) were unresolved. The discriminating performance of deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate in HF was evaluated in 130 HF patients and 212 controls. Acceleration capacity and deceleration capacity were independent risk factors for HF in males, evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis, with odds ratios (ORs) of 5.94 and 0.13, respectively. Acceleration capacity was also an independent risk factor for HF in females, with an OR of 8.58. Deceleration capacity was the best cardiac electrophysiological index to classify HF in males, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.88. Deceleration capacity was the best classification factor of HF in females with an AUC of 0.97, significantly higher than even left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Acceleration capacity also showed high performance in classifying HF in males (0.84) and females (0.92). The cut-off values of deceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were 4.55 ms and 4.85 ms, respectively. The cut-off values of acceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were −6.15 ms and −5.75 ms, respectively. Our study illustrates the role of acceleration and deceleration capacity measurements in the neuro-pathophysiology of HF. PMID:27005970

  12. Executive function moderates the relationship between depressive symptoms and resting heart rate variability in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gathright, Emily C; Walter, Fawn A; Hawkins, Misty A W; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Hughes, Joel W; Gunstad, John

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with high rates of depression. In turn, depression is associated with reduced heart rate variability (HRV), a marker of parasympathetic dysfunction and poorer cardiac outcomes. Cognitive impairment--especially executive dysfunction--is also highly prevalent in HF, but it is unknown whether executive function (EF) impacts the depression-HRV relationship. The primary objective of this paper is to examine whether EF moderates the relationship between depression and HRV in HF. Participants were 109 HF patients. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory-II. EF was assessed using a composite of age-adjusted T scores on the Frontal Assessment Battery, Trail Making Test B, and Stroop Color Word subtest. Parasympathetic function was assessed using resting high frequency HRV (HF-HRV). Multiple hierarchical regression was used to conduct BDI × EF moderation analyses. BDI scores were associated with reduced resting HF-HRV (p < .05). No main effects were detected between EF and resting HF-HRV (p > .05). However, EF moderated the relationship between BDI scores and resting HF-HRV (β = 0.59, p < .01). Simple slope analyses revealed that among participants with poorer EF, higher BDI scores were associated with lower resting HF-HRV (p < .001). Structural brain changes common in HF may contribute to lower EF, increased depression, and poorer autonomic functioning. Alternatively, the results may indicate that individuals with intact EF engage in self-care strategies that negate the detrimental impact of depression on autonomic function. Additional work is needed to clarify these possibilities and the potential benefits of treating depression in HF patients with different cognitive abilities.

  13. An analysis of the SEU rate of microcircuits exposed by the various components of space radiation.

    PubMed

    Bashkirov, V F; Kuznetsov, N V; Nymmik, R A

    1999-06-01

    In the present paper the experimental and calculated data of SEU rate in microcircuits operating onboard spacecraft are compared. The main features of models and the calculation methods, which are incorporated in the SEREIS software package, are considered. The main features of models, and the calculation methods are considered. The contribution of the different space radiation components (ERB Protons; GCR particles and SEPs) to the SEU rate is discussed with an allowance for the shielding thickness.

  14. Graft Rejection Rate and Graft Failure Rate of Penetrating Keratoplasty (PKP) vs Lamellar Procedures: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Akanda, Zarique Z.; Naeem, Abdul; Russell, Elizabeth; Belrose, Jillian; Si, Francie F.; Hodge, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of our investigation was to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis of the present world literature comparing the major surgical outcomes of penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) to lamellar procedures. Our goal is that clinicians, eye bank administrators, and health policy makers will be able to utilize this study in implementing decisions in regards to corneal transplantation. Methods Pooled measures of association were with odds ratios and because of study heterogeneity, the pooled effects were assumed to follow a random effects model (DerSimonian-Laird). The comparisons were between 1) PKP’s and all lamellar procedures (anterior AND posterior) and then 2) between PKP’s and all anterior lamellar procedures and 3) PKP and all posterior lamellar procedures. Results For PKP vs anterior lamellar procedures, the pooled odds ratio for rejection of PKP over lamellar keratoplasty (LK) was 3.56 (95% CI: 1.76-7.20) and for outright failure, the pooled odds ratio of PKP failure vs LK was 2.85 (95% CI: 0.84-9.66). For posterior lamellar procedures, the pooled odds ratio for rejection of PKP over LK was 1.52 (95% CI: 1.00-2.32). The pooled odds ratio for outright failure of PKP over posterior lamellar procedures was 2.09 (95% CI: 0.57-7.59). The follow up time was significantly longer for full transplants than for lamellar procedures. Conclusions For both anterior and posterior lamellar procedures, the odds ratios comparing rejection of full transplants to lamellar procedures (both anterior and posterior individually) were significantly higher in the PKP group. For outright failure, the PKP group also had a higher risk of failure than the lamellar groups but this was not statistically significant in either instance (anterior or posterior). Some of the clinical differences benefitting lamellar procedures may at least be partly explained by follow up time differences between groups and this needs to be accounted for more rigorously in future studies. PMID:25781319

  15. Pyrolysis characteristics of organic components of municipal solid waste at high heating rates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiao; Jin, Yu-Qi; Chi, Yong; Wen, Jun-Ming; Jiang, Xu-Guang; Ni, Ming-Jiang

    2009-03-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics of six representative organic components of municipal solid waste (MSW) and their mixtures were studied in a specially designed thermogravimetric analysis apparatus with a maximum recorded heating rate of 864.8 degrees Cmin(-1). The pyrolysis behavior of individual components was described by the Avrami-Erofeev equation. The influence of final temperature on individual components was studied, and it was concluded that final temperature was a factor in reaction speed and intensity, but that it played only a limited role in determining the reaction mechanism. The interactions between different components were evaluated, and it was concluded that the interaction between homogeneous materials was minimal, whereas the interaction between polyethylene and biomass was significant.

  16. Plerixafor as preemptive strategy results in high success rates in autologous stem cell mobilization failure.

    PubMed

    Worel, Nina; Fritsch, Gerhard; Agis, Hermine; Böhm, Alexandra; Engelich, Georg; Leitner, Gerda C; Geissler, Klaus; Gleixner, Karoline; Kalhs, Peter; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Keil, Felix; Kopetzky, Gerhard; Mayr, Viktor; Rabitsch, Werner; Reisner, Regina; Rosskopf, Konrad; Ruckser, Reinhard; Zoghlami, Claudia; Zojer, Niklas; Greinix, Hildegard T

    2016-08-31

    Plerixafor in combination with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is approved for autologous stem cell mobilization in poor mobilizing patients with multiple myeloma or malignant lymphoma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate efficacy and safety of plerixafor in an immediate rescue approach, administrated subsequently to G-CSF alone or chemotherapy and G-CSF in patients at risk for mobilization failure. Eighty-five patients mobilized with G-CSF alone or chemotherapy were included. Primary endpoint was the efficacy of the immediate rescue approach of plerixafor to achieve ≥2.0 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg for a single or ≥5 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg for a double transplantation and potential differences between G-CSF and chemotherapy-based mobilization. Secondary objectives included comparison of stem cell graft composition including CD34(+) cell and lymphocyte subsets with regard to the mobilization regimen applied. No significant adverse events were recorded. A median 3.9-fold increase in CD34(+) cells following plerixafor was observed, resulting in 97% patients achieving at least ≥2 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. Significantly more differentiated granulocyte and monocyte forming myeloid progenitors were collected after chemomobilization whereas more CD19(+) and natural killer cells were collected after G-CSF. Fifty-two patients underwent transplantation showing rapid and durable engraftment, irrespectively of the stem cell mobilization regimen used. The addition of plerixafor in an immediate rescue model is efficient and safe after both, G-CSF and chemomobilization and results in extremely high success rates. Whether the differences in graft composition have a clinical impact on engraftment kinetics, immunologic recovery, and graft durability have to be analysed in larger prospective studies.

  17. Impact of Dose on Local Failure Rates After Image-Guided Reirradiation of Recurrent Paraspinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Damast, Shari; Wright, Jean; Bilsky, Mark; Hsu, Meier; Zhang Zhigang; Lovelock, Michael; Cox, Brett; Zatcky, Joan; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the impact of dose on local failure (LF) rates in the re-treatment of recurrent paraspinal metastases with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). Methods and Materials: The records of patients with in-field recurrence after previous spine radiation (median dose, 30 Gy) who received salvage IG-IMRT with either five 4-Gy (20-Gy group, n = 42) or five 6-Gy (30-Gy group, n = 55) daily fractions between January 2003 and August 2008 were reviewed. Institutional practice was 20 Gy before April 2006, when it changed to 30 Gy. A total of 47 cases (48%) were treated adjuvantly, after surgery to decompress epidural disease. LF after IG-IMRT was defined radiographically. Results: The median follow-up was 12.1 months (range, 0.2-63.6 months). The 1-year cumulative incidences of LF after 20 Gy and 30 Gy IG-IMRT were 45% and 26%, respectively (p = 0.04). Of all treatment characteristics examined (20-Gy vs. 30-Gy dose group, dose to 95% of the planned and gross target volume, tumor size, histology, receipt of surgery, and interval between first and second radiation), only dose group had a significant impact on actuarial LF incidence (p = 0.04; unadjusted HR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.27-0.96). There was no incidence of myelopathy. Conclusions: A significant decrease in LF after IG-IMRT with five 6-Gy fractions compared with five 4-Gy fractions was observed without increased risk of myelopathy. Until prospective data comparing stereotactic hypofractionated and single-fraction regimens become available, when reirradiating recurrent paraspinal metastases with IG-IMRT, administration of five 6-Gy daily fractions is reasonable.

  18. Analysis of Shock and High-Rate Data for Ceramics: Strength and Failure of Brittle Solids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    Fracture Damage............................................................................... 31 Residual Projectile Velocity... Fracture ............................................................................................ 36 VI Closure...Project No. 17168 2 exploration of ceramic strength in the ballistic event – in particular the failure, or fracture , wave phenomena. Another objective is

  19. Ejaculate components delay reproductive senescence while elevating female reproductive rate in an insect.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Klaus; Naylor, Richard A; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2009-12-22

    Increased female reproductive rates usually result in accelerated senescence. This correlation provides a link between the evolutionary conflict of the sexes and aging when ejaculate components elevate female reproductive rates at the cost of future reproduction. It is not clear whether this female cost is manifest as shorter lifespan or an earlier onset or a steeper rate of reproductive senescence. It also is unclear whether beneficial ejaculates release females from reproductive trade-offs and, if so, which senescence parameters are affected. We examined these issues in the bedbug, Cimex lectularius, a long-lived insect that shows reduced female lifespan as well as female reproductive senescence at the male-determined mating frequency. We demonstrate experimentally that, independently of the mating frequency, females receiving more ejaculate show increased reproductive rates and enter reproductive senescence later than females receiving less ejaculate. The rate of reproductive senescence did not differ between treatments, and reproductive rates did not predict mortality. The ejaculate effects were consistent in inter- and intra-population crosses, suggesting they have not evolved recently and are not caused by inbreeding. Our results suggest that ejaculate components compensate for the costs of elevated female reproductive rates in bedbugs by delaying the onset of reproductive senescence. Ejaculate components that are beneficial to polyandrous females could have arisen because male traits that protect the ejaculate have positive pleiotropic effects and/or because female counteradaptations to antagonistic male traits exceed the neutralization of those traits. That males influence female reproductive senescence has important consequences for trade-offs between reproduction and longevity and for studies of somatic senescence.

  20. The second Sandia Fracture Challenge. Predictions of ductile failure under quasi-static and moderate-rate dynamic loading

    DOE PAGES

    Boyce, B. L.; Kramer, S. L. B.; Bosiljevac, T. R.; ...

    2016-03-14

    Ductile failure of structural metals is relevant to a wide range of engineering scenarios. Computational methods are employed to anticipate the critical conditions of failure, yet they sometimes provide inaccurate and misleading predictions. Challenge scenarios, such as the one presented in the current work, provide an opportunity to assess the blind, quantitative predictive ability of simulation methods against a previously unseen failure problem. Instead of evaluating the predictions of a single simulation approach, the Sandia Fracture Challenge relied on numerous volunteer teams with expertise in computational mechanics to apply a broad range of computational methods, numerical algorithms, and constitutive modelsmore » to the challenge. This exercise is intended to evaluate the state of health of technologies available for failure prediction. In the first Sandia Fracture Challenge, a wide range of issues were raised in ductile failure modeling, including a lack of consistency in failure models, the importance of shear calibration data, and difficulties in quantifying the uncertainty of prediction [see Boyce et al. (Int J Fract 186:5–68, 2014) for details of these observations]. This second Sandia Fracture Challenge investigated the ductile rupture of a Ti–6Al–4V sheet under both quasi-static and modest-rate dynamic loading (failure in ~ 0.1 s). Like the previous challenge, the sheet had an unusual arrangement of notches and holes that added geometric complexity and fostered a competition between tensile- and shear-dominated failure modes. The teams were asked to predict the fracture path and quantitative far-field failure metrics such as the peak force and displacement to cause crack initiation. Fourteen teams contributed blind predictions, and the experimental outcomes were quantified in three independent test labs. In addition, shortcomings were revealed in this second challenge such as inconsistency in the application of appropriate boundary

  1. The second Sandia Fracture Challenge. Predictions of ductile failure under quasi-static and moderate-rate dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, B. L.; Kramer, S. L. B.; Bosiljevac, T. R.; Corona, E.; Moore, J. A.; Elkhodary, K.; Simha, C. H. M.; Williams, B. W.; Cerrone, A. R.; Nonn, A.; Hochhalter, J. D.; Bomarito, G. F.; Warner, J. E.; Carter, B. J.; Warner, D. H.; Ingraffea, A. R.; Zhang, T.; Fang, X.; Lua, J.; Chiaruttini, V.; Mazière, M.; Feld-Payet, S.; Yastrebov, V. A.; Besson, J.; Chaboche, J. -L.; Lian, J.; Di, Y.; Wu, B.; Novokshanov, D.; Vajragupta, N.; Kucharczyk, P.; Brinnel, V.; Döbereiner, B.; Münstermann, S.; Neilsen, M. K.; Dion, K.; Karlson, K. N.; Foulk, J. W.; Brown, A. A.; Veilleux, M. G.; Bignell, J. L.; Sanborn, S. E.; Jones, C. A.; Mattie, P. D.; Pack, K.; Wierzbicki, T.; Chi, S. -W.; Lin, S. -P.; Mahdavi, A.; Predan, J.; Zadravec, J.; Gross, A. J.; Ravi-Chandar, K.; Xue, L.

    2016-03-14

    Ductile failure of structural metals is relevant to a wide range of engineering scenarios. Computational methods are employed to anticipate the critical conditions of failure, yet they sometimes provide inaccurate and misleading predictions. Challenge scenarios, such as the one presented in the current work, provide an opportunity to assess the blind, quantitative predictive ability of simulation methods against a previously unseen failure problem. Instead of evaluating the predictions of a single simulation approach, the Sandia Fracture Challenge relied on numerous volunteer teams with expertise in computational mechanics to apply a broad range of computational methods, numerical algorithms, and constitutive models to the challenge. This exercise is intended to evaluate the state of health of technologies available for failure prediction. In the first Sandia Fracture Challenge, a wide range of issues were raised in ductile failure modeling, including a lack of consistency in failure models, the importance of shear calibration data, and difficulties in quantifying the uncertainty of prediction [see Boyce et al. (Int J Fract 186:5–68, 2014) for details of these observations]. This second Sandia Fracture Challenge investigated the ductile rupture of a Ti–6Al–4V sheet under both quasi-static and modest-rate dynamic loading (failure in ~ 0.1 s). Like the previous challenge, the sheet had an unusual arrangement of notches and holes that added geometric complexity and fostered a competition between tensile- and shear-dominated failure modes. The teams were asked to predict the fracture path and quantitative far-field failure metrics such as the peak force and displacement to cause crack initiation. Fourteen teams contributed blind predictions, and the experimental outcomes were quantified in three independent test labs. In addition, shortcomings were revealed in this second challenge such as inconsistency in the application of appropriate boundary conditions, need

  2. Comparison of compact bone failure under two different loading rates: experimental and modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Pithioux, M; Subit, D; Chabrand, P

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the mechanical behaviour of bones up to failure is necessary for diagnosis and prevention of accident and trauma. As far as we know, no authors have yet studied the tensile behaviour of compact bone including failure under dynamic loadings (1 m/s). The originality of this study comes from not only the analysis of compact bone failure under dynamic loadings, the results of which are compared to those obtained under quasi-static loadings, but also the development of a statistical model. We developed a protocol using three different devices. Firstly, an X-ray scanner to analyse bone density, secondly, a common tensile device to perform quasi-static experiments, and thirdly, a special device based upon a hydraulic cylinder to perform dynamic tests. For all the tests, we used the same sample shape which took into account the brittleness of the compact bone. We first performed relaxation and hysteresis tests followed by tensile tests up to failure. Viscous and plastic effects were not relevant to the compact bone behaviour so its behaviour was considered elastic and brittle. The bovine compact bone was three to four times more brittle under a dynamic load than under a quasi-static one. Numerically, a statistical model, based upon the Weibull theory, is used to predict the failure stress in compact bone.

  3. Microcracking damage and the fracture process in relation to strain rate in human cortical bone tensile failure.

    PubMed

    Zioupos, Peter; Hansen, Ulrich; Currey, John D

    2008-10-20

    It is difficult to define the 'physiological' mechanical properties of bone. Traumatic failures in-vivo are more likely to be orders of magnitude faster than the quasistatic tests usually employed in-vitro. We have reported recently [Hansen, U., Zioupos, P., Simpson, R., Currey, J.D., Hynd, D., 2008. The effect of strain rate on the mechanical properties of human cortical bone. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering/Transactions of the ASME 130, 011011-1-8] results from tests on specimens of human femoral cortical bone loaded in tension at strain rates (epsilon ) ranging from low (0.08s(-1)) to high (18s(-1)). Across this strain rate range the modulus of elasticity generally increased, stress at yield and failure and strain at failure decreased for rates higher than 1s(-1), while strain at yield was invariant for most strain rates and only decreased at rates higher than 10s(-1). The results showed that strain rate has a stronger effect on post-yield deformation than on initiation of macroscopic yielding. In general, specimens loaded at high strain rates were brittle, while those loaded at low strain rates were much tougher. Here, a post-test examination of the microcracking damage reveals that microcracking was inversely related to the strain rate. Specimens loaded at low strain rates showed considerable post-yield strain and also much more microcracking. Partial correlation and regression analysis suggested that the development of post-yield strain was a function of the amount of microcracking incurred (the cause), rather than being a direct result of the strain rate (the excitation). Presumably low strain rates allow time for microcracking to develop, which increases the compliance of the specimen, making them tougher. This behaviour confirms a more general rule that the degree to which bone is brittle or tough depends on the amount of microcracking damage it is able to sustain. More importantly, the key to bone toughness is its ability to avoid a ductile

  4. Flow rate and inorganic components of submandibular saliva in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Blomfield, Jeanette; Warton, Kathryn L.; Brown, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The inorganic components of submandibular saliva were determined in 35 patients with cystic fibrosis and in 28 controls. No differences due to flow rate were apparent between the two groups. At comparable flow rates, cystic fibrosis submandibular saliva had higher concentrations of calcium, sodium, and chloride, and similar concentrations of magnesium, inorganic phosphate, potassium, copper, and zinc. The insoluble, turbid fraction of the cystic fibrosis submandibular saliva contained both calcium and phosphate, and these were precipitated in a ratio which was consistent with hydroxyapatite. The secretory granules are postulated as the source of the excess calcium in cystic fibrosis submandibular saliva. PMID:4705932

  5. RBANS embedded measures of suboptimal effort in dementia: effort scale has a lower failure rate than the effort index.

    PubMed

    Burton, Rachel L; Enright, Joe; O'Connell, Megan E; Lanting, Shawnda; Morgan, Debra

    2015-02-01

    The importance of evaluating effort in neuropsychological assessments has been widely acknowledged, but measuring effort in the context of dementia remains challenging due to the impact of dementia severity on effort measure scores. Two embedded measures have been developed for the repeatable battery for the assessment of neuropsychological status (RBANS; Randolph, C., Tierney, M. C., Mohr, E., & Chase, T. N. (1998). The repeatable battery for the assessment of neuropsychological status (RBANS): Preliminary clinical validity. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 20 (3), 310-319): the Effort Index (EI; Silverberg, N. D., Wertheimer, J. C., & Fichtenberg, N. L. (2007). An effort index for the repeatable battery for the assessment of neuropsychological status (RBANS). Clinical Neuropsychologist, 21 (5), 841-854) and the Effort Scale (ES; Novitski, J., Steele, S., Karantzoulis, S., & Randolph, C. (2012). The repeatable battery for the assessment of neuropsychological status effort scale. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 27 (2), 190-195). We explored failure rates on these effort measures in a non-litigating mixed dementia sample (N = 145). Failure rate on the EI was high (48%) and associated with dementia severity. In contrast, failure on the ES was 14% but differed based on type of dementia. ES failure was low (4%) when dementia was due to Alzheimer disease (AD), but high (31%) for non-AD dementias. These data raise concerns about use of the RBANS embedded effort measures in dementia evaluations.

  6. Convergence of strain energy release rate components for edge-delaminated composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Crews, J. H., Jr.; Aminpour, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    Strain energy release rates for edge delaminated composite laminates were obtained using quasi 3 dimensional finite element analysis. The problem of edge delamination at the -35/90 interfaces of an 8-ply composite laminate subjected to uniform axial strain was studied. The individual components of the strain energy release rates did not show convergence as the delamination tip elements were made smaller. In contrast, the total strain energy release rate converged and remained unchanged as the delamination tip elements were made smaller and agreed with that calculated using a classical laminated plate theory. The studies of the near field solutions for a delamination at an interface between two dissimilar isotropic or orthotropic plates showed that the imaginary part of the singularity is the cause of the nonconvergent behavior of the individual components. To evaluate the accuracy of the results, an 8-ply laminate with the delamination modeled in a thin resin layer, that exists between the -35 and 90 plies, was analyzed. Because the delamination exists in a homogeneous isotropic material, the oscillatory component of the singularity vanishes.

  7. Convergence of strain energy release rate components for edge-delaminated composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Crews, J. H., Jr.; Aminpour, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Strain energy release rates for edge delaminated composite laminates were obtained using quasi 3 dimensional finite element analysis. The problem of edge delamination at the -35/90 interfaces of an 8-ply composite laminate subjected to uniform axial strain was studied. The individual components of the strain energy release rates did not show convergence as the delamination tip elements were made smaller. In contrast, the total strain energy release rate converged and remained unchanged as the delamination tip elements were made smaller and agreed with that calculated using a classical laminated plate theory. The studies of the near field solutions for a delamination at an interface between two dissimilar isotropic or orthotropic plates showed that the imaginary part of the singularity is the cause of the nonconvergent behavior of the individual components. To evaluate the accuracy of the results, an 8-ply laminate with the delamination modeled in a thin resin layer, that exists between the -35 and 90 plies, was analyzed. Because the delamination exists in a homogeneous isotropic material, the oscillatory component of the singularity vanishes.

  8. Uncemented porous tantalum acetabular components: early follow-up and failures in 613 primary total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Noiseux, Nicolas O; Long, William J; Mabry, Tad M; Hanssen, Arlen D; Lewallen, David G

    2014-03-01

    Uncemented tantalum acetabular components were introduced in 1997. The purpose was to determine the 2- to 10-year results with this implant material in primary total hip arthroplasty. Our registry identified all primary total hip cases with porous tantalum cups implanted from 1997 to 2004. Clinical outcomes and radiographs were studied. 613 cases were identified. Seventeen percent of patients were lost to follow-up. Twenty-five reoperations were performed (4.4%). Acetabular cup removal occurred in 6 cases (1.2%). No cups were revised for aseptic loosening. Incomplete radiolucent lines were found on 9.3% of initial postoperative radiographs. At 2 years, 67% had resolved. Zero new radiolucent lines were detected. Two- to 10-year results of porous tantalum acetabular components for primary total hip arthroplasty demonstrate high rates of initial stability and apparent ingrowth.

  9. Cryogenic Treatment of Production Components in High-Wear Rate Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Milliken, M.

    2002-04-29

    Deep Cryogenic Tempering (DCT) is a specialized process whereby the molecular structure of a material is ''re-trained'' through cooling to -300 F and then heating to +175-1100 F. Cryocon, Inc. (hereafter referred to as Cryocon) and RMOTC entered an agreement to test the process on oilfield production components, including rod pumps, rods, couplings, and tubing. Three Shannon Formation wells were selected (TD about 500 ft) based on their proclivity for high component wear rates. Phase 1 of the test involved operation for a nominal 120 calendar day period with standard, non-treated components. In Phase 2, treated components were installed and operated for another nominal 120 calendar day period. Different cryogenic treatment profiles were used for components in each well. Rod pumps (two treated and one untreated) were not changed between test phases. One well was operated in pumped-off condition, resulting in abnormal wear and disqualification from the test. Testing shows that cryogenic treatment reduced wear of rods, couplers, and pump barrels. Testing of production tubing produced mixed results.

  10. Electrophysiological analyses of threshold conditions and rate-dependent failure of excitation in single myocytes from rabbit ventricle.

    PubMed

    Firek, L; Giles, W R

    1997-11-01

    The changes in transmembrane ionic currents that underlie normal excitability and rate-dependent failure were studied in single cells from rabbit ventricle by using whole cell voltage clamp methods. When trains of brief (1 to 2 ms) stimuli are applied at strengths very close to the threshold for excitation, a number of different patterns of action potential entrainment and failure are observed. In an individual cell, a characteristic pattern of entrainment or failure can be maintained for a relatively long time, allowing both a detailed description and a quantitative investigation of the ionic basis for this phenomenon. Three hypotheses for rate-dependent failure of excitation in rabbit ventricle were examined. The first is that following relatively high rates of stimulation, the intracellular calcium ion concentration increases and, secondarily, a background inwardly rectifying potassium ion current (IK1) decreases, thereby lowering the excitation threshold. The second hypothesis is that residual activation of the delayed rectifier potassium ion current (IK) causes the stimulus to become subthreshold as the rate of stimulation increases. The third hypothesis is that small changes in the time and voltage dependence of the inactivation and reactivation of the sodium ion current (INa) result in less net inward ion current for a given waveform of depolarization, and the cell therefore becomes inexcitable (eg, to every second stimulus). The calcium ion hypothesis was tested by buffering changes in intracellular calcium ion concentrations with BAPTA. The results strongly suggest that changes in intracellular calcium ion concentrations do not contribute significantly to the observed patterns of failure of excitation. The delayed rectifier hypothesis was evaluated using the class III antiarrhythmic drug dofetilide, which selectively blocks a large fraction of the IK current in rabbit ventricle. Dofetilide slightly decreased the stimulus threshold, suggesting that residual

  11. Components of the cannabinoid system in the dorsal periaqueductal gray are related to resting heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Caron; Hillard, Cecilia J.; Seagard, Jeanne L.; Hopp, Francis A.; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine whether variations in endocannabinoid signaling in the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) are associated with baseline autonomic nerve activity, heart rate, and blood pressure. Blood pressure was recorded telemetrically in rats, and heart rate and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability were determined. Natural variations from animal to animal provided a range of baseline values for analysis. Transcript levels of endocannabinoid signaling components in the dPAG were analyzed, and endocannabinoid content and catabolic enzyme activity were measured. Higher baseline heart rate was associated with increased anandamide content and with decreased activity of the anandamide-hydrolyzing enzyme and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and it was negatively correlated with transcript levels of both FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), a catabolic enzyme for 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Autonomic tone and heart rate, but not blood pressure, were correlated to levels of FAAH mRNA. In accordance with these data, exogenous anandamide in the dPAG of anesthetized rats increased heart rate. These data indicate that in the dPAG, anandamide, a FAAH-regulated lipid, contributes to regulation of baseline heart rate through influences on autonomic outflow. PMID:27280429

  12. Axonal and synaptic failure suppress the transfer of firing rate oscillations, synchrony and information during high frequency deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Robert; Zimnik, Andrew; Zheng, Fang; Turner, Robert S; Alzheimer, Christian; Doiron, Brent; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2014-02-01

    High frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a widely used treatment for Parkinson's disease, but its effects on neural activity in basal ganglia circuits are not fully understood. DBS increases the excitation of STN efferents yet decouples STN spiking patterns from the spiking patterns of STN synaptic targets. We propose that this apparent paradox is resolved by recent studies showing an increased rate of axonal and synaptic failures in STN projections during DBS. To investigate this hypothesis, we combine in vitro and in vivo recordings to derive a computational model of axonal and synaptic failure during DBS. Our model shows that these failures induce a short term depression that suppresses the synaptic transfer of firing rate oscillations, synchrony and rate-coded information from STN to its synaptic targets. In particular, our computational model reproduces the widely reported suppression of parkinsonian β oscillations and synchrony during DBS. Our results support the idea that short term depression is a therapeutic mechanism of STN DBS that works as a functional lesion by decoupling the somatic spiking patterns of STN neurons from spiking activity in basal ganglia output nuclei.

  13. [Research on ultrafine grinding technology of improving dissolution rates of effective components in Sanjie Zhentong capsule].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhong-kun; Gao, Jin; Qin, Jian-ping; Chen, Guang-bo; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The effects of ultrafine grinding on the dissolution rates of the effective components in Sanjie Zhentong capsule (SZC) were studied in this experiment. Fine and ultrafine powder of SZC intermediates were made by ordinary grinding and ultrafine grinding technology, and then granulated by wet granulation. SZC were prepared by fine powder, ultrafine powder and ultrafine granules, respectively. With resveratrol and loureirin B as investigated indexes, dissolution rates of the four intermediates in SZC were determined by cup method and HPLC. The dissolution rates of resveratrol in SZC prepared by fine powder, ultrafine powder and ultrafine granules were 26.11%, 63.27%, 67.49%, respectively; and the dissolution rates of loureirin B were 7.160%, 20.29%, 23.05%, respectively. The dissolution rate of resveratrol and loureirin B in SZC prepared by ultrafine granules was the best. D90 size of ultrafine grinding was 13.221 μm and could improve the dissolution rates of resveratrol and loureirin B in SZC.

  14. Suppression of large earthquakes by stress shadows: A comparison of Coulomb and rate-and-state failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Ruth A.; Simpson, Robert W.

    1998-10-01

    Stress shadows generated by California's two most recent great earthquakes (1857 Fort Tejon and 1906 San Francisco) substantially modified 19th and 20th century earthquake history in the Los Angeles basin and in the San Francisco Bay area. Simple Coulomb failure calculations, which assume that earthquakes can be modeled as static dislocations in an elastic half-space, have done quite well at approximating how long the stress shadows, or relaxing effects, should last and at predicting where subsequent large earthquakes will not occur. There has, however, been at least one apparent exception to the predictions of such simple models. The 1911 M>6.0 earthquake near Morgan Hill, California, occurred at a relaxed site on the Calaveras fault. We examine how the more complex rate-and-state friction formalism based on laboratory experiments might have allowed the 1911 earthquake. Rate-and-state time-to-failure calculations are consistent with the occurrence of the 1911 event just 5 years after 1906 if the Calaveras fault was already close to failure before the effects of 1906. We also examine the likelihood that the entire 78 years of relative quiet (only four M≥6 earthquakes) in the bay area after 1906 is consistent with rate-and-state assumptions, given that the previous 7 decades produced 18 M≥6 earthquakes. Combinations of rate-and-state variables can be found that are consistent with this pattern of large bay area earthquakes, assuming that the rate of earthquakes in the 7 decades before 1906 would have continued had 1906 not occurred. These results demonstrate that rate-and-state offers a consistent explanation for the 78-year quiescence and the 1911 anomaly, although they do not rule out several alternate explanations.

  15. Removing the thermal component from heart rate provides an accurate VO2 estimation in forest work.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Philippe-Antoine; Imbeau, Daniel; Dubeau, Denise; Lebel, Luc; Kolus, Ahmet

    2016-05-01

    Heart rate (HR) was monitored continuously in 41 forest workers performing brushcutting or tree planting work. 10-min seated rest periods were imposed during the workday to estimate the HR thermal component (ΔHRT) per Vogt et al. (1970, 1973). VO2 was measured using a portable gas analyzer during a morning submaximal step-test conducted at the work site, during a work bout over the course of the day (range: 9-74 min), and during an ensuing 10-min rest pause taken at the worksite. The VO2 estimated, from measured HR and from corrected HR (thermal component removed), were compared to VO2 measured during work and rest. Varied levels of HR thermal component (ΔHRTavg range: 0-38 bpm) originating from a wide range of ambient thermal conditions, thermal clothing insulation worn, and physical load exerted during work were observed. Using raw HR significantly overestimated measured work VO2 by 30% on average (range: 1%-64%). 74% of VO2 prediction error variance was explained by the HR thermal component. VO2 estimated from corrected HR, was not statistically different from measured VO2. Work VO2 can be estimated accurately in the presence of thermal stress using Vogt et al.'s method, which can be implemented easily by the practitioner with inexpensive instruments.

  16. Verification of International Space Station Component Leak Rates by Helium Accumulation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Steve D.; Smith, Sherry L.

    2003-01-01

    Discovery of leakage on several International Space Station U.S. Laboratory Module ammonia system quick disconnects (QDs) led to the need for a process to quantify total leakage without removing the QDs from the system. An innovative solution was proposed allowing quantitative leak rate measurement at ambient external pressure without QD removal. The method utilizes a helium mass spectrometer configured in the detector probe mode to determine helium leak rates inside a containment hood installed on the test component. The method was validated through extensive developmental testing. Test results showed the method was viable, accurate and repeatable for a wide range of leak rates. The accumulation method has been accepted by NASA and is currently being used by Boeing Huntsville, Boeing Kennedy Space Center and Boeing Johnson Space Center to test welds and valves and will be used by Alenia to test the Cupola. The method has been used in place of more expensive vacuum chamber testing which requires removing the test component from the system.

  17. Estimation of variance components and genetic trends for twinning rate in Holstein dairy cattle of Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghavi Hossein-Zadeh, N; Nejati-Javaremi, A; Miraei-Ashtiani, S R; Kohram, H

    2009-07-01

    Calving records from the Animal Breeding Center of Iran, collected from January 1991 to December 2007 and comprising 1,163,594 Holstein calving events from 2,552 herds, were analyzed using a linear animal model, linear sire model, threshold animal model, and threshold sire model to estimate variance components, heritabilities, genetic correlations, and genetic trends for twinning rate in the first, second, and third parities. The overall twinning rate was 3.01%. Mean incidence of twins increased from first to fourth and later parities: 1.10, 3.20, 4.22, and 4.50%, respectively. For first-parity cows, a maximum frequency of twinning was observed from January through April (1.36%), and second- and third-parity cows showed peaks from July to September (at 3.35 and 4.55%, respectively). The phenotypic rate of twinning decreased from 1991 to 2007 for the first, second, and third parities. Sire predicted transmitting abilities were estimated using linear sire model and threshold sire model analyses. Sire transmitting abilities for twinning rate in the first, second, and third parities ranged from -0.30 to 0.42, -0.32 to 0.31, and -0.27 to 0.30, respectively. Heritability estimates of twinning rate for parities 1, 2, and 3 ranged from 1.66 to 10.6%, 1.35 to 9.0%, and 1.10 to 7.3%, respectively, using different models for analysis. Heritability estimates for twinning rate, obtained from the analysis of threshold models, were greater than the estimates of linear models. Solutions for age at calving for the first, second, and third parities demonstrated that cows older at calving were more likely to have twins. Genetic correlations for twinning rate between parities 2 and 3 were greater than correlations between parities 1 and 2 and between parities 1 and 3. There was a slightly increasing trend for twinning rate in parities 1, 2, and 3 over time with the analysis of linear animal and linear sire models, but the trend for twinning rate in parities 1, 2, and 3 with threshold

  18. Phylogenetic, functional, and structural components of variation in bone growth rate of amniotes.

    PubMed

    Cubo, Jorge; Legendre, Pierre; de Ricqlès, Armand; Montes, Laëtitia; de Margerie, Emmanuel; Castanet, Jacques; Desdevises, Yves

    2008-01-01

    The biological features observed in every living organism are the outcome of three sets of factors: historical (inherited by homology), functional (biological adaptation), and structural (properties inherent to the materials with which organs are constructed, and the morphogenetic rules by which they grow). Integrating them should bring satisfactory causal explanations of empirical data. However, little progress has been accomplished in practice toward this goal, because a methodologically efficient tool was lacking. Here we use a new statistical method of variation partitioning to analyze bone growth in amniotes. (1) Historical component. The variation of bone growth rates contains a significant phylogenetic signal, suggesting that the observed patterns are partly the outcome of shared ancestry. (2) Functional causation. High growth rates, although energy costly, may be adaptive (i.e., they may increase survival rates) in taxa showing short growth periods (e.g., birds). In ectothermic amniotes, low resting metabolic rates may limit the maximum possible growth rates. (3) Structural constraint. Whereas soft tissues grow through a multiplicative process, growth of mineralized tissues is accretionary (additive, i.e., mineralization fronts occur only at free surfaces). Bone growth of many amniotes partially circumvents this constraint: it is achieved not only at the external surface of the bone shaft, but also within cavities included in the bone cortex as it grows centrifugally. Our approach contributes to the unification of historicism, functionalism, and structuralism toward a more integrated evolutionary biology.

  19. Low Rates of Treatment Failure in Children Aged 2–59 Months Treated for Severe Pneumonia: A Multisite Pooled Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Matthew P.; Thea, Donald M.; Sadruddin, Salim; Bari, Abdul; Bonawitz, Rachael; Hazir, Tabish; Bin Nisar, Yasir; Qazi, Shamim A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Despite advances in childhood pneumonia management, it remains a major killer of children worldwide. We sought to estimate global treatment failure rates in children aged 2–59 months with World Health Organization–defined severe pneumonia. Methods. We pooled data from 4 severe pneumonia studies conducted during 1999–2009 using similar methodologies. We defined treatment failure by day 6 as death, danger signs (inability to drink, convulsions, abnormally sleepy), fever (≥38°C) and lower chest indrawing (LCI; days 2–3), LCI (day 6), or antibiotic change. Results. Among 6398 cases of severe pneumonia from 10 countries, 564 (cluster adjusted: 8.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.9%–11.5%) failed treatment by day 6. The most common reasons for clinical failure were persistence of fever and LCI or LCI or fever alone (75% of failures). Seventeen (0.3%) children died. Danger signs were uncommon (<1%). Infants 6–11 months and 2–5 months were 2- and 3.5-fold more likely, respectively, to fail treatment (adjusted OR [AOR], 1.8 [95% CI, 1.4–2.3] and AOR, 3.5 [95% CI, 2.8–4.3]) as children aged 12–59 months. Failure was increased 7-fold (AOR, 7.2 [95% CI, 5.0–10.5]) when comparing infants 2–5 months with very fast breathing to children 12–59 months with normal breathing. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate that severe pneumonia case management with antibiotics at health facilities or in the community is associated with few serious morbidities or deaths across diverse geographic settings and support moves to shift management of severe pneumonia with oral antibiotics to outpatients in the community. PMID:23264361

  20. Success rate and risk factors of failure of the induced membrane technique in children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Aurégan, Jean-Charles; Bégué, Thierry; Rigoulot, Guillaume; Glorion, Christophe; Pannier, Stéphanie

    2016-12-01

    The induced membrane technique was designed by Masquelet et al. to address segmental bone defects of critical size in adults. It has been used after bone defects of traumatic, infectious and tumoral origin with satisfactory results. Recently, it has been used in children but, after an initial enthusiasm, several cases of failure have been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the success rate and the risk factors of failure of the induced membrane for children. We conducted a systematic review of all the studies reporting the results of the induced membrane technique to address bone defects of critical size in children. Our primary outcome was the success rate of the technique defined as a bone union before any iterative surgery. Our secondary outcomes were the complications and the risk factors of failure. We searched Medline via Pubmed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Twelve studies, including 69 patients, met the inclusion criteria. There were 41 boys and 28 girls. Mean age at surgery was 10 years. Mean size of resection was 12.38 cm and the mean time between the two stages was 5.86 months. Mean rate of bone union after the two stages of the induced membrane technique was 58% (40/69) but this rate increased to 87% after revision surgeries (60/69). Main complications were non-unions (19/69), lysis of the graft (6/69) and fractures of the bone graft (6/69). Only 1/69 deep infection was reported. Other non specific complications were regularly reported such limb length discrepancies, joint stiffness and protruding wires. Risk factor of failure that could be suspected comprised the resection of a malignant tumour, a bone defect located at the femur, a wide resection, a long time between the two stages, an unstable osteosynthesis and a bone graft associating autograft to other graft materials. The induced membrane technique is suitable for bone defects of critical size in children. It is a reliable technique with no need of micro vascular surgery

  1. Ductile failure of steel HY80 under high strain rates and triaxial stress states, experimental results and damage description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Malek, S.; Halle, Th.; Meyer, L. W.

    2003-09-01

    Ductile fracture investigations are an important part in current research. The simulation of fracture by means of numerical codes needs precise material data that may be reached from accurate mechanical testing. In order to predict failure processes, the stress state history as a function of strain development has to be known. In this work tensile tests on HY80 steel were performed under quasistatic and high strain rate loading conditions at room temperature using smooth and notched specimens. The force-time and displacement-time behaviour was measured during testing. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the fractured surfaces. Furthermore, different models were applied to describe the failure process. FE-calculations were used to receive the stress state in the material in the region of the notch as a function of strain development.

  2. A comparison of volume-equated knee extensions to failure, or not to failure, upon rating of perceived exertion and strength adaptations.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James Peter; Blossom, Dominic; Steele, James

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effects of repetition duration-, volume-, and load-matched resistance training to muscular failure (MMF) or not to muscular failure (NMF) on maximal voluntary isometric knee extensor strength. This design also allowed testing of the efficacy of "5×5" training. Nine recreationally active males (age, 21.4 ± 1.2 years; height, 1.79 ± 0.07 m; weight, 78.4 ± 7.1 kg) performed unilateral resistance training at 80% of maximal torque at 2×/week for 6 weeks. Using their nondominant leg, participants performed 5 sets of 5 repetitions (NMF). Using their dominant leg, participants performed 25 repetitions in as few sets as possible (MMF). All repetitions were performed at a pace of 2 s concentric, 1 s isometric pause, and 2 s eccentric with a 2-min rest interval between sets. Analyses identified significant pre- to post-intervention strength increases for both MMF and NMF, with effect sizes (ESs) of 2.01 and 1.65, respectively, with no significant differences between conditions (p > 0.05). Peak and mean ratings of perceived exertion (RPEs) were significantly higher for MMF compared with NMF conditions (p < 0.0001), and a tendency for significantly higher RPE values reported for later sets for the NMF condition. Total training time per session was significantly longer for NMF compared with MMF (p < 0.001). The present study suggests that in untrained participants, resistance training NMF produces equivocally the same strength increases as training to MMF when volume-matched. However, resistance training to MMF appears to be a more time-efficient protocol and may produce greater strength gains as indicated by a larger ES.

  3. Structures for attaching or sealing a space between components having different coefficients or rates of thermal expansion

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Dean, Anthony John; Tognarelli, Leonardo; Pecchioli, Mario

    2005-06-28

    A structure for attaching together or sealing a space between a first component and a second component that have different rates or amounts of dimensional change upon being exposed to temperatures other than ambient temperature. The structure comprises a first attachment structure associated with the first component that slidably engages a second attachment structure associated with the second component, thereby allowing for an independent floating movement of the second component relative to the first component. The structure can comprise split rings, laminar rings, or multiple split rings.

  4. Development of KSC program for investigating and generating field failure rates. Volume 1: Summary and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, E. E.; Bloomquist, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the KSC program for investigating the reliability aspects of the ground support activities is presented. An analysis of unsatisfactory condition reports (RC), and the generation of reliability assessment of components based on the URC are discussed along with the design considerations for attaining reliable real time hardware/software configurations.

  5. Long-duration correlation and attractor topology of the heartbeat rate differ for healthy patients and those with heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcott, Robert G.; Teich, Malvin C.

    1993-11-01

    The point process formed by the sequence of human heartbeats exhibits long-duration power- law correlation. We obtain the normalized coincidence rate g(2)((tau) ) of the underlying point process and demonstrate that the correlation is stronger for patients with normal hearts than those with heart failure. This is consistent with the greater rate fluctuations observed in the normal heart. A number of statistical measures are used to establish the existence and reveal the form of the correlation, including rescaled range analysis, pulse- number distribution, Fano-factor time curve (FFC), and power spectral density. The normalized coincidence rate is obtained from the FFC. The long-duration, power-law correlation observed in the sequence of heartbeats is similar to that observed at a number of neurophysiological loci in a variety of species. We also obtain the box-counting estimate of the attractor's fractal dimension from a phase-space reconstruction and analysis of the trajectory of the number of heartbeat events. This approach reveals that the heartbeats of normal patients exhibit an attractor of higher dimension than those of heart-failure patients.

  6. Evaluation of errors in prior mean and variance in the estimation of integrated circuit failure rates using Bayesian methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, B. C.

    1972-01-01

    The critical point of any Bayesian analysis concerns the choice and quantification of the prior information. The effects of prior data on a Bayesian analysis are studied. Comparisons of the maximum likelihood estimator, the Bayesian estimator, and the known failure rate are presented. The results of the many simulated trails are then analyzed to show the region of criticality for prior information being supplied to the Bayesian estimator. In particular, effects of prior mean and variance are determined as a function of the amount of test data available.

  7. Multidimensional Life Table Estimation of the Total Fertility Rate and Its Components

    PubMed Central

    Retherford, Robert D.; Eini-Zinab, Hassan; Choe, Minja Kim; Ogawa, Naohiro; Matsukura, Rikiya

    2013-01-01

    Using discrete-time survival models of parity progression and illustrative data from the Philippines, this article develops a multivariate multidimensional life table of nuptiality and fertility, the dimensions of which are age, parity, and duration in parity. The measures calculated from this life table include total fertility rate (TRF), total marital fertility rate (TMFR), parity progression ratios (PPR), age-specific fertility rates, mean and median ages at first marriage, mean and median closed birth intervals, and mean and median ages at childbearing by child’s birth order and for all birth orders combined. These measures are referred to collectively as “TFR and its components.” Because the multidimensional life table is multivariate, all measures derived from it are also multivariate in the sense that they can be tabulated by categories or selected values of one socioeconomic variable while controlling for other socioeconomic variables. The methodology is applied to birth history data, in the form of actual birth histories from a fertility survey or reconstructed birth histories derived from a census or household survey. The methodology yields period estimates as well as cohort estimates of the aforementioned measures. PMID:23264037

  8. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  9. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  10. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  11. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  12. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Minimum Capital Components for Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Foreign Exchange Rate Contracts A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF... CAPITAL Minimum Capital Pt. 1750, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 1750—Minimum Capital... sheet interest rate and foreign exchange rate contracts: a. Interest Rate Contracts i. Single...

  13. Analysis of Photosynthetic Rate and Bio-Optical Components from Ocean Color Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Dale A.; Stramski, Dariusz

    1997-01-01

    Our research over the last 5 years indicates that the successful transformation of ocean color imagery into maps of bio-optical properties will require continued development and testing of algorithms. In particular improvements in the accuracy of predicting from ocean color imagery the concentration of the bio-optical components of sea as well as the rate of photosynthesis will require progress in at least three areas: (1) we must improve mathematical models of the growth and physiological acclimation of phytoplankton; (2) we must better understand the sources of variability in the absorption and backscattering properties of phytoplankton and associated microparticles; and (3) we must better understand how the radiance distribution just below the sea surface varies as a function sun and sky conditions and inherent optical properties.

  14. Two-component mixture model: Application to palm oil and exchange rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoong, Seuk-Yen; Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Hamzah, Firdaus Mohamad

    2014-12-01

    Palm oil is a seed crop which is widely adopt for food and non-food products such as cookie, vegetable oil, cosmetics, household products and others. Palm oil is majority growth in Malaysia and Indonesia. However, the demand for palm oil is getting growth and rapidly running out over the years. This phenomenal cause illegal logging of trees and destroy the natural habitat. Hence, the present paper investigates the relationship between exchange rate and palm oil price in Malaysia by using Maximum Likelihood Estimation via Newton-Raphson algorithm to fit a two components mixture model. Besides, this paper proposes a mixture of normal distribution to accommodate with asymmetry characteristics and platykurtic time series data.

  15. Evaluation of components, subsystems, and networks for high rate, high frequency space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Ivancic, William D.; Zuzek, John E.

    1991-01-01

    The development of new space communications technologies by NASA has included both commercial applications and space science requirements. NASA's Systems Integration, Test and Evaluation (SITE) Space Communication System Simulator is a hardware based laboratory simulator for evaluating space communications technologies at the component, subsystem, system, and network level, geared toward high frequency, high data rate systems. The SITE facility is well-suited for evaluation of the new technologies required for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) and advanced commercial systems. Described here are the technology developments and evaluation requirements for current and planned commercial and space science programs. Also examined are the capabilities of SITE, the past, present and planned future configurations of the SITE facility, and applications of SITE to evaluation of SEI technology.

  16. A Krebs Cycle Component Limits Caspase Activation Rate through Mitochondrial Surface Restriction of CRL Activation.

    PubMed

    Aram, Lior; Braun, Tslil; Braverman, Carmel; Kaplan, Yosef; Ravid, Liat; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Arama, Eli

    2016-04-04

    How cells avoid excessive caspase activity and unwanted cell death during apoptotic caspase-mediated removal of large cellular structures is poorly understood. We investigate caspase-mediated extrusion of spermatid cytoplasmic contents in Drosophila during spermatid individualization. We show that a Krebs cycle component, the ATP-specific form of the succinyl-CoA synthetase β subunit (A-Sβ), binds to and activates the Cullin-3-based ubiquitin ligase (CRL3) complex required for caspase activation in spermatids. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that this interaction occurs on the mitochondrial surface, thereby limiting the source of CRL3 complex activation to the vicinity of this organelle and reducing the potential rate of caspase activation by at least 60%. Domain swapping between A-Sβ and the GTP-specific SCSβ (G-Sβ), which functions redundantly in the Krebs cycle, show that the metabolic and structural roles of A-Sβ in spermatids can be uncoupled, highlighting a moonlighting function of this Krebs cycle component in CRL activation.

  17. Guidelines to achieve seals with minimal leak rates for HWR-NPR coolant system components

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.

    1991-03-01

    Seal design practices that are acceptable in pressurized-water and boiling-water reactors in the United States are not usable for the Heavy Water Reactor-New Production Reactor (HWR-NPR) because of the stringent requirement on tritium control for the atmosphere within its containment building. To maintain an atmosphere in which workers do not need protective equipment, the components of the coolant system must have a cumulative leak rate less than 0.00026 L/s. Existing technology for seal systems was reviewed with regard to flange, elastomer, valve, and pump design. A technology data base for the designers of the HWR-NPR coolant system was derived from operating experience and seal development work on reactors in the United States, Canada, and Europe. This data base was then used to generate guidelines for the design of seals and/or joints for the HWR-NPR coolant system. Also discussed are needed additional research and development, as well as the necessary component qualification tests for an effective quality control program. 141 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  18. Improving the Estimates of International Space Station (ISS) Induced K-Factor Failure Rates for On-Orbit Replacement Unit (ORU) Supportability Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Leif F.; Harrington, Sean P.; Omeke, Ojei, II; Schwaab, Douglas G.

    2009-01-01

    This is a case study on revised estimates of induced failure for International Space Station (ISS) on-orbit replacement units (ORUs). We devise a heuristic to leverage operational experience data by aggregating ORU, associated function (vehicle sub -system), and vehicle effective' k-factors using actual failure experience. With this input, we determine a significant failure threshold and minimize the difference between the actual and predicted failure rates. We conclude with a discussion on both qualitative and quantitative improvements the heuristic methods and potential benefits to ISS supportability engineering analysis.

  19. Measurement for the dose-rates of the cosmic-ray components on the ground.

    PubMed

    Rasolonjatovo, Danielle A H; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Hirabayashi, Naoya; Nunomiya, Tomoya; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakao, Noriaki

    2002-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to measure the directly ionizing component (muons and photons) and the indirectly ionizing component (neutrons) of the cosmic-ray spectra and evaluate their dose rate contribution to the total dose rate on a ground level in Japan. Measurements were carried out in Tohoku University, Japan, from October 2000. The pulse-height spectra of the cosmic-ray photons and muons were measured with a 12.7 cm diameter and 12.7 cm long NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. In order to measure energy spectra of cosmic-ray photons and muons, response functions of the detector to photons and muons were determined by the Monte Carlo simulation codes. The cosmic-ray photon dose was evaluated directly from the measured pulse-height spectrum by using the spectrum weight function, and the cosmic-ray muon dose was evaluated by converting the measured pulse height spectrum into deposited energy within the detector. The quantity of the cosmic-ray electrons is estimated to be very small and is not taken into account in this study. The cosmic-ray neutron spectrum and the neutron dose were measured by using a multi-moderator spectrometer (Bonner ball) and a rem counter. The measurements could finally give the annual absorbed dose in tissue of the cosmic-ray muons of 315 microSv/y and annual ambient doses of the cosmic-ray photons and neutrons on the ground in Japan of 55 microSv/y and 31 microSv/y, respectively.

  20. Particulate Air Pollution and the Rate of Hospitalization for Congestive Heart Failure among Medicare Beneficiaries in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

    PubMed Central

    Wellenius, Gregory A.; Bateson, Thomas F.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Schwartz., Joel

    2006-01-01

    We used a case-crossover approach to evaluate the association between ambient air pollution and the rate of hospitalization for congestive heart failure (CHF) among Medicare recipients (age ≥ 65) residing in Allegheny County (Pittsburgh area), PA, during 1987–1999. We also explored effect modification by age, gender, and specific secondary diagnoses. During follow-up, there were 55,019 admissions with a primary diagnosis of CHF. We found that particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide – but not ozone – were positively and significantly associated with the rate of admission on the same day in single-pollutant models. The strongest associations were observed with CO, NO2 and PM10. The associations with CO and NO2 were the most robust in two-pollutant models, remaining statistically significant even after adjusting for other pollutants. Patients with a recent myocardial infarction were at greater risk of particulate-related admission, but there was otherwise no significant effect modification by age, gender, or other secondary diagnoses. These results suggest that short-term elevations in air pollution from traffic-related sources may trigger acute cardiac decompensation of heart failure patients and that those with certain comorbid conditions may be more susceptible to these effects. PMID:15901623

  1. Determination of crack morphology parameters from service failures for leak-rate analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.

    1997-04-01

    In leak-rate analyses described in the literature, the crack morphology parameters are typically not well agreed upon by different investigators. This paper presents results on a review of crack morphology parameters determined from examination of service induced cracks. Service induced cracks were found to have a much more tortuous flow path than laboratory induced cracks due to crack branching associated with the service induced cracks. Several new parameters such as local and global surface roughnesses, as well as local and global number of turns were identified. The effect of each of these parameters are dependent on the crack-opening displacement. Additionally, the crack path is typically assumed to be straight through the pipe thickness, but the service data show that the flow path can be longer due to the crack following a fusion line, and/or the number of turns, where the number of turns in the past were included as a pressure drop term due to the turns, but not the longer flow path length. These parameters were statistically evaluated for fatigue cracks in air, corrosion-fatigue, IGSCC, and thermal fatigue cracks. A refined version of the SQUIRT leak-rate code was developed to account for these variables. Sample calculations are provided in this paper that show how the crack size can vary for a given leak rate and the statistical variation of the crack morphology parameters.

  2. Effects of age and loading rate on equine cortical bone failure.

    PubMed

    Kulin, Robb M; Jiang, Fengchun; Vecchio, Kenneth S

    2011-01-01

    Although clinical bone fractures occur predominantly under impact loading (as occurs during sporting accidents, falls, high-speed impacts or other catastrophic events), experimentally validated studies on the dynamic fracture behavior of bone, at the loading rates associated with such events, remain limited. In this study, a series of tests were performed on femoral specimens obtained post-mortem from equine donors ranging in age from 6 months to 28 years. Fracture toughness and compressive tests were performed under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions in order to determine the effects of loading rate and age on the mechanical behavior of the cortical bone. Fracture toughness experiments were performed using a four-point bending geometry on single and double-notch specimens in order to measure fracture toughness, as well as observe differences in crack initiation between dynamic and quasi-static experiments. Compressive properties were measured on bone loaded parallel and transverse to the osteonal growth direction. Fracture propagation was then analyzed using scanning electron and scanning confocal microscopy to observe the effects of microstructural toughening mechanisms at different strain rates. Specimens from each horse were also analyzed for dry, wet and mineral densities, as well as weight percent mineral, in order to investigate possible influences of composition on mechanical behavior. Results indicate that bone has a higher compressive strength, but lower fracture toughness when tested dynamically as compared to quasi-static experiments. Fracture toughness also tends to decrease with age when measured quasi-statically, but shows little change with age under dynamic loading conditions, where brittle "cleavage-like" fracture behavior dominates.

  3. A pilot rating scale for evaluating failure transients in electronic flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindson, William S.; Schroeder, Jeffery A.; Eshow, Michelle M.

    1990-01-01

    A pilot rating scale was developed to describe the effects of transients in helicopter flight-control systems on safety-of-flight and on pilot recovery action. The scale was applied to the evaluation of hardovers that could potentially occur in the digital flight-control system being designed for a variable-stability UH-60A research helicopter. Tests were conducted in a large moving-base simulator and in flight. The results of the investigation were combined with existing airworthiness criteria to determine quantitative reliability design goals for the control system.

  4. Failure analysis of sandwich-type ceramic-on-ceramic hip joints: A spectroscopic investigation into the role of the polyethylene shell component.

    PubMed

    Okita, Shinya; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Takahashi, Yasuhito; Puppulin, Leonardo; Sudo, Akihiro; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    The mechanisms leading to systematic failure in modular acetabular components with a sandwich insertion (alumina/polyethylene/titanium) have been reconsidered in light of the newly collected Raman spectroscopic results. Raman assessments were conducted on the polyethylene shells, which belonged to a series of six failed sandwich implants with in vivo lifetimes ranging between 2 and 9yr. With only one exception, all implants commonly showed dislodgment of the polyethylene shell during radiographic analyses prior to revision surgery. The polyethylene shell slipped out of the backing titanium shell, while always remaining integer to the ceramic liner. Four implants fractured at the ceramic liners, but their fractures occurred according to distinctly different patterns, which could be rationalized and classified. The insertion of the polyethylene layer, originally conceived to reduce the rigidity of the ceramic-on-ceramic bearing and to prevent impingement between the ceramic liner rim and the femoral neck, played a role in implant failure with its initial (asymmetric) thickness reduction due to creep deformation (eventually followed by cup rotation and backside wear). The results of the present spectroscopic investigation suggest that a simplistic failure classification of the sandwich-type implant as a "ceramic fracture failure" could be misleading and might represent a confounding factor in judging about the reliability of modern ceramic implants.

  5. Unrecognized high brachial artery bifurcation is associated with higher rate of dialysis access failure.

    PubMed

    Kirksey, Lee

    2011-01-01

    A thorough consideration of all factors contributing to successful dialysis access creation is necessary to achieve optimal outcomes. A high bifurcation of the brachial artery (brachioradial variant) occurs in greater than 20% of patients. Dialysis access was created in 22 limbs with this variant--15 fistula, and 7 prosthetic grafts. Nonmaturation occurred in 33% of fistula. Early thromboses occurred in 29% of prosthetic bridge grafts. In this experience, the brachioradial variant is associated with a relatively higher rate of fistula nonmaturation and prosthetic graft thromboses. These findings reinforce the critical role of preoperative imaging studies in dialysis access creation. A sound algorithm for the surgical management of the brachioradial variation facilitates decision making and will improve dialysis access outcomes.

  6. Numerical analysis of high strain rate failure of electro-magnetically loaded steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erice, Borja; Mohr, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Electro-magnetic forces provide a potentially power full means in designing dynamic experiments with active control of the loading conditions. This article deals with the development of computational models to simulate the thermo-mechanical response of electro-magnetically loaded metallic structures. The model assumes linear electromagnetic constitutive equations and time-independent electric induction to estimate the Joule heating and the Lorentz forces. The latter are then taken into account when evaluating stress equilibrium. A thermo-visco-plastic model with Johnson-Cook type of temperature and strain rate dependence and combined Swift-Voce hardening is used to evaluate the material's thermo-mechanical response. As a first application, the model is used to analyse the effect of electro-magnetic loading on the ductility of advanced high strength steels.

  7. Plastic flow, inferred strength, and incipient failure in BCC metals at high pressures, strains, and strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Sook

    2013-06-01

    We present our extensive experimental results from the Omega laser to test models of high pressure, high strain rate strength at ~1 Mbar peak pressures, strains >10%, and strain rates of ~107 s-1 in Ta, V, and Fe, using plastic flows driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The observed time evolution of the plastic deformation is compared with 2D simulations incorporating a strength model. This methodology allows average values of strength at peak pressure and peak strain rate conditions to be inferred. The observed values of strength are typically factors of 5-10 higher than ambient strength, with contributions coming from pressure hardening (via the shear modulus), and strain rate hardening. For Fe, there is the added contribution from the alpha-epsilon phase transition. Ta has been studied as a function of grain size, and at the high strain rates and short durations of the experiments, no grain size dependence was observed; the observed deformation and inferred strength were independent of grain size. Both Ta and V have been driven to large enough strains that incipient failure (softening) has been observed. Both the Ta and V experiments were compared favorably with multiscale strength models, with the conclusion that the Ta deformation was in the thermal activation regime, whereas the V deformation was in the phonon drag regime. Finally, preliminary results of new iron RT strength experiments done at ~1 Mbar pressures, and ~107 s-1 strain rates, well beyond the alpha-epsilon phase transition, will be given. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Influenza vaccination coverage rate in children: reasons for a failure and how to go forward.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Catherine Weil

    2012-01-01

    Based on an increasingly extensive literature expressing the large interest in the field, this paper gives an overview of different aspects of influenza prevention in children. It relies on paradoxes. First, the heaviest part of the burden is well demonstrated in the youngest infants by numerous epidemiological data elsewhere. On the contrary, with older children, the prevention by influenza vaccines is more efficacious-without notable side effects. Second, the available TIV vaccines are 60 years old and the requests of registration and regulation of vaccines have evolved. There is a specific need in children: it is time to re-discuss the pragmatic utilization of influenza vaccines (full dose in the youngest patient? More flexibility regarding the interval between the two required doses in vaccine-naïve children), and to change from a compassionate use to a targeted research and adapted vaccines considering the limits of TIV in the youngest children. Third, influenza virus transmission is the highest in children in semi-close communities (day-care centers, schools), diffusing to households and more largely to the population. A restricted policy on high risk groups (roughly 10% in a pediatric population, all medical conditions including asthma, for whom influenza vaccine coverage is a 15-75% range) is far below the estimated threshold of 45% coverage rate to limit the virus circulation by an indirect impact during seasonal epidemics. Fourth, public health decisions in the vaccination field are usually taken from top to bottom. The pandemic A/H1N1 has toughly demonstrated that "forgetting" about the perception and expectations of the public and the parents nearly created conflicts and at least a strong resistance impeding the quality of a program worked on for a long time ahead. Fifth, and not the least, HCPs are pivotal in influenza vaccination mostly trusted by the parents. Too often, they are not backed by a national and clear support and they need to reinforce

  9. Reproducibility for Heart Rate Variability Analysis during 6-Min Walk Test in Patients with Heart Failure and Agreement between Devices

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Lays Magalhães; Prado, Gustavo Faibischew; Umeda, Iracema Ioco Kikuchi; Kawauchi, Tatiana Satie; Taboada, Adriana Marques Fróes; Azevedo, Raymundo Soares; Pereira Filho, Horacio Gomes; Grupi, César José; Souza, Hayala Cristina Cavenague; Moreira, Dalmo Antônio Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a useful method to assess abnormal functioning in the autonomic nervous system and to predict cardiac events in patients with heart failure (HF). HRV measurements with heart rate monitors have been validated with an electrocardiograph in healthy subjects but not in patients with HF. We explored the reproducibility of HRV in two consecutive six-minute walk tests (6MW), 60-minute apart, using a heart rate monitor (PolarS810i) and a portable electrocardiograph (called Holter) in 50 HF patients (mean age 59 years, NYHA II, left ventricular ejection fraction ~35%). The reproducibility for each device was analysed using a paired t-test or the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Additionally, we assessed the agreement between the two devices based on the HRV indices at rest, during the 6MW and during recovery using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), 95% confidence intervals and Bland-Altman plots. The test-retest for the HRV analyses was reproducible using Holter and PolarS810i at rest but not during recovery. In the second 6MW, patients showed significant increases in rMSSD and walking distance. The PolarS810i measurements had remarkably high concordance correlation [0.86rates, a small effect in increasing differences between Holter and Polar in R-R intervals was observed. In conclusion, our study showed good reproducibility of HRV at rest in two consecutive 6MW using Holter and PolarS810i. Additionally, PolarS810i produced good agreements in short-term HRV indices based on Holter simultaneous recordings at rest, during the 6MW and recovery in HF patients. PMID:27936043

  10. Reproducibility for Heart Rate Variability Analysis during 6-Min Walk Test in Patients with Heart Failure and Agreement between Devices.

    PubMed

    Braga, Lays Magalhães; Prado, Gustavo Faibischew; Umeda, Iracema Ioco Kikuchi; Kawauchi, Tatiana Satie; Taboada, Adriana Marques Fróes; Azevedo, Raymundo Soares; Pereira Filho, Horacio Gomes; Grupi, César José; Souza, Hayala Cristina Cavenague; Moreira, Dalmo Antônio Ribeiro; Nakagawa, Naomi Kondo

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a useful method to assess abnormal functioning in the autonomic nervous system and to predict cardiac events in patients with heart failure (HF). HRV measurements with heart rate monitors have been validated with an electrocardiograph in healthy subjects but not in patients with HF. We explored the reproducibility of HRV in two consecutive six-minute walk tests (6MW), 60-minute apart, using a heart rate monitor (PolarS810i) and a portable electrocardiograph (called Holter) in 50 HF patients (mean age 59 years, NYHA II, left ventricular ejection fraction ~35%). The reproducibility for each device was analysed using a paired t-test or the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Additionally, we assessed the agreement between the two devices based on the HRV indices at rest, during the 6MW and during recovery using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), 95% confidence intervals and Bland-Altman plots. The test-retest for the HRV analyses was reproducible using Holter and PolarS810i at rest but not during recovery. In the second 6MW, patients showed significant increases in rMSSD and walking distance. The PolarS810i measurements had remarkably high concordance correlation [0.86rates, a small effect in increasing differences between Holter and Polar in R-R intervals was observed. In conclusion, our study showed good reproducibility of HRV at rest in two consecutive 6MW using Holter and PolarS810i. Additionally, PolarS810i produced good agreements in short-term HRV indices based on Holter simultaneous recordings at rest, during the 6MW and recovery in HF patients.

  11. Post-Exercise Heart Rate Recovery Independently Predicts Clinical Outcome in Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Jong-Chan; Lee, Hye Sun; Choi, Suk-Won; Han, Seong-Woo; Ryu, Kyu-Hyung; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Kang, Seok-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-exercise heart rate recovery (HRR) is an index of parasympathetic function associated with clinical outcome in patients with chronic heart failure. However, its relationship with the pro-inflammatory response and prognostic value in consecutive patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) has not been investigated. Methods We measured HRR and pro-inflammatory markers in 107 prospectively and consecutively enrolled, recovered ADHF patients (71 male, 59 ± 15 years, mean ejection fraction 28.9 ± 14.2%) during the pre-discharge period. The primary endpoint included cardiovascular (CV) events defined as CV mortality, cardiac transplantation, or rehospitalization due to HF aggravation. Results The CV events occurred in 30 (28.0%) patients (5 cardiovascular deaths and 7 cardiac transplantations) during the follow-up period (median 214 days, 11–812 days). When the patients with ADHF were grouped by HRR according to the Contal and O’Quigley’s method, low HRR was shown to be associated with significantly higher levels of serum monokine-induced by gamma interferon (MIG) and poor clinical outcome. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that low HRR was an independent predictor of CV events in both enter method and stepwise method. The addition of HRR to a model significantly increased predictability for CV events across the entire follow-up period. Conclusion Impaired post-exercise HRR is associated with a pro-inflammatory response and independently predicts clinical outcome in patients with ADHF. These findings may explain the relationship between autonomic dysfunction and clinical outcome in terms of the inflammatory response in these patients. PMID:27135610

  12. Rate-dependent force, intracellular calcium, and action potential voltage alternans are modulated by sarcomere length and heart failure induced-remodeling of thin filament regulation in human heart failure: A myocyte modeling study.

    PubMed

    Zile, Melanie A; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-01-01

    Microvolt T-wave alternans (MTWA) testing identifies heart failure patients at risk for lethal ventricular arrhythmias at near-resting heart rates (<110 beats per minute). Since pressure alternans occurs simultaneously with MTWA and has a higher signal to noise ratio, it may be a better predictor of arrhythmia, although the mechanism remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between force alternans (FORCE-ALT), the cellular manifestation of pressure alternans, and action potential voltage alternans (APV-ALT), the cellular driver of MTWA. Our goal was to uncover the mechanisms linking APV-ALT and FORCE-ALT in failing human myocytes and to investigate how the link between those alternans was affected by pacing rate and by physiological conditions such as sarcomere length and heart failure induced-remodeling of mechanical parameters. To achieve this, a mechanically-based, strongly coupled human electromechanical myocyte model was constructed. Reducing the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake current (Iup) to 27% was incorporated to simulate abnormal calcium handling in human heart failure. Mechanical remodeling was incorporated to simulate altered thin filament activation and crossbridge (XB) cycling rates. A dynamical pacing protocol was used to investigate the development of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca]i), voltage, and active force alternans at different pacing rates. FORCE-ALT only occurred in simulations incorporating reduced Iup, demonstrating that alternans in the intracellular calcium concentration (CA-ALT) induced FORCE-ALT. The magnitude of FORCE-ALT was found to be largest at clinically relevant pacing rates (<110 bpm), where APV-ALT was smallest. We found that the magnitudes of FORCE-ALT, CA-ALT and APV-ALT were altered by heart failure induced-remodeling of mechanical parameters and sarcomere length due to the presence of myofilament feedback. These findings provide important insight into the relationship between heart-failure

  13. Rate-dependent force, intracellular calcium, and action potential voltage alternans are modulated by sarcomere length and heart failure induced-remodeling of thin filament regulation in human heart failure: A myocyte modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Zile, Melanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Microvolt T-wave alternans (MTWA) testing identifies heart failure patients at risk for lethal ventricular arrhythmias at near-resting heart rates (<110 beats per minute). Since pressure alternans occurs simultaneously with MTWA and has a higher signal to noise ratio, it may be a better predictor of arrhythmia, although the mechanism remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between force alternans (FORCE-ALT), the cellular manifestation of pressure alternans, and APV-ALT, the cellular driver of MTWA. Our goal was to uncover the mechanisms linking APV-ALT and FORCE-ALT in failing human myocytes and to investigate how the link between those alternans was affected by pacing rate and by physiological conditions such as sarcomere length and heart failure induced-remodeling of mechanical parameters. To achieve this, a mechanically-based, strongly coupled human electromechanical myocyte model was constructed. Reducing the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake current (Iup) to 27% was incorporated to simulate abnormal calcium handling in human heart failure. Mechanical remodeling was incorporated to simulate altered thin filament activation and crossbridge (XB) cycling rates. A dynamical pacing protocol was used to investigate the development of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca]i), voltage, and active force alternans at different pacing rates. FORCE-ALT only occurred in simulations incorporating reduced Iup, demonstrating that alternans in the intracellular calcium concentration (CA-ALT) induced FORCE-ALT. The magnitude of FORCE-ALT was found to be largest at clinically relevant pacing rates (<110 bpm), where APV-ALT was smallest. We found that the magnitudes of FORCE-ALT, CA-ALT and APV-ALT were altered by heart failure induced-remodeling of mechanical parameters and sarcomere length due to the presence of myofilament feedback. These findings provide important insight into the relationship between heart-failure-induced electrical and mechanical

  14. A Novel and Effective Method for Congestive Heart Failure Detection and Quantification Using Dynamic Heart Rate Variability Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenhui; Zheng, Lianrong; Li, Kunyang; Wang, Qian; Liu, Guanzheng; Jiang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessment of congestive heart failure (CHF) is essential for detection, especially helping patients make informed decisions about medications, devices, transplantation, and end-of-life care. The majority of studies have focused on disease detection between CHF patients and normal subjects using short-/long-term heart rate variability (HRV) measures but not much on quantification. We downloaded 116 nominal 24-hour RR interval records from the MIT/BIH database, including 72 normal people and 44 CHF patients. These records were analyzed under a 4-level risk assessment model: no risk (normal people, N), mild risk (patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I-II, P1), moderate risk (patients with NYHA III, P2), and severe risk (patients with NYHA III-IV, P3). A novel multistage classification approach is proposed for risk assessment and rating CHF using the non-equilibrium decision-tree–based support vector machine classifier. We propose dynamic indices of HRV to capture the dynamics of 5-minute short term HRV measurements for quantifying autonomic activity changes of CHF. We extracted 54 classical measures and 126 dynamic indices and selected from these using backward elimination to detect and quantify CHF patients. Experimental results show that the multistage risk assessment model can realize CHF detection and quantification analysis with total accuracy of 96.61%. The multistage model provides a powerful predictor between predicted and actual ratings, and it could serve as a clinically meaningful outcome providing an early assessment and a prognostic marker for CHF patients. PMID:27835634

  15. Cross sectional longitudinal study of spot morning urine protein:creatinine ratio, 24 hour urine protein excretion rate, glomerular filtration rate, and end stage renal failure in chronic renal disease in patients without diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Ruggenenti, P.; Gaspari, F.; Perna, A.; Remuzzi, G.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the protein:creatinine ratio in spot morning urine samples is a reliable indicator of 24 hour urinary protein excretion and predicts the rate of decline of glomerular filtration rate and progression to end stage renal failure in non-diabetic patients with chronic nephropathy. DESIGN: Cross sectional correlation between the ratio and urinary protein excretion rate. Univariate and multivariate analysis of baseline predictors, including the ratio and 24 hour urinary protein, of decline in glomerular filtration rate and end stage renal failure in the long term. SETTING: Research centre in Italy. SUBJECTS: 177 non-diabetic outpatients with chronic renal disease screened for participation in the ramipril efficacy in nephropathy study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rate of decline in filtration rate evaluated by repeated measurements of unlabelled iohexol plasma clearance and rate of progression to renal failure. RESULTS: Protein:creatinine ratio was significantly correlated with absolute and log transformed 24 hour urinary protein values (P = 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively.) Ratios also had high predictive value for rate of decline of the glomerular filtration rate (univariate P = 0.0003, multivariate P = 0.004) and end stage renal failure (P = 0.002 and P = 0.04). Baseline protein:creatinine ratios and rate of decline of the glomerular filtration rate were also significantly correlated (P < 0.0005). In the lowest third of the protein:creatinine ratio (< 1.7) there was 3% renal failure compared with 21.2% in the highest third (> 2.7) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Protein:creatinine ratio in spot morning urine samples is a precise indicator of proteinuria and a reliable predictor of progression of disease in non-diabetic patients with chronic nephropathies and represents a simple and inexpensive procedure in establishing severity of renal disease and prognosis. PMID:9501711

  16. Generalized discriminant analysis for congestive heart failure risk assessment based on long-term heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Fatemeh; Asl, Babak Mohammadzadeh

    2015-11-01

    The aims of this study are summarized in the following items: first, to investigate the class discrimination power of long-term heart rate variability (HRV) features for risk assessment in patients suffering from congestive heart failure (CHF); second, to introduce the most discriminative features of HRV to discriminate low risk patients (LRPs) and high risk patients (HRPs), and third, to examine the influence of feature dimension reduction in order to achieve desired accuracy of the classification. We analyzed two public Holter databases: 12 data of patients suffering from mild CHF (NYHA class I and II), labeled as LRPs and 32 data of patients suffering from severe CHF (NYHA class III and IV), labeled as HRPs. A K-nearest neighbor classifier was used to evaluate the performance of feature set in the classification. Moreover, to reduce the number of features as well as the overlap of the samples of two classes in feature space, we used generalized discriminant analysis (GDA) as a feature extraction method. By applying GDA to the discriminative nonlinear features, we achieved sensitivity and specificity of 100% having the least number of features. Finally, the results were compared with other similar conducted studies regarding the performance of feature selection procedure and classifier besides the number of features used in training.

  17. Correlation analysis between the rate of respiration in the root and the active components in licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis).

    PubMed

    Guo, Peijun; Sun, Zhirong; Liu, Wenlan; Chen, Long; DU, Yuan; Wei, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between root respiration and the percentage of active components in licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.), in order to provide a foundation for the regulation and modulation of the quality of G. uralensis. Respiration efflux of annual and biennial G. uralensis was determined using a Li-7000 CO2/H2O analyzer. The root systems were scanned at a resolution of 3,000 dpi using an Epson Expression 10000XL scanner. Root growth was determined by analyzing the scanned images using WinRHIZO version Pro2007d software and the rate of respiration in the root was subsequently calculated. In addition, the percentages of the five major active components in licorice, glycyrrhizic acid, glycyrrhizin, isoliquiritin, liquiritigenin and isoliquiritigenin, were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The correlation between the root respiration and the percentage of the active components was investigated. Significant seasonal changes were observed in the rates of respiration of first and zero-class roots. In annual and biennial G. uralensis, the maximum and minimum values for rate of respiration were present in July (P<0.05) and November (P<0.05), respectively. The correlation coefficients between the five major active components and the rate of respiration were -0.304 (glycyrrhizin), -0.129 (liquiritigenin), -0.441 (glycyrrhizic acid; P<0.05), -0.471 (isoliquiritin; P<0.05) and 0.148 (isoliquiritigenin). The percentages of glycyrrhizic acid and isoliquiritin were significantly negatively correlated with the rate of respiration in annual and biennial G. uralensis. Understanding the correlation between the root rate of respiration and the active components in G. uralensis may be beneficial to ensuring the quality of cultivated G. uralensis.

  18. [Evaluation on contribution rate of each component total salvianolic acids and characterization of apparent oil/water partition coefficient].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-mei; Chen, Xiao-yun; Xia, Hai-jian; Liu, Dan; Jia, Xiao-bin; Zhang, Zhen-hai

    2015-02-01

    The difference between three representative components of total salvianolic acids in pharmacodynamic activity were compared by three different pharmacological experiments: HUVECs oxidative damage experiment, 4 items of blood coagulation in vitro experiment in rabbits and experimental myocardial ischemia in rats. And the effects of contribution rate of each component were calculated by multi index comprehensive evaluation method based on CRITIC weights. The contribution rates of salvianolic acid B, rosmarinic acid and Danshensu were 28.85%, 30.11%, 41.04%. Apparent oil/water partition coefficient of each representative components of total salvianolic acids in n-octyl alcohol-buffer was tested and the total salvianolic acid components were characterized based on a combination of the approach of self-defined weighting coefficient with effects of contribution rate. Apparent oil/water partition coefficient of total salvianolic acids was 0.32, 1.06, 0.89, 0.98, 0.90, 0.13, 0.02, 0.20, 0.56 when in octanol-water/pH 1.2 dilute hydrochloric acid solution/ pH 2.0, 2.5, 5.0, 5.8, 6.8, 7.4, 7.8 phosphate buffer solution. It provides a certain reference for the characterization of components.

  19. Cardiac Mitochondrial Proteome Dynamics with Heavy Water Reveals Stable Rate of Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis in Heart Failure Despite Decline in Mitochondrial Oxidative Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Shekar, Kadambari Chandra; Li, Ling; Dabkowski, Erinne R.; Xu, Wenhong; Ribeiro, Rogerio Faustino; Hecker, Peter A.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Sadygov, Rovshan G.; Willard, Belinda; Kasumov, Takhar; Stanley, William C.

    2017-01-01

    We recently developed a method to measure mitochondrial proteome dynamics with heavy water (2H2O)-based metabolic labeling and high resolution mass spectrometry. We reported the half-lives and synthesis rates of several proteins in the two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations, subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar (SSM and IFM), in Sprague Dawley rats. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the mitochondrial protein synthesis rate is reduced in heart failure, with possible differential changes in SSM versus IFM. Six to seven week old male Sprague Dawley rats underwent transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and developed moderate heart failure after 22 weeks. Heart failure and sham rats of the same age received heavy water (5% in drinking water) for up to 80 days. Cardiac SSM and IFM were isolated from both groups and the proteins were separated by 1D gel electrophoresis. Heart failure reduced protein content and increased the turnover rate of several proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation, electron transport chain and ATP synthesis, while it decreased the turnover of other proteins, including pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit in IFM, but not in SSM. Because of these bidirectional changes, the average overall half-life of proteins was not altered by heart failure in both SSM and IFM. The kinetic measurements of individual mitochondrial proteins presented in this study may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for mitochondrial alterations in the failing heart. PMID:24995939

  20. Metabolic Rates of ATP Transfer Through Creatine Kinase (CK Flux) Predict Clinical Heart Failure Events and Death

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, Paul A.; Panjrath, Gurusher S.; Lai, Shenghan; Hirsch, Glenn A.; Wu, Katherine; Najjar, Samer S.; Steinberg, Angela; Gerstenblith, Gary; Weiss, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from heart failure (HF) are high, and current risk stratification approaches for predicting HF progression are imperfect. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is required for normal cardiac contraction, and abnormalities in creatine kinase (CK) energy metabolism, the primary myocardial energy reserve reaction, have been observed in experimental and clinical HF. However, the prognostic value of abnormalities in ATP production rates through CK in human HF has not been investigated. Fifty-eight HF patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy underwent 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to quantify cardiac high-energy phosphates and the rate of ATP synthesis through CK (CK flux) and were prospectively followed for a median of 4.7 years. Multiple-event analysis (MEA) was performed for HF-related events including all-cause and cardiac death, HF hospitalization, cardiac transplantation, and ventricular-assist device placement. Among baseline demographic, clinical, and metabolic parameters, MEA identified four independent predictors of HF events: New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), African-American race, and CK flux. Reduced myocardial CK flux was a significant predictor of HF outcomes, even after correction for NYHA class, LVEF, and race. For each increase in CK flux of 1 μmol g−1 s−1, risk of HF-related composite outcomes decreased by 32 to 39%. These findings suggest that reduced CK flux may be a potential HF treatment target. Newer imaging strategies, including noninvasive 31P MRS that detect altered ATP kinetics, could thus complement risk stratification in HF and add value in conditions involving other tissues with high energy demands, including skeletal muscle and brain. PMID:24337482

  1. Central exogenous nitric oxide decreases cardiac sympathetic drive and improves baroreflex control of heart rate in ovine heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ramchandra, Rohit; Hood, Sally G; May, Clive N

    2014-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with increased cardiac and renal sympathetic drive, which are both independent predictors of poor prognosis. A candidate mechanism for the centrally mediated sympathoexcitation in HF is reduced synthesis of the inhibitory neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO), resulting from downregulation of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS). Therefore, we investigated the effects of increasing the levels of NO in the brain, or selectively in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) and baroreflex control of CSNA and heart rate in ovine pacing-induced HF. The resting level of CSNA was significantly higher in the HF than in the normal group, but the resting level of RSNA was unchanged. Intracerebroventricular infusion of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 500 μg · ml(-1)· h(-1)) in conscious normal sheep and sheep in HF inhibited CSNA and restored baroreflex control of heart rate, but there was no change in RSNA. Microinjection of SNP into the PVN did not cause a similar cardiac sympathoinhibition in either group, although the number of nNOS-positive cells was decreased in the PVN of sheep in HF. Reduction of endogenous NO with intracerebroventricular infusion of N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester decreased CSNA in normal but not in HF sheep and caused no change in RSNA in either group. These findings indicate that endogenous NO in the brain provides tonic excitatory drive to increase resting CSNA in the normal state, but not in HF. In contrast, exogenously administered NO inhibited CSNA in both the normal and HF groups via an action on sites other than the PVN.

  2. Growth of monosodium urate monohydrate crystals: effect of cartilage and synovial fluid components on in vitro growth rates.

    PubMed Central

    Burt, H M; Dutt, Y C

    1986-01-01

    The effects of cartilage and synovial fluid components such as proteoglycans, chondroitin sulphate, hyaluronic acid, phospholipids, and albumin on the growth kinetics of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSUM) crystals were investigated. MSUM seed crystals were added to supersaturated sodium urate solutions, and the rate of decrease in the concentration of growth medium was used as a measure of the growth rate. A second order dependence of growth rate on supersaturation was found, and growth rate constants were determined with an integrated form of the growth equation. The additives, hyaluronic acid, proteoglycan monomer and aggregate, and phosphatidylserine, had no significant effect on the growth rate constant. Chondroitin sulphate and phosphatidylcholine increased the growth rate constant, possibly by promoting further nucleation in the growth medium. Albumin significantly inhibited MSUM crystallisation. The possible implications of these findings on in vivo MSUM crystallisation are discussed. PMID:3098195

  3. Rate of change in physical fitness and quality of life and depression following exercise training in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Smart, Neil A; Murison, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Exercise training appears to improve peak oxygen consumption (VO(2) ) and quality of life (QOL) in heart failure patients, although disease etiology, patient demographics and medication may alter the rate of adaptation. The authors sought to identify rate of change from baseline in fitness, QOL, and depression following exercise training in a cohort of patients with congestive heart failure. Thirty male systolic heart failure patients (aged 63.8±8.3 years, baseline peak VO(2) 12.2±4.8 mL/kg/min, left ventricular ejection fraction 28.2±9.4%, New York Heart Association class II/II 22/8) undertook 52 weeks of exercise training, 16 weeks as an outpatient and a further 36 weeks of home exercise. Peak VO(2) and QOL was measured using the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure (MLWHF) questionnaire and depression using the Hare-Davis scale. The authors analyzed the rate of change in peak VO(2) and MLWHF after grouping patients according to clinical, demographic, and pharmacologic characteristics. Peak VO(2) measurements varied over time, with no effect of disease pathology or β-blocker on peak VO(2) . The rate of change in physical MLWHF score was significantly greater (improved) during 0 to 16 weeks in patients with dilated pathology, but was not significantly affected by β-blocker use or age. The exercise training venue and supervision, or lack thereof, is the major determinant of adaptation to the intervention in heart failure patients, although age, β-adrenergic medication, and heart failure etiology also explain some of the variation in adaptive responses observed.

  4. [Evaluation of therapy for dilated cardiomyopathy with heart failure by iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging: comparison with heart rate variability power spectral analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, S; Ikeda, J; Takita, T; Sekiguchi, Y; Demachi, J; Chikama, H; Goto, A; Shirato, K

    1998-11-01

    The relationship between the myocardial uptake of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) and heart rate variability parameters has not been determined. This study determined the relationship between the change in myocardial uptake of 123I-MIBG and improvement in left ventricular function after treatment, to determine the usefulness of 123I-MIBG imaging to assess the effect of therapy on heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). 123I-MIBG imaging and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability were performed before and after treatment in 17 patients with heart failure due to DCM. The following parameters were compared before and after treatment: New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, radiographic cardiothoracic ratio (CTR), blood pressure, echocardiographic data [left ventricular end-systolic (LVDs) and end-diastolic (LVDd) diameters, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)], plasma concentrations of norepinephrine and epinephrine, heart rate variability power spectral analysis data [mean low frequency (MLF) and high frequency power (MHF)] and the myocardium to mediastinum activity ratio (MYO/M) obtained in early and late images, and washout rate calculated by anterior planar imaging of 123I-MIBG. The NYHA functional class, LVEF, LVDs, CTR, MLF and MHF improved after treatment. Early MYO/M and late MYO/M improved after treatment. The rate of increase in late MYO/M was positively correlated with the rate of improvement of LVEF after treatment. Furthermore, the late MYO/M was negatively correlated with MLF. Washout rate revealed no correlation with hemodynamic parameters. These findings suggest that late MYO/M is more useful than washout rate to assess the effect of treatment on heart failure due to DCM. Furthermore, the 123I-MIBG imaging and heart rate variability parameters are useful to assess the autonomic tone in DCM with heart failure.

  5. Using Reading Strategies To Reduce the Failure Rate in the Content Area. Subject: Social Studies. Grade Level: 6-7-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, Olivett

    Content area reading instruction includes two elements: the information presented in subject matter text, and the plan that teachers use to help students understand the content. According to research and interviews with social studies teachers, there is a high failure rate in the social studies content area because children have problems…

  6. Payload and Components Real-Time Automated Test System (PACRATS), Data Acquisition of Leak Rate and Pressure Data Test Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Maegan L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to provide the Mechanical Components Test Facility (MCTF) with the capability to obtain electronic leak test and proof pressure data, Payload and Components Real-time Automated Test System (PACRATS) data acquisition software will be utilized to display real-time data. It will record leak rates and pressure/vacuum level(s) simultaneously. This added functionality will provide electronic leak test and pressure data at specified sampling frequencies. Electronically stored data will provide ES61 with increased data security, analysis, and accuracy. The tasks performed in this procedure are to verify PACRATS only, and are not intended to provide verifications for MCTF equipment.

  7. Heart Rate Recovery in the First Minute at the Six-Minute Walk Test in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lindemberg, Sabrina; Chermont, Sergio; Quintão, Mônica; Derossi, Milena; Guilhon, Sergio; Bernardez, Sabrina; Marchese, Luana; Martins, Wolney; Nóbrega, Antônio Claudio L.; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart rate recovery at one minute of rest (HRR1) is a predictor of mortality in heart failure (HF), but its prognosis has not been assessed at six-minute walk test (6MWT) in these patients. Objective This study aimed to determine the HRR1 at 6MWT in patients with HF and its correlation with six-minute walk distance (6MWD). Methods Cross-sectional, controlled protocol with 161 individuals, 126 patients with stable systolic HF, allocated into 2 groups (G1 and G2) receiving or not β-blocker and 35 volunteers in control group (G3) had HRR1 recorded at the 6MWT. Results HRR1 and 6MWD were significantly different in the 3 groups. Mean values of HRR1 and 6MWD were: HRR1 = 12 ± 14 beat/min G1; 18 ± 16 beat/min G2 and 21 ± 13 beat/min G3; 6MWD = 423 ± 102 m G1; 396 ± 101m G2 and 484 ± 96 m G3 (p < 0.05). Results showed a correlation between HRR1 and 6MWD in G1(r = 0.3; p = 0.04) and in G3(r = 0.4; p= 0.03), but not in G2 (r= 0.12; p= 0.48). Conclusion HRR1 response was attenuated in patients using βB and showed correlation with 6MWD, reflecting better exercise tolerance. HRR1 after 6MWT seems to represent an alternative when treadmill tests could not be tolerated. PMID:24714794

  8. Sleeping and resting respiratory rates in dogs and cats with medically-controlled left-sided congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Porciello, F; Rishniw, M; Ljungvall, I; Ferasin, L; Haggstrom, J; Ohad, D G

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping and resting respiratory rates (SRR and RRR, respectively) are commonly used to monitor dogs and cats with left-sided cardiac disease and to identify animals with left-sided congestive heart failure (L-CHF). Dogs and cats with subclinical heart disease have SRRmean values <30 breaths/min. However, little is known about SRR and RRR in dogs and cats with CHF that is well controlled with medical therapy. In this study, SRR and RRR were measured by the owners of 51 dogs and 22 cats with stable, well-controlled CHF. Median canine SRRmean was 20 breaths/min (7-39 breaths/min); eight dogs were ≥25 breaths/min and one dog only was ≥30 breaths/min. Canine SRRmean was unrelated to pulmonary hypertension or diuretic dose. Median feline SRRmean was 20 breaths/min (13-31 breaths/min); four cats were ≥25 breaths/min and only one cat was ≥30 breaths/min. Feline SRRmean was unrelated to diuretic dose. SRR remained stable during collection in both species with little day-to-day variability. The median canine RRRmean was 24 breaths/min (12-44 breaths/min), 17 were ≥25 breaths/min, seven were ≥30 breaths/min, two were >40 breaths/min. Median feline RRRmean was 24 breaths/min (15-45 breaths/min); five cats had RRRmean ≥25 breaths/min; one had ≥30 breaths/min, and two had ≥40 breaths/min. These data suggest that most dogs and cats with CHF that is medically well-controlled and stable have SRRmean and RRRmean <30 breaths/min at home. Clinicians can use these data to help determine how best to control CHF in dogs and cats.

  9. High rate of virological failure and low rate of switching to second-line treatment among adolescents and adults living with HIV on first-line ART in Myanmar, 2005-2015

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Anthony D.; Kumar, Ajay M. V.; Oo, Myo Minn; Kyaw, Khine Wut Yee; Win, Than; Aung, Thet Ko; Min, Aung Chan; Oo, Htun Nyunt

    2017-01-01

    Background The number of people living with HIV on antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Myanmar has been increasing rapidly in recent years. This study aimed to estimate rates of virological failure on first-line ART and switching to second-line ART due to treatment failure at the Integrated HIV Care program (IHC). Methods Routinely collected data of all adolescent and adult patients living with HIV who were initiated on first-line ART at IHC between 2005 and 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The cumulative hazard of virological failure on first-line ART and switching to second-line ART were estimated. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios were calculated using the Cox regression model to identify risk factors associated with the two outcomes. Results Of 23,248 adults and adolescents, 7,888 (34%) were tested for HIV viral load. The incidence rate of virological failure among those tested was 3.2 per 100 person-years follow-up and the rate of switching to second-line ART among all patients was 1.4 per 100 person-years follow-up. Factors associated with virological failure included: being adolescent; being lost to follow-up at least once; having WHO stage 3 and 4 at ART initiation; and having taken first-line ART elsewhere before coming to IHC. Of the 1032 patients who met virological failure criteria, 762 (74%) switched to second-line ART. Conclusions We found high rates of virological failure among one third of patients in the cohort who were tested for viral load. Of those failing virologically on first-line ART, about one quarter were not switched to second-line ART. Routine viral load monitoring, especially for those identified as having a higher risk of treatment failure, should be considered in this setting to detect all patients failing on first-line ART. Strategies also need to be put in place to prevent treatment failure and to treat more of those patients who are actually failing. PMID:28182786

  10. Do Insect Populations Die at Constant Rates as They Become Older? Contrasting Demographic Failure Kinetics with Respect to Temperature According to the Weibull Model.

    PubMed

    Damos, Petros; Soulopoulou, Polyxeni

    2015-01-01

    Temperature implies contrasting biological causes of demographic aging in poikilotherms. In this work, we used the reliability theory to describe the consistency of mortality with age in moth populations and to show that differentiation in hazard rates is related to extrinsic environmental causes such as temperature. Moreover, experiments that manipulate extrinsic mortality were used to distinguish temperature-related death rates and the pertinence of the Weibull aging model. The Newton-Raphson optimization method was applied to calculate parameters for small samples of ages at death by estimating the maximum likelihoods surfaces using scored gradient vectors and the Hessian matrix. The study reveals for the first time that the Weibull function is able to describe contrasting biological causes of demographic aging for moth populations maintained at different temperature regimes. We demonstrate that at favourable conditions the insect death rate accelerates as age advances, in contrast to the extreme temperatures in which each individual drifts toward death in a linear fashion and has a constant chance of passing away. Moreover, slope of hazard rates shifts towards a constant initial rate which is a pattern demonstrated by systems which are not wearing out (e.g. non-aging) since the failure, or death, is a random event independent of time. This finding may appear surprising, because, traditionally, it was mostly thought as rule that in aging population force of mortality increases exponentially until all individuals have died. Moreover, in relation to other studies, we have not observed any typical decelerating aging patterns at late life (mortality leveling-off), but rather, accelerated hazard rates at optimum temperatures and a stabilized increase at the extremes.In most cases, the increase in aging-related mortality was simulated reasonably well according to the Weibull survivorship model that is applied. Moreover, semi log- probability hazard rate model

  11. Do Insect Populations Die at Constant Rates as They Become Older? Contrasting Demographic Failure Kinetics with Respect to Temperature According to the Weibull Model

    PubMed Central

    Damos, Petros; Soulopoulou, Polyxeni

    2015-01-01

    Temperature implies contrasting biological causes of demographic aging in poikilotherms. In this work, we used the reliability theory to describe the consistency of mortality with age in moth populations and to show that differentiation in hazard rates is related to extrinsic environmental causes such as temperature. Moreover, experiments that manipulate extrinsic mortality were used to distinguish temperature-related death rates and the pertinence of the Weibull aging model. The Newton-Raphson optimization method was applied to calculate parameters for small samples of ages at death by estimating the maximum likelihoods surfaces using scored gradient vectors and the Hessian matrix. The study reveals for the first time that the Weibull function is able to describe contrasting biological causes of demographic aging for moth populations maintained at different temperature regimes. We demonstrate that at favourable conditions the insect death rate accelerates as age advances, in contrast to the extreme temperatures in which each individual drifts toward death in a linear fashion and has a constant chance of passing away. Moreover, slope of hazard rates shifts towards a constant initial rate which is a pattern demonstrated by systems which are not wearing out (e.g. non-aging) since the failure, or death, is a random event independent of time. This finding may appear surprising, because, traditionally, it was mostly thought as rule that in aging population force of mortality increases exponentially until all individuals have died. Moreover, in relation to other studies, we have not observed any typical decelerating aging patterns at late life (mortality leveling-off), but rather, accelerated hazard rates at optimum temperatures and a stabilized increase at the extremes.In most cases, the increase in aging-related mortality was simulated reasonably well according to the Weibull survivorship model that is applied. Moreover, semi log- probability hazard rate model

  12. Relative contribution of articular cartilage's constitutive components to load support depending on strain rate.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, J M Párraga; Wilson, W; Ito, K; van Donkelaar, C C

    2017-02-01

    Cartilage is considered a biphasic material in which the solid is composed of proteoglycans and collagen. In biphasic tissue, the hydraulic pressure is believed to bear most of the load under higher strain rates and its dissipation due to fluid flow determines creep and relaxation behavior. In equilibrium, hydraulic pressure is zero and load bearing is transferred to the solid matrix. The viscoelasticity of the collagen network also contributes to its time-dependent behavior, and the osmotic pressure to load bearing in equilibrium. The aim of the present study was to determine the relative contributions of hydraulic pressure, viscoelastic collagen stress, solid matrix stiffness and osmotic pressure to load carriage in cartilage under transient and equilibrium conditions. Unconfined compression experiments were simulated using a fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic model of articular cartilage, including water, fibrillar viscoelastic collagen and non-fibrillar charged glycosaminoglycans. The relative contributions of hydraulic and osmotic pressures and stresses in the fibrillar and non-fibrillar network were evaluated in the superficial, middle and deep zone of cartilage under five different strain rates and after relaxation. Initially upon loading, the hydraulic pressure carried most of the load in all three zones. The osmotic swelling pressure carried most of the equilibrium load. In the surface zone, where the fibers were loaded in tension, the collagen network carried 20 % of the load for all strain rates. The importance of these fibers was illustrated by artificially modifying the fiber architecture, which reduced the overall stiffness of cartilage in all conditions. In conclusion, although hydraulic pressure dominates the transient behavior during cartilage loading, due to its viscoelastic nature the superficial zone collagen fibers carry a substantial part of the load under transient conditions. This becomes increasingly important with higher strain rates. The

  13. Effect of Correlations of Component Failures and Cross-Connections of EDGs on Seismically Induced Core Damages of a Multi-Unit Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Ken; Liu, Qiao; Uchiyama, Tomoaki

    Aiming at proposing effective applications of seismic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for design and risk management of nuclear facilities, we conducted a preliminary seismic PSA study for a multi-unit site to examine core damage frequency (CDF) and core damage sequences with consideration of the effect of correlations of component failures. In addition, we also examined the effectiveness of an accident management measure, namely, cross-connections of emergency diesel generators (EDGs) between adjacent units in this study. Twin BWR-5 units of the same design were hypothesized to be located at the same site in this study and the CDF as well as the accident sequences of this two-unit site were analyzed by using SECOM2, a system reliability analysis code for seismic PSA. The results showed that the calculated CDF was dependent on the assumptions on the correlations of component failures. When the rules for assigning correlation coefficients of component responses defined in the NUREG-1150 program were adopted, the CDF of a single unit, the CDF of this two-unit site (the frequency of core damages of at least one unit at this site) and the frequency of simultaneous core damages of both units increased by factors of about 1.3, 1.2 and 2.3, respectively. In addition, it might be possible that the simultaneous core damages of both units are caused by different accident sequence pairs as well as the same sequence pairs. When cross-connections of EDGs between two units were available, the CDF of a single unit, the CDF of this two-unit site as well as the frequency of simultaneous core damages of both units decreased. In addition, the CDF of this two-unit site was smaller than the CDF of a single unit site. These results show that cross-connections of EDGs might be beneficial for a multi-unit site if the rules for assigning correlation coefficients defined in NUREG-1150 program are reasonable.

  14. Time-variant parametric estimation of transient quadratic phase couplings between heart rate components in healthy neonates.

    PubMed

    Schwab, K; Eiselt, M; Putsche, P; Helbig, M; Witte, H

    2006-12-01

    The heart rate variability (HRV) can be taken as an indicator of the coordination of the cardio-respiratory rhythms. Bispectral analysis using a direct (fast Fourier transform based) and time-invariant approach has shown the occurrence of a quadratic phase coupling (QPC) between a low-frequency (LF: 0.1 Hz) and a high-frequency (HF: 0.4-0.6 Hz) component of the HRV during quiet sleep in healthy neonates. The low-frequency component corresponds to the Mayer-Traube-Hering waves in blood pressure and the high-frequency component to the respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). Time-variant, parametric estimation of the bispectrum provides the possibility of quantifying QPC in the time course. Therefore, the aim of this work was a parametric, time-variant bispectral analysis of the neonatal HRV in the same neonates used in the direct, time-invariant approach. For the first time rhythms in the time course of QPC between the HF component and the LF component could be shown in the neonatal HRV.

  15. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  16. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  17. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshal Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  18. Heart rate variability and n-3 fatty acids in patients with chronic renal failure--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Christensen, J H; Aarøe, J; Knudsen, N; Dideriksen, K; Kornerup, H J; Dyerberg, J; Schmidt, E B

    1998-02-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) often have autonomic cardiac dysfunction, which can be assessed by measuring heart rate variability (HRV). This dysfunction prediposes the patients to sudden cardiac death. This study describes 24-hour HRV in patients with CRF compared to HRV in patients with a previous myocardial infarction (MI). Furthermore, associations between HRV in patients with CRF and the content of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in cell membranes were examined, because n-3 PUFA may improve HRV. Twenty-nine patients with CRF treated with dialysis were enrolled. A 24-hour Holter recording was obtained at baseline and the HRV variables, RR (= mean of all normal RR intervals during the 24-hour recording) and SDNN (= standard deviation of all normal RR intervals in the entire 24-hour recording) were analyzed. Also, granulocyte fatty acid composition was determined. The patients were allocated to dietary supplementation with either 5.2 g of n-3 PUFA or a placebo oil (olive oil) daily for 12 weeks in a double-blind design. At the end of the supplementation period the Holter recording and blood sampling were repeated. At baseline the CRF patients' mean SDNN ws 86 ms compared to 118 ms (p < 0.01) in patients with a previous MI. After supplementation with either n-3 PUFA or placebo a highly significant correlation was observed between the content of n-3 PUFA in cell membranes and HRV (r = 0.71, p < 0.01). Furthermore, when the patients were dichotomized according to their mean SDNN, it was found, that those with the highest SDNN had a higher content of n-3 PUFA in cell membranes compared to those with the lowest SDNN (7.8% vs 4.2%, p < 0.05). In conclusion, HRV was decreased in CRF patients indicating a cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. The positive correlation between the n-3 PUFA content in cell membranes and HRV suggests that the effects of an increased intake of n-3 PUFA in CRF patients should be further studied.

  19. Risk-standardized Acute Admission Rates Among Patients With Diabetes and Heart Failure as a Measure of Quality of Accountable Care Organizations: Rationale, Methods, and Early Results

    PubMed Central

    Spatz, Erica S.; Lipska, Kasia J.; Dai, Ying; Bao, Haikun; Lin, Zhenqiu; Parzynski, Craig S.; Altaf, Faseeha K.; Joyce, Erin K.; Montague, Julia A.; Ross, Joseph S.; Bernheim, Susannah M.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Drye, Elizabeth E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Population-based measures of admissions among patients with chronic conditions are important quality indicators of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), yet there are challenges in developing measures that enable fair comparisons among providers. Methods Based on consensus standards for outcome measure development and with expert and stakeholder input on methods decisions, we developed and tested two models of risk-standardized acute admission rates (RSAARs) for patients with diabetes and heart failure using 2010–2012 Medicare claims data. Model performance was assessed with deviance R-squared; score reliability was tested with intraclass correlation coefficient. We estimated RSAARs for 114 Shared Savings Program ACOs in 2012 and we assigned ACOs to 3 performance categories: no different, worse than, and better than the national rate. Results The diabetes and heart failure cohorts included 6.5 and 2.6 million Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries aged ≥65 years, respectively. Risk-adjustment variables were age, comorbidities and condition-specific severity variables, but not socioeconomic status or other contextual factors. We selected hierarchical negative binomial models with the outcome of acute, unplanned hospital admissions per 100 person-years. For the diabetes and heart failure measures respectively, the models accounted for 22% and 12% of the deviance in outcomes and score reliability was 0.89 and 0.77. For the diabetes measure, 51 (44.7%) ACOs were no different, 45 (39.5%) were better, and 18 (15.8%) were worse than the national rate. The distribution of performance for the heart failure measure was: 61 (53.5%);,37 (32.5%) and 16 (14.0%), respectively. Conclusion Measures of RSAARs for patients with diabetes and heart failure meet criteria for scientific soundness and reveal important variation in quality across ACOs. PMID:26918404

  20. Reliability and validity of the subjective component of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society clinical rating scales.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Talal; Beiri, Almoghera; Azzabi, Mohamed; Best, Alistair J; Taylor, Grahame J; Menon, Dipen K

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates the criterion validity of the subjective component of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) clinical rating scales by correlating scores obtained with these rating scales to scores obtained with the Foot Function Index (FFI) in patients with foot and ankle conditions. To date, the AOFAS scoring scales have not been shown to provide valid information despite their popularity. The FFI, on the other hand, has previously been shown to provide valid information in regard to conditions affecting the foot and ankle. A moderately strong inverse criterion validity correlation (Pearson correlation coefficient = -0.68) was shown when preoperative patients were administered both the AOFAS and FFI questionnaires, and the resultant scores were compared. Test-retest reliability measurements showed no significant difference (P = .27) between preoperative AOFAS scale scores measured at least 2 weeks apart. Construct validity was shown (P = .006) when dependent preoperative and postoperative (at least 3 months) AOFAS scale scores were compared, indicative of the clinical rating scales' ability to discriminate and predict quality of life related to foot and ankle conditions. The moderate level of correlation, satisfactory degree of reliability, and responsiveness (ability to distinguish differences between preoperative and postoperative conditions in the same patient) observed in this study suggest that the subjective component of the AOFAS clinical rating scales provides quality-of-life information that conveys acceptable validity regarding conditions affecting the foot and ankle.

  1. Azimilide causes reverse rate-dependent block while reducing both components of delayed-rectifier current in canine ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Gintant, G A

    1998-06-01

    Most class III antiarrhythmic drugs reduce the rapidly activating component of delayed-rectifier current (IKr) without affecting the slowly activating component (IKs). Recently the novel antiarrhythmic agent azimilide (NE-10064) was reported to enhance IKs at low (nanomolar) concentrations and to block both IKr and IKs at higher (micromolar) concentrations. Further to understand the electrophysiologic effects of azimilide, we compared its effects on IKr and IKs (by using whole cell clamp techniques) and action potentials (microelectrode and perforated-patch techniques) on canine ventricular myocytes. A lower azimilide concentration (50 nM) did not enhance IKs. In contrast, a therapeutic azimilide concentration (2 microM) was equieffective in reducing IKr (300-ms isochrones) and IKs (3-s isochrones) by approximately 40% during depolarizing test pulses, as well as reducing IKr (38% decrease) and IKs (33% decrease) tail currents on repolarization. Block of IKs was independent of voltage at positive test potentials. In action-potential studies, 50 nM azimilide had no effect on the action-potential duration (APD), whereas 2 microM azimilide delayed repolarization and caused reverse rate-dependent effects on the APD. Whereas the extent of APD prolongation by azimilide was not correlated with the drug-free APD, azimilide preferentially exaggerated the APD-rate relationship of myocytes displaying the steepest APD-rate relationship under drug-free conditions. In conclusion, therapeutic concentrations of azimilide that cause comparable reduction of canine ventricular IKr and IKs exert reverse rate-dependent effects, which are dependent on the steepness of the APD-rate relationship.

  2. Effects of Active Components of Fuzi and Gancao Compatibility on Bax, Bcl-2, and Caspase-3 in Chronic Heart Failure Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqin; He, Yu; Zhang, Yuyan; Zhou, Huifen; Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Hypaconitine (HA) and glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) are active components of Fuzi (Aconitum carmichaelii) and Gancao (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch); they have been used in compatibility for chronic heart failure (CHF) from ancient times. The purpose of the present research was to explore whether apoptosis pathways were related with the protective effects of HA + GA against CHF rats or not. The rats were progressed with transverse-aortic constriction (TAC) operation for 4 weeks to build the CHF state, and then the Digoxin (1 mg/kg), HA (2.07 mg/kg), GA (25 mg/kg), and HA (2.07 mg/kg) + GA (25 mg/kg) were orally administrated to rats for 1 week. The levels of BNP and cTnI in the plasma were decreased in the HA + GA group, and the heart/body weight ratio (H/B) and left ventricular (LV) parameters of transthoracic echocardiography were also declined; moreover, the expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3 were all improved in the HA + GA group than other groups in the immunohistochemistry and western blot methods. In general, the data suggested that Fuzi and Gancao compatibility could protect the CHF rats from apoptosis, which provided a strong evidence for further searching for mechanisms of them. PMID:28053643

  3. Modelling the failure behaviour of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulstich, S.; Berkhout, V.; Mayer, J.; Siebenlist, D.

    2016-09-01

    Modelling the failure behaviour of wind turbines is an essential part of offshore wind farm simulation software as it leads to optimized decision making when specifying the necessary resources for the operation and maintenance of wind farms. In order to optimize O&M strategies, a thorough understanding of a wind turbine's failure behaviour is vital and is therefore being developed at Fraunhofer IWES. Within this article, first the failure models of existing offshore O&M tools are presented to show the state of the art and strengths and weaknesses of the respective models are briefly discussed. Then a conceptual framework for modelling different failure mechanisms of wind turbines is being presented. This framework takes into account the different wind turbine subsystems and structures as well as the failure modes of a component by applying several influencing factors representing wear and break failure mechanisms. A failure function is being set up for the rotor blade as exemplary component and simulation results have been compared to a constant failure rate and to empirical wind turbine fleet data as a reference. The comparison and the breakdown of specific failure categories demonstrate the overall plausibility of the model.

  4. Failure in glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeton, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Review of state of the art concerning glass failure mechanisms and fatigue theories discusses brittle fracture in glass, fatigue mechanisms, fatigue behavior, environmental effects on failure rate, and aging.

  5. Relationship Between Changes in Pulse Pressure and Frequency Domain Components of Heart Rate Variability During Short-Term Left Ventricular Pacing in Patients with Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Bożena; Ruta, Jan; Kudryński, Krzysztof; Ptaszyński, Paweł; Klimczak, Artur; Wranicz, Jerzy Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between changes in pulse pressure (PP) and frequency domain heart rate variability (HRV) components caused by left ventricular pacing in patients with implanted cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Material/Methods Forty patients (mean age 63±8.5 years) with chronic heart failure (CHF) and implanted CRT were enrolled in the study. The simultaneous 5-minute recording of beat-to-beat arterial systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) by Finometer and standard electrocardiogram with CRT switched off (CRT/0) and left ventricular pacing (CRT/LV) was performed. PP (PP=SBP-DBP) and low- and high-frequency (LF and HF) HRV components were calculated, and the relationship between these parameters was analyzed. Results Short-term CRT/LV in comparison to CRT/0 caused a statistically significant increase in the values of PP (P<0.05), LF (P<0.05), and HF (P<0.05). A statistically significant correlation between ΔPP and ΔHF (R=0.7384, P<0.05) was observed. The ΔHF of 6 ms2 during short-term CRT/LV predicted a PP increase of ≥10% with 84.21% sensitivity and 85.71% specificity. Conclusions During short-term left ventricular pacing in patients with CRT, a significant correlation between ΔPP and ΔHF was observed. ΔHF ≥6 ms2 may serve as a tool in the selection of a suitable site for placement of a left ventricular lead. PMID:27305349

  6. Failure Rate of Direct High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomer Versus Hybrid Resin Composite Restorations in Posterior Permanent Teeth - a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Traditionally, resin composite restorations are claimed by reviews of the dental literature as being superior to glass-ionomer fillings in terms of restoration failures in posterior permanent teeth. The aim of this systematic review is to answer the clinical question, whether conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer restorations, in patients with single and/or multi-surface cavities in posterior permanent teeth, have indeed a higher failure rate than direct hybrid resin composite restorations. Methods Eight databases were searched until December 02, 2013. Trials were assessed for bias risks, in-between datasets heterogeneity and statistical sample size power. Effects sizes were computed and statistically compared. A total of 55 citations were identified through systematic literature search. From these, 46 were excluded. No trials related to high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus resin composite restorations for direct head-to-head comparison were found. Three trials related to high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam and three trials related to resin composite versus amalgam restorations could be included for adjusted indirect comparison, only. Results The available evidence suggests no difference in the failure rates between both types of restoration beyond the play of chance, is limited by lack of head-to-head comparisons and an insufficient number of trials, as well as by high bias and in-between-dataset heterogeneity risk. The current clinical evidence needs to be regarded as too poor in order to justify superiority claims regarding the failure rates of both restoration types. Sufficiently large-sized, parallel-group, randomised control trials with high internal validity are needed, in order to justify any clinically meaningful judgment to this topic. PMID:26962372

  7. Consciously controlled breathing decreases the high-frequency component of heart rate variability by inhibiting cardiac parasympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Konosuke; Maruyama, Ryoko

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat alterations in heart rate, comprises sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activities of the heart. HRV analysis is used to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation. Since respiration could be a confounding factor in HRV evaluation, some studies recommend consciously controlled breathing to standardize the method. However, it remains unclear whether controlled breathing affects HRV measurement. We compared the effects of controlled breathing on HRV with those of spontaneous breathing. In 20 healthy volunteers, we measured respiratory frequency (f), tidal volume, and blood pressure (BP) and recorded electrocardiograms during spontaneous breathing (14.8 ± 0.7 breaths/min) and controlled breathing at 15 (0.25 Hz) and 6 (0.10 Hz) breaths/min. Compared to spontaneous breathing, controlled breathing at 0.25 Hz showed a higher heart rate and a lower high-frequency (HF) component, an index of parasympathetic nerve activity, although the f was the same. During controlled breathing at 0.10 Hz, the ratio of the low frequency (LF) to HF components (LF/HF), an index of sympathetic nerve activity, increased greatly and HF decreased, while heart rate and BP remained almost unchanged. Thus, controlled breathing at 0.25 Hz, which requires mental concentration, might inhibit parasympathetic nerve activity. During controlled breathing at 0.10 Hz, LF/HF increases because some HF subcomponents are synchronized with f and probably move into the LF band. This increment leads to misinterpretation of the true autonomic nervous regulation. We recommend that the respiratory pattern of participants should be evaluated before spectral HRV analysis to correctly understand changes in autonomic nervous regulation.

  8. What does self-rated health mean? Changes and variations in the association of obesity with objective and subjective components of self-rated health*

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Claire E.; Van Hook, Jennifer; Hillemeier, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    There are concerns about the meaning of SRH and the factors individuals consider. To illustrate how SRH is contextualized, we examine how the obesity-SRH association varies across age, periods, and cohorts. We decompose SRH into subjective and objective components and used a mechanism-based APC model approach with four decades (1970s-2000s) and five birth cohorts of NHANES data (N=26,184). Obese adults rate their health more negatively than non-obese when using overall SRH with little variation by age, period, or cohort. However, when we decomposed SRH into objective and subjective components, the obesity gap widened with increasing age in objective SRH, but narrowed in subjective SRH. Additionally, the gap narrowed for more recently-born cohorts for objective SRH, but widened for subjective SRH. The results provide indirect evidence that the relationship between obesity and SRH is socially patterned according to exposure to information about obesity and the availability of resources to manage it. PMID:26811364

  9. Translating effects of inbreeding depression on component vital rates to overall population growth in endangered bighorn sheep.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Heather E; Mills, L Scott; Wehausen, John D; Stephenson, Thomas R; Luikart, Gordon

    2011-12-01

    detecting the effects of inbreeding depression on a component vital rate (e.g., fecundity) and the effects of inbreeding depression on population growth underscores the importance of quantifying inbreeding costs relative to population dynamics to effectively manage endangered populations.

  10. Wind Turbine Failures - Tackling current Problems in Failure Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reder, M. D.; Gonzalez, E.; Melero, J. J.

    2016-09-01

    The wind industry has been growing significantly over the past decades, resulting in a remarkable increase in installed wind power capacity. Turbine technologies are rapidly evolving in terms of complexity and size, and there is an urgent need for cost effective operation and maintenance (O&M) strategies. Especially unplanned downtime represents one of the main cost drivers of a modern wind farm. Here, reliability and failure prediction models can enable operators to apply preventive O&M strategies rather than corrective actions. In order to develop these models, the failure rates and downtimes of wind turbine (WT) components have to be understood profoundly. This paper is focused on tackling three of the main issues related to WT failure analyses. These are, the non-uniform data treatment, the scarcity of available failure analyses, and the lack of investigation on alternative data sources. For this, a modernised form of an existing WT taxonomy is introduced. Additionally, an extensive analysis of historical failure and downtime data of more than 4300 turbines is presented. Finally, the possibilities to encounter the lack of available failure data by complementing historical databases with Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) alarms are evaluated.

  11. Oscillatory behavior of ventricular action potential duration in heart failure patients at respiratory rate and low frequency

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Ben; Child, Nick; Van Duijvenboden, Stefan; Orini, Michele; Chen, Zhong; Coronel, Ruben; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Gill, Jaspal S.; Gill, Jaswinder S.; Taggart, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Oscillations of arterial pressure occur spontaneously at a frequency of approximately 0.1 Hz coupled with synchronous oscillations of sympathetic nerve activity (“Mayer waves”). This study investigated the extent to which corresponding oscillations may occur in ventricular action potential duration (APD). Fourteen ambulatory (outpatient) heart failure patients with biventricular pacing devices were studied while seated upright watching movie clips to maintain arousal. Activation recovery intervals (ARI) as a measure of ventricular APD were obtained from unipolar electrograms recorded from the LV epicardial pacing lead during steady state RV pacing from the device. Arterial blood pressure was measured non-invasively (Finapress) and respiration monitored. Oscillations were quantified using time frequency and coherence analysis. Oscillatory behavior of ARI at the respiratory frequency was observed in all subjects. The magnitude of the ARI variation ranged from 2.2 to 6.9 ms (mean 5.0 ms). Coherence analysis showed a correlation with respiratory oscillation for an average of 43% of the recording time at a significance level of p < 0.05. Oscillations in systolic blood pressure in the Mayer wave frequency range were observed in all subjects for whom blood pressure was recorded (n = 13). ARI oscillation in the Mayer wave frequency range was observed in 6/13 subjects (46%) over a range of 2.9 to 9.2 ms. Coherence with Mayer waves at the p < 0.05 significance level was present for an average of 29% of the recording time. In ambulatory patients with heart failure during enhanced mental arousal, left ventricular epicardial APD (ARI) oscillated at the respiratory frequency (approximately 0.25 Hz). In 6 patients (46%) APD oscillated at the slower Mayer wave frequency (approximately 0.1 Hz). These findings may be important in understanding sympathetic activity-related arrhythmogenesis. PMID:25389408

  12. An in vivo study of the orientation-dependent and independent components of transverse relaxation rates in white matter.

    PubMed

    Gil, Rita; Khabipova, Diana; Zwiers, Marcel; Hilbert, Tom; Kober, Tobias; Marques, José P

    2016-12-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides information that allows the estimation of white-matter (WM) fibre orientation and distribution, but it does not provide information about myelin density, fibre concentration or fibre size within each voxel. On the other hand, quantitative relaxation contrasts (like the apparent transverse relaxation, R2∗) offer iron and myelin-related contrast, but their dependence on the orientation of microstructure with respect to the applied magnetic field, B0 , is often neglected. The aim of this work was to combine the fibre orientation information retrieved from the DWI acquisition and the sensitivity to microstructural information from quantitative relaxation parameters. The in vivo measured quantitative transverse relaxation maps (R2 and R2∗) were decomposed into their orientation-dependent and independent components, using the DWI fibre orientation information as prior knowledge. The analysis focused on major WM fibre bundles such as the forceps major (FMj), forceps minor (FMn), cingulum (CG) and corticospinal tracts (CST). The orientation-dependent R2 parameters, despite their small size (0-1.5 Hz), showed higher variability across different fibre populations, while those derived from R2∗, although larger (3.1-4.5 Hz), were mostly bundle-independent. With this article, we have, for the first time, attempted the in vivo characterization of the orientation-(in)dependent components of the transverse relaxation rates and demonstrated that the orientation of WM fibres influences both R2 and R2∗ contrasts.

  13. Rate of Virological Treatment Failure and Frequencies of Drug Resistance Genotypes among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Subjects on Antiretroviral Therapy in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Oscar; Ruíz, Lidia; Vallejo, Alex; Clotet, Bonaventura; Leal, Manuel; Soriano, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    The knowledge of which drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genotypes are the most prevalent in a community may be helpful for designing the best salvage regimens. A total of 540 individuals on antiretroviral therapy attending 18 different outclinics in Spain were examined in a cross-sectional study conducted during June 2000. The overall rate of virologic failure (>50 HIV RNA copies/ml) was 54%. Among the subjects showing treatment failure, 79% harbored resistant HIV genotypes, 77% showed resistance to nucleoside analogues, 53% showed resistance to protease inhibitors, and 42% showed resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Overall, 78.5% of individuals harbored HIV strains which showed resistance to two or more drug classes. Moreover, nucleotide substitutions causing broad cross-resistance among compounds within each drug family were quite common. These findings suggest that drug resistance mutations are very prevalent among subjects who have experienced several treatment failures. Therefore, facilitating the arrival of compounds belonging to new drug classes should be considered a priority. PMID:12354903

  14. Human sperm devoid of germinal angiotensin-converting enzyme is responsible for total fertilization failure and lower fertilization rates by conventional in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Le-Jun; Zhang, Feng-Bin; Liu, Shu-Yuan; Tian, Yong-Hong; Le, Fang; Wang, Li-Ya; Lou, Hang-Ying; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Huang, He-Feng; Jin, Fan

    2014-06-01

    In conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF), complete failure of fertilization occurs in 5% to 15% of treatments. Although the causes may be unclear, sperm defects appear to be the major contributor. However, a convincing test is not yet available that can predict the risk of fertilization failure. In this study, we found that germinal angiotensin-converting enzyme (gACE) (also called testicular ACE) was undetectable in sperm from patients who had total fertilization failure (TFF) and lower fertilization rates (LFRs) by IVF based on Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence analyses. Additionally, almost all of the patients without gACE on sperm (23 of 25) manifested a TT genotype of the rs4316 single-nucleotide polymorphism of ACE. Overall, our results indicate that the absence of gACE expression is responsible for TFF and LFRs by IVF. The rs4316 polymorphism of ACE might be associated with infertility in those patients. We conclude that sperm lacking gACE may be recognized before commencing IVF and that the patients may be directed instead to consider intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  15. Simulation of initial frontside and backside wear rates in a modular acetabular component with multiple screw holes.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, S M; Ochoa, J A; Hovey, C B; White, C V

    1999-09-01

    A sliding distance-based finite element formulation was implemented to predict initial wear rates at the front and back surfaces of a commercially available modular polyethylene component during in vitro loading conditions. We found that contact area, contact stress, and wear at the back surface were more sensitive to the liner/shell conformity than the presence of multiple screw holes. Furthermore, backside linear and volumetric wear rates were at least three orders of magnitude less than respective wear estimates at the articulating surface. This discrepancy was primarily attributed to the difference in maximum sliding distances at the articulating surfaces (measured in mm) versus the back surface (measured in microm). This is the first study in which backside wear has been quantified and explicitly compared with frontside wear using clinically relevant metrics established for the articulating surface. The results of this study suggest that with a polished metal shell, the presence of screw holes does not substantially increase abrasive backside wear when compared with the effects of backside nonconformity.

  16. Gravity field and solar component of the precession rate and nutation coefficients of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhotka, C.; Reimond, S.; Souchay, J.; Baur, O.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is first to determine the gravity field of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and second to derive the solar component of the precession rate and nutation coefficients of the spin-axis of the comet nucleus, i.e. without the direct, usually larger, effect of outgassing. The gravity field and related moments of inertia are obtained from two polyhedra, which are provided by the Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System (OSIRIS) and NAVigation CAMera (NAVCAM) experiments on Rosetta, and are based on the assumption of uniform density for the comet nucleus. We also calculate the forced precession rate as well as the nutation coefficients on the basis of Kinoshita's theory of rotation of the rigid Earth and adapted it to be able to indirectly include the effect of outgassing on the rotational parameters. The second degree denormalized Stokes coefficients of comet 67P/C-G turn out to be (bracketed numbers refer to second shape model) C20 ≃ -6.74 [-7.93] × 10-2, C22 ≃ 2.60 [2.71] × 10-2, consistent with normalized principal moments of inertia A/MR2 ≃ 0.13 [0.11], B/MR2 ≃ 0.23 [0.22], with polar moment c = C/MR2 ≃ 0.25, depending on the choice of the polyhedron model. The obliquity between the rotation axis and the mean orbit normal is ε ≃ 52°, and the precession rate only due to solar torques becomes dot{ψ }in [20,30] arcsec yr^{-1}. Oscillations in longitude caused by the gravitational pull of the Sun turn out to be of the order of Δψ ≃ 1 arcmin, and oscillations in obliquity can be estimated to be of the order of Δε ≃ 0.5 arcmin.

  17. Excellent Local Control Rates and Distinctive Patterns of Failure in Myxoid Liposarcoma Treated With Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh Zagars, Gunar K.; Ballo, Matthew T.; Patel, Shreyaskumar R.; Lewis, Valerae O.; Benjamin, Robert S.; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local control rates and patterns of metastatic relapse in patients with localized myxoid liposarcoma treated with conservation surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Patients and Methods: Between 1960 and 2003, 127 patients with non-metastatic myxoid liposarcoma were treated with conservation surgery and RT at our institution. The median patient age was 39 years (range, 14-79 years). Of the 127 patients, 46% underwent preoperative RT (median dose, 50 Gy) and 54% underwent postoperative RT (median dose, 60 Gy). Also, 28% received doxorubicin-based chemotherapy as a part of their treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 9.1 years. The overall survival rate at 5 and 10 years was 87% and 79%, respectively. The corresponding disease-free survival rates were 81% and 73%. The local control rate at {>=}5 years was 97%. The actuarial rate of distant metastases at 5 and 10 years was 15% and 24%, respectively. Of the 27 patients who developed distant metastases, 48% did so in the retroperitoneum, 22% in other extrapulmonary soft tissues, 22% in the lung, 15% in bone, and 4% in the liver. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that RT and conservation surgery for localized myxoid liposarcoma provide excellent local control. Distant metastatic relapse tended to occur in the retroperitoneum and other nonpulmonary soft tissues. Therefore, staging and surveillance imaging should include the abdomen and pelvis, as well as the thorax, for patients with localized myxoid liposarcoma.

  18. Associations of estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria with mortality and renal failure by sex: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nitsch, Dorothea; Grams, Morgan; Sang, Yingying; Black, Corri; Cirillo, Massimo; Djurdjev, Ognjenka; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Jassal, Simerjot K; Kimm, Heejin; Kronenberg, Florian; Øien, Cecilia M; Levin, Adeera; Woodward, Mark; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess for the presence of a sex interaction in the associations of estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria with all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and end stage renal disease. Design Random effects meta-analysis using pooled individual participant data. Setting 46 cohorts from Europe, North and South America, Asia, and Australasia. Participants 2 051 158 participants (54% women) from general population cohorts (n=1 861 052), high risk cohorts (n=151 494), and chronic kidney disease cohorts (n=38 612). Eligible cohorts (except chronic kidney disease cohorts) had at least 1000 participants, outcomes of either mortality or end stage renal disease of ≥50 events, and baseline measurements of estimated glomerular filtration rate according to the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation (mL/min/1.73 m2) and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (mg/g). Results Risks of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality were higher in men at all levels of estimated glomerular filtration rate and albumin-creatinine ratio. While higher risk was associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher albumin-creatinine ratio in both sexes, the slope of the risk relationship for all-cause mortality and for cardiovascular mortality were steeper in women than in men. Compared with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 95, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality at estimated glomerular filtration rate 45 was 1.32 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.61) in women and 1.22 (1.00 to 1.48) in men (Pinteraction<0.01). Compared with a urinary albumin-creatinine ratio of 5, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality at urinary albumin-creatinine ratio 30 was 1.69 (1.54 to 1.84) in women and 1.43 (1.31 to 1.57) in men (Pinteraction<0.01). Conversely, there was no evidence of a sex difference in associations of estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio with end stage renal

  19. Success rate and risk factors for failure of empirical antifungal therapy with itraconazole in patients with hematological malignancies: a multicenter, prospective, open-label, observational study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Jeong; Cheong, June-Won; Min, Yoo Hong; Choi, Young Jin; Lee, Dong-Gun; Lee, Je-Hwan; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Yang Soo; Kwak, Jae-Yong; Park, Jinny; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Hoon-Gu; Kim, Byung Soo; Ryoo, Hun-Mo; Jang, Jun Ho; Kim, Min Kyoung; Kang, Hye Jin; Cho, In Sung; Mun, Yeung Chul; Jo, Deog-Yeon; Kim, Ho Young; Park, Byeong-Bae; Kim, Jin Seok

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the success rate of empirical antifungal therapy with itraconazole and evaluated risk factors for predicting the failure of empirical antifungal therapy. A multicenter, prospective, observational study was performed in patients with hematological malignancies who had neutropenic fever and received empirical antifungal therapy with itraconazole at 22 centers. A total of 391 patients who had abnormal findings on chest imaging tests (31.0%) or a positive result of enzyme immunoassay for serum galactomannan (17.6%) showed a 56.5% overall success rate. Positive galactomannan tests before the initiation of the empirical antifungal therapy (P=0.026, hazard ratio [HR], 2.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-4.69) and abnormal findings on the chest imaging tests before initiation of the empirical antifungal therapy (P=0.022, HR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.11-3.71) were significantly associated with poor outcomes for the empirical antifungal therapy. Eight patients (2.0%) had premature discontinuation of itraconazole therapy due to toxicity. It is suggested that positive galactomannan tests and abnormal findings on the chest imaging tests at the time of initiation of the empirical antifungal therapy are risk factors for predicting the failure of the empirical antifungal therapy with itraconazole. (Clinical Trial Registration on National Cancer Institute website, NCT01060462).

  20. A Randomized Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Local Endometrial Injury on the Clinical Pregnancy Rate of Frozen Embryo Transfer Cycles in Patients With Repeated Implantation Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokh-Tehraninejad, Ensieh; Dashti, Minoo; Hossein-Rashidi, Batool; Azimi-Nekoo, Elham; Haghollahi, Fedyeh; Kalantari, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Repeated implantation failure (RIF) is a condition in which the embryos implantation decreases in the endometrium. So, our aim was to evaluate the effect of local endometrial injury on embryo transfer results. Materials and methods: In this simple randomized clinical trial (RCT), a total of 120 patients were selected. The participants were less than 40 years old, and they are in their minimum two cycles of vitro fertilization (IVF). Patients were divided randomly into two groups of LEI (Local endometrial injury) and a control group (n = 60 in each group). The first group had four small endometrial injuries from anterior, posterior, and lateral uterus walls which were obtained from people who were in 21th day of their previous IVF cycle. The second group was the patients who have not received any intervention. Results: The experimental and control patients were matched in the following factors. Regarding the clinical pregnancy rate, there was no significant difference noted between the experimental and the control group. Conclusion: Local endometrial injury in a preceding cycle does not increase the clinical pregnancy rate in the subsequent FET cycle of patients with repeated implantation failure. PMID:28101111

  1. Fast Track or Failure: A Study of the Graduation and Dropout Rates of Ph.D. Students in Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ours, J. C.; Ridder, G.

    2003-01-01

    Analyzes Ph.D. education procedures for economics in The Netherlands. Finds that universities are successful in persuading students to quit who are unlikely to graduate or to graduate in a timely manner. Also finds that active researchers who supervise doctoral candidates have low dropout and high graduation rates, because they attract good…

  2. Estimation of calcium and phosphorus content in growing and finishing pigs: whole empty body components and relative accretion rates.

    PubMed

    Pettey, L A; Cromwell, G L; Jang, Y D; Lindemann, M D

    2015-01-01

    Two comparative serial-slaughter experiments were conducted to determine whole empty body (WEB) composition and accretion rates of Ca and P in 18 to 109 kg BW pigs to provide information for modeling of these nutrients for growth. Both studies were conducted with 5 sets of 5 littermate barrows which were allotted to 5 slaughter groups in each study (Exp. 1: 18, 27, 36, 45, and 54 kg BW; Exp. 2: 36, 54, 73, 91, and 109 kg BW). Pigs were fed corn-soybean meal-based diets fortified with minerals and vitamins in 2 dietary phases in Exp. 1 (Phase 1: 18 to 36 kg BW; Phase 2: 36 to 54 kg BW) and 3 dietary phases in Exp. 2 (Phase 2: 36 to 54 kg BW; Phase 3: 54 to 78 kg BW; and Phase 4: 78 to 109 kg BW). At the predetermined BW, pigs were slaughtered and separated into body components of hair, hooves, blood, head, viscera, and carcass. The carcass was split along the dorsal midline and the left carcass side was ground for chemical analysis. Whole empty body weight averaged 93.6% and 94.0% of live BW in Exp. 1 and Exp. 2, respectively. As WEB weight increased in both experiments, the percentage carcass of the WEB linearly (P < 0.05) increased, the percentage viscera linearly (P < 0.05) decreased, and the mass (g) of N, ash, Ca, and P in the WEB increased linearly (R(2) = 0.98). The concentration (g/kg) of P in the WEB of 18 to 54 kg pigs increased from 4.30 to 4.57 (linear; P < 0.05) and for Ca increased from 5.13 to 5.66 (linear; P < 0.05). In Exp. 2, P concentration was not related to WEB weight and Ca concentration increased quadratically (P < 0.05). The relative accretion rate of N to P was 1.00 (R(2) = 0.99) in the pigs from 18 to 54 kg. In conclusion, these results indicate that compositional changes as BW increases are strongly related to P retention and that the quantification of WEB P and relationships of WEB P to other chemical components in the body may be useful for modeling purposes in growing and finishing pigs.

  3. PREDICTIVE MODELING OF HOSPITAL READMISSION RATES USING ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORD-WIDE MACHINE LEARNING: A CASE-STUDY USING MOUNT SINAI HEART FAILURE COHORT

    PubMed Central

    SHAMEER, KHADER; JOHNSON, KIPP W; YAHI, ALEXANDRE; MIOTTO, RICCARDO; LI, LI; RICKS, DORAN; JEBAKARAN, JEBAKUMAR; KOVATCH, PATRICIA; SENGUPTA, PARTHO P.; GELIJNS, ANNETINE; MOSKOVITZ, ALAN; DARROW, BRUCE; REICH, DAVID L; KASARSKIS, ANDREW; TATONETTI, NICHOLAS P.; PINNEY, SEAN; DUDLEY, JOEL T

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of preventable hospital readmissions that result from chronic or acute conditions like stroke, heart failure, myocardial infarction and pneumonia remains a significant challenge for improving the outcomes and decreasing the cost of healthcare delivery in the United States. Patient readmission rates are relatively high for conditions like heart failure (HF) despite the implementation of high-quality healthcare delivery operation guidelines created by regulatory authorities. Multiple predictive models are currently available to evaluate potential 30-day readmission rates of patients. Most of these models are hypothesis driven and repetitively assess the predictive abilities of the same set of biomarkers as predictive features. In this manuscript, we discuss our attempt to develop a data-driven, electronic-medical record-wide (EMR-wide) feature selection approach and subsequent machine learning to predict readmission probabilities. We have assessed a large repertoire of variables from electronic medical records of heart failure patients in a single center. The cohort included 1,068 patients with 178 patients were readmitted within a 30-day interval (16.66% readmission rate). A total of 4,205 variables were extracted from EMR including diagnosis codes (n=1,763), medications (n=1,028), laboratory measurements (n=846), surgical procedures (n=564) and vital signs (n=4). We designed a multistep modeling strategy using the Naïve Bayes algorithm. In the first step, we created individual models to classify the cases (readmitted) and controls (non-readmitted). In the second step, features contributing to predictive risk from independent models were combined into a composite model using a correlation-based feature selection (CFS) method. All models were trained and tested using a 5-fold cross-validation method, with 70% of the cohort used for training and the remaining 30% for testing. Compared to existing predictive models for HF readmission rates (AUCs in the range

  4. Dissociation between blood pressure and heart rate response to hypoxia after bilateral carotid body removal in men with systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Niewinski, Piotr; Janczak, Dariusz; Rucinski, Artur; Tubek, Stanislaw; Engelman, Zoar J; Jazwiec, Przemyslaw; Banasiak, Waldemar; Sobotka, Paul A; Hart, Emma C J; Paton, Julian F R; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2014-03-01

    While the ventilatory response to hypoxia is known to be mediated by the carotid bodies, the origin of the haemodynamic alterations evoked by hypoxia is less certain. Bilateral carotid body removal (CBR) performed to treat congestive heart failure may serve as a model to improve our understanding of haemodynamic responses to hypoxia in humans. We studied six congestive heart failure patients before and 1 month after CBR [median (interquartile range): age, 58.5 (56-61) years old; and ejection fraction, 32 (25-34)%]. Peripheral chemosensitivity (hypoxic ventilatory response) was equated to the slope relating lowest oxygen saturation to highest minute ventilation following exposures to hypoxia. Likewise, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) slopes were calculated as slopes relating the lowest oxygen saturations to the highest SBP, DBP and HR responses. We found that CBR reduces the hypoxic ventilatory response (91%, P < 0.05), SBP (71%, P < 0.05) and DBP slopes (59%, P = 0.07). In contrast, the HR slope remained unchanged. The dissociation between the blood pressure and HR responses after CBR shows involvement of a different chemoreceptive site(s) maintaining the response to acute hypoxia. We conclude that carotid bodies are responsible for ventilatory and blood pressure responses, while the HR response might be mediated by the aortic bodies. The significant reduction of the blood pressure response to hypoxia after CBR suggests a decrease in sympathetic tone, which is of particular clinical relevance in congestive heart failure.

  5. Relationships among achieved heart rate, β-blocker dose and long-term outcomes in patients with heart failure with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Jonathan G; Chiu, Michael H; Southern, Danielle A; Knudtson, Merril; Wilton, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    Objective Higher β-blocker dose and lower heart rate are associated with decreased mortality in patients with systolic heart failure (HF) and sinus rhythm. However, in the 30% of patients with HF with atrial fibrillation (AF), whether β-blocker dose or heart rate predict mortality is less clear. We assessed the association between β-blocker dose, heart rate and all-cause mortality in patients with HF and AF. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study in 935 patients (60% men, mean age 74, 44.7% with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)) discharged with concurrent diagnoses of HF and AF. We used Cox models to test independent associations between higher versus lower predischarge heart rate (dichotomised at 70/min) and higher versus lower β-blocker dose (dichotomised at 50% of the evidence-based target), with the primary composite end point of mortality or cardiovascular rehospitalisation over a median of 2.9 years. All analyses were stratified by the presence of left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVEF≤40%). Results After adjustment for covariates, neither β-blocker dose nor predischarge heart rate was associated with the primary composite end point. However, tachycardia at admission (heart rate >120/min) was associated with a reduced risk of the composite outcome in patients with both reduced LVEF (adjusted HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.88, p<0.01) and preserved LVEF (adjusted HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.64 to 0.98, p=0.04). Conclusions We found no associations between predischarge heart rate or β-blocker dosage and clinical outcomes in patients with recent hospitalisations for HF and AF. PMID:28123760

  6. Highly effective and reversible control of the rocking rates of rotaxanes by changes to the size of stimulus-responsive ring components.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Keiji; Ishibashi, Kazuaki; Shiba, Yoshinobu; Doi, Yasuko; Tobe, Yoshito

    2008-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized rotaxanes whose rates of rocking motion (pendular motion) were switched reversibly through changes to the size of the ring component in response to external stimuli. The ring molecules of the rotaxanes incorporate a metaphenylene unit, which swings like a pendulum, and a dianthrylethane unit, which undergoes reversible isomerization in response to photo- and thermal stimuli and changes the size of the ring component. The rocking rates were estimated quantitatively by variable-temperature (VT) NMR spectroscopy and saturation transfer experiments, which revealed substantial changes in the rates between the open and closed forms, particularly in the case of rotaxanes with an isopropoxy group attached to a phenylene unit.

  7. Multi-scale defect interactions in high-rate brittle material failure. Part I: Model formulation and application to ALON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonge, Andrew L.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2016-01-01

    Within this two part series we develop a new material model for ceramic protection materials to provide an interface between microstructural parameters and bulk continuum behavior to provide guidance for materials design activities. Part I of this series focuses on the model formulation that captures the strength variability and strain rate sensitivity of brittle materials and presents a statistical approach to assigning the local flaw distribution within a specimen. The material model incorporates a Mie-Grüneisen equation of state, micromechanics based damage growth, granular flow and dilatation of the highly damaged material, and pore compaction for the porosity introduced by granular flow. To provide initial qualitative validation and illustrate the usefulness of the model, we use the model to investigate Edge on Impact experiments (Strassburger, 2004) on Aluminum Oxynitride (AlON), and discuss the interactions of multiple mechanisms during such an impact event. Part II of this series is focused on additional qualitative validation and using the model to suggest material design directions for boron carbide.

  8. Elevated Heart Rate is Associated with Cardiac Denervation in Patients with Heart Failure: A 123-Iodine-MIBG Myocardial Scintigraphy Study

    PubMed Central

    Villacorta, Aline Sterque; Villacorta, Humberto; de Souza, Jenne Serrão; Teixeira, José Antônio Caldas; Muradas, Maria Clara S. S. S.; Alves, Christiane Rodrigues; Precht, Bernardo Campanário; Porto, Pilar; Ubaldo, Letícia; Mesquita, Cláudio Tinoco; da Nóbrega, Antônio Cláudio Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Background In the Systolic Heart Failure Treatment With the If Inhibitor Ivabradine Trial (SHIFT), heart rate (HR) reduction with ivabradine was associated with improved survival and reduced hospitalizations in patients with heart failure (HF). The mechanisms by which elevated HR increases mortality are not fully understood. Objective To assess the relationship of baseline HR with clinical, neurohormonal and cardiac sympathetic activity in patients with chronic HF and elevated HR. Method Patients with chronic HF who were in sinus rhythm and had resting HR>70 bpm despite optimal medical treatment were included in a randomized, double-blind study comparing ivabradine versus pyridostigmine. This report refers to the baseline data of 16 initial patients. Baseline HR (before randomization to one of the drugs) was assessed, and patients were classified into two groups, with HR below or above mean values. Cardiac sympathetic activity was assessed by 123-iodine-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy. Results Mean HR was 83.5±11.5 bpm (range 72 to 104), and seven (43.7%) patients had HR above the mean. These patients had lower 6-min walk distance (292.3±93 vs 465.2±97.1 m, p=0.0029), higher values of N-Terminal-proBNP (median 708.4 vs 76.1, p=0.035) and lower late heart/mediastinum rate, indicating cardiac denervation (1.48±0.12 vs 1.74±0.09, p<0.001). Conclusion Elevated resting HR in patients with HF under optimal medical treatment was associated with cardiac denervation, worse functional capacity, and neurohormonal activation. PMID:27982270

  9. Rates of Reconstruction Failure in Patients Undergoing Immediate Reconstruction With Tissue Expanders and/or Implants and Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fowble, Barbara; Park, Catherine; Wang, Frederick; Peled, Anne; Alvarado, Michael; Ewing, Cheryl; Esserman, Laura; Foster, Robert; Sbitany, Hani; Hanlon, Alex

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Mastectomy rates for breast cancer have increased, with a parallel increase in immediate reconstruction. For some women, tissue expander and implant (TE/I) reconstruction is the preferred or sole option. This retrospective study examined the rate of TE/I reconstruction failure (ie, removal of the TE or I with the inability to replace it resulting in no final reconstruction or autologous tissue reconstruction) in patients receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2012, 99 women had skin-sparing mastectomies (SSM) or total nipple/areolar skin-sparing mastectomies (TSSM) with immediate TE/I reconstruction and PMRT for pathologic stage II to III breast cancer. Ninety-seven percent had chemotherapy (doxorubicin and taxane-based), 22% underwent targeted therapies, and 78% had endocrine therapy. Radiation consisted of 5000 cGy given in 180 to 200 cGy to the reconstructed breast with or without treatment to the supraclavicular nodes. Median follow-up was 3.8 years. Results: Total TE/I failure was 18% (12% without final reconstruction, 6% converted to autologous reconstruction). In univariate analysis, the strongest predictor of reconstruction failure (RF) was absence of total TE/I coverage (acellular dermal matrix and/or serratus muscle) at the time of radiation. RF occurred in 32.5% of patients without total coverage compared to 9% with coverage (P=.0069). For women with total coverage, the location of the mastectomy scar in the inframammary fold region was associated with higher RF (19% vs 0%, P=.0189). In multivariate analysis, weight was a significant factor for RF, with lower weight associated with a higher RF. Weight appeared to be a surrogate for the interaction of total coverage, thin skin flaps, interval to exchange, and location of the mastectomy scar. Conclusions: RFs in patients receiving PMRT were lowered with total TE/I coverage at the time of radiation by avoiding inframammary fold incisions and

  10. Clinical and haemodynamic correlates of heart rate turbulence as a non-invasive index of baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Maestri, Roberto; Pinna, Gian Domenico; Sleight, Peter; Febo, Oreste

    2011-01-01

    HRT (heart rate turbulence), describing the heart rate changes following a premature ventricular contraction, has been regarded as an indirect index of baroreflex function. However, limited data are available on its relationship with invasive assessment by phenylephrine injection (Phe-slope). In the present study, we therefore compared these methodologies in a series of patients with HF (heart failure) in which both measures together with clinical and haemodynamic data were available. HRT parameters [TO (turbulence onset) and TS (turbulence slope)] were measured from 24-h Holter recordings obtained within 1 week of baroreflex sensitivity assessment and right heart haemodynamic evaluation (Swan-Ganz catheter). HRT was computable in 135 out of 157 (86%) patients who had both a phenylephrine test and haemodynamic evaluation. TO and TS significantly correlated with Phe-slope (r=−0.39, P<0.0001 and r=0.66, P<0.0001 respectively). Age, baseline heart rate, LVEF (left ventricular ejection fraction), PCP (pulmonary capillary pressure), CI (cardiac index) and sodium were significant and independent predictors of Phe-slope, accounting for 51% of its variability. Similarly, age, baseline heart rate and PCP, and NYHA (New York Heart Association) classes III–IV were independent predictors for TS and explained 48% of its variability, whereas only CI and LVEF were found to be significantly related to TO and explained a very limited proportion (20%) of the variability. In conclusion, these results suggest that HRT may be regarded as a surrogate measure of baroreflex sensitivity in clinical and prognostic evaluation in patients with HF. PMID:21526982

  11. Rate of change in cerebral oxygenation and blood pressure in response to passive changes in posture: a comparison between pure autonomic failure patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Tachtsidis, Ilias; Elwell, Clare E; Leung, Terence S; Bleasdale-Barr, Katharine; Hunt, Katharine; Toms, Nathan; Smith, Martin; Mathias, Christopher J; Delpy, David T

    2005-01-01

    The cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to head-up postural change are compromised in pure autonomic failure (PAF) patients because of sympathetic denervation. The aim of this study was to characterize the rate of change of systemic mean blood pressure (MBP) and cerebral haemodynamics in response to passive posture changes. Nine PAF patients and 9 age-matched controls took part in this study. MBP and oxy- (O2Hb), deoxy-haemoglobin (HHb), and tissue oxygenation index (TOI) on the forehead were continuously monitored non-invasively using the Portapres and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), respectively. From visual inspection of the haemoglobin difference signal (Hb(diff) = O2Hb-HHb), seven distinct phases were marked (1: supine, 2: start passive tilt, 3: head up to 60 degrees degrees, 4: end of tilt, 5: tilt reversal, 6: return to supine, 7: rest); the same time points were used for all of the other signals. For each phase, the slope was calculated using a linear regression algorithm. Significant differences were found between PAF patients and controls in the Hb(diff) slope magnitudes for phases 3 (P < .05) and 5 (P = .01), and the duration of phase 2 (P < .05). MBP slope magnitudes showed significant differences for phases 2 (P < .01) and 5 (P < .01). These differences in the rate of change suggest differences in blood vessel resistance related to sympathetic activation.

  12. Disparate Rates of Utilization and Progression to Combined Heart Failure and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease among Asians and Pacific Islanders in Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Elizabeth; Taira, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to compare ethnic differences in the rates of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations, and to examine ethnic differences in how quickly patients with either chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or congestive heart failure (CHF) developed both diseases. A large health plan in Hawai.i provided administrative data (2007 to 2010) on patients of Native Hawaiian, Japanese, Chinese, Filipino, and White race/ethnicity. The study found distinct patterns of health risks among the multi-ethnic population of patients with COPD, CHF, or both conditions. Native Hawaiians had the highest rates of ED visits and hospitalizations. Japanese, the largest ethnic group and relatively low health risks, were selected as the reference population. In adjusted regression models, Filipino patients with CHF developed COPD the most rapidly; 71% faster than Japanese patients. Compared to Japanese, Native Hawaiians with COPD transitioned to CHF 68% faster. The study highlights ethnic disparities in adverse events and disease progression in patients with COPD and CHF, with important implications for clinical practice. Health care providers may want to inform patients of ways to mitigate the risks. PMID:27563499

  13. Hybrid Microcircuit Failure Rate Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    drawn. The problem with the metal platform package was a thermal mismatch between the metal package and the glass seal around the leads and was limited to...made generalizations for broad classifications of package types virtually impossible. Package seal perimeter, however, was found to be a significant...parameter for all types of packages. The new package term is a function of only the seal perimeter, temperature, and environment. f. The substrate

  14. Direct Contra Naïve-Indirect Comparison of Clinical Failure Rates between High-Viscosity GIC and Conventional Amalgam Restorations: An Empirical Study

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2013-01-01

    Background Naïve-indirect comparisons are comparisons between competing clinical interventions’ evidence from separate (uncontrolled) trials. Direct comparisons are comparisons within randomised control trials (RCTs). The objective of this empirical study is to test the null-hypothesis that trends and performance differences inferred from naïve-indirect comparisons and from direct comparisons/RCTs regarding the failure rates of amalgam and direct high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement (HVGIC) restorations in permanent posterior teeth have similar direction and magnitude. Methods A total of 896 citations were identified through systematic literature search. From these, ten and two uncontrolled clinical longitudinal studies for HVGIC and amalgam, respectively, were included for naïve-indirect comparison and could be matched with three out twenty RCTs. Summary effects sizes were computed as Odds ratios (OR; 95% Confidence intervals) and compared with those from RCTs. Trend directions were inferred from 95% Confidence interval overlaps and direction of point estimates; magnitudes of performance differences were inferred from the median point estimates (OR) with 25% and 75% percentile range, for both types of comparison. Mann-Whitney U test was applied to test for statistically significant differences between point estimates of both comparison types. Results Trends and performance differences inferred from naïve-indirect comparison based on evidence from uncontrolled clinical longitudinal studies and from direct comparisons based on RCT evidence are not the same. The distributions of the point estimates differed significantly for both comparison types (Mann–Whitney U  =  25, nindirect  =  26; ndirect  =  8; p  =  0.0013, two-tailed). Conclusion The null-hypothesis was rejected. Trends and performance differences inferred from either comparison between HVGIC and amalgam restorations failure rates in permanent posterior teeth are not the same. It is

  15. Improving teacher-child relationship quality and teacher-rated behavioral adjustment amongst externalizing preschoolers: effects of a two-component intervention.

    PubMed

    Vancraeyveldt, Caroline; Verschueren, Karine; Wouters, Sofie; Van Craeyevelt, Sanne; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Colpin, Hilde

    2015-02-01

    The school-based Playing-2-gether is a 12-week intervention with two components aimed at decreasing child externalizing behavior through improving teacher-child interactions. The first component is rooted in attachment theory and aimed at enhancing teacher-child relationship quality, and the second is based on learning theory and aimed at improving teachers' behavior management. In this three-wave randomized study, effects of Playing-2-gether on the teacher-child relationship quality and on teacher-rated child behavioral adjustment were investigated. To this aim, 175 dyads consisting of male preschoolers with relatively high levels of externalizing problem behavior and their teachers were randomly assigned to Playing-2-gether (n = 89) or an education-as-usual control condition (n = 86). Teacher-rated questionnaires were collected at pre-test, after the first intervention component, and at post-test. At post-test, the intervention group showed a larger decrease in teacher-child conflict, child conduct problems, and child hyperactivity/inattention. Supplementary analyses showed that all positive effects were already visible after the first intervention component and that teacher-child conflict, child conduct problems and hyperactivity/inattention did not further reduce during the second component. In addition, an increase in closeness was found following the first component, but subsequently disappeared at post-test.

  16. Failure detection and identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massoumnia, Mohammad-Ali; Verghese, George C.; Willsky, Alan S.

    1989-01-01

    Using the geometric concept of an unobservability subspace, a solution is given to the problem of detecting and identifying control system component failures in linear, time-invariant systems. Conditions are developed for the existence of a causal, linear, time-invariant processor that can detect and uniquely identify a component failure, first for the case where components can fail simultaneously, and then for the case where they fail only one at a time. Explicit design algorithms are provided when these conditions are satisfied. In addition to time-domain solvability conditions, frequency-domain interpretations of the results are given, and connections are drawn with results already available in the literature.

  17. The failure of earthquake failure models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.

    2001-01-01

    In this study I show that simple heuristic models and numerical calculations suggest that an entire class of commonly invoked models of earthquake failure processes cannot explain triggering of seismicity by transient or "dynamic" stress changes, such as stress changes associated with passing seismic waves. The models of this class have the common feature that the physical property characterizing failure increases at an accelerating rate when a fault is loaded (stressed) at a constant rate. Examples include models that invoke rate state friction or subcritical crack growth, in which the properties characterizing failure are slip or crack length, respectively. Failure occurs when the rate at which these grow accelerates to values exceeding some critical threshold. These accelerating failure models do not predict the finite durations of dynamically triggered earthquake sequences (e.g., at aftershock or remote distances). Some of the failure models belonging to this class have been used to explain static stress triggering of aftershocks. This may imply that the physical processes underlying dynamic triggering differs or that currently applied models of static triggering require modification. If the former is the case, we might appeal to physical mechanisms relying on oscillatory deformations such as compaction of saturated fault gouge leading to pore pressure increase, or cyclic fatigue. However, if dynamic and static triggering mechanisms differ, one still needs to ask why static triggering models that neglect these dynamic mechanisms appear to explain many observations. If the static and dynamic triggering mechanisms are the same, perhaps assumptions about accelerating failure and/or that triggering advances the failure times of a population of inevitable earthquakes are incorrect.

  18. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US Massive Gas Injection Disruption Mitigation System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2013-10-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a candidate design for the ITER Disruption Mitigation System. This candidate is the Massive Gas Injection System that provides machine protection in a plasma disruption event. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data as well as some data calculated from operating facilities, and the failure events were ranked for their criticality to system operation.

  19. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2007-08-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  20. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2010-06-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  1. 12 May 2008 M = 7.9 Wenchuan, China, earthquake calculated to increase failure stress and seismicity rate on three major fault systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toda, S.; Lin, J.; Meghraoui, M.; Stein, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    The Wenchuan earthquake on the Longmen Shan fault zone devastated cities of Sichuan, claiming at least 69,000 lives. We calculate that the earthquake also brought the Xianshuihe, Kunlun and Min Jiang faults 150-400 km from the mainshock rupture in the eastern Tibetan Plateau 0.2-0.5 bars closer to Coulomb failure. Because some portions of these stressed faults have not ruptured in more than a century, the earthquake could trigger or hasten additional M > 7 earthquakes, potentially subjecting regions from Kangding to Daofu and Maqin to Rangtag to strong shaking. We use the calculated stress changes and the observed background seismicity to forecast the rate and distribution of damaging shocks. The earthquake probability in the region is estimated to be 57-71% for M ??? 6 shocks during the next decade, and 8-12% for M ??? 7 shocks. These are up to twice the probabilities for the decade before the Wenchuan earthquake struck. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Two components of delayed rectifier current in canine atrium and ventricle. Does IKs play a role in the reverse rate dependence of class III agents?

    PubMed

    Gintant, G A

    1996-01-01

    Because the number and characteristics of delayed rectifier K+ current (IK) components vary between species, the role of each component in the action potential and modulation by class III agents is uncertain. To address these issues, IK was assessed in adult isolated canine ventricular and and atrial myocytes by using whole-cell and perforated-patch techniques. IK components were characterized by using two complementary approaches: a kinetic approach (based on biexponential fits to deactivating tail currents) and a pharmacological approach approach (using the methanesulfonanilide compound E-4031). In ventricular myocytes, two exponential tail current components were distinguished; these components differed in the voltage and time dependence of activation and the effect of lower (K+). Both kinetic components contributed equally to peak tail current amplitude (measured at -35 mV) after a single 300-ms pulse to 5 mV, simulating an action potential. By use of E-4031, rapidly and slowly activating components described kinetically were identified. The activation kinetics and rectification properties of canine IKr and IKs are qualitatively similar to those described previously for guinea pigs. In contrast, canine IKr and IKs deactivation kinetics differed markedly from those found in guinea pigs, with canine IKr deactivating slowly (time constant tau, 2 to 3 s near -35 mV) and IKs deactivating rapidly (tau, 150 ms near -35 mV and decreasing to 30 ms near -85 mV). E-4031 elicited reverse rate-dependent effects (greater drug-induced prolongation of the action potential at slower stimulation rates); this effect is inconsistent with the hypothesis attributing reverse rate dependence to incomplete IKs deactivation during rapid stimulation (due to rapid deactivation of canine IKs). Two IK components with characteristics comparable to those found in ventricular myocytes were also observed in atrial myocytes. In conclusion, (1) IKr- and IKs-like components of IK are present in

  3. Hydrophobic Surfaces of Spacecraft Components Enhance the Aggregation of Microorganisms and May Lead to Higher Survival Rates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerger, A. C.; Kern, R. G.

    2003-01-01

    In order to minimize the forward contamination of Mars, spacecraft are assembled under clean-room conditions that often require several procedures to clean and sterilize components. Surface characteristics of spacecraft materials may contribute to microbial survival by protecting spores from sterilizing agents, including UV irradiation on the surface of Mars. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of surface characteristics of several spacecraft materials on the survival of Bacillus subtilis spores under simulated Martian conditions.

  4. High rate of HIV resuppression after viral failure on first-line antiretroviral therapy in the absence of switch to second-line therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravindra K; Goodall, Ruth L; Ranopa, Michael; Kityo, Cissy; Munderi, Paula; Lyagoba, Fred; Mugarura, Lincoln; Gilks, Charles F; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Pillay, Deenan

    2014-04-01

    In a randomized comparison of nevirapine or abacavir with zidovudine plus lamivudine, routine viral load monitoring was not performed, yet 27% of individuals with viral failure at week 48 experienced resuppression by week 96 without switching. This supports World Health Organization recommendations that suspected viral failure should trigger adherence counseling and repeat measurement before a treatment switch is considered.

  5. Effect of Loss of Heart Rate Variability on T-Wave Heterogeneity and QT Variability in Heart Failure Patients: Implications in Ventricular Arrhythmogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nayyar, Sachin; Hasan, Muhammad A; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C; Sullivan, Thomas; Baumert, Mathias

    2017-03-03

    Heart rate variability (HRV) modulates dynamics of ventricular repolarization. A diminishing value of HRV is associated with increased vulnerability to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, however the causal relationship is not well-defined. We evaluated if fixed-rate atrial pacing that abolishes the effect of physiological HRV, will alter ventricular repolarization wavefronts and is relevant to ventricular arrhythmogenesis. The study was performed in 16 subjects: 8 heart failure patients with spontaneous ventricular tachycardia [HFVT], and 8 subjects with structurally normal hearts (H Norm). The T-wave heterogeneity descriptors [total cosine angle between QRS and T-wave loop vectors (TCRT, negative value corresponds to large difference in the 2 loops), T-wave morphology dispersion, T-wave loop dispersion] and QT intervals were analyzed in a beat-to-beat manner on 3-min records of 12-lead surface ECG at baseline and during atrial pacing at 80 and 100 bpm. The global T-wave heterogeneity was expressed as mean values of each of the T-wave morphology descriptors and variability in QT intervals (QTV) as standard deviation of QT intervals. Baseline T-wave morphology dispersion and QTV were higher in HFVT compared to H Norm subjects (p ≤ 0.02). While group differences in T-wave morphology dispersion and T-wave loop dispersion remained unaltered with atrial pacing, TCRT tended to fall more in HFVT patients compared to H Norm subjects (interaction p value = 0.086). Atrial pacing failed to reduce QTV in both groups, however group differences were augmented (p < 0.0001). Atrial pacing and consequent loss of HRV appears to introduce unfavorable changes in ventricular repolarization in HFVT subjects. It widens the spatial relationship between wavefronts of ventricular depolarization and repolarization. This may partly explain the concerning relation between poorer HRV and the risk of ventricular arrhythmias.

  6. Predicting survival in heart failure case and control subjects by use of fully automated methods for deriving nonlinear and conventional indices of heart rate dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, K. K.; Moody, G. B.; Peng, C. K.; Mietus, J. E.; Larson, M. G.; Levy, D.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite much recent interest in quantification of heart rate variability (HRV), the prognostic value of conventional measures of HRV and of newer indices based on nonlinear dynamics is not universally accepted. METHODS AND RESULTS: We have designed algorithms for analyzing ambulatory ECG recordings and measuring HRV without human intervention, using robust methods for obtaining time-domain measures (mean and SD of heart rate), frequency-domain measures (power in the bands of 0.001 to 0.01 Hz [VLF], 0.01 to 0.15 Hz [LF], and 0.15 to 0.5 Hz [HF] and total spectral power [TP] over all three of these bands), and measures based on nonlinear dynamics (approximate entropy [ApEn], a measure of complexity, and detrended fluctuation analysis [DFA], a measure of long-term correlations). The study population consisted of chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) case patients and sex- and age-matched control subjects in the Framingham Heart Study. After exclusion of technically inadequate studies and those with atrial fibrillation, we used these algorithms to study HRV in 2-hour ambulatory ECG recordings of 69 participants (mean age, 71.7+/-8.1 years). By use of separate Cox proportional-hazards models, the conventional measures SD (P<.01), LF (P<.01), VLF (P<.05), and TP (P<.01) and the nonlinear measure DFA (P<.05) were predictors of survival over a mean follow-up period of 1.9 years; other measures, including ApEn (P>.3), were not. In multivariable models, DFA was of borderline predictive significance (P=.06) after adjustment for the diagnosis of CHF and SD. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that HRV analysis of ambulatory ECG recordings based on fully automated methods can have prognostic value in a population-based study and that nonlinear HRV indices may contribute prognostic value to complement traditional HRV measures.

  7. Design of Critical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2001-01-01

    Critical component design is based on minimizing product failures that results in loss of life. Potential catastrophic failures are reduced to secondary failures where components removed for cause or operating time in the system. Issues of liability and cost of component removal become of paramount importance. Deterministic design with factors of safety and probabilistic design address but lack the essential characteristics for the design of critical components. In deterministic design and fabrication there are heuristic rules and safety factors developed over time for large sets of structural/material components. These factors did not come without cost. Many designs failed and many rules (codes) have standing committees to oversee their proper usage and enforcement. In probabilistic design, not only are failures a given, the failures are calculated; an element of risk is assumed based on empirical failure data for large classes of component operations. Failure of a class of components can be predicted, yet one can not predict when a specific component will fail. The analogy is to the life insurance industry where very careful statistics are book-kept on classes of individuals. For a specific class, life span can be predicted within statistical limits, yet life-span of a specific element of that class can not be predicted.

  8. Being on sick leave due to heart failure: self-rated health, encounters with healthcare professionals and social insurance officers and self-estimated ability to return to work.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Lena; Söderlund, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Younger people with heart failure often experience poor self-rated health. Furthermore, poor self-rated health is associated with long-term sick leave and disability pension. Socio-demographic factors affect the ability to return to work. However, little is known about people on sick leave due to heart failure. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between self-rated health, mood, socio-demographic factors, sick leave compensation, encounters with healthcare professionals and social insurance officers and self-estimated ability to return to work, for people on sick leave due to heart failure. This population-based investigation had a cross-sectional design. Data were collected in Sweden in 2012 from two official registries and from a postal questionnaire. In total, 590 subjects, aged 23-67, responded (response rate 45.8%). Descriptive statistics, correlation analyses (Spearman bivariate analysis) and logistic regression analyses were used to investigate associations. Poor self-rated health was strongly associated with full sick leave compensation (OR = 4.1, p < .001). Compared self-rated health was moderately associated with low income (OR =  .6, p =  .003). Good self-rated health was strongly associated with positive encounters with healthcare professionals (OR = 3.0, p =  .022) and to the impact of positive encounters with healthcare professionals on self-estimated ability to return to work (OR = 3.3, p < .001). People with heart failure are sicklisted for long periods of time and to a great extent receive disability pension. Not being able to work imposes reduced quality of life. Positive encounters with healthcare professionals and social insurance officers can be supportive when people with heart failure struggle to remain in working life.

  9. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  10. Generalized energy failure criterion.

    PubMed

    Qu, R T; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, P; Liu, Z Q; Zhang, Z F

    2016-03-21

    Discovering a generalized criterion that can predict the mechanical failure of various different structural materials is one of ultimate goals for scientists in both material and mechanics communities. Since the first study on the failure criterion of materials by Galileo, about three centuries have passed. Now we eventually find the "generalized energy criterion", as presented here, which appears to be one universal law for various different kinds of materials. The validity of the energy criterion for quantitatively predicting the failure is experimentally confirmed using a metallic glass. The generalized energy criterion reveals the competition and interaction between shear and cleavage, the two fundamental inherent failure mechanisms, and thus provides new physical insights into the failure prediction of materials and structural components.

  11. Generalized energy failure criterion

    PubMed Central

    Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, P.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2016-01-01

    Discovering a generalized criterion that can predict the mechanical failure of various different structural materials is one of ultimate goals for scientists in both material and mechanics communities. Since the first study on the failure criterion of materials by Galileo, about three centuries have passed. Now we eventually find the “generalized energy criterion”, as presented here, which appears to be one universal law for various different kinds of materials. The validity of the energy criterion for quantitatively predicting the failure is experimentally confirmed using a metallic glass. The generalized energy criterion reveals the competition and interaction between shear and cleavage, the two fundamental inherent failure mechanisms, and thus provides new physical insights into the failure prediction of materials and structural components. PMID:26996781

  12. Failure to restore sagittal tibiotalar alignment in total ankle arthroplasty: Its relationship to the axis of the tibia and the positioning of the talar component.

    PubMed

    Cho, J; Yi, Y; Ahn, T K; Choi, H J; Park, C H; Chun, D I; Lee, J S; Lee, W C

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the change in sagittal tibiotalar alignment after total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) for osteoarthritis and to investigate factors affecting the restoration of alignment. This retrospective study included 119 patients (120 ankles) who underwent three component TAA using the Hintegra prosthesis. A total of 63 ankles had anterior displacement of the talus before surgery (group A), 49 had alignment in the normal range (group B), and eight had posterior displacement of the talus (group C). Ankles in group A were further sub-divided into those in whom normal alignment was restored following TAA (41 ankles) and those with persistent displacement (22 ankles). Radiographic and clinical results were assessed. Pre-operatively, the alignment in group A was significantly more varus than that in group B, and the posterior slope of the tibial plafond was greater (p < 0.01 in both cases). The posterior slope of the tibial component was strongly associated with restoration of alignment: ankles in which the alignment was restored had significantly less posterior slope (p < 0.001). An anteriorly translated talus was restored to a normal position after TAA in most patients. We suggest that surgeons performing TAA using the Hintegra prosthesis should aim to insert the tibial component at close to 90° relative to the axis of the tibia, hence reducing posterior soft-tissue tension and allowing restoration of normal tibiotalar alignment following surgery.

  13. Evidence for a respiratory component, similar to mammalian respiratory sinus arrhythmia, in the heart rate variability signal from the rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus terrificus.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Hamish A; Leite, Cleo A C; Wang, Tobias; Skals, Marianne; Abe, Augusto S; Egginton, Stuart; Rantin, F Tadeu; Bishop, Charles M; Taylor, Edwin W

    2006-07-01

    Autonomic control of heart rate variability and the central location of vagal preganglionic neurones (VPN) were examined in the rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus), in order to determine whether respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) occurred in a similar manner to that described for mammals. Resting ECG signals were recorded in undisturbed snakes using miniature datalogging devices, and the presence of oscillations in heart rate (fh) was assessed by power spectral analysis (PSA). This mathematical technique provides a graphical output that enables the estimation of cardiac autonomic control by measuring periodic changes in the heart beat interval. At fh above 19 min(-1) spectra were mainly characterised by low frequency components, reflecting mainly adrenergic tonus on the heart. By contrast, at fh below 19 min(-1) spectra typically contained high frequency components, demonstrated to be cholinergic in origin. Snakes with a fh >19 min(-1) may therefore have insufficient cholinergic tonus and/or too high an adrenergic tonus acting upon the heart for respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) to develop. A parallel study monitored fh simultaneously with the intraperitoneal pressures associated with lung inflation. Snakes with a fh<19 min(-1) exhibited a high frequency (HF) peak in the power spectrum, which correlated with ventilation rate (fv). Adrenergic blockade by propranolol infusion increased the variability of the ventilation cycle, and the oscillatory component of the fh spectrum broadened accordingly. Infusion of atropine to effect cholinergic blockade abolished this HF component, confirming a role for vagal control of the heart in matching fh and fv in the rattlesnake. A neuroanatomical study of the brainstem revealed two locations for vagal preganglionic neurones (VPN). This is consistent with the suggestion that generation of ventilatory components in the heart rate variability (HRV) signal are dependent on spatially distinct loci for cardiac VPN. Therefore

  14. Separating arterial and venous-related components of photoplethysmographic signals for accurate extraction of oxygen saturation and respiratory rate.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Rasoul; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2015-05-01

    We propose an algorithm for separating arterial and venous-related signals using second-order statistics of red and infrared signals in a blind source separation technique. The separated arterial signal is used to compute accurate arterial oxygen saturation. We have also introduced an algorithm for extracting the respiratory pattern from the extracted venous-related signal. In addition to real-time monitoring, respiratory rate is also extracted. Our experimental results from multiple subjects show that the proposed separation technique is extremely useful for extracting accurate arterial oxygen saturation and respiratory rate. Specifically, the breathing rate is extracted with average root mean square deviation of 1.89 and average mean difference of -0.69.

  15. Dose-rate controlled energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic mapping of the metallic components in a biohybrid nanosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanyuan; Munro, Catherine J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Edwards, Danny J.; Braunschweig, Adam B.; Knecht, Marc R.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we showcase that through precise control of the electron dose rate, state-of-the-art large solid angle energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope is capable of faithful and unambiguous chemical characterization of the Pt and Pd distribution in a peptide-mediated nanosystem. This low-dose-rate recording scheme adds another dimension of flexibility to the design of elemental mapping experiments, and holds significant potential for extending its application to a wide variety of beam sensitive hybrid nanostructures.

  16. Dose-rate controlled energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic mapping of the metallic components in a biohybrid nanosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yuanyuan; Munro, Catherine J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Edwards, Danny J.; Braunschweig, Adam B.; Knecht, Marc R.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2016-06-30

    In this work, we showcase that through precise control of the electron dose rate, state-of-the-art large solid angle energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is capable of faithful and unambiguous chemical characterization of the Pt and Pd distribution in a peptide-mediated nanosystem. This low-dose-rate recording scheme adds another dimension of flexibility to the design of elemental mapping experiments, and holds significant potential for extending its application to a wide variety of beam sensitive hybrid nanostructures.

  17. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... Tiredness and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  18. Effects of Students' Multiple Intelligences on Participation Rate of Course Components in a Blended Secondary Family and Consumer Sciences Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Breanne M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated students' learning style participation rate within a blended Family and Consumer Sciences Exploring Childhood constructivist secondary course using an exploratory quantitative approach with descriptive analysis, ANOVA testing, and contingency tables. Howard Gardner's multiple intelligence inventory was used to determine…

  19. Failure mechanisms of fibrin-based surgical tissue adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, David Hugh

    A series of studies was performed to investigate the potential impact of heterogeneity in the matrix of multiple-component fibrin-based tissue adhesives upon their mechanical and biomechanical properties both in vivo and in vitro. Investigations into the failure mechanisms by stereological techniques demonstrated that heterogeneity could be measured quantitatively and that the variation in heterogeneity could be altered both by the means of component mixing and delivery and by the formulation of the sealant. Ex vivo tensile adhesive strength was found to be inversely proportional to the amount of heterogeneity. In contrast, in vivo tensile wound-closure strength was found to be relatively unaffected by the degree of heterogeneity, while in vivo parenchymal organ hemostasis in rabbits was found to be affected: greater heterogeneity appeared to correlate with an increase in hemostasis time and amount of sealant necessary to effect hemostasis. Tensile testing of the bulk sealant showed that mechanical parameters were proportional to fibrin concentration and that the physical characteristics of the failure supported a ductile mechanism. Strain hardening as a function of percentage of strain, and strain rate was observed for both concentrations, and syneresis was observed at low strain rates for the lower fibrin concentration. Blister testing demonstrated that burst pressure and failure energy were proportional to fibrin concentration and decreased with increasing flow rate. Higher fibrin concentration demonstrated predominately compact morphology debonds with cohesive failure loci, demonstrating shear or viscous failure in a viscoelastic rubbery adhesive. The lower fibrin concentration sealant exhibited predominately fractal morphology debonds with cohesive failure loci, supporting an elastoviscous material condition. The failure mechanism for these was hypothesized and shown to be flow-induced ductile fracture. Based on these findings, the failure mechanism was

  20. Correlation Between Analog Noise Measurements and the Expected Bit Error Rate of a Digital Signal Propagating Through Passive Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Joseph D.; Theofylaktos, Onoufrios

    2012-01-01

    A method of determining the bit error rate (BER) of a digital circuit from the measurement of the analog S-parameters of the circuit has been developed. The method is based on the measurement of the noise and the standard deviation of the noise in the S-parameters. Once the standard deviation and the mean of the S-parameters are known, the BER of the circuit can be calculated using the normal Gaussian function.

  1. Novel application of multi dynamic trend analysis as a sensitive tool for detecting the effects of aging and congestive heart failure on heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Lo, Men-Tzung; Peng, Chung-Kang; Huang, Norden E.; Yang, Cheryl C. H.; Kuo, Terry B. J.

    2016-02-01

    The complex fluctuations in heart rate variability (HRV) reflect cardiac autonomic modulation and are an indicator of congestive heart failure (CHF). This paper proposes a novel nonlinear approach to HRV investigation, the multi dynamic trend analysis (MDTA) method, based on the empirical mode decomposition algorithm of the Hilbert-Huang transform combined with a variable-sized sliding-window method. Electrocardiographic signal data obtained from the PhysioNet database were used. These data were from subjects with CHF (mean age = 59.4 ± 8.4), an age-matched elderly healthy control group (59.3 ± 10.6), and a healthy young group (30.3 ± 4.8); the HRVs of these subjects were processed using the MDTA method, time domain analysis, and frequency domain analysis. Among all HRV parameters, the MDTA absolute value slope (MDTS) and MDTA deviation (MDTD) exhibited the greatest area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics in distinguishing between the CHF group and the healthy controls (AUC = 1.000) and between the healthy elderly subject group and the young subject group (AUC = 0.834 ± 0.067 for MDTS; 0.837 ± 0.066 for MDTD). The CHF subjects presented with lower MDTA indices than those of the healthy elderly subject group. Furthermore, the healthy elderly subjects exhibited lower MDTA indices than those of the young controls. The MDTA method can adaptively and automatically identify the intrinsic fluctuation on variable temporal and spatial scales when investigating complex fluctuations in the cardiac autonomic regulation effects of aging and CHF.

  2. Comparison of different threshold values r for approximate entropy: application to investigate the heart rate variability between heart failure and healthy control groups.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengyu; Liu, Changchun; Shao, Peng; Li, Liping; Sun, Xin; Wang, Xinpei; Liu, Feng

    2011-02-01

    Approximate entropy (ApEn) is widely accepted as a complexity measure of the heart rate variability (HRV) signal, but selecting the criteria for the threshold value r is controversial. This paper aims to verify whether Chon's method of forecasting the r(max) is an appropriate one for the HRV signal. The standard limb lead ECG signals of 120 subjects were recorded for 10 min in a supine position. The subjects were divided into two groups: the heart failure (22 females and 38 males, median age 62.4 ± 12.6) and healthy control group (33 females and 27 males, median age 51.5 ± 16.9). Three types of ApEn were calculated: the ApEn(0.2) using the recommended constant r = 0.2, the ApEn(chon) using Chon's method and the ApEn(max) using the true r(max). A Wilcoxon rank sum test showed that the ApEn(0.2) (p = 0.267) and the ApEn(max) (p = 0.813) had no statistical differences between the two groups, while the ApEn(chon) (p = 0.040) had. We generated a synthetic database to study the effect of two influential factors (the signal length N and the ratio of short- and long-term variability sd(1)/sd(2)) on the empirical formula in Chon's method (Chon et al 2009 IEEE Eng. Med. Biol. Mag. 28 18-23). The results showed that the empirical formula proposed by Chon et al is a good method for analyzing the random signal, but not an appropriate tool for analyzing nonlinear signals, such as the logistic or HRV signals.

  3. Failure to Achieve a PSA Level {<=}1 ng/mL After Neoadjuvant LHRHA Therapy Predicts for Lower Biochemical Control Rate and Overall Survival in Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darren M. McAleese, Jonathan; Park, Richard M.; Stewart, David P.; Stranex, Stephen; Eakin, Ruth L.; Houston, Russell F.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether failure to suppress the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level to {<=}1 ng/mL after {>=}2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy in patients scheduled to undergo external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate carcinoma is associated with reduced biochemical failure-free survival. Methods and Materials: A retrospective case note review of consecutive patients with intermediate- or high-risk localized prostate cancer treated between January 2001 and December 2002 with neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy, followed by concurrent hormonal therapy and radiotherapy was performed. Patient data were divided for analysis according to whether the PSA level in Week 1 of radiotherapy was {<=}1.0 ng/mL. Biochemical failure was determined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (Phoenix) definition. Results: A total of 119 patients were identified. The PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy was {<=}1 ng/mL in 67 patients and >1 ng/mL in 52. At a median follow-up of 49 months, the 4-year actuarial biochemical failure-free survival rate was 84% vs. 60% (p = 0.0016) in favor of the patients with a PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy of {<=}1 ng/mL. The overall survival rate was 94% vs. 77.5% (p = 0.0045), and the disease-specific survival rate at 4 years was 98.5% vs. 82.5%. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that patients with a PSA level >1 ng/mL at the beginning of external beam radiotherapy after {>=}2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy have a significantly greater rate of biochemical failure and lower survival rate compared with those with a PSA level of {<=}1 ng/mL. Patients without adequate PSA suppression should be considered a higher risk group and considered for dose escalation or the use of novel treatments.

  4. Dynamic failure in brittle solids

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.

    1994-04-01

    Failure of brittle solids within the extremes of the shock loading environment is not well understood. Recent shock-wave data on compression shear failure and tensile spall failure for selected high-strength ceramics are presented and used to examine the mechanisms of dynamic failure. Energy-based theories are used to bound the measured strength properties. A new concept of failure waves in brittle solids is explored in light of the kinetic processes of high-rate fracture. Classical failure criteria are compared with the present base of dynamic strength data on ceramics.

  5. Storm-time variation of the horizontal and vertical components of the geomagnetic fields and rate of induction at different latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falayi, E. O.; Oyebanjo, O. A.; Omotosho, T. V.; Okusanya, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the hourly mean variation of horizontal (H) and vertical (Z) components of the geomagnetic field and the rate of induction ΔH/ΔZ at different latitudes during magnetic storm of 20 March 2001 and 1 October 2001. The results of the analysis revealed that at high latitude stations greater than 60°, the reduction in ΔH component was noticed after the noon time while other stations less than 60° experienced reduction of H in the morning time during the geomagnetic storm. Large amplitude of ΔH and ΔZ were exhibited during the daytime over the equatorial zone, the amplitude decreases from mid latitudes to the dip equator during the nighttime. The daytime enhancement of ΔH at AAE, BAN and MBO suggest the presence of a strong eastward directed current which comes under the influence of electrojet. There were strong positive and negative correlations between ring current (DR) and horizontal component of the magnetic field ΔH. The effect of rate of induction is more significant at high latitudes than lower latitudes, during the geomagnetic storm. More enhancement in rate of induction occurred at nighttime than daytime. This result may be from other sources other than the ionosphere that is magnetospheric process significantly contributes toward the variation of induction.

  6. Stochastic simulation of prokaryotic two-component signalling indicates stochasticity-induced active-state locking and growth-rate dependent bistability.

    PubMed

    Wei, Katy; Moinat, Maxim; Maarleveld, Timo R; Bruggeman, Frank J

    2014-07-29

    Signal transduction by prokaryotes almost exclusively relies on two-component systems for sensing and responding to (extracellular) signals. Here, we use stochastic models of two-component systems to better understand the impact of stochasticity on the fidelity and robustness of signal transmission, the outcome of autoregulatory gene expression and the influence of cell growth and division. We report that two-component systems are remarkably robust against copy number fluctuations of the signalling proteins they are composed of, which enhances signal transmission fidelity. Furthermore, we find that due to stochasticity these systems can get locked in an active state for extended time periods when (initially high) signal levels drop to zero. This behaviour can contribute to a bet-hedging adaptation strategy, aiding survival in fluctuating environments. Additionally, autoregulatory gene expression can cause two-component systems to become bistable at realistic parameter values. As a result, two sub-populations of cells can co-exist-active and inactive cells, which contributes to fitness in unpredictable environments. Bistability proved robust with respect to cell growth and division, and is tunable by the growth rate. In conclusion, our results indicate how single cells can cope with the inevitable stochasticity occurring in the activity of their two-component systems. They are robust to disadvantageous fluctuations that scramble signal transduction and they exploit beneficial stochasticity that generates fitness-enhancing heterogeneity across an isogenic population of cells.

  7. The AP-1 transcription factor component Fosl2 potentiates the rate of myocardial differentiation from the zebrafish second heart field.

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Leila; Sharpe, Michka; Novikov, Natasha; González-Rosa, Juan Manuel; Borikova, Asya; Nevis, Kathleen; Paffett-Lugassy, Noelle; Zhao, Long; Adams, Meghan; Guner-Ataman, Burcu; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate heart forms through successive phases of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Initially, cardiomyocytes derived from first heart field (FHF) progenitors assemble the linear heart tube. Thereafter, second heart field (SHF) progenitors differentiate into cardiomyocytes that are accreted to the poles of the heart tube over a well-defined developmental window. Although heart tube elongation deficiencies lead to life-threatening congenital heart defects, the variables controlling the initiation, rate and duration of myocardial accretion remain obscure. Here, we demonstrate that the AP-1 transcription factor, Fos-like antigen 2 (Fosl2), potentiates the rate of myocardial accretion from the zebrafish SHF. fosl2 mutants initiate accretion appropriately, but cardiomyocyte production is sluggish, resulting in a ventricular deficit coupled with an accumulation of SHF progenitors. Surprisingly, mutant embryos eventually correct the myocardial deficit by extending the accretion window. Overexpression of Fosl2 also compromises production of SHF-derived ventricular cardiomyocytes, a phenotype that is consistent with precocious depletion of the progenitor pool. Our data implicate Fosl2 in promoting the progenitor to cardiomyocyte transition and uncover the existence of regulatory mechanisms to ensure appropriate SHF-mediated cardiomyocyte contribution irrespective of embryonic stage.

  8. The AP-1 transcription factor component Fosl2 potentiates the rate of myocardial differentiation from the zebrafish second heart field

    PubMed Central

    Jahangiri, Leila; Sharpe, Michka; Novikov, Natasha; González-Rosa, Juan Manuel; Borikova, Asya; Nevis, Kathleen; Paffett-Lugassy, Noelle; Zhao, Long; Adams, Meghan; Guner-Ataman, Burcu; Burns, Caroline E.; Burns, C. Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate heart forms through successive phases of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Initially, cardiomyocytes derived from first heart field (FHF) progenitors assemble the linear heart tube. Thereafter, second heart field (SHF) progenitors differentiate into cardiomyocytes that are accreted to the poles of the heart tube over a well-defined developmental window. Although heart tube elongation deficiencies lead to life-threatening congenital heart defects, the variables controlling the initiation, rate and duration of myocardial accretion remain obscure. Here, we demonstrate that the AP-1 transcription factor, Fos-like antigen 2 (Fosl2), potentiates the rate of myocardial accretion from the zebrafish SHF. fosl2 mutants initiate accretion appropriately, but cardiomyocyte production is sluggish, resulting in a ventricular deficit coupled with an accumulation of SHF progenitors. Surprisingly, mutant embryos eventually correct the myocardial deficit by extending the accretion window. Overexpression of Fosl2 also compromises production of SHF-derived ventricular cardiomyocytes, a phenotype that is consistent with precocious depletion of the progenitor pool. Our data implicate Fosl2 in promoting the progenitor to cardiomyocyte transition and uncover the existence of regulatory mechanisms to ensure appropriate SHF-mediated cardiomyocyte contribution irrespective of embryonic stage. PMID:26732840

  9. Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

    2012-01-01

    DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

  10. Fluctuations in isometric muscle force can be described by one linear projection of low-frequency components of motor unit discharge rates.

    PubMed

    Negro, Francesco; Holobar, Ales; Farina, Dario

    2009-12-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relation between linear transformations of motor unit discharge rates and muscle force. Intramuscular (wire electrodes) and high-density surface EMG (13 x 5 electrode grid) were recorded from the abductor digiti minimi muscle of eight healthy men during 60 s contractions at 5%, 7.5% and 10% of the maximal force. Spike trains of a total of 222 motor units were identified from the EMG recordings with decomposition algorithms. Principal component analysis of the smoothed motor unit discharge rates indicated that one component (first common component, FCC) described 44.2 +/- 7.5% of the total variability of the smoothed discharge rates when computed over the entire contraction interval and 64.3 +/- 10.2% of the variability when computed over 5 s intervals. When the FCC was computed from four or more motor units per contraction, it correlated with the force produced by the muscle (62.7 +/- 10.1%) by a greater degree (P < 0.001) than the smoothed discharge rates of individual motor units (41.4 +/- 7.8%). The correlation between FCC and the force signal increased up to 71.8 +/- 13.1% when the duration and the shape of the smoothing window for discharge rates were similar to the average motor unit twitch force. Moreover, the coefficients of variation (CoV) for the force and for the FCC signal were correlated in all subjects (R(2) range = 0.14-0.56; P < 0.05) whereas the CoV for force was correlated to the interspike interval variability in only one subject (R(2) = 0.12; P < 0.05). Similar results were further obtained from measures on the tibialis anterior muscle of an additional eight subjects during contractions at forces up to 20% of the maximal force (e.g. FCC explained 59.8 +/- 11.0% of variability of the smoothed discharge rates). In conclusion, one signal captures most of the underlying variability of the low-frequency components of motor unit discharge rates and explains large part of the fluctuations in the motor output

  11. Evidence that the RdeA protein is a component of a multistep phosphorelay modulating rate of development in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, W T; Thomason, P A; Gross, J D; Neweil, P C

    1998-01-01

    We have isolated an insertional mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum that aggregated rapidly and formed spores and stalk cells within 14 h of development instead of the normal 24 h. We have shown by parasexual genetics that the insertion is in the rdeA locus and have cloned the gene. It encodes a predicted 28 kDa protein (RdeA) that is enriched in charged residues and is very hydrophilic. Constructs with the DNA for the c-Myc epitope or for the green fluorescent protein indicate that RdeA is not compartmentalized. RdeA displays homology around a histidine residue at amino acid 65 with members of the H2 module family of phosphotransferases that participate in multistep phosphoryl relays. Replacement of this histidine rendered the protein inactive. The mutant is complemented by transformation with the Ypd1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, itself an H2 module protein. We propose that RdeA is part of a multistep phosphorelay system that modulates the rate of development. PMID:9582274

  12. The effect of age on the growth rate of tissues and organs and the percentage content of edible and inedible components in Koluda White geese.

    PubMed

    Murawska, Daria

    2013-05-01

    The parts of carcasses of slaughtered animals that are not intended for human consumption are referred to as inedible components. The total percentage of edible to inedible components in the carcasses of different poultry species is an important economic consideration. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of age on the growth rate of tissues and organs and the percentage change in edible to inedible components in geese. A flock of 240 Polish Koluda White geese was raised to 12 wk of age. The percentage content of edible components increased (P < 0.001) and the percentage content of inedible parts decreased (P < 0.001) as the birds grew older. Among edible components, the most considerable changes were noted in the growth rates of muscle tissue (10.5% increase; P < 0.001) and giblets (5.1% decrease; P < 0.001). The percentage share of muscle tissue increased to 10 wk of age. Lean meat weight increased from 175 g in wk 2 to 1,482 g in wk 12. The increase in lean meat weight varied considerably between body parts. The proportion of breast muscles in total meat weight increased substantially (by 26%), whereas the proportion of leg muscles decreased (by 34%). An increase in the weight of skin with subcutaneous fat was observed until the end of the rearing period, but the percentage content of this component remained at a similar level throughout the experiment (19.1 to 19.6%). The decrease in the percentage content of inedible components was mostly due to a decrease in the share of slaughter offal (by approximately 6.5%) because the proportion of bones remained at a stable level (approximately 11.9 to 11.5%). The weight of abdominal fat, which can be classified as edible or inedible, increased significantly with age, from 15.1 g in wk 2 to 205.1 g in wk 12, accounting for 1.6% and 4.0% total BW, respectively.

  13. Human carotid atherosclerotic lesion protein components decrease cholesterol biosynthesis rate in macrophages through 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase regulation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Elad; Aviram, Michael; Khatib, Soliman; Rosenblat, Mira; Vaya, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the formation of cholesterol-loaded macrophages, which are turned into foam cells, the hallmark of early atherogenesis. As part of ongoing research on the interactions among human carotid lesion components and blood elements, the effect of plaque homogenate on macrophage cholesterol biosynthesis rate was examined. Human carotid plaques were ground, extracted with phosphate-buffered saline (homogenate), and then added to the macrophage medium. This extract decreased macrophage cholesterol biosynthesis rate up to 50% in a dose-dependent manner. Cholesterol or lipoproteins were separated from the homogenate and added to the MQ medium. Unlike the homogenate, neither free cholesterol nor the lipoproteins were able to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis rate under the above experimental concentration, suggesting that the homogenate-induced cholesterol biosynthesis inhibition in our experimental system was not owing to the feedback inhibition of cholesterol. Furthermore, the homogenate remaining after lipoprotein removal (lipoprotein-deficient homogenate) also decreased cholesterol biosynthesis rate, whereas boiled homogenate or phospholipids extracted from the homogenate decreased macrophage cholesterol biosynthesis rate only partially. Finally, cholesterol biosynthesis inhibition was achieved only upon using the precursor [(3)H]acetate, but not [(14)C]mevalonate, suggesting that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCoA Reductase), the rate-limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, is involved in the above antiatherogenic effect of the homogenate, whereas the treatment with homogenate decreased HMGCoA Reductase mRNA. Proteins and phospholipids from human carotid lesion homogenate decrease cholesterol biosynthesis rate in macrophages secondary to HMGCoA Reductase feedback regulation. Such an effect may delay foam cell formation and atherosclerosis progression.

  14. Oscillations in motor unit discharge are reflected in the low-frequency component of rectified surface EMG and the rate of change in force.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Yasuhide; Shinohara, Minoru

    2013-11-01

    Common drive to a motor unit (MU) pool manifests as low-frequency oscillations in MU discharge rate, producing fluctuations in muscle force. The aim of the study was to examine the temporal correlation between instantaneous MU discharge rate and rectified EMG in low frequencies. Additionally, we attempted to examine whether there is a temporal correlation between the low-frequency oscillations in MU discharge rate and the first derivative of force (dF/dt). Healthy young subjects produced steady submaximal force with their right finger as a single task or while maintaining a pinch-grip force with the left hand as a dual task. Surface EMG and fine-wire MU potentials were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous muscle in the right hand. Surface EMG was band-pass filtered (5-1,000 Hz) and full-wave rectified. Rectified surface EMG and the instantaneous discharge rate of MUs were smoothed by a Hann-window of 400 ms duration (equivalent to 2 Hz low-pass filtering). In each of the identified MUs, the smoothed MU discharge rate was positively correlated with the rectified-and-smoothed EMG as confirmed by the distinct peak in cross-correlation function with greater values in the dual task compared with the single task. Additionally, the smoothed MU discharge rate was temporally correlated with dF/dt more than with force and with rectified-and-smoothed EMG. The results indicated that the low-frequency component of rectified surface EMG and the first derivative of force provide temporal information on the low-frequency oscillations in the MU discharge rate.

  15. An evaluation of the relations between flow regime components, stream characteristics, species traits and meta-demographic rates of warmwater stream fishes: Implications for aquatic resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, James T.; Shea, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Fishery biologists are increasingly recognizing the importance of considering the dynamic nature of streams when developing streamflow policies. Such approaches require information on how flow regimes influence the physical environment and how those factors, in turn, affect species-specific demographic rates. A more cost-effective alternative could be the use of dynamic occupancy models to predict how species are likely to respond to changes in flow. To appraise the efficacy of this approach, we evaluated relative support for hypothesized effects of seasonal streamflow components, stream channel characteristics, and fish species traits on local extinction, colonization, and recruitment (meta-demographic rates) of stream fishes. We used 4 years of seasonal fish collection data from 23 streams to fit multistate, multiseason occupancy models for 42 fish species in the lower Flint River Basin, Georgia. Modelling results suggested that meta-demographic rates were influenced by streamflows, particularly short-term (10-day) flows. Flow effects on meta-demographic rates also varied with stream size, channel morphology, and fish species traits. Small-bodied species with generalized life-history characteristics were more resilient to flow variability than large-bodied species with specialized life-history characteristics. Using this approach, we simplified the modelling framework, thereby facilitating the development of dynamic, spatially explicit evaluations of the ecological consequences of water resource development activities over broad geographic areas. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Consent Procedures and Participation Rates in School-Based Intervention and Prevention Research: Using a Multi-Component, Partnership-Based Approach to Recruit Participants

    PubMed Central

    Leff, Stephen S.; Franko, Debra L.; Weinstein, Elana; Beakley, Kelly; Power, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluations of school-based interventions and prevention programs typically require parental consent for students to participate. In school-based efforts, program evaluators may have limited access to parents and considerable effort is required to obtain signed consent. This issue is particularly salient when conducting research in under-resourced, urban schools, where parent involvement in the school setting may be somewhat limited. The aims of this article were to (a) examine the published school-based prevention and intervention literature to assess the state of the field in terms of consent procedures and participation rates; and (b) describe two examples of health promotion studies that used multi-component, partnership-based strategies in urban schools to encourage communication among children, their parents, and researchers. The purpose of the case studies was to generate hypotheses to advance the science related to school-based participant recruitment for research studies. Of nearly 500 studies reviewed, only 11.5% reported both consent procedures and participation rates. Studies using active consent procedures had a mean participation rate of 65.5% (range: 11–100%). This article highlights the need for researchers to report consent procedures and participation rates and describes partnership-based strategies used to enroll students into two urban, school-based health promotion studies. PMID:19834586

  17. EBSD investigation of the effect of the solidification rate on the nucleation behavior of eutectic components in a hypoeutectic Al-Si-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsen Sadrossadat, S.; Johansson, Sten; Peng, Ru Lin

    2012-06-01

    This article represents a study of the influence of the solidification rate on the crystallographic orientation of eutectic components with respect to the primary α-Al in the tested hypoeutectic alloy. Electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) patterns were produced from the Al-Si cast specimens that were solidified with different cooling rates and prepared via ion etch polishing as a complementary method after mechanical polishing. The results indicated a strong orientation relationship between the primary α-Al and eutectic Al phase at all cooling rates. It was also found that the silicon eutectic flakes were heterogeneously nucleated in the interdendritic eutectic liquid. The increase of the cooling rate from 2 to 80 mm/min was found to be effective in lowering the intensity of the relationship between the primary α-Al and eutectic Al phases, and changing the misorientation angle clustering between the primary α-Al and eutectic Si phases in the interval from 41-60° to lower angle intervals.

  18. An interpretation of fluctuations in enzyme catalysis rate, spectral diffusion, and radiative component of lifetimes in terms of electric field fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Meher K; Marcus, R A

    2007-10-09

    Time-dependent fluctuations in the catalysis rate (deltak(t)) observed in single-enzyme experiments were found in a particular study to have an autocorrelation function decaying on the same time scale as that of spectral diffusion deltaomega(0)(t). To interpret this similarity, the present analysis focuses on a factor in enzyme catalysis, the local electrostatic interaction energy (E) at the active site and its effect on the activation free energy barrier. We consider the slow fluctuations of the electrostatic interaction energy (deltaE(t)) as a contributor to deltak(t) and relate the latter to deltaomega(0)(t). The resulting relation between deltak(t) and deltaomega(0)(t) is a dynamic analog of the solvatochromism used in interpreting solvent effects on organic reaction rates. The effect of the postulated deltaE(t) on fluctuations in the radiative component (deltagamma(r)(-1)(t)) of the fluorescence decay of chromophores in proteins also is examined, and a relation between deltagamma(r)(-1)(t) and deltaomega(0)(t) is obtained. Experimental tests will determine whether the correlation functions for deltak(t), deltaomega(0)(t), and deltagamma(r)(-1) are indeed similar for any enzyme. Measurements of dielectric dispersion, epsilon(omega), for the enzyme discussed elsewhere will provide further insight into the correlation function for deltaE(t). They also will determine whether fluctuations in the nonradiative component gamma(nr)(-1) of the lifetime decay has a different origin, fluctuations in distance for example.

  19. An Investigation of Ways to Reduce the Failure Rate of Student Pilots during Flying Training in the Royal Australian Air Force.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    criticism (other than constructive), sarcasm or comparison with others after failure. Attributions to stable factors (ability or task difficulty...I k In-flight Remediation Any ideas about what might help? r Caring for frame of mind/ pi-A. I h,24~ eI ’.A-, fPW.’. anxiety / demoralization...source(s) Of your satisfaction or dissatisfaction’ 71l,. Any ideas about what might help? ______ . ei .- 13. So that w may better aoppreciate your

  20. Premature ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Kalantaridou, S N; Davis, S R; Nelson, L M

    1998-12-01

    In 1% of women, premature ovarian failure develops by 40 years of age, a condition causing amenorrhea, infertility, sex steroid deficiency, and elevated gonadotropins. Early loss of ovarian function has significant psychosocial sequelae and major health implications. These young women have a nearly two-fold age-specific increase in mortality rate. Among women with spontaneous premature ovarian failure who have a normal karyotype, half have ovarian follicles remaining in the ovary that function intermittently. Indeed, pregnancies have occurred after the diagnosis of premature ovarian failure. Thus, premature ovarian failure should not be considered as a premature menopause. Young women with this disorder have a 5% to 10% chance for spontaneous pregnancy. Attempts at ovulation induction using various regimens fail to induce ovulation rates greater than those seen in untreated patients; however, oocyte donation for women desiring fertility is an option. Young women with premature ovarian failure need a thorough assessment, sex steroid replacement, and long-term surveillance to monitor therapy. Estrogen-progestin replacement therapy should be instituted as soon as the diagnosis is made. Androgen replacement should also be considered for women with low libido, persistent fatigue, and poor well-being despite taking adequate estrogen replacement. Women with premature ovarian failure should be followed up for the presence of associated autoimmune endocrine disorders such as hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and diabetes mellitus.

  1. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. October 2, 2013 Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  2. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... for people who can't tolerate ACE inhibitors. Beta blockers. This class of drugs not only slows your ... rhythms and lessen your chance of dying unexpectedly. Beta blockers may reduce signs and symptoms of heart failure, ...

  3. Analysis of nuclear power plant component failures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Items are shown that have caused 90% of the nuclear unit outages and/or deratings between 1971 and 1980 and the magnitude of the problem indicated by an estimate of power replacement cost when the units are out of service or derated. The funding EPRI has provided on these specific items for R and D and technology transfer in the past and the funding planned in the future (1982 to 1986) are shown. EPRI's R and D may help the utilities on only a small part of their nuclear unit outage problems. For example, refueling is the major cause for nuclear unit outages or deratings and the steam turbine is the second major cause for nuclear unit outages; however, these two items have been ranked fairly low on the EPRI priority list for R and D funding. Other items such as nuclear safety (NRC requirements), reactor general, reactor and safety valves and piping, and reactor fuel appear to be receiving more priority than is necessary as determined by analysis of nuclear unit outage causes.

  4. Failure characteristics of 6061/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/15p and 2014/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/15p composites as a function of loading rate

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, B.Y.; Huang, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of loading rate on the toughness and fracture mechanisms of two cast 6061/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/15p and 2014/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/15p composites under the as-worked (AW) and AW + T6 conditions have been examined. The quasistatic bending and high-rate impact tests were conducted over strain rates from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} to 1 {times} 10{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} using screw-driven or servohydraulic high-rate systems. The results showed that the peak load P{sub max}, specimen deflection d, specimen lateral expansion fraction {Delta}w, crack initiation energy E{sub i}, propagation energy E{sub p}, total fracture energy E{sub t}, and deformation zone all tended to increase with increasing strain rate. Under quasistatic loading, the composites failed predominantly by matrix/reinforcement interface decohesion. As the loading rate increased, reinforcement failure became the major failure mechanism. Differences in the effect of matrix microstructure and stress state on the fracture properties also are discussed. In comparing the fracture modes in the AW and AW + T6 specimens, the latter showed a higher tendency toward particle cracking. Based on mechanical data, the degree of specimen deflection and expansion and fracture modes, the AW composites exhibited a higher strain-rate dependence. The T6 specimens, due to their intrinsically more brittle nature, appeared to be less influenced by loading rate over the strain-rate range examined.

  5. Heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of multidisciplinary interventions for heart failure? What are the effects of exercise in people with heart failure? What are the effects of drug treatments for heart failure? What are the effects of devices for treatment of heart failure? What are the effects of coronary revascularisation for treatment of heart failure? What are the effects of drug treatments in people at high risk of heart failure? What are the effects of treatments for diastolic heart failure? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aldosterone receptor antagonists, amiodarone, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, anticoagulation, antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, calcium

  6. Modeling Failure Propagation in Large-Scale Engineering Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schläpfer, Markus; Shapiro, Jonathan L.

    The simultaneous unavailability of several technical components within large-scale engineering systems can lead to high stress, rendering them prone to cascading events. In order to gain qualitative insights into the failure propagation mechanisms resulting from independent outages, we adopt a minimalistic model representing the components and their interdependencies by an undirected, unweighted network. The failure dynamics are modeled by an anticipated accelerated “wearout” process being dependent on the initial degree of a node and on the number of failed nearest neighbors. The results of the stochastic simulations imply that the influence of the network topology on the speed of the cascade highly depends on how the number of failed nearest neighbors shortens the life expectancy of a node. As a formal description of the decaying networks we propose a continuous-time mean field approximation, estimating the average failure rate of the nearest neighbors of a node based on the degree-degree distribution.

  7. Design of a case management model for people with chronic disease (Heart Failure and COPD). Phase I: modeling and identification of the main components of the intervention through their actors: patients and professionals (DELTA-icE-PRO Study)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases account for nearly 60% of deaths around the world. The extent of this silent epidemic has not met determined responses in governments, policies or professionals in order to transform old Health Care Systems, configured for acute diseases. There is a large list of research about alternative models for people with chronic conditions, many of them with an advanced practice nurse as a key provider, as case management. But some methodological concerns raise, above all, the design of the intervention (intensity, frequency, components, etc). Methods/Design Objectives: General: To develop the first and second phases (theorization and modeling) for designing a multifaceted case-management intervention in people with chronic conditions (COPD and heart failure) and their caregivers. Specific aims: 1) To identify key events in people living with chronic disease and their relation with the Health Care System, from their point of view. 2) To know the coping mechanisms developed by patients and their caregivers along the story with the disease. 3) To know the information processing and its utilization in their interactions with health care providers. 4) To detect potential unmet needs and the ways deployed by patients and their caregivers to resolve them. 5) To obtain a description from patients and caregivers, about their itineraries along the Health Care System, in terms of continuity, accessibility and comprehensiveness of care. 6) To build up a list of promising case-management interventions in patients with Heart Failure and COPD with this information in order to frame it into theoretical models for its reproducibility and conceptualization. 7) To undergo this list to expert judgment to assess its feasibility and pertinence in the Andalusian Health Care. Design: Qualitative research with two phases: For the first five objectives, a qualitative technique with biographic stories will be developed and, for the remaining objectives, an expert

  8. Weld failure detection

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting failure in a welded connection, particrly applicable to not readily accessible welds such as those joining components within the reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor system. A preselected tag gas is sealed within a chamber which extends through selected portions of the base metal and weld deposit. In the event of a failure, such as development of a crack extending from the chamber to an outer surface, the tag gas is released. The environment about the welded area is directed to an analyzer which, in the event of presence of the tag gas, evidences the failure. A trigger gas can be included with the tag gas to actuate the analyzer.

  9. Development of STS/Centaur failure probabilities liftoff to Centaur separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an analysis to determine STS/Centaur catastrophic vehicle response probabilities for the phases of vehicle flight from STS liftoff to Centaur separation from the Orbiter are presented. The analysis considers only category one component failure modes as contributors to the vehicle response mode probabilities. The relevant component failure modes are grouped into one of fourteen categories of potential vehicle behavior. By assigning failure rates to each component, for each of its failure modes, the STS/Centaur vehicle response probabilities in each phase of flight can be calculated. The results of this study will be used in a DOE analysis to ascertain the hazard from carrying a nuclear payload on the STS.

  10. Heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug treatments, and of drug and invasive treatments, for heart failure? What are the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in people at high risk of heart failure? What are the effects of treatments for diastolic heart failure? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 85 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aldosterone receptor antagonists, amiodarone, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, anticoagulation, antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, cardiac resynchronisation therapy, digoxin (in people already receiving diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), exercise, hydralazine plus isosorbide dinitrate, implantable cardiac

  11. Reliability Quantification of Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Korovaichuk, Igor; Zampino, Edward

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor, is intended to provide power for an unmanned planetary spacecraft and has an operational life requirement of 17 years. Over this 17 year mission, the ASC must provide power with desired performance and efficiency and require no corrective maintenance. Reliability demonstration testing for the ASC was found to be very limited due to schedule and resource constraints. Reliability demonstration must involve the application of analysis, system and component level testing, and simulation models, taken collectively. Therefore, computer simulation with limited test data verification is a viable approach to assess the reliability of ASC components. This approach is based on physics-of-failure mechanisms and involves the relationship among the design variables based on physics, mechanics, material behavior models, interaction of different components and their respective disciplines such as structures, materials, fluid, thermal, mechanical, electrical, etc. In addition, these models are based on the available test data, which can be updated, and analysis refined as more data and information becomes available. The failure mechanisms and causes of failure are included in the analysis, especially in light of the new information, in order to develop guidelines to improve design reliability and better operating controls to reduce the probability of failure. Quantified reliability assessment based on fundamental physical behavior of components and their relationship with other components has demonstrated itself to be a superior technique to conventional reliability approaches based on utilizing failure rates derived from similar equipment or simply expert judgment.

  12. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Kidney Failure Kidney failure, also known as renal failure, ... evaluated? How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain ...

  13. Enhanced Component Performance Study. Emergency Diesel Generators 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2014-11-01

    This report presents an enhanced performance evaluation of emergency diesel generators (EDGs) at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. This report evaluates component performance over time using Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES) data from 1998 through 2013 and maintenance unavailability (UA) performance data using Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) Basis Document data from 2002 through 2013. The objective is to present an analysis of factors that could influence the system and component trends in addition to annual performance trends of failure rates and probabilities. The factors analyzed for the EDG component are the differences in failures between all demands and actual unplanned engineered safety feature (ESF) demands, differences among manufacturers, and differences among EDG ratings. Statistical analyses of these differences are performed and results showing whether pooling is acceptable across these factors. In addition, engineering analyses were performed with respect to time period and failure mode. The factors analyzed are: sub-component, failure cause, detection method, recovery, manufacturer, and EDG rating.

  14. Therapeutic drug monitoring of enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium by limited sampling strategies is associated with a high rate of failure

    PubMed Central

    Hougardy, Jean-Michel; Maufort, Laurette; Cotton, Frédéric; Coussement, Julien; Mikhalski, Dimitri; Wissing, Karl M.; Le Moine, Alain; Broeders, Nilufer; Abramowicz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic drug monitoring of mycophenolic acid (MPA) is usually performed with a limited sampling strategy (LSS), which relies on a limited number of blood samples and subsequent extrapolation of the global exposure to MPA. LSS is usually performed successfully with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), but data on enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) are scarce. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of 6-h LSS therapeutic drug monitoring with EC-MPS compared with MMF monitoring among kidney transplant recipients. Methods Sixty-two patients who received EC-MPS during the first 6 months of transplantation were compared with a matched group of 64 MMF-treated kidney transplant recipients. The area under the curve (AUC) was computed by LSS using multiple concentration time points (0, 1, 2, 3 and 6 h post-dose) and a trapezoidal rule. Patients had MPA therapeutic drug monitoring performed on two occasions, one within 2 weeks and the second after 3–4 months of transplantation. Results EC-MPS monitoring and MMF therapeutic drug monitoring were not interpretable in 34.5% (n = 40/116) and 1.8% (n = 2/112) of patients, respectively {relative risk [RR] 19.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 4.8–78.0]; P < 0.0001}. The main cause of abnormal EC-MPS therapeutic drug monitoring was delayed absorption of both the previous evening and the morning dose, resulting in MPA plasma levels before the next morning dose being higher than MPA plasma levels measured at 1, 2 and 3 h after taking EC-MPS. Cyclosporin in association with MMF significantly increased the risk of low AUC values (<30 mg h/L) in comparison with tacrolimus [55% (n = 11/20) and 10% (n = 9/88), respectively; RR 5.4 (95% CI 2.6–11.2); P < 0.0001]. Conclusions The risk of therapeutic drug monitoring failure with EC-MPS is >30% during the first 6 months of renal transplantation. Delayed pharmacokinetics was the main reason. In contrast, the risk of therapeutic drug monitoring failure was substantially lower with

  15. Determinants of Toxicity, Patterns of Failure, and Outcome Among Adult Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity and Superficial Trunk Treated With Greater Than Conventional Doses of Perioperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    San Miguel, Inigo; San Julian, Mikel; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Sanmamed, Miguel Fernandez; Vazquez-Garcia, Blanca; Pagola, Maria; Gaztanaga, Miren; Martin-Algarra, Salvador; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present study was undertaken to determine factors predictive of toxicity, patterns of failure, and survival in 60 adult patients with soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity and superficial trunk treated with combined perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The patients were treated with surgical resection and perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (16 or 24 Gy) for negative and close/microscopically positive resection margins, respectively. External beam radiotherapy (45 Gy) was added postoperatively to reach a 2-Gy equivalent dose of 62.9 and 72.3 Gy, respectively. Adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide and doxorubicin was given to patients with advanced high-grade tumors. Results: Grade 3 toxic events were observed in 18 patients (30%) and Grade 4 events in 6 patients (10%). No Grade 5 events were observed. A location in the lower limb was significant for Grade 3 or greater toxic events on multivariate analysis (p = .013), and the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line showed a trend toward statistical significance (p = .086). The local control, locoregional control, and distant control rate at 9 years was 77.4%, 69.5%, and 63.8%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, microscopically involved margins correlated with local control (p = .036) and locoregional control (p = .007) and tumor size correlated with distant metastases (p = .004). The 9-year disease-free survival and overall survival rate was 47.0% and 61.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed poorer disease-free survival rates for patients with tumors >6 cm (p = .005) and microscopically involved margins (p = .043), and overall survival rates decreased with increasing tumor size (p = .011). Conclusions: Grade 3 or greater wound complications can probably be decreased using meticulous treatment planning to decrease the tissue volume encompassed by the 150% isodose line, especially in lower limb locations

  16. Micromechanical Failure Analyses for Finite Element Polymer Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    CHAMBERS,ROBERT S.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID; LO,CHI S.; ADOLF,DOUGLAS B.; GUESS,TOMMY R.

    2000-11-01

    Polymer stresses around sharp corners and in constrained geometries of encapsulated components can generate cracks leading to system failures. Often, analysts use maximum stresses as a qualitative indicator for evaluating the strength of encapsulated component designs. Although this approach has been useful for making relative comparisons screening prospective design changes, it has not been tied quantitatively to failure. Accurate failure models are needed for analyses to predict whether encapsulated components meet life cycle requirements. With Sandia's recently developed nonlinear viscoelastic polymer models, it has been possible to examine more accurately the local stress-strain distributions in zones of likely failure initiation looking for physically based failure mechanisms and continuum metrics that correlate with the cohesive failure event. This study has identified significant differences between rubbery and glassy failure mechanisms that suggest reasonable alternatives for cohesive failure criteria and metrics. Rubbery failure seems best characterized by the mechanisms of finite extensibility and appears to correlate with maximum strain predictions. Glassy failure, however, seems driven by cavitation and correlates with the maximum hydrostatic tension. Using these metrics, two three-point bending geometries were tested and analyzed under variable loading rates, different temperatures and comparable mesh resolution (i.e., accuracy) to make quantitative failure predictions. The resulting predictions and observations agreed well suggesting the need for additional research. In a separate, additional study, the asymptotically singular stress state found at the tip of a rigid, square inclusion embedded within a thin, linear elastic disk was determined for uniform cooling. The singular stress field is characterized by a single stress intensity factor K{sub a} and the applicable K{sub a} calibration relationship has been determined for both fully bonded and

  17. Molecular chain stretch is a multiaxial failure criterion for conventional and highly crosslinked UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Bergström, J S; Rimnac, C M; Kurtz, S M

    2005-03-01

    The development of accurate theoretical failure, fatigue, and wear models for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is an important step towards better understanding the micromechanisms of the surface damage that occur in load bearing orthopaedic components and improving the lifetime of joint arthoplasties. Previous attempts to analytically predict the clinically observed damage, wear, and fatigue failure modes have met with limited success due to the complicated interaction between microstructural deformations and continuum level stresses. In this work, we examined monotonic uniaxial and multiaxial loading to failure of UHMWPE using eight failure criteria (maximum principal stress, Mises stress, Tresca stress, hydrostatic stress, Coulomb stress, maximum principal strain, Mises strain, and chain stretch). The quality of the predictions of the different models was assessed by comparing uniaxial tension and small punch test data at different rates with the failure model predictions. The experimental data were obtained for two conventional (unirradiated and gamma radiation sterilized in nitrogen) and two highly crosslinked (150kGy, remelted and annealed) UHMWPE materials. Of the different failures models examined, the chain stretch failure model was found to capture uniaxial and multiaxial failure data most accurately for all of the UHMWPE materials. In addition, the chain stretch failure criterion can readily be calculated for contemporary UHMWPE materials based on available uniaxial tension data. These results lay the foundation for future developments of damage and wear models capable of predicting multiaxial failure under cyclic loading conditions.

  18. Progressive failure of large deformation composites under dynamic tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Liqun

    The applications of polymer based composite materials in structural components under dynamic loading have increased dramatically. The accurate understanding and modeling of the material mechanical behavior is the basis for the composite structure design and analysis. This research was designed to investigate the progressive failure nature of woven polymer-based composites under dynamic tensile loading conditions. A plain-woven E-glass/vinyl ester composite was selected and a generalized anisotropic material characterization procedure was developed. Off-axial tensile dynamic loading experiments with different strain rates and temperature was conducted. A nonlinear and rate dependent constitutive model used for the polymer-based composites under tensile dynamic tensile loading was constructed. The comparison shows a good match with testing data and a good prediction of stress to failure values. A hybrid method that combined the classical laminate theory with material microstructure analysis was presented to model the large strain to failure phenomenon. A single material parameter failure criteria based on Monkman-Grant concept was built to represent the materials anisotropic and rate dependency natural for tensile loading. And the strength concept based on the material constitution relationship and failure criteria was established to for structure analyses.

  19. Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-05-05

    In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

  20. A comprehensive analysis of the physiological and anatomical components involved in higher water loss rates after leaf development at high humidity.

    PubMed

    Fanourakis, Dimitrios; Heuvelink, Ep; Carvalho, Susana M P

    2013-07-01

    To better understand the poor regulation of water loss after leaf development at high relative air humidity (RH), the relative importance of the physiological and anatomical components was analyzed focusing on cultivars with a contrasting sensitivity to elevated RH. The stomatal responsiveness to three closing stimuli (desiccation, abscisic acid feeding, light/dark transition), as well as several stomatal features (density, index, size and pore dimensions) and the cuticular transpiration rate (CTR) were determined in four rose cultivars, grown under moderate (60%) and high (95%) RH. Moreover, the effects of changes in stomatal density and pore dimensions on the stomatal conductance (gs) were quantified using a modified version of the Brown and Escombe equation. Higher water loss, as a result of plant growth at high RH, was primarily caused by an increase in residual gs, and to a lesser extent due to higher CTR. It was estimated that in leaflets subjected to desiccation the enhanced gs in high RH- as compared to moderate RH-grown plants was mostly due to poor stomatal functionality and to a lesser extent the combined result of higher stomatal density and longer pore length. It is concluded that the reduced degree and, specially, the reduced rate of stomatal closure are the primary causes of the large genotypic variation in the control of water loss in high RH-grown plants. Furthermore, it was found that although changes in stomatal length have no influence on stomatal functionality, changed anatomical features per se represent a significant and direct contribution to the increased water loss.

  1. Mitigating mechanical failure of crystalline silicon electrodes for lithium batteries by morphological design [Morphological design of silicon electrode with anisotropic interface reaction rate for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    An, Yonghao; Wood, Brandon C.; Ye, Jianchao; Chiang, Yet -Ming; Wang, Y. Morris; Tang, Ming; Jiang, Hanqing

    2015-06-08

    Although crystalline silicon (c-Si) anodes promise very high energy densities in Li-ion batteries, their practical use is complicated by amorphization, large volume expansion and severe plastic deformation upon lithium insertion. Recent experiments have revealed the existence of a sharp interface between crystalline Si (c-Si) and the amorphous LixSi alloy during lithiation, which propagates with a velocity that is orientation dependent; the resulting anisotropic swelling generates substantial strain concentrations that initiate cracks even in nanostructured Si. Here we describe a novel strategy to mitigate lithiation-induced fracture by using pristine c-Si structures with engineered anisometric morphologies that are deliberately designed to counteract the anisotropy in the crystalline/amorphous interface velocity. This produces a much more uniform volume expansion, significantly reducing strain concentration. Based on a new, validated methodology that improves previous models of anisotropic swelling of c-Si, we propose optimal morphological designs for c-Si pillars and particles. The advantages of the new morphologies are clearly demonstrated by mesoscale simulations and verified by experiments on engineered c-Si micropillars. The results of this study illustrate that morphological design is effective in improving the fracture resistance of micron-sized Si electrodes, which will facilitate their practical application in next-generation Li-ion batteries. In conclusion, the model and design approach present in this paper also have general implications for the study and mitigation of mechanical failure of electrode materials that undergo large anisotropic volume change upon ion insertion and extraction.

  2. Mitigating mechanical failure of crystalline silicon electrodes for lithium batteries by morphological design [Morphological design of silicon electrode with anisotropic interface reaction rate for lithium ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    An, Yonghao; Wood, Brandon C.; Ye, Jianchao; ...

    2015-06-08

    Although crystalline silicon (c-Si) anodes promise very high energy densities in Li-ion batteries, their practical use is complicated by amorphization, large volume expansion and severe plastic deformation upon lithium insertion. Recent experiments have revealed the existence of a sharp interface between crystalline Si (c-Si) and the amorphous LixSi alloy during lithiation, which propagates with a velocity that is orientation dependent; the resulting anisotropic swelling generates substantial strain concentrations that initiate cracks even in nanostructured Si. Here we describe a novel strategy to mitigate lithiation-induced fracture by using pristine c-Si structures with engineered anisometric morphologies that are deliberately designed to counteractmore » the anisotropy in the crystalline/amorphous interface velocity. This produces a much more uniform volume expansion, significantly reducing strain concentration. Based on a new, validated methodology that improves previous models of anisotropic swelling of c-Si, we propose optimal morphological designs for c-Si pillars and particles. The advantages of the new morphologies are clearly demonstrated by mesoscale simulations and verified by experiments on engineered c-Si micropillars. The results of this study illustrate that morphological design is effective in improving the fracture resistance of micron-sized Si electrodes, which will facilitate their practical application in next-generation Li-ion batteries. In conclusion, the model and design approach present in this paper also have general implications for the study and mitigation of mechanical failure of electrode materials that undergo large anisotropic volume change upon ion insertion and extraction.« less

  3. New understandings of failure modes in SSL luminaires

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Sarah D; Mills, Karmann C; Yaga, Robert; Johnson, Cortina; Davis, J Lynn

    2014-09-18

    As SSL products are being rapidly introduced into the market, there is a need to develop standard screening and testing protocols that can be performed quickly and provide data surrounding product lifetime and performance. These protocols, derived from standard industry tests, are known as ALTs (accelerated life tests) and can be performed in a timeframe of weeks to months instead of years. Accelerated testing utilizes a combination of elevated temperature and humidity conditions as well as electrical power cycling to control aging of the luminaires. In this study, we report on the findings of failure modes for two different luminaire products exposed to temperature-humidity ALTs. LEDs are typically considered the determining component for the rate of lumen depreciation. However, this study has shown that each luminaire component can independently or jointly influence system performance and reliability. Material choices, luminaire designs, and driver designs all have significant impacts on the system reliability of a product. From recent data, it is evident that the most common failure modes are not within the LED, but instead occur within resistors, capacitors, and other electrical components of the driver. Insights into failure modes and rates as a result of ALTs are reported with emphasis on component influence on overall system reliability.

  4. New understandings of failure modes in SSL luminaires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Sarah D.; Mills, Karmann C.; Yaga, Robert; Johnson, Cortina; Davis, J. Lynn

    2014-09-01

    As SSL products are being rapidly introduced into the market, there is a need to develop standard screening and testing protocols that can be performed quickly and provide data surrounding product lifetime and performance. These protocols, derived from standard industry tests, are known as ALTs (accelerated life tests) and can be performed in a timeframe of weeks to months instead of years. Accelerated testing utilizes a combination of elevated temperature and humidity conditions as well as electrical power cycling to control aging of the luminaires. In this study, we report on the findings of failure modes for two different luminaire products exposed to temperature-humidity ALTs. LEDs are typically considered the determining component for the rate of lumen depreciation. However, this study has shown that each luminaire component can independently or jointly influence system performance and reliability. Material choices, luminaire designs, and driver designs all have significant impacts on the system reliability of a product. From recent data, it is evident that the most common failure modes are not within the LED, but instead occur within resistors, capacitors, and other electrical components of the driver. Insights into failure modes and rates as a result of ALTs are reported with emphasis on component influence on overall system reliability.

  5. The Use of Probabilistic Methods to Evaluate the Systems Impact of Component Design Improvements on Large Turbofan Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Michael H.

    2002-01-01

    Probabilistic Structural Analysis (PSA) is now commonly used for predicting the distribution of time/cycles to failure of turbine blades and other engine components. These distributions are typically based on fatigue/fracture and creep failure modes of these components. Additionally, reliability analysis is used for taking test data related to particular failure modes and calculating failure rate distributions of electronic and electromechanical components. How can these individual failure time distributions of structural, electronic and electromechanical component failure modes be effectively combined into a top level model for overall system evaluation of component upgrades, changes in maintenance intervals, or line replaceable unit (LRU) redesign? This paper shows an example of how various probabilistic failure predictions for turbine engine components can be evaluated and combined to show their effect on overall engine performance. A generic model of a turbofan engine was modeled using various Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) tools (Quantitative Risk Assessment Software (QRAS) etc.). Hypothetical PSA results for a number of structural components along with mitigation factors that would restrict the failure mode from propagating to a Loss of Mission (LOM) failure were used in the models. The output of this program includes an overall failure distribution for LOM of the system. The rank and contribution to the overall Mission Success (MS) is also given for each failure mode and each subsystem. This application methodology demonstrates the effectiveness of PRA for assessing the performance of large turbine engines. Additionally, the effects of system changes and upgrades, the application of different maintenance intervals, inclusion of new sensor detection of faults and other upgrades were evaluated in determining overall turbine engine reliability.

  6. High rates of virological failure and drug resistance in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving lifelong antiretroviral therapy in routine clinics in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Salou, Mounerou; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Butel, Christelle; Vidal, Nicole; Serrano, Laetitia; Takassi, Elom; Konou, Abla A; Houndenou, Spero; Dapam, Nina; Singo-Tokofaï, Assetina; Pitche, Palokinam; Atakouma, Yao; Prince-David, Mireille; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been scaled up over the last decade but compared to adults, children living with HIV are less likely to receive ART. Moreover, children and adolescents are more vulnerable than adults to virological failure (VF) and emergence of drug resistance. In this study we determined virological outcome in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving ART in Togo. Methods HIV viral load (VL) testing was consecutively proposed to all children and adolescents who were on ART for at least 12 months when attending HIV healthcare services for their routine follow-up visit (June to September 2014). Plasma HIV-1 VL was measured using the m2000 RealTime HIV-1 assay (Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL, USA). Genotypic drug resistance was done for all samples with VL>1000 copies/ml. Results and discussion Among 283 perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents included, 167 (59%) were adolescents and 116 (41%) were children. The median duration on ART was 48 months (interquartile range: 28 to 68 months). For 228 (80.6%), the current ART combination consisted of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) (zidovudine and lamivudine) and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) (nevirapine or efavirenz). Only 28 (9.9%) were on a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen. VL was below the detection limit (i.e. 40 copies/ml) for 102 (36%), between 40 and 1000 copies/ml for 35 (12.4%) and above 1000 copies/ml for 146 (51.6%). Genotypic drug-resistance testing was successful for 125/146 (85.6%); 110/125 (88.0%) were resistant to both NRTIs and NNRTIs, 1/125 (0.8%) to NRTIs only, 4/125 (3.2%) to NNRTIs only and three harboured viruses resistant to reverse transcriptase and PIs. Overall, 86% (108/125) of children and adolescents experiencing VF and successfully genotyped, corresponding thus to at least 38% of the study population, had either no effective ART or had only a single effective drug in

  7. The effect of time step, thermostat, and strain rate on ReaxFF simulations of mechanical failure in diamond, graphene, and carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Benjamin D; Wise, Kristopher E; Odegard, Gregory M

    2015-08-05

    As the sophistication of reactive force fields for molecular modeling continues to increase, their use and applicability has also expanded, sometimes beyond the scope of their original development. Reax Force Field (ReaxFF), for example, was originally developed to model chemical reactions, but is a promising candidate for modeling fracture because of its ability to treat covalent bond cleavage. Performing reliable simulations of a complex process like fracture, however, requires an understanding of the effects that various modeling parameters have on the behavior of the system. This work assesses the effects of time step size, thermostat algorithm and coupling coefficient, and strain rate on the fracture behavior of three carbon-based materials: graphene, diamond, and a carbon nanotube. It is determined that the simulated stress-strain behavior is relatively independent of the thermostat algorithm, so long as coupling coefficients are kept above a certain threshold. Likewise, the stress-strain response of the materials was also independent of the strain rate, if it is kept below a maximum strain rate. Finally, the mechanical properties of the materials predicted by the Chenoweth C/H/O parameterization for ReaxFF are compared with literature values. Some deficiencies in the Chenoweth C/H/O parameterization for predicting mechanical properties of carbon materials are observed.

  8. Causes of failure of the Kinemax Plus total knee replacement in the first five years.

    PubMed

    Davis, C R; Davies, A P; Newman, J H

    2007-03-01

    In order to investigate whether any single batch of polyethylene inserts was responsible for premature failure of total knee replacements (TKR), we performed a retrospective database review of 1133 consecutive primary Kinemax Plus TKR performed by 2 surgical teams between January 1992 and January 2001 at our institution. Cases re-operated in any way within 5 years of the index arthroplasty were identified, case notes studied and radiographs reviewed. The causes contributing to the premature failure of the implants were identified where possible and the polyethylene lot numbers were recorded. Nineteen cases were known to have been revised, 7 cases for deep infection of the prosthesis and 12 for aseptic failure. In 10 cases, an identifiable technical error had contributed to the early failure of the implant. In 4 of these cases, there was inadequate tissue balancing in patients with a significant pre-operative valgus deformity. In 2 cases, the tibial base plate was inserted in a varus mal-alignment. There was one extended tibial component, one internally rotated femoral component, one oversized femoral component and one femoral component with inadequate fixation. Two further cases failed aseptically, one with a fracture of the medial tibial plateau and one idiopathic. The lot numbers of the polyethylene inserts were all different. This study confirms that the premature failure rate of the Kinemax Plus TKR is low. Although a "bad batch" of polyethylene has been suggested as a cause for early failure in TKR, in this series, surgical error was the predominant cause.

  9. Metabolic mechanisms in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ashrafian, Houman; Frenneaux, Michael P; Opie, Lionel H

    2007-07-24

    Although neurohumoral antagonism has successfully reduced heart failure morbidity and mortality, the residual disability and death rate remains unacceptably high. Though abnormalities of myocardial metabolism are associated with heart failure, recent data suggest that heart failure may itself promote metabolic changes such as insulin resistance, in part through neurohumoral activation. A detrimental self-perpetuating cycle (heart failure --> altered metabolism --> heart failure) that promotes the progression of heart failure may thus be postulated. Accordingly, we review the cellular mechanisms and pathophysiology of altered metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. It is hypothesized that the ensuing detrimental myocardial energetic perturbations result from neurohumoral activation, increased adverse free fatty acid metabolism, decreased protective glucose metabolism, and in some cases insulin resistance. The result is depletion of myocardial ATP, phosphocreatine, and creatine kinase with decreased efficiency of mechanical work. On the basis of the mechanisms outlined, appropriate therapies to mitigate aberrant metabolism include intense neurohumoral antagonism, limitation of diuretics, correction of hypokalemia, exercise, and diet. We also discuss more novel mechanistic-based therapies to ameliorate metabolism and insulin resistance in heart failure. For example, metabolic modulators may optimize myocardial substrate utilization to improve cardiac function and exercise performance beyond standard care. The ultimate success of metabolic-based therapy will be manifest by its capacity further to lessen the residual mortality in heart failure.

  10. Reliability considerations of electronics components for the deep underwater muon and neutrino detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.

    1980-02-01

    The reliability of some electronics components for the Deep Underwater Muon and Neutrino Detection (DUMAND) System is discussed. An introductory overview of engineering concepts and technique for reliability assessment is given. Component reliability is discussed in the contest of major factors causing failures, particularly with respect to physical and chemical causes, process technology and testing, and screening procedures. Failure rates are presented for discrete devices and for integrated circuits as well as for basic electronics components. Furthermore, the military reliability specifications and standards for semiconductor devices are reviewed.

  11. Heart failure.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2013-02-01

    Despite major improvements in the treatment of virtually all cardiac disorders, heart failure (HF) is an exception, in that its prevalence is rising, and only small prolongations in survival are occurring. An increasing fraction, especially older women with diabetes, obesity, and atrial fibrillation exhibit HF with preserved systolic function. Several pathogenetic mechanisms appear to be operative in HF. These include increased hemodynamic overload, ischemia-related dysfunction, ventricular remodeling, excessive neurohumoral stimulation, abnormal myocyte calcium cycling, excessive or inadequate proliferation of the extracellular matrix, accelerated apoptosis, and genetic mutations. Biomarkers released as a consequence of myocardial stretch, imbalance between formation and breakdown of extracellular matrix, inflammation, and renal failure are useful in the identification of the pathogenetic mechanism and, when used in combination, may become helpful in estimating prognosis and selecting appropriate therapy. Promising new therapies that are now undergoing intensive investigation include an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, a naturally-occurring vasodilator peptide, a myofilament sensitizer and several drugs that enhance Ca++ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Cell therapy, using autologous bone marrow and cardiac progenitor cells, appears to be promising, as does gene therapy. Chronic left ventricular assistance with continuous flow pumps is being applied more frequently and successfully as destination therapy, as a bridge to transplantation, and even as a bridge to recovery and explantation. While many of these therapies will improve the care of patients with HF, significant reductions in prevalence will require vigorous, multifaceted, preventive approaches.

  12. Component Repair Times Obtained from MSPI Data

    SciTech Connect

    Eide, Steven A.

    2015-05-01

    Information concerning times to repair or restore equipment to service given a failure is valuable to probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). Examples of such uses in modern PRAs include estimation of the probability of failing to restore a failed component within a specified time period (typically tied to recovering a mitigating system before core damage occurs at nuclear power plants) and the determination of mission times for support system initiating event (SSIE) fault tree models. Information on equipment repair or restoration times applicable to PRA modeling is limited and dated for U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. However, the Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) program covering all U.S. commercial nuclear power plants provides up-to-date information on restoration times for a limited set of component types. This paper describes the MSPI program data available and analyzes the data to obtain median and mean component restoration times as well as non-restoration cumulative probability curves. The MSPI program provides guidance for monitoring both planned and unplanned outages of trains of selected mitigating systems deemed important to safety. For systems included within the MSPI program, plants monitor both train UA and component unreliability (UR) against baseline values. If the combined system UA and UR increases sufficiently above established baseline results (converted to an estimated change in core damage frequency or CDF), a “white” (or worse) indicator is generated for that system. That in turn results in increased oversight by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and can impact a plant’s insurance rating. Therefore, there is pressure to return MSPI program components to service as soon as possible after a failure occurs. Three sets of unplanned outages might be used to determine the component repair durations desired in this article: all unplanned outages for the train type that includes the component of interest, only

  13. Embryo quality before and after slow freezing: Viability, implantation and pregnancy rates in 627 single frozen-thawed embryo replacement cycles following failure of fresh transfer.

    PubMed

    Capodanno, Francesco; De Feo, Gaetano; Gizzo, Salvatore; Nicoli, Alessia; Palomba, Stefano; La Sala, Giovanni Battista

    2016-06-01

    Frozen embryo transfer cycles are now common practice, however, various aspects regarding the potential of frozen embryos remain unclear. The main goal of the present study was to assess embryo quality before and after slow freezing procedure, and more specifically blastomere loss and embryo quality as indicator of viability. A single center retrospective analysis of single frozen-thawed embryo replacements (s-FER) was performed. The embryo quality before and after slow freezing and thawing, implantation, and pregnancy rates were recorded. One hundred and twenty seven s-FER were included in the final analysis. The probability of achieving an ongoing pregnancy was significantly associated with embryo quality and the percentage of blastomere loss after thawing. Considering thawed embryos, a non-significant difference in term of implantation rate was observed, regardless to their post-thawing quality and the percentage of blastomeres loss. In conclusion, current data suggest that thawed embryos are capable of implantation regardless of their morphological quality and the degree of cryoinjury sustained.

  14. Using Statistical Penalties In The Tsai-Wu Failure Criterion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, D. E.; Regl, R. R.; Iverson, M. P.; Phipps, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    Improved methods of applying statistical penalties when using Tsai-Wu failure criterion lead to more accurate predictions of failures of composite-material structural components under stress, and provide better safety factors for designing such components. Intended to ensure proper use of statistical penalties with respect to failure hypersurface.

  15. Do bisexual girls report higher rates of substance use than heterosexual girls? A failure to replicate with incarcerated and detained youth

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Michael H.; Stein, L.A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Prior research suggests that sexual minority females, particularly bisexuals, report greater rates of substance use than heterosexuals. However, to our knowledge, no study has compared alcohol/drug use between bisexual and heterosexual incarcerated or detained female youth. The current study pools data from three prior treatment studies with incarcerated or detained adolescent girls that self-identify as bisexual or heterosexual (N=86). Hierarchical regression models were conducted to determine whether 12-month prevalence of alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana, or other drug use differed between bisexual and heterosexual participants. In contrast to most prior work, no differences were observed. Findings are considered in light of the recruitment setting, which drew a sample with high levels of substance use prevalence. PMID:27087787

  16. Phenomenological Studies of Macroscale Failure in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwa, Bryan Andrew; Hull, Lawrence Mark

    2016-12-06

    Highlights of recent phenomenological studies of metal failure are given. Failure leading to spallation and fragmentation are typically of interest. The current ‘best model’ includes the following; a full history stress in tension; nucleation initiating dynamic relaxation; toward a tensile yield function; failure dependent on strain, strain rate, and temperature; a mean-preserving ‘macrodefect’ is introduced when failure occurs in tension; and multifield theoretical refinements

  17. Predicting Failure Progression and Failure Loads in Composite Open-Hole Tension Coupons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arunkumar, Satyanarayana; Przekop, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Failure types and failure loads in carbon-epoxy [45n/90n/-45n/0n]ms laminate coupons with central circular holes subjected to tensile load are simulated using progressive failure analysis (PFA) methodology. The progressive failure methodology is implemented using VUMAT subroutine within the ABAQUS(TradeMark)/Explicit nonlinear finite element code. The degradation model adopted in the present PFA methodology uses an instantaneous complete stress reduction (COSTR) approach to simulate damage at a material point when failure occurs. In-plane modeling parameters such as element size and shape are held constant in the finite element models, irrespective of laminate thickness and hole size, to predict failure loads and failure progression. Comparison to published test data indicates that this methodology accurately simulates brittle, pull-out and delamination failure types. The sensitivity of the failure progression and the failure load to analytical loading rates and solvers precision is demonstrated.

  18. Energy-Dependent Scintillation Pulse Shape and Proportionality of Decay Components for CsI:Tl: Modeling with Transport and Rate Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Gridin, S.; Williams, R. T.; Mayhugh, M. R.; Gektin, A.; Syntfeld-Kazuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Moszynski, M.

    2017-01-01

    Relatively recent experiments on the scintillation response of CsI:Tl have found that there are three main decay times of about 730 ns, 3 μ s , and 16 μ s , i.e., one more principal decay component than had been previously reported; that the pulse shape depends on gamma-ray energy; and that the proportionality curves of each decay component are different, with the energy-dependent light yield of the 16 -μ s component appearing to be anticorrelated with that of the 0.73 -μ s component at room temperature. These observations can be explained by the described model of carrier transport and recombination in a particle track. This model takes into account processes of hot and thermalized carrier diffusion, electric-field transport, trapping, nonlinear quenching, and radiative recombination. With one parameter set, the model reproduces multiple observables of CsI:Tl scintillation response, including the pulse shape with rise and three decay components, its energy dependence, the approximate proportionality, and the main trends in proportionality of different decay components. The model offers insights on the spatial and temporal distributions of carriers and their reactions in the track.

  19. Probability of failure of the waste hoist brake system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, M.A.; Sargent, T.J. |

    1998-01-01

    In its most recent report on the annual probability of failure of the waste hoist brake system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the annual failure rate is calculated to be 1.3E({minus}7)(1/yr), rounded off from 1.32E({minus}7). A calculation by the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) produces a result that is about 4% higher, namely 1.37E({minus}7)(1/yr). The difference is due to a minor error in the US Department of Energy (DOE) calculations in the Westinghouse 1996 report. WIPP`s hoist safety relies on a braking system consisting of a number of components including two crucial valves. The failure rate of the system needs to be recalculated periodically to accommodate new information on component failure, changes in maintenance and inspection schedules, occasional incidents such as a hoist traveling out-of-control, either up or down, and changes in the design of the brake system. This report examines DOE`s last two reports on the redesigned waste hoist system. In its calculations, the DOE has accepted one EEG recommendation and is using more current information about the component failures rates, the Nonelectronic Parts Reliability Data (NPRD). However, the DOE calculations fail to include the data uncertainties which are described in detail in the NPRD reports. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission recommended that a system evaluation include mean estimates of component failure rates and take into account the potential uncertainties that exist so that an estimate can be made on the confidence level to be ascribed to the quantitative results. EEG has made this suggestion previously and the DOE has indicated why it does not accept the NRC recommendation. Hence, this EEG report illustrates the importance of including data uncertainty using a simple statistical example.

  20. Early Prevention of School Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kent C.

    The Early Prevention of School Failure (EPSF) program developed by Dr. Luceille Werner is presented. The program is designed to identify and remediate developmental deficiencies of four-, five-, and six-year-old children and has been accepted in the National Diffusion Network as a nationally validated program. The main program components are…

  1. Failure mode analysis to predict product reliability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemanick, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    The failure mode analysis (FMA) is described as a design tool to predict and improve product reliability. The objectives of the failure mode analysis are presented as they influence component design, configuration selection, the product test program, the quality assurance plan, and engineering analysis priorities. The detailed mechanics of performing a failure mode analysis are discussed, including one suggested format. Some practical difficulties of implementation are indicated, drawn from experience with preparing FMAs on the nuclear rocket engine program.

  2. A Report on Simulation-Driven Reliability and Failure Analysis of Large-Scale Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Lipeng; Wang, Feiyi; Oral, H. Sarp; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S.; Cao, Qing

    2014-11-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) storage systems provide data availability and reliability using various hardware and software fault tolerance techniques. Usually, reliability and availability are calculated at the subsystem or component level using limited metrics such as, mean time to failure (MTTF) or mean time to data loss (MTTDL). This often means settling on simple and disconnected failure models (such as exponential failure rate) to achieve tractable and close-formed solutions. However, such models have been shown to be insufficient in assessing end-to-end storage system reliability and availability. We propose a generic simulation framework aimed at analyzing the reliability and availability of storage systems at scale, and investigating what-if scenarios. The framework is designed for an end-to-end storage system, accommodating the various components and subsystems, their interconnections, failure patterns and propagation, and performs dependency analysis to capture a wide-range of failure cases. We evaluate the framework against a large-scale storage system that is in production and analyze its failure projections toward and beyond the end of lifecycle. We also examine the potential operational impact by studying how different types of components affect the overall system reliability and availability, and present the preliminary results

  3. [Failure effects and gender differences in perfectionism].

    PubMed

    Masson, A M; Cadot, M; Ansseau, M

    2003-01-01

    perfectionism are described: SOP (Self Oriented Perfectionism) related to high standards and self criticism, SPP (Socially Prescribed Perfectionism) related to the need of approval from others and fear of negative evaluation, OOP (Other-Oriented Perfectionism) reflecting a tendency to set high expectations for others and to evaluate them in a demanding way; this component is related, especially for males, to self-esteem, hostility and authoritarianism. Validity and internal consistency have been established too (30, 31, 35). The Frost and al's Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale and the Hewitt and Flett's scales are closely associated, except concerning the OOP. Because this component could provide new information, we have chosen the second scale, referring to the French translation and validation of Labrecque (45). EMP is the French name of MPS; it is a self-report questionnaire of 45 questions, in fact three subscales of 15 items rated on a 7-point Likert-type scale. MPS was administered to 617 first year students at the university of Liège (table II). Differences are considered according to gender and experience of failure i.e. the fact of repeating an academic year. We realized a component analysis with promax rotation. Among the different possibilities offered by the scree-test the choice of a 4 factor solution stresses the original structure: SOP (14 items), SPP (12 items), OOP (9 items) and anti OOP (10 items); the last one is additional but allows for respecting semantics and saturation of the items. The first aim of confirming validity and internal consistency is satisfactory. In other respects the multidimensional structure of the concept leads to consideration of a positive, adaptive perfectionism and a more negative perfectionism, facilitating psychopathology (59, 60, 61). So it seems interesting to compare the different components of MPS in order to find an eventual sex-failure effect. The evaluation of perfectionism is obvious, considering it as a personality

  4. Alumina Inlay Failure in Cemented Polyethylene-backed Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Hiroyoshi; Minoda, Yukihide; Ohashi, Hirotsugu; Takaoka, Kunio

    2008-01-01

    Alumina-on-alumina bearings for THA have markedly improved in mechanical properties through advances in technology; however, alumina fracture is still a concern. We retrospectively reviewed 77 patients (82 hips) with cemented alumina-on-alumina THAs to identify factors relating to alumina failure. The mean age of the patients at surgery was 63 years. The prostheses had a cemented polyethylene-backed acetabular component with an alumina inlay and a 28-mm alumina head. Revision surgery was performed because of alumina inlay failure in four hips (three fractures and one dissociation; 5.6%), deep infection in two, and recurrent dislocation in one. The 8-year survival rate was 90.7% with revision for any reason and 94.4% with revision for alumina failure as the end point. There were no differences in age, body mass index, gender, mobility, function, abduction angle, or size of component among the four hips with alumina failure and the remaining 68 hips without it; however, radiolucent lines in the sockets were more apparent in four cases with alumina inlay failure. This alumina-on-alumina THA thus yielded unsatisfactory medium-term results because we observed a high rate of catastrophic alumina inlay failure. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18288546

  5. Development of a clinical prediction rule to improve peripheral intravenous cannulae first attempt success in the emergency department and reduce post insertion failure rates: the Vascular Access Decisions in the Emergency Room (VADER) study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Peter J; Rippey, James C R; Cooke, Marie L; Bharat, Chrianna; Murray, Kevin; Higgins, Niall S; Foale, Aileen; Rickard, Claire M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral intravenous cannula (PIVC) insertion is one of the most common clinical interventions performed in emergency care worldwide. However, factors associated with successful PIVC placement and maintenance are not well understood. This study seeks to determine the predictors of first time PIVC insertion success in emergency department (ED) and identify the rationale for removal of the ED inserted PIVC in patients admitted to the hospital ward. Reducing failed insertion attempts and improving peripheral intravenous cannulation practice could lead to better staff and patient experiences, as well as improving hospital efficiency. Methods and analysis We propose an observational cohort study of PIVC insertions in a patient population presenting to ED, with follow-up observation of the PIVC in subsequent admissions to the hospital ward. We will collect specific PIVC observational data such as; clinician factors, patient factors, device information and clinical practice variables. Trained researchers will gather ED PIVC insertion data to identify predictors of insertion success. In those admitted from the ED, we will determine the dwell time of the ED-inserted PIVC. Multivariate regression analyses will be used to identify factors associated with insertions success and PIVC failure and standard statistical validation techniques will be used to create and assess the effectiveness of a clinical predication rule. Ethics and dissemination The findings of our study will provide new evidence to improve insertion success rates in the ED setting and identify strategies to reduce premature device failure for patients admitted to hospital wards. Results will unravel a complexity of factors that contribute to unsuccessful PIVC attempts such as patient and clinician factors along with the products, technologies and infusates used. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000588594; Pre-results. PMID:26868942

  6. Components of US Associate Degree Nursing Programs and Their Relationship to the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Graduate Pass Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popescu, Caroline A.

    2011-01-01

    The nursing shortage has accelerated the need for nursing programs to discover program components related to success on the NCLEX-RN. As the demand for nurses is growing, nursing programs have been called upon to help find solutions to the problem. This study attempted to contribute to the resolution of the shortage and provide nursing educators…

  7. Enhanced Component Performance Study: Emergency Diesel Generators 1998–2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-11-01

    This report presents an enhanced performance evaluation of emergency diesel generators (EDGs) at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. This report evaluates component performance over time using (1) Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES) data from 1998 through 2014 and (2) maintenance unavailability (UA) performance data from Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) Basis Document data from 2002 through 2014. The objective is to show estimates of current failure probabilities and rates related to EDGs, trend these data on an annual basis, determine if the current data are consistent with the probability distributions currently recommended for use in NRC probabilistic risk assessments, show how the reliability data differ for different EDG manufacturers and for EDGs with different ratings; and summarize the subcomponents, causes, detection methods, and recovery associated with each EDG failure mode. Engineering analyses were performed with respect to time period and failure mode without regard to the actual number of EDGs at each plant. The factors analyzed are: sub-component, failure cause, detection method, recovery, manufacturer, and EDG rating. Six trends with varying degrees of statistical significance were identified in the data.

  8. Prevention of mechanical failures in implanted spinal cord stimulation systems.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Jaimie M; Schade, C M; Sasaki, John; Caraway, David L; Oakley, John C

    2006-07-01

    Introduction.  Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is an effective procedure for the treatment of neuropathic extremity pain, with success rates approaching 70%. However, mechanical failures, including breakage and migration, can significantly limit the long-term effectiveness of SCS. A systematic analysis of surgical techniques was undertaken by a consensus group, coupled with extensive in vivo and in vitro biomechanical testing of system components. Methods.  A computer model based on morphometric data was used to predict movement in a standard SCS system between an anchored lead and pulse generator placed in various locations. These displacements were then used to determine a realistic range of forces exerted on components of the SCS system. Laboratory fixtures were constructed to subject leads and anchors to repetitive stresses until failure occurred. An in vivo sheep model also was used to determine system compliances and failure thresholds in a biologically realistic setting. A panel of experienced implanters then interpreted the results and related them to clinical observations. Results.  Use of a soft silastic anchor pushed through the fascia to provide a larger bend radius for the lead was associated with a time to failure 65 times longer than an anchored but unsupported lead. In addition, failures of surgical paddle leads occurred when used with an anchor, whereas without an anchor, no failures occurred to 1 million cycles. Based on these findings, the panel recommended a paramedian approach, abdominal pulse generator placement, maximizing bend radius by pushing the anchor through the fascia, and anchoring of the extension connector near the lead anchor. Discussion.  Several factors are important in longevity of SCS systems. We discovered that technical factors can make a large difference in SCS reliability and that strict attention to these "best practices" will provide the best chance for maintaining the integrity of SCS systems over the long term.

  9. Failure Rates for Fiber Optic Assemblies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Observatorio Nacional de Fisica Cosmica, Dept. de Semiconductores, San Miguel, Argentina). FRANZ-KELDYSH EFFECT AND PHOTOVOLTAGE EDGE OF PbSe IR DETECTORS...H.B., C.K. Walker , C.K. Kim, et al. (Hughes Aircraft Co., Torrance Res. Center, Torrance, CA). MANUFACTURING METHODS AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM FOR GaAs...1976. DNA-O01-76- C-0201. AD/A048 563. Walker , L.G., and G.W., Pratt, Jr. (MIT, Cambridge, MA). LOW-VOLTAGE TUNNEL-INJECTION BLUE

  10. Failure and Life Cycle Evaluation of Watering Valves

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, David M; Graciano, Sandy J; Karlstad, John; Leblanc, Mathias; Clark, Tom; Holmes, Scott; Reuter, Jon D

    2011-01-01

    Automated watering systems provide a reliable source of ad libitum water to animal cages. Our facility uses an automated water delivery system to support approximately 95% of the housed population (approximately 14,000 mouse cages). Drinking valve failure rates from 2002 through 2006 never exceeded the manufacturer standard of 0.1% total failure, based on monthly cage census and the number of floods. In 2007, we noted an increase in both flooding and cases of clinical dehydration in our mouse population. Using manufacturer's specifications for a water flow rate of 25 to 50 mL/min, we initiated a wide-scale screening of all valves used. During a 4-mo period, approximately 17,000 valves were assessed, of which 2200 failed according to scoring criteria (12.9% overall; 7.2% low flow; 1.6% no flow; 4.1% leaky). Factors leading to valve failures included residual metal shavings, silicone flash, introduced debris or bedding, and (most common) distortion of the autoclave-rated internal diaphragm and O-ring. Further evaluation revealed that despite normal autoclave conditions of heat, pressure, and steam, an extreme negative vacuum pull caused the valves’ internal silicone components (diaphragm and O-ring) to become distorted and water-permeable. Normal flow rate often returned after a ‘drying out’ period, but components then reabsorbed water while on the animal rack or during subsequent autoclave cycles to revert to a variable flow condition. On the basis of our findings, we recalibrated autoclaves and initiated a preventative maintenance program to mitigate the risk of future valve failure. PMID:22330720

  11. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  12. What Is Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  13. Hydrophobic Surfaces of Spacecraft Components Enhance the Aggregation of Microorganisms and May Lead to Higher Survival Rates of Bacteria on Mars Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Kern, Roger G.

    2004-01-01

    In order to minimize the forward contamination of Mars, spacecraft are assembled under cleanroom conditions that require several procedures to clean and sterilize components. Surface characteristics of spacecraft materials may contribute to microbial survival on the surface of Mars by protecting spores from sterilizing agents, including UV irradiation. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of surface characteristics of several spacecraft materials on the survival of Bacillus subtilis spores under simulated Martian conditions.

  14. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  15. Analysis of Emergency Diesel Generators Failure Incidents in Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ronderio LaDavis

    In early years of operation, emergency diesel generators have had a minimal rate of demand failures. Emergency diesel generators are designed to operate as a backup when the main source of electricity has been disrupted. As of late, EDGs (emergency diesel generators) have been failing at NPPs (nuclear power plants) around the United States causing either station blackouts or loss of onsite and offsite power. These failures occurred from a specific type called demand failures. This thesis evaluated the current problem that raised concern in the nuclear industry which was averaging 1 EDG demand failure/year in 1997 to having an excessive event of 4 EDG demand failure year which occurred in 2011. To determine the next occurrence of the extreme event and possible cause to an event of such happening, two analyses were conducted, the statistical and root cause analysis. Considering the statistical analysis in which an extreme event probability approach was applied to determine the next occurrence year of an excessive event as well as, the probability of that excessive event occurring. Using the root cause analysis in which the potential causes of the excessive event occurred by evaluating, the EDG manufacturers, aging, policy changes/ maintenance practices and failure components. The root cause analysis investigated the correlation between demand failure data and historical data. Final results from the statistical analysis showed expectations of an excessive event occurring in a fixed range of probability and a wider range of probability from the extreme event probability approach. The root-cause analysis of the demand failure data followed historical statistics for the EDG manufacturer, aging and policy changes/ maintenance practices but, indicated a possible cause regarding the excessive event with the failure components. Conclusions showed the next excessive demand failure year, prediction of the probability and the next occurrence year of such failures, with an

  16. A failure management prototype: DR/Rx

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammen, David G.; Baker, Carolyn G.; Kelly, Christine M.; Marsh, Christopher A.

    1991-01-01

    This failure management prototype performs failure diagnosis and recovery management of hierarchical, distributed systems. The prototype, which evolved from a series of previous prototypes following a spiral model for development, focuses on two functions: (1) the diagnostic reasoner (DR) performs integrated failure diagnosis in distributed systems; and (2) the recovery expert (Rx) develops plans to recover from the failure. Issues related to expert system prototype design and the previous history of this prototype are discussed. The architecture of the current prototype is described in terms of the knowledge representation and functionality of its components.

  17. Prognostics for Microgrid Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav

    2012-01-01

    Prognostics is the science of predicting future performance and potential failures based on targeted condition monitoring. Moving away from the traditional reliability centric view, prognostics aims at detecting and quantifying the time to impending failures. This advance warning provides the opportunity to take actions that can preserve uptime, reduce cost of damage, or extend the life of the component. The talk will focus on the concepts and basics of prognostics from the viewpoint of condition-based systems health management. Differences with other techniques used in systems health management and philosophies of prognostics used in other domains will be shown. Examples relevant to micro grid systems and subsystems will be used to illustrate various types of prediction scenarios and the resources it take to set up a desired prognostic system. Specifically, the implementation results for power storage and power semiconductor components will demonstrate specific solution approaches of prognostics. The role of constituent elements of prognostics, such as model, prediction algorithms, failure threshold, run-to-failure data, requirements and specifications, and post-prognostic reasoning will be explained. A discussion on performance evaluation and performance metrics will conclude the technical discussion followed by general comments on open research problems and challenges in prognostics.

  18. Development of A Tabulated Thermo-Viscoplastic Material Model with Regularized Failure for Dynamic Ductile Failure Prediction of Structures under Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyuk, Murat

    -of-stress, strain-rate and temperature. Regularization treatment is implemented to reduce mesh size dependency especially for the problems where softening and failure is involved for the failure prediction. Ductile deformation and failure mechanism of 2024-T3/T351 aluminum alloy is investigated experimentally and numerically for quasi-static and dynamic conditions at various temperatures and stress-states. An intelligently contrived test matrix is developed by designing specific test specimens with different geometries that can construct a failure locus as a function of state-of-stress, strain-rate and temperature. An inverse material characterization algorithm is then introduced to generate input data for the new material model. Tabulated inputs of characterized material test results are directly used for both the constitutive and failure treatment of the new material model. Component based specimen tests that are used to characterize the material input properties and full-scale impact tests that are performed at different target thicknesses and impact speeds are used to validate and show the robustness, accuracy and efficiency of the new material model. It is shown that the new material model is capable of predicting ballistic limit and failure modes accurately for structures under impact even if the failure mode changes drastically. It is also shown that the new regularization model provides less mesh size dependency. These associated features of the model suggest that the new material model can be used as a promising generic tool for diverse applications of dynamic ductile deformation and failure phenomenon.

  19. Failure and recovery in dynamical networks

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, L.; Luković, M.; Nagler, J.; Havlin, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    Failure, damage spread and recovery crucially underlie many spatially embedded networked systems ranging from transportation structures to the human body. Here we study the interplay between spontaneous damage, induced failure and recovery in both embedded and non-embedded networks. In our model the network’s components follow three realistic processes that capture these features: (i) spontaneous failure of a component independent of the neighborhood (internal failure), (ii) failure induced by failed neighboring nodes (external failure) and (iii) spontaneous recovery of a component. We identify a metastable domain in the global network phase diagram spanned by the model’s control parameters where dramatic hysteresis effects and random switching between two coexisting states are observed. This dynamics depends on the characteristic link length of the embedded system. For the Euclidean lattice in particular, hysteresis and switching only occur in an extremely narrow region of the parameter space compared to random networks. We develop a unifying theory which links the dynamics of our model to contact processes. Our unifying framework may help to better understand controllability in spatially embedded and random networks where spontaneous recovery of components can mitigate spontaneous failure and damage spread in dynamical networks. PMID:28155876

  20. Failure and recovery in dynamical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, L.; Luković, M.; Nagler, J.; Havlin, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2017-02-01

    Failure, damage spread and recovery crucially underlie many spatially embedded networked systems ranging from transportation structures to the human body. Here we study the interplay between spontaneous damage, induced failure and recovery in both embedded and non-embedded networks. In our model the network’s components follow three realistic processes that capture these features: (i) spontaneous failure of a component independent of the neighborhood (internal failure), (ii) failure induced by failed neighboring nodes (external failure) and (iii) spontaneous recovery of a component. We identify a metastable domain in the global network phase diagram spanned by the model’s control parameters where dramatic hysteresis effects and random switching between two coexisting states are observed. This dynamics depends on the characteristic link length of the embedded system. For the Euclidean lattice in particular, hysteresis and switching only occur in an extremely narrow region of the parameter space compared to random networks. We develop a unifying theory which links the dynamics of our model to contact processes. Our unifying framework may help to better understand controllability in spatially embedded and random networks where spontaneous recovery of components can mitigate spontaneous failure and damage spread in dynamical networks.

  1. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  2. [Heart failure: the importance of a disease management program].

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Gianna; Gorini, Marco; Maggioni, Aldo P; Oliva, Fabrizio

    2007-06-01

    Heart failure remains a growing public health problem, hospitalizations represent the main cost component of heart failure care and the poor quality of life of patients is often worsened by frequent admissions. A multidisciplinary approach and specific disease management programs are a potentially useful instrument to reducing hospitalizations in heart failure patients. These concepts have recently been discussed in a consensus document by all the Scientific Societies involved in the care of heart failure patients. The effectiveness of intervention programs delivering continuity of care by a multidisciplinary team achieved a promising reduction in admissions, but the results of the studies have not been univocal for category of strategies and about the effect on survival. Telephone intervention significantly decreased heart failure admissions but not all-cause admissions and mortality. The multicenter randomized DIAL study, comparing a centralized telephone intervention program delivering continuity of care by a multidisciplinary team with usual care in patients with heart failure, confirms these findings. After a mean 16-month follow-up, there was a benefit mostly due to a significant reduction in admissions for heart failure, but mortality was similar in both groups. Data on 9000 patients from the IN-CHF registry show that hospitalizations are a serious problem in Italy: 44% of the patients had at least one hospitalization for heart failure in the year prior to the entry visit and this is the most powerful independent predictor of rehospitalization during the follow-up. Nearly a quarter of the population with follow-up data availability (92%) has been rehospitalized in the year after enrollment; patients in advanced functional class (32.1% hospitalization rate) and with ischemic etiology (25.0%) are more likely to be hospitalized than those in NYHA class I-II and without ischemic etiology. In a survey carried out recently in Italy, in 1152 patients admitted for

  3. Heart Failure Readmission Reduction.

    PubMed

    Drozda, Joseph P; Smith, Donna A; Freiman, Paul C; Pursley, Janet; VanSlette, Jeffrey A; Smith, Timothy R

    Little is known regarding effectiveness of readmission reduction programs over time. The Heart Failure Management Program (HFMP) of St. John's Physician Group Practice (PGP) Demonstration provided an opportunity to assess outcomes over an extended period. Data from an electronic health record, an inpatient database, a disease registry, and the Social Security Death Master File were analyzed for patients admitted with heart failure (HF) for 5 years before (Period 1) and 5 years after (Period 2) inception of PGP. HF admissions decreased (Period 1, 58.3/month; Period 2, 52.4/month, P = .007). Thirty-day all-cause readmission rate dropped from Period 1 (annual average 18.8% [668/3545]) to year 1 of Period 2 (16.9% [136/804], P = .04) and remained stable thereafter (annual average 16.8% [589/3503]). Thirty-day mortality rate was flat throughout. HFMP was associated with decreased readmissions, primarily related to outpatient case management, while mortality remained stable.

  4. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity.

  5. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Feb 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  6. The comparative study of five sex-determining proteins across insects unveils high rates of evolution at basal components of the sex determination cascade.

    PubMed

    Eirín-López, José M; Sánchez, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    In insects, the sex determination cascade is composed of genes that interact with each other in a strict hierarchical manner, constituting a coadapted gene complex built in reverse order from bottom to top. Accordingly, ancient elements at the bottom are expected to remain conserved ensuring the correct functionality of the cascade. In the present work, we have studied the levels of variation displayed by five key components of the sex determination cascade across 59 insect species, including Sex-lethal, transformer, transformer-2, fruitless, doublesex, and sister-of-Sex-lethal (a paralog of Sxl encompassing sex-independent functions). Surprisingly, our results reveal that basal components of the cascade (doublesex, fruitless) seem to evolve more rapidly than previously suspected. Indeed, in the case of Drosophila, these proteins evolve more rapidly than the master regulator Sex-lethal. These results agree with the notion suggesting that genes involved in early aspects of development will be more constrained due to the large deleterious pleiotropic effects of mutations, resulting in increased levels of purifying selection at top positions of the cascade. The analyses of the selective episodes involved in the recruitment of Sxl into sex-determining functions further support this idea, suggesting the presence of bursts of adaptive selection in the common ancestor of drosophilids, followed by the onset of purifying selection preserving the master regulatory role of this protein on top of the Drosophila sex determination cascade. Altogether, these results underscore the importance of the position of sex determining genes in the cascade, constituting a major constraint shaping the molecular evolution of the insect sex determination pathway.

  7. Components of Particle Emissions from Light-Duty Spark-Ignition Vehicles with Varying Aromatic Content and Octane Rating in Gasoline.

    PubMed

    Short, Daniel Z; Vu, Diep; Durbin, Thomas D; Karavalakis, Georgios; Asa-Awuku, Akua

    2015-09-01

    Typical gasoline consists of varying concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons and octane ratings. However, their impacts on particulate matter (PM) such as black carbon (BC) and water-soluble and insoluble particle compositions are not well-defined. This study tests seven 2012 model year vehicles, which include one port fuel injection (PFI) configured hybrid vehicle, one PFI vehicle, and six gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles. Each vehicle was driven on the Unified transient testing cycle (UC) using four different fuels. Three fuels had a constant octane rating of 87 with varied aromatic concentrations at 15%, 25%, and 35%. A fourth fuel with higher octane rating, 91, contained 35% aromatics. BC, PM mass, surface tension, and water-soluble organic mass (WSOM) fractions were measured. The water-insoluble mass (WIM) fraction of the vehicle emissions was estimated. Increasing fuel aromatic content increases BC emission factors (EFs) of transient cycles. BC concentrations were higher for the GDI vehicles than the PFI and hybrid vehicles, suggesting a potential climate impact for increased GDI vehicle production. Vehicle steady-state testing showed that the hygroscopicity of PM emissions at high speeds (70 mph; κ > 1) are much larger than emissions at low speeds (30 mph; κ < 0.1). Iso-paraffin content in the fuels was correlated to the decrease in WSOM emissions. Both aromatic content and vehicle speed increase the amount of hygroscopic material found in particle emissions.

  8. Enhanced Droplet Erosion Resistance of Laser Treated Nano Structured TWAS and Plasma Ion Nitro-Carburized Coatings for High Rating Steam Turbine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, B. K.; Arya, Vivek; Mann, B. S.

    2010-09-01

    This article deals with surface modification of twin wire arc sprayed (TWAS) and plasma ion nitro-carburized X10CrNiMoV1222 steel using high power diode laser (HPDL) to overcome water droplet erosion occurring in low pressure steam turbine (LPST) bypass valves and LPST moving blades used in high rating conventional, critical, and super critical thermal power plants. The materials commonly used for high rating steam turbines blading are X10CrNiMoV1222 steel and Ti6Al4V titanium alloy. The HPDL surface treatment on TWAS coated X10CrNiMoV1222 steel as well as on plasma ion nitro-carburized steel has improved water droplet resistance manifolds. This may be due to combination of increased hardness and toughness as well as the formation of fine grained structure due to rapid heating and cooling rates associated with the laser surface treatment. The water droplet erosion test results along with their damage mechanism are reported in this article.

  9. Component outage data analysis methods. Volume 2: Basic statistical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. A.; Mazumdar, M.; McCutchan, D. A.

    1981-08-01

    Statistical methods for analyzing outage data on major power system components such as generating units, transmission lines, and transformers are identified. The analysis methods produce outage statistics from component failure and repair data that help in understanding the failure causes and failure modes of various types of components. Methods for forecasting outage statistics for those components used in the evaluation of system reliability are emphasized.

  10. The failure-tolerant leader.

    PubMed

    Farson, Richard; Keyes, Ralph

    2002-08-01

    "The fastest way to succeed," IBM's Thomas Watson, Sr., once said, "is to double your failure rate." In recent years, more and more executives have embraced Watson's point of view, coming to understand what innovators have always known: Failure is a prerequisite to invention. But while companies may grasp the value of making mistakes at the level of corporate practices, they have a harder time accepting the idea at the personal level. People are afraid to fail, and corporate culture reinforces that fear. In this article, psychologist and former Harvard Business School professor Richard Farson and coauthor Ralph Keyes discuss how companies can reduce the fear of miscues. What's crucial is the presence of failure-tolerant leaders--executives who, through their words and actions, help employees overcome their anxieties about making mistakes and, in the process, create a culture of intelligent risk-taking that leads to sustained innovation. Such leaders don't just accept productive failure, they promote it. Drawing from their research in business, politics, sports, and science, the authors identify common practices among failure-tolerant leaders. These leaders break down the social and bureaucratic barriers that separate them from their followers. They engage at a personal level with the people they lead. They avoid giving either praise or criticism, preferring to take a nonjudgmental, analytical posture as they interact with staff. They openly admit their own mistakes rather than trying to cover them up or shifting the blame. And they try to root out the destructive competitiveness built into most organizations. Above all else, failure-tolerant leaders push people to see beyond traditional definitions of success and failure. They know that as long as a person views failure as the opposite of success, rather than its complement, he or she will never be able to take the risks necessary for innovation.

  11. Attributional Retraining: Reducing the Likelihood of Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes Stewart, Tara L.; Clifton, Rodney A.; Daniels, Lia M.; Perry, Raymond P.; Chipperfield, Judith G.; Ruthig, Joelle C.

    2011-01-01

    Failing a course is an acutely negative event for first-year university students, and a major contributor to high attrition rates at North American universities. Despite its prevalence, course failure receives relatively little research attention. What can be done to reduce course failure and help first-year students remain in university? This…

  12. Enhancement of the initial rate of ethanol fermentation due to dysfunction of yeast stress response components Msn2p and/or Msn4p.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Wu, Hong; Noguchi, Chiemi; Zhou, Yan; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2011-02-01

    Sake yeasts (strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae) produce high concentrations of ethanol in sake fermentation. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying this brewing property, we compared gene expression of sake and laboratory yeasts in sake mash. DNA microarray and reporter gene analyses revealed defects of sake yeasts in environmental stress responses mediated by transcription factors Msn2p and/or Msn4p (Msn2/4p) and stress response elements (STRE). Furthermore, we found that dysfunction of MSN2 and/or MSN4 contributes to the higher initial rate of ethanol fermentation in both sake and laboratory yeasts. These results provide novel insights into yeast stress responses as major impediments of effective ethanol fermentation.

  13. Enhancement of the Initial Rate of Ethanol Fermentation Due to Dysfunction of Yeast Stress Response Components Msn2p and/or Msn4p▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Wu, Hong; Noguchi, Chiemi; Zhou, Yan; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Sake yeasts (strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae) produce high concentrations of ethanol in sake fermentation. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying this brewing property, we compared gene expression of sake and laboratory yeasts in sake mash. DNA microarray and reporter gene analyses revealed defects of sake yeasts in environmental stress responses mediated by transcription factors Msn2p and/or Msn4p (Msn2/4p) and stress response elements (STRE). Furthermore, we found that dysfunction of MSN2 and/or MSN4 contributes to the higher initial rate of ethanol fermentation in both sake and laboratory yeasts. These results provide novel insights into yeast stress responses as major impediments of effective ethanol fermentation. PMID:21131516

  14. Parts and Components Reliability Assessment: A Cost Effective Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    System reliability assessment is a methodology which incorporates reliability analyses performed at parts and components level such as Reliability Prediction, Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) to assess risks, perform design tradeoffs, and therefore, to ensure effective productivity and/or mission success. The system reliability is used to optimize the product design to accommodate today?s mandated budget, manpower, and schedule constraints. Stand ard based reliability assessment is an effective approach consisting of reliability predictions together with other reliability analyses for electronic, electrical, and electro-mechanical (EEE) complex parts and components of large systems based on failure rate estimates published by the United States (U.S.) military or commercial standards and handbooks. Many of these standards are globally accepted and recognized. The reliability assessment is especially useful during the initial stages when the system design is still in the development and hard failure data is not yet available or manufacturers are not contractually obliged by their customers to publish the reliability estimates/predictions for their parts and components. This paper presents a methodology to assess system reliability using parts and components reliability estimates to ensure effective productivity and/or mission success in an efficient manner, low cost, and tight schedule.

  15. Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Rasmuson; D. L. Kelly

    2008-06-01

    This paper reviews the basic concepts of modelling common-cause failures (CCFs) in reliability and risk studies and then applies these concepts to the treatment of CCF in event assessment. The cases of a failed component (with and without shared CCF potential) and a component being unavailable due to preventive maintenance or testing are addressed. The treatment of two related failure modes (e.g. failure to start and failure to run) is a new feature of this paper, as is the treatment of asymmetry within a common-cause component group.

  16. Recognition Failure: Another Case of Retrieval Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowitz, Jan; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical explanation of the phenomenon of recognition failure and a presentation of seven experiments investigating performance. Recognition failure is reduced when a more stringent recognition criterion is used, essentially eliminated when the proper access test is used and significantly reduced when variability in recognition performance is…

  17. Scaling of structural failure

    SciTech Connect

    Bazant, Z.P.; Chen, Er-Ping

    1997-01-01

    This article attempts to review the progress achieved in the understanding of scaling and size effect in the failure of structures. Particular emphasis is placed on quasibrittle materials for which the size effect is complicated. Attention is focused on three main types of size effects, namely the statistical size effect due to randomness of strength, the energy release size effect, and the possible size effect due to fractality of fracture or microcracks. Definitive conclusions on the applicability of these theories are drawn. Subsequently, the article discusses the application of the known size effect law for the measurement of material fracture properties, and the modeling of the size effect by the cohesive crack model, nonlocal finite element models and discrete element models. Extensions to compression failure and to the rate-dependent material behavior are also outlined. The damage constitutive law needed for describing a microcracked material in the fracture process zone is discussed. Various applications to quasibrittle materials, including concrete, sea ice, fiber composites, rocks and ceramics are presented.

  18. Field failure mechanisms for photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, L. N.; Shumka, A.

    1981-01-01

    Beginning in 1976, Department of Energy field centers have installed and monitored a number of field tests and application experiments using current state-of-the-art photovoltaic modules. On-site observations of module physical and electrical degradation, together with in-depth laboratory analysis of failed modules, permits an overall assessment of the nature and causes of early field failures. Data on failure rates are presented, and key failure mechanisms are analyzed with respect to origin, effect, and prospects for correction. It is concluded that all failure modes identified to date are avoidable or controllable through sound design and production practices.

  19. Acoustic emissions (AE) monitoring of large-scale composite bridge components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, E.; Klein, D. J.; Robinson, M. J.; Kosmatka, J. B.

    2008-03-01

    Acoustic Emissions (AE) has been successfully used with composite structures to both locate and give a measure of damage accumulation. The current experimental study uses AE to monitor large-scale composite modular bridge components. The components consist of a carbon/epoxy beam structure as well as a composite to metallic bonded/bolted joint. The bonded joints consist of double lap aluminum splice plates bonded and bolted to carbon/epoxy laminates representing the tension rail of a beam. The AE system is used to monitor the bridge component during failure loading to assess the failure progression and using time of arrival to give insight into the origins of the failures. Also, a feature in the AE data called Cumulative Acoustic Emission counts (CAE) is used to give an estimate of the severity and rate of damage accumulation. For the bolted/bonded joints, the AE data is used to interpret the source and location of damage that induced failure in the joint. These results are used to investigate the use of bolts in conjunction with the bonded joint. A description of each of the components (beam and joint) is given with AE results. A summary of lessons learned for AE testing of large composite structures as well as insight into failure progression and location is presented.

  20. First passage failure: Analysis alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    PAEZ,THOMAS L.; NGUYEN,H.P.; WIRSCHING,PAUL H.

    2000-04-17

    Most mechanical and structural failures can be formulated as first passage problems. The traditional approach to first passage analysis models barrier crossings as Poisson events. The crossing rate is established and used in the Poisson framework to approximate the no-crossing probability. While this approach is accurate in a number of situations, it is desirable to develop analysis alternatives for those situations where traditional analysis is less accurate and situations where it is difficult to estimate parameters of the traditional approach. This paper develops an efficient simulation approach to first passage failure analysis. It is based on simulation of segments of complex random processes with the Karhunen-Loeve expansion, use of these simulations to estimate the parameters of a Markov chain, and use of the Markov chain to estimate the probability of first passage failure. Some numerical examples are presented.

  1. Mud pump failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.C. II

    1981-10-01

    Extrusion, the primary cause of piston failure, is the degradation of a seal caused by the seal material moving into the interface between the two parts being sealed. It is shown that operational dynamics of the mud piston lead to an aggravated extrusion condition. As both the liner wall and the piston OD lose material, the clearance gap between liner and piston increases. This gap provides the piston seal a space to move into when pressurized. This movement, called extrusion, is undesirable because the piston rubber is then subjected to abnormal stresses which it cannot tolerate. As the piston moves forward, this extruded material is gradually nibbled away. Extrusion and nibble action continue on each stroke of the pump as additional rubber moves away from the high-pressure side of the piston toward the low-pressure side. A discussion is presented of extrusion rates and seal leakage.

  2. [Understanding heart failure].

    PubMed

    Boo, José Fernando Guadalajara

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure is a disease with several definitions. The term "heart failure" is used by has brougth about confusion in the terminology. For this reason, the value of the ejection fraction (< 0.40 or < 0.35) is used in most meganalyses on the treatment of heart failure, avoiding the term "heart failure" that is a confounding concept. In this paper we carefully analyze the meaning of contractility, ventricular function or performance, preload, afterload, heart failure, compensation mechanisms in heart failure, myocardial oxygen consumption, inadequate, adequate and inappropriate hypertrophy, systole, diastole, compliance, problems of relaxation, and diastolic dysfunction. Their definitions are supported by the original scientific descriptions in an attempt to clarify the concepts about ventricular function and heart failure and, in this way, use the same scientific language about the meaning of ventricular function, heart failure, and diastolic dysfunction.

  3. Failures in psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gold, Jerry; Stricker, George

    2011-11-01

    This article addresses the issue of failures in psychodynamic psychotherapy. Drawing on the clinical and research literatures, and utilizing our clinical experiences, we first describe and define criteria for success and failure in treatment. We then review five factors that can lead to failure: client factors, therapist factors, technical factors, relationship factors, and environmental factors. We illustrate our presentation with a case example, and conclude by discussing ways in which the likelihood of failures in psychodynamic treatment can be lowered.

  4. Low-overhead accrual failure detector.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao; Dong, Jian; Liu, Hongwei; Li, Yang; Yang, Xiaozong

    2012-01-01

    Failure detectors are one of the fundamental components for building a distributed system with high availability. In order to maintain the efficiency and scalability of failure detection in a complicated large-scale distributed system, accrual failure detectors that can adapt to multiple applications have been studied extensively. In this paper, an new accrual failure detector--LA-FD with low system overhead has been proposed specifically for current mobile network equipment on the Internet whose processing power, memory space and power supply are all constrained. It does not rely on the probability distribution of message transmission time, or on the maintenance of a history message window. By simple calculation, LA-FD provides adaptive failure detection service with high accuracy to multiple upper applications. The related experiments and results have also been presented.

  5. Ammonia tank failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sweat, M.E.

    1983-04-01

    An ammonia tank failure at Hawkeye Chemical of Clinton, Iowa is discussed. The tank was a double-wall, 27,000 metric-ton tank built in 1968 and commissioned in December 1969. The paper presented covers the cause of the failure, repair, and procedural changes made to prevent recurrence of the failure. (JMT)

  6. Uncertainties in container failure time predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Williford, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Stochastic variations in the local chemical environment of a geologic waste repository can cause corresponding variations in container corrosion rates and failure times, and thus in radionuclide release rates. This paper addresses how well the future variations in repository chemistries must be known in order to predict container failure times that are bounded by a finite time period within the repository lifetime. Preliminary results indicate that a 5000 year scatter in predicted container failure times requires that repository chemistries be known to within {plus minus}10% over the repository lifetime. These are small uncertainties compared to current estimates. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Extracorporeal Life Support for Pediatric Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Christopher R.; McMullan, D. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) represents an essential component in the treatment of the pediatric patient with refractory heart failure. Defined as the use of an extracorporeal system to provide cardiopulmonary support, ECLS provides hemodynamic support to facilitate end-organ recovery and can be used as a salvage therapy during acute cardiorespiratory failure. Support strategies employed in pediatric cardiac patients include bridge to recovery, bridge to therapy, and bridge to transplant. Advances in extracorporeal technology and refinements in patient selection have allowed wider application of this therapy in pediatric heart failure patients. PMID:27812522

  8. Failure modes and effects analysis automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhieh, Cynthia H.; Cutts, Dannie E.; Purves, R. Byron

    1988-01-01

    A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) assistant was implemented as a knowledge based system and will be used during design of the Space Station to aid engineers in performing the complex task of tracking failures throughout the entire design effort. The three major directions in which automation was pursued were the clerical components of the FMEA process, the knowledge acquisition aspects of FMEA, and the failure propagation/analysis portions of the FMEA task. The system is accessible to design, safety, and reliability engineers at single user workstations and, although not designed to replace conventional FMEA, it is expected to decrease by many man years the time required to perform the analysis.

  9. Right heart failure: toward a common language.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Park, Myung H; Landzberg, Michael J; Lala, Anuradha; Waxman, Aaron B

    2014-02-01

    In this perspective, the International Right Heart Foundation Working Group moves a step forward to develop a common language to describe the development and defects that exemplify the common syndrome of right heart failure. We first propose fundamental definitions of the distinctive components of the right heart circulation and provide consensus on a universal definition of right heart failure. These definitions will form the foundation for describing a uniform nomenclature for right heart circulatory failure with a view to foster collaborative research initiatives and conjoint education in an effort to provide insight into echanisms of disease unique to the right heart.

  10. Heart Failure: A Primer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S; Auld, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure is a complex and multisystem clinical syndrome that results from impaired ventricular contractility and/or relaxation. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease are common antecedents to heart failure. The main pathogenic mechanisms involved in heart failure include sympathetic nervous and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation, as well as inflammation. A detailed history and physical examination and additional diagnostic tests may be needed to diagnose heart failure. Most treatment strategies target neurohormonal systems. Nonpharmacologic interventions and effective engagement in self-care are also important in overall heart failure management. Therapeutic strategies are geared toward prolonging life and optimizing quality of life.

  11. Diastolic function in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Sándor J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure has reached epidemic proportions, and diastolic heart failure or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes about 50% of all heart failure admissions. Long-term prognosis of both reduced ejection fraction heart failure and HFpEF are similarly dismal. No pharmacologic agent has been developed that actually treats or repairs the physiologic deficit(s) responsible for HFpEF. Because the physiology of diastole is both subtle and counterintuitive, its role in heart failure has received insufficient attention. In this review, the focus is on the physiology of diastole in heart failure, the dominant physiologic laws that govern the process in all hearts, how all hearts work as a suction pump, and, therefore, the elucidation and characterization of what actually is meant by "diastolic function". The intent is for the reader to understand what diastolic function actually is, what it is not, and how to measure it. Proper measurement of diastolic function requires one to go beyond the usual E/A, E/E', etc. phenomenological metrics and employ more rigorous causality (mathematical modeling) based parameters of diastolic function. The method simultaneously provides new physiologic insight into the meaning of in vivo "equilibrium volume" of the left ventricle (LV), longitudinal versus transverse volume accommodation of the chamber, diastatic "ringing" of the mitral annulus, and the mechanism of L-wave generation, as well as availability of a load-independent index of diastolic function (LIIDF). One important consequence of understanding what diastolic function is, is the recognition that all that current therapies can do is basically alter the load, rather than actually "repair" the functional components (chamber stiffness, chamber relaxation). If beneficial (biological/structural/metabolic) remodeling due to therapy does manifest ultimately as improved diastolic function, it is due to resumption of normal physiology (as in alleviation of

  12. Diastolic Function in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Sándor J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure has reached epidemic proportions, and diastolic heart failure or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes about 50% of all heart failure admissions. Long-term prognosis of both reduced ejection fraction heart failure and HFpEF are similarly dismal. No pharmacologic agent has been developed that actually treats or repairs the physiologic deficit(s) responsible for HFpEF. Because the physiology of diastole is both subtle and counterintuitive, its role in heart failure has received insufficient attention. In this review, the focus is on the physiology of diastole in heart failure, the dominant physiologic laws that govern the process in all hearts, how all hearts work as a suction pump, and, therefore, the elucidation and characterization of what actually is meant by “diastolic function”. The intent is for the reader to understand what diastolic function actually is, what it is not, and how to measure it. Proper measurement of diastolic function requires one to go beyond the usual E/A, E/E′, etc. phenomenological metrics and employ more rigorous causality (mathematical modeling) based parameters of diastolic function. The method simultaneously provides new physiologic insight into the meaning of in vivo “equilibrium volume” of the left ventricle (LV), longitudinal versus transverse volume accommodation of the chamber, diastatic “ringing” of the mitral annulus, and the mechanism of L-wave generation, as well as availability of a load-independent index of diastolic function (LIIDF). One important consequence of understanding what diastolic function is, is the recognition that all that current therapies can do is basically alter the load, rather than actually “repair” the functional components (chamber stiffness, chamber relaxation). If beneficial (biological/structural/metabolic) remodeling due to therapy does manifest ultimately as improved diastolic function, it is due to resumption of normal physiology (as in

  13. Renal failure in fulminant hepatic failure and terminal cirrhosis: a comparison between incidence, types, and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ring-Larsen, H; Palazzo, U

    1981-01-01

    Forty patients with terminal cirrhosis and 40 patients with fulminant hepatic failure-all consecutively admitted-were studied with regard to incidence, types, and prognosis of complicating renal insufficiency. Renal failure was considered present when the serum creatinine was greater than 0.20 mmol/l. Of the patients with cirrhosis 26 (65%) developed renal failure. In 15 the type was functional, in three due to acute tubular necrosis, and in eight indeterminable. Of the patients with fulminant hepatic failure 22 (55%) had renal insufficiency; of these 13 had functional renal failure, five acute tubular necrosis, and in four the type was indeterminable. In both categories of patients, renal failure was equally frequent among patients with or without gastrointestinal bleeding and with or without ascites or diuretic therapy. The biochemical tests of liver function were similar in patients with or without renal failure in both categories. The mean renal blood flow in seven unselected patients with fulminant hepatic failure was reduced in the same order as previously observed in patients with cirrhosis. In terminal cirrhosis the mortality rate was 88% in the presence of renal failure, 71% in its absence (p greater than 0.05), while the same figures in fulminant hepatic failure were 100% and 67% (p less than 0.05). The incidence, relative frequency, and prognosis of renal failure were not different in the two conditions, indicating identical pathophysiological circumstances. PMID:7262632

  14. Failure Mode Identification Through Clustering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arunajadai, Srikesh G.; Stone, Robert B.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Research has shown that nearly 80% of the costs and problems are created in product development and that cost and quality are essentially designed into products in the conceptual stage. Currently, failure identification procedures (such as FMEA (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis), FMECA (Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis) and FTA (Fault Tree Analysis)) and design of experiments are being used for quality control and for the detection of potential failure modes during the detail design stage or post-product launch. Though all of these methods have their own advantages, they do not give information as to what are the predominant failures that a designer should focus on while designing a product. This work uses a functional approach to identify failure modes, which hypothesizes that similarities exist between different failure modes based on the functionality of the product/component. In this paper, a statistical clustering procedure is proposed to retrieve information on the set of predominant failures that a function experiences. The various stages of the methodology are illustrated using a hypothetical design example.

  15. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.

    1992-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power generating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with and analyzing radioactive components are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in service. The failures discussed are (a) intergranular stress corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (b) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressure water reactor, (c) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (d) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor.

  16. Virtually-synchronous communication based on a weak failure suspector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiper, Andre; Ricciardi, Aleta

    1993-01-01

    Failure detectors (or, more accurately Failure Suspectors (FS)) appear to be a fundamental service upon which to build fault-tolerant, distributed applications. This paper shows that a FS with very weak semantics (i.e., that delivers failure and recovery information in no specific order) suffices to implement virtually-synchronous communication (VSC) in an asynchronous system subject to process crash failures and network partitions. The VSC paradigm is particularly useful in asynchronous systems and greatly simplifies building fault-tolerant applications that mask failures by replicating processes. We suggest a three-component architecture to implement virtually-synchronous communication: (1) at the lowest level, the FS component; (2) on top of it, a component (2a) that defines new views; and (3) a component (2b) that reliably multicasts messages within a view. The issues covered in this paper also lead to a better understanding of the various membership service semantics proposed in recent literature.

  17. Kidney Failure: What to Expect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidneys & How They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Kidney Failure What is kidney failure and how is it treated? Kidney failure ... Methods for Kidney Failure: Peritoneal Dialysis . Peritoneal dialysis Kidney Transplant A kidney transplant places a healthy kidney ...

  18. Real-time monitoring of progression towards renal failure in primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Diggle, Peter J; Sousa, Inês; Asar, Özgür

    2015-07-01

    Chronic renal failure is a progressive condition that, typically, is asymptomatic for many years. Early detection of incipient kidney failure enables ameliorative treatment that can slow the rate of progression to end-stage renal failure, at which point expensive and invasive renal replacement therapy (dialysis or transplantation) is required. We use routinely collected clinical data from a large sample of primary care patients to develop a system for real-time monitoring of the progression of undiagnosed incipient renal failure. Progression is characterized as the rate of change in a person's kidney function as measured by the estimated glomerular filtration rate, an adjusted version of serum creatinine level in a blood sample. Clinical guidelines in the UK suggest that a person who is losing kidney function at a relative rate of at least 5% per year should be referred to specialist secondary care. We model the time-course of a person's underlying kidney function through a combination of explanatory variables, a random intercept and a continuous-time, non-stationary stochastic process. We then use the model to calculate for each person the predictive probability that they meet the clinical guideline for referral to secondary care. We suggest that probabilistic predictive inference linked to clinical criteria can be a useful component of a real-time surveillance system to guide, but not dictate, clinical decision-making.

  19. Brain components

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  20. Fluid management strategies in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M

    2012-04-01

    In patients with chronic heart failure, fluid retention (or hypervolemia) is often the stimulus for acute decompensated heart failure that requires hospitalization. The pathophysiology of fluid retention is complex and involves both hemodynamic and clinical congestion. Signs and symptoms of both hemodynamic and clinical congestion should be assessed serially during hospitalization. Core heart failure drug and cardiac device therapies should be provided, and ultrafiltration may be warranted. Critical care, intermediate care, and telemetry nurses have roles in both assessment and management of patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure and fluid retention. Nurse administrators and managers have heightened their attention to fluid retention because the Medicare performance measure known as the risk-standardized 30-day all-cause readmission rate after heart failure hospitalization can be attenuated by fluid management strategies initiated by nurses during a patient's hospitalization.

  1. The Failure Analysis in Traction Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungchul; Heo, Guk-bum; Lee, Hyungwoo; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Jin O.

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a failure analysis of traction power systems. The electric railway consists of traction power systems, various vehicles, operating equipment, track, overhead line and electric equipment. It is a fundamental function of traction power systems that they supply customers with acceptable reliability and high quality power. Perhaps the most commonly used reliability assessment for railway systems has been the failure analysis of the traction signal system. The reliability assessment of traction power systems has also been an indispensable issue for reliability assessment. This paper deals with the classification of railway accidents caused by electrification problems, the estimation of failure rate in power equipments and failure analysis using fault trees. In study cases, the fault tree method for failure analysis is applied to railway substations in South Korea.

  2. System diagnostics using qualitative analysis and component functional classification

    DOEpatents

    Reifman, Jaques; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    A method for detecting and identifying faulty component candidates during off-normal operations of nuclear power plants involves the qualitative analysis of macroscopic imbalances in the conservation equations of mass, energy and momentum in thermal-hydraulic control volumes associated with one or more plant components and the functional classification of components. The qualitative analysis of mass and energy is performed through the associated equations of state, while imbalances in momentum are obtained by tracking mass flow rates which are incorporated into a first knowledge base. The plant components are functionally classified, according to their type, as sources or sinks of mass, energy and momentum, depending upon which of the three balance equations is most strongly affected by a faulty component which is incorporated into a second knowledge base. Information describing the connections among the components of the system forms a third knowledge base. The method is particularly adapted for use in a diagnostic expert system to detect and identify faulty component candidates in the presence of component failures and is not limited to use in a nuclear power plant, but may be used with virtually any type of thermal-hydraulic operating system.

  3. System diagnostics using qualitative analysis and component functional classification

    DOEpatents

    Reifman, J.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1993-11-23

    A method for detecting and identifying faulty component candidates during off-normal operations of nuclear power plants involves the qualitative analysis of macroscopic imbalances in the conservation equations of mass, energy and momentum in thermal-hydraulic control volumes associated with one or more plant components and the functional classification of components. The qualitative analysis of mass and energy is performed through the associated equations of state, while imbalances in momentum are obtained by tracking mass flow rates which are incorporated into a first knowledge base. The plant components are functionally classified, according to their type, as sources or sinks of mass, energy and momentum, depending upon which of the three balance equations is most strongly affected by a faulty component which is incorporated into a second knowledge base. Information describing the connections among the components of the system forms a third knowledge base. The method is particularly adapted for use in a diagnostic expert system to detect and identify faulty component candidates in the presence of component failures and is not limited to use in a nuclear power plant, but may be used with virtually any type of thermal-hydraulic operating system. 5 figures.

  4. Early complications. Respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Zwischenberger, J B; Alpard, S K; Bidani, A

    1999-08-01

    Pulmonary complications following thoracic surgery are common and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Respiratory failure after pneumonectomy occurs in approximately 5% to 15% of cases and significantly increases patient mortality. Strategies for ventilator support are based on the nature of the underlying complication and the pathophysiology of respiratory failure. This article describes the cause and pathophysiology of respiratory failure and pulmonary embolus postpneumonectomy. Diagnosis, management, and innovative therapies are also reviewed.

  5. Failure to thrive.

    PubMed

    Krugman, Scott D; Dubowitz, Howard

    2003-09-01

    Failure to thrive is a condition commonly seen by primary care physicians. Prompt diagnosis and intervention are important for preventing malnutrition and developmental sequelae. Medical and social factors often contribute to failure to thrive. Either extreme of parental attention (neglect or hypervigilance) can lead to failure to thrive. About 25 percent of normal infants will shift to a lower growth percentile in the first two years of life and then follow that percentile; this should not be diagnosed as failure to thrive. Infants with Down syndrome, intrauterine growth retardation, or premature birth follow different growth patterns than normal infants. Many infants with failure to thrive are not identified unless careful attention is paid to plotting growth parameters at routine checkups. A thorough history is the best guide to establishing the etiology of the failure to thrive and directing further evaluation and management. All children with failure to thrive need additional calories for catch-up growth (typically 150 percent of the caloric requirement for their expected, not actual, weight). Few need laboratory evaluation. Hospitalization is rarely required and is indicated only for severe failure to thrive and for those whose safety is a concern. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended when failure to thrive persists despite intervention or when it is severe.

  6. Comprehensive reliability allocation method for CNC lathes based on cubic transformed functions of failure mode and effects analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhou; Zhu, Yunpeng; Ren, Hongrui; Zhang, Yimin

    2015-03-01

    Reliability allocation of computerized numerical controlled(CNC) lathes is very important in industry. Traditional allocation methods only focus on high-failure rate components rather than moderate failure rate components, which is not applicable in some conditions. Aiming at solving the problem of CNC lathes reliability allocating, a comprehensive reliability allocation method based on cubic transformed functions of failure modes and effects analysis(FMEA) is presented. Firstly, conventional reliability allocation methods are introduced. Then the limitations of direct combination of comprehensive allocation method with the exponential transformed FMEA method are investigated. Subsequently, a cubic transformed function is established in order to overcome these limitations. Properties of the new transformed functions are discussed by considering the failure severity and the failure occurrence. Designers can choose appropriate transform amplitudes according to their requirements. Finally, a CNC lathe and a spindle system are used as an example to verify the new allocation method. Seven criteria are considered to compare the results of the new method with traditional methods. The allocation results indicate that the new method is more flexible than traditional methods. By employing the new cubic transformed function, the method covers a wider range of problems in CNC reliability allocation without losing the advantages of traditional methods.

  7. Tri-component, mobile bearing, total ankle replacement: mid-term functional outcome and survival.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Rohit; Turner, Jake; Sharma, Vikas; Nayak, Ramesh K

    2012-01-01

    Tri-component, mobile bearing, uncemented, total ankle replacements were introduced after the high failure rates of cemented, highly constrained, first-generation, total ankle replacement implants. A total of 30 primary total ankle replacements in 29 patients (20 males and 9 females) were followed up in the present retrospective study for up to 13 (mean 5.1 ± 4) years. The postoperative functional and radiographic outcomes were measured. Failure was defined as revision of either of the components for any reason or conversion of the total ankle replacement to arthrodesis because of debilitating pain that did not resolve after surgery. Of the 29 patients, 2 underwent revision and 1 underwent arthrodesis. All 3 patients had the malpositioned talar implant revised. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 81 at 1 year postoperatively. Revision of the tibial or talar component for any reason or conversion of the ankle replacement to arthrodesis was considered failure for the survival analysis. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a 5-year survival rate of 87.6%. The last failure occurred 23.3 months after surgery.

  8. Destructive Single-Event Failures in Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, Megan C.; Gigliuto, Robert A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Chen, Dakai; Phan, Anthony M.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    In this summary, we have shown that diodes are susceptible to destructive single-event effects, and that these failures occur along the guard ring. By determining the last passing voltages, a safe operating area can be derived. By derating off of those values, rather than by the rated voltage, like what is currently done with power MOSFETs, we can work to ensure the safety of future missions. However, there are still open questions about these failures. Are they limited to a single manufacturer, a small number, or all of them? Is there a threshold rated voltage that must be exceeded to see these failures? With future work, we hope to answer these questions. In the full paper, laser results will also be presented to verify that failures only occur along the guard ring.

  9. Telerehabilitation for patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tousignant, Michel; Mampuya, Warner Mbuila

    2015-02-01

    Heart failure is a chronic and progressive condition that is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Even though cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has been shown to be beneficial to heart failure patients, only a very small proportion of them will actually be referred and eventually participate. The low participation rate is due in part to accessibility and travel difficulties. Telerehabilitation is a new approach in the rehabilitation field that allows patients to receive a complete rehabilitation program at home in a safe manner and under adequate supervision. We believe that by increasing accessibility to CR, telerehabilitation programs will significantly improve heart failure patients' functional capacity and quality of life. However, it is crucial to provide policy makers with evidence-based data on cardiac telerehabilitation if we want to see its successful implementation in heart failure patients.

  10. Design of analytical failure detection using secondary observers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisar, M.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of designing analytical failure-detection systems (FDS) for sensors and actuators, using observers, is addressed. The use of observers in FDS is related to the examination of the n-dimensional observer error vector which carries the necessary information on possible failures. The problem is that in practical systems, in which only some of the components of the state vector are measured, one has access only to the m-dimensional observer-output error vector, with m or = to n. In order to cope with these cases, a secondary observer is synthesized to reconstruct the entire observer-error vector from the observer output error vector. This approach leads toward the design of highly sensitive and reliable FDS, with the possibility of obtaining a unique fingerprint for every possible failure. In order to keep the observer's (or Kalman filter) false-alarm rate under a certain specified value, it is necessary to have an acceptable matching between the observer (or Kalman filter) models and the system parameters. A previously developed adaptive observer algorithm is used to maintain the desired system-observer model matching, despite initial mismatching or system parameter variations. Conditions for convergence for the adaptive process are obtained, leading to a simple adaptive law (algorithm) with the possibility of an a priori choice of fixed adaptive gains. Simulation results show good tracking performance with small observer output errors, while accurate and fast parameter identification, in both deterministic and stochastic cases, is obtained.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Interface Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Cao, Deng; Leonard, Robert H.; Owens, Eli T.; Swan, Wm. Trevor, III; Ducatman, Samuel C.

    2007-03-01

    The mechanical integrity of silicon/silicon nitride interfaces is of great importance in their applications in micro electronics and solar cells. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are an excellent tool to study mechanical and structural failure of interfaces subjected to externally applied stresses and strains. When pulling the system parallel to the interface, cracks in silicon nitride and slip and pit formation in silicon are typical failure mechanisms. Hypervelocity impact perpendicular to the interface plane leads to structural transformation and delamination at the interface. Influence of system temperature, strain rate, impact velocity, and system size on type and characteristics of failure will be discussed.

  12. Battery component

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, F.; Batson, D.C.; Miserendino, A.J.; Boyle, G.

    1988-03-15

    A mechanical component for reserve type electrochemical batteries having cylindrical porous members is described comprising a disc having: (i) circular grooves in one flat side for accepting the porous members; and (ii) at least one radial channel in the opposite flat side in fluid communication with the grooves.

  13. Model for heart failure education.

    PubMed

    Baldonado, Analiza; Dutra, Danette; Abriam-Yago, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the heart's inability to meet the body's need for blood and oxygen. According to the American Heart Association 2013 update, approximately 5.1 million people are diagnosed with HF in the United States in 2006. Heart failure is the most common diagnosis for hospitalization. In the United States, the HF direct and indirect costs are estimated to be US $39.2 billion in 2010. To address this issue, nursing educators designed innovative teaching frameworks on HF management both in academia and in clinical settings. The model was based on 2 resources: the American Association of Heart Failure Nurses (2012) national nursing certification and the award-winning Pierce County Responsive Care Coordination Program. The HF educational program is divided into 4 modules. The initial modules offer foundational levels of Bloom's Taxonomy then progress to incorporate higher-levels of learning when modules 3 and 4 are reached. The applicability of the key components within each module allows formatting to enhance learning in all areas of nursing, from the emergency department to intensive care units to the medical-surgical step-down units. Also applicable would be to provide specific aspects of the modules to nurses who care for HF patients in skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation centers, and in the home-health care setting.

  14. Design of robust failure detection filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    San Martin, A. M.; Vander Velde, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    An essential aspect of the design of control systems for large, flexible spacecraft is fault tolerance. Because it is anticipated that a large number of sensors and actuators will be required to realize good control over these assemblies, the detection and isolation of component failures cannot be based on direct comparisons among replicated components. Instead, the notion of 'analytic redundancy' must be employed for the FDI function. Unfortunately this makes the FDI function sensitive to modeling errors which are certain to exist in the large space structure problem due to model truncation and parameter uncertainty. This paper addresses the robustness to model error of one method of FDI residual generation - the failure detection filter. Initial designs were found to be extremely sensitive to modeling error. The sources of this sensitivity are analyzed and modifications to the design are suggested. The improved filter is shown to have much better visibility of the failure signatures relative to the background due to modeling error.

  15. Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Dana L. Kelly; Dale M. Rasmuson

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the approach taken by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to the treatment of common-cause failure in probabilistic risk assessment of operational events. The approach is based upon the Basic Parameter Model for common-cause failure, and examples are illustrated using the alpha-factor parameterization, the approach adopted by the NRC in their Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models. The cases of a failed component (with and without shared common-cause failure potential) and a component being unavailable due to preventive maintenance or testing are addressed. The treatment of two related failure modes (e.g., failure to start and failure to run) is a new feature of this paper. These methods are being applied by the NRC in assessing the risk significance of operational events for the Significance Determination Process (SDP) and the Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program.

  16. Living with Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... smoking. Emotional Issues and Support Living with respiratory failure may cause fear, anxiety, depression, and stress. Talk about how you feel with your health care team. Talking to a professional counselor also can ... to living with respiratory failure. You can see how other people who have ...

  17. Ampoule Failure System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watring, Dale A. (Inventor); Johnson, Martin L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An ampoule failure system for use in material processing furnaces comprising a containment cartridge and an ampoule failure sensor. The containment cartridge contains an ampoule of toxic material therein and is positioned within a furnace for processing. An ampoule failure probe is positioned in the containment cartridge adjacent the ampoule for detecting a potential harmful release of toxic material therefrom during processing. The failure probe is spaced a predetermined distance from the ampoule and is chemically chosen so as to undergo a timely chemical reaction with the toxic material upon the harmful release thereof. The ampoule failure system further comprises a data acquisition system which is positioned externally of the furnace and is electrically connected to the ampoule failure probe so as to form a communicating electrical circuit. The data acquisition system includes an automatic shutdown device for shutting down the furnace upon the harmful release of toxic material. It also includes a resistance measuring device for measuring the resistance of the failure probe during processing. The chemical reaction causes a step increase in resistance of the failure probe whereupon the automatic shutdown device will responsively shut down the furnace.

  18. Failure Analysis of Electrical Pin Connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James M.; Smith, Stephen W.; Herath, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    A study was initiated to determine the root cause of failure for circuit board electrical connection pins that failed during vibRatory testing. The circuit board is part of an unmanned space probe, and the vibratory testing was performed to ensure component survival of launch loading conditions. The results of this study show that the pins failed as a result of fatigue loading.

  19. Premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Persani, Luca

    2006-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a primary ovarian defect characterized by absent menarche (primary amenorrhea) or premature depletion of ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years (secondary amenorrhea). It is a heterogeneous disorder affecting approximately 1% of women <40 years, 1:10,000 women by age 20 and 1:1,000 women by age 30. The most severe forms present with absent pubertal development and primary amenorrhea (50% of these cases due to ovarian dysgenesis), whereas forms with post-pubertal onset are characterized by disappearance of menstrual cycles (secondary amenorrhea) associated with premature follicular depletion. As in the case of physiological menopause, POF presents by typical manifestations of climacterium: infertility associated with palpitations, heat intolerance, flushes, anxiety, depression, fatigue. POF is biochemically characterized by low levels of gonadal hormones (estrogens and inhibins) and high levels of gonadotropins (LH and FSH) (hypergonadotropic amenorrhea). Beyond infertility, hormone defects may cause severe neurological, metabolic or cardiovascular consequences and lead to the early onset of osteoporosis. Heterogeneity of POF is also reflected by the variety of possible causes, including autoimmunity, toxics, drugs, as well as genetic defects. POF has a strong genetic component. X chromosome abnormalities (e.g. Turner syndrome) represent the major cause of primary amenorrhea associated with ovarian dysgenesis. Despite the description of several candidate genes, the cause of POF remains undetermined in the vast majority of the cases. Management includes substitution of the hormone defect by estrogen/progestin preparations. The only solution presently available for the fertility defect in women with absent follicular reserve is ovum donation. PMID:16722528

  20. Renal denervation and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Michael; Ewen, Sebastian; Kindermann, Ingrid; Linz, Dominik; Ukena, Christian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2014-06-01

    Renal denervation has been developed in order to lower systolic blood pressure in resistant hypertension by a reduction in renal afferent and efferent sympathetic nerve activity. In heart failure sympathetic activation, in particular, renal norepinephrine release is closely associated with morbidity and mortality. Initial studies have shown that renal denervation is able to reduce not only blood pressure but also heart rate, and is associated with a reduction in myocardial hypertrophy, improved glucose tolerance, and ameliorated microalbuminuria. Since some experimental and observational data suggest an antiarrhythmic effect, it is possible that renal denervation might also play a therapeutic role in arrhythmias often occurring in chronic heart failure. The first proof-of-concept studies are planned to evaluate the clinical effect of this pathophysiologically plausible method, which might be able to change clinical practice.

  1. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Susan M.; Cedars, Ari M.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Geltman, Edward M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    Hospitalizations for acute decompensated heart failure are increasing in the United States. Moreover, the prevalence of heart failure is increasing consequent to an increased number of older individuals, as well as to improvement in therapies for coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death that have enabled patients to live longer with cardiovascular disease. The main treatment goals in the hospitalized patient with heart failure are to restore euvolemia and to minimize adverse events. Common in-hospital treatments include intravenous diuretics, vasodilators, and inotropic agents. Novel pharmaceutical agents have shown promise in the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure and may simplify the treatment and reduce the morbidity associated with the disease. This review summarizes the contemporary management of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:20069075

  2. Real-time forecasting and predictability of catastrophic failure events: from rock failure to volcanoes and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, I. G.; Bell, A. F.; Naylor, M.; Atkinson, M.; Filguera, R.; Meredith, P. G.; Brantut, N.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate prediction of catastrophic brittle failure in rocks and in the Earth presents a significant challenge on theoretical and practical grounds. The governing equations are not known precisely, but are known to produce highly non-linear behavior similar to those of near-critical dynamical systems, with a large and irreducible stochastic component due to material heterogeneity. In a laboratory setting mechanical, hydraulic and rock physical properties are known to change in systematic ways prior to catastrophic failure, often with significant non-Gaussian fluctuations about the mean signal at a given time, for example in the rate of remotely-sensed acoustic emissions. The effectiveness of such signals in real-time forecasting has never been tested before in a controlled laboratory setting, and previous work has often been qualitative in nature, and subject to retrospective selection bias, though it has often been invoked as a basis in forecasting natural hazard events such as volcanoes and earthquakes. Here we describe a collaborative experiment in real-time data assimilation to explore the limits of predictability of rock failure in a best-case scenario. Data are streamed from a remote rock deformation laboratory to a user-friendly portal, where several proposed physical/stochastic models can be analysed in parallel in real time, using a variety of statistical fitting techniques, including least squares regression, maximum likelihood fitting, Markov-chain Monte-Carlo and Bayesian analysis. The results are posted and regularly updated on the web site prior to catastrophic failure, to ensure a true and and verifiable prospective test of forecasting power. Preliminary tests on synthetic data with known non-Gaussian statistics shows how forecasting power is likely to evolve in the live experiments. In general the predicted failure time does converge on the real failure time, illustrating the bias associated with the 'benefit of hindsight' in retrospective analyses

  3. Multiaxial failure characterization of composites

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, S.E.; Sanchez, R.J.; Feng, W.W.

    1991-02-01

    The primary objective of this research has been to develop a multiaxial testing capability for continuous fiber composites using the axial/torsion/internal pressurization of tubes. This capability enables one to generate the two-dimensional (in-plane) failure surface for these materials. The multiaxial test specimen consists of a 5.08 cm (2.0 in.) diameter composite tube with 15{degrees} cast epoxy end cones for gripping. The unique advancement with this new technique is the simple, but very efficient, gripping mechanism that provides a very smooth transition in load from the grip into the specimen. This has eliminated grip related stress risers in the composite tube. Consequently, most of the failures occur in the gage section of the tube. This system is coupled into a biaxial MTS servo hydraulic test machine capable of simultaneously applying axial load, torque, and internal pressure, providing one complete control of the axial, transverse, and shear stresses that develop in the wall of the composite tube. This paper will present the failure results obtained to date for various laminate configurations of Toray 1000/DER332-T403 filament wound carbon/epoxy tubes along with T300/F263 prepreg carbon/epoxy tubes. The goal of our efforts is to develop a more fully characterized three-dimensional failure criterion for these materials. This model will then be incorporated into a large three-dimensional orthotropic finite element model for structural analysis as well as a specialized three-dimensional orthotropic finite element model capable of detailed sub-ply level analysis on sub-structural components. 19 refs., 10 figs.

  4. A Weibull distribution accrual failure detector for cloud computing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhibo; Wu, Jin; Zhao, Yao; Wen, Dongxin

    2017-01-01

    Failure detectors are used to build high availability distributed systems as the fundamental component. To meet the requirement of a complicated large-scale distributed system, accrual failure detectors that can adapt to multiple applications have been studied extensively. However, several implementations of accrual failure detectors do not adapt well to the cloud service environment. To solve this problem, a new accrual failure detector based on Weibull Distribution, called the Weibull Distribution Failure Detector, has been proposed specifically for cloud computing. It can adapt to the dynamic and unexpected network conditions in cloud computing. The performance of the Weibull Distribution Failure Detector is evaluated and compared based on public classical experiment data and cloud computing experiment data. The results show that the Weibull Distribution Failure Detector has better performance in terms of speed and accuracy in unstable scenarios, especially in cloud computing. PMID:28278229

  5. A Weibull distribution accrual failure detector for cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiaxi; Wu, Zhibo; Wu, Jin; Dong, Jian; Zhao, Yao; Wen, Dongxin

    2017-01-01

    Failure detectors are used to build high availability distributed systems as the fundamental component. To meet the requirement of a complicated large-scale distributed system, accrual failure detectors that can adapt to multiple applications have been studied extensively. However, several implementations of accrual failure detectors do not adapt well to the cloud service environment. To solve this problem, a new accrual failure detector based on Weibull Distribution, called the Weibull Distribution Failure Detector, has been proposed specifically for cloud computing. It can adapt to the dynamic and unexpected network conditions in cloud computing. The performance of the Weibull Distribution Failure Detector is evaluated and compared based on public classical experiment data and cloud computing experiment data. The results show that the Weibull Distribution Failure Detector has better performance in terms of speed and accuracy in unstable scenarios, especially in cloud computing.

  6. Spatial Stratification of Order As Used in Failure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Robert H.; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2007-03-01

    Silicon nitride deposited on silicon substrates has application in dielectric layers for microelectronics as well as in photovoltaics. During production and operation of components involving silicon/silicon nitride interfaces, stresses and strains can build up at various temperatures resulting in component failure. Using molecular dynamics simulations the influence of temperature and rate of externally applied strain on silicon/silicon nitride interfaces has been analyzed. The primary purpose of this research is to understand the mechanisms leading to the failure of these films. Analyses involving bond lengths and angles have been developed to gain insight into these mechanisms. Methods for stratifying bond lengths and bond angles into unique sub-populations on the basis of spatial orientation have been developed, and have given much insight to how the material behaves, particularly with regards to the Poisson effect. Possible extensions of this stratification method to primitive rings will also be examined. In combination with experimental observations, this analysis will deepen our understanding of the structural properties of silicon/silicon nitride interfaces.

  7. [Heart failure and comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Boully, Clémence; Hanon, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Heart failure is a frequent disease in the elderly. Its clinical presentation is less typical and the prognosis more severe than in younger subjects because heart failure occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities. A comprehensive geriatric assessment should therefore be performed to detect the vulnerabilities and manage the comorbidities. The main diseases associated with heart failure are dementia, depression, malnutrition, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, orthostatic hypotension, renal failure, anemia and iron deficiency. Comorbidities worsen heart failure and makes its treatment more difficult. The identification and treatment of comorbidities improve the prognosis in terms of mortality but especially in terms of quality of life. Caution with drugs is necessary because of pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic changes related to aging and the comorbidities. In this context, clinical and laboratory monitoring should be increased, mostly during an acute event (acute heart failure, infection, dehydration, fall, new therapy…). Therefore, the follow-up of elderly patients with heart failure requires a multidisciplinary approach that involves close cooperation between cardiologists, geriatricians, general practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists.

  8. Failure of Components Although the Causes Are Simple & Well Documented.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    other design properties have been well-studied and documented. Yet, very common and simple oversights are made in choosing the right material and the...Alternative Materials for the Spring Strip: Other spring materials which can be used instead of the 301 SS are 410 SS and 420 SS, PH13 -8Mo SS and Custom...8Mo and Custom 450 are precipitation hardenable stainless steels. These steels have better fatigue properties than the currently used cold-worked 301 SS

  9. Component failures at pressurized water reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Objective of this study was to identify those systems having major impact on safety and availability. This report consists of appendices: systems descriptions and profiles, year data tables, problem profiles, valve experience, trip reports, cost benefit model, assumed values used in model, SIGMA code, and projected fuel costs and sensitivity curves. (DLC)

  10. Decomposition-Based Failure Mode Identification Method for Risk-Free Design of Large Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; Stone, Robert B.; Roberts, Rory A.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    When designing products, it is crucial to assure failure and risk-free operation in the intended operating environment. Failures are typically studied and eliminated as much as possible during the early stages of design. The few failures that go undetected result in unacceptable damage and losses in high-risk applications where public safety is of concern. Published NASA and NTSB accident reports point to a variety of components identified as sources of failures in the reported cases. In previous work, data from these reports were processed and placed in matrix form for all the system components and failure modes encountered, and then manipulated using matrix methods to determine similarities between the different components and failure modes. In this paper, these matrices are represented in the form of a linear combination of failures modes, mathematically formed using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) decomposition. The PCA decomposition results in a low-dimensionality representation of all failure modes and components of interest, represented in a transformed coordinate system. Such a representation opens the way for efficient pattern analysis and prediction of failure modes with highest potential risks on the final product, rather than making decisions based on the large space of component and failure mode data. The mathematics of the proposed method are explained first using a simple example problem. The method is then applied to component failure data gathered from helicopter, accident reports to demonstrate its potential.

  11. Role of biomolecules on annulus fibrosus micromechanics: effect of enzymatic digestion on elastic and failure properties.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Jessica L; Vresilovic, Edward; Sarkar, Sumona; Marcolongo, Michele

    2014-12-01

    Uniaxial tension was applied to selectively digested single lamellar human cadaveric annulus fibrosus specimens to investigate the role of different biomolecules in annular biomechanics. Single layered and inter-lamellar annulus fibrosus samples were obtained from 10 isolated cadaveric lumbar intervertebral discs in one of four orientations: longitudinal, transverse, radial, and circumferential. Within each orientation the samples were subjected to a selective enzymatic digestion protocol with collagenase, elastase, chondroitinase ABC, or 1× Phosphate Buffered Saline. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed to failure at a strain rate of 0.005s(-1). Failure stress and strain, and elastic moduli were compared among the digested conditions. The collagenase- and elastase-treated groups had the most significant effect on the mechanical properties among the orientation groups, decreasing the failure stress for both interlaminar and intralaminar groups. Collagenase-treated groups showed an increase in the failure strain following enzymatic digestion for the intralaminar groups and one interlaminar testing direction (circumferential). The chondroitinase ABC-treated group only had a significant impact on the single layer orientations, decreasing the failure stress and strain (intralaminar group). The digested properties described provide insights into the laminar mechanical behavior and the role of the molecular components to the annular mechanical behavior. Understanding annular mechanics may prove insightful in diagnosis, prevention and repair of debilitating intervertebral disc disorders and manufacturing of tissue-engineered annulus.

  12. Liver Failure in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bacak, Stephen J; Thornburg, Loralei L

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare but life-threatening medical emergency in pregnancy whose true incidence remains unknown. Many cases of acute liver failure are caused by pregnancy-related conditions such as acute fatty liver of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. However, acute deterioration in liver function can also be caused by drug overdose, viral infections, and an exacerbation of underlying chronic liver disease. This article provides an overview of the normal liver changes that occur during pregnancy, and summarizes the most common conditions and general management strategies of liver failure during pregnancy.

  13. Damage mechanics - failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Krajcinovic, D.; Vujosevic, M.

    1996-12-31

    The present study summarizes the results of the DOE sponsored research program focused on the brittle failure of solids with disordered microstructure. The failure is related to the stochastic processes on the microstructural scale; namely, the nucleation and growth of microcracks. The intrinsic failure modes, such as the percolation, localization and creep rupture, are studied by emphasizing the effect of the micro-structural disorder. A rich spectrum of physical phenomena and new concepts that emerges from this research demonstrates the reasons behind the limitations of traditional, deterministic, and local continuum models.

  14. Clinical heterogeneity in autoimmune acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Tapia, Norberto C; Martinez-Salgado, Julio; Granados, Julio; Uribe, Misael; Tellez-Avila, Felix I

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To describe the outcome and prognosis in a cohort of patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis without liver transplantation. METHODS: A retrospective trial was conducted in 11 patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis who attended the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubiran. Demographic, biochemical and severity indexes, and treatment and outcome were assessed. RESULTS: Among the 11 patients, with a median age of 31 years, 72% had inflammatory response syndrome, and six patients received corticosteroids. The mortality rate within four weeks was 56%, and the one-year survival was 27%. In the survivors, severity indexes were lower and 83% received corticosteroids. CONCLUSION: We observed a relatively high survival rate in patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis. This survival rate could be influenced by severity of the disease and/or use of corticosteroids. PMID:17465474

  15. Study of intermittent field hardware failure data in digital electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, E. J.; Halverson, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The collection and analysis of data concerning intermittent dailures in digital devices was performed using data from a computer design for shipboard usage. The failure data consisted of actual field failures classified by failure mechanisms and their likelihood of having been intermittent, potentially intermittent, or hard. Each class was studies with respect to computer operation in the ranges of 0 to 2,000 hours, 0 to 5, hours, and 0 to 10,000 hours. The study was done at the computer level as well as the microcircuit level. Results indicate that as age increases, the quasi-intermittent failure rate increases and the mean time to failure descreases.

  16. Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Prognosis of Heart Failure in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    Synopsis Heart failure is the quintessential cardiovascular syndrome of aging that results from common cardiovascular conditions in older adults in conjunction with age-associated changes in cardiovascular structure and function. To a large extent, heart failure is a geriatric syndrome in much the same way that dementia, falls, and frailty are geriatric syndromes. The incidence and prevalence of heart failure increase strikingly with age and make heart failure the most common reason for hospitalization among older adults. While outcomes for older adults with heart failure have improved over time, mortality, hospitalization, and rehospitalization rates remain high. PMID:17905375

  17. Enhanced Component Performance Study: Air-Operated Valves 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an enhanced performance evaluation of air-operated valves (AOVs) at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. The data used in this study are based on the operating experience failure reports from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for the component reliability as reported in the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). Results (beta distributions for failure probabilities upon demand and gamma distributions for rates) are used as inputs to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission standardized plant analysis risk models of U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. The AOV failure modes considered are failure-to-open/close, failure to operate or control, and spurious operation. The component reliability estimates and the reliability data are trended for the most recent 10-year period while yearly estimates for reliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing trends were identified in the AOV results. Statistically significant decreasing trends were identified in two areas: AOV operation demands less than or equal to 20 demands per year and greater than 20 demands.

  18. IUD failures--possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Barwin, B N; Gillieson, M

    1983-09-01

    Failure rates with IUDs have decreased markedly due to better design and increased surface area, as well as the addition of copper and progesterone agents. There is a constant pregnancy rate for all devices varying between 0.7 and 3.6 for 100 woman years' use. Ultrasound scans were carried out in 23 patients with positive pregnancy tests. With the exception of 5 pregnancies, 18 IUDs were located in the lower segment of the uterus below the gestational sac. This was probably as a result of 1 or more of the following: poor IUD positioning, partial expulsion of the IUD, malposition of IUD, abnormal geometry of the uterine cavity, myometrial contractions, impeded or diminished immunological response to a foreign body, antiprostaglandins, and rate of calcium or other deposits on the copper IUD. When the IUD was below the gestational sac as demonstrated by ultrasound, IUD removal resulted in no spontaneous abortions.

  19. Prediction of Cascading Failures in Spatial Networks.

    PubMed

    Shunkun, Yang; Jiaquan, Zhang; Dan, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Cascading overload failures are widely found in large-scale parallel systems and remain a major threat to system reliability; therefore, they are of great concern to maintainers and managers of different systems. Accurate cascading failure prediction can provide useful information to help control networks. However, for a large, gradually growing network with increasing complexity, it is often impractical to explore the behavior of a single node from the perspective of failure propagation. Fortunately, overload failures that propagate through a network exhibit certain spatial-temporal correlations, which allows the study of a group of nodes that share common spatial and temporal characteristics. Therefore, in this study, we seek to predict the failure rates of nodes in a given group using machine-learning methods. We simulated overload failure propagations in a weighted lattice network that start with a center attack and predicted the failure percentages of different groups of nodes that are separated by a given distance. The experimental results of a feedforward neural network (FNN), a recurrent neural network (RNN) and support vector regression (SVR) all show that these different models can accurately predict the similar behavior of nodes in a given group during cascading overload propagation.

  20. Heterogeneity: The key to failure forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Lavallée, Yan; Bell, Andrew F.; Main, Ian G.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Elastic waves are generated when brittle materials are subjected to increasing strain. Their number and energy increase non-linearly, ending in a system-sized catastrophic failure event. Accelerating rates of geophysical signals (e.g., seismicity and deformation) preceding large-scale dynamic failure can serve as proxies for damage accumulation in the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). Here we test the hypothesis that the style and mechanisms of deformation, and the accuracy of the FFM, are both tightly controlled by the degree of microstructural heterogeneity of the material under stress. We generate a suite of synthetic samples with variable heterogeneity, controlled by the gas volume fraction. We experimentally demonstrate that the accuracy of failure prediction increases drastically with the degree of material heterogeneity. These results have significant implications in a broad range of material-based disciplines for which failure forecasting is of central importance. In particular, the FFM has been used with only variable success to forecast failure scenarios both in the field (volcanic eruptions and landslides) and in the laboratory (rock and magma failure). Our results show that this variability may be explained, and the reliability and accuracy of forecast quantified significantly improved, by accounting for material heterogeneity as a first-order control on forecasting power. PMID:26307196

  1. GCS component development cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Jose A.; Macias, Rosa; Molgo, Jordi; Guerra, Dailos; Pi, Marti

    2012-09-01

    The GTC1 is an optical-infrared 10-meter segmented mirror telescope at the ORM observatory in Canary Islands (Spain). First light was at 13/07/2007 and since them it is in the operation phase. The GTC control system (GCS) is a distributed object & component oriented system based on RT-CORBA8 and it is responsible for the management and operation of the telescope, including its instrumentation. GCS has used the Rational Unified process (RUP9) in its development. RUP is an iterative software development process framework. After analysing (use cases) and designing (UML10) any of GCS subsystems, an initial component description of its interface is obtained and from that information a component specification is written. In order to improve the code productivity, GCS has adopted the code generation to transform this component specification into the skeleton of component classes based on a software framework, called Device Component Framework. Using the GCS development tools, based on javadoc and gcc, in only one step, the component is generated, compiled and deployed to be tested for the first time through our GUI inspector. The main advantages of this approach are the following: It reduces the learning curve of new developers and the development error rate, allows a systematic use of design patterns in the development and software reuse, speeds up the deliverables of the software product and massively increase the timescale, design consistency and design quality, and eliminates the future refactoring process required for the code.

  2. Emerging Novel Therapies for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Szema, Anthony M; Dang, Sophia; Li, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Heart function fails when the organ is unable to pump blood at a rate proportional to the body’s need for oxygen or when this function leads to elevated cardiac chamber filling pressures (cardiogenic pulmonary edema). Despite our sophisticated knowledge of heart failure, even so-called ejection fraction-preserved heart failure has high rates of mortality and morbidity. So, novel therapies are sorely needed. This review discusses current standard therapies for heart failure and launches an exploration into emerging novel treatments on the heels of recently-approved sacubitril and ivbradine. For example, Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) is protective of the heart, so in the absence of VIP, VIP knockout mice have dysregulation in key heart failure genes: 1) Force Generation and Propagation; 2) Energy Production and Regulation; 3) Ca+2 Cycling; 4) Transcriptional Regulators. VIP administration leads to coronary dilation in human subjects. In heart failure patients, VIP levels are elevated as a plausible endogenous protective effect. With the development of elastin polymers to stabilize VIP and prevent its degradation, VIP may therefore have a chance to satisfy the unmet need as a potential treatment for acute heart failure. PMID:26512208

  3. Risk and Recovery from Course Failure in the Early Years of High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roderick, Melissa; Camburn, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Examined patterns in the relative risk of course failure and recovery from failure over the first four semesters of high school for students in the Chicago, Illinois, school system, showing how failure rates vary as a function of race, ethnicity, gender, age, and prior performance. Results for 27,612 students show that few recover from failure,…

  4. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart failure - overview Heart pacemaker High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Smoking - tips on how to quit ... ask your doctor How to read food labels Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge Low-salt diet Mediterranean diet ...

  5. Heart failure overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart failure: Fast or difficult breathing Leg swelling (edema) Neck veins that stick out (are distended) Sounds ( ... pacemaker High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Pulmonary edema Stable angina Ventricular assist device Patient Instructions ACE ...

  6. Failure to communicate.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1998-02-01

    When a medication error is coupled with a communication problem, a patient may experience significant injury. Cases involving communication breakdown, i.e, failure to communicate or listen, are discussed.

  7. Triac failure detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A failure detector is provided for detecting unidirectional failures in triacs, particularly as used in power factor controllers for induction motors. In a first embodiment, the triac voltage waveform is sensed and upon detection of an unbalanced signal, corresponding to failure of the triac in either the positive or negative direction, the triac is turned full on in both directions. In a second embodiment, a pair of pulsed signals are derived, the pulse durations of which are proportional to the phase difference between the load current and voltage for each half cycle, and the triac is turned full on responsive to a difference in pulse duration between the half cycle signals. An unidirectional open circuit detector is adapted to use a signal from either of the first and second embodiment to turn the triac off in response to an open circuit failure in either direction.

  8. Inverter ratio failure detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, A. P.; Ebersole, T. J.; Andrews, R. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A failure detector which detects the failure of a dc to ac inverter is disclosed. The inverter under failureless conditions is characterized by a known linear relationship of its input and output voltages and by a known linear relationship of its input and output currents. The detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the detector's input and output voltages and which provides a failure-indicating signal only when the monitored output voltage is less by a selected factor, than the expected output voltage for the monitored input voltage, based on the known voltages' relationship. Similarly, the detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the input and output currents and provides a failure-indicating signal only when the input current exceeds by a selected factor the expected input current for the monitored output current based on the known currents' relationship.

  9. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... An echocardiogram (Echo) is a test that uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. The picture is much more detailed than a plain ...

  10. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.

  11. Evaluation of ultrafiltration failure.

    PubMed

    Korbet, S M

    1998-07-01

    The evaluation of ultrafiltration failure is embarked upon when a patient has persistent problems with symptoms and signs of fluid overload. Fluid overload is a common problem in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients and the risk of its occurrence increases with time on dialysis. Although often attributed to changes in peritoneal membrane function (membrane failure), there are a number of potential, and frequently more common factors that can contribute to the failure of adequate fluid removal in patients on PD. Many of the causes of ultrafiltration failure may be apparent after an initial informal evaluation. However, if after this the etiology remains unexplained, a systematic approach to the differential diagnosis of this problem can be utilized with the use of the peritoneal equilibration test. Once a diagnosis is confirmed, a logical therapeutic plan can be formulated.

  12. Living with Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... help you in the future. Follow Your Treatment Plan Treatment can relieve your symptoms and make daily ... or nurse about getting flu and pneumonia vaccines. Plan Ahead If you have heart failure, it's important ...

  13. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the lungs, airways, diaphragm, rib cage, pulmonary arteries, brain, and spinal cord ... STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US ...

  14. First-line endoscopic treatment with over-the-scope clips significantly improves the primary failure and rebleeding rates in high-risk gastrointestinal bleeding: A single-center experience with 100 cases

    PubMed Central

    Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Glatz, Torben; Walker, Christine; Fischer, Andreas; Thimme, Robert

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate rebleeding, primary failure (PF) and mortality of patients in whom over-the-scope clips (OTSCs) were used as first-line and second-line endoscopic treatment (FLET, SLET) of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB, LGIB). METHODS A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database identified all patients with UGIB and LGIB in a tertiary endoscopic referral center of the University of Freiburg, Germany, from 04-2012 to 05-2016 (n = 93) who underwent FLET and SLET with OTSCs. The complete Rockall risk scores were calculated from patients with UGIB. The scores were categorized as < or ≥ 7 and were compared with the original Rockall data. Differences between FLET and SLET were calculated. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to evaluate the factors that influenced rebleeding after OTSC placement. RESULTS Primary hemostasis and clinical success of bleeding lesions (without rebleeding) was achieved in 88/100 (88%) and 78/100 (78%), respectively. PF was significantly lower when OTSCs were applied as FLET compared to SLET (4.9% vs 23%, P = 0.008). In multivariate analysis, patients who had OTSC placement as SLET had a significantly higher rebleeding risk compared to those who had FLET (OR 5.3; P = 0.008). Patients with Rockall risk scores ≥ 7 had a significantly higher in-hospital mortality compared to those with scores < 7 (35% vs 10%, P = 0.034). No significant differences were observed in patients with scores < or ≥ 7 in rebleeding and rebleeding-associated mortality. CONCLUSION Our data show for the first time that FLET with OTSC might be the best predictor to successfully prevent rebleeding of gastrointestinal bleeding compared to SLET. The type of treatment determines the success of primary hemostasis or primary failure. PMID:27895403

  15. Immunity-based detection, identification, and evaluation of aircraft sub-system failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncayo, Hever Y.

    This thesis describes the design, development, and flight-simulation testing of an integrated Artificial Immune System (AIS) for detection, identification, and evaluation of a wide variety of sensor, actuator, propulsion, and structural failures/damages including the prediction of the achievable states and other limitations on performance and handling qualities. The AIS scheme achieves high detection rate and low number of false alarms for all the failure categories considered. Data collected using a motion-based flight simulator are used to define the self for an extended sub-region of the flight envelope. The NASA IFCS F-15 research aircraft model is used and represents a supersonic fighter which include model following adaptive control laws based on non-linear dynamic inversion and artificial neural network augmentation. The flight simulation tests are designed to analyze and demonstrate the performance of the immunity-based aircraft failure detection, identification and evaluation (FDIE) scheme. A general robustness analysis is also presented by determining the achievable limits for a desired performance in the presence of atmospheric perturbations. For the purpose of this work, the integrated AIS scheme is implemented based on three main components. The first component performs the detection when one of the considered failures is present in the system. The second component consists in the identification of the failure category and the classification according to the failed element. During the third phase a general evaluation of the failure is performed with the estimation of the magnitude/severity of the failure and the prediction of its effect on reducing the flight envelope of the aircraft system. Solutions and alternatives to specific design issues of the AIS scheme, such as data clustering and empty space optimization, data fusion and duplication removal, definition of features, dimensionality reduction, and selection of cluster/detector shape are also

  16. Genesis Failure Investigation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, John

    2004-01-01

    The-Genesis mission to collect solar-wind samples and return them to Earth for detailed analysis proceeded successfully for 3.5 years. During reentry on September 8, 2004, a failure in the entry, descent and landing sequence resulted in a crash landing of the Genesis sample return capsule. This document describes the findings of the avionics sub-team that supported the accident investigation of the JPL Failure Review Board.

  17. Heart failure in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, John D

    2012-12-01

    With increasing maternal age and the presence of comorbid conditions such as hypertension, cardiovascular assessment and monitoring is the responsibility of all clinicians caring for pregnant patients. Furthermore, there are specific conditions, such as mitral stenosis, peripartum cardiomyopathy, and preeclampsia, that can be associated with heart failure and secondary maternal (and fetal) mortality and morbidity. The important causes of heart failure in pregnancy are discussed.

  18. Acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-10-01

    Acute renal failure (now acute kidney injury) is a common complication of critical illness affecting between 30 and 60% of critically ill patients. The development of a consensus definition (RIFLE--risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage system) has allowed standardization of reporting and epidemiological work. Multicenter multinational epidemiological studies indicate that sepsis is now the most common cause of acute renal failure in the intensive care unit (ICU) followed by cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury. Unfortunately, our understanding of the pathogenesis of acute renal failure in these settings remains limited. Because of such limited understanding, no reproducibly effective therapies have been developed. In addition the diagnosis of acute renal failure still rests upon the detection of changes in serum creatinine, which only occur if more than 50% of glomerular filtration is lost and are often delayed by more than 24 hours. Such diagnostic delays make the implementation of early therapy nearly impossible. In response to these difficulties, there has been a concerted effort to use proteomics to identify novel early biomarkers of acute renal failure. The identification and study of neutrophil gelatinase- associated lipocalin has been an important step in this field. Another area of active interest and investigation relates to the role of intravenous fluid resuscitation and fluid balance. Data from large observational studies and randomized, controlled trials consistently indicate that a positive fluid balance in patients with acute renal failure represents a major independent risk factor for mortality and provides no protection of renal function. The pendulum is clearly swinging away from a fluid-liberal approach to a fluid-conservative approach in these patients. Finally, there is a growing appreciation that acute renal failure may identify patients who are at increased risk of subsequent chronic renal dysfunction and mortality, opening the way