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Sample records for component flow test

  1. Flow Components in a NaK Test Loop Designed to Simulate Conditions in a Nuclear Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    A test loop using NaK as the working fluid is presently in use to study material compatibility effects on various components that comprise a possible nuclear reactor design for use on the lunar surface. A DC electromagnetic (EM) pump has been designed and implemented as a means of actively controlling the NaK flow rate through the system and an EM flow sensor is employed to monitor the developed flow rate. These components allow for the matching of the flow rate conditions in test loops with those that would be found in a full-scale surface-power reactor. The design and operating characteristics of the EM pump and flow sensor are presented. In the EM pump, current is applied to a set of electrodes to produce a Lorentz body force in the fluid. A measurement of the induced voltage (back-EMF) in the flow sensor provides the means of monitoring flow rate. Both components are compact, employing high magnetic field strength neodymium magnets thermally coupled to a water-cooled housing. A vacuum gap limits the heat transferred from the high temperature NaK tube to the magnets and a magnetically-permeable material completes the magnetic circuit. The pump is designed to produce a pressure rise of 5 psi, and the flow sensor's predicted output is roughly 20 mV at the loop's nominal flow rate of 0.5 GPM.

  2. Flow Components in a NaK Test Loop Designed to Simulate Conditions in a Nuclear Surface Power Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2008-01-21

    A test loop using NaK as the working fluid is presently in use to study material compatibility effects on various components that comprise a possible nuclear reactor design for use on the lunar surface. A DC electromagnetic (EM) pump has been designed and implemented as a means of actively controlling the NaK flow rate through the system and an EM flow sensor is employed to monitor the developed flow rate. These components allow for the matching of the flow rate conditions in test loops with those that would be found in a full-scale surface-power reactor. The design and operating characteristics of the EM pump and flow sensor are presented. In the EM pump, current is applied to a set of electrodes to produce a Lorentz body force in the fluid. A measurement of the induced voltage (back-EMF) in the flow sensor provides the means of monitoring flow rate. Both components are compact, employing high magnetic field strength neodymium magnets thermally coupled to a water-cooled housing. A vacuum gap limits the heat transferred from the high temperature NaK tube to the magnets and a magnetically-permeable material completes the magnetic circuit. The pump is designed to produce a pressure rise of 34.5 kPa, and the flow sensor's predicted output is roughly 20 mV at the loop's nominal flow rate of 0.114 m{sup 3}/hr.

  3. Testing and Performance Verification of a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor in an Internal Flow Component Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Podboy, Gary G.; Miller, Christopher J.; Thorp, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    A 1/5 scale model rotor representative of a current technology, high bypass ratio, turbofan engine was installed and tested in the W8 single-stage, high-speed, compressor test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The same fan rotor was tested previously in the GRC 9x15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel as a fan module consisting of the rotor and outlet guide vanes mounted in a flight-like nacelle. The W8 test verified that the aerodynamic performance and detailed flow field of the rotor as installed in W8 were representative of the wind tunnel fan module installation. Modifications to W8 were necessary to ensure that this internal flow facility would have a flow field at the test package that is representative of flow conditions in the wind tunnel installation. Inlet flow conditioning was designed and installed in W8 to lower the fan face turbulence intensity to less than 1.0 percent in order to better match the wind tunnel operating environment. Also, inlet bleed was added to thin the casing boundary layer to be more representative of a flight nacelle boundary layer. On the 100 percent speed operating line the fan pressure rise and mass flow rate agreed with the wind tunnel data to within 1 percent. Detailed hot film surveys of the inlet flow, inlet boundary layer and fan exit flow were compared to results from the wind tunnel. The effect of inlet casing boundary layer thickness on fan performance was quantified. Challenges and lessons learned from testing this high flow, low static pressure rise fan in an internal flow facility are discussed.

  4. Informed Test Component Weighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies and evaluates alternative methods for weighting tests. Presents formulas for composite reliability and validity as a function of component weights and suggests a rational process that identifies and considers trade-offs in determining weights. Discusses drawbacks to implicit weighting and explicit weighting and the difficulty of…

  5. Advanced nozzle and engine components test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltran, Luis R.; Delroso, Richard L.; Delrosario, Ruben

    1992-01-01

    A test facility for conducting scaled advanced nozzle and engine component research is described. The CE-22 test facility, located in the Engine Research Building of the NASA Lewis Research Center, contains many systems for the economical testing of advanced scale-model nozzles and engine components. The combustion air and altitude exhaust systems are described. Combustion air can be supplied to a model up to 40 psig for primary air flow, and 40, 125, and 450 psig for secondary air flow. Altitude exhaust can be simulated up to 48,000 ft, or the exhaust can be atmospheric. Descriptions of the multiaxis thrust stand, a color schlieren flow visualization system used for qualitative flow analysis, a labyrinth flow measurement system, a data acquisition system, and auxiliary systems are discussed. Model recommended design information and temperature and pressure instrumentation recommendations are included.

  6. PACS component testing: beta and acceptance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Frost, Meryll M.; Staab, Edward V.

    1997-05-01

    The functionality and performance expectations of all PACS components must be specified at the time of purchase and tested completely upon delivery to assure customer satisfaction and successful adoption of the new technology. This process may be more elaborate if the customer agrees to serve as a Beta test site for a new component or a new revision of an existing component.A carefully designed test plan will save time at installation, will allow the customer and vendor to agree on expectations, and will assure that the installation will proceed as planned. This paper describes the test procedure used at the University of Florida to accept each PACS component, either a commercial product, or one developed in house. A set of documents contain descriptions of the pre-installation environment, sets of studies to be used in the test, installation checklist, functional usage reports, subjective evaluations, and problem reporting forms. Training and user documentation is also reviewed and 'help lists' are created to help users perform the most common functions. Although details in the documents are changed to match the type of component being tested, the general form of the test remains the same. A formal procedure for testing the functionality and performance of new equipment can save time for both the vendor and the customer and, if specified at the time of purchase, can serve to document the expectations of the customer. Following these procedures will assure a successful installation and improve customer satisfaction.

  7. Measurement of two-component flow using ultrasonic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, J. C.; Eghbali, D. A.; Flitton, V. E.; Anderson, D. G.

    Calibration of transit-time and Doppler ultrasonic flowmeters under two-component flow conditions has been conducted on 400 mm (16-in.) pipe. Testing covered total flows of 0.19 to 1.89 m(exp 3)/s (3000 to 30,000 gpm) and void fractions up to 40 percent. Both flowmeter types accurately measured total volumetric flow over a portion of their ranges. Pipe average void fraction, based on a three-beam gamma densitometer, was used to determine water component flow under stratified flow conditions, with similar results.

  8. Measurement of two-component flow using ultrasonic flowmeters

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, J.C.; Eghbali, D.A.; Flitton, V.E.; Anderson, D.G.

    1991-12-31

    Calibration of transit-time and Doppler ultrasonic flowmeters under two-component flow conditions has been conducted on 400 mm (16-in.) pipe. Testing covered total flows of 0.19 to 1.89 m{sup 3}/s (3000 to 30,000 gpm) and void fractions up to 40%. Both flowmeter types of accurately measured total volumetric flow over a portion of their ranges. Pipe average void fraction, based on a three-beam gamma densitometer, was used to determine water component flow under stratified flow conditions, with similar results. 2 refs.

  9. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY (SATURN V IN BACKGROUND). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  10. Oxidizer heat exchanger component test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, P. G.

    1988-01-01

    The RL10-IIB engine, is capable of multimode thrust operation. The engine operates at two low-thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), approximately 1 to 2 percent of full thrust; and pumped idle, 10 percent of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank prepressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-IIB engine during the low-thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidized heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. This report summarizes the test activity and post-test data analysis for two possible heat exchangers, each of which employs a completely different design philosophy. One design makes use of a low-heat transfer (PHT) approach in combination with a volume to attenuate pressure and flow oscillations. The test data showed that the LHT unit satisfied the oxygen exit quality of 0.95 or greater in both the THI and PI modes while maintaining stability. The HHT unit fulfilled all PI requirements; data for THI satisfactory operation is implied from experimental data that straddle the exact THI operating point.

  11. Scale modeling flow-induced vibrations of reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-06-01

    Similitude relationships currently employed in the design of flow-induced vibration scale-model tests of nuclear reactor components are reviewed. Emphasis is given to understanding the origins of the similitude parameters as a basis for discussion of the inevitable distortions which occur in design verification testing of entire reactor systems and in feature testing of individual component designs for the existence of detrimental flow-induced vibration mechanisms. Distortions of similitude parameters made in current test practice are enumerated and selected example tests are described. Also, limitations in the use of specific distortions in model designs are evaluated based on the current understanding of flow-induced vibration mechanisms and structural response.

  12. 4. VIEW SOUTHWEST COMPONENTS TEST LAB TEST BAY DETAIL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW SOUTHWEST COMPONENTS TEST LAB TEST BAY DETAIL SHOWING EMERGENCY SHOWER, AND EYEWASH, AND OBSERVATION WINDOW. STORAGE TANKS ON ROOF. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  13. Fluorescent Particles For Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnell, Jeremy L.; Stern, Susan M.; Torkelson, Jan R.

    1995-01-01

    Small alumina spheres coated with fluorescent dye used in flow testing of transparent plastic model of check valve. Entrained fluroescent particles make flows visible. After completion of flow test, particles remaining in valve easily detectable and removed for measurement of their sizes.

  14. Measurement Of Flow Induced Vibration Of Reactor Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmaraju, N.; Meher, K. K.; Rao, A. Rama

    The effect of flow-induced vibration on class I components in the reactor is a very important design factor for its qualifications worthy of loading inside the core. In this regard, a clear definition of the flow excitation and the dynamic characteristics of the component are the two primary inputs required to make an estimation of vibration severity. Though there are general guidelines available, more often it has been seen that they only help in arriving at a first approximation. There are many instances wherein a component has failed to perform as per design in spite of sufficient margin provided in the calculations. There are also instances wherein some components have failed even after successful testing under close to simulated flow condition. The paper deals with qualification procedure followed to flow test an in core component in an out of pile facility. The adopted procedure is considered to be a best approach especially in this field where in there are many gray areas.

  15. LADEE Propulsion System Cold Flow Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jonathan Hunter; Chapman, Jack M.; Trinh, Hau, P.; Bell, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a NASA mission that will orbit the Moon. Its main objective is to characterize the atmosphere and lunar dust environment. The spacecraft development is being led by NASA Ames Research Center and scheduled for launch in 2013. The LADEE spacecraft will be operated with a bi-propellant hypergolic propulsion system using MMH and NTO as the fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The propulsion system utilizes flight-proven hardware on major components. The propulsion layout is composed of one 100-lbf main thruster and four 5-lbf RCS thrusters. The propellants are stored in four tanks (two parallel-connected tanks per propellant component). The propellants will be pressurized by regulated helium. A simulated propulsion system has been built for conducting cold flow test series to characterize the transient fluid flow of the propulsion system feed lines and to verify the critical operation modes, such as system priming, waterhammer, and crucial mission duty cycles. Propellant drainage differential between propellant tanks will also be assessed. Since the oxidizer feed line system has a higher flow demand than the fuel system does, the cold flow test focuses on the oxidizer system. The objective of the cold flow test is to simulate the LADEE propulsion fluid flow operation through water cold flow test and to obtain data for anchoring analytical models. The models will be used to predict the transient and steady state flow behaviors in the actual flight operations. The test activities, including the simulated propulsion test article, cold flow test, and analytical modeling, are being performed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. At the time of the abstract submission, the test article checkout is being performed. The test series will be completed by November, 2012

  16. Component test program for variable-cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, A. G.; Whitlow, J. B.; Stitt, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    Variable cycle engine (VCE) concepts for a supersonic cruise aircraft were studied. These VCE concepts incorporate unique critical components and flow path arrangements that provide good performance at both supersonic and subsonic cruise and appear to be economically and environmentally viable. Certain technologies were identified as critical to the successful development of these engine concepts and require considerable development and testing. The feasibility and readiness of the most critical VCE technologies, was assessed, a VCE component test program was initiated. The variable stream control engine (VSCE) component test program, tested and evaluated an efficient low emission duct burner and a quiet coannular ejector nozzle at the rear of a rematched F100 engine.

  17. Modeling turbulence in flows with a strong rotational component

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, D.E.; O`Rourke, P.J.

    1993-11-01

    We consider the effectiveness of various turbulence models in flows with a strong rotational component. To evaluate the models, we implement them into a one-dimensional test code and make comparisons with experimental data for swirling flow in a cylinder. The K - {epsilon} type turbulence models do poorly in predicting the experimental results. However, we find that the incorporation of a Reynolds stress evolution equation gives good agreement with the experimentally measured mean flow. Modeling the pressure-strain correlation tensor correctly is the key for obtaining good results. A combination of Launder`s basic model together with Yakhot`s dissipation rate equation {sup 3} works best in predicting both the mean flow and the turbulence intensity.

  18. Analysis of flow reversal test

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L.Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1996-03-01

    A series of tests has been conducted to measure the dryout power associated with a flow transient whereby the coolant in a heated channel undergoes a change in flow direction. An analysis of the test was made with the aid of a system code, RELAP5. A dryout criterion was developed in terms of a time-averaged void fraction calculated by RELAP5 for the heated channel. The dryout criterion was also compared with several CHF correlations developed for the channel geometry.

  19. Component evaluation testing and analysis algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Darren M.; Merchant, Bion John

    2011-10-01

    The Ground-Based Monitoring R&E Component Evaluation project performs testing on the hardware components that make up Seismic and Infrasound monitoring systems. The majority of the testing is focused on the Digital Waveform Recorder (DWR), Seismic Sensor, and Infrasound Sensor. In order to guarantee consistency, traceability, and visibility into the results of the testing process, it is necessary to document the test and analysis procedures that are in place. Other reports document the testing procedures that are in place (Kromer, 2007). This document serves to provide a comprehensive overview of the analysis and the algorithms that are applied to the Component Evaluation testing. A brief summary of each test is included to provide the context for the analysis that is to be performed.

  20. High power, high frequency component test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Krawczonek, Walter

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has available a high frequency, high power laboratory facility for testing various components of aerospace and/or terrestrial power systems. This facility is described here. All of its capabilities and potential applications are detailed.

  1. Mechanical Components Branch Test Facilities and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.

    2004-01-01

    The Mechanical Components Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center formulates, conducts, and manages research focused on propulsion systems for both present and advanced aeronautical and space vehicles. The branch is comprised of research teams that perform basic research in three areas: mechanical drives, aerospace seals, and space mechanisms. Each team has unique facilities for testing aerospace hardware and concepts. This report presents an overview of the Mechanical Components Branch test facilities.

  2. Capillary flow solder wettability test

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    A test procedure was developed to assess the capillary flow wettability of solders inside of a confined geometry. The test geometry was comprised of two parallel plates with a controlled gap of constant thickness (0.008 cm, 0.018 cm, 0.025 cm, and 0.038 cm). Capillary flow was assessed by: (1) the meniscus or capillary rise of the solder within the gap, (2) the extent of void formation in the gap, and (3) the time-dependence of the risen solder film. Tests were performed with the lead-free solders.

  3. Guide for Oxygen Component Qualification Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, Larry J.; Rucker, Michelle A.; Dobbin, Douglas

    1996-01-01

    Although oxygen is a chemically stable element, it is not shock sensitive, will not decompose, and is not flammable. Oxygen use therefore carries a risk that should never be overlooked, because oxygen is a strong oxidizer that vigorously supports combustion. Safety is of primary concern in oxygen service. To promote safety in oxygen systems, the flammability of materials used in them should be analyzed. At the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), we have performed configurational tests of components specifically engineered for oxygen service. These tests follow a detailed WSTF oxygen hazards analysis. The stated objective of the tests was to provide performance test data for customer use as part of a qualification plan for a particular component in a particular configuration, and under worst-case conditions. In this document - the 'Guide for Oxygen Component Qualification Tests' - we outline recommended test systems, and cleaning, handling, and test procedures that address worst-case conditions. It should be noted that test results apply specifically to: manual valves, remotely operated valves, check valves, relief valves, filters, regulators, flexible hoses, and intensifiers. Component systems are not covered.

  4. Evaluation of antithrombotic effect: Importance of testing components and methodologies.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Junichiro; Tamura, Yukinori; Ijiri, Yoshinobu; Iwasaki, Masahiro; Murakami, Masahiro; Matsuo, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    The beneficial antithrombotic effect of some dietary components may offer the most promising approach of prevention of cardiovascular diseases and arterial thrombosis. The major stumbling block in finding effective dietary components is the lack of physiologically relevant techniques which can detect potential antithrombotic effect in humans. The presently used platelet function and coagulation tests do not allow the assessment of global thrombotic status and their value in screening dietary components for antithrombotic effect is questionable. Most of these in vitro tests ignore the effect of flow and shear stress, thrombin generation and vascular endothelium, the major contributors to arterial thrombogenesis in humans. As a gold standard, we employed the helium-neon (He-Ne) laser-induced thrombosis test in murine carotid artery and mesenteric microvessels, as the pathomechanism of this test closely reflects arterial thrombogenesis in humans. Results obtained with laser thrombosis test were compared with various shear-induced in vitro platelet function tests which use native blood (Haemostatometry, Thrombotic Status Analyser, Global Thrombosis Test-GTT). Contribution of vascular endothelium to thrombogenesis was assessed by measuring flow-mediated vasodilation (FMV) in vivo. The combination of the two shear-induced ex vivo thrombosis tests (Haemostatometry and GTT) with FMV correlated most closely with the laser-thrombosis test. Our findings suggest that combining the commercially available point-of-care GTT with the FMV test could provide a better assessment of the overall thrombotic status than either of the two tests alone. PMID:26370524

  5. SSME hot gas manifold flow comparison test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, G. B., Jr.; Dill, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFT) component of NASA's Alternate Turbopump Development effort, which is aimed at the proper aerodynamic integration of the current Phase II three-duct SSME Hot Gas Manifold (HGM) and the future 'Phase II-plus' two-duct HGM. Half-scale water flow tests of both HGM geometries were conducted to provide initial design data for the HPFT. The results reveal flowfield results and furnish insight into the performance differences between the two HGM flowpaths. Proper design of the HPFT can potentially secure significant flow improvements in either HGM configuration.

  6. Coal feed component testing for CDIF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, C. V.; Snyder, B. K.; Fornek, T. E.

    1977-01-01

    Investigations conducted during the conceptual design of the Montana MHD Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) identified commercially available processing and feeding equipment potentially suitable for use in a reference design. Tests on sub-scale units of this equipment indicated that they would perform as intended.

  7. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-09-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs.

  8. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    PubMed

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains.

  9. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    PubMed

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains. PMID:19616380

  10. Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2010-05-05

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these

  11. Deconvolved spectra of Two Component Advective Flow including jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Santanu; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Outflows and winds are produced when the accretion flows have positive specific energy. Two Component Advective Flow (TCAF) model suggests that the centrifugal pressure supported region of the flow outside the black hole horizon, acts as the base of this outflow. We study the spectral properties of the TCAF which includes a jet component. We consider the jet as a conical in shape which also up-scatters the soft photons from the Keplerian disc. We see that due to the presence of jet component, spectrum become harder as the jet itself behaves like an another Compton cloud above the inner hot corona. We also see how the jet spectra depends on the flow rates. This gives the direct link in timing properties of the X-rays in CENBOL component and the radiation emitted in the jet component.

  12. 1. VIEW EAST, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY SHOWING CATCH BASINS, TURBINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW EAST, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY SHOWING CATCH BASINS, TURBINE TESTING AREA, AND PUMP TESTING TOWER. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  13. Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

    2014-11-25

    Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

  14. Integration Test of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator System Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Pinero, Luis; Peterson, Todd; Dankanich, John

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a 4 kilowatt-class Hall propulsion system for implementation in NASA science missions. NASA science mission performance analysis was completed using the latest high voltage Hall accelerator (HiVHAc) and Aerojet-Rocketdyne's state-of-the-art BPT-4000 Hall thruster performance curves. Mission analysis results indicated that the HiVHAc thruster out performs the BPT-4000 thruster for all but one of the missions studied. Tests of the HiVHAc system major components were performed. Performance evaluation of the HiVHAc thruster at NASA Glenn's vacuum facility 5 indicated that thruster performance was lower than performance levels attained during tests in vacuum facility 12 due to the lower background pressures attained during vacuum facility 5 tests when compared to vacuum facility 12. Voltage-Current characterization of the HiVHAc thruster in vacuum facility 5 showed that the HiVHAc thruster can operate stably for a wide range of anode flow rates for discharge voltages between 250 and 600 volts. A Colorado Power Electronics enhanced brassboard power processing unit was tested in vacuum for 1,500 hours and the unit demonstrated discharge module efficiency of 96.3% at 3.9 kilowatts and 650 volts. Stand-alone open and closed loop tests of a VACCO TRL 6 xenon flow control module were also performed. An integrated test of the HiVHAc thruster, brassboard power processing unit, and xenon flow control module was performed and confirmed that integrated operation of the HiVHAc system major components. Future plans include continuing the maturation of the HiVHAc system major components and the performance of a single-string integration test.

  15. Resource Prospector Propulsion System Cold Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Hunter; Holt, Kim; Addona, Brad; Trinh, Huu

    2015-01-01

    Resource Prospector (RP) is a NASA mission being led by NASA Ames Research Center with current plans to deliver a scientific payload package aboard a rover to the lunar surface. As part of an early risk reduction activity, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Johnson Space Flight Center (JSC) have jointly developed a government-version concept of a lunar lander for the mission. The spacecraft consists of two parts, the lander and the rover which carries the scientific instruments. The lander holds the rover during launch, cruise, and landing on the surface. Following terminal descent and landing the lander portion of the spacecraft become dormant after the rover embarks on the science mission. The lander will be equipped with a propulsion system for lunar descent and landing, as well as trajectory correction and attitude control maneuvers during transit to the moon. Hypergolic propellants monomethyl hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide will be used to fuel sixteen 70-lbf descent thrusters and twelve 5-lbf attitude control thrusters. A total of four metal-diaphragm tanks, two per propellant, will be used along with a high-pressure composite-overwrapped pressure vessel for the helium pressurant gas. Many of the major propulsion system components are heritage missile hardware obtained by NASA from the Air Force. In parallel with the flight system design activities, a simulated propulsion system based on flight drawings was built for conducting a series of water flow tests to characterize the transient fluid flow of the propulsion system feed lines and to verify the critical operation modes such as system priming, waterhammer, and crucial mission duty cycles. The primary objective of the cold flow testing was to simulate the RP propulsion system fluid flow operation through water flow testing and to obtain data for anchoring analytical models. The models will be used to predict the transient and steady state flow behaviors in the actual flight operations. All design and

  16. Elevations, Major Component Isometric, Propellant Flow Schematic, and External Tank ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations, Major Component Isometric, Propellant Flow Schematic, and External Tank Connection to Shuttle Main Engines - Space Transportation System, Space Shuttle Main Engine, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  17. Testing of high speed network components

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, W.R.

    1997-06-30

    At the time of the start of this project, a battle was being fought between the computer networking technologies and telephone networking technologies. The telecommunications industry wanted to standardize on Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) as the technology of choice for carrying all cross-country traffic. The computer industry wanted to use Packet Transfer Mode (PTM). The project had several goals, some unspoken. At the highest, most obvious level, the project goals were to test the high-speed components being developed by the computer technology industry. However, in addition, both industrial partners were having trouble finding markets for the high-speed networking technology they were developing and deploying. Thus, a part of the project was to demonstrate applications developed at Oak Ridge which would stretch the limits of the network, and thus demonstrate the utility of high-speed networks. Finally, an unspoken goal of the computer technology industry was to convince the telecommunications industry that packet switching was superior to cell switching. Conversely, the telecommunications industry hoped to see the computer technology industry`s packet switch fail to perform in a real-world test. Project was terminated early due to failure of one of the CRADA partners to deliver needed component.

  18. Software for Testing Electroactive Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Fox, Robert L.; Dimery, Archie D.; Bryant, Robert G.; Shams, Qamar

    2003-01-01

    A computer program generates a graphical user interface that, in combination with its other features, facilitates the acquisition and preprocessing of experimental data on the strain response, hysteresis, and power consumption of a multilayer composite-material structural component containing one or more built-in sensor(s) and/or actuator(s) based on piezoelectric materials. This program runs in conjunction with Lab-VIEW software in a computer-controlled instrumentation system. For a test, a specimen is instrumented with appliedvoltage and current sensors and with strain gauges. Once the computational connection to the test setup has been made via the LabVIEW software, this program causes the test instrumentation to step through specified configurations. If the user is satisfied with the test results as displayed by the software, the user activates an icon on a front-panel display, causing the raw current, voltage, and strain data to be digitized and saved. The data are also put into a spreadsheet and can be plotted on a graph. Graphical displays are saved in an image file for future reference. The program also computes and displays the power and the phase angle between voltage and current.

  19. Testing the frozen flow approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Melott, Adrian L.; Moscardini, Lauro

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the accuracy of the frozen-flow approximation (FFA), recently proposed by Matarrese, et al. (1992), for following the nonlinear evolution of cosmological density fluctuations under gravitational instability. We compare a number of statistics between results of the FFA and n-body simulations, including those used by Melott, Pellman & Shandarin (1993) to test the Zel'dovich approximation. The FFA performs reasonably well in a statistical sense, e.g. in reproducing the counts-in-cell distribution, at small scales, but it does poorly in the crosscorrelation with n-body which means it is generally not moving mass to the right place, especially in models with high small-scale power.

  20. Arcjet component conditions through a multistart test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Frank M.; Haag, Thomas W.

    1987-01-01

    A low power, dc arcjet thruster was tested for starting reliability using hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures simulating the decomposition products of hydrazine. More than 300 starts were accumulated in phases with extended burn-in periods interlaced. A high degree of flow stabilization was built into the arcjet and the power supply incorporated both rapid current regulation and a high voltage, pulsed starting circuit. A nominal current level of 10 A was maintained throughout the test. Photomicrographs of the cathode tip showed a rapid recession to a steady-state operating geometry. A target of 300 starts was selected, as this represents significantly more than anticipated (150 to 240), in missions of 10 yr or less duration. Weighings showed no apparent mass loss. Some anode erosion was observed, particularly at the entrance to the constrictor. This was attributed to the brief period during startup the arc mode attachment point spends in the high pressure region upstream of the nozzle. Based on the results obtained, startup does not appear to be performance or life limiting for the number of starts typical of operational satellite applications.

  1. Thermal Performance Testing of Single Channel GRCop-84 SLM Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Chance P.; Cross, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The surface finish found on components manufactured by sinter laser manufacturing (SLM) is rougher (0.013 - 0.0006 inches) than parts made using traditional fabrication methods. Internal features and passages built into SLM components do not readily allow for roughness reduction processes. Alternatively, engineering literature suggests that the roughness of a surface can enhance thermal performance within a pressure drop regime. To further investigate the thermal performance of SLM fabricated pieces, several GRCop-84 SLM single channel components were tested using a thermal conduction rig at MSFC. A 20 kW power source running at 25% duty cycle and 25% power level applied heat to each component while varying water flow rates between 2.1 - 6.2 gallons/min (GPM) at a supply pressure of 500 to 750 psi. Each test was allowed to reach quasi-steady state conditions where pressure, temperature, and thermal imaging data were recorded. Presented in this work are the heat transfer responses compared to a traditional machined OHFC Copper test section. An analytical thermal model was constructed to anchor theoretical models with the empirical data.

  2. Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a flow path having solid components flowing therethrough

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Svoboda, John M.; Bauer, William F.; Elias, Gracy

    2008-05-06

    A method and apparatus is provided for monitoring a flow path having plurality of different solid components flowing therethrough. For example, in the harvesting of a plant material, many factors surrounding the threshing, separating or cleaning of the plant material and may lead to the inadvertent inclusion of the component being selectively harvested with residual plant materials being discharged or otherwise processed. In accordance with the present invention the detection of the selectively harvested component within residual materials may include the monitoring of a flow path of such residual materials by, for example, directing an excitation signal toward of flow path of material and then detecting a signal initiated by the presence of the selectively harvested component responsive to the excitation signal. The detected signal may be used to determine the presence or absence of a selected plant component within the flow path of residual materials.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging the velocity vector components of fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, D A; Crooks, L E; Sheldon, P; Hoenninger, J; Watts, J; Arakawa, M

    1985-12-01

    Encoding the precession phase angle of proton nuclei for Fourier analysis has produced accurate measurement of fluid velocity vector components by MRI. A pair of identical gradient pulses separated in time by exactly 1/2 TE, are used to linearly encode the phase of flow velocity vector components without changing the phase of stationary nuclei. Two-dimensional Fourier transformation of signals gave velocity density images of laminar flow in angled tubes which were in agreement with the laws of vector addition. These velocity profile images provide a quantitative method for the investigation of fluid dynamics and hemodynamics. PMID:3880097

  4. Low Emissions RQL Flametube Combustor Component Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes and summarizes elements of the High Speed Research (HSR) Low Emissions Rich burn/Quick mix/Lean burn (RQL) flame tube combustor test program. This test program was performed at NASA Glenn Research Center circa 1992. The overall objective of this test program was to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of the RQL combustor concept for High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) applications with the goal of achieving NOx emission index levels of 5 g/kg-fuel at representative HSCT supersonic cruise conditions. The specific objectives of the tests reported herein were to investigate component performance of the RQL combustor concept for use in the evolution of ultra-low NOx combustor design tools. Test results indicated that the RQL combustor emissions and performance at simulated supersonic cruise conditions were predominantly sensitive to the quick mixer subcomponent performance and not sensitive to fuel injector performance. Test results also indicated the mixing section configuration employing a single row of circular holes was the lowest NOx mixer tested probably due to the initial fast mixing characteristics of this mixing section. However, other quick mix orifice configurations such as the slanted slot mixer produced substantially lower levels of carbon monoxide emissions most likely due to the enhanced circumferential dispersion of the air addition. Test results also suggested that an optimum momentum-flux ratio exists for a given quick mix configuration. This would cause undesirable jet under- or over-penetration for test conditions with momentum-flux ratios below or above the optimum value. Tests conducted to assess the effect of quick mix flow area indicated that reduction in the quick mix flow area produced lower NOx emissions at reduced residence time, but this had no effect on NOx emissions measured at similar residence time for the configurations tested.

  5. 17. Interior view of Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) in Components ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Interior view of Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing west and north walls. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  6. 14. Interior view of Test Cell 10 (environmental) in Components ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Interior view of Test Cell 10 (environmental) in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing east and south walls. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  7. 16. Interior view of Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) in Components ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Interior view of Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing east wall. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. The windows in the wall enable personnel in the control room to observe component testing in the cell. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  8. 13. Interior view of Test Cell 9 (fuel) in Components ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Interior view of Test Cell 9 (fuel) in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing west and north walls. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. Two windows in the wall to the left enable personnel in the control room to observe component testing in the cell. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  9. 15. Interior view of Test Cell 10 (environmental) in Components ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Interior view of Test Cell 10 (environmental) in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing north and east walls. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. The window in the wall to the left enables personnel in the control room to observe component testing in the cell. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  10. AMTEC recirculating test cell component testing and operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, M. L.; Sievers, R. K.; O'Connor, D.; Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Bankston, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    Alkali metal thermoelectric converter operation in a recirculating test cell (RTC), which requires a small electromagnetic pump (EM) and a high-temperature beta-double-prime alumina-solid-electrolyte (BASE)-to-metal seal, is discussed. The design of a pump and an active metal braze seal and the initial operation of a cell using these components are described. The pump delivered 0.25 cu cm/min against a 28-psia head. A braze seal system was selected after shear strength tests of Ta or Nb brazed to BASE by a variety of fillers including TiCuNi, TiNi, and TiNiCr. The TiCuNi filler was chosen for environment cell testing and showed no failure or observable degradation after short-term tests up to 1055 K. The pump and the Nb/TiCuNi/BASE seal were used in a test that demonstrated all the operational functions of the RTC for the first time. An increase in the radiation reduction factor at constant input power was observed, indicating that the condenser was being wet by sodium resulting in an increased reflectivity.

  11. Moving Bed, Granular Bed Filter Development Program: Option 1, Component Test Facility. Task 3, Test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, J.C.; Purdhomme, J.W.; Wilson, K.B.

    1994-04-01

    In the base contract, Combustion Power Co. developed commercial designs for a moving granular-bed filter (GBF). The proposed filter is similar to previous designs in terms of its shape and method of filtration. The commercial designs have scaled the filter from a 5 ft diameter to as large as a 20 ft diameter filter. In Task 2 of the Moving Bed-Granular Filter Development Program, all technical concerns related to the further development of the filter are identified. These issues are discussed in a Topical Report which has been issued as part of Task 2. Nineteen issues are identified in this report. Along with a discussion of these issues are the planned approaches for resolving each of these issues. These issues will be resolved in either a cold flow component test facility or in pilot scale testing at DOE`s Power System Development Facility (PSDF) located at Southem Company Services` Wilsonville facility. Task 3 presents a test plan for resolving those issues which can be addressed in component test facilities. The issues identified in Task 2 which will be addressed in the component test facilities are: GBF scale-up; effect of filter cone angle and sidewall materials on medium flow and ash segregation; maximum gas filtration rate; lift pipe wear; GBF media issues; mechanical design of the gas inlet duct; and filter pressure drop. This document describes a test program to address these issues, with testing to be performed at Combustion Power Company`s facility in Belmont, California.

  12. HEAVY WATER COMPONENTS TEST REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

    2011-10-13

    The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2009 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Removal Action with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This paper summarizes the history prior to 2009, the major D&D activities, and final end state of the facility at completion of decommissioning in June 2011. The HWCTR facility was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. In 2009 the $1.6 billion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for site footprint reduction at SRS reopened the doors to HWCTR - this time for final decommissioning. Alternative studies concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning was to remove the reactor vessel, both steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. The transfer coffin, originally above grade, was to be placed in the cavity vacated by the reactor vessel and the remaining below grade spaces would be grouted. Once all above equipment

  13. Miniature probes for use in gas turbine testing. [component reliability measuring instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glawe, G. E.; Krause, L. N.

    1974-01-01

    Several examples of miniature probes (null type as well as fixed position) are presented which have proved useful in aircraft and space power systems component testing and are applicable to automotive gas turbine testing. These probes are used to determine component or system performance from the measurement of gas temperature as well as total and static pressure, and flow direction. Detailed drawings of the sensors are presented along with experimental data covering the flow characteristics over the range of intended use.

  14. FFTF thermal-hydraulic testing results affecting piping and vessel component design in LMFBR's

    SciTech Connect

    Stover, R.L.; Beaver, T.R.; Chang, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility completed four years of pre-operational testing in April 1982. This paper describes thermal-hydraulic testing results from this period which impact piping and vessel component design in LMFBRs. Data discussed are piping flow oscillations, piping thermal stratification and vessel upper plenum stratification. Results from testing verified that plant design limits were met.

  15. Resource Prospector Propulsion Cold Flow Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Hunter; Pederson, Kevin; Dervan, Melanie; Holt, Kimberly; Jernigan, Frankie; Trinh, Huu; Flores, Sam

    2014-01-01

    For the past year, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center have been working on a government version of a lunar lander design for the Resource Prospector Mission. A propulsion cold flow test system, representing an early flight design of the propulsion system, has been fabricated. The primary objective of the cold flow test is to simulate the Resource Prospector propulsion system operation through water flow testing and obtain data for anchoring analytical models. This effort will also provide an opportunity to develop a propulsion system mockup to examine hardware integration to a flight structure. This paper will report the work progress of the propulsion cold flow test system development and test preparation. At the time this paper is written, the initial waterhammer testing is underway. The initial assessment of the test data suggests that the results are as expected and have a similar trend with the pretest prediction. The test results will be reported in a future conference.

  16. 11. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking north. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  17. 18. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing northwest corner. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications for HVAC system installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  18. 19. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Interior view of HVAC room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking toward east wall. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, machinery, and technological modifications for HVAC system installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5240 Complement components immunological test system. (a) Identification. A complement components... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Complement components immunological test...

  20. Testing of Liquid Metal Components for Nuclear Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2010-01-01

    efficiency of 28%. A baseline performance map was established for the pair of 1kW Stirling convertors. The performance data will then be used for design modification to the Stirling convertors. The ALIP tested at MSFC has no moving parts and no direct electrical connections to the liquid metal containing components. Pressure is developed by the interaction of the magnetic field produced by the stator and the current which flows as a result of the voltage induced in the liquid metal contained in the pump duct. Flow is controlled by variation of the voltage supplied to the pump windings. Under steady-state conditions, pump performance is measured for flow rates from 0.5-4.3 kg/s. The pressure rise developed by the pump to support these flow rates is roughly 5-65 kPa. The RMS input voltage (phase-to-phase voltage) ranges from 5-120 V, while the frequency can be varied arbitrarily up to 60 Hz. Performance is quantified at different loop temperature levels from 50 C up to 650 C, which is the peak operating temperature of the proposed AFSP reactor. The transient response of the pump is also evaluated to determine its behavior during startup and shut-down procedures.

  1. 12. Interior view of Test Cell 9 (fuel) in Components ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Interior view of Test Cell 9 (fuel) in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), showing north and east walls. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  2. 5. AERIAL PHOTO OF THE COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY DURING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. AERIAL PHOTO OF THE COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY DURING THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE EAST TEST AREA. 1955, FRED ORDWAY COLLECTION, U.S. SPACE AND ROCKET CENTER, HUNTSVILLE, AL. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  3. 16 CFR 1109.11 - Component part testing for paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Component part testing for paint. 1109.11... Component part testing for paint. (a) Generally. The Commission will permit certification of a consumer product, or a component part of a consumer product, as being in compliance with the lead paint limit...

  4. 16 CFR 1109.11 - Component part testing for paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Component part testing for paint. 1109.11... Component part testing for paint. (a) Generally. The Commission will permit certification of a consumer product, or a component part of a consumer product, as being in compliance with the lead paint limit...

  5. 16 CFR 1109.11 - Component part testing for paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Component part testing for paint. 1109.11... Component part testing for paint. (a) Generally. The Commission will permit certification of a consumer product, or a component part of a consumer product, as being in compliance with the lead paint limit...

  6. 10. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Interior view of control room in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking east. The control room is located in the center of the building and abuts the Test Cell 8, 9, and 10 and equipment room wings. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  7. Leak testing of cryogenic components — problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, S. P.; Pandarkar, S. P.; Unni, T. G.; Sinha, A. K.; Mahajan, K.; Suthar, R. L.

    2008-05-01

    A prototype of Cold Neutron Source (CNS) for Dhruva Reactor is being manufactured at Centre for Design and Manufacture (CDM), BARC, Mumbai for validating the mechanical and thermal engineering design aspects, besides checking the integrity of all joints and components at low temperature, 77K. Task of a Cold Neutron Source is to generate cold neutrons by cooling down the thermal neutrons, which are originally produced in a nuclear research reactor. The complete Cold Neutron Source system comprises a complex arrangement of moderator pot, transfer line (piping), pumps, refrigerators, storage tanks, a heat exchanger and associated controls and instrumentation. The heart of the system is moderator pot in which water (moderator) is cooled down by Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) being circulated through an annular cavity machined on the walls of the pot. Transfer lines for LN2 basically consist of two concentric Stainless Steel flexible pipes, which are joined to the inlet and outlet Aluminium tubes of the moderator pot through transition joints. Leak in any component may result in loss of liquid Nitrogen, degradation of vacuum, which in turn may affect the heat removal efficiency of the source. Hence, leak testing was considered a very important quality control tool and all joints and components were subjected to helium leak test using mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD) at cryogenic temperature. During one of the earlier experiments, flow of LN2 through inner flexible pipe of the transfer line resulted in rise of pressure in the vacuum annulus and sweating on the outer flexible pipe. After investigations it was found that large thermal stress compounded with mechanical stress resulted in cracks in the inner pipe. Accordingly design was modified to get leak proof transfer line assembly. Further, during leak testing of thin wall moderator pot, gross leak was observed on the outer jacket welded joint. Leak was so large that even a small amount of Helium gas in the vicinity of the

  8. Testing variance components by two jackknife methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The jacknife method, a resampling technique, has been widely used for statistical tests for years. The pseudo value based jacknife method (defined as pseudo jackknife method) is commonly used to reduce the bias for an estimate; however, sometimes it could result in large variaion for an estmimate a...

  9. Quantifiable Lateral Flow Assay Test Strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    As easy to read as a home pregnancy test, three Quantifiable Lateral Flow Assay (QLFA) strips used to test water for E. coli show different results. The brightly glowing control line on the far right of each strip indicates that all three tests ran successfully. But the glowing test line on the middle left and bottom strips reveal their samples were contaminated with E. coli bacteria at two different concentrations. The color intensity correlates with concentration of contamination.

  10. Testing of Liquid Metal Components for Nuclear Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Pearson, J. B.; Godfroy, T. J.; Schoenfeld, M.; Webster, K.; Briggs, M. H.; Geng, S. M.; Adkins, H. E.; Werner, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    The capability to perform testing at both the module/component level and in near prototypic reactor configurations using a non-nuclear test methodology allowed for evaluation of two components critical to the development of a potential nuclear fission power system for the lunar surface. A pair of 1 kW Stirling power convertors, similar to the type that would be used in a reactor system to convert heat to electricity, were integrated into a reactor simulator system to determine their performance using pumped NaK as the hot side working fluid. The performance in the pumped-NaK system met or exceed the baseline performance measurements where the converters were electrically heated. At the maximum hot-side temperature of 550 C the maximum output power was 2375 watts. A specially-designed test apparatus was fabricated and used to quantify the performance of an annular linear induction pump that is similar to the type that could be used to circulate liquid metal through the core of a space reactor system. The errors on the measurements were generally much smaller than the magnitude of the measurements, permitting accurate performance evaluation over a wide range of operating conditions. The pump produced flow rates spanning roughly 0.16 to 5.7 l/s (2.5 to 90 GPM), and delta p levels from less than 1 kPa to 90 kPa (greater than 0.145 psi to roughly 13 psi). At the nominal FSP system operating temperature of 525 C the maximum efficiency was just over 4%.

  11. Dynamic tests of cracked pipe components

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, D.A.; Heald, J.D.; Sharma, S.R.

    1984-02-01

    Dynamic tests were conducted involving notched sections of 4-in. (10-cm) stainless steel and Inconel-600 pipe. The specimen was a four-point bending beam with end masses sized to give an elastic first-mode frequency near that of typical field installed piping systems (15 Hz). Specimens were loaded using sinewave excitation at this first mode natural frequency. Specimen response was compared to predictions from an elastic-plastic dynamic analysis previously developed on this program. In addition, specimen loads at failure were compared to those predicted from a net section collapse failure criterion. The results confirmed that the elasticplastic dynamic analysis adequately predicted the dynamic response of flawed pipes under seismic-type excitation. Furthermore, net section collapse does not occur under dynamic loading conditions which simulate natural frequencies of asinstalled light water reactor piping systems. Finally, a net section collapse criterion yields conservative estimates of the load capacity of flawed pipe sections provided crack growth is properly accounted for.

  12. 16 CFR 1509.5 - Component-spacing test apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Component-spacing test apparatus. 1509.5 Section 1509.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.5 Component-spacing test apparatus. (a)...

  13. 16 CFR 1509.5 - Component-spacing test apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Component-spacing test apparatus. 1509.5 Section 1509.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.5 Component-spacing test apparatus. (a)...

  14. 16 CFR 1509.6 - Component-spacing test method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Component-spacing test method. 1509.6 Section 1509.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.6 Component-spacing test method. The apex of...

  15. 16 CFR 1509.6 - Component-spacing test method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Component-spacing test method. 1509.6 Section 1509.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.6 Component-spacing test method. The apex of...

  16. Energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine component rig performance test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, K. P.

    1983-01-01

    A rig test of the cooled high-pressure turbine component for the Energy Efficient Engine was successfully completed. The principal objective of this test was to substantiate the turbine design point performance as well as determine off-design performance with the interaction of the secondary flow system. The measured efficiency of the cooled turbine component was 88.5 percent, which surpassed the rig design goal of 86.5 percent. The secondary flow system in the turbine performed according to the design intent. Characterization studies showed that secondary flow system performance is insensitive to flow and pressure variations. Overall, this test has demonstrated that a highly-loaded, transonic, single-stage turbine can achieve a high level of operating efficiency.

  17. Use of laser flow visualization techniques in reactor component thermal-hydraulic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Oras, J.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    To properly design reactor components, an understanding of the various thermal hydraulic phenomena, i.e., thermal stratification flow channeling, recirculation regions, shear layers, etc., is necessary. In the liquid metal breeder reactor program, water is commonly used to replace sodium in experimental testing to facilitate the investigations, (i.e., reduce cost and allow fluid velocity measurement or flow pattern study). After water testing, limited sodium tests can be conducted to validate the extrapolation of the water results to sodium. This paper describes a novel laser flow visualization technique being utilized at ANL together with various examples of its use and plans for further development. A 3-watt argon-ion laser, in conjunction with a cylindrical opticallens, has been used to create a thin (approx. 1-mm) intense plane of laser light for the illuminiation of various flow tracers in precisely defined regions of interest within a test article having windows. Both fluorescing dyes tuned to the wavelength of the laser light (to maximize brightness and sharpness of flow image) and small (< 0.038-mm, 0.0015-in. dia.) opaque, nearly neutrally buoyant polystyrene spheres (to ensure that the particles trace out the fluid motion) have been used as flow tracers.

  18. Non-equilibrium Flows of Reacting Air Components in Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevich, S. S.; Sinitsyn, K. A.; Nagnibeda, E. A.

    2008-12-01

    The paper presents the results of the investigation of non-equilibrium flows of reacting air mixtures in nozzles. State-to-state approach based on the solution of the equations for vibrational level populations of molecules and atomic concentrations coupled to the gas dynamics equations is used. For the 5-component air mixture (N2, O2, NO, N, O) non-equilibrium distributions and gasdynamical parameters are calculated for different conditions in a nozzle throat. The influence of various kinetic processes on distributions and gas dynamics parameters is studied. The paper presents the comparison of the results with ones obtained for binary mixtures of molecules and atoms and various models of elementary processes.

  19. High-temperature test facility at the NASA Lewis engine components research laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colantonio, Renato O.

    1990-01-01

    The high temperature test facility (HTTF) at NASA-Lewis Engine Components Research Laboratory (ECRL) is presently used to evaluate the survivability of aerospace materials and the effectiveness of new sensing instrumentation in a realistic afterburner environment. The HTTF has also been used for advanced heat transfer studies on aerospace components. The research rig uses pressurized air which is heated with two combustors to simulate high temperature flow conditions for test specimens. Maximum airflow is 31 pps. The HTTF is pressure rated for up to 150 psig. Combustors are used to regulate test specimen temperatures up to 2500 F. Generic test sections are available to house test plates and advanced instrumentation. Customized test sections can be fabricated for programs requiring specialized features and functions. The high temperature test facility provides government and industry with a facility for testing aerospace components. Its operation and capabilities are described.

  20. Fiber Laser Component Testing for Space Qualification Protocol Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falvey, S.; Buelow, M.; Nelson, B.; Starcher, Y.; Thienel, L.; Rhodes, C.; Tull, Jackson; Drape, T.; Westfall, C.

    A test protocol for the space qualifying of Ytterbium-doped diode-pumped fiber laser (DPFL) components was developed under the Bright Light effort, sponsored by AFRL/VSE. A literature search was performed and summarized in an AMOS 2005 conference paper that formed the building blocks for the development of the test protocol. The test protocol was developed from the experience of the Bright Light team, the information in the literature search, and the results of a study of the Telcordia standards. Based on this protocol developed, test procedures and acceptance criteria for a series of vibration, thermal/vacuum, and radiation exposure tests were developed for selected fiber laser components. Northrop Grumman led the effort in vibration and thermal testing of these components at the Aerospace Engineering Facility on Kirtland Air Force Base, NM. The results of the tests conducted have been evaluated. This paper discusses the vibration and thermal testing that was executed to validate the test protocol. The lessons learned will aid in future assessments and definition of space qualification protocols. Components representative of major items within a Ytterbium-doped diode-pumped fiber laser were selected for testing; including fibers, isolators, combiners, fiber Bragg gratings, and laser diodes. Selection of the components was based on guidelines to test multiple models of typical fiber laser components. A goal of the effort was to test two models (i.e. different manufacturers) of each type of article selected, representing different technologies for the same type of device. The test articles did not include subsystems or systems. These components and parts may not be available commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS), and, in fact, many are custom articles, or newly developed by the manufacturer. The primary goal for this effort is a completed taxonomy that lists all relevant laser components, modules, subsystems, and interfaces, and cites the documentation for space

  1. Characterization of Flow Bench Engine Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voris, Alex; Riley, Lauren; Puzinauskas, Paul

    2015-11-01

    This project was an attempt at characterizing particle image velocimetry (PIV) and swirl-meter test procedures. The flow direction and PIV seeding were evaluated for in-cylinder steady state flow of a spark ignition engine. For PIV seeding, both wet and dry options were tested. The dry particles tested were baby powder, glass particulate, and titanium dioxide. The wet particles tested were fogs created with olive oil, vegetable oil, DEHS, and silicon oil. The seeding was evaluated at 0.1 and 0.25 Lift/Diameter and at cylinder pressures of 10, 25 and 40 inches of H2O. PIV results were evaluated through visual and fluid momentum comparisons. Seeding particles were also evaluated based on particle size and cost. It was found that baby powder and glass particulate were the most effective seeding options for the current setup. The oil fogs and titanium dioxide were found to deposit very quickly on the mock cylinder and obscure the motion of the particles. Based on initial calculations and flow measurements, the flow direction should have a negligible impact on PIV and swirl-meter results. The characterizations found in this project will be used in future engine research examining the effects of intake port geometry on in-cylinder fluid motion and exhaust gas recirculation tolerances. Thanks to NSF site grant #1358991.

  2. Seawater test results of Open-Cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OC-OTEC) components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangrando, F.; Bharathan, D.; Link, H.; Panchal, C. B.

    Key components of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion systems- the flash evaporator, mist eliminator, passive predeaerator, two surface condenser stages, and two direct-contact condenser stages- have been tested using seawater. These components operate at lower steam pressures and higher inlet noncondensable gas concentrations than do conventional power plant heat exchangers. The rate of heat exchanged between the evaporator and the condenser is on the order of 1.25MW-thermal, requiring a warm seawater flow of about 0.1 cu m/s; the cold seawater flow is on the order of half the warm water flow. In addition to characterizing the performance of the various components, the system has produced potable water from condensation of the steam produced in the evaporator. The information obtained in these tests is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which net power production is expected to be demonstrate for the first time using OC-OTEC technology.

  3. Fluid flow measurements of Test Series A and B for the Small Scale Seal Performance Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Lie, K.

    1987-12-01

    The degree of waste isolation achieved by a repository seal system is dependent upon the fluid flow characteristics, or permeability, of the seals. In order to obtain meaningful, site-specific data on the performance of various possible seal system components, a series of in situ experiments called the Small Scale Seal Performance Tests (SSSPT) are being conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report contains the results of gas flow, tracer penetration, and brine flow tests conducted on concrete seals in vertical (Test Series A) and horizontal (Test Series B) configurations. The test objectives were to evaluate the seal performance and to determine if there existed scaling effects which could influence future SSSPT designs. 3 refs., 77 figs.

  4. Flow simulation of the Component Development Integration Facility magnetohydrodynamic power train system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.; Petrick, M.

    1997-11-01

    This report covers application of Argonne National Laboratory`s (ANL`s) computer codes to simulation and analysis of components of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train system at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF). Major components of the system include a 50-MWt coal-fired, two-stage combustor and an MHD channel. The combustor, designed and built by TRW, includes a deswirl section between the first and the second-stage combustor and a converging nozzle following the second-stage combustor, which connects to the MHD channel. ANL used computer codes to simulate and analyze flow characteristics in various components of the MHD system. The first-stage swirl combustor was deemed a mature technology and, therefore, was not included in the computer simulation. Several versions of the ICOMFLO computer code were used for the deswirl section and second-stage combustor. The MGMHD code, upgraded with a slag current leakage submodel, was used for the MHD channel. Whenever possible data from the test facilities were used to aid in calibrating parameters in the computer code, to validate the computer code, or to set base-case operating conditions for computations with the computer code. Extensive sensitivity and parametric studies were done on cold-flow mixing in the second-stage combustor, reacting flow in the second-stage combustor and converging nozzle, and particle-laden flow in the deswirl zone of the first-stage combustor, the second-stage combustor, and the converging nozzle. These simulations with subsequent analysis were able to show clearly in flow patterns and various computable measures of performance a number of sensitive and problematical areas in the design of the power train. The simulations of upstream components also provided inlet parameter profiles for simulation of the MHD power generating channel. 86 figs., 18 tabs.

  5. The SHOOT cryogenic components - Testing and applicability to other flight programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipirro, Michael J.; Schein, Michael E.; Boyle, Robert F.; Figueroa, Orlando; Lindauer, David A.; Mchugh, Daniel C.; Shirron, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    Cryogenic components and techniques for the superfluid helium on-orbit transfer (SHOOT) flight demonstration are described. Instrumentation for measuring liquid quantity, position, flow rate, temperature, and pressure has been developed using the data obtained from the IRAS, Cosmic Background Explorer, and Spacelab 2 helium dewars. Topics discussed include valves and burst disks, fluid management devices, structural/thermal components, instrumentation, and ground support equipment and performance test apparatus.

  6. Wing Leading Edge Joint Laminar Flow Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Aaron; Westphal, Russell V.; Zuniga, Fanny A.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Koga, Dennis J.

    1996-01-01

    An F-104G aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has been equipped with a specially designed and instrumented test fixture to simulate surface imperfections of the type likely to be present near the leading edge on the wings of some laminar flow aircraft. The simulated imperfections consisted of five combinations of spanwise steps and gaps of various sizes. The unswept fixture yielded a pressure distribution similar to that of some laminar flow airfoils. The experiment was conducted at cruise conditions typical for business-jets and light transports: Mach numbers were in the range 0.5-0.8, and unit Reynolds numbers were 1.5-2.5 million per foot. Skin friction measurements indicated that laminar flow was often maintained for some distance downstream of the surface imperfections. Further work is needed to more precisely define transition location and to extend the experiments to swept-wing conditions and a broader range of imperfection geometries.

  7. Multi-phase multi-component reactive flow in Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Beñat; Afonso, Juan Carlos; Zlotnik, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Multi-phase multi-component reactive flow (MPMCRF) controls a number of important complex geodynamic/geochemical problems, such as melt generation and percolation, metasomatism, rheological weakening, magmatic differentiation, ore emplacement, and fractionation of chemical elements, to name a few. These interacting processes occur over very different spatial and temporal scales and under very different physico-chemical conditions. Therefore, there is a strong motivation in geodynamics for investigating the equations governing MPMCRF, their mathematical structure and properties, and the numerical techniques necessary to obtain reliable and accurate results. In this contribution we present results from a novel numerical framework to solve multiscale MPMCRF problems in geodynamic contexts. Our approach is based on the effective tracking of the most basic building blocks: internal energy and chemical composition. This is achieved through the combination of rigorous solutions to the conservation equations (mass, energy and momentum) for each dynamic phase (instead of the more common "mixture-type" approach) and the transport equation for the chemical species, within the context of classical irreversible thermodynamics. Interfacial processes such as phase changes, chemical diffusion+reaction, and surface tension effects are explicitly incorporated in the context of ensemble averaging. Phase assemblages, mineral and melt compositions, and all other physical parameters of multi-phase systems are obtained through dynamic free-energy minimization procedures.

  8. 14 CFR 33.53 - Engine system and component tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine system and component tests. 33.53 Section 33.53 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.53 Engine system...

  9. 14 CFR 33.91 - Engine system and component tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine system and component tests. 33.91 Section 33.91 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.91 Engine system...

  10. 14 CFR 33.91 - Engine system and component tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine system and component tests. 33.91 Section 33.91 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.91 Engine system...

  11. 14 CFR 33.91 - Engine system and component tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine system and component tests. 33.91 Section 33.91 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.91 Engine system...

  12. 14 CFR 33.91 - Engine system and component tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine system and component tests. 33.91 Section 33.91 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.91 Engine system...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system. 866.5240 Section 866.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  14. 21 CFR 866.5240 - Complement components immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Complement components immunological test system. 866.5240 Section 866.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  15. Component Reliability Testing of Long-Life Sorption Cryocoolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, S.; Wu, J.; Karlmann, P.; Mirate, C.; Wade, L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes ongoing experiments characterizing the ability of critical sorption cryocooler components to achieve highly reliable operation for long-life space missions. Test data obtained over the past several years at JPL are entirely consistent with achieving ten year life for sorption compressors, electrical heaters, container materials, valves, and various sorbent materials suitable for driving 8 to 180 K refrigeration stages. Test results for various compressor systems are reported. Planned future tests necessary to gain a detailed understanding of the sensitivity of cooler performance and component life to operating constraints, design configurations, and fabrication, assembly and handling techniques, are also discussed.

  16. Influence of stationary components on unsteady flow in industrial centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonciani, L.; Terrinoni, L.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the characteristics of the onset and the growth of rotating nonuniform flow in a standard low specific speed stage, normally utilized in high pressure applications, in relation to change of stationary component geometry. Four configurations, differing only in the return channel and crossover geometry were tested on an atmospheric pressure open loop test rig. Experimental results make conspicious the effect of return channel geometry and give the possibility of shifting the unstable zone onset varying such geometry. An attempt was made to interpret the experimental results in the Emmons - Stenning's rotating stall theory.

  17. Lunar Dust Simulant in Mechanical Component Testing - Paradigm and Practicality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, T.; Street, K.; Abel, P.; Richmond, R.

    2008-01-01

    Due to the uniquely harsh lunar surface environment, terrestrial test activities may not adequately represent abrasive wear by lunar dust likely to be experienced in mechanical systems used in lunar exploration. Testing to identify potential moving mechanism problems has recently begun within the NASA Engineering and Safety Center Mechanical Systems Lunar Dust Assessment activity in coordination with the Exploration Technology and Development Program Dust Management Project, and these complimentary efforts will be described. Specific concerns about differences between simulant and lunar dust, and procedures for mechanical component testing with lunar simulant will be considered. In preparing for long term operations within a dusty lunar environment, the three fundamental approaches to keeping mechanical equipment functioning are dust avoidance, dust removal, and dust tolerance, with some combination of the three likely to be found in most engineering designs. Methods to exclude dust from contact with mechanical components would constitute mitigation by dust avoidance, so testing seals for dust exclusion efficacy as a function of particle size provides useful information for mechanism design. Dust of particle size less than a micron is not well documented for impact on lunar mechanical components. Therefore, creating a standardized lunar dust simulant in the particulate size range of ca. 0.1 to 1.0 micrometer is useful for testing effects on mechanical components such as bearings, gears, seals, bushings, and other moving mechanical assemblies. Approaching actual wear testing of mechanical components, it is beneficial to first establish relative wear rates caused by dust on commonly used mechanical component materials. The wear mode due to dust within mechanical components, such as abrasion caused by dust in grease(s), needs to be considered, as well as the effects of vacuum, lunar thermal cycle, and electrostatics on wear rate.

  18. A Small-Scale Safety Test for Initiation Components

    SciTech Connect

    Cutting, J; Chow, C; Chau, H; Hodgin, R; Lee, R

    2002-04-22

    We have developed a small-scale safety test for initiation train components. A low-cost test was needed to assess the response of initiation components to an abnormal shock environment and to detect changes in the sensitivity of initiation components as they age. The test uses a disk of Detasheet to transmit a shock through a PMMA barrier into a the test article. A schematic drawing of the fixture is shown. The 10-cm-diameter disk of 3-mm-thick Detasheet, initiated at its center by a RISI, RP detonator, produces a shock wave that is attenuated by a variable-thickness PMMA spacer (gap). Layers of metal and plastic above the test article and the material surrounding the test article may be chosen to mock up the environment of the test article at its location in a warhead. A metal plate at the bottom serves as a witness plate to record whether or not the test article detonated. For articles containing a small amount of explosive, it can be difficult to determine whether or not a detonation has occurred. In such cases, one can use a pressure transducer or laser velocimeter to detect the shock wave from the detonation of the article. The assembly is contained in a 10-cm-ID section of PVC pipe and fired in a containment vessel rated at 100 g. Test results are given for a hemispherical, exploding-bridgewire (EBW) detonator.

  19. Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, Monty; Ali, Muhammad; Ravens, Tom

    2013-12-06

    The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment – information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

  20. NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, T.

    2000-01-01

    Low cost access to space has been a long-time goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Fastrac engine program was begun at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop a 60,000-pound (60K) thrust, liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon (LOX/RP), gas generator-cycle booster engine for a fraction of the cost of similar engines in existence. To achieve this goal, off-the-shelf components and readily available materials and processes would have to be used. This paper will present the Fastrac gas generator (GG) design and the component level hot-fire test program and results. The Fastrac GG is a simple, 4-piece design that uses well-defined materials and processes for fabrication. Thirty-seven component level hot-fire tests were conducted at MSFC's component test stand #116 (TS116) during 1997 and 1998. The GG was operated at all expected operating ranges of the Fastrac engine. Some minor design changes were required to successfully complete the test program as development issues arose during the testing. The test program data results and conclusions determined that the Fastrac GG design was well on the way to meeting the requirements of NASA's X-34 Pathfinder Program that chose the Fastrac engine as its main propulsion system.

  1. Scaling of the streamwise velocity component in turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, J. F.; McKeon, B. J.; Jiang, W.; Smits, A. J.

    2004-06-01

    Statistics of the streamwise velocity component in fully developed pipe flow are examined for Reynolds numbers in the range 5.5 × 10(4) ≤ Re_D ≤ 5.7 × 10(6) . Probability density functions and their moments (up to sixth order) are presented and their scaling with Reynolds number is assessed. The second moment exhibits two maxima: the one in the viscous sublayer is Reynolds-number dependent while the other, near the lower edge of the log region, follows approximately the peak in Reynolds shear stress. Its locus has an approximate (R(+)(0.5)) dependence. This peak shows no sign of ‘saturation’, increasing indefinitely with Reynolds number. Scalings of the moments with wall friction velocity and (U_{cl}-/line{U}) are examined and the latter is shown to be a better velocity scale for the outer region, y/R > 0.35, but in two distinct Reynolds-number ranges, one when Re_D < 6 × 10(4) , the other when Re_D > 7 × 10(4) . Probability density functions do not show any universal behaviour, their higher moments showing small variations with distance from the wall outside the viscous sublayer. They are most nearly Gaussian in the overlap region. Their departures from Gaussian are assessed by examining the behaviour of the higher moments as functions of the lower ones. Spectra and the second moment are compared with empirical and theoretical scaling laws and some anomalies are apparent. In particular, even at the highest Reynolds number, the spectrum does not show a self-similar range of wavenumbers in which the spectral density is proportional to the inverse streamwise wavenumber. Thus such a range does not attract any special significance and does not involve a universal constant.

  2. NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, Tim; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This presentation consists of viewgraph which review the test program and the results of the tests for the Gas Generator (GG) component for the Fastrac Engine. Included are pictures of the Fastrac (MC-1) Engine and the GG, diagrams of the flight configuration, and schematics of the LOX, and the RP-1 systems and the injector assembly. The normal operating parameters are reviewed, as are the test instrumentation. Also shown are graphs of the hot gas temperature, and the test temperature profiles. The results are summarized.

  3. Relationship Between Storm Hydrograph Components and Subsurface Flow Processes in a Hilly Headwater Basin, Toyota, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimura, M.; Asai, K.; Takei, R.

    2001-05-01

    Temporal and spatial distribution of tracer elements and subsurface flow processes were investigated to study relationship between storm hydrograph components and behavior of subsurface water in a headwater catchment of Toyota Hill, Aichi prefecture, central Japan. The catchment has an area of 0.857 ha with an altitude of 60 to 100 m, and is underlain by granite. The soil depth revealed by sounding test ranges from 0.5 to 4.0 m. Rain, stream, soil and ground waters were sampled once in a week, and the stream water was sampled at 5 to 60 minute intervals during rainstorms. The pressure head of subsurface water was monitored using tensiometers and piezometers nests, and the stream flow was monitored using V-notch weir. The stable isotopic ratios of deuterium and oxygen 18 and inorganic ion concentrations were determined on all water samples. The oxygen 18 isotopic ratio in stream water decreased with rainfall during the rainstorms. The ratio of event water component to the total runoff water at the peak discharge ranged from 16 to 92 %, and the event water ratio correlated with the peak discharge rate and rainfall intensity. The tesiometric data showed that the shallow subsurface water with low isotopic ratios at the lower slope discharged directly to the stream during the heavy rainstorms. The shallow subsurface flow at the lower slope and overland flow on the raiparian zone contributed much to the stream water chemistry during heavy rainstorms.

  4. Scaled Rocket Testing in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrene, Aaron; MacLean, Matthew; Carr, Zakary; Parker, Ron; Holden, Michael; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) uses four clustered liquid rocket engines along with two solid rocket boosters. The interaction between all six rocket exhaust plumes will produce a complex and severe thermal environment in the base of the vehicle. This work focuses on a recent 2% scale, hot-fire SLS base heating test. These base heating tests are short-duration tests executed with chamber pressures near the full-scale values with gaseous hydrogen/oxygen engines and RSRMV analogous solid propellant motors. The LENS II shock tunnel/Ludwieg tube tunnel was used at or near flight duplicated conditions up to Mach 5. Model development was strongly based on the Space Shuttle base heating tests with several improvements including doubling of the maximum chamber pressures and duplication of freestream conditions. Detailed base heating results are outside of the scope of the current work, rather test methodology and techniques are presented along with broader applicability toward scaled rocket testing in supersonic and hypersonic flow.

  5. Evaluation of Integrated High Temperature Component Testing Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Rafael Soto; David Duncan; Vincent Tonc

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the requirements for a large-scale component test capability to support the development of advanced nuclear reactor technology and their adaptation to commercial applications that advance U.S. energy economy, reliability, and security and reduce carbon emissions.

  6. 49 CFR 195.305 - Testing of components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Testing of components. 195.305 Section 195.305 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS...

  7. Design and Testing of Improved Spacesuit Shielding Components

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, J.; Ferl, J.; Wilson, J.W.; Clowdsley, M.S.; DeAngelis, G.; Tweed, J.; Zeitlin, C.J.

    2002-05-08

    In prior studies of the current Shuttle Spacesuit (SSA), where basic fabric lay-ups were tested for shielding capabilities, it was found that the fabric portions of the suit give far less protection than previously estimated due to porosity and non-uniformity of fabric and LCVG components. In addition, overall material transmission properties were less than optimum. A number of alternate approaches are being tested to provide more uniform coverage and to use more efficient materials. We will discuss in this paper, recent testing of new material lay-ups/configurations for possible use in future spacesuit designs.

  8. Frequency versus time domain immunity testing of Smart Grid components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronwald, F.

    2014-11-01

    Smart Grid components often are subject to considerable conducted current disturbances in the frequency range 2-150 kHz and, as a consequence, it is necessary to provide reliable immunity test methods. The relevant basic standard IEC 61000-4-19 that is currently under discussion focusses on frequency domain test methods. It is remarked in this contribution that in the context of frequency domain testing the chosen frequency spacing is related to the resonance response of the system under test which, in turn, is characterized in terms of resonance frequencies and quality factors. These notions apply well to physical system but it is pointed out by the example of an actual smart meter immunity test that smart grid components may exhibit susceptibilities that do not necessarily follow a resonance pattern and, additionally, can be narrowband. As a consequence it is suggested to supplement the present frequency domain test methods by time domain tests which utilize damped sinusoidal excitations with corresponding spectra that properly cover the frequency range 2-150 kHz, as exemplified by the military standard MIL-STD-461.

  9. Air flow testing on aerodynamic truck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This photograph illustrates a standard passenger van modified at the Dryden Flight Research Center to investigate the aerodynamics of trucks. The resulting vehicle--re-fashioned with sheet metal--resembled a motor home, with rounded vertical corners on the vehicle's front and rear sections. For subsequent tests, researchers installed a 'boat tail' structure, shown in the photograph. During a decade spanning the 1970s and 1980s, Dryden researchers conducted tests to determine the extent to which adjustments in the shape of trucks reduced aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the tests, the vehicle's sides were fitted with tufts, or strings, that showed air flow. The investigators concluded that rounding the vertical corners front and rear reduced drag by 40 percent, yet decreased the vehicle's internal volume by only 1.3 percent. Rounding both the vertical and horizontal corners cut drag by 54 percent, resulting in a three percent loss of internal volume. A second group of tests added a faired underbody and a boat tail, the latter feature resulting in drag reduction of about 15 percent.

  10. A simulated lightning effects test facility for testing live and inert missiles and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Jeffery D.; Knaur, James A.; Moore, Truman W., Jr.; Shumpert, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Details of a simulated lightning effects test facility for testing live and inert missiles, motors, and explosive components are described. The test facility is designed to simulate the high current, continuing current, and high rate-of-rise current components of an idealized direct strike lightning waveform. The Lightning Test Facility was in operation since May, 1988, and consists of: 3 separate capacitor banks used to produce the lightning test components; a permanently fixed large steel safety cage for retaining the item under test (should it be ignited during testing); an earth covered bunker housing the control/equipment room; a charge/discharge building containing the charging/discharging switching; a remotely located blockhouse from which the test personnel control hazardous testing; and interconnecting cables.

  11. Allergen Component Testing in the Diagnosis of Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Schussler, Edith; Kattan, Jacob

    2015-09-01

    IgE-mediated food allergies are an important public health problem, affecting 5 % of adults and 8 % of children, with numerous studies indicating that the prevalence is increasing. Food allergic reactions can range in severity from mild to severe and life threatening. Accurate diagnosis of food allergy is necessary not only to provide appropriate and potentially life-saving preventive measures but also to prevent unwarranted dietary restrictions. The diagnosis of food allergy has traditionally been based on clinical history and food specific IgE (sIgE) testing, including skin prick testing (SPT), serum tests, or both. These tests tend to be extremely sensitive, but positive test results to foods that are tolerated are common. Studies of allergen component-resolved diagnostics (CRD) show that adjuvant use of this modality may provide a more accurate assessment in the diagnosis of food allergy, though the reported benefits are questionable for a number of major allergens. Furthermore, diagnostic cutoff values have been difficult to determine for allergens where component testing has been demonstrated to be beneficial.

  12. Universal Verification Methodology Based Register Test Automation Flow.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jae Hun; Cho, Yong Kwan; Park, Sun Kyu

    2016-05-01

    In today's SoC design, the number of registers has been increased along with complexity of hardware blocks. Register validation is a time-consuming and error-pron task. Therefore, we need an efficient way to perform verification with less effort in shorter time. In this work, we suggest register test automation flow based UVM (Universal Verification Methodology). UVM provides a standard methodology, called a register model, to facilitate stimulus generation and functional checking of registers. However, it is not easy for designers to create register models for their functional blocks or integrate models in test-bench environment because it requires knowledge of SystemVerilog and UVM libraries. For the creation of register models, many commercial tools support a register model generation from register specification described in IP-XACT, but it is time-consuming to describe register specification in IP-XACT format. For easy creation of register model, we propose spreadsheet-based register template which is translated to IP-XACT description, from which register models can be easily generated using commercial tools. On the other hand, we also automate all the steps involved integrating test-bench and generating test-cases, so that designers may use register model without detailed knowledge of UVM or SystemVerilog. This automation flow involves generating and connecting test-bench components (e.g., driver, checker, bus adaptor, etc.) and writing test sequence for each type of register test-case. With the proposed flow, designers can save considerable amount of time to verify functionality of registers. PMID:27483924

  13. Flow-induced vibration and instability of some nuclear-reactor-system components. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1983-01-01

    The high-velocity coolant flowing through a reactor system component is a source of energy that can induce component vibration and instability. In fact, many reactor components have suffered from excessive vibration and/or dynamic instability. The potential for detrimental flow-induced vibration makes it necessary that design engineers give detailed considerations to the flow-induced vibration problems. Flow-induced-vibration studies have been performed in many countries. Significant progress has been made in understanding the different phenomena and development of design guidelines to avoid damaging vibration. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the recent progress in several selected areas, to discuss some new results and to indentify future research needs. Specifically, the following areas will be presented: examples of flow-induced-vibration problems in reactor components; excitation mechanisms and component response characteristics; instability mechanisms and stability criteria; design considerations; and future research needs.

  14. Laser damage testing of optical components under cryogenic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulehla, Jindrich; Pokorný, Pavel; Lazar, Josef

    2012-11-01

    In this contribution we present a technology for deposition and testing of interference coatings for optical components designed to operate in power pulsed lasers. The aim of the technology is to prepare components for high power laser facilities such as ELI (Extreme Light Infrastructure) or HiLASE. ELI is a part of the European plan to build a new generation of large research facilities selected by the European Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). These facilities rely on the use of diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSL). The choice of the material for the lasers' optical components is critical. Some of the most important properties include the ability to be antireflection and high reflection coated to reduce the energy losses and increase the overall efficiency. As large amounts of heat need to be dissipated during laser operation, cryogenic cooling is necessary. The conducted experiments served as preliminary tests of laser damage threshold measurement methodology that we plan to use in the future. We designed a special apparatus consisting of a vacuum chamber and a cooling system. The samples were placed into the vacuum chamber which was evacuated and then the samples were cooled down to approximately 120K and illuminated by a pulsed laser. Pulse duration was in the nanosecond region. Multiple test sites on the sample's surface were used for different laser pulse energies. We used optical and electron microscopy and spectrophotometer measurements for coating investigation after the conducted experiments.

  15. Laser damage testing of optical components under cryogenic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulehla, Jindřich; Pokorný, Pavel; Lazar, Josef

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution we present a technology for deposition and testing of interference coatings for optical components designed to operate in power pulsed lasers. The aim of the technology is to prepare components for high power laser facilities such as ELI (Extreme Light Infrastructure) or HiLASE. ELI is a part of the Eropean plan to build a new generation of large research facilities selected by the the Eropean Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). These facilities rely on the use of diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSL). The choice of the material or the lasers' optical components is critical. Some of the most important properties include the ability to be antireflection and high reflection coated to reduce the energy losses and increase the overall efficiency. As large amounts of hear need to be dissipated during laser operation, cryogenic cooling is necessary. The conducted experiments served as preliminary tests of laser damage threshold measurement methodology that we plan to use in the future. We designed a special apparatus consistion of a vacuum chamber an a cooling system. The samples were placed into the vacuum chamber which was evacuated and them the samples were cooled down to approximately 120K and illuminated by a pulsed laser. Pulse duration was in the nanosecond region. Multiple test sites on the sample's surface were used for different laser pulse energies. We used optical and electron microscopy and spectrophotometer measurements for coating investigation after the conducted experiments.

  16. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Component Verification Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Pinero, Luis R.; Sovey, James S.

    2009-01-01

    Component testing is a critical facet of the comprehensive thruster life validation strategy devised by the NASA s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) program. Component testing to-date has consisted of long-duration high voltage propellant isolator and high-cycle heater life validation testing. The high voltage propellant isolator, a heritage design, will be operated under different environmental condition in the NEXT ion thruster requiring verification testing. The life test of two NEXT isolators was initiated with comparable voltage and pressure conditions with a higher temperature than measured for the NEXT prototype-model thruster. To date the NEXT isolators have accumulated 18,300 h of operation. Measurements indicate a negligible increase in leakage current over the testing duration to date. NEXT 1/2 in. heaters, whose manufacturing and control processes have heritage, were selected for verification testing based upon the change in physical dimensions resulting in a higher operating voltage as well as potential differences in thermal environment. The heater fabrication processes, developed for the International Space Station (ISS) plasma contactor hollow cathode assembly, were utilized with modification of heater dimensions to accommodate a larger cathode. Cyclic testing of five 1/22 in. diameter heaters was initiated to validate these modified fabrication processes while retaining high reliability heaters. To date two of the heaters have been cycled to 10,000 cycles and suspended to preserve hardware. Three of the heaters have been cycled to failure giving a B10 life of 12,615 cycles, approximately 6,000 more cycles than the established qualification B10 life of the ISS plasma contactor heaters.

  17. Tutorial on Quantification of Differences between Single- and Two-Component Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delil, A. A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Single-component two-phase systems are envisaged for aerospace thermal control applications: Mechanically Pumped Loops, Vapour Pressure Driven Loops, Capillary Pumped Loops and Loop Heat Pipes. Thermal control applications are foreseen in different gravity environments: Micro-g, reduced-g for Mars or Moon bases, 1-g during terrestrial testing, and hyper-g in rotating spacecraft, during combat aircraft manoeuvres and in systems for outer planets. In the evaporator, adiabatic line and condenser sections of such single-component two-phase systems, the fluid is a mixture of the working liquid (for example ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethanol, or other refrigerants, etc.) and its saturated vapour. Results of two-phase two-component flow and heat transfer research (pertaining to liquid-gas mixtures, e.g. water/air, or argon or helium) are often applied to support research on flow and heat transfer in two-phase single-component systems. The first part of the tutorial updates the contents of two earlier tutorials, discussing various aerospace-related two-phase flow and heat transfer research. It deals with the different pressure gradient constituents of the total pressure gradient, with flow regime mapping (including evaporating and condensing flow trajectories in the flow pattern maps), with adiabatic flow and flashing, and with thermal-gravitational scaling issues. The remaining part of the tutorial qualitatively and quantitatively determines the differences between single- and two-component systems: Two systems that physically look similar and close, but in essence are fully different. It was already elucidated earlier that, though there is a certain degree of commonality, the differences will be anything but negligible, in many cases. These differences (quantified by some examples) illustrates how careful one shall be in interpreting data resulting from two-phase two-component simulations or experiments, for the development of single-component two-phase thermal control

  18. Here are considerations in evaluating Russian flow tests, reservoir performance

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, J.A. ); Connelly, W. )

    1992-12-28

    Flow test data contain some of the most important information for evaluation of a field. As part of the Russian evaluation process, research wells are extensively tested. Three types of well tests are conducted: drillstem tests, production flow test (if the well flows to the surface), and rising head test (if the well will not flow to the surface). Drillstem tests are run in the open hole across potential pay zones. After casing is run, wells are flow tested with multiple-rate tests, and the bottom hole pressures are recorded during the build-up periods. Results of the tests are summarized in test reports, on net pay maps, and on logs. The results from these tests include reservoir pressure, reservoir temperature, formation permeability, productivity index, and damage ratio. This paper reports that this information provides the basis for estimating production capacities and future reservoirs.

  19. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  20. Counter-Flow Cooling Tower Test Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Lukáš; Nožička, Jiří

    2014-03-01

    The article contains a design of a functional experimental model of a cross-flow mechanical draft cooling tower and the results and outcomes of measurements. This device is primarily used for measuring performance characteristics of cooling fills, but with a simple rebuild, it can be used for measuring other thermodynamic processes that take part in so-called wet cooling. The main advantages of the particular test cell lie in the accuracy, size, and the possibility of changing the water distribution level. This feature is very useful for measurements of fills of different heights without the influence of the spray and rain zone. The functionality of this test cell has been verified experimentally during assembly, and data from the measurement of common film cooling fills have been compared against the results taken from another experimental line. For the purpose of evaluating the data gathered, computational scripts were created in the MATLAB numerical computing environment. The first script is for exact calculation of the thermal balance of the model, and the second is for determining Merkel's number via Chebyshev's method.

  1. Field Testing of Nano-PCM Enhanced Building Envelope Components

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field-testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility at Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections, which were separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCM-enhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure, in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheets-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side, which served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Further, numerical modeling of

  2. Test-Retest Reliability of Component Process Variables Within the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Steven Paul; Scott, J. Cobb; Conover, Emily; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Heaton, Robert K.; Grant, Igor

    2005-01-01

    Emerging data support the construct validity of component process variables of learning and memory within the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R; Brandt & Benedict, 2001); however, the test-retest reliabilities of such measures are heretofore largely unknown. This study reveals generally modest-to-low 1-year test-retest stability for…

  3. Free-piston Stirling component test power converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dochat, George; Dhar, Manmohan

    1991-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been evaluating free-piston Stirling power converters (FPSPCs) for use on a wide variety of space missions. They provide high reliability, long life, and efficient operation and can be coupled with all potential heat sources, various heat input and heat rejection systems, and various power management and distribution systems. FPSPCs can compete favorably with alternative power conversion systems over a range of hundreds of watts to megawatts. Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) is developing FPSPC technology under contract to NASA Lewis Research Center and will demonstrate this technology in two full-scale power converters operating at space temperature conditions. The testing of the first of these, the component test power converter (CTPC), was initiated in Spring 1991 to evaluate mechanical operation at space operating temperatures. The CTPC design, hardware fabrication, and initial test results are reviewed.

  4. Purinergic and cholinergic components of bladder contractility and flow.

    PubMed

    Theobald, R J

    1995-01-01

    The role of ATP as a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in the urinary tract has been the subject of much study, particularly whether ATP has a functional role in producing urine flow. Recent studies suggested significant species variation, specifically a variation between cat and other species. This study was performed to determine the in vivo response of cat urinary bladder to pelvic nerve stimulation (PNS) and to the exogenous administration of cholinergic and purinergic agents. In anesthetized cats, bladder contractions and fluid expulsion was measured in response to PNS and to the exogenous administration of cholinergic and purinergic agents. Fluid was instilled into the bladder and any fluid expelled by bladder contractions induced by PNS or exogenous agents was collected in a beaker. The volume was measured in a graduated cylinder and recorded. PNS, carbachol and APPCP produced sustained contractions with significant expulsion of fluid. ATP, ACh and hypogastric nerve stimulation did not produce any significant expulsion of fluid. Atropine, a cholinergic antagonist, inhibited PNS contractions and fluid expulsion with no effect on purinergic actions. There was a significant relationship between the magnitude of the contraction, duration of the contractions and volume of fluid expelled. The data and information from other studies, strongly suggests a functional role for ATP as a cotransmitter in the lower urinary tract different from ACh's role. ATP stimulation of a specific purinergic receptor plays a role in initiation of bladder contractions and perhaps in the initiation of urine flow from the bladder. ACh's role is functionally different and appears to be more involved in maintenance of contractile activity and flow. PMID:7830505

  5. 46 CFR 162.018-7 - Flow rating tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Safety Relief Valves, Liquefied Compressed Gas § 162.018-7 Flow rating tests. (a) Flow rating of valves shall be conducted in accordance with UG-131 of section VIII of... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flow rating tests. 162.018-7 Section 162.018-7...

  6. 46 CFR 162.018-7 - Flow rating tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Safety Relief Valves, Liquefied Compressed Gas § 162.018-7 Flow rating tests. (a) Flow rating of valves shall be conducted in accordance with UG-131 of section VIII of... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flow rating tests. 162.018-7 Section 162.018-7...

  7. Facility for cold flow testing of solid rocket motor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchus, D. L.; Hill, O. E.; Whitesides, R. Harold

    1992-02-01

    A new cold flow test facility was designed and constructed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for the purpose of characterizing the flow field in the port and nozzle of solid propellant rocket motors (SRM's). A National Advisory Committee was established to include representatives from industry, government agencies, and universities to guide the establishment of design and instrumentation requirements for the new facility. This facility design includes the basic components of air storage tanks, heater, submicron filter, quiet control valve, venturi, model inlet plenum chamber, solid rocket motor (SRM) model, exhaust diffuser, and exhaust silencer. The facility was designed to accommodate a wide range of motor types and sizes from small tactical motors to large space launch boosters. This facility has the unique capability of testing ten percent scale models of large boosters such as the new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM), at full scale motor Reynolds numbers. Previous investigators have established the validity of studying basic features of solid rocket motor development programs include the acquisition of data to (1) directly evaluate and optimize the design configuration of the propellant grain, insulation, and nozzle; and (2) provide data for validation of the computational fluid dynamics, (CFD), analysis codes and the performance analysis codes. A facility checkout model was designed, constructed, and utilized to evaluate the performance characteristics of the new facility. This model consists of a cylindrical chamber and converging/diverging nozzle with appropriate manifolding to connect it to the facility air supply. It was designed using chamber and nozzle dimensions to simulate the flow in a 10 percent scale model of the ASRM. The checkout model was recently tested over the entire range of facility flow conditions which include flow rates from 9.07 to 145 kg/sec (20 to 320 Ibm/sec) and supply pressure from 5.17 x 10 exp 5 to 8.27 x 10 exp 6 Pa. The

  8. Single Component Sorption-Desorption Test Experimental Design Approach Discussions

    SciTech Connect

    Phil WInston

    2011-09-01

    A task was identified within the fission-product-transport work package to develop a path forward for doing testing to determine behavior of volatile fission products behavior and to engage members of the NGNP community to advise and dissent on the approach. The following document is a summary of the discussions and the specific approaches suggested for components of the testing. Included in the summary isare the minutes of the conference call that was held with INL and external interested parties to elicit comments on the approaches brought forward by the INL participants. The conclusion was that an initial non-radioactive, single component test will be useful to establish the limits of currently available chemical detection methods, and to evaluated source-dispersion uniformity. In parallel, development of a real-time low-concentration monitoring method is believed to be useful in detecting rapid dispersion as well as desorption phenomena. Ultimately, the test cycle is expected to progress to the use of radio-traced species, simply because this method will allow the lowest possible detection limits. The consensus of the conference call was that there is no need for an in-core test because the duct and heat exchanger surfaces that will be the sorption target will be outside the main neutron flux and will not be affected by irradiation. Participants in the discussion and contributors to the INL approach were Jeffrey Berg, Pattrick Calderoni, Gary Groenewold, Paul Humrickhouse, Brad Merrill, and Phil Winston. Participants from outside the INL included David Hanson of General Atomics, Todd Allen, Tyler Gerczak, and Izabela Szlufarska of the University of Wisconsin, Gary Was, of the University of Michigan, Sudarshan Loyalka and Tushar Ghosh of the University of Missouri, and Robert Morris of Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  9. Correlation of Test Data from Some NIF Small Optical Components

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; McBurney, M; Eickelberg, W K; Williams, W H; Thomas, M D

    2001-06-12

    The NIF injection laser system requires over 8000 precision optical components. Two special requirements for such optics are wavefront and laser damage threshold. Wavefront gradient is an important specification on the NIF ILS optics. The gradient affects the spot size and, in the second order, the contrast ratio of the laser beam. Wavefront errors are specified in terms of peak-to-valley, rms, and rms gradient, with filtering requirements. Typical values are lambda/8 PV, lambda/30 rms, and lambda/30/cm rms gradient determined after filtering for spatial periods greater than 2 mm. One objective of this study is to determine whether commercial software supplied with common phase measuring interferometers can filter, perform the gradient analysis, and produce numbers comparable to that by CVOS, the LLNL wavefront analysis application. Laser survivability of optics is another important specification for the operational longevity of the laser system. Another objective of this study is to find alternate laser damage test facilities. The addition of non-NIF testing would allow coating suppliers to optimize their processes according to their test plans and NIF integrators to validate the coatings from their sub-tiered suppliers. The maximum level required for anti-reflective, 45-degree high reflector, and polarizer coatings are 20, 30, and 5 J/cm{sup 2} (1064 nm, 3 ns pulse-width), respectively. The damage threshold correlation between a common set of samples tested by LLNL and a commercial test service is given.

  10. Seawater test results of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) components

    SciTech Connect

    Zangrando, F.; Bharathan, D.; Link, H. ); Panchal, C.B. )

    1994-01-01

    Key components of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion systems--the flash evaporator, mist eliminator, passive predeaerator, two surface condenser stages, and two direct-contact condenser stages--have been tested using seawater. These components operate at lower steam pressures and higher inlet noncondensable gas concentrations than do conventional power plant heat exchangers. The rate of heat exchanged between the evaporator and the condenser is on the order of 1.25MW-thermal, requiring a warm seawater flow of about 0.1 m[sup 3]/s; the cold seawater flow is on the order of half the warm water flow. In addition to characterizing the performance of the various components, the system has produced potable water from condensation of the steam produced in the evaporator. The information obtained in these tests is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which net power production is expected to be demonstrate for the first time using OC-OTEC technology.

  11. Corrosion erosion test of SS316 in flowing Pb Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Kurata, Y.; Saito, S.; Futakawa, M.; Sasa, T.; Oigawa, H.; Wakai, E.; Miura, K.

    2003-05-01

    Corrosion tests of austenitic stainless tube were done under flowing Pb-Bi conditions for 3000 h at 450 °C. Specimens were 316SS produced as a tubing form with 13.8 mm outer diameter, 2 mm thickness and 40 cm length. During operation, maximum temperature, temperature difference and flow velocity of Pb-Bi at the specimen were kept at 450, 50 °C, and 1 m/s, respectively. After the test, specimen and components of the loop were cut and examined by optical microscope, SEM, EDX, WDX and X-ray diffraction. Pb-Bi adhered on the surface of the specimen even after Pb-Bi was drained out to the storage tank from the circulating loop. Results differed from a stagnant corrosion test in that the specimen surface became rough and the corrosion rate was maximally 0.1 mm/3000 h. Mass transfer from the high temperature to the lower temperature area was observed: crystals of Fe-Cr were found on the tube surface in the low-temperature region. The sizes of crystals varied from 0.1 to 0.2 mm. The depositing crystals were ferrite grains and the chemical composition ratio (mass%) of Fe to Cr was 9:1.

  12. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  13. Analysis of Flow Angularity Repeatability Tests in the NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    An extensive data base of flow angularity repeatability measurements from four NTF check standard model tests is analyzed for statistical consistency and to characterize the results for prediction of angle-of-attack uncertainty for customer tests. A procedure for quality assurance for flow angularity measurements during customer tests is also presented. The efficacy of the procedure is tested using results from a customer test.

  14. Plutonium immobilization ceramic feed batching component test report

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.A.

    1999-10-04

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with high level waste glass for permanent storage. Ceramic feed batching (CFB) is one of the first process steps involved with first stage plutonium immobilization. The CFB step will blend plutonium oxide powder before it is combined with other materials to make pucks. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization CFB process preliminary concept (including a process block diagram), batch splitting component test results, CFB development areas, and FY 1999 and 2000 CFB program milestones.

  15. NASTRAN Modeling of Flight Test Components for UH-60A Airloads Program Test Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idosor, Florentino R.; Seible, Frieder

    1993-01-01

    Based upon the recommendations of the UH-60A Airloads Program Review Committee, work towards a NASTRAN remodeling effort has been conducted. This effort modeled and added the necessary structural/mass components to the existing UH-60A baseline NASTRAN model to reflect the addition of flight test components currently in place on the UH-60A Airloads Program Test Configuration used in NASA-Ames Research Center's Modern Technology Rotor Airloads Program. These components include necessary flight hardware such as instrument booms, movable ballast cart, equipment mounting racks, etc. Recent modeling revisions have also been included in the analyses to reflect the inclusion of new and updated primary and secondary structural components (i.e., tail rotor shaft service cover, tail rotor pylon) and improvements to the existing finite element mesh (i.e., revisions of material property estimates). Mode frequency and shape results have shown that components such as the Trimmable Ballast System baseplate and its respective payload ballast have caused a significant frequency change in a limited number of modes while only small percent changes in mode frequency are brought about with the addition of the other MTRAP flight components. With the addition of the MTRAP flight components, update of the primary and secondary structural model, and imposition of the final MTRAP weight distribution, modal results are computed representative of the 'best' model presently available.

  16. An analysis method for multi-component airfoils in separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. M.; Duorak, F. A.; Maskew, B.

    1980-01-01

    The multi-component airfoil program (Langley-MCARF) for attached flow is modified to accept the free vortex sheet separation-flow model program (Analytical Methods, Inc.-CLMAX). The viscous effects are incorporated into the calculation by representing the boundary layer displacement thickness with an appropriate source distribution. The separation flow model incorporated into MCARF was applied to single component airfoils. Calculated pressure distributions for angles of attack up to the stall are in close agreement with experimental measurements. Even at higher angles of attack beyond the stall, correct trends of separation, decrease in lift coefficients, and increase in pitching moment coefficients are predicted.

  17. Development and testing of a 20-kHz component test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.; Brush, Andrew S.; Sundberg, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    A history of the General Dynamics Space Systems Division 20 kHz Breadboard is presented including its current configuration and its role in the Space Station Freedom (SSF) program. Highlights and results are presented on a series of tests conducted on the 20 kHz Breadboard. The first test presented is the 20 kHz Breadboard Acceptance test. This test verified the operation of the delivered Breadboard and also characterized the main components of the system. Next, an indepth efficiency testing effort is presented. The tests attempted to apportion all the power losses in the 20 kHz Breadboard Main Invert Units. Distortion test data is presented showing the distortion characteristics of a Mapham inverter. Lastly, current work on the 20 kHz Breadboard is presented including Main Inverter Unit paralleling tests. Conclusions are summarized and references given.

  18. Additive Manufacturing Thermal Performance Testing of Single Channel GRCop-84 SLM Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Chance P.; Cross, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The surface finish found on components manufactured by sinter laser manufacturing (SLM) is rougher (0.013 - 0.0006 inches) than parts made using traditional fabrication methods. Internal features and passages built into SLM components do not readily allow for roughness reduction processes. Alternatively, engineering literature suggests that the roughness of a surface can enhance thermal performance within a pressure drop regime. To further investigate the thermal performance of SLM fabricated pieces, several GRCop-84 SLM single channel components were tested using a thermal conduction rig at MSFC. A 20 kW power source running at 25% duty cycle and 25% power level applied heat to each component while varying water flow rates between 2.1 - 6.2 gallons/min (GPM) at a supply pressure of 550 to 700 psi. Each test was allowed to reach quasi-steady state conditions where pressure, temperature, and thermal imaging data were recorded. Presented in this work are the heat transfer responses compared to a traditional machined OHFC Copper test section. An analytical thermal model was constructed to anchor theoretical models with the empirical data.

  19. Static Feed Water Electrolysis Subsystem Testing and Component Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koszenski, E. P.; Schubert, F. H.; Burke, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    A program was carried out to develop and test advanced electrochemical cells/modules and critical electromechanical components for a static feed (alkaline electrolyte) water electrolysis oxygen generation subsystem. The accomplishments were refurbishment of a previously developed subsystem and successful demonstration for a total of 2980 hours of normal operation; achievement of sustained one-person level oxygen generation performance with state-of-the-art cell voltages averaging 1.61 V at 191 ASF for an operating temperature of 128F (equivalent to 1.51V when normalized to 180F); endurance testing and demonstration of reliable performance of the three-fluid pressure controller for 8650 hours; design and development of a fluid control assembly for this subsystem and demonstration of its performance; development and demonstration at the single cell and module levels of a unitized core composite cell that provides expanded differential pressure tolerance capability; fabrication and evaluation of a feed water electrolyte elimination five-cell module; and successful demonstration of an electrolysis module pressurization technique that can be used in place of nitrogen gas during the standby mode of operation to maintain system pressure and differential pressures.

  20. Development of Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment on the International Space Station- Normal and Low Gravity Flow Boiling Experiment Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hall, Nancy R.; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Wagner, James D.; May, Rochelle L.; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kolacz, John S.; Butcher, Robert L.; Frankenfield, Bruce J.; Mudawar, Issam; Konichi, Chris; Hyounsoon, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Flow boiling and condensation have been identified as two key mechanisms for heat transport that are vital for achieving weight and volume reduction as well as performance enhancement in future space systems. Since inertia driven flows are demanding on power usage, lower flows are desirable. However, in microgravity, lower flows are dominated by forces other than inertia (like the capillary force). It is of paramount interest to investigate limits of low flows beyond which the flow is inertial enough to be gravity independent. One of the objectives of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Flight Experiment sets to investigate these limits for flow boiling and condensation. A two-phase flow loop consisting of a Flow Boiling Module and two Condensation Modules has been developed to experimentally study flow boiling condensation heat transfer in the reduced gravity environment provided by the reduced gravity platform. This effort supports the development of a flow boiling and condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS). The closed loop test facility is designed to deliver the test fluid, FC-72 to the inlet of any one of the test modules at specified thermodynamic and flow conditions. The zero-g-aircraft tests will provide subcooled and saturated flow boiling critical heat flux and flow condensation heat transfer data over wide range of flow velocities. Additionally, these tests will verify the performance of all gravity sensitive components, such as evaporator, condenser and accumulator associated with the two-phase flow loop. We will present in this paper the breadboard development and testing results which consist of detailed performance evaluation of the heater and condenser combination in reduced and normal gravity. We will also present the design of the reduced gravity aircraft rack and the results of the ground flow boiling heat transfer testing performed with the Flow Boiling Module that is designed to investigate flow boiling heat transfer and

  1. Oscillating-flow regenerator test rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. G.; Gedeon, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes work performed in setting up and performing tests on a regenerator test rig. An earlier status report presented test results, together with heat transfer correlations, for four regenerator samples (two woven screen samples and two felt metal samples). Lessons learned from this testing led to improvements to the experimental setup, mainly instrumentation as well as to the test procedure. Given funding and time constraints for this project it was decided to complete as much testing as possible while the rig was set up and operational, and to forego final data reduction and analysis until later. Additional testing was performed on several of the previously tested samples as well an on five newly fabricated samples. The following report is a summary of the work performed at OU, with many of the final test results included in raw data form.

  2. Inert gas electric heater for elevated temperature testing of small propulsion components

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.C.; Lanning, R.K.; Evans, M.C.; Barabas, N.J.

    1992-06-25

    An electric heater for inert gas has been developed to enable safe, nontoxic, indoor, low cost testing of miniature propulsion components which operate on warm gas. High pressure helium regulated to 7 MPa (1000 psi) is passed through in 8-kW electric heating element to raise its temperature to 700{degree}C (1300 {degree}F) at mass flow rates up to 2 grams/sec. The pressure and temperature are independently adjustable to lower values, and the temperature controller rapidly varies the electric power in response to changes in flow rate, so that pulsed-flow as well as be tested. The heating element is a 3.2 mm (1/8 inch) diameter nickel alloy tube, which carries the helium internally and up to 80 amperes of electric current in its wall. A transparent polycarbonate safety shield ensures personnel safety while permitting direct visual and auditory observations. Digital displays of time, pressure, and temperatures are adjacent to the test hardware, to facillitate realtime interpretation of test results and video documentation. Equations for pressure drop, heat transfer, electrical resistance, stress, and thermal response time are presented to facillitate designing similar systems.

  3. Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

  4. Capillary flow solderability test for printed wiring boards

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Yost, F.G.; Hernandez, C.L.; Sackinger, S.J.

    1994-04-01

    This report describes a new technique for evaluating capillary flow solderability on printed circuit boards. The test involves the flow of molten solder from a pad onto different-sized conductor lines. It simulates the spreading dynamics of either plated-through-hole (PTH) or surface mount technology (SMT) soldering. A standard procedure has been developed for the test. Preliminary experiments were conducted and the results demonstrate test feasibility. Test procedures and results are presented in this report.

  5. NASA Flight Tests Explore Supersonic Laminar Flow

    NASA Video Gallery

    In partnership with Aerion Corporation of Reno, Nevada, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center’s tested supersonic airflow over a small experimental airfoil design on its F-15B Test Bed aircraft du...

  6. Conservative numerical simulation of multi-component transport in two-dimensional unsteady shallow water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, J.; García-Navarro, P.; Burguete, J.

    2009-08-01

    An explicit finite volume model to simulate two-dimensional shallow water flow with multi-component transport is presented. The governing system of coupled conservation laws demands numerical techniques to avoid unrealistic values of the transported scalars that cannot be avoided by decreasing the size of the time step. The presence of non conservative products such as bed slope and friction terms, and other source terms like diffusion and reaction, can make necessary the reduction of the time step given by the Courant number. A suitable flux difference redistribution that prevents instability and ensures conservation at all times is used to deal with the non-conservative terms and becomes necessary in cases of transient boundaries over dry bed. The resulting method belongs to the category of well-balanced Roe schemes and is able to handle steady cases with flow in motion. Test cases with exact solution, including transient boundaries, bed slope, friction, and reaction terms are used to validate the numerical scheme. Laboratory experiments are used to validate the techniques when dealing with complex systems as the κ-ɛ model. The results of the proposed numerical schemes are compared with the ones obtained when using uncoupled formulations.

  7. Detecting Combustion and Flow Features In Situ Using Principal Component Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David; Grout, Ray W.; Fabian, Nathan D.; Bennett, Janine Camille

    2009-03-01

    This report presents progress on identifying and classifying features involving combustion in turbulent flow using principal component analysis (PCA) and k-means clustering using an in situ analysis framework. We describe a process for extracting temporally- and spatially-varying information from the simulation, classifying the information, and then applying the classification algorithm to either other portions of the simulation not used for training the classifier or further simulations. Because the regions classified as being of interest take up a small portion of the overall simulation domain, it will consume fewer resources to perform further analysis or save these regions at a higher fidelity than previously possible. The implementation of this process is partially complete and results obtained from PCA of test data is presented that indicates the process may have merit: the basis vectors that PCA provides are significantly different in regions where combustion is occurring and even when all 21 species of a lifted flame simulation are correlated the computational cost of PCA is minimal. What remains to be determined is whether k-means (or other) clustering techniques will be able to identify combined combustion and flow features with an accuracy that makes further characterization of these regions feasible and meaningful.

  8. Assessment of the National Transonic Facility for Laminar Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Jeffrey D.; Sutanto, Mary I.; Witkowski, David P.; Watkins, A. Neal; Rivers, Melissa B.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    A transonic wing, designed to accentuate key transition physics, is tested at cryogenic conditions at the National Transonic Facility at NASA Langley. The collaborative test between Boeing and NASA is aimed at assessing the facility for high-Reynolds number testing of configurations with significant regions of laminar flow. The test shows a unit Reynolds number upper limit of 26 M/ft for achieving natural transition. At higher Reynolds numbers turbulent wedges emanating from the leading edge bypass the natural transition process and destroy the laminar flow. At lower Reynolds numbers, the transition location is well correlated with the Tollmien-Schlichting-wave N-factor. The low-Reynolds number results suggest that the flow quality is acceptable for laminar flow testing if the loss of laminar flow due to bypass transition can be avoided.

  9. Design Choices for Thermofluid Flow Components and Systems that are Exported as Functional Mockup Units

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael; Fuchs, Marcus; Nouidui, Thierry

    2015-09-21

    This paper discusses design decisions for exporting Modelica thermofluid flow components as Functional Mockup Units. The purpose is to provide guidelines that will allow building energy simulation programs and HVAC equipment manufacturers to effectively use FMUs for modeling of HVAC components and systems. We provide an analysis for direct input-output dependencies of such components and discuss how these dependencies can lead to algebraic loops that are formed when connecting thermofluid flow components. Based on this analysis, we provide recommendations that increase the computing efficiency of such components and systems that are formed by connecting multiple components. We explain what code optimizations are lost when providing thermofluid flow components as FMUs rather than Modelica code. We present an implementation of a package for FMU export of such components, explain the rationale for selecting the connector variables of the FMUs and finally provide computing benchmarks for different design choices. It turns out that selecting temperature rather than specific enthalpy as input and output signals does not lead to a measurable increase in computing time, but selecting nine small FMUs rather than a large FMU increases computing time by 70%.

  10. Pesticides and biocides in a karst catchment: Identification of contaminant sources and related flow components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Thomas; Bollmann, Ulla E.; Bester, Kai; Birk, Steffen

    2013-04-01

    Karst aquifers are widely used as drinking water resources. However, their high vulnerability to chemical and bacterial contamination due to the heterogeneity in aquifer properties (highly conductive solution conduits embedded in the less conductive fissured rock) is difficult to assess and thus poses major challenges to the management of karst water resources. Contamination of karst springs by organic micro-pollutants has been observed in recent studies. Within this study the water from different springs draining one karst aquifer as well as the main sinking stream replenishing it were analysed before, during and after a storm water event in order to examine the occurrence of different pesticides and biocides. Contaminants from both urban as well as agricultural origin could be detected in the water with concentrations in the low ng/L range (tebuconazole, carbendazim, diuron, isoproturon, terbutryn, atrazine, dichlorobenzamide (BAM), which is a metabolite of dichlobenil). While some compounds could be followed from the sinking stream to the springs (e.g. dichlorobenzamide) some seem to have a source in the autogenic recharge from the karst plateau (Tebuconazole: wood preservative in buildings). These compounds appear to be related to fast flow components with residence times in the order of days, which are known from a number of tracer tests with fluorescent dyes. However, the occurrence of the pesticide atrazine (banned since 1995 in Austria) in the springs, while on the other hand no current input into the karst occurs, shows that some compounds have long residence times in the karst aquifer. These differences in residence times can hardly be attributed to differences in physico-chemical properties of the compounds and must thus be due to the presence of slow and fast flow components. This is in agreement with the duality of karst aquifers due to highly conductive networks of solution conduits embedded in less conductive fissured carbonate rocks.

  11. Results of no-flow rotary drill bit comparison testing

    SciTech Connect

    WITWER, K.S.

    1998-11-30

    This document describes the results of testing of a newer rotary sampling bit and sampler insert called the No-Flow System. This No-Flow System was tested side by side against the currently used rotary bit and sampler insert, called the Standard System. The two systems were tested using several ''hard to sample'' granular non-hazardous simulants to determine which could provide greater sample recovery. The No-Flow System measurably outperformed the Standard System in each of the tested simulants.

  12. Simulation of three-component fluid flows using the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Tang, G. H.; Wang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we extend the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver, which was proposed in [1] for simulating incompressible flows of binary fluids based on two-component Cahn-Hilliard model, to three-component fluid flows. In the present method, the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver is applied to solve for the flow field and the three-component Cahn-Hilliard model is used to predict the evolution of the interfaces. The proposed method is first validated through the classical problem of simulation of partial spreading of a liquid lens between the other two components. Numerical results of interface shapes and contact angles agree well with theoretical solutions. After that, to further demonstrate the capability of the present method, several numerical examples of three-component fluid flows are presented, including a bubble rising across a fluid-fluid interface, single droplet falling through a fluid-fluid interface, the collision-coalescence of two droplets, and the non-contact collision of two droplets. It is shown that the present method can successfully handle complex interactions among three components.

  13. Application of differential similarity to finding nondimensional groups important in tests of cooled engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sucec, J.

    1977-01-01

    The method of differential similarity is applied to the partial differential equations and boundary conditions which govern the temperature, velocity, and pressure fields in the flowing gases and the solid stationary components in air-cooled engines. This procedure yields the nondimensional groups which must have the same value in both the test rig and the engine to produce similarity between the test results and the engine performance. These results guide the experimentalist in the design and selection of test equipment that properly scales quantities to actual engine conditions. They also provide a firm fundamental foundation for substantiation of previous similarity analyses which employed heuristic, physical reasoning arguments to arrive at the nondimensional groups.

  14. High-temperature combustor liner tests in structural component response test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Paul E.

    1988-01-01

    Jet engine combustor liners were tested in the structural component response facility at NASA Lewis. In this facility combustor liners were thermally cycled to simulate a flight envelope of takeoff, cruise, and return to idle. Temperatures were measured with both thermocouples and an infrared thermal imaging system. A conventional stacked-ring louvered combustor liner developed a crack at 1603 cycles. This test was discontinued after 1728 cycles because of distortion of the liner. A segmented or float wall combustor liner tested at the same heat flux showed no significant change after 1600 cycles. Changes are being made in the facility to allow higher temperatures.

  15. Separate Flow Nozzle Test Status Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, Naseem H. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn, in partnership with US industry, completed an exhaustive experimental study on jet noise reduction from separate flow nozzle exhaust systems. The study developed a data base on various bypass ratio nozzles, screened quietest configurations and acquired pertinent data for predicting the plume behavior and ultimately its corresponding jet noise. Several exhaust system configurations provided over 2.5 EPNdB jet noise reduction at take-off power. These data were disseminated to US aerospace industry in a conference hosted by NASA GRC whose proceedings are shown in this report.

  16. Test flow disturbances in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paull, A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The operation of an expansion tube is investigated theoretically with emphasis on the factors that have limited the utility of the expansion tube in the past. It is shown why the window of steady test conditions is narrow and how this window can be expanded so that these facilities can be used in a variety of hypersonic research. The theoretical predictions are supported by centerline Pitot pressure measurements using air as the test gas.

  17. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 1; Injection Induced Water-Flow Tests from Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Yeh, Y. P.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Prior to selecting a proper porous material for use in simulating the internal port flow of a solid rocket motor (SRM), in cold-flow testing, the flow emerging from porous materials is experimentally investigated. The injection-flow emerging from a porous matrix always exhibits a lumpy velocity profile that is spatially stable and affects the development of the longitudinal port flow. This flow instability, termed pseudoturbulence, is an inherent signature of the porous matrix and is found to generally increase with the wall porosity and with the injection flow rate. Visualization studies further show that the flow from porous walls made from shaving-type material (sintered stainless-steel) exhibits strong recirculation zones that are conspicuously absent in walls made from nodular or spherical material (sintered bronze). Detailed flow visualization observations and hot-film measurements are reported from tests of injection-flow and a coupled cross-flow from different porous wall materials. Based on the experimental data, discussion is provided on the choice of suitable material for SRM model testing while addressing the consequences and shortcomings from such a test.

  18. Periodic Components in Communication Data: Models and Hypothesis Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, James H., Jr.

    A relatively simple procedure for modeling periodic components in time series data is presented in this paper, along with an example of the procedure's use with communication data. Similar to multiple regression analysis, the described procedure has four steps that are based on information about periodic waves and their components, how to create…

  19. Item Calibrations for Licensure Tests with Multiple Specialty Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chi-Yu; Lohss, William E.; Lin, Chuan-Ju; Shin, David

    This study was conducted to compare the usefulness of three item response theory (IRT) calibration packages (BILOG, BILOG-MG, and PIC) for examinations that include common and specialty components. Because small sample sizes and different mean abilities between specialty components are the most frequent problems that licensure/certification…

  20. Ecological, Psychological, and Cognitive Components of Reading Difficulties: Testing the Component Model of Reading in Fourth Graders across 38 Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Ming Ming; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Lin, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The authors tested the component model of reading (CMR) among 186,725 fourth grade students from 38 countries (45 regions) on five continents by analyzing the 2006 Progress in International Reading Literacy Study data using measures of ecological (country, family, school, teacher), psychological, and cognitive components. More than 91% of the…

  1. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  2. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Michael A.; Banks, Daniel W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    A flight-test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80-inch (203 cm) chord and 40-inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane (McDonnell Douglas Corporation, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0 deg to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2-D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, were similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  3. Flow tests of the Willis Hulin well

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

    1992-02-01

    The Hulin well was tested between 20,100 and 20,700 feet down in layers of brine-saturated clean sand with occasional intervening layers of shale. The characteristics of the brine and gas were determined in this interval and an initial determination of the reservoir properties were made.

  4. Experimental and kinetic modeling study of combustion of JP-8, its surrogates and components in laminar premixed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Kalyanasundaram; Frassoldati, Alessio; Cuoci, Alberto; Faravelli, Tiziano; Niemann, Ulrich; Weydert, Patrick; Ranzi, Eliseo

    2011-08-01

    Experimental and kinetic modeling studies are carried out to characterize premixed combustion of jet fuels, their surrogates, and reference components in laminar nonuniform flows. In previous studies, it was established that the Aachen surrogate made up of 80 % n-decane and 20 % trimethylbenzene by weight, and surrogate C made up of 57 % n-dodecane, 21 % methylcyclohexane and 22 % o-xylene by weight, reproduce key aspects of combustion of jet fuels in laminar nonpremixed flows. Here, these surrogates and a jet fuel are tested in premixed, nonuniform flows. The counterflow configuration is employed, and critical conditions of extinction are measured. In addition, the reference components tested are n-heptane, n-decane, n-dodecane, methylcyclohexane, trimethylbenzene, and o-xylene. Measured critical conditions of extinction of the Aachen surrogate and surrogate C are compared with those for the jet fuel. In general the alkanes n-heptane, n-decane, and n-dodecane, and methylcyclohexane are found to be more reactive than the aromatics o-xylene and trimethylbenzene. Flame structure and critical conditions of extinction are predicted for the reference components and the surrogates using a semi-detailed kinetic model. The predicted values are compared with experimental data. Sensitivity analysis shows that the lower reactivity of the aromatic species arises from the formation of resonantly stabilized radicals. These radicals are found to have a scavenging effect. The present study on premixed flows together with previous studies on nonpremixed flows show that the Aachen surrogate and surrogate C reproduce many aspects of premixed and nonpremixed combustion of jet fuels.

  5. 46 CFR 162.018-7 - Flow rating tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Safety Relief Valves, Liquefied Compressed Gas § 162.018-7 Flow rating tests. (a) Flow rating of valves shall be conducted in accordance with UG-131 of section VIII of... the Commanding Officer, USCG Marine Safety Center. (b)...

  6. 46 CFR 162.018-7 - Flow rating tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Safety Relief Valves, Liquefied Compressed Gas § 162.018-7 Flow rating tests. (a) Flow rating of valves shall be conducted in accordance with UG-131 of section VIII of... the Commanding Officer, USCG Marine Safety Center. (b)...

  7. 46 CFR 162.018-7 - Flow rating tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Safety Relief Valves, Liquefied Compressed Gas § 162.018-7 Flow rating tests. (a) Flow rating of valves shall be conducted in accordance with UG-131 of section VIII of... the Commanding Officer, USCG Marine Safety Center. (b)...

  8. Ambient Test Rig (ATR) flow studies: A laminar flow, reduced entrainment electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    Results of flow testing on a Reduced Entrainment Precipitator Ambient Test Rig are presented. The Reduced Entrainment Precipitator concept involves drawing a portion of the main precipitator flow through hollow, porous collecting plates. The purposes of flow through porous collecting plates ( side flow'') are to provide a dust layer clamping force, and to reduce turbulence with the precipitator. Achievement of these goals should reduce re-entrainment, and result in increased precipitator efficiency. The increased efficiency should be especially evident at higher precipitator main flow velocities. Flow tests conducted included pilot tube velocity traverses, smoke (turbulence) visualization, and measurements of turbulence and velocity with a (fast-response) hot-wire anemometer. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  9. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80-inch (203 cm) chord and 40-inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The wing was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0 deg to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2-D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, were similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  10. An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

    2013-07-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535ÀC. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535ÀC and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice wont be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

  11. NGNP Component Test Capability Design Code of Record

    SciTech Connect

    S.L. Austad; D.S. Ferguson; L.E. Guillen; C.W. McKnight; P.J. Petersen

    2009-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project is conducting a trade study to select a preferred approach for establishing a capability whereby NGNP technology development testing—through large-scale, integrated tests—can be performed for critical HTGR structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The mission of this capability includes enabling the validation of interfaces, interactions, and performance for critical systems and components prior to installation in the NGNP prototype.

  12. Development, testing and application of DrainFlow: A fully distributed integrated surface-subsurface flow model for drainage study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Ali; Bardsley, William Earl

    2016-06-01

    Hydrological and hydrogeological investigation of drained land is a complex and integrated procedure. The scale of drainage studies may vary from a high-resolution small scale project through to comprehensive catchment or regional scale investigations. This wide range of scales and integrated system behaviour poses a significant challenge for the development of suitable drainage models. Toward meeting these requirements, a fully distributed coupled surface-subsurface flow model titled DrainFlow has been developed and is described. DrainFlow includes both the diffusive wave equation for surface flow components (overland flow, open drain, tile drain) and Richard's equation for saturated/unsaturated zones. To overcome the non-linearity problem created from switching between wet and dry boundaries, a smooth transitioning technique is introduced to buffer the model at tile drains and at interfaces between surface and subsurface flow boundaries. This gives a continuous transition between Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. DrainFlow is tested against five well-known integrated surface-subsurface flow benchmarks. DrainFlow as applied to some synthetic drainage study examples is quite flexible for changing all or part of the model dimensions as required by problem complexity, problem scale, and data availability. This flexibility enables DrainFlow to be modified to allow for changes in both scale and boundary conditions, as often encountered in real-world drainage studies. Compared to existing drainage models, DrainFlow has the advantage of estimating actual infiltration directly from the partial differential form of Richard's equation rather than through analytical or empirical infiltration approaches like the Green and Ampt equation.

  13. Tell tale signatures of a Two Component Advective Flow around Black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Two Component Advective Flow or TCAF naturally explains every observed X-ray/gamma-ray signatures of black hole candidates. Every aspect of this solution has either been derived from Governing equations reproduced by numerical simulations of time dependent hydrodynamic codes of viscous and radiative flows. We discuss how, the same solution, when fitted observational results of several outbursts, consistently and satisfactorily explain evolutions of physical flow parameters, such as the accretion rates of the high and low angular momentum components, QPO frequencies in various spectral states, sizes of the Compton cloud, time lag properties of the high and low inclination angle systems etc. We also discuss possible effects of dynamically important magnetic fields.

  14. Task 8 -- Design and test of critical components

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, T.F.

    1996-11-01

    This report covers tasks 8.1, 8.1.1, and 8.2. The primary objective of Task 8.1, Particulates Flow Deposition, is to characterize the particulate generated in an operating gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plant whose configuration approximates that proposed for an ATS power plant. In addition, the task is to evaluate the use of full-flow filtering to reduce the steam particulate loads. Before the start of this task, GE had already negotiated an agreement with the candidate power plant, piping and a filter unit had already been installed at the power plant site, and major elements of the data acquisition system had been purchased. The objective of Task 8.1.1, Coolant Purity, is to expose typical ATS gas turbine airfoil cooling channel geometries to real steam flow to determine whether there are any unexpected deposit formations. The task is a static analog of the centrifugal deposition rig trials of Task 8.2, in which a bucket channel return bend is exposed to steam flow. Two cooling channel geometries are of primary interest in this static exposure. The primary objective of Task 8.2, Particle Centrifugal Sedimentation, is to determine the settling characteristics of particles in a cooling stream from an operating gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plant when that stream is ducted through a passage experiencing the G-loads expected in a simulated bucket channel specimen representative of designs proposed for an ATS gas turbine.

  15. Phase 2: HGM air flow tests in support of HEX vane investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, G. B., Jr.; Steele, L. L.; Eisenhart, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    Following the start of SSME certification testing for the Pratt and Whitney Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP), cracking of the leading edge of the inner HEX vane was experienced. The HEX vane, at the inlet of the oxidizer bowl in the Hot Gas Manifold (HGM), accepts the HPOTP turbine discharge flow and turns it toward the Gaseous Oxidizer Heat Exchanger (GOX HEX) coil. The cracking consistently initiated over a specific circumferential region of the hex vane, with other circumferential locations appearing with increased run time. Since cracking had not to date been seen with the baseline HPOTP, a fluid-structural interaction involving the ATD HPOTP turbine exit flowfield and the HEX inner vane was suspected. As part of NASA contract NAS8-36801, Pratt and Whitney conducted air flow tests of the ATD HPOTP turbine turnaround duct flowpath in the MSFC Phase 2 HGM air flow model. These tests included HEX vane strain gages and additional fluctuating pressure gages in the turnaround duct and HEX vane flowpath area. Three-dimensional flow probe measurements at two stations downstream of the turbine simulator exit plane were also made. Modifications to the HPOTP turbine simulator investigated the effects on turbine exit flow profile and velocity components, with the objective of reproducing flow conditions calculated for the actual ATD HPOTP hardware. Testing was done at the MSFC SSME Dynamic Fluid Air Flow (Dual-Leg) Facility, at air supply pressures between 50 and 250 psia. Combinations of turbine exit Mach number and pressure level were run to investigate the effect of flow regime. Information presented includes: (1) Descriptions of turbine simulator modifications to produce the desired flow environment; (2) Types and locations for instrumentation added to the flow model for improved diagnostic capability; (3) Evaluation of the effect of changes to the turbine simulator flowpath on the turbine exit flow environment; and (4

  16. Multi-Module Modeling of Heavy Ion Reactions and the 3rd Flow Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csernai, L. P.; Anderlik, A.; Anderlik, Cs.; Magas, V. K.; Molná, E.; Nyiri, A.; Röhrich, D.; Tamosiunas, K.

    2004-12-01

    Fluid dynamical calculations with QGP showed a softening of the directed flow while with hadronic matter this effect is absent. On the other hand, we indicated that a third flow component shows up in the reaction plane as an enhanced emission, which is orthogonal to the directed flow. This is not shadowed by the deflected projectile and target, and shows up at measurable rapidities, ycm = 1 - 2. To study the formation of this effect initial stages of relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied. An effective string rope model is presented for heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies. Our model takes into account baryon recoil for both target and projectile, arising from the acceleration of partons in an effective field. The typical field strength (string tension) for RHIC energies is about 5-12 GeV/fm, what allows us to talk about "string ropes". The results show that QGP forms a tilted disk, such that the direction of the largest pressure gradient stays in the reaction plane, but deviates from both the beam and the usual transverse flow directions. The produced initial state can be used as an initial condition for further hydrodynamical calculations. Such initial conditions lead to the creation of third flow component. Recent v1 measurements are promising that this effect can be used as a diagnostic tool of the QGP. Collective flow is sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. To study the sensitivity of the flow signal, we have calculated flow harmonics from a Blast Wave model, a tilted, ellipsoidally expanding source. We studied recent experimental techniques used for calculation of the vn Fourier coefficients and pointed out a few possible problems connected to these techniques, which may impair the sensitivity of flow analysis.

  17. Estimating exotic gene flow into native pine stands: zygotic vs. gametic components.

    PubMed

    Unger, G M; Vendramin, G G; Robledo-Arnuncio, J J

    2014-11-01

    Monitoring contemporary gene flow from widespread exotic plantations is becoming an important problem in forest conservation genetics. In plants, where both seed and pollen disperse, three components of exotic gene flow with potentially unequal consequences should be, but have not been, explicitly distinguished: zygotic, male gametic and female gametic. Building on a previous model for estimating contemporary rates of zygotic and male gametic gene flow among plant populations, we present here an approach that additionally estimates the third (female gametic) gene flow component, based on a combination of uni- and biparentally inherited markers. Using this method and a combined set of chloroplast and nuclear microsatellites, we estimate gene flow rates from exotic plantations into two Iberian relict stands of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). Results show neither zygotic nor female gametic gene flow but moderate (6-8%) male gametic introgression for both species, implying significant dispersal of pollen, but not of seeds, from exotic plantations into native stands shortly after introduced trees reached reproductive maturity. Numerical simulation results suggest that the model yields reasonably accurate estimates for our empirical data sets, especially for larger samples. We discuss conservation management implications of observed levels of exposure to nonlocal genes and identify research needs to determine potentially associated hazards. Our approach should be useful for plant ecologists and ecosystem managers interested in the vectors of contemporary genetic connectivity among discrete plant populations.

  18. Linear model describing three components of flow in karst aquifers using 18O data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, A.J.; Putnam, L.D.

    2004-01-01

    The stable isotope of oxygen, 18O, is used as a naturally occurring ground-water tracer. Time-series data for ??18O are analyzed to model the distinct responses and relative proportions of the conduit, intermediate, and diffuse flow components in karst aquifers. This analysis also describes mathematically the dynamics of the transient fluid interchange between conduits and diffusive networks. Conduit and intermediate flow are described by linear-systems methods, whereas diffuse flow is described by mass-balance methods. An automated optimization process estimates parameters of lognormal, Pearson type III, and gamma distributions, which are used as transfer functions in linear-systems analysis. Diffuse flow and mixing parameters also are estimated by these optimization methods. Results indicate the relative proximity of a well to a main conduit flowpath and can help to predict the movement and residence times of potential contaminants. The three-component linear model is applied to five wells, which respond to changes in the isotopic composition of point recharge water from a sinking stream in the Madison aquifer in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Flow velocities as much as 540 m/d and system memories of as much as 71 years are estimated by this method. Also, the mean, median, and standard deviation of traveltimes; time to peak response; and the relative fraction of flow for each of the three components are determined for these wells. This analysis infers that flow may branch apart and rejoin as a result of an anastomotic (or channeled) karst network.

  19. Turbine Air-Flow Test Rig CFD Results for Test Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Josh

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the Turbine Air-Flow Test (TAFT) rig computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results for test matrix. The topics include: 1) TAFT Background; 2) Design Point CFD; 3) TAFT Test Plan and Test Matrix; and 4) CFD of Test Points. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  20. The role of event water, a rapid shallow flow component, and catchment size in summer stormflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, V.A.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.; Burns, Douglas A.; Kendall, C.

    1999-01-01

    Seven nested headwater catchments (8 to 161 ha) were monitored during five summer rain events to evaluate storm runoff components and the effect of catchment size on water sources. Two-component isotopic hydrograph separation showed that event-water contributions near the time of peakflow ranged from 49% to 62% in the 7 catchments during the highest intensity event. The proportion of event water in stormflow was greater than could be accounted for by direct precipitation onto saturated areas. DOC concentrations in stormflow were strongly correlated with stream 18O composition. Bivariate mixing diagrams indicated that the large event water contributions were likely derived from flow through the soil O-horizon. Results from two-tracer, three-component hydrograph separations showed that the throughfall and O-horizon soil-water components together could account for the estimated contributions of event water to stormflow. End-member mixing analysis confirmed these results. Estimated event-water contributions were inversely related to catchment size, but the relation was significant for only the event with greatest rainfall intensity. Our results suggest that perched, shallow subsurface flow provides a substantial contribution to summer stormflow in these small catchments, but the relative contribution of this component decreases with catchment size.Seven nested headwater catchments (8 to 161 ha) were monitored during five summer rain events to evaluate storm runoff components and the effect of catchment size on water sources. Two-component isotopic hydrograph separation showed that event-water contributions near the time of peakflow ranged from 49% to 62% in the 7 catchments during the highest intensity event. The proportion of event water in stormflow was greater than could be accounted for by direct precipitation onto saturated areas. DOC concentrations in stormflow were strongly correlated with stream 18O composition. Bivariate mixing diagrams indicated that the

  1. 4. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking northeast. The building wing on the left houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault, and that on the right houses Test Cell 10 (environmental). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  2. 5. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking northwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking northwest. The building wing on the left houses Test Cell 10 (environmental), and that on the right houses Test Cell 9 (fuel) and the fuel storage pit or vault. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  3. Incompressible viscous flow computations for the pump components and the artificial heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin

    1992-01-01

    A finite-difference, three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes formulation to calculate the flow through turbopump components is utilized. The solution method is based on the pseudocompressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. Both steady and unsteady flow calculations can be performed using the current algorithm. In this work, the equations are solved in steadily rotating reference frames by using the steady-state formulation in order to simulate the flow through a turbopump inducer. Eddy viscosity is computed by using an algebraic mixing-length turbulence model. Numerical results are compared with experimental measurements and a good agreement is found between the two. Included in the appendix is a paper on incompressible viscous flow through artificial heart devices with moving boundaries. Time-accurate calculations, such as impeller and diffusor interaction, will be reported in future work.

  4. Multi-scale diffuse interface modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce a diffuse interface model to simulate multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility based on a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state). Because of partial miscibility, thermodynamic relations are used to model not only interfacial properties but also bulk properties, including density, composition, pressure, and realistic viscosity. As far as we know, this effort is the first time to use diffuse interface modeling based on equation of state for modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility. In numerical simulation, the key issue is to resolve the high contrast of scales from the microscopic interface composition to macroscale bulk fluid motion since the interface has a nanoscale thickness only. To efficiently solve this challenging problem, we develop a multi-scale simulation method. At the microscopic scale, we deduce a reduced interfacial equation under reasonable assumptions, and then we propose a formulation of capillary pressure, which is consistent with macroscale flow equations. Moreover, we show that Young-Laplace equation is an approximation of this capillarity formulation, and this formulation is also consistent with the concept of Tolman length, which is a correction of Young-Laplace equation. At the macroscopical scale, the interfaces are treated as discontinuous surfaces separating two phases of fluids. Our approach differs from conventional sharp-interface two-phase flow model in that we use the capillary pressure directly instead of a combination of surface tension and Young-Laplace equation because capillarity can be calculated from our proposed capillarity formulation. A compatible condition is also derived for the pressure in flow equations. Furthermore, based on the proposed capillarity formulation, we design an efficient numerical method for directly computing the capillary pressure between two fluids composed of multiple components. Finally, numerical tests

  5. AMTEC cell testing, optimization of rhodium/tungsten electrodes, and tests of other components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Underwood, Mark L.; O'Connor, Dennis; Kikkert, Stan

    1991-01-01

    Electrodes, current collectors, ceramic to metal braze seals, and metallic components exposed to the high 'hot side' temperatures and sodium liquid and vapor environment have been tested and evaluated in laboratory cells running for hundreds of hours at 1100-1200 K. Rhodium/tungsten electrodes have been selected as the optimum electrodes based on performance parameters and durability. Current collectors have been evaluated under simulated and actual operating conditions. The microscopic effects of metal migration between electrode and current collector alloys as well as their thermal and electrical properties determined the suitability of current collector and lead materials. Braze seals suitable for long term application to AMTEC devices are being developed.

  6. Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test plan and procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-13

    The purpose of this test plan and procedure is to test the Whittaker electrochemical cell and the Sierra Monitor Corp. flammable gas monitors in a simulated field flow configuration. The sensors are used on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) Flammable Gas Interlock (FGI), to detect flammable gases, including hydrogen and teminate the core sampling activity at a predetermined concentration level.

  7. A New Component of Solar Dynamics: North-South Diverging Flows Migrating toward the Equator with an 11 Year Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, J. G.; Gizon, L.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Time-distance helioseismology analysis of dopplergrams provides maps of torsional oscillations and meridional flows. Meridional flow maps show a time-varying component that has a banded structure which matches the torsional oscillations with an equatorward migration over the solar cycle. The time-varying component of meridional flow consists of a flow diverging from the dominant latitude of magnetic activity. These maps are compared with other torsional oscillation maps and with magnetic flux maps, showing a strong correlation with active latitudes. These results demonstrate a strong link between the time-varying component of the meridional flow and the torsional oscillations.

  8. Analytical flow/thermal modeling of combustion gas flows in Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor test joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, G. H.; Knox, E. C.; Pond, J. E.; Bacchus, D. L.; Hengel, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    A one-dimensional analytical tool, TOPAZ (Transient One-dimensional Pipe flow AnalyZer), was used to model the flow characteristics of hot combustion gases through Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) joints and to compute the resultant material surface temperatures and o-ring seal erosion of the joints. The capabilities of the analytical tool were validated with test data during the Seventy Pound Charge (SPC) motor test program. The predicted RSRM joint thermal response to ignition transients was compared with test data for full-scale motor tests. The one-dimensional analyzer is found to be an effective tool for simulating combustion gas flows in RSRM joints and for predicting flow and thermal properties.

  9. ac power control in the Core Flow Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    This work represents a status report on a development effort to design an ac power controller for the Core Flow Test Loop. The Core Flow Test Loop will be an engineering test facility which will simulate the thermal environment of a gas-cooled fast-breeder reactor. The problems and limitations of using sinusoidal ac power to simulate the power generated within a nuclear reactor are addressed. The transformer-thyristor configuration chosen for the Core Flow Test Loop power supply is presented. The initial considerations, design, and analysis of a closed-loop controller prototype are detailed. The design is then analyzed for improved performance possibilities and failure modes are investigated at length. A summary of the work completed to date and a proposed outline for continued development completes the report.

  10. Is Regional Groundwater Flow a Significant Component of the Water Budget in a River Basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, M. F.; Fan, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The spatial organization and temporal memory of the groundwater reservoir, and its interaction with the surface water has an integral role in the lateral transport of continental water and energy, affecting soil moisture distributions, evapotranspiration, precipitation and stream discharge across the land surface. The current climate models are unable to account for this lateral component, and route Precipitation (P) minus Evapotranspiration (ET) directly to stream discharge; hence, a separation of groundwater flow from surface water flow is necessary to asses the relative importance of each reservoir across a given continent. Here we use the ratio of P-ET (surface recharge, or R) to stream discharge (Qr) to evaluate the importance of the groundwater component within a given basin; where Qr/R = 1 we surmise that all the atmospheric surplus exits a basin through river discharge; where Qr/R < 1, a basin is considered a groundwater exporter; and where Qr/R > 1, a basin is considered a groundwater importer. In this study, 39 years of USGS HCDN annual mean observed stream discharge (naturalized) from 1555 basins across the continental U.S are removed from total surface recharge, derived from VIC simulation, yielding the portion of surface recharge leaving a basin via subsurface pathways. It was found that the Qr/R ratio deviates significantly from 1 across the contiguous 48 U.S. states. Detailed investigations of individual basins across the continent suggest that deviations of the Qr/R ratio from 1 are primarily a function of the subsurface geology, while climate and basin scale influence the magnitude of those deviations. Further, a marked incongruity between the surface drainage flow direction and groundwater flow direction is apparent where regional groundwater flow has developed, suggesting that surface drainage as a result of elevation is only partially indicative of subsurface flow regimes. This apparent significance of the groundwater component reinforces the

  11. Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. )

    1992-04-01

    This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor pills'' directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

  12. Analysis of components from drip tests with ATM-10 glass

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

    1996-09-01

    Waste package assemblies consisting of actinide-doped West Valley ATM-10 reference glass and sensitized 304L stainless steel have been reacted with simulated repository groundwater using the Unsaturated Test Method. Analyses of surface corrosion and reaction products resulting from tests that were terminated at scheduled intervals between 13 and 52 weeks are reported. Analyses reveal complex interactions between the groundwater, the sensitized stainless steel waste form holder, and the glass. Alteration phases form that consist mainly of smectite clay, brockite, and an amorphous thorium iron titanium silicate, the latter two incorporating thorium, uranium, and possibly transuranics. The results from the terminated tests, combined with data from tests that are still ongoing, will help determine the suitability of glass waste forms in the proposed high-level repository at the Yucca Mountain Site.

  13. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Certification Flow Loop Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Scott, Paul A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Wells, Beric E.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Denslow, Kayte M.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

    2010-01-01

    A future requirement of Hanford Tank Farm operations will involve transfer of wastes from double shell tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant. As the U.S. Department of Energy contractor for Tank Farm Operations, Washington River Protection Solutions anticipates the need to certify that waste transfers comply with contractual requirements. This test plan describes the approach for evaluating several instruments that have potential to detect the onset of flow stratification and critical suspension velocity. The testing will be conducted in an existing pipe loop in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s facility that is being modified to accommodate the testing of instruments over a range of simulated waste properties and flow conditions. The testing phases, test matrix and types of simulants needed and the range of testing conditions required to evaluate the instruments are described

  14. Structural Dynamics Testing of Advanced Stirling Convertor Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Sal; Williams, Zach

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has been supporting the development of Stirling energy conversion for use in space. Lockheed Martin has been contracted by the Department of Energy to design and fabricate flight-unit Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators, which utilize Sunpower, Inc., free-piston Advanced Stirling Convertors. The engineering unit generator has demonstrated conversion efficiency in excess of 20 percent, offering a significant improvement over existing radioisotope-fueled power systems. NASA Glenn has been supporting the development of this generator by developing the convertors through a technology development contract with Sunpower, and conducting research and experiments in a multitude of areas, such as high-temperature material properties, organics testing, and convertor-level extended operation. Since the generator must undergo launch, several launch simulation tests have also been performed at the convertor level. The standard test sequence for launch vibration exposure has consisted of workmanship and flight acceptance levels. Together, these exposures simulate what a flight convertor will experience. Recently, two supplementary tests were added to the launch vibration simulation activity. First was a vibration durability test of the convertor, intended to quantify the effect of vibration levels up to qualification level in both the lateral and axial directions. Second was qualification-level vibration of several heater heads with small oxide inclusions in the material. The goal of this test was to ascertain the effect of the inclusions on launch survivability to determine if the heater heads were suitable for flight.

  15. Ground vibration test of the laminar flow control JStar airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, M. W.; Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Ellison, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A ground vibration test was conducted on a Lockheed JetStar airplane that had been modified for the purpose of conducting laminar flow control experiments. The test was performed prior to initial flight flutter tests. Both sine-dwell and single-point-random excitation methods were used. The data presented include frequency response functions and a comparison of mode frequencies and mode shapes from both methods.

  16. AEROFROSH: a shock condition calculator for multi-component fuel aerosol-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, M. F.; Haylett, D. R.; Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    This article introduces an algorithm that determines the thermodynamic conditions behind incident and reflected shocks in aerosol-laden flows. Importantly, the algorithm accounts for the effects of droplet evaporation on post-shock properties. Additionally, this article describes an algorithm for resolving the effects of multiple-component-fuel droplets. This article presents the solution methodology and compares the results to those of another similar shock calculator. It also provides examples to show the impact of droplets on post-shock properties and the impact that multi-component fuel droplets have on shock experimental parameters. Finally, this paper presents a detailed uncertainty analysis of this algorithm's calculations given typical experimental uncertainties.

  17. The GfW handbook for data compilation of irradiation tested electronic components, volume 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, F.; Braeunig, D.; Boden, A.

    1984-05-01

    Fifty-three standardized reports of spacecraft electronic components irradiation tests are presented. Statistical values are given which enable reader to evaluate the components life time in a radiative environment.

  18. Initial Component Testing for a Germanium Array Cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Keillor, Martin E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fast, James E.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Seifert, Allen

    2009-06-01

    This report describes progress on the construction of two ultra-low-background cryostats that are part of the NA-22 funded “Radionuclide Laboratories” (RN Labs) project. Each cryostat will house seven high-purity germanium crystals (HPGe). These cryostats are being built from a limited set of materials that are known to have very low levels of radioactive impurities. The RN Labs instrument is designed to take advantage of low background performance, high detection efficiency, and γ-γ coincidence signatures to provide unprecedented gamma spectroscopy sensitivity. The project is focused on improving gamma analysis capabilities for nuclear detonation detection (NDD) applications. The instrument also has the potential for basic nuclear physics research. Section 1 provides the background for the project. Section 2 discusses germanium crystal acceptance testing. Design problems were found after the first delivery of new detectors from the vendor, Canberra Semiconductors. The first four crystals were returned for repair, resulting in a delay in crystal procurement. Section 3 provides an update on copper electroforming. In general, electroforming parts for RN Labs has proceeded smoothly, but there have been recent problems in electroforming three large copper parts necessary for the project. Section 4 describes the first round of testing for the instrument: anti-cosmic scintillator testing, electronics testing, and initial vacuum testing. Section 5 concludes with an overall description of the state of the project and challenges that remain.

  19. Rayleigh Scattering for Measuring Flow in a Nozzle Testing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Carlos R.; Panda, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh-scattering-based air-density measurement system was built in a large nozzle-and-engine-component test facility for surveying supersonic plumes from jet-engine exhaust. A molecular Rayleigh-scattering-based air-density measurement system was built in a large nozzle-and-enginecomponent test facility for surveying supersonic plumes from jet-engine exhaust

  20. High level radioactive waste vitrification process equipment component testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemens, D. H.; Health, W. C.; Larson, D. E.; Craig, S. N.; Berger, D. N.; Goles, R. W.

    1985-04-01

    Remote operability and maintainability of vitrification equipment were assessment under shielded cell conditions. The equipment tested will be applied to immobilize high level and transuranic liquid waste slurries that resulted from plutonium production for defense weapons. Equipment tested included: a turntable for handling waste canisters under the melter; a removable discharge cone in the melter overflow section; a thermocouple jumper that extends into a shielded cell; remote instrument and electrical connectors; remote, mechanical, and heat transfer aspects of the melter glass overflow section; a reamer to clean out plugged nozzles in the melter top; a closed circuit camera to view the melter interior; and a device to retrieve samples of the glass product. A test was also conduucted to evaluate liquid metals for use in a liquid metal sealing system.

  1. High level radioactive waste vitrification process equipment component testing

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, D.H.; Heath, W.O.; Larson, D.E.; Craig, S.N.; Berger, D.N.; Goles, R.W.

    1985-04-01

    Remote operability and maintainability of vitrification equipment were assessed under shielded-cell conditions. The equipment tested will be applied to immobilize high-level and transuranic liquid waste slurries that resulted from plutonium production for defense weapons. Equipment tested included: a turntable for handling waste canisters under the melter; a removable discharge cone in the melter overflow section; a thermocouple jumper that extends into a shielded cell; remote instrument and electrical connectors; remote, mechanical, and heat transfer aspects of the melter glass overflow section; a reamer to clean out plugged nozzles in the melter top; a closed circuit camera to view the melter interior; and a device to retrieve samples of the glass product. A test was also conducted to evaluate liquid metals for use in a liquid metal sealing system.

  2. Mass-Flow-Meter Leak-Testing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Eric B.; Polidori, Andre V.; Heman, Joe R.; Dresser, Holland L.; Hellum, John

    1996-01-01

    Improved leak-testing system incorporates mass-flow meter as primary sensor for measurement of leakage rate. System easier to use and more reliable and enables leak tests to be completed in less time. Produces test data more plentiful, more accurate, and better suited to leak detection and diagnosis. Operates over range of test conditions, including pressures from atmospheric to 1,000 psi, temperatures from 50 to 120 degrees F and volumes from less than 1 in.(sup3) to 22 in.(sup3). Sensitive enough to measure absorbed gas seeping from O-ring seals after test pressure released.

  3. A review of DOE HEPA filter component test activities

    SciTech Connect

    Slawski, J.W.; Bresson, J.F.; Scripsick, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    All HEPA filters purchased for installation in DOE nuclear facilities are required to be tested at a Filter Test Facility (FTF) prior to installation. The number of HEPA filters purchased by DOE has been reduced so much that the Hanford FTF was closed. From Fiscal Year (FY) 1992 to 1994, funding was not provided to the FTF Technical Support Group (TSG) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. As a consequence, Round Robin Tests (RRTs), performed twice each year by the FTFs to assess constituency of test results among the FTFs, were not performed in FY 1992 and FY 1993. The Annual Reports of FTF test activities were not prepared for FY 1992 - 1995. Technical support provided to the FTFs was minimal. There is talk of closing a second FTF, and ongoing discussions as to whether DOE will continue to fund operation of the FTFs. In FY 1994, DOE Defense Programs commenced funding the TSG. RRT data for FY 1994 and 1995 have been entered into the database; the FY 1994 RRT report has been issued; and the FY 1995 RRT report is in progress. Data from semiannual reports have been retrieved and entered into the database. Standards related to HEPA filter test and procurement activities are now scheduled for issuance by FY 1996. Continuation of these activities depends on whether DOE will continue to support the HEPA filter test program. The history and activities of the FTFs and the TSG at Los Alamos have been reported at previous Air Cleaning Conferences. Data from the FY 1991 Annual Report of FTF activities was presented at the 1992 Air Cleaning Conference. Preparation of the Annual Reports was temporarily suspended in 1992. However, all of the FTF Semiannual report data have been retrieved and entered into the data base. This paper focuses primarily on the results of HEPA filter tests conducted by FTFs during FY 1992 - FY 1995, and the possible effects of the DOE program uncertainties on the quality of HEPA filters for installation at the DOE sites. 15 refs., 13 tabs.

  4. Evaluating Key Watershed Components of Low Flow Regimes in New England Streams.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Alisa C; Gold, Arthur J; Pelletier, Marguerite C

    2016-05-01

    Water resource managers seeking to optimize stream ecosystem services and abstractions of water from watersheds need an understanding of the importance of land use, physical and climatic characteristics, and hydrography on different low flow components of stream hydrographs. Within 33 USGS gaged watersheds of southern New England, we assessed relationships between watershed variables and a set of low flow parameters by using an information-theoretical approach. The key variables identified by the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC) weighting factors as generating positive relationships with low flow events included percent stratified drift, mean elevation, drainage area, and mean August precipitation. The extent of wetlands in the watershed was negatively related to low flow magnitudes. Of the various land use variables, the percentage of developed land was found to have the highest importance and a negative relationship on low flow magnitudes, but was less important than wetlands and physical and climatic features. Our results suggest that management practices aimed to sustain low flows in fluvial systems can benefit from attention to specific watershed features. We draw attention to the finding that streams located in watersheds with high proportions of wetlands may require more stringent approaches to withdrawals to sustain fluvial ecosystems during drought periods, particularly in watersheds with extensive development and limited deposits of stratified drift.

  5. Eigenmodes of Ducted Flows With Radially-Dependent Axial and Swirl Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kousen, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    This report characterizes the sets of small disturbances possible in cylindrical and annular ducts with mean flow whose axial and tangential components vary arbitrarily with radius. The linearized equations of motion are presented and discussed, and then exponential forms for the axial, circumferential, and time dependencies of any unsteady disturbances are assumed. The resultant equations form a generalized eigenvalue problem, the solution of which yields the axial wavenumbers and radial mode shapes of the unsteady disturbances. Two numerical discretizations are applied to the system of equations: (1) a spectral collocation technique based on Chebyshev polynomial expansions on the Gauss-Lobatto points, and (2) second and fourth order finite differences on uniform grids. The discretized equations are solved using a standard eigensystem package employing the QR algorithm. The eigenvalues fall into two primary categories: a discrete set (analogous to the acoustic modes found in uniform mean flows) and a continuous band (analogous to convected disturbances in uniform mean flows) where the phase velocities of the disturbances correspond to the local mean flow velocities. Sample mode shapes and eigensystem distributions are presented for both sheared axial and swirling flows. The physics of swirling flows is examined with reference to hydrodynamic stability and completeness of the eigensystem expansions. The effect of assuming exponential dependence in the axial direction is discussed.

  6. 2. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast. The building wing on the left houses the equipment room and that on the right houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  7. 3. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast. The building wing on the left houses the equipment room, and that on the right houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  8. 42 CFR 84.21 - Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator components or subassemblies; fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Fees § 84.21 Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator components or... examination, inspection and testing of the individual respirator components or subassemblies: Facepieces...

  9. 42 CFR 84.21 - Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator components or subassemblies; fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Fees § 84.21 Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator components or... examination, inspection and testing of the individual respirator components or subassemblies: Facepieces...

  10. Investigation of the Flow-Induced Vibration in the E2 Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, Luciano

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of flow induced vibration due to coupling between the fluid flow and the propellants lines (LOX and RP-1) was performed. Various flow rate conditions were studied to check whether flow induced vibration was possible due to vortex shedding in both valves and pipe lines. Resonance test was conducted for all segments of the LOX-feedline for the preburner under test. In addition, critical values of frequency and velocity are calculated using a mass damping model. A simple chart characterizing the relation between frequency and velocity is developed for each component; i.e. propellant lines, valves and flow meters. It was found that flow induced vibration occurs for various segments with flow rates of 113 lb/s, 275 lb/s and 40 lb/s. Even more interesting using critical conditions for buckling, it was found that the valve or pipe may collapse for a flow rate of 275 lb/s and valve height of 10% of pipe diameter. Furthermore, two models for the acoustic pressure acting on the segments particularly for the valve are proposed.

  11. Investigation of the Flow-Induced Vibration in the E2 Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, Luciano

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of flow induced vibration due to coupling between the fluid flow and the propellants lines (LOX and RP-1) was performed. Various flow rate conditions were studied to check whether flow induced vibration was possible due to vortex shedding in both valves and pipe lines. Resonances test was conducted for all segments of the LOX-feedline for the preburner under test. In addition, critical values of frequency and velocity are calculated using a mass damping model. A simple chart characterizing the relation between frequency and velocity is developed for each component; i.e. propellant lines, valves and flow meters. It was found that flow induced vibration occurs for various segments with flow rates of 113 1b/s, 275 lb/s and 40 lb/s. Even more interesting using critical conditions for buckling, it was found that the valve or pipe may collapse for a flow rate of 275 lb/s and valve height of 10% of pipe diameter. Furthermore, two models for the acoustic pressure acting on the segments particularly for the valve are proposed.

  12. Inverse Comptonization in a Two Component Advective Flow: Results of a Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Himadri; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Laurent, Philippe

    2008-10-08

    We compute the resultant spectrum due to multiple scattering of soft photons emitted from a Keplerian disk by thermal electrons inside a torus axisymmetrically placed around a black hole. In a two component advective flow model, the post-shock region is similar to a thick accretion disk and the pre-shock sub-keplerian flow is highly optically thin. As a preliminary run of the Monte Carlo simulation of the system, we assume the CENBOL to be a small (2-14r{sub g}) thick accretion disk without a cusp to allow bulk motion of the flow. Bulk Motion Comptonization (BMC) has also been added. We show that the spectral behaviour is very similar to what is predicted in Chakrabarti and Titarchuk (1995)

  13. Three-dimensional flows about simple components at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peake, D. J.; Tobak, M.

    1982-01-01

    The structures of three dimensional separated flow about some chosen aerodynamic components at angle of attack are synthesized, holding strictly to the notion that streamlines in the external flow (viscous plus inviscid) and skin friction lines on the body surface may be considered as trajectories having properties consistent with those of continuous vector fields. Singular points in the fields are of limited number and are classified as simple nodes and saddles. Analogous flow structures at high angles of attack about blunt and pointed bodies, straight and swept wings, etc., are discussed, highlighting the formation of spiral nodes (foci) in the pattern of the skin friction lines. How local and global three dimensional separation lines originate and form is addressed, and the characteristics of both symmetric and asymmetric leeward wakes are described.

  14. Microencapsulation of multiple components by compound-fluidic electro-flow focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Chuansheng; Si, Ting; Gao, Peng; Xu, Ronald X.

    2014-02-01

    Microcapsules with multiple components inside a biodegradable shell are of great significance in various applications such as biomedicine, biochemistry, sustained drug delivery and image-guided therapy. Here we report a compoundfluidic electro-flow focusing (CFEFF) process that has the potential to one-step envelope multiple drugs and imaging agents separately into a single microcapsule. In this method, a compound needle is assembled by embedding two parallel thin inner needles into a relatively large outer needle. Two kinds of core fluids flow through the inner needles separately and the shell fluid flows through the outer needle. Under the action of aerodynamic and electric driving forces, stable cone-jet configurations can be obtained, resulting in multilayered microcapsules after the breakup of the compound liquid jet because of flow instability. The feasibility and effectiveness of using this CFEFF method to encapsulate multiple components into one shell is verified experimentally. The effects of various process parameters on the morphology and size of the microcapsules are further studied.

  15. Design verification and cold-flow modeling test report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This report presents a compilation of the following three test reports prepared by TRW for Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) as part of the Healy Clean Coal Project, Phase 1 Design of the TRW Combustor and Auxiliary Systems, which is co-sponsored by the Department of Energy under the Clean Coal Technology 3 Program: (1) Design Verification Test Report, dated April 1993, (2) Combustor Cold Flow Model Report, dated August 28, 1992, (3) Coal Feed System Cold Flow Model Report, October 28, 1992. In this compilation, these three reports are included in one volume consisting of three parts, and TRW proprietary information has been excluded.

  16. Diagnostic testing: a key component of high-value care.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Lucien J

    2016-01-01

    This is the fourth article of a series on fundamental concepts in biostatistics and research. In this article, the author reviews the fundamental concepts in diagnostic testing, sensitivity, and specificity and how they relate to the concept of high-value care. The topics are discussed in common language, with a minimum of jargon and mathematics, and with clinical examples. Emphasis is given to conceptual understanding. A companion article will follow focusing on predictive value and prior probability.

  17. Diagnostic testing: a key component of high-value care

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, Lucien J.

    2016-01-01

    This is the fourth article of a series on fundamental concepts in biostatistics and research. In this article, the author reviews the fundamental concepts in diagnostic testing, sensitivity, and specificity and how they relate to the concept of high-value care. The topics are discussed in common language, with a minimum of jargon and mathematics, and with clinical examples. Emphasis is given to conceptual understanding. A companion article will follow focusing on predictive value and prior probability. PMID:27406456

  18. Testing Components of New Community Isopycnal Ocean Circulation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Kirk

    2008-05-09

    The ocean and atmosphere are both governed by the same physical laws and models of the two media have many similarities. However, there are critical differences that call for special methods to provide the best simulation. One of the most important difference is that the ocean is nearly opaque to radiation in the visible and infra-red part of the spectrum. For this reason water mass properties in the ocean are conserved along trajectories for long distances and for long periods of time. For this reason isopycnal coordinate models would seem to have a distinct advantage in simulating ocean circulation. In such a model the coordinate surfaces are aligned with the natural paths of near adiabatic, density conserving flow in the main thermocline. The difficulty with this approach is at the upper and lower boundaries of the ocean, which in general do not coincide with density surfaces. For this reason hybrid coordinate models were proposed by Bleck and Boudra (1981) in which Cartesian coordinates were used near the ocean surface and isopycnal coordinates were used in the main thermocline. This feature is now part of the HICOM model (Bleck, 2002).

  19. 32 CFR 21.425 - How does a DoD Component's authority flow to awarding and administering activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the contracting activity for procurement contracts, as defined at 48 CFR 2.101. The intent is that... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How does a DoD Component's authority flow to... a DoD Component's authority flow to awarding and administering activities? The Head of a...

  20. 32 CFR 21.425 - How does a DoD Component's authority flow to awarding and administering activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the contracting activity for procurement contracts, as defined at 48 CFR 2.101. The intent is that... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How does a DoD Component's authority flow to... a DoD Component's authority flow to awarding and administering activities? The Head of a...

  1. 32 CFR 21.425 - How does a DoD Component's authority flow to awarding and administering activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the contracting activity for procurement contracts, as defined at 48 CFR 2.101. The intent is that... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How does a DoD Component's authority flow to... a DoD Component's authority flow to awarding and administering activities? The Head of a...

  2. 32 CFR 21.425 - How does a DoD Component's authority flow to awarding and administering activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the contracting activity for procurement contracts, as defined at 48 CFR 2.101. The intent is that... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How does a DoD Component's authority flow to... a DoD Component's authority flow to awarding and administering activities? The Head of a...

  3. Flow Visualization of Liquid Hydrogen Line Chilldown Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique; Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen John B.

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental measurements of wall and fluid temperature during chill-down tests of a warm cryogenic line with liquid hydrogen. Synchronized video and fluid temperature measurements are used to interpret stream temperature profiles versus time. When cold liquid hydrogen starts to flow into the warm line, a sequence of flow regimes, spanning from all-vapor at the outset to bubbly with continuum liquid at the end can be observed at a location far downstream of the cold inlet. In this paper we propose interpretations to the observed flow regimes and fluid temperature histories for two chilldown methods, viz. trickle (i.e. continuous) flow and pulse flow. Calculations of heat flux from the wall to the fluid versus wall temperature indicate the presence of the transition/nucleate boiling regimes only. The present tests, run at typical Reynolds numbers of approx O(10 (exp 5)), are in sharp contrast to similar tests conducted at lower Reynolds numbers where a well-defined film boiling region is observed.

  4. Water Flow Testing and Unsteady Pressure Analysis of a Two-Bladed Liquid Oxidizer Pump Inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Jordan B.; Mulder, Andrew; Zoladz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The unsteady fluid dynamic performance of a cavitating two-bladed oxidizer turbopump inducer was characterized through sub-scale water flow testing. While testing a novel inlet duct design that included a cavitation suppression groove, unusual high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed. With potential implications for inducer blade loads, these high-frequency components were analyzed extensively in order to understand their origins and impacts to blade loading. Water flow testing provides a technique to determine pump performance without the costs and hazards associated with handling cryogenic propellants. Water has a similar density and Reynolds number to liquid oxygen. In a 70%-scale water flow test, the inducer-only pump performance was evaluated. Over a range of flow rates, the pump inlet pressure was gradually reduced, causing the flow to cavitate near the pump inducer. A nominal, smooth inducer inlet was tested, followed by an inlet duct with a circumferential groove designed to suppress cavitation. A subsequent 52%-scale water flow test in another facility evaluated the combined inducer-impeller pump performance. With the nominal inlet design, the inducer showed traditional cavitation and surge characteristics. Significant bearing loads were created by large side loads on the inducer during synchronous cavitation. The grooved inlet successfully mitigated these loads by greatly reducing synchronous cavitation, however high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed over a range of frequencies. Analytical signal processing techniques showed these oscillations to be created by a rotating, multi-celled train of pressure pulses, and subsequent CFD analysis suggested that such pulses could be created by the interaction of rotating inducer blades with fluid trapped in a cavitation suppression groove. Despite their relatively low amplitude, these high-frequency pressure oscillations posed a design concern due to their sensitivity to flow conditions and

  5. Countercurrent Flow of Molten Glass and Air during Siphon Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.

    2001-01-16

    Siphon tests of molten glass were performed to simulate potential drainage of a radioactive waste melter, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site. Glass is poured from the melter through a vertical downspout that is connected to the bottom of the melter through a riser. Large flow surges have the potential of completely filling the downspout and creating a siphon effect that has the potential for complete draining of the melter. Visual observations show the exiting glass stream starts as a single-phase pipe flow, constricting into a narrow glass stream. Then a half-spherical bubble forms at the exit of the downspout. The bubble grows, extending upwards into the downspout, while the liquid flows counter-currently to one side of the spout. Tests were performed to determine what are the spout geometry and glass properties that would be conducive to siphoning, conditions for terminating the siphon, and the total amount of glass drained.

  6. Aortic Relative Pressure Components Derived from Four-Dimensional Flow Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Lamata, Pablo; Pitcher, Alex; Krittian, Sebastian; Nordsletten, David; Bissell, Malenka M; Cassar, Thomas; Barker, Alex J; Markl, Michael; Neubauer, Stefan; Smith, Nicolas P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the assessment of the spatiotemporal distribution of relative aortic pressure quantifying the magnitude of its three major components. Methods Nine healthy volunteers and three patients with aortic disease (bicuspid aortic valve, dissection, and Marfan syndrome) underwent 4D-flow CMR. Spatiotemporal pressure maps were computed from the CMR flow fields solving the pressure Poisson equation. The individual components of pressure were separated into time-varying inertial (“transient”), spatially varying inertial (“convective”), and viscous components. Results Relative aortic pressure is primarily caused by transient effects followed by the convective and small viscous contributions (64.5, 13.6, and 0.3 mmHg/m, respectively, in healthy subjects), although regional analysis revealed prevalent convective effects in specific contexts, e.g., Sinus of Valsalva and aortic arch at instants of peak velocity. Patients showed differences in peak transient values and duration, and localized abrupt convective changes explained by abnormalities in aortic geometry, including the presence of an aneurysm, a pseudo-coarctation, the inlet of a dissection, or by complex flow patterns. Conclusion The evaluation of the three components of relative pressure enables the quantification of mechanistic information for understanding and stratifying aortic disease, with potential future implications for guiding therapy. Magn Reson Med 72:1162–1169, 2014. © 2013 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:24243444

  7. VERIFICATION TESTING OF WET-WEATHER FLOW TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the USEPA's ETV Program, the Wet-Weather Flow (WWF) Technologies Pilot Program verifies the performance of commercial-ready technologies by generating quality-assured data using test protocols developed with broad-based stakeholder input. The availability of a credible...

  8. Testing of ceramic gas turbine components under service-like conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebmanns, W.

    1980-01-01

    The German firm MTU, Munich, West Germany, is developing gas turbine components made of special ceramics (silicon nitride, silicon carbide) which can withstand temperatures up to 1600 K. Various components such as the combustor and turbine wheel are being developed. Various preliminary tests of components are discussed.

  9. Design, testing, and model validation of an MR squeeze-flow vibration damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Neil D.; Stanway, Roger; Johnson, Andrew R.; Mellor, Phillip

    2001-07-01

    Ongoing research at the University of Sheffield is currently concerned with the design and construction of magneto- rheological (MR) squeeze-flow vibration damper. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of employing such a device as the key component in a controllable vibration isolator. The work also demonstrated the inadequacies of existing mathematical models which do not account for the observed behavior of MR fluids in squeeze flow. In parallel with investigations into the behavior of MR dampers, a collaborative programme between the Universities of Liverpool and Sheffield is also in progress. Here attention is focussed on ER fluids in squeeze-flow and a new test facility has been constructed for use in the development and validation of mathematical models. It is anticipated that this collaborative programme will assist in the development of both ER and MR squeeze-flow models. In this paper, the authors present a summary of progress to date.

  10. Centripetal flow of pseudopodial surface components could propel the amoeboid movement of Caenorhabditis elegans spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Roberts, T M; Ward, S

    1982-01-01

    Latex beads and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) were used to examine the movement of membrane components on amoeboid spermatozoa of Caenorhabditis elegans. The behavior of beads attached to the cell revealed continuous, directed movement from the tip of the pseudopod to its base, but no movement on the cell body. Lectin receptors are also cleared from the pseudopod (4). Blocking preexisting lectin receptors with unlabeled WGA followed by pulse-labeling wih fluorescent WGA showed that new lectin receptors are continuously inserted at the tip of the pseudopod. Like latex beads, these new lectin receptors move continuously over the pseudopod surface to the cell body-pseudopod junction where they are probably internalized. Mutants altering the rate of membrane flow, and eliminating its topographical asymmetry, have been identified. Together with the observation that fluorescent phospholipids are cleared from the pseudopod of developing spermatozoa at the same rate as lectin receptors (25), these results show that there is bulk membrane flow over the pseudopod with assembly at the tip and apparent disassembly at the base. There are no vesicles visible at either the pseudopodial tip or base, so these spermatozoa must have a novel mechanism for insertion and uptake of membrane components. This membrane flow could provide the forward propulsion of spermatozoa attached to a substrate by their pseudopods.

  11. Prototyping and testing of mechanical components for the GRAVITY spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiest, Michael; Fischer, Sebastian; Thiel, Markus; Haug, Marcus; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Straubmeier, Christian; Araujo-Hauck, Constanza; Yazici, Senol; Eisenhauer, Frank; Perrin, Guy; Brandner, Wolfgang; Perraut, Karine; Amorim, Antonio; Schöller, Markus; Eckart, Andreas

    2010-07-01

    GRAVITY is a 2nd generation VLTI Instrument which operates on 6 interferometric baselines by using all 4 UTs. It will offer narrow angle astrometry in the infrared K-band with an accuracy of 10 ìas. The University of Cologne is part of the international GRAVITY consortium and responsible for the design and manufacturing of the two spectrometers. One is optimized for observing the science object, providing three different spectral resolutions and optional polarimetry, the other is optimized for a fast fringe tracking at a spectral resolution of R=22 with optional polarimetry. In order to achieve the necessary image quality, the current mechanical design foresees 5 motorized functions, 2 linear motions and 3 filter wheels. Additionally the latest optical design proposal includes 20 degrees of freedom for manual adjustments distributed over the different optical elements. Both spectrometers require precise linear and rotational movements on micrometer or arcsecond scales. These movements will be realized using custom linear stages based on compliant joints. These stages will be driven by actuators based on a Phytron/Harmonic Drive combination. For dimensioning and in order to qualify the reliability of these mechanisms, it is necessary to evaluate the mechanisms on the base of several prototypes. Due to the cryogenic environment the wheel mechanisms will be driven by Phytron stepper motors, too. A ratchet mechanism, which is currently in the beginning of his design phase, will deliver the required precision to the filter wheels. This contribution will give a first impression how the next mechanical prototypes will look like. Besides, advantages of purchasing and integrating a distance sensor and a resolver are reported. Both are supposed to work under cryogenic conditions and should achieve high resolutions for the measuring of movements inside the test cryostat.

  12. Mutation Testing for Effective Verification of Digital Components of Physical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushik, N. G.; Evtushenko, N. V.; Torgaev, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Digital components of modern physical systems are often designed applying circuitry solutions based on the field programmable gate array technology (FPGA). Such (embedded) digital components should be carefully tested. In this paper, an approach for the verification of digital physical system components based on mutation testing is proposed. The reference description of the behavior of a digital component in the hardware description language (HDL) is mutated by introducing into it the most probable errors and, unlike mutants in high-level programming languages, the corresponding test case is effectively derived based on a comparison of special scalable representations of the specification and the constructed mutant using various logic synthesis and verification systems.

  13. In vitro heart valve testing: steady versus pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Black, M M; Hose, D R; Lamb, C J; Lawford, P V; Ralph, S J

    1994-03-01

    The design of artificial heart valves has traditionally been based on the development of a prototype device which was then subjected to extensive laboratory testing in order to confirm its suitability for clinical use. In the past the in vitro assessment of a valve's performance was based principally on the measurement of parameters such as pressure difference, regurgitation and, more recently, energy losses. Such measurements can be defined as being at the 'macro' level and rarely show any clinically significant differences amongst currently available prostheses. The analytical approach to flow through heart valves has previously been hampered by difficulties experienced in solving the relevant equations of flow particularly in the case of pulsatile conditions. Computational techniques are now available which enable appropriate solutions to be obtained for these problems and consequently provide an opportunity for detailed examination of the 'micro' level of flow disturbances exhibited by the different valves. This present preliminary study is designed to illustrate the use of such an analytical approach to the flow through prosthetic valves. A single topic has been selected for this purpose which is the comparative value of steady versus pulsatile flow testing. A bileaflet valve was chosen for the analysis and a mathematical model of this valve in the aortic position of the Sheffield Pulse Duplicator was created. The theoretical analysis was carried out using a commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics package, namely, FIDAP, on a SUN MICROSYSTEMS 10-30 workstation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Experimental and analytical study of one- and two-component flows in spherical chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate techniques for obtaining high inner-gas concentrations in a spherical cavity for application to the open-cycle gaseous-core nuclear rocket. The study included flow visualization tests with water and gases as the working fluids, calculations of the streamline distribution, and calculation and measurement of the inner-gas concentration with air and Freon-11 as the inner-stream gases. The cavity shape, the outer-stream injection conditions, the turbulent transport coefficients, and the buoyancy effects were found to affect the inner-stream flow patterns.

  15. Ecological, psychological, and cognitive components of reading difficulties: testing the component model of reading in fourth graders across 38 countries.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ming Ming; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Lin, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The authors tested the component model of reading (CMR) among 186,725 fourth grade students from 38 countries (45 regions) on five continents by analyzing the 2006 Progress in International Reading Literacy Study data using measures of ecological (country, family, school, teacher), psychological, and cognitive components. More than 91% of the differences in student difficulty occurred at the country (61%) and classroom (30%) levels (ecological), with less than 9% at the student level (cognitive and psychological). All three components were negatively associated with reading difficulties: cognitive (student's early literacy skills), ecological (family characteristics [socioeconomic status, number of books at home, and attitudes about reading], school characteristics [school climate and resources]), and psychological (students' attitudes about reading, reading self-concept, and being a girl). These results extend the CMR by demonstrating the importance of multiple levels of factors for reading deficits across diverse cultures.

  16. An immersed boundary method for imposing solid wall conditions in lattice Boltzmann solvers for single- and multi-component fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Favier, Julien; D'Ortona, Umberto; Poncet, Sébastien

    2014-11-01

    In this work, one proposes an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann coupled algorithm to solve single- and multi-component fluid flows, in the presence of fixed or moving solid boundaries. The prescribed motion of immersed boundaries is imposed by adding a body force term in the lattice Boltzmann model, which is obtained from the macroscopic fluid velocity definition interpolated at the Lagrangian solid points. Numerical validation test cases show that the proposed numerical solver is second-order accurate. Furthermore, the Shan-Chen's lattice Boltzmann model is applied for multi-component fluid flows, and a special focus is given to the treatment of different wetting properties of fixed walls. The capability of the new numerical solver is finally evaluated by simulating a cluster of moving cilia in a two-component fluid flow.

  17. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Free secretory component immuno-logical test system. 866.5380 Section 866.5380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Systems § 866.5380 Free secretory component immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A...

  18. Techniques employed by the NASA White Sands Test Facility to ensure oxygen system component safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stradling, J. S.; Pippen, D. L.; Frye, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Methods of ascertaining the safety and suitability of a variety of oxygen system components are discussed. Additionally, qualification and batch control requirements for soft goods in oxygen systems are presented. Current oxygen system component qualification test activities in progress at White Sands Test Facility are described.

  19. 7. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking south. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking south. The wing in the immediate foreground houses the equipment room. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  20. 16 CFR 1508.5 - Component spacing test method for § 1508.4(b).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Component spacing test method for § 1508.4(b). 1508.5 Section 1508.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1508.5 Component spacing test method...

  1. 16 CFR 1508.5 - Component spacing test method for § 1508.4(b).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Component spacing test method for § 1508.4(b). 1508.5 Section 1508.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1508.5 Component spacing test method...

  2. Flow-Field Survey in the Test Region of the SR-71 Aircraft Test Bed Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Jones, Daniel; Weinstock, Vladimir D.

    2000-01-01

    A flat plate and faired pod have been mounted on a NASA SR-71A aircraft for use as a supersonic flight experiment test bed. A test article can be placed on the flat plate; the pod can contain supporting systems. A series of test flights has been conducted to validate this test bed configuration. Flight speeds to a maximum of Mach 3.0 have been attained. Steady-state sideslip maneuvers to a maximum of 2 deg have been conducted, and the flow field in the test region has been surveyed. Two total-pressure rakes, each with two flow-angle probes, have been placed in the expected vicinity of an experiment. Static-pressure measurements have been made on the flat plate. At subsonic and low supersonic speeds with no sideslip, the flow in the surveyed region is quite uniform. During sideslip maneuvers, localized flow distortions impinge on the test region. Aircraft sideslip does not produce a uniform sidewash over the test region. At speeds faster than Mach 1.5, variable-pressure distortions were observed in the test region. Boundary-layer thickness on the flat plate at the rake was less than 2.1 in. For future experiments, a more focused and detailed flow-field survey than this one would be desirable.

  3. Flow and diffusion of high-stakes test scores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marder, M.; Bansal, D.

    2009-10-01

    We apply visualization and modeling methods for convective and diffusive flows to public school mathematics test scores from Texas. We obtain plots that show the most likely future and past scores of students, the effects of random processes such as guessing, and the rate at which students appear in and disappear from schools. We show that student outcomes depend strongly upon economic class, and identify the grade levels where flows of different groups diverge most strongly. Changing the effectiveness of instruction in one grade naturally leads to strongly nonlinear effects on student outcomes in subsequent grades.

  4. Cold Flow Plume Entrainment Test Final Report NTF Test Number 2456

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David; Mishtawy, Jason; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Hammad, Khaled J.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the Space Shuttle Return to Flight (RTF) program, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to define the velocity flowfields around the Shuttle stack at liftoff. These CFD predicted velocity flowfields were used in debris transport analysis (DTA). High speed flows such as plumes induce or 'entrain' mass from the surrounding environment. Previous work had shown that CFD analysis over-predicts plume induced flows. Therefore, the DTA would tend to 1) predict more debris impacts, and 2) the debris velocity (and kinetic energy) of those impacts would be too high. At a November, 2004 peer-review it was recommended that the Liftoff DTA team quantify the uncertainty in the DTA caused by the CFD's over prediction of plume induced flow. To do so, the Liftoff DTA team needed benchmark quality data for plume induced flow to quantify the CFD accuracy and its effect on the DTA. MSFC's Nozzle Test Facility (NTF) conducted the "Nozzle Induced Flows test, P#2456" to obtain experimental data for plume induced flows for nozzle flow exhausting into q quiescent freestream. Planning for the test began in December, 2004 and the experimental data was obtained in February and March of 2005. The funding for this test was provided by MSFC's Space Shuttle Propulsion Systems Integration and Engineering office.

  5. Identifying Components of Groundwater Flow, Flux, and Storage in Tuolumne Meadows, Yosemite, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vialpando, M., III; Lowry, C.; Visser, A.; Moran, J. E.; Esser, B. K.

    2015-12-01

    High elevation meadows in the Sierra Nevada of California, USA represent mixing zones between surface water and groundwater. Quantifying the exchange between stream water and groundwater, and the residence time of water stored in meadow sediments will allow examination of the possible buffer effect that groundwater has on meadows and streams. This in turn has implications for the resilience of the ecosystem as well as the downstream communities that are dependent upon runoff for water supply. Stream flow was measured and water samples were collected along a 5 km reach of the Tuolumne River and adjacent wells during both spring runoff and baseflow. Water samples were analyzed for concentrations of dissolved noble gases and anions, sulfur-35, tritium and radon to study surface water-groundwater interactions and residence times. Although lower than average because of the ongoing drought in California, discharge in early July 2015 was about 35 times that measured during the previous fall. During baseflow, a small component of fracture flow (2%) is identified using dissolved helium. Radon, anions and stream discharge identify reaches of groundwater discharge. Anions show a steady increase in the groundwater component over the western portion of the meadow during baseflow, and over 50% of stream water is exchanged with meadow groundwater, without a net gain or loss of stream flow. Sulfur-35 and tritium results indicated that groundwater contributing to stream flow has recharged within the previous two years. With the current drought, estimated as the most severe in 1200 years, accurate estimations of water availability are becoming increasingly important to water resource managers.

  6. Measurements of Turbulent Flow Field in Separate Flow Nozzles with Enhanced Mixing Devices - Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2002-01-01

    As part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a series of experiments was conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center on the effect of mixing enhancement devices on the aeroacoustic performance of separate flow nozzles. Initial acoustic evaluations of the devices showed that they reduced jet noise significantly, while creating very little thrust loss. The explanation for the improvement required that turbulence measurements, namely single point mean and RMS statistics and two-point spatial correlations, be made to determine the change in the turbulence caused by the mixing enhancement devices that lead to the noise reduction. These measurements were made in the summer of 2000 in a test program called Separate Nozzle Flow Test 2000 (SFNT2K) supported by the Aeropropulsion Research Program at NASA Glenn Research Center. Given the hot high-speed flows representative of a contemporary bypass ratio 5 turbofan engine, unsteady flow field measurements required the use of an optical measurement method. To achieve the spatial correlations, the Particle Image Velocimetry technique was employed, acquiring high-density velocity maps of the flows from which the required statistics could be derived. This was the first successful use of this technique for such flows, and shows the utility of this technique for future experimental programs. The extensive statistics obtained were likewise unique and give great insight into the turbulence which produces noise and how the turbulence can be modified to reduce jet noise.

  7. Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) Structural Component Successfully Tested Under Pseudo-Operating Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.

    1997-01-01

    A fabrication feasibility demonstration component for the Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) program was evaluated under prototypical engine loading conditions at the Structural Benchmark Test Facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The purpose for this test was to verify EPM casting, joining, coating, and life-prediction methods. Electron beam welding techniques developed in the EPM program were used to join two large superalloy cast sections of an exhaust nozzle flap to fabricate the demonstration component. After the joints were inspected, the component was coated with an oxidation-resistant barrier coating and was sent to Lewis for testing. The special test fixture shown in the photo (the Structural Benchmark Test Facility) was designed and built at Lewis to produce a biaxial bending condition similar to the loading condition this part would encounter during engine operation. Several finite element analyses were conducted to validate the mechanical test method. A floating furnace was then designed to provide prototypical thermal profiles in the component. An isothermal low-cycle fatigue test was used to evaluate the component at a cyclic load of 13 kN (maximum) to 1 kN (minimum) at a frequency of 1 Hz. Component failure was defined as a 30-percent increase in the component's compliance. On the basis of this definition, the low-cycle fatigue life of this component would be 35,000 cycles.

  8. Flap survey test of a combined surface blowing model: Flow measurements at static flow conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukushima, T.

    1978-01-01

    The Combined Surface Blowing (CSB) V/STOL lift/propulsion system consists of a blown flap system which deflects the exhaust from a turbojet engine over a system of flaps deployed at the trailing edge of the wing. Flow measurements consisting of velocity measurements using split film probes and total measure surveys using a miniature Kiel probe were made at control stations along the flap systems at two spanwise stations, the centerline of the nozzle and 60 percent of the nozzle span outboard of the centerline. Surface pressure measurements were made in the wing cove and the upper surface of the first flap element. The test showed a significant flow separation in the wing cove. The extent of the separation is so large that the flow into the first flap takes place only at the leading edge of the flap. The velocity profile measurements indicate that large spanwise (3 dimensional) flow may exist.

  9. Effects of light intensity and pattern contrast on the ability of the land crab, Cardisoma guanhumi, to separate optic flow-field components.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Aaron P; Barnes, W Jon P; Macauley, Martin W S

    2004-01-01

    Using a novel suite of computer-generated visual stimuli that mimicked components of optic flow, the visual responses of the tropical land crab, Cardisoma guanhumi, were investigated. We show that crabs are normally successful in distinguishing the rotational and translational components of the optic flow field, showing strong optokinetic responses to the former but not the latter. This ability was not dependent on the orientation of the crab, occurring both in "forwards-walking" and "sideways-walking" configurations. However, under conditions of low overall light intensity and/or low object/background contrast, the separation mechanism shows partial failure causing the crab to generate compensatory eye movements to translation, particularly in response to low-frequency (low-velocity) stimuli. Using this discovery, we then tested the ability of crabs to separate rotational and translational components in a combined rotation/translation flow field under different conditions. We demonstrate that, while crabs can successfully separate such a combined flow field under normal circumstances, showing compensatory eye movements only to the rotational component, they are unable to make this separation under conditions of low overall light intensity and low object/background contrast. Here, the responses to both flow-field components show summation when they are in phase, but, surprisingly, there is little reduction in the amplitude of responses to rotation when the translational component is in antiphase. Our results demonstrate that the crab's visual system finds separation of flow-field components a harder task than detection of movement, since the former shows partial failure at light intensities and/or object/background contrasts at which movement of the world around the crab is still generating high-gain optokinetic responses.

  10. Analysis of Alcove 8/Niche 3 Flow and Transport Tests

    SciTech Connect

    H.H. Liu

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document analyses of the Alcove 8/Niche 3 flow and transport tests, with a focus on the large-infiltration-plot tests and compare pre-test model predictions with the actual test observations. The tests involved infiltration that originated from the floor of Alcove 8 (located in the Enhanced Characterization of Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift) and observations of seepage and tracer transport at Niche 3 (located in the Main Drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF)). The test results are relevant to drift seepage and solute transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. The main objective of this analysis was to evaluate the modeling approaches used and the importance of the matrix diffusion process by comparing simulation and actual test observations. The pre-test predictions for the large plot test were found to differ from the observations and the reasons for the differences were documented in this report to partly address CR 6783, which concerns unexpected test results. These unexpected results are discussed and assessed with respect to the current baseline unsaturated zone radionuclide transport model in Sections 6.2.4, 6.3.2, and 6.4.

  11. The use of programmable logic controllers (PLC) for rocket engine component testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nail, William; Scheuermann, Patrick; Witcher, Kern

    1991-01-01

    Application of PLCs to the rocket engine component testing at a new Stennis Space Center Component Test Facility is suggested as an alternative to dedicated specialized computers. The PLC systems are characterized by rugged design, intuitive software, fault tolerance, flexibility, multiple end device options, networking capability, and built-in diagnostics. A distributed PLC-based system is projected to be used for testing LH2/LOx turbopumps required for the ALS/NLS rocket engines.

  12. Three-dimensional model for multi-component reactive transport with variable density groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mao, X.; Prommer, H.; Barry, D.A.; Langevin, C.D.; Panteleit, B.; Li, L.

    2006-01-01

    PHWAT is a new model that couples a geochemical reaction model (PHREEQC-2) with a density-dependent groundwater flow and solute transport model (SEAWAT) using the split-operator approach. PHWAT was developed to simulate multi-component reactive transport in variable density groundwater flow. Fluid density in PHWAT depends not on only the concentration of a single species as in SEAWAT, but also the concentrations of other dissolved chemicals that can be subject to reactive processes. Simulation results of PHWAT and PHREEQC-2 were compared in their predictions of effluent concentration from a column experiment. Both models produced identical results, showing that PHWAT has correctly coupled the sub-packages. PHWAT was then applied to the simulation of a tank experiment in which seawater intrusion was accompanied by cation exchange. The density dependence of the intrusion and the snow-plough effect in the breakthrough curves were reflected in the model simulations, which were in good agreement with the measured breakthrough data. Comparison simulations that, in turn, excluded density effects and reactions allowed us to quantify the marked effect of ignoring these processes. Next, we explored numerical issues involved in the practical application of PHWAT using the example of a dense plume flowing into a tank containing fresh water. It was shown that PHWAT could model physically unstable flow and that numerical instabilities were suppressed. Physical instability developed in the model in accordance with the increase of the modified Rayleigh number for density-dependent flow, in agreement with previous research. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Complementary Constrains on Component based Multiphase Flow Problems, Should It Be Implemented Locally or Globally?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Kolditz, O.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow problems are numerically difficult to solve, as it often contains nonlinear Phase transition phenomena A conventional technique is to introduce the complementarity constraints where fluid properties such as liquid saturations are confined within a physically reasonable range. Based on such constraints, the mathematical model can be reformulated into a system of nonlinear partial differential equations coupled with variational inequalities. They can be then numerically handled by optimization algorithms. In this work, two different approaches utilizing the complementarity constraints based on persistent primary variables formulation[4] are implemented and investigated. The first approach proposed by Marchand et.al[1] is using "local complementary constraints", i.e. coupling the constraints with the local constitutive equations. The second approach[2],[3] , namely the "global complementary constrains", applies the constraints globally with the mass conservation equation. We will discuss how these two approaches are applied to solve non-isothermal componential multiphase flow problem with the phase change phenomenon. Several benchmarks will be presented for investigating the overall numerical performance of different approaches. The advantages and disadvantages of different models will also be concluded. References[1] E.Marchand, T.Mueller and P.Knabner. Fully coupled generalized hybrid-mixed finite element approximation of two-phase two-component flow in porous media. Part I: formulation and properties of the mathematical model, Computational Geosciences 17(2): 431-442, (2013). [2] A. Lauser, C. Hager, R. Helmig, B. Wohlmuth. A new approach for phase transitions in miscible multi-phase flow in porous media. Water Resour., 34,(2011), 957-966. [3] J. Jaffré, and A. Sboui. Henry's Law and Gas Phase Disappearance. Transp. Porous Media. 82, (2010), 521-526. [4] A. Bourgeat, M. Jurak and F. Smaï. Two-phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in

  14. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Flow Measurements Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliff; Wernet, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Modern aircraft design often puts the engine exhaust in close proximity to the airframe surfaces. Aircraft noise prediction tools must continue to develop in order to meet the challenges these aircraft present. The Jet-Surface Interaction Tests have been conducted to provide a comprehensive quality set of experimental data suitable for development and validation of these exhaust noise prediction methods. Flow measurements have been acquired using streamwise and cross-stream particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating surface pressure data acquired using flush mounted pressure transducers near the surface trailing edge. These data combined with previously reported far-field and phased array noise measurements represent the first step toward the experimental data base. These flow data are particularly applicable to development of noise prediction methods which rely on computational fluid dynamics to uncover the flow physics. A representative sample of the large flow data set acquired is presented here to show how a surface near a jet affects the turbulent kinetic energy in the plume, the spatial relationship between the jet plume and surface needed to generate surface trailing-edge noise, and differences between heated and unheated jet flows with respect to surfaces.

  15. NASA Ares I Launch Vehicle First Stage Roll Control System Cold Flow Development Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butt, Adam; Popp, Christopher G.; Holt, Kimberly A.; Pitts, Hank M.

    2010-01-01

    The Ares I launch vehicle is the selected design, chosen to return humans to the moon, Mars, and beyond. It is configured in two inline stages: the First Stage is a Space Shuttle derived five-segment Solid Rocket Booster and the Upper Stage is powered by a Saturn V derived J-2X engine. During launch, roll control for the First Stage (FS) is handled by a dedicated Roll Control System (RoCS) located on the connecting Interstage. That system will provide the Ares I with the ability to counteract induced roll torque while any induced yaw or pitch moments are handled by vectoring of the booster nozzle. This paper provides an overview of NASA s Ares I FS RoCS cold flow development test program including detailed test objectives, types of tests run to meet those objectives, an overview of the results, and applicable lessons learned. The test article was built and tested at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. The FS RoCS System Development Test Article (SDTA) is a full scale, flight representative water flow test article whose primary objective was to obtain fluid system performance data to evaluate integrated system level performance characteristics and verify analytical models. Development testing and model correlation was deemed necessary as there is little historical precedent for similar large flow, pulsing systems such as the FS RoCS. The cold flow development test program consisted of flight-similar tanks, pressure regulators, and thruster valves, as well as plumbing simulating flight geometries, combined with other facility grade components and structure. Orifices downstream of the thruster valves were used to simulate the pressure drop through the thrusters. Additional primary objectives of this test program were to: evaluate system surge pressure (waterhammer) characteristics due to thruster valve operation over a range of mission duty cycles at various feed system pressures, evaluate temperature transients and heat transfer in the

  16. Payload and Components Real-Time Automated Test System (PACRATS), Data Acquisition of Leak Rate and Pressure Data Test Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Maegan L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to provide the Mechanical Components Test Facility (MCTF) with the capability to obtain electronic leak test and proof pressure data, Payload and Components Real-time Automated Test System (PACRATS) data acquisition software will be utilized to display real-time data. It will record leak rates and pressure/vacuum level(s) simultaneously. This added functionality will provide electronic leak test and pressure data at specified sampling frequencies. Electronically stored data will provide ES61 with increased data security, analysis, and accuracy. The tasks performed in this procedure are to verify PACRATS only, and are not intended to provide verifications for MCTF equipment.

  17. Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test report

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-24

    The purpose of this test report is to document the testing performed under the guidance of HNF-SD-WM-TC-073, {ital Flammable Gas Interlock Spoolpiece Flow Response Test Plan and Procedure}. This testing was performed for Lockheed Martin Hanford Characterization Projects Operations (CPO) in support of Rotary Mode Core Sampling jointly by SGN Eurisys Services Corporation and Numatec Hanford Company. The testing was conducted in the 305 building Engineering Testing Laboratory (ETL). NHC provides the engineering and technical support for the 305 ETL. The key personnel identified for the performance of this task are as follows: Test responsible engineering manager, C. E. Hanson; Flammable Gas Interlock Design Authority, G. P. Janicek; 305 ETL responsible manager, N. J. Schliebe; Cognizant RMCS exhauster engineer, E. J. Waldo/J. D. Robinson; Cognizant 305 ETL engineer, K. S. Witwer; Test director, T. C. Schneider. Other support personnel were supplied, as necessary, from 305/306 ETL. The testing, on the flammable Gas Interlock (FGI) system spoolpiece required to support Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) of single shell flammable gas watch list tanks, took place between 2-13-97 and 2-25-97.

  18. On cavity flow permeability testing of a sandstone.

    PubMed

    Selvadurai, P A; Selvadurai, A P S

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory experiment designed to measure the bulk permeability of a cuboidal sample of sandstone measuring approximately 450 mm(2) in plan area and 508 mm in height. The relatively large dimensions of the sandstone specimen allow the determination of the permeability of the material by creating a central cavity that can be pressurized to maintain a constant flow rate. The paper describes the experimental details and the test procedure, and discusses the computational and analytic approaches that have been used to interpret the test results.

  19. Capability for aerothermal-structural tests of large-to-full-scale components of future space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couch, L. M.; Wieting, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    The design of viable, low-mass thermostructural concepts for future space transportation systems requires accurate definition of the localized heat flux, pressures, and flow-surface interaction parameters for complex flow regions of detailed areas of large vehicles, such as wing-elevon coves, thermal protection system tile gaps, and corrugated metallic surfaces. This paper discusses investigations recently conducted in and planned for two high-energy wind tunnels at the Langley Research Center - the 8-foot High-temperatures Tunnel and the Thermal Protection System Test Facility. The data obtained on large-to-full-scale vehicle components, comparisons of the experimental data with theory, and the large, reusable, generalized test apparatus available at or planned for these facilities are discussed.

  20. Hydrologic and geochemical approaches for determining ground-water flow components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hjalmarson, H.W.; Robertson, F.N.

    1991-01-01

    Lyman Lake is an irrigation-storage reservoir on the Little Colorado River near St. Johns, Arizona. The main sources of water for the lake are streamflow in the Little Colorado River and ground-water inflow from the underlying Coconino aquifer. Two approaches, a hydrologic analysis and a geochemical analysis, were used to compute the quantity of ground-water flow to and from Lyman Lake. Hydrologic data used to calculate a water budget were precipitation on the lake, evaporation from the lake, transpiration from dense vegetation, seepage through the dam, streamflow in and out of the lake, and changes in lake storage. Geochemical data used to calculate the ground-water flow components were major ions, trace elements, and the stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. During the study, the potentiometric level of the Coconino aquifer was above the lake level at the upstream end of the lake and below the lake level at the downstream end. Hydrologic and geochemical data indicate that about 10 percent and 8 percent, respectively, of the water in the lake is ground-water inflow and that about 35 percent of the water in the Little Colorado River 6 miles downgradient from the lake near Salado Springs is ground water. These independent estimates of ground-water flow derived from each approach are in agreement and support a conceptual model of the water budget.

  1. 1. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast from hill north of structure. The building wing in the right foreground houses Test Cell 8 (oxidizer) and the oxidizer storage pit or vault. Test Cell 10 is located in the center background, Test Cell 9 is at the far left, and the equipment room is in the immediate left foreground. The control room is in the center of the structure and abuts the aforementioned test cell and equipment room wings. This structure served as a facility for testing, handling, and storage of Titan II's hydrazine- and nitrogen teteroxide-based propellant system components for compatability determinations. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  2. The dipole flow test: A new single-borehole test for aquifer characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kabala, Z.J. )

    1993-01-01

    A new single-borehole measurement technique for confined aquifers, the dipole flow test, yields the vertical distributions of the horizontal hydraulic conductivity, the vertical hydraulic conductivity, and the specific storativity when applied to different borehole intervals. The test utilizes straddle packers to isolate two chambers in the borehole, pressure transducers to monitor drawdown in them, and a small pump to create a dipole flow pattern in the aquifer by pumping water at a constant rate from the aquifer into one chamber, transferring it within the well to the next chamber, and finally injecting it back to the aquifer. A mathematical model describing the drawdown in each chamber is derived for the transient as well as the steady state cases. The aquifer parameters may be estimated from data produced by the dipole flow test alone or in conjunction with conventional pumping tests. The dipole flow regime reaches a steady state relatively quickly, especially in well permeable aquifers. A robust computational methodology for estimating the aquifer parameters, suitable for automatization, is based on the Newton-Raphson algorithm applied to a system of up to three nonlinear equations, each describing the well drawdown at a different judiciously chosen time. Due to the relatively small drawdown it invokes, the dipole flow test may be applicable to unconfined aquifers as well.

  3. Investigating the Reliability of the Civics Component of the U.S. Naturalization Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winke, Paula

    2011-01-01

    In this study, I investigated the reliability of the U.S. Naturalization Test's civics component by asking 414 individuals to take a mock U.S. citizenship test comprising civics test questions. Using an incomplete block design of six forms with 16 nonoverlapping items and four anchor items on each form (the anchors connected the six subsets of…

  4. Lateral flow-based antibody testing for Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Gwyn, Sarah; Mitchell, Alexandria; Dean, Deborah; Mkocha, Harran; Handali, Sukwan; Martin, Diana L

    2016-08-01

    We describe here a lateral flow-based assay (LFA) for the detection of antibodies against immunodominant antigen Pgp3 from Chlamydia trachomatis, the causative agent of urogenital chlamydia infection and ocular trachoma. Optimal signal detection was achieved when the gold-conjugate and test line contained Pgp3, creating a dual sandwich capture assay. The LFA yielded positive signals with serum and whole blood but not with eluted dried blood spots. For serum, the agreement of the LFA with the non-reference multiplex assay was 96%, the specificity using nonendemic pediatric sera was 100%, and the inter-rater agreement was κ=0.961. For whole blood, the agreement of LFA with multiplex was 81.5%, the specificity was 100%, and the inter-rater agreement was κ=0.940. The LFA was tested in a field environment and yielded similar results to those from laboratory-based testing. These data show the successful development of a lateral flow assay for detection of antibodies against Pgp3 with reliable use in field settings, which would make antibody-based testing for trachoma surveillance highly practical, especially after cessation of trachoma elimination programs. PMID:27208400

  5. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be performed on all open-circuit apparatus. (b) The flow from the apparatus shall be greater than 200...

  6. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be performed on all open-circuit apparatus. (b) The flow from the apparatus shall be greater than 200...

  7. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be performed on all open-circuit apparatus. (b) The flow from the apparatus shall be greater than 200...

  8. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be performed on all open-circuit apparatus. (b) The flow from the apparatus shall be greater than 200...

  9. Development and testing of CMC components for automotive gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials are currently being developed and evaluated for advanced gas turbine engine components because of their high specific strength and resistance to catastrophic failure. Components with 2D and 3D composite architectures have been successfully designed and fabricated. This is an overview of the test results for a backplate, combustor, and a rotor.

  10. 225-kW Dynamometer for Testing Small Wind Turbine Components: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.

    2006-06-01

    This paper describes NREL's new 225-kW dynamometer facility that is suitable for testing a variety of components and subsystems for small wind turbines and discusses opportunities for industry partnerships with NREL for use of the facility.

  11. One Component Two Phase Flow in Horizontal and Vertical Ducts: Some Basic Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Maeder, Paul F.; Dickinson, David A.; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.

    1983-12-15

    For a description and analysis of the flow they consider the conservation equations of the two phases separately, but in thermal and mechanical equilibrium, coupled by the itnerface shear forces (two fluid model, drift flux model). Coupling may be weak or strong, depending on Froude and Mach numbers of the flow. The fluid is highly compressible, not because the individual phases move at such speeds that their individual density changes are significant but because evapiration (phase change) results in large density changes of the system at moderate pressure or temperature changes once flashing occurs. The slip between the phases is caused by unequal wall shear stress, acceleration of the fluid or gravitational forces and is hindered by the interface interaction. if they denote by {gamma} the ratio of the liquid density to the vapor density and by {sigma} the ratio of the vapor speed to the liquid speed they find that in horizontal flows {sigma} = {gamma}{sup 1/2} yields the maximum slip (neglecting acceleration effects) that can be reached with no interface force acting (assuming equal friction coefficients for both phases at the wall). If one investigates the conditions of thermodynamic flow similarity between different substances in two phase flow, one finds that the latent heat of vaporization is the principal controlling parameter. Thus, a 5 cm diameter test section in two phase R-114, at room temperature, corresponds to a 30 cm diameter duct in water-steam at boiling conditions at high temperatures such as encountered in geothermal and other power production systems.

  12. Parametric Testing of Chevrons on Single Flow Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Brown, Clifford A.

    2004-01-01

    A parametric family of chevron nozzles have been studied, looking for relationships between chevron geometric parameters, flow characteristics, and far-field noise. Both cold and hot conditions have been run at acoustic Mach number 0.9. Ten models have been tested, varying chevron count, penetration, length, and chevron symmetry. Four comparative studies were defined from these datasets which show: that chevron length is not a major impact on either flow or sound; that chevron penetration increases noise at high frequency and lowers it at low frequency, especially for low chevron counts; that chevron count is a strong player with good low frequency reductions being achieved with high chevron count without strong high frequency penalty; and that chevron asymmetry slightly reduces the impact of the chevron. Finally, it is shown that although the hot jets differ systematically from the cold one, the overall trends with chevron parameters is the same.

  13. Testing of models of flow-induced hemolysis in blood flow through hypodermic needles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangsheng; Kent, Timothy L; Sharp, M Keith

    2013-03-01

    Hemolysis caused by flow in hypodermic needles interferes with a number of tests on blood samples drawn by venipuncture, including assays for metabolites, electrolytes, and enzymes, causes discomfort during dialysis sessions, and limits transfusion flow rates. To evaluate design modifications to address this problem, as well as hemolysis issues in other cardiovascular devices, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based prediction of hemolysis has potential for reducing the time and expense for testing of prototypes. In this project, three CFD-integrated blood damage models were applied to flow-induced hemolysis in 16-G needles and compared with experimental results, which demonstrated that a modified needle with chamfered entrance increased hemolysis, while a rounded entrance decreased hemolysis, compared with a standard needle with sharp entrance. After CFD simulation of the steady-state velocity field, the time histories of scalar stress along a grid of streamlines were calculated. A strain-based cell membrane failure model and two empirical power-law blood damage models were used to predict hemolysis on each streamline. Total hemolysis was calculated by weighting the predicted hemolysis along each streamline by the flow rate along each streamline. The results showed that only the strain-based blood damage model correctly predicted increased hemolysis in the beveled needle and decreased hemolysis in the rounded needle, while the power-law models predicted the opposite trends. PMID:23419169

  14. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Mike; Banks, Dan; Garzon, Andres; Matisheck, Jason

    2014-01-01

    IR thermography was used to characterize the transition front on a S-NLF test article at chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million Changes in transition due to Mach number, Reynolds number, and surface roughness were investigated - Regions of laminar flow in excess of 80% chord at chord Reynolds numbers greater than 14 million IR thermography clearly showed the transition front and other flow features such as shock waves impinging upon the surface A series of parallel oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, were found to cause premature transition at higher Reynolds numbers. NASA has a current goal to eliminate barriers to the development of practical supersonic transport aircraft Drag reduction through the use of supersonic natural laminar flow (S-NLF) is currently being explored as a means of increasing aerodynamic efficiency - Tradeoffs work best for business jet class at M<2 Conventional high-speed designs minimize inviscid drag at the expense of viscous drag - Existence of strong spanwise pressure gradient leads to crossflow (CF) while adverse chordwise pressure gradients amplifies and Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) instabilities Aerion Corporation has patented a S-NLF wing design (US Patent No. 5322242) - Low sweep to control CF - dp/dx < 0 on both wing surfaces to stabilize TS - Thin wing with sharp leading edge to minimize wave drag increase due to reduction in sweep NASA and Aerion have partnered to study S-NLF since 1999 Series of S-NLF experiments flown on the NASA F-15B research test bed airplane Infrared (IR) thermography used to characterize transition - Non-intrusive, global, good spatial resolution - Captures significant flow features well

  15. Development and testing of highway storm-sewer flow measurement and recording system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, F.A.; Kaehrle, W.R.; Hardee, Jack; Cordes, E.H.; Landers, M.N.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive study and development of measuring instruments and techniques for measuring all components of flow in a storm-sewer drainage system was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey under the sponsorship of the Federal Highway Administration. The study involved laboratory and field calibration and testing of measuring flumes, pipe insert meters, weirs, electromagnetic velocity meters as well as the development and calibration of pneumatic-bubbler pressure transducer head measuring systems. Tracer-dilution and acoustic flow meter measurements were used in field verification tests. A single micrologger was used to record data from all the above instruments as well as from a tipping-bucket rain gage and also to activate on command the electromagnetic velocity meter and tracer-dilution systems. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Preliminary Results of Testing of Flow Effects on Evaporator Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z.

    2002-02-15

    This investigation has focused on the effects of fluid flow on solids deposition from solutions that simulate the feed to the 2H evaporator at the Savannah River Site. Literature studies indicate that the fluid flow (or shear) affects particle-particle and particle-surface interactions and thus the phenomena of particle aggregation in solution and particle deposition (i.e., scale formation) onto solid surfaces. Experimental tests were conducted with two configurations: (1) using a rheometer to provide controlled shear conditions and (2) using controlled flow of reactive solution through samples of stainless steel tubing. All tests were conducted at 80 C and at high silicon and aluminum concentrations, 0.133 M each, in solutions containing 4 M sodium hydroxide and 1 A4 each of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. Two findings from these experiments are important for consideration in developing approaches for reducing or eliminating evaporator scaling problems: (1) The rheometer tests suggested that for the conditions studied, maximum solids deposition occurs at a moderate shear rate, approximately 12 s{sup -1}. That value is expected to be on the order of shear rates that will occur in various parts of the evaporator system; for instance, a 6 gal/min single-phase liquid flow through the 2-in. lift or gravity drain lines would result in a shear rate of approximately 16 s{sup -1}. These results imply that engineering approaches aimed at reducing deposits through increased mixing would need to generate shear near all surfaces significantly greater than 12 s{sup -1}. However, further testing is needed to set a target value for shear that is applicable to evaporator operation. This is because the measured trend is not statistically significant at the 95% confidence interval due to variability in the results. In addition, testing at higher temperatures and lower concentrations of aluminum and silicon would more accurately represent conditions in the evaporator. Without

  17. Energy efficient engine low-pressure compressor component test hardware detailed design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, C. J.; Halle, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The aerodynamic and mechanical design description of the low pressure compressor component of the Energy Efficient Engine were used. The component was designed to meet the requirements of the Flight Propulsion System while maintaining a low cost approach in providing a low pressure compressor design for the Integrated Core/Low Spool test required in the Energy Efficient Engine Program. The resulting low pressure compressor component design meets or exceeds all design goals with the exception of surge margin. In addition, the expense of hardware fabrication for the Integrated Core/Low Spool test has been minimized through the use of existing minor part hardware.

  18. An automated thermal vacuum test system for use in environmental testing of flight systems and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleckner, Craig S.; Knutson, Jeffrey R.

    1991-01-01

    Unusual requirements for the Pressure Distribution/Air Data System (PD/ADS) transducer thermal vacuum testing led to the development of a conductively heated and cooled, fully automated, bell-jar test system. The system has proven to be easily adaptable for other tests and offers the advantages of quick turn-around and low operational cost.

  19. Improved E-ELT subsystem and component specifications, thanks to M1 test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmler, M.; Marrero, J.; Leveque, S.; Barriga, Pablo; Sedghi, B.; Kornweibel, N.

    2014-07-01

    During the last 2 years ESO has operated the "M1 Test Facility", a test stand consisting of a representative section of the E-ELT primary mirror equipped with 4 complete prototype segment subunits including sensors, actuators and control system. The purpose of the test facility is twofold: it serves to study and get familiar with component and system aspects like calibration, alignment and handling procedures and suitable control strategies on real hardware long before the primary mirror (hereafter M1) components are commissioned. Secondly, and of major benefit to the project, it offered the possibility to evaluate component and subsystem performance and interface issues in a system context in such detail, that issues could be identified early enough to feed back into the subsystem and component specifications. This considerably reduces risk and cost of the production units and allows refocusing the project team on important issues for the follow-up of the production contracts. Experiences are presented in which areas the results of the M1 Test Facility particularly helped to improve subsystem specifications and areas, where additional tests were adopted independent of the main test facility. Presented are the key experiences of the M1 Test Facility which lead to improved specifications or identified the need for additional testing outside of the M1 Test Facility.

  20. Multiphase pumps and flow meters -- Status of field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Skiftesvik, P.K.; Svaeren, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    With the development and qualification of multiphase pumps and multiphase flow meters, two new tools have been made available to the oil and gas industry for enhanced production from existing installations or new field developments. This paper presents an overview of the major achievements gained from various test installations carried out the last years using equipment qualified by Framo Engineering AS. The experience from the extensive Field Verification Programmes as described shows that multiphase pumps and meters can operate in various and often harsh well environments providing significant well stream pressure boost or acceptable phase accuracy measurements of oil, water and gas.

  1. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Environments and Base Flow Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Manish; Knox, Kyle S.; Seaford, C. Mark; Dufrene, Aaron T.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle is composed of four RS-25 liquid oxygen-hydrogen rocket engines in the core-stage and two 5-segment solid rocket boosters and as a result six hot supersonic plumes interact within the aft section of the vehicle during flight. Due to the complex nature of rocket plume-induced flows within the launch vehicle base during ascent and a new vehicle configuration, sub-scale wind tunnel testing is required to reduce SLS base convective environment uncertainty and design risk levels. This hot-fire test program was conducted at the CUBRC Large Energy National Shock (LENS) II short-duration test facility to simulate flight from altitudes of 50 kft to 210 kft. The test program is a challenging and innovative effort that has not been attempted in 40+ years for a NASA vehicle. This paper discusses the various trends of base convective heat flux and pressure as a function of altitude at various locations within the core-stage and booster base regions of the two-percent SLS wind tunnel model. In-depth understanding of the base flow physics is presented using the test data, infrared high-speed imaging and theory. The normalized test design environments are compared to various NASA semi-empirical numerical models to determine exceedance and conservatism of the flight scaled test-derived base design environments. Brief discussion of thermal impact to the launch vehicle base components is also presented.

  2. 30 CFR 27.35 - Tests to determine life of critical components and subassemblies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tests to determine life of critical components and subassemblies. 27.35 Section 27.35 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS...

  3. 30 CFR 27.35 - Tests to determine life of critical components and subassemblies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tests to determine life of critical components and subassemblies. 27.35 Section 27.35 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS...

  4. 30 CFR 27.35 - Tests to determine life of critical components and subassemblies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests to determine life of critical components and subassemblies. 27.35 Section 27.35 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS...

  5. 42 CFR 84.21 - Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator components or subassemblies; fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Canisters 900 Cartridges 600 Filters 650 Hoses 250 Blowers 250 Harnesses 100 ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Fees § 84.21 Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator components...

  6. 42 CFR 84.21 - Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator components or subassemblies; fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Canisters 900 Cartridges 600 Filters 650 Hoses 250 Blowers 250 Harnesses 100 ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Fees § 84.21 Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator components...

  7. 42 CFR 84.21 - Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator components or subassemblies; fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Canisters 900 Cartridges 600 Filters 650 Hoses 250 Blowers 250 Harnesses 100 ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Fees § 84.21 Examination, inspection, and testing of respirator components...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... system. 866.5380 Section 866.5380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5380 Free secretory component immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... system. 866.5380 Section 866.5380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5380 Free secretory component immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A...

  10. 6. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T27), looking southwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Exterior view of Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southwest. The building wing on the left houses Test Cell 9 (fuel), and that on the right houses the equipment room. The corrugated aluminum shed that is taller than the main building in the left foreground houses a citric acid air pollution control room (also known as scrubber room), the interior of which may be seen in CO-88-A-21. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  11. Patch testing for allergic contact dermatitis to cigarettes: smoked/unsmoked components and formaldehyde factors.

    PubMed

    Carew, Benjamin; Muir, Jim

    2014-08-01

    A patient with hand dermatitis reported that switching her smoking hand resulted in reduced symptoms. When allergy to cigarettes is suspected the literature supports standard allergy testing as well as testing the individual components of cigarettes. Initial standard patch testing revealed an allergy to formaldehyde and the formaldehyde releasing agent, quaternium-15. The patient did not react to her usual roll-your-own cigarette components but reacted to the smoked filter paper of a particular brand of cigarette she frequently borrowed from a friend. Possible explanations include either a variation of ingredients between cigarettes that alters the formaldehyde concentration or another unidentified allergen in the branded cigarette causing allergic contact dermatitis.

  12. Compatibility tests of steels in flowing liquid lead-bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, F.; Benamati, G.; Fazio, C.; Rusanov, A.

    2001-06-01

    The behaviour of steels exposed to flowing Pb-55Bi was evaluated. The materials tested are the two austenitic steels AISI 316L and 1.4970, and the six martensitic steels Optifer IVc, T91, Batman 27, Batman 28, EP823 and EM10 which were exposed to flowing Pb-55Bi for 1000, 2000 and 3000 h and at two temperatures (573 and 743 K). The corrosion tests were conducted in the non-isothermal loop of IPPE-Obninsk under a controlled oxygen level (10 -6 wt%). The compatibility study showed that at a lower temperature, a very thin oxide layer (<1 μm) was formed on the steels. At higher temperature, austenitic steels also exhibited a thin oxide layer sufficient to prevent their dissolution in the melt. A thicker oxide, which grew according to a parabolic law, was observed on the surface of the martensitic steels. The oxidation resistance behaviour of the martensitic steels was correlated with their alloying elements.

  13. Interrater reliability of mechanical tests for functional classification of transtibial prosthesis components distal to the socket.

    PubMed

    Major, Matthew J; Johnson, William Brett; Gard, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that the design and associated mechanical function of lower-limb prostheses affects user health and mobility, supporting common standards of clinical practice for appropriate matching of prosthesis design and user needs. This matching process is dependent on accurate and reliable methods for the functional classification of prosthetic components. The American Orthotic & Prosthetic Association developed a set of tests for L-code characterization of prosthesis mechanical properties to facilitate functional classification of passive below-knee prosthetic components. The mechanical tests require use of test-specific fixtures to be installed in a materials testing machine by a test administrator. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the interrater reliability of test outcomes between two administrators using the same testing facility. Ten prosthetic components (8 feet and 2 pylons) that spanned the range of commercial designs were subjected to all appropriate tests. Tests with scalar outcomes demonstrated high interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient(2,1) >/= 0.935), and there was no discrepancy in observation-based outcomes between administrators, suggesting that between-administrator variability may not present a significant source of error. These results support the integration of these mechanical tests for prosthesis classification, which will help enhance objectivity and optimization of the prosthesis-patient matching process for maximizing rehabilitation outcomes.

  14. Uninstrumented assembly airflow testing in the Annular Flow Distribution facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kielpinski, A.L.

    1992-02-01

    During the Emergency Cooling System phase of a postulated large-break loss of coolant accident (ECS-LOCA), air enters the primary loop and is pumped down the reactor assemblies. One of the experiments performed to support the analysis of this accident was the Annular Flow Distribution (AFD) experiment, conducted in a facility built for this purpose at Babcock and Wilcox Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. As part of this experiment, a large body of airflow data were acquired in a prototypical mockup of the Mark 22 reactor assembly. This assembly was known as the AFD (or the I-AFD here) reference assembly. The I-AFD assembly was fully prototypical, having been manufactured in SRS`s production fabrication facility. Similar Mark 22 mockup assemblies were tested in several test facilities in the SRS Heat Transfer Laboratory (HTL). Discrepancies were found. The present report documents further work done to address the discrepancy in airflow measurements between the AFD facility and HTL facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to disseminate the data from the U-AFD test, and to compare these test results to the I-AFD data and the U-AT data. A summary table of the test data and the B&W data transmittal letter are included as an attachment to this report. The full data transmittal volume from B&W (including time plots of the various instruments) is included as an appendix to this report. These data are further analyzed by comparing them to two other HTL tests, namely, SPRIHTE 1 and the Single Assembly Test Stand (SATS).

  15. Experience with helium leak and thermal shocks test of SST-1 cryo components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rajiv; Nimavat, Hiren; Srikanth, G. L. N.; Bairagi, Nitin; Shah, Pankil; Tanna, V. L.; Pradhan, S.

    2012-11-01

    A steady state superconducting Tokamak SST-1 is presently under its assembly stage at the Institute for Plasma Research. The SST-1 machine is a family of Superconducting SC coils for both Toroidal field and Poloidal Field. An ultra high vacuum compatible vacuum vessel, placed in the bore of the TF coils, houses the plasma facing components. A high vacuum cryostat encloses all the SC coils and the vacuum vessel. Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) cooled thermal shield between the vacuum vessel & SC coils as well as between cryostat and the SC coils. There are number of crucial cryogenic components as Electrical isolators, 80 K thermal shield, Cryogenic flexible hose etc., which have to be passed the performance validation tests as part of fulfillment of the stringent QA/QC before incorporated in the main assembly. The individual leak tests of components at RT as well as after thermal cycle from 300 K to 77 K ensure us to make final overall leak proof system. These components include, Large numbers of Electrical Isolators for Helium as well as LN2 services, Flexible Bellows and Hoses for Helium as well as LN2 services, Thermal shock tests of large numbers of 80 K Bubble shields In order to validate the helium leak tightness of these components, we have used the calibrated mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD) at 300 K, 77 K and 4.2. Since it is very difficult to locate the leaks, which are appearing at rather lower temperatures e.g. less than 20 K, We have invented different approaches to resolve the issue of such leaks. This paper, in general describes the design of cryogenic flexible hose, assembly, couplings for leak testing, test method and techniques of thermal cycles test at 77 K inflow conditions and leak testing aspects of different cryogenic components. The test results, the problems encountered and its solutions techniques are discussed.

  16. Test results of the RS-44 integrated component evaluator liquid oxygen/hydrogen rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, R. F.; Lariviere, B. W.

    1993-10-01

    An advanced LOX/LH2 expander cycle rocket engine, producing 15,000 lbf thrust for Orbital Transfer Vehicle missions, was tested to determine ignition, transition, and main stage characteristics. Detail design and fabrication of the pump fed RS44 integrated component evaluator (ICE) was accomplished using company discretionary resources and was tested under this contracted effort. Successful demonstrations were completed to about the 50 percent fuel turbopump power level (87,000 RPM), but during this last test, a high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) bearing failed curtailing the test program. No other hardware were affected by the HPFTP premature shutdown. The ICE operations matched well with the predicted start transient simulations. The tests demonstrated the feasibility of a high performance advanced expander cycle engine. All engine components operated nominally, except for the HPFTP, during the engine hot-fire tests. A failure investigation was completed using company discretionary resources.

  17. Test Results of the RS-44 Integrated Component Evaluator Liquid Oxygen/Hydrogen Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, R. F.; Lariviere, B. W.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced LOX/LH2 expander cycle rocket engine, producing 15,000 lbf thrust for Orbital Transfer Vehicle missions, was tested to determine ignition, transition, and main stage characteristics. Detail design and fabrication of the pump fed RS44 integrated component evaluator (ICE) was accomplished using company discretionary resources and was tested under this contracted effort. Successful demonstrations were completed to about the 50 percent fuel turbopump power level (87,000 RPM), but during this last test, a high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) bearing failed curtailing the test program. No other hardware were affected by the HPFTP premature shutdown. The ICE operations matched well with the predicted start transient simulations. The tests demonstrated the feasibility of a high performance advanced expander cycle engine. All engine components operated nominally, except for the HPFTP, during the engine hot-fire tests. A failure investigation was completed using company discretionary resources.

  18. 42 CFR 84.94 - Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus. 84.94...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.94 Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus. (a) Where oxygen is supplied by a constant-flow device only, the rate of flow shall be at least 3 liters per minute for the...

  19. 42 CFR 84.94 - Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus. 84.94...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.94 Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus. (a) Where oxygen is supplied by a constant-flow device only, the rate of flow shall be at least 3 liters per minute for the...

  20. C/SiC Component & Material Analysis, Attachment Verification, & Blisk Turbopump Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Genge, Gary; Gregg, Wayne; Jordan, William

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic composite blisk components constructed of carbon fibers & silicon carbide ceramic matrix have been fabricated and tested. Room and cryogenic torque testing have verified the attachment configuration. The polar and quasi-isotropic blisks have been proof spun, balanced, and tested in the Simplex turbopump. Foreign particle impact analysis was conducted for C/SiC. Data and manufacturing lessons learned are significantly benefiting the development of the Reusable Launch Vehicle's ceramic matrix composite integrally bladed disk.

  1. The development and testing of ceramic components in piston engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McEntire, B.J.; Willis, R.W.; Southam, R.E.

    1994-10-01

    Within the past 10--15 years, ceramic hardware has been fabricated and tested in a number of piston engine applications including valves, piston pins, roller followers, tappet shims, and other wear components. It has been shown that, with proper design and installation, ceramics improve performance, fuel economy, and wear and corrosion resistance. These results have been obtained using rig and road tests on both stock and race engines. Selected summaries of these tests are presented in this review paper.

  2. Laminar flow control leading edge glove flight test article development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.; Mcnay, D. E.; Thelander, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A laminar flow control (LFC) flight test article was designed and fabricated to fit into the right leading edge of a JetStar aircraft. The article was designed to attach to the front spar and fill in approx. 70 inches of the leading edge that are normally occupied by the large slipper fuel tank. The outer contour of the test article was constrained to align with an external fairing aft of the front spar which provided a surface pressure distribution over the test region representative of an LFC airfoil. LFC is achieved by applying suction through a finely perforated surface, which removes a small fraction of the boundary layer. The LFC test article has a retractable high lift shield to protect the laminar surface from contamination by airborne debris during takeoff and low altitude operation. The shield is designed to intercept insects and other particles that could otherwise impact the leading edge. Because the shield will intercept freezing rain and ice, a oozing glycol ice protection system is installed on the shield leading edge. In addition to the shield, a liquid freezing point depressant can be sprayed on the back of the shield.

  3. Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

    2010-05-13

    This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

  4. Temporal Variability from the Two-Component Advective Flow Solution and Its Observational Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Broja G.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-09-01

    In the propagating oscillatory shock model, the oscillation of the post-shock region, i.e., the Compton cloud, causes the observed low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). The evolution of QPO frequency is explained by the systematic variation of the Compton cloud size, i.e., the steady radial movement of the shock front, which is triggered by the cooling of the post-shock region. Thus, analysis of the energy-dependent temporal properties in different variability timescales can diagnose the dynamics and geometry of accretion flows around black holes. We study these properties for the high-inclination black hole source XTE J1550-564 during its 1998 outburst and the low-inclination black hole source GX 339-4 during its 2006–07 outburst using RXTE/PCA data, and we find that they can satisfactorily explain the time lags associated with the QPOs from these systems. We find a smooth decrease of the time lag as a function of time in the rising phase of both sources. In the declining phase, the time lag increases with time. We find a systematic evolution of QPO frequency and hard lags in these outbursts. In XTE J1550-564, the lag changes from hard to soft (i.e., from a positive to a negative value) at a crossing frequency (ν c) of ∼3.4 Hz. We present possible mechanisms to explain the lag behavior of high and low-inclination sources within the framework of a single two-component advective flow model.

  5. Temporal Variability from the Two-Component Advective Flow Solution and Its Observational Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Broja G.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-09-01

    In the propagating oscillatory shock model, the oscillation of the post-shock region, i.e., the Compton cloud, causes the observed low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). The evolution of QPO frequency is explained by the systematic variation of the Compton cloud size, i.e., the steady radial movement of the shock front, which is triggered by the cooling of the post-shock region. Thus, analysis of the energy-dependent temporal properties in different variability timescales can diagnose the dynamics and geometry of accretion flows around black holes. We study these properties for the high-inclination black hole source XTE J1550-564 during its 1998 outburst and the low-inclination black hole source GX 339-4 during its 2006-07 outburst using RXTE/PCA data, and we find that they can satisfactorily explain the time lags associated with the QPOs from these systems. We find a smooth decrease of the time lag as a function of time in the rising phase of both sources. In the declining phase, the time lag increases with time. We find a systematic evolution of QPO frequency and hard lags in these outbursts. In XTE J1550-564, the lag changes from hard to soft (i.e., from a positive to a negative value) at a crossing frequency (ν c) of ˜3.4 Hz. We present possible mechanisms to explain the lag behavior of high and low-inclination sources within the framework of a single two-component advective flow model.

  6. Implementation of Speed Variation in the Structural Dynamic Assessment of Turbomachinery Flow-Path Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Davis, R. Benjamin; DeHaye, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    During the design of turbomachinery flow path components, the assessment of possible structural resonant conditions is critical. Higher frequency modes of these structures are frequently found to be subject to resonance, and in these cases, design criteria require a forced response analysis of the structure with the assumption that the excitation speed exactly equals the resonant frequency. The design becomes problematic if the response analysis shows a violation of the HCF criteria. One possible solution is to perform "finite-life" analysis, where Miner's rule is used to calculate the actual life in seconds in comparison to the required life. In this situation, it is beneficial to incorporate the fact that, for a variety of turbomachinery control reasons, the speed of the rotor does not actually dwell at a single value but instead dithers about a nominal mean speed and during the time that the excitation frequency is not equal to the resonant frequency, the damage accumulated by the structure is diminished significantly. Building on previous investigations into this process, we show that a steady-state assumption of the response is extremely accurate for this typical case, resulting in the ability to quickly account for speed variation in the finite-life analysis of a component which has previously had its peak dynamic stress at resonance calculated. A technique using Monte Carlo simulation is also presented which can be used when specific speed time histories are not available. The implementation of these techniques can prove critical for successful turbopump design, as the improvement in life when speed variation is considered is shown to be greater than a factor of two.

  7. Implementation of Speed Variation in the Structural Dynamic Assessment of Turbomachinery Flow-Path Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Davis, R. Benjamin; DeHaye, Michael

    2013-01-01

    During the design of turbomachinery flow path components, the assessment of possible structural resonant conditions is critical. Higher frequency modes of these structures are frequently found to be subject to resonance, and in these cases, design criteria require a forced response analysis of the structure with the assumption that the excitation speed exactly equals the resonant frequency. The design becomes problematic if the response analysis shows a violation of the HCF criteria. One possible solution is to perform "finite-life" analysis, where Miner's rule is used to calculate the actual life in seconds in comparison to the required life. In this situation, it is beneficial to incorporate the fact that, for a variety of turbomachinery control reasons, the speed of the rotor does not actually dwell at a single value but instead dithers about a nominal mean speed and during the time that the excitation frequency is not equal to the resonant frequency, the damage accumulated by the structure is diminished significantly. Building on previous investigations into this process, we show that a steady-state assumption of the response is extremely accurate for this typical case, resulting in the ability to quickly account for speed variation in the finite-life analysis of a component which has previously had its peak dynamic stress at resonance calculated. A technique using Monte Carlo simulation is also presented which can be used when specific speed time histories are not available. The implementation of these techniques can prove critical for successful turbopump design, as the improvement in life when speed variation is considered is shown to be greater than a factor of two

  8. Modeling the Relations Between Flow Regime Components, Species Traits, and Spawning Success of Fishes in Warmwater Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, Scott W.; Peterson, James T.; Freeman, Mary C.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Irwin, Elise

    2010-08-01

    Modifications to stream hydrologic regimes can have a profound influence on the dynamics of their fish populations. Using hierarchical linear models, we examined the relations between flow regime and young-of-year fish density using fish sampling and discharge data from three different warmwater streams in Illinois, Alabama, and Georgia. We used an information theoretic approach to evaluate the relative support for models describing hypothesized influences of five flow regime components representing: short-term high and low flows; short-term flow stability; and long-term mean flows and flow stability on fish reproductive success during fish spawning and rearing periods. We also evaluated the influence of ten fish species traits on fish reproductive success. Species traits included spawning duration, reproductive strategy, egg incubation rate, swimming locomotion morphology, general habitat preference, and food habits. Model selection results indicated that young-of-year fish density was positively related to short-term high flows during the spawning period and negatively related to flow variability during the rearing period. However, the effect of the flow regime components varied substantially among species, but was related to species traits. The effect of short-term high flows on the reproductive success was lower for species that broadcast their eggs during spawning. Species with cruiser swimming locomotion morphologies (e.g., Micropterus) also were more vulnerable to variable flows during the rearing period. Our models provide insight into the conditions and timing of flows that influence the reproductive success of warmwater stream fishes and may guide decisions related to stream regulation and management.

  9. Modeling the relations between flow regime components, species traits, and spawning success of fishes in warmwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craven, S.W.; Peterson, J.T.; Freeman, Mary C.; Kwak, T.J.; Irwin, E.

    2010-01-01

    Modifications to stream hydrologic regimes can have a profound influence on the dynamics of their fish populations. Using hierarchical linear models, we examined the relations between flow regime and young-of-year fish density using fish sampling and discharge data from three different warmwater streams in Illinois, Alabama, and Georgia. We used an information theoretic approach to evaluate the relative support for models describing hypothesized influences of five flow regime components representing: short-term high and low flows; short-term flow stability; and long-term mean flows and flow stability on fish reproductive success during fish spawning and rearing periods. We also evaluated the influence of ten fish species traits on fish reproductive success. Species traits included spawning duration, reproductive strategy, egg incubation rate, swimming locomotion morphology, general habitat preference, and food habits. Model selection results indicated that young-of-year fish density was positively related to short-term high flows during the spawning period and negatively related to flow variability during the rearing period. However, the effect of the flow regime components varied substantially among species, but was related to species traits. The effect of short-term high flows on the reproductive success was lower for species that broadcast their eggs during spawning. Species with cruiser swimming locomotion morphologies (e.g., Micropterus) also were more vulnerable to variable flows during the rearing period. Our models provide insight into the conditions and timing of flows that influence the reproductive success of warmwater stream fishes and may guide decisions related to stream regulation and management. ?? 2010 US Government.

  10. Numerical Modeling for Hole-Edge Cracking of Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) Components in the Static Bend Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunok; Mohr, William; Yang, Yu-Ping; Zelenak, Paul; Kimchi, Menachem

    2011-08-01

    Numerical modeling of local formability, such as hole-edge cracking and shear fracture in bending of AHSS, is one of the challenging issues for simulation engineers for prediction and evaluation of stamping and crash performance of materials. This is because continuum-mechanics-based finite element method (FEM) modeling requires additional input data, "failure criteria" to predict the local formability limit of materials, in addition to the material flow stress data input for simulation. This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for predicting hole-edge failures during static bend tests of AHSS structures. A local-strain-based failure criterion and a stress-triaxiality-based failure criterion were developed and implemented in LS-DYNA simulation code to predict hole-edge failures in component bend tests. The holes were prepared using two different methods: mechanical punching and water-jet cutting. In the component bend tests, the water-jet trimmed hole showed delayed fracture at the hole-edges, while the mechanical punched hole showed early fracture as the bending angle increased. In comparing the numerical modeling and test results, the load-displacement curve, the displacement at the onset of cracking, and the final crack shape/length were used. Both failure criteria also enable the numerical model to differentiate between the local formability limit of mechanical-punched and water-jet-trimmed holes. The failure criteria and static bend test developed here are useful to evaluate the local formability limit at a structural component level for automotive crash tests.

  11. An Analysis of Testing Requirements for Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Cetiner, Sacit M; Flanagan, George F; Peretz, Fred J; Yoder Jr, Graydon L

    2009-11-01

    This report provides guidance on the component testing necessary during the next phase of fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) development. In particular, the report identifies and describes the reactor component performance and reliability requirements, provides an overview of what information is necessary to provide assurance that components will adequately achieve the requirements, and then provides guidance on how the required performance information can efficiently be obtained. The report includes a system description of a representative test scale FHR reactor. The reactor parameters presented in this report should only be considered as placeholder values until an FHR test scale reactor design is completed. The report focus is bounded at the interface between and the reactor primary coolant salt and the fuel and the gas supply and return to the Brayton cycle power conversion system. The analysis is limited to component level testing and does not address system level testing issues. Further, the report is oriented as a bottom-up testing requirements analysis as opposed to a having a top-down facility description focus.

  12. Space Flight Requirements for Fiber Optic Components; Qualification Testing and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Jin, Xiaodan Linda; Chuska, Richard; Friedberg, Patricia; Malenab, Mary; Matuszeski, Adam

    2007-01-01

    "Qualification" of fiber optic components holds a very different meaning than it did ten years ago. In the past, qualification meant extensive prolonged testing and screening that led to a programmatic method of reliability assurance. For space flight programs today, the combination of using higher performance commercial technology, with shorter development schedules and tighter mission budgets makes long term testing and reliability characterization unfeasible. In many cases space flight missions will be using technology within years of its development and an example of this is fiber laser technology. Although the technology itself is not a new product the components that comprise a fiber laser system change frequently as processes and packaging changes occur. Once a process or the materials for manufacturing a component change, even the data that existed on its predecessor can no longer provide assurance on the newer version. In order to assure reliability during a space flight mission, the component engineer must understand the requirements of the space flight environment as well as the physics of failure of the components themselves. This can be incorporated into an efficient and effective testing plan that "qualifies" a component to specific criteria defined by the program given the mission requirements and the component limitations. This requires interaction at the very initial stages of design between the system design engineer, mechanical engineer, subsystem engineer and the component hardware engineer. Although this is the desired interaction what typically occurs is that the subsystem engineer asks the components or development engineers to meet difficult requirements without knowledge of the current industry situation or the lack of qualification data. This is then passed on to the vendor who can provide little help with such a harsh set of requirements due to high cost of testing for space flight environments. This presentation is designed to guide the

  13. Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) Component Responses to Payload Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration testing of SUMI was performed at both the experiment and payload levels. No accelerometers were installed inside the experiment during testing, but it is certain that component responses were very high. The environments experienced by optical and electronic components in these tests is an area of ongoing concern. The analysis supporting this presentation included a detailed finite element model of the SUMI experiment section, the dynamic response of which, correlated well with accelerometer measurements from the testing of the experimental section at Marshall Space Flight Center. The relatively short timeframe available to complete the task and the limited design information available was a limitation on the level of detail possible for the non-experiment portion of the model. However, since the locations of interest are buried in the experimental section of the model, the calculated responses should be enlightening both for the development of test criteria and for guidance in design.

  14. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  15. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  16. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  17. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  18. Aeroacoustic Characteristics of Model Jet Test Facility Flow Conditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzie, Kevin W.; Henderson, Brenda S.; Haskin, Harry H.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation of flow conditioning devices used to suppress internal rig noise in high speed, high temperature experimental jet facilities is discussed. The aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of a number of devices including pressure loss and extraneous noise generation are measured. Both aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics are strongly dependent on the porosity of the flow conditioner and the closure ratio of the duct system. For unchoked flow conditioners, the pressure loss follows conventional incompressible flow models. However, for choked flow conditioners, a compressible flow model where the duct and flow conditioner system is modeled as a convergent-divergent nozzle can be used to estimate pressure loss. Choked flow conditioners generate significantly more noise than unchoked conditioners. In addition, flow conditioners with small hole diameters or sintered metal felt material generate less self-noise noise compared to flow conditioners with larger holes.

  19. Compensation between meridional flow components of the Atlantic MOC at 26° N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frajka-Williams, E.; Meinen, C. S.; Johns, W. E.; Smeed, D. A.; Duchez, A.; Lawrence, A. J.; Cuthbertson, D. A.; McCarthy, G. D.; Bryden, H. L.; Baringer, M. O.; Moat, B. I.; Rayner, D.

    2016-04-01

    From ten years of observations of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC) at 26° N (2004-2014), we revisit the question of flow compensation between components of the circulation. Contrasting with early results from the observations, transport variations of the Florida Current (FC) and upper mid-ocean (UMO) transports (top 1000 m east of the Bahamas) are now found to compensate on sub-annual timescales. The observed compensation between the FC and UMO transports is associated with horizontal circulation and means that this part of the correlated variability does not project onto the MOC. A deep baroclinic response to wind-forcing (Ekman transport) is also found in the lower North Atlantic Deep Water (LNADW; 3000-5000 m) transport. In contrast, co-variability between Ekman and the LNADW transports does contribute to overturning. On longer timescales, the southward UMO transport has continued to strengthen, resulting in a continued decline of the MOC. Most of this interannual variability of the MOC can be traced to changes in isopycnal displacements on the western boundary, within the top 1000 m and below 2000 m. Substantial trends are observed in isopycnal displacements in the deep ocean, underscoring the importance of deep boundary measurements to capture the variability of the Atlantic MOC.

  20. Combustor and Vane Features and Components Tested in a Gas Turbine Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roinson, R. Craig; Verrilli, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    The use of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) as combustor liners and turbine vanes provides the potential of improving next-generation turbine engine performance, through lower emissions and higher cycle efficiency, relative to today s use of superalloy hot-section components. For example, the introduction of film-cooling air in metal combustor liners has led to higher levels of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from the combustion process. An environmental barrier coated (EBC) siliconcarbide- fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) composite is a new material system that can operate at higher temperatures, significantly reducing the film-cooling requirements and enabling lower NOx production. Evaluating components and subcomponents fabricated from these advanced CMCs under gas turbine conditions is paramount to demonstrating that the material system can perform as required in the complex thermal stress and environmentally aggressive engine environment. To date, only limited testing has been conducted on CMC combustor and turbine concepts and subelements of this type throughout the industry. As part of the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program, the High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) at the NASA Glenn Research Center was selected to demonstrate coupon, subcomponent feature, and component testing because it can economically provide the temperatures, pressures, velocities, and combustion gas compositions that closely simulate the engine environments. The results have proven the HPBR to be a highly versatile test rig amenable to multiple test specimen configurations essential to coupon and component testing.

  1. An Approach of Vulnerability Testing for Third-Party Component Based on Condition and Parameter Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weihe

    2013-01-01

    The research on component vulnerability testing is critical. In this paper, an approach of vulnerability testing is proposed based on condition mutation and parameter mutation in order to effectively detect the explicit vulnerabilities of third-party components. To start with, the Pre-condition Mutation Algorithm (PCMA) is presented to generate mutants set of the pre-condition and test cases are generated based on these mutants. Then, the Single Parameter Mutated Values (SPMV) procedure is addressed to generate parameter values based on mutation operators of parameter specification. These values are then taken as the input of the Test Case Generation Algorithm based on the Parameter Constraint (TCGPC), which is addressed to generate test case set violating the parameter constraint. The explicit vulnerabilities can be detected by the vulnerability detecting algorithm based on the test cases of condition and parameter mutation. The experiments show that our approach can detect explicit vulnerability faults of third-party components. Furthermore, the proposed approach can detect more vulnerability faults than other related approaches such as condition coverage methods, fuzzy testing method and boundary value method. PMID:24194686

  2. Shuttle Return-to-Flight IH-108 Aerothermal Test at CUBRC - Flow Field Calibration and CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Kei Y.; Holden, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses one specific aspect of the Shuttle Retrun-To-Flight IH-108 Aerothermal Test at CUBRC, the test flow field calibration. It showed the versatility of the CUBRC LENS II wind tunnel for an aerothermal test with unique and demanding requirements. CFD analyses were used effectively to extend the test range at the low end of the Mach range. It demonstrated how ground test facility and CFD synergy can be utilitzed iteratively to enhance the confidence in the fedility of both tools. It addressed the lingering concerns of the aerothermal community on use of inpulse facility and CFD analysis. At the conclusion of the test program, members from the NASA Marshall (MSFC), CUBRC and USA (United Space Alliance) Consultants (The Grey Beards) were asked to independently verify the flight scaling data generated by Boeing for flight certification of the re-designed external tank (ET) components. The blind test comparison showed very good results. A more comprehensive discussion of the topics in this paper can be found in Chapter 6 of Reference [1]. The overall aspect of the test program has been discussed in an AIAA paper by Tim Wadhams [2]. The Shuttle Ascent Stack performance and related issues discussed in the Report [1] are not included in this paper. No ITAR data is included in this paper.

  3. Component Prioritization Schema for Achieving Maximum Time and Cost Benefits from Software Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Praveen Ranjan; Pareek, Deepak

    Software testing is any activity aimed at evaluating an attribute or capability of a program or system and determining that it meets its required results. Defining the end of software testing represents crucial features of any software development project. A premature release will involve risks like undetected bugs, cost of fixing faults later, and discontented customers. Any software organization would want to achieve maximum possible benefits from software testing with minimum resources. Testing time and cost need to be optimized for achieving a competitive edge in the market. In this paper, we propose a schema, called the Component Prioritization Schema (CPS), to achieve an effective and uniform prioritization of the software components. This schema serves as an extension to the Non Homogenous Poisson Process based Cumulative Priority Model. We also introduce an approach for handling time-intensive versus cost-intensive projects.

  4. A study of facilities and fixtures for testing of a high speed civil transport wing component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerro, J. A.; Vause, R. F.; Bowman, L. M.; Jensen, J. K.; Martin, C. J., Jr.; Stockwell, A. E.; Waters, W. A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the feasibility of testing a large-scale High Speed Civil Transport wing component in the Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory in Building 1148 at NASA Langley Research Center. The report includes a survey of the electrical and hydraulic resources and identifies the backing structure and floor hard points which would be available for reacting the test loads. The backing structure analysis uses a new finite element model of the floor and backstop support system in the Structures Laboratory. Information on the data acquisition system and the thermal power requirements is also presented. The study identified the hardware that would be required to test a typical component, including the number and arrangement of hydraulic actuators required to simulate expected flight loads. Load introduction and reaction structure concepts were analyzed to investigate the effects of experimentally induced boundary conditions.

  5. Developing standard performance testing procedures for MC&A components at a site

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, Carolynn

    2010-01-01

    The condition of a nuclear material control and accountability system (MC&A) and its individual components, as with any system combining technical elements, documentation and the human factor, may be characterized through an aggregate of values for the various parameters that determine the system's ability to perform. The MC&A system's status may be functioning effectively, marginally or not functioning based on a summary of the values of the individual parameters. This work included a review of the following elements and subsystems or components for a material control and accountability system: (1) MC&A Elements: Information subsystem, Measurement subsystem, NM access subsystem, including a tamper-indicating device (TID) program, and Automated information-gathering subsystem; and (2) Detecting NM Loses Elements: Inventory differences, Shipper/receiver differences, Confirmatory measurements and differences with accounting data, and TID or seal violations. In order to detect the absence or loss of nuclear material there must be appropriate interactions among the elements and their respective subsystems (from the list above). Additionally this work includes a review of the status of regulatory requirements for the MC&A system components and potential criteria that support the evaluation of the performance of the listed components. The listed components had performance testing algorithms and procedures developed that took into consideration the regulatory criteria. The developed MC&A performance-testing procedures were the basis for a pilot Guide for MC&A Performance Testing at the MBAs of SSC RF IPPE.

  6. Results of molten salt panel and component experiments for solar central receivers: Cold fill, freeze/thaw, thermal cycling and shock, and instrumentation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, J.E.; Ralph, M.E.; Chavez, J.M.; Dunkin, S.R.; Rush, E.E.; Ghanbari, C.M.; Matthews, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted with a molten salt loop at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM to resolve issues associated with the operation of the 10MW{sub e} Solar Two Central Receiver Power Plant located near Barstow, CA. The salt loop contained two receiver panels, components such as flanges and a check valve, vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters, and an impedance pressure transducer. Tests were conducted on procedures for filling and thawing a panel, and assessing components and instrumentation in a molten salt environment. Four categories of experiments were conducted: (1) cold filling procedures, (2) freeze/thaw procedures, (3) component tests, and (4) instrumentation tests. Cold-panel and -piping fill experiments are described, in which the panels and piping were preheated to temperatures below the salt freezing point prior to initiating flow, to determine the feasibility of cold filling the receiver and piping. The transient thermal response was measured, and heat transfer coefficients and transient stresses were calculated from the data. Freeze/thaw experiments were conducted with the panels, in which the salt was intentionally allowed to freeze in the receiver tubes, then thawed with heliostat beams. Slow thermal cycling tests were conducted to measure both how well various designs of flanges (e.g., tapered flanges or clamp type flanges) hold a seal under thermal conditions typical of nightly shut down, and the practicality of using these flanges on high maintenance components. In addition, the flanges were thermally shocked to simulate cold starting the system. Instrumentation such as vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters were tested alongside each other, and compared with flow measurements from calibration tanks in the flow loop.

  7. A regional test of global models for flow, rheology, and seismic anisotropy at the base of the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Heather A.; Long, Maureen D.

    2015-08-01

    The study of flow patterns and seismic anisotropy in the lowermost mantle is fraught with uncertainties, given the limitations in our understanding of the physical properties of the lowermost mantle and the relationships between deformation and anisotropy. Here we use a set of SKS, SKKS, and ScS splitting measurements that sample the eastern edge of the African Large Low Shear Velocity Province to test predictions of seismic anisotropy derived from previously published 3D global mantle flow models and anisotropy modeling (Walker et al., 2011). The observations can be fit by a model that invokes flow directed to the southwest with a component of downwelling in our study region, and slip that occurs along the (0 1 0) plane of post-perovskite. Most importantly, we demonstrate the ability of a regional shear wave splitting data set to test the robustness of models for flow and deformation in the lowermost mantle.

  8. Computed tomography (CT) as a nondestructive test method used for composite helicopter components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oster, Reinhold

    1991-09-01

    The first components of primary helicopter structures to be made of glass fiber reinforced plastics were the main and tail rotor blades of the Bo105 and BK 117 helicopters. These blades are now successfully produced in series. New developments in rotor components, e.g., the rotor blade technology of the Bo108 and PAH2 programs, make use of very complex fiber reinforced structures to achieve simplicity and strength. Computer tomography was found to be an outstanding nondestructive test method for examining the internal structure of components. A CT scanner generates x-ray attenuation measurements which are used to produce computer reconstructed images of any desired part of an object. The system images a range of flaws in composites in a number of views and planes. Several CT investigations and their results are reported taking composite helicopter components as an example.

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) as a nondestructive test method used for composite helicopter components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oster, Reinhold

    The first components of primary helicopter structures to be made of glass fiber reinforced plastics were the main and tail rotor blades of the Bo105 and BK117 helicopters. These blades are now successfully produced in series. New developments in rotor components, e.g. the rotor blade technology of the Bo108 and PAH2 programs, make use of very complex fiber reinforced structures to achieve simplicity and strength. Computer tomography was found to be an outstanding nondestructive test method for examining the internal structure of components. A CT scanner generates x-ray attenuation measurements which are used to produce computer reconstructed images of any desired part of an object. The system images a range of flaws in composites in a number of views and planes. Several CT investigations and their results are reported taking composite helicopter components as an example.

  10. Cinematics and sticking of heart valves in pulsatile flow test.

    PubMed

    Köhler, J; Wirtz, R

    1991-05-01

    The aim of the project was to develop laboratory test devices for studies of the cinematics and sticking behaviour of technical valve protheses. The second step includes testing technical valves of different types and sizes under static and dynamic conditions. A force-deflection balance was developed in order to load valve rims by static radial forces until sticking or loss of a disc (sticking- and clamping-mould point) with computer-controlled force deflection curves. A second deflection device was developed and used for prosthetic valves in the aortic position of a pulsatile mock circulation loop with simultaneous video-cinematography. The stiffness of technical valve rims varied between 0.20 (St. Jude) and about 1.0 N/micron (metal rim valves). The stiffness decreased significantly with increasing valve size. Sticking under pulsatile flow conditions was in good agreement with the static deflection measurements. Hence, valve sticking with increasing danger of thrombus formation is more likely with a less stiff valve rim. In the case of forces acting perpendicularly to the pendulum axis, the clamping mould-point of the valve can be reached, followed by disc dislodgement. PMID:1864654

  11. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    A rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for a curved orthogrid panel typical of launch vehicle skin structures. Several test article configurations were produced by adding component equipment of differing weights to the flight-like vehicle panel. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was employed to describe the assumed correlation of phased input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application demonstrates the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software modules developed for the RPTF method can be easily adapted for

  12. Association between anaerobic components of the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit and 30-second Wingate test.

    PubMed

    Bertuzzi, R; Kiss, M A P D M; Damasceno, M; Oliveira, R S F; Lima-Silva, A E

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between the anaerobic components of the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) and of the 30-second Wingate anaerobic test (30-WAnT). Nine male physical education students performed: a) a maximal incremental exercise test; b) a supramaximal constant workload test to determine the anaerobic components of the MAOD; and c) a 30-WAnT to measure the peak power (PP) and mean power (MP). The fast component of the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption and blood lactate accumulation were measured after the supramaximal constant workload test in order to determine the contributions made by alactic (ALMET) and lactic (LAMET) metabolism. Significant correlations were found between PP and ALMET (r=0.71; P=0.033) and between MP and LAMET (r=0.72; P=0.030). The study results suggested that the anaerobic components of the MAOD and of the 30-WAnT are similarly applicable in the assessment of ALMET and LAMET during high-intensity exercise.

  13. Components of Spatial Thinking: Evidence from a Spatial Thinking Ability Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jongwon; Bednarz, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the development and validation of the spatial thinking ability test (STAT). The STAT consists of sixteen multiple-choice questions of eight types. The STAT was validated by administering it to a sample of 532 junior high, high school, and university students. Factor analysis using principal components extraction was applied…

  14. 75 FR 28208 - Conditions and Requirements for Testing Component Parts of Consumer Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... November 13, 2009, at 74 FR 58611, 58616; and (5) an Interim Enforcement Policy on Component Testing and... and published in the Federal Register on December 29, 2009 (74 FR 68593)). The proposed rule also... distribution in commerce has occurred that would affect compliance, including contamination or...

  15. Oblique breathers generated by a flow of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates past a polarized obstacle.

    PubMed

    Kamchatnov, A M; Kartashov, Y V

    2013-10-01

    We predict that oblique breathers can be generated by a flow of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates past a polarized obstacle that attracts one component of the condensate and repels the other one. The breather exists if intraspecies interaction constants differ from the interspecies interaction constant, and it corresponds to the nonlinear excitation of the so-called polarization mode with domination of the relative motion of the components. Analytical theory is developed for the case of small-amplitude breathers that is in reasonable agreement with the numerical results.

  16. Concentrating Solar Power Central Receiver Panel Component Fabrication and Testing FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Michael W; Miner, Kris

    2013-03-30

    The objective of this project is to complete a design of an advanced concentrated solar panel and demonstrate the manufacturability of key components. Then confirm the operation of the key components under prototypic solar flux conditions. This work is an important step in reducing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from a central receiver solar power plant. The key technical risk to building larger power towers is building the larger receiver systems. Therefore, this proposed technology project includes the design of an advanced molten salt prototypic sub-scale receiver panel that can be utilized into a large receiver system. Then complete the fabrication and testing of key components of the receive design that will be used to validate the design. This project shall have a significant impact on solar thermal power plant design. Receiver panels of suitable size for utility scale plants are a key element to a solar power tower plant. Many subtle and complex manufacturing processes are involved in producing a reliable, robust receiver panel. Given the substantial size difference between receiver panels manufactured in the past and those needed for large plant designs, the manufacture and demonstration on prototype receiver panel components with representative features of a full-sized panel will be important to improving the build process for commercial success. Given the thermal flux limitations of the test facility, the panel components cannot be rendered full size. Significance changes occurred in the projects technical strategies from project initiation to the accomplishments described herein. The initial strategy was to define cost improvements for the receiver, design and build a scale prototype receiver and test, on sun, with a molten salt heat transport system. DOE had committed to constructing a molten salt heat transport loop to support receiver testing at the top of the NSTTF tower. Because of funding constraints this did not happen. A subsequent plan to

  17. Oscillatory Flow Testing in a Sandbox - Towards Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Lim, D.; Cupola, F.; Cardiff, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed knowledge of subsurface hydraulic properties is important for predicting groundwater flow and contaminant transport. The spatial variation of hydraulic properties in the shallow subsurface has been extensively studied in the past two decades. A recent approach to characterize subsurface properties is hydraulic tomography, in which pressure data from multiple constant-rate pumping tests is inverted using a numerical model. Many laboratory sandbox studies have explored the performance of hydraulic tomography under different controlled conditions and shown that detailed heterogeneity information can be extracted (Liu et al., 2002, Illman et al., 2007, 2008, 2010a, 2010b, Liu et al., 2007, 2008, Xiang et al., 2009, Yin and Illman, 2009, Liu and Kitanidis, 2011, Berg and Illman, 2011a). Recently, Cardiff et al. (2013) proposed a modified approach of Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography (OHT) - in which periodic pumping signals of different frequencies are used for aquifer stimulation - to characterize aquifer properties. The potential advantages of OHT over traditional hydraulic tomography include: 1) no net injection or extraction of water; 2) little movement of existing contamination; 3) minimal impact of model boundary conditions; and 4) robust extraction of oscillatory signals from noisy data. To evaluate the premise of OHT, we built a highly-instrumented 2-D laboratory sandbox and record pressure responses to periodic pumping tests. In our setup, the laboratory sandbox is filled with sand of known hydraulic properties, and we measure aquifer responses at a variety of testing frequencies. The signals recorded are processed using Fourier-domain analysis, and compared against expected results under linear (Darcian) theory. The responses are analyzed using analytical and numerical models, which provide key insights as to: 1) how "effective" hydraulic properties estimated using homogeneous models are associated with aquifer heterogeneity; and 2) how OHT is able to

  18. The sympathetic release test: a test used to assess thermoregulation and autonomic control of blood flow.

    PubMed

    Tansey, E A; Roe, S M; Johnson, C J

    2014-03-01

    When a subject is heated, the stimulation of temperature-sensitive nerve endings in the skin, and the raising of the central body temperature, results in the reflex release of sympathetic vasoconstrictor tone in the skin of the extremities, causing a measurable temperature increase at the site of release. In the sympathetic release test, the subject is gently heated by placing the feet and calves in a commercially available foot warming pouch or immersing the feet and calves in warm water and wrapping the subject in blankets. Skin blood flow is estimated from measurements of skin temperature in the fingers. Normally skin temperature of the fingers is 65-75°F in cool conditions (environmental temperature: 59-68°F) and rises to 85-95°F during body heating. Deviations in this pattern may mean that there is abnormal sympathetic vasoconstrictor control of skin blood flow. Abnormal skin blood flow can substantially impair an individual's ability to thermoregulate and has important clinical implications. During whole body heating, the skin temperature from three different skin sites is monitored and oral temperature is monitored as an index of core temperature. Students determine the fingertip temperature at which the reflex release of sympathetic activity occurs and its maximal attainment, which reflects the vasodilating capacity of this cutaneous vascular bed. Students should interpret typical sample data for certain clinical conditions (Raynaud's disease, peripheral vascular disease, and postsympathectomy) and explain why there may be altered skin blood flow in these disorders.

  19. Status of Proof-Of-Concept testing at the Coal-Fired-Flow Facility, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Attig, R.C.; Chapman, J.N.; Johanson, N.R.

    1993-06-01

    Proof-of-concept (POC) testing, and collection and evaluation of data continued at the Coal-Fired-Flow Facility during the past year. Following four preliminary tests firing Rosebud coal in 1991 to establish base conditions for the Rosebud coal POC tests, three POC tests were run in 1992, and a fourth test early in 1993. Major equipment additions or modifications included installation of a wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP), which replaced a badly deteriorated venturi. This component also provides improved capability to meet Tennessee pollution regulations while operating the dry ESP and/or baghouse off design, or if one of these two control devices does not function properly. Improvements were also made to the dry ESP prior to the 1993 test, which appear to have improved the performance of this equipment. This paper will present an overview of the major results obtained during the Rosebud coal POC tests, including the performance of the dry and wet electrostatic precipitators. Differences between the Rosebud and Illinois coals will be described, but it is emphasized that these observations are based on incomplete results for the Rosebud coal.

  20. Shuttle Return-to-Flight IH-108 Aerothermal Test at CUBRC - Flow Field Calibration and CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Kei Y.; Holden, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses one specific aspect of the Shuttle Retrun-To-Flight IH-108 Aerothermal Test at Calspan-University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC), the test flow field calibration. It showed the versatility of the CUBRC Large Energy National Shock Tunnel (LENS) II wind tunnel for an aerothermal test with unique and demanding requirements. CFD analyses were used effectively to extend the test range at the low end of the Mach range. It demonstrated how ground test facility and CFD synergy can be utilitzed iteratively to enhance the confidence in the fedility of both tools. It addressed the lingering concerns of the aerothermal community on use of inpulse facility and CFD analysis. At the conclusion of the test program, members from the NASA Marshall (MSFC), CUBRC and USA (United Space Alliance) Consultants (The Grey Beards) were asked to independently verify the flight scaling data generated by Boeing for flight certification of the re-designed external tank (ET) components. The blind test comparison showed very good results.

  1. Testing of optical components to assure performance in a high acerage power environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Taylor, J.R.; Eickelberg, W.K.; Primdahl, K.A.

    1997-06-24

    Evaluation and testing of the optical components used in the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) plant is critical for qualification of suppliers, development of new optical multilayer designs and monufacturing processes, and assurance of performance in the production cycle. The range of specifications requires development of specialized test equipment and methods which are not routine or readily available in industry. Specifications are given on material characteristics such as index homogeneity, subsurface damage left after polishing, microscopic surface defects and contamination, coating absorption, and high average power laser damage. The approach to testing these performance characteristics and assuring the quality throughout the production cycle is described.

  2. Boeing Helicopters Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) Program summary of component tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenski, Joseph W., Jr.; Valco, Mark J.

    1992-07-01

    The principal objectives of the ART program are briefly reviewed, and the results of advanced technology component tests are summarized. The tests discussed include noise reduction by active cancellation, hybrid bidirectional tapered roller bearings, improved bearing life theory and friction tests, transmission lube study with hybrid bearings, and precision near-net-shape forged spur gears. Attention is also given to the study of high profile contact ratio noninvolute tooth form spur gears, parallel axis gear noise study, and surface modified titanium accessory spur gears.

  3. Facility Activation and Characterization for IPD Oxidizer Turbopump Cold-Flow Testing at NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sass, J. P.; Raines, N. G.; Farner, B. R.; Ryan, H. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD) is a 250K lbf (1.1 MN) thrust cryogenic hydrogen/oxygen engine technology demonstrator that utilizes a full flow staged combustion engine cycle. The Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD) is part of NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program, which seeks to provide safe, dependable, cost-cutting technologies for future space launch systems. The project also is part of the Department of Defense's Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology (IHPRPT) program, which seeks to increase the performance and capability of today s state-of-the-art rocket propulsion systems while decreasing costs associated with military and commercial access to space. The primary industry participants include Boeing-Rocketdyne and GenCorp Aerojet. The intended full flow engine cycle is a key component in achieving all of the aforementioned goals. The IPD Program achieved a major milestone with the successful completion of the IPD Oxidizer Turbopump (OTP) cold-flow test project at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) E-1 test facility in November 2001. A total of 11 IPD OTP cold-flow tests were completed. Following an overview of the NASA SSC E-1 test facility, this paper addresses the facility aspects pertaining to the activation and the cold-flow testing of the IPD OTP. In addition, some of the facility challenges encountered during the test project are addressed.

  4. 42 CFR 84.94 - Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus. 84.94...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.94 Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus. (a) Where oxygen is supplied... rated service time of the apparatus. (b) Where constant flow is used in conjunction with demand...

  5. 42 CFR 84.94 - Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus. 84.94...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.94 Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus. (a) Where oxygen is supplied... rated service time of the apparatus. (b) Where constant flow is used in conjunction with demand...

  6. 7 CFR 28.603 - Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading... of the United States for Fiber Fineness and Maturity § 28.603 Procedures for air flow tests of...) Air flow instrument complete with accessories to measure the fineness and maturity, in combination,...

  7. Field Testing of Nano-PCM-Enhanced Building Envelope Components in a Warm-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; LuPh.D., Jue; Soroushian, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy-efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy-efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential enduse energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase-change material (PCM) enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative PCM (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility in Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCMenhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheet-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side that served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. This paper presents the measured performance and analysis to evaluate the

  8. Oscillating-flow loss test results in rectangular heat exchanger passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. Gary

    1991-01-01

    Test results of oscillating flow losses in rectangular heat exchanger passages of various aspect ratios are given. This work was performed in support of the design of a free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) for a dynamic space power conversion system. Oscillating flow loss testing was performed using an oscillating flow rig, which was based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. Tests were run over a range of oscillating flow parameters encompassing the flow regimes of the proposed engine design. Test results are presented in both tabular and graphical form and are compared against analytical predictions.

  9. Joint representation of translational and rotational components of optic flow in parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Adhira; DeAngelis, Gregory C; Angelaki, Dora E

    2016-05-01

    Terrestrial navigation naturally involves translations within the horizontal plane and eye rotations about a vertical (yaw) axis to track and fixate targets of interest. Neurons in the macaque ventral intraparietal (VIP) area are known to represent heading (the direction of self-translation) from optic flow in a manner that is tolerant to rotational visual cues generated during pursuit eye movements. Previous studies have also reported that eye rotations modulate the response gain of heading tuning curves in VIP neurons. We tested the hypothesis that VIP neurons simultaneously represent both heading and horizontal (yaw) eye rotation velocity by measuring heading tuning curves for a range of rotational velocities of either real or simulated eye movements. Three findings support the hypothesis of a joint representation. First, we show that rotation velocity selectivity based on gain modulations of visual heading tuning is similar to that measured during pure rotations. Second, gain modulations of heading tuning are similar for self-generated eye rotations and visually simulated rotations, indicating that the representation of rotation velocity in VIP is multimodal, driven by both visual and extraretinal signals. Third, we show that roughly one-half of VIP neurons jointly represent heading and rotation velocity in a multiplicatively separable manner. These results provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, for a joint representation of translation direction and rotation velocity in parietal cortex and show that rotation velocity can be represented based on visual cues, even in the absence of efference copy signals. PMID:27095846

  10. A discrimination-association model for decomposing component processes of the implicit association test.

    PubMed

    Stefanutti, Luca; Robusto, Egidio; Vianello, Michelangelo; Anselmi, Pasquale

    2013-06-01

    A formal model is proposed that decomposes the implicit association test (IAT) effect into three process components: stimuli discrimination, automatic association, and termination criterion. Both response accuracy and reaction time are considered. Four independent and parallel Poisson processes, one for each of the four label categories of the IAT, are assumed. The model parameters are the rate at which information accrues on the counter of each process and the amount of information that is needed before a response is given. The aim of this study is to present the model and an illustrative application in which the process components of a Coca-Pepsi IAT are decomposed.

  11. A discrimination-association model for decomposing component processes of the implicit association test.

    PubMed

    Stefanutti, Luca; Robusto, Egidio; Vianello, Michelangelo; Anselmi, Pasquale

    2013-06-01

    A formal model is proposed that decomposes the implicit association test (IAT) effect into three process components: stimuli discrimination, automatic association, and termination criterion. Both response accuracy and reaction time are considered. Four independent and parallel Poisson processes, one for each of the four label categories of the IAT, are assumed. The model parameters are the rate at which information accrues on the counter of each process and the amount of information that is needed before a response is given. The aim of this study is to present the model and an illustrative application in which the process components of a Coca-Pepsi IAT are decomposed. PMID:23239064

  12. 16 CFR 1109.13 - Component part testing for phthalates in children's toys and child care articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Component part testing for phthalates in..., Component Parts, and Chemicals § 1109.13 Component part testing for phthalates in children's toys and child... children's toy or child care article for phthalate content provided that the requirements in § 1109.5...

  13. 16 CFR 1109.13 - Component part testing for phthalates in children's toys and child care articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Component part testing for phthalates in..., Component Parts, and Chemicals § 1109.13 Component part testing for phthalates in children's toys and child... children's toy or child care article for phthalate content provided that the requirements in § 1109.5...

  14. 16 CFR 1109.13 - Component part testing for phthalates in children's toys and child care articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Component part testing for phthalates in..., Component Parts, and Chemicals § 1109.13 Component part testing for phthalates in children's toys and child... children's toy or child care article for phthalate content provided that the requirements in § 1109.5...

  15. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for component-loaded curved orthogrid panels typical of launch vehicle skin structures. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was applied to correlate the measured input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application quantifies the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software developed for the RPTF method allows easy replacement of the diffuse acoustic field with other pressure fields such as a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) model suitable for vehicle ascent. Structural responses

  16. Skin and muscle components of forearm blood flow in directly heated resting man.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detry, J.-M. R.; Brengelmann, G. L.; Rowell, L. B.; Wyss, C.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in forearm muscle blood flow (FMBF) during direct whole-body heating were measured in 17 normal subjects using three different methods. We conclude that FMBF is not increased by direct whole-body heating. Since renal and splanchnic blood flow fall 30% under these conditions, maximal total skin blood flow in 12 previously studied subjects can be estimated from the rise in cardiac output to be 7.6 L/min (3.0-11.1 L/min).

  17. EFFECTS OF TEST TEMPERATURE ON FLOW OF METALLIC GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. NOURI; Y. LIU; P. WESSELING; J. LEWANDOWSKI

    2006-04-12

    Micro-hardness experiments were conducted over a range of temperatures using a Nikon QM micro-hardness machine on a number of metallic glass (e.g. Zr-, Fe-, Al-) systems. Although high micro-hardness was exhibited at room temperature, significant hardness reductions were exhibited near the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}. The effects of changes in test temperature on the micro-hardness will be reported. The effects of exposure time on the hardness evolution at a given temperature will also be summarized to illustrate some of the differences in behavior of the systems shown. The extreme softening near T{sub g}, characteristic of bulk metallic glass systems, enables the exploration of novel deformation processing. In order to develop deformation processing windows, the evaluation of bulk metallic glass mechanical properties under quasi-static conditions and the determination of flow properties at different temperatures and strain rates are reported. The use of such information to create layered/composite bulk metallic glasses will be summarized.

  18. Quality assurance and functionality tests on electrical components during the ATLAS IBL production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassalat, A.

    2014-01-01

    During the shutdown of 2013-2014, for the enhancement of the current ATLAS Pixel Detector, a fourth layer (Insertable B Layer, IBL) is being built and will be installed between the innermost layer and a new beam pipe. A new generation of readout chip has been developed, and two different sensor designs, a rather conventional planar and a 3D design, have been bump bonded to the Front Ends. Additionally, new staves and module flex circuits have been developed. A production QA test bench was therefore established to test all production staves before integration with the new beam pipe. Quality assurance measurements under cleanroom conditions, including temperature and humidity control, are being performed on the individual components during the various production steps of the IBL; namely, connectivity tests, electrical tests and signal probing on individual parts and assembled subsystems. This paper discusses the pre-assembly QC procedures, the capabilities of the stave qualification setup, and recent results from stave testing.

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF RADIOACTIVITY IN THE REACTOR VESSEL OF THE HEAVY WATER COMPONENT TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, Dennis

    2010-06-01

    The Heavy Water Component Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility is a pressurized heavy water reactor that was used to test candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. The reactor operated at nominal power of 50 MW{sub th}. The reactor coolant loop operated at 1200 psig and 250 C. Two isolated test loop were designed into the reactor to provide special test conditions. Fig. 1 shows a cut-away view of the reactor. The two loops are contained in four inch diameter stainless steel piping. The HWCTR was operated for only a short duration, from March 1962 to December 1964 in order to test the viability of test fuel elements and other reactor components for use in a heavy water power reactor. The reactor achieved 13,882 MWd of total power while testing 36 different fuel assemblies. In the course of operation, HWCTR experienced the cladding failures of 10 separate test fuel assemblies. In each case, the cladding was breached with some release of fuel core material into the isolated test loop, causing fission product and actinide contamination in the main coolant loop and the liquid and boiling test loops. Despite the contribution of the contamination from the failed fuel, the primary source of radioactivity in the HWCTR vessel and internals is the activation products in the thermal shields, and to a lesser degree, activation products in the reactor vessel walls and liner. A detailed facility characterization report of the HWCTR facility was completed in 1996. Many of the inputs and assumptions in the 1996 characterization report were derived from the HWCTR decommissioning plan published in 1975. The current paper provides an updated assessment of the radioisotopic characteristics of the HWCTR vessel and internals to support decommissioning activities on the facility.

  20. Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-01

    Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic

  1. Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-25

    Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic

  2. F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Flight Test Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Fischer, Michael C.

    1999-01-01

    The F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Flight Test Experiment was part of the NASA High-Speed Research Program. The goal of the experiment was to demonstrate extensive laminar flow, to validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and design methodology, and to establish laminar flow control design criteria. Topics include the flight test hardware and design, airplane modification, the pressure and suction distributions achieved, the laminar flow achieved, and the data analysis and code correlation.

  3. High fidelity replication of surface texture and geometric form of a high aspect ratio aerodynamic test component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Karl; Fleming, Leigh; Goodhand, Martin; Racasan, Radu; Zeng, Wenhan

    2016-06-01

    This paper details, assesses and validates a technique for the replication of a titanium wind tunnel test aerofoil in polyurethane resin. Existing resin replication techniques are adapted to overcome the technical difficulties associated with casting a high aspect ratio component. The technique is shown to have high replication fidelity over all important length-scales. The blade chord was accurate to 0.02%, and the maximum blade thickness was accurate to 2.5%. Important spatial and amplitude areal surface texture parameter were accurate to within 2%. Compared to an existing similar system using correlation areal parameters the current technique is shown to have lower fidelity and this difference is discussed. The current technique was developed for the measurement of boundary layer flow ‘laminar to turbulent’ transition for gas turbine compressor blade profiles and this application is illustrated.

  4. High heat flux testing of divertor plasma facing materials and components using the HHF test facility at IPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yashashri; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Belsare, Sunil; Swamy, Rajamannar; Tripathi, Sudhir; Bhope, Kedar; Kanpara, Shailesh

    2016-02-01

    The High Heat Flux Test Facility (HHFTF) was designed and established recently at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) in India for testing heat removal capability and operational life time of plasma facing materials and components of the ITER-like tokamak. The HHFTF is equipped with various diagnostics such as IR cameras and IR-pyrometers for surface temperature measurements, coolant water calorimetry for absorbed power measurements and thermocouples for bulk temperature measurements. The HHFTF is capable of simulating steady state heat load of several MW m-2 as well as short transient heat loads of MJ m-2. This paper presents the current status of the HHFTF at IPR and high heat flux tests performed on the curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups as well as transient heat flux tests carried out on pure tungsten materials using the HHFTF. Curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups were fabricated using hot radial pressing (HRP) technique. Two curved tungsten monoblock type test mock-ups successfully sustained absorbed heat flux up to 14 MW m-2 with thermal cycles of 30 s ON and 30 s OFF duration. Transient high heat flux tests or thermal shock tests were carried out on pure tungsten hot-rolled plate material (Make:PLANSEE) with incident power density of 0.49 GW m-2 for 20 milliseconds ON and 1000 milliseconds OFF time. A total of 6000 thermal shock cycles were completed on pure tungsten material. Experimental results were compared with mathematical simulations carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics for transient high heat flux tests.

  5. Sub-picosecond laser induced damage test facility for petawatt reflective optical components characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozet, Martin; Néauport, Jérôme; Lavastre, Eric; Roquin, Nadja; Gallais, Laurent; Lamaignère, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    While considering long pulse or short pulse high power laser facilities, optical components performances and in particular laser damage resistance are always factors limiting the overall system performances. Consequently, getting a detailed knowledge of the behavior of these optical components under irradiations with large beam in short pulse range is of major importance. In this context, a Laser Induced Damage Threshold test facility called DERIC has been developed at the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Bordeaux. It uses an Amplitude Systemes laser source which delivers Gaussian pulses of 500 fs at 1053 nm. 1-on-1, S-on-1 and RasterScan test procedures are implemented to study the behavior of monolayer and multilayer dielectric coatings.

  6. Development and testing of hermetic, laser-ignited pyrotechnic and explosive components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Daniel P.; Beckman, Thomas M.; Spangler, Ed M.; Munger, Alan C.; Woods, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    During the last decade there has been increasing interest in the use of lasers in place of electrical systems to ignite various pyrotechnic and explosive materials. The principal driving force for this work was the requirement for safer energetic components which would be insensitive to electrostatic and electromagnetic radiation. In the last few years this research has accelerated since the basic concepts have proven viable. At the present time it is appropriate to shift the research emphasis in laser initiation from the scientific arena--whether it can be done--to the engineering realm--how it can be put into actual practice in the field. Laser initiation research and development at EG&G Mound was in three principal areas: (1) laser/energetic material interactions; (2) development of novel processing techniques for fabricating hermetic (helium leak rate of less than 1 x 10(exp -8) cu cm/s) laser components; and (3) evaluation and testing of laser-ignited components. Research in these three areas has resulted in the development of high quality, hermetic, laser initiated components. Examples are presented which demonstrate the practicality of fabricating hermetic, laser initiated explosive or pyrotechnic components that can be used in the next generation of ignitors, actuators, and detonators.

  7. The development of pyro shock test requirements for Viking Lander Capsule components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, S.

    1975-01-01

    The procedure used to derive component-level pyro shock specifications for the Viking Lander Capsule (VLC) is described. Effects of shock path distance and mechanical joints between the device and the point at which the environment is to be estimated are accounted for in the method. The validity of the prediction technique was verified by a series of shock tests on a full-scale structural model of the lander body.

  8. Full scale technology demonstration of a modern counterrotating unducted fan engine concept: Component test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The UDF trademark (Unducted Fan) engine is a new aircraft engine concept based on an ungeared, counterrotating, unducted, ultra-high-bypass turbofan configuration. This engine is being developed to provide a high thrust-to-weight ratio powerplant with exceptional fuel efficiency for subsonic aircraft application. This report covers the testing of pertinent components of this engine such as the fan blades, control and actuation system, turbine blades and spools, seals, and mixer frame.

  9. Scaling Analysis Techniques to Establish Experimental Infrastructure for Component, Subsystem, and Integrated System Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sabharwall, Piyush; O'Brien, James E.; McKellar, Michael G.; Housley, Gregory K.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2015-03-01

    Hybrid energy system research has the potential to expand the application for nuclear reactor technology beyond electricity. The purpose of this research is to reduce both technical and economic risks associated with energy systems of the future. Nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) mitigate the variability of renewable energy sources, provide opportunities to produce revenue from different product streams, and avoid capital inefficiencies by matching electrical output to demand by using excess generation capacity for other purposes when it is available. An essential step in the commercialization and deployment of this advanced technology is scaled testing to demonstrate integrated dynamic performance of advanced systems and components when risks cannot be mitigated adequately by analysis or simulation. Further testing in a prototypical environment is needed for validation and higher confidence. This research supports the development of advanced nuclear reactor technology and NHES, and their adaptation to commercial industrial applications that will potentially advance U.S. energy security, economy, and reliability and further reduce carbon emissions. Experimental infrastructure development for testing and feasibility studies of coupled systems can similarly support other projects having similar developmental needs and can generate data required for validation of models in thermal energy storage and transport, energy, and conversion process development. Experiments performed in the Systems Integration Laboratory will acquire performance data, identify scalability issues, and quantify technology gaps and needs for various hybrid or other energy systems. This report discusses detailed scaling (component and integrated system) and heat transfer figures of merit that will establish the experimental infrastructure for component, subsystem, and integrated system testing to advance the technology readiness of components and systems to the level required for commercial

  10. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/epoxy metering truss structure components, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, materials, tooling, manufacturing processes, quality control, test procedures, and results associated with the fabrication and test of graphite/epoxy metering truss structure components exhibiting a near zero coefficient of thermal expansion are described. Analytical methods were utilized, with the aid of a computer program, to define the most efficient laminate configurations in terms of thermal behavior and structural requirements. This was followed by an extensive material characterization and selection program, conducted for several graphite/graphite/hybrid laminate systems to obtain experimental data in support of the analytical predictions. Mechanical property tests as well as the coefficient of thermal expansion tests were run on each laminate under study, the results of which were used as the selection criteria for the single most promising laminate. Further coefficient of thermal expansion measurement was successfully performed on three subcomponent tubes utilizing the selected laminate.

  11. Fracture Tests of Etched Components Using a Focused Ion Beam Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Jonathan, L.; Fettig, Rainer K.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Orloff, Jon; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Many optical MEMS device designs involve large arrays of thin (0.5 to 1 micron components subjected to high stresses due to cyclic loading. These devices are fabricated from a variety of materials, and the properties strongly depend on size and processing. Our objective is to develop standard and convenient test methods that can be used to measure the properties of large numbers of witness samples, for every device we build. In this work we explore a variety of fracture test configurations for 0.5 micron thick silicon nitride membranes machined using the Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) process. Testing was completed using an FEI 620 dual focused ion beam milling machine. Static loads were applied using a probe. and dynamic loads were applied through a piezo-electric stack mounted at the base of the probe. Results from the tests are presented and compared, and application for predicting fracture probability of large arrays of devices are considered.

  12. Development and tests of molybdenum armored copper components for MITICA ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavei, Mauro; Böswirth, Bernd; Greuner, Henri; Marcuzzi, Diego; Rizzolo, Andrea; Valente, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    In order to prevent detrimental material erosion of components impinged by back-streaming positive D or H ions in the megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement beam source, a solution based on explosion bonding technique has been identified for producing a 1 mm thick molybdenum armour layer on copper substrate, compatible with ITER requirements. Prototypes have been recently manufactured and tested in the high heat flux test facility Garching Large Divertor Sample Test Facility (GLADIS) to check the capability of the molybdenum-copper interface to withstand several thermal shock cycles at high power density. This paper presents both the numerical fluid-dynamic analyses of the prototypes simulating the test conditions in GLADIS as well as the experimental results.

  13. Brayton-cycle heat-recovery system characterization program. Component test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-19

    The critical components of the glass furnace subject to corrosion/erosion are: the valve gate and the valve seat bottom and sides which can also be subject to warpage causing subsequent leakage and the furnace flues (or ducting). The Brayton System will be added to the glass furnace just downstream of the reversal valve. Hence, the inlet air to the flues will no longer be at ambient temperature but at a higher level between 800 to 1000/sup 0/F. Also, the exhaust gas for the Brayton System is required to be 1500 to 1600/sup 0/F at these locations. Thus, the flues and valve components will be exposed to a much higher average temperature operating with the Brayton System. The possibility of cracking of the refractory linings and warpage and scaling of the switching valve, with consequent leakage to the exhaust stream should be avoided or decreased as much as feasible because of its effect of lowering the turbine inlet temperature and thus the total system value. On the inlet side, leakage dilutes the heat added to the air (which is preheated) and reduces the expected fuel savings. Assessment of such effects and determination of potential solutions and/or improvements in these areas is the purpose of this component system analysis and testing. The materials, mechanics and operations of the two areas of concern and the program for testing alternative approaches including test hardware, objectives, conditions and locations are described.

  14. 21 CFR 212.60 - What requirements apply to the laboratories where I test components, in-process materials, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... I test components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products? 212.60 Section 212.60 Food... materials, and finished PET drug products? (a) Testing procedures. Each laboratory used to conduct testing of components, in-process materials, and finished PET drug products must have and follow...

  15. Test of a new heat-flow equation for dense-fluid shock waves.

    PubMed

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel; Ravelo, Ramon

    2010-09-21

    Using a recently proposed equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier's Law of heat conduction, we model shockwave propagation in the dense Lennard-Jones fluid. Disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the kinetic temperature in the direction of a planar shock wave and those in the transverse directions, particularly in the region near the shock front, gives rise to a new transport (equilibration) mechanism not seen in usual one-dimensional heat-flow situations. The modification of the heat-flow equation was tested earlier for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which had been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes-Fourier solutions. Now, the Lennard-Jones fluid, whose equation of state and transport properties have been determined from independent calculations, allows us to study the case where potential, as well as kinetic contributions are important. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations under strong shock wave conditions, compared to Navier-Stokes.

  16. Test of a new heat-flow equation for dense-fluid shock waves.

    PubMed

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel; Ravelo, Ramon

    2010-09-21

    Using a recently proposed equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier's Law of heat conduction, we model shockwave propagation in the dense Lennard-Jones fluid. Disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the kinetic temperature in the direction of a planar shock wave and those in the transverse directions, particularly in the region near the shock front, gives rise to a new transport (equilibration) mechanism not seen in usual one-dimensional heat-flow situations. The modification of the heat-flow equation was tested earlier for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which had been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes-Fourier solutions. Now, the Lennard-Jones fluid, whose equation of state and transport properties have been determined from independent calculations, allows us to study the case where potential, as well as kinetic contributions are important. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations under strong shock wave conditions, compared to Navier-Stokes. PMID:20866140

  17. Integrated elastomeric components for autonomous regulation of sequential and oscillatory flow switching in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosadegh, Bobak; Kuo, Chuan-Hsien; Tung, Yi-Chung; Torisawa, Yu-Suke; Bersano-Begey, Tommaso; Tavana, Hossein; Takayama, Shuichi

    2010-06-01

    A critical need for enhancing the usability and capabilities of microfluidic technologies is the development of standardized, scalable and versatile control systems. Electronically controlled valves and pumps typically used for dynamic flow regulation, although useful, can limit convenience, scalability and robustness. This shortcoming has motivated the development of device-embedded non-electrical flow-control systems. Existing approaches to regulate operation timing on-chip, however, still require external signals such as timed generation of fluid flow, bubbles, liquid plugs or droplets or an alteration of chemical compositions or temperature. Here, we describe a strategy to provide device-embedded flow switching and clocking functions. Physical gaps and cavities interconnected by holes are fabricated into a three-layer elastomer structure to form networks of fluidic gates that can spontaneously generate cascading and oscillatory flow output using only a constant flow of Newtonian fluids as the device input. The resulting microfluidic substrate architecture is simple, scalable and should be applicable to various materials. This flow-powered fluidic gating scheme brings the autonomous signal processing ability of microelectronic circuits to microfluidics where there is the added diversity in current information of having distinct chemical or particulate species and richness in current operation of having chemical reactions and physical interactions.

  18. Component-cost and performance based comparison of flow and static batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Brandon J.; Smith, Kyle C.; Slocum, Alexander H.; Chiang, Yet-Ming

    2015-10-01

    Flow batteries are a promising grid-storage technology that is scalable, inherently flexible in power/energy ratio, and potentially low cost in comparison to conventional or "static" battery architectures. Recent advances in flow chemistries are enabling significantly higher energy density flow electrodes. When the same battery chemistry can arguably be used in either a flow or static electrode design, the relative merits of either design choice become of interest. Here, we analyze the costs of the electrochemically active stack for both architectures under the constraint of constant energy efficiency and charge and discharge rates, using as case studies the aqueous vanadium-redox chemistry, widely used in conventional flow batteries, and aqueous lithium-iron-phosphate (LFP)/lithium-titanium-phosphate (LTP) suspensions, an example of a higher energy density suspension-based electrode. It is found that although flow batteries always have a cost advantage (kWh-1) at the stack level modeled, the advantage is a strong function of flow electrode energy density. For the LFP/LTP case, the cost advantages decreases from ∼50% to ∼10% over experimentally reasonable ranges of suspension loading. Such results are important input for design choices when both battery architectures are viable options.

  19. Preparation of a Frozen Regolith Simulant Bed for ISRU Component Testing in a Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenhenz, Julie; Linne, Diane

    2013-01-01

    In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) systems and components have undergone extensive laboratory and field tests to expose hardware to relevant soil environments. The next step is to combine these soil environments with relevant pressure and temperature conditions. Previous testing has demonstrated how to incorporate large bins of unconsolidated lunar regolith into sufficiently sized vacuum chambers. In order to create appropriate depth dependent soil characteristics that are needed to test drilling operations for the lunar surface, the regolith simulant bed must by properly compacted and frozen. While small cryogenic simulant beds have been created for laboratory tests, this scale effort will allow testing of a full 1m drill which has been developed for a potential lunar prospector mission. Compacted bulk densities were measured at various moisture contents for GRC-3 and Chenobi regolith simulants. Vibrational compaction methods were compared with the previously used hammer compaction, or "Proctor", method. All testing was done per ASTM standard methods. A full 6.13 m3 simulant bed with 6 percent moisture by weight was prepared, compacted in layers, and frozen in a commercial freezer. Temperature and desiccation data was collected to determine logistics for preparation and transport of the simulant bed for thermal vacuum testing. Once in the vacuum facility, the simulant bed will be cryogenically frozen with liquid nitrogen. These cryogenic vacuum tests are underway, but results will not be included in this manuscript.

  20. Linear score tests for variance components in linear mixed models and applications to genetic association studies.

    PubMed

    Qu, Long; Guennel, Tobias; Marshall, Scott L

    2013-12-01

    Following the rapid development of genome-scale genotyping technologies, genetic association mapping has become a popular tool to detect genomic regions responsible for certain (disease) phenotypes, especially in early-phase pharmacogenomic studies with limited sample size. In response to such applications, a good association test needs to be (1) applicable to a wide range of possible genetic models, including, but not limited to, the presence of gene-by-environment or gene-by-gene interactions and non-linearity of a group of marker effects, (2) accurate in small samples, fast to compute on the genomic scale, and amenable to large scale multiple testing corrections, and (3) reasonably powerful to locate causal genomic regions. The kernel machine method represented in linear mixed models provides a viable solution by transforming the problem into testing the nullity of variance components. In this study, we consider score-based tests by choosing a statistic linear in the score function. When the model under the null hypothesis has only one error variance parameter, our test is exact in finite samples. When the null model has more than one variance parameter, we develop a new moment-based approximation that performs well in simulations. Through simulations and analysis of real data, we demonstrate that the new test possesses most of the aforementioned characteristics, especially when compared to existing quadratic score tests or restricted likelihood ratio tests. PMID:24328714

  1. Empirical expressions for estimating length and weight of axial-flow components of VTOL powerplants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Lieblein, S.; Krebs, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    Simplified equations are presented for estimating the length and weight of major powerplant components of VTOL aircraft. The equations were developed from correlations of lift and cruise engine data. Components involved include fan, fan duct, compressor, combustor, turbine, structure, and accessories. Comparisons of actual and calculated total engine weights are included for several representative engines.

  2. Smart licensing and environmental flows: Modeling framework and sensitivity testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, R. L.; Fenn, C. R.; Wood, P. J.; Timlett, R.; Lequesne, T.

    2011-12-01

    Adapting to climate change is just one among many challenges facing river managers. The response will involve balancing the long-term water demands of society with the changing needs of the environment in sustainable and cost effective ways. This paper describes a modeling framework for evaluating the sensitivity of low river flows to different configurations of abstraction licensing under both historical climate variability and expected climate change. A rainfall-runoff model is used to quantify trade-offs among environmental flow (e-flow) requirements, potential surface and groundwater abstraction volumes, and the frequency of harmful low-flow conditions. Using the River Itchen in southern England as a case study it is shown that the abstraction volume is more sensitive to uncertainty in the regional climate change projection than to the e-flow target. It is also found that "smarter" licensing arrangements (involving a mix of hands off flows and "rising block" abstraction rules) could achieve e-flow targets more frequently than conventional seasonal abstraction limits, with only modest reductions in average annual yield, even under a hotter, drier climate change scenario.

  3. Investigation of turbulent flow in highly curved ducts with application to turbomachinery components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, J. A. C.; Arnal, M. P.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical predictions were performed using a semi-elliptic calculation procedure for the case of turbulent flow in passage through a 90 deg bend of square cross section. Two versions of the isotropic turbulent viscosity two equation k-epsilon model were used. The first, the wall function model (WFM), employs the logarithmic law-of-the-wall relation and the notion of equilibrium flow to set all the necessary boundary conditions at the first grid point adjacent to a solid wall. The second model, the Van Driest model (VDM), employs Prandtl's original mixing length formulation, in conjunction with Van Driest's semi-empirical relation for the mixing length, to calculate the turbulent viscosity in the near wall regions of the flow. In this case, boundary conditions for k and epsilon, required to calculate these quantities in the core of the flow, are obtained by matching the mixing length and Reynolds number model formulations in an overlapping region of the flow near the walls. In both cases the results obtained show an improvement over earlier calculations using an elliptic numerical procedure. This is attributed to the finer grids possible in the present work. Of the two models, the VDM formulation shows better overall conformity with the mean flow measurements. Neither model reproduces well the details of the stress distribution as a result of the implied isotropic turbulent viscosity.

  4. Developing standard performance testing procedures for material control and accounting components at a site

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, Carolynn P; Bushlya, Anatoly V; Efimenko, Vladimir F; Ilyanstev, Anatoly; Regoushevsky, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    The condition of a nuclear material control and accountability system (MC&A) and its individual components, as with any system combining technical elements and documentation, may be characterized through an aggregate of values for the various parameters that determine the system's ability to perform. The MC&A system's status may be functioning effectively, marginally or not functioning based on a summary of the values of the individual parameters. This work included a review of the following subsystems, MC&A and Detecting Material Losses, and their respective elements for the material control and accountability system: (a) Elements of the MC&A Subsystem - Information subsystem (Accountancy/Inventory), Measurement subsystem, Nuclear Material Access subsystem, including tamper-indicating device (TID) program, and Automated Information-gathering subsystem; (b) Elements for Detecting Nuclear Material Loses Subsystem - Inventory Differences, Shipper/receiver Differences, Confirmatory Measurements and differences with accounting data, and TID or Seal Violations. In order to detect the absence or loss of nuclear material there must be appropriate interactions among the elements and their respective subsystems from the list above. Additionally this work includes a review of regulatory requirements for the MC&A system component characteristics and criteria that support the evaluation of the performance of the listed components. The listed components had performance testing algorithms and procedures developed that took into consideration the regulatory criteria. The developed MC&A performance-testing procedures were the basis for a Guide for MC&A Performance Testing at the material balance areas (MBAs) of State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (SSC RF-IPPE).

  5. Computation of aircraft component flow fields at transonic Mach numbers using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrewsbury, George D.; Vadyak, Joseph; Schuster, David M.; Smith, Marilyn J.

    1989-01-01

    A computer analysis was developed for calculating steady (or unsteady) three-dimensional aircraft component flow fields. This algorithm, called ENS3D, can compute the flow field for the following configurations: diffuser duct/thrust nozzle, isolated wing, isolated fuselage, wing/fuselage with or without integrated inlet and exhaust, nacelle/inlet, nacelle (fuselage) afterbody/exhaust jet, complete transport engine installation, and multicomponent configurations using zonal grid generation technique. Solutions can be obtained for subsonic, transonic, or hypersonic freestream speeds. The algorithm can solve either the Euler equations for inviscid flow, the thin shear layer Navier-Stokes equations for viscous flow, or the full Navier-Stokes equations for viscous flow. The flow field solution is determined on a body-fitted computational grid. A fully-implicit alternating direction implicit method is employed for the solution of the finite difference equations. For viscous computations, either a two layer eddy-viscosity turbulence model or the k-epsilon two equation transport model can be used to achieve mathematical closure.

  6. Initial results for a 170 GHz high power ITER waveguide component test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Timothy; Barker, Alan; Dukes, Carl; Killough, Stephen; Kaufman, Michael; White, John; Bell, Gary; Hanson, Greg; Rasmussen, Dave

    2014-10-01

    A high power microwave test stand is being setup at ORNL to enable prototype testing of 170 GHz cw waveguide components being developed for the ITER ECH system. The ITER ECH system will utilize 63.5 mm diameter evacuated corrugated waveguide and will have 24 >150 m long runs. A 170 GHz 1 MW class gyrotron is being developed by Communications and Power Industries and is nearing completion. A HVDC power supply, water-cooling and control system has been partially tested in preparation for arrival of the gyrotron. The power supply and water-cooling system are being designed to operate for >3600 second pulses to simulate the operating conditions planned for the ITER ECH system. The gyrotron Gaussian beam output has a single mirror for focusing into a 63.5 mm corrugated waveguide in the vertical plane. The output beam and mirror are enclosed in an evacuated duct with absorber for stray radiation. Beam alignment with the waveguide is a critical task so a combination of mirror tilt adjustments and a bellows for offsets will be provided. Analysis of thermal patterns on thin witness plates will provide gyrotron mode purity and waveguide coupling efficiency data. Pre-prototype waveguide components and two dummy loads are available for initial operational testing of the gyrotron. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  7. Component Fragility Research Program: Phase 1, Demonstration tests: Volume 1, Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.; Shipway, G.D.; Glozman, V.

    1987-08-01

    This report describes tests performed in Phase I of the NRC Component Fragility Research Program. The purpose of these tests was to demonstrate procedures for characterizing the seismic fragility of a selected component, investigating how various parameters affect fragility, and finally using test data to develop practical fragility descriptions suitable for application in probabilistic risk assessments. A three-column motor control center housing motor controllers of various types and sizes as well as relays of different types and manufacturers was subjected to seismic input motions up to 2.5g zero period acceleration. To investigate the effect of base flexibility on the structural behavior of the MCC and on the functional behavior of the electrical devices, multiple tests were performed on each of four mounting configurations: four bolts per column with top bracking, four bolts per column with no top brace, four bolts per column with internal diagonal bracking, and two bolts per column with no top or internal bracking. Device fragility was characterized by contact chatter correlated to local in-cabinet response at the device location. Seismic capacities were developed for each device on the basis of local input motion required to cause chatter; these results were then applied to develop probabilistic fragility curves for each type of device, including estimates of the ''high-confidence low probability of failure'' capacity of each.

  8. Seasonal changes in immunoreactivity of activin signaling component proteins in wild ground squirrel testes.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xia; Zhang, Haolin; Zhang, Mengyuan; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Xiao; Song, Moshi; Zhou, Jiao; Xu, Meiyu; Weng, Qiang; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal spermatogenesis and localization of inhibin/activin subunits (alpha, betaA, betaB) in the testes of wild ground squirrel has been previously described; however, the expression pattern of activin receptors and cytoplasmic signaling SMADs has not been detected in any seasonal breeders. The objective of this study was to investigate the abundance and cellular localization of activin signaling components in testes of the wild ground squirrel during the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. The immunolocalizations of ActRIIB (activin type II receptor B) and activin-related SMADs (phospho-SMAD2/3, SMAD4 and SMAD7) were observed by immunohistochemistry. Total proteins were extracted from testicular tissues in the breeding and nonbreeding seasons and were used for Western blotting analysis for ActRIIB and SMADs. Immunoreactivities of activin signaling components were greater in the testes of the breeding season, and then decreased to a relatively low level in the nonbreeding season. ActRIIB and related SMADs were widely spread in the active testes, while spermatogonia were the predominant cellular sites of activin signal transduction during arrested spermatogenesis. The dynamic regulation of activin type II receptor and SMADs indicated that the activin signal pathway played an important paracrine role in seasonal spermatogenesis of the wild ground squirrel. Furthermore, the distinct localizations and immunoreactivity of ActRIIB and SMADs might suggest different functions of activin in seasonal spermatogenesis.

  9. Extension of physical component BFC method for the analysis of free-surface flows coupled with moving boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, D.; Takizawa, A.; Kondo, S.

    A newly developed ``physical component boundary fitted coordinate (PCBFC) method'' is extended for the analysis of free-surface flows coupled with moving boundaries. Extra techniques are employed to deal with the coupling movement of the free surface and moving boundaries. After the validation of the extension by several benchmark problems, the method is successfully applied for the first time to the simulation of overflow-induced vibration of the weir coupled with sloshing of the free-surface liquid.

  10. The application of flow cytometry to histocompatibility testing.

    PubMed

    Horsburgh, T; Martin, S; Robson, A J

    2000-03-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful technique that enables the sensitive and quantitative detection of both cellular antigens and bound biological moieties. This article reviews how flow cytometry is increasingly being used as histocompatibility laboratories for the analysis of antibody specificity and HLA antigen expression. A basic description of flow cytometry principles and standardisation is given, together with an outline of clinical application in the areas of pre-transplant cross-matching, antibody screening, post-transplant antibody monitoring and HLA-B27 detection. It is concluded that flow cytometry is a useful multi-parametric analytical tool, yielding clinical benefit especially in the identification of patients at risk of early transplant rejection. PMID:10834606

  11. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 3. Single tube parallel flow tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-06-01

    The coolant in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production nuclear reactor assemblies is circulated as a subcooled liquid under normal operating conditions. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout multiple annular flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. During the postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), which is initiated by a hypothetical guillotine pipe break, the coolant flow through the reactor assemblies is significantly reduced. The flow reduction and accompanying power reduction (after shutdown is initiated) occur in the first 1--2 seconds of the LOCA. This portion of the LOCA is referred to as the Flow Instability phase. A series of down flow experiments have been conducted on three different size single tubes. The objective of these experiments was to determine the effect of a parallel flow path on the occurrence of flow instability. In all cases, it has been shown that the point of flow instability (OFI) determined under controlled flow operation does not change when operating in a controlled pressure drop mode (parallel path operation).

  12. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, U.; Bieberle, A.; Hoppe, D.; Kronenberg, J.; Schleicher, E.; Sühnel, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Zippe, C.

    2007-10-01

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2linepairs/mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  13. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, U.; Bieberle, A.; Hoppe, D.; Kronenberg, J.; Schleicher, E.; Suehnel, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Zippe, C.

    2007-10-15

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662 keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2 line pairs/mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  14. Phosphorylated SAP155, the spliceosomal component, is localized to chromatin in postnatal mouse testes

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Ko; Sonoda, Yoshiyuki; Jin, Yuji; Abe, Shin-ichi

    2010-03-19

    SAP155 is an essential component of the spliceosome and its phosphorylation is required for splicing catalysis, but little is known concerning its expression and regulation during spermatogenesis in postnatal mouse testes. We report that SAP155 is ubiquitously expressed in nuclei of germ and Sertoli cells within the seminiferous tubules of 6- and 35-day postpartum (dpp) testes. Analyses by fractionation of testes revealed that (1) phosphorylated SAP155 was found in the fraction containing nuclear structures at 6 dpp in amounts much larger than that at other ages; (2) non-phosphorylated SAP155 was detected in the fraction containing nucleoplasm; and (3) phosphorylated SAP155 was preferentially associated with chromatin. Our findings suggest that the active spliceosome, containing phosphorylated SAP155, performs pre-mRNA splicing on chromatin concomitant with transcription during testicular development.

  15. Coulometric detection of components in liquid plugs by microfabricated flow channel and electrode structures.

    PubMed

    Sassa, Fumihiro; Laghzali, Hind; Fukuda, Junji; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    2010-10-15

    Coulometry has been demonstrated to be effective for determining the analyte in a liquid plug on the nanoliter-scale confined in a flow channel. A plug prepared in a rhombus structure of an auxiliary flow channel was placed on a thin-film three-electrode system, and hydrogen peroxide was detected as a model analyte. Under a fixed potential, the current decayed rapidly, particularly in shallow flow channels, thus making reproducible amperometric detection difficult. On the other hand, the increasing charge during coulometry facilitated the measurements. A constricted flow channel structure with an array of platinum strips for the working electrode was effective at efficiently consuming the analyte to improve the sensitivity and lower the detection limit. Compared to the case of a single short working electrode with the same area, a 4-fold increase in sensitivity was observed for the best combination of flow channel height and interstrip distance. With an increase in the generated current while maintaining the background at a low level, the detection limit was lowered from 1.3 μM to 410 nM using working electrodes with the same area. Furthermore, the processing of solutions containing L-glutamate or L-glutamate oxidase and the detection of L-glutamate were demonstrated.

  16. Identification of a nonlinear groundwater flow at a slug test in fractured rock and its influence on the test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, S.; Koh, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Many laboratory and numerical studies reported that a groundwater flow through a fracture at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers does not obey the cubic law which assumes a linear relation between the hydraulic gradient and the flux. Most of them observed that the transitions from a linear to nonlinear flow arose at the Reynolds numbers greater than 10. A slug test is one of the common hydraulic tests, and used for estimation of the hydraulic properties of an aquifer by analyzing the recovery after a sudden change in hydraulic pressure. In this study, we conducted a series of slug tests with various initial head displacements at an experimental borehole at KAERI's (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) underground research tunnel whose host rock is Jurassic granite. The Reynolds number at a fracture during slug tests was calculated using the geophysical logging data and slug test results, and the nonlinear flow regime at slug tests was identified. From changes in the Reynolds number during the tests and estimates of the hydraulic properties from the tests, the influence of a nonlinear flow on a slug test was discussed. Our results indicate that the nonlinearity of groundwater flow at a slug test became more severe and the estimated hydraulic conductivity decreased as the initial head displacement increased.

  17. Department of Defense picture archiving and communication system acceptance testing: results and identification of problem components.

    PubMed

    Allison, Scott A; Sweet, Clifford F; Beall, Douglas P; Lewis, Thomas E; Monroe, Thomas

    2005-09-01

    The PACS implementation process is complicated requiring a tremendous amount of time, resources, and planning. The Department of Defense (DOD) has significant experience in developing and refining PACS acceptance testing (AT) protocols that assure contract compliance, clinical safety, and functionality. The DOD's AT experience under the initial Medical Diagnostic Imaging Support System contract led to the current Digital Imaging Network-Picture Archiving and Communications Systems (DIN-PACS) contract AT protocol. To identify the most common system and component deficiencies under the current DIN-PACS AT protocol, 14 tri-service sites were evaluated during 1998-2000. Sixteen system deficiency citations with 154 separate types of limitations were noted with problems involving the workstation, interfaces, and the Radiology Information System comprising more than 50% of the citations. Larger PACS deployments were associated with a higher number of deficiencies. The most commonly cited systems deficiencies were among the most expensive components of the PACS. PMID:15924273

  18. Suppression of relative flow by multiple domains in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Yujiro; Kunimi, Masaya; Tokita, Hidekatsu; Saito, Hiroki; Hirano, Takuya

    2015-07-01

    We investigate flow properties of immiscible Bose-Einstein condensates composed of two different Zeeman spin states of 87Rb. Two spatially overlapping condensates in the optical trap are prepared by application of a resonant radio-frequency pulse, and then the magnetic field gradient is applied in order to produce the atomic flow. We find that the spontaneous multiple-domain formation arising from the immiscible nature drastically changes the fluidity. The homogeneously overlapping condensates readily separate under the magnetic field gradient, and they form a stable configuration composed of the two layers. In contrast, the relative flow between two condensates is largely suppressed in the case where the magnetic field gradient is applied after spontaneous domain formation.

  19. Modeling of transient two-component flow using a four-point implicit method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiggert, D. C.; Martin, C. S.; Naghash, M.; Rao, P. V.

    1983-01-01

    The four-point, centered implicit scheme that is extensively used in open channel flow simulation is shown to be applicable to rapid and slow pressure transient problems in conduits with nearly single phase and two-phase flows. It is only necessary to choose the proper weighting factor value, theta, of the Courant number. For rapid pressure transients such as waterhammer, the implicit method can yield reasonable results with limited numerical dispersion and attenuation if theta is only slightly greater than the critical value of 0.5. For slower pressure gradients in single and two-phase flows, reasonable numerical solutions may be achieved for Courant number values as high as 20.

  20. Air conditioning system and component therefore distributing air flow from opposite directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D.; Bauer, H. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The air conditioning system comprises a plurality of separate air conditioning units coupled to a common supply duct such that air may be introduced into the supply duct in two opposite flow directions. A plurality of outlets such as registers or auxiliary or branch ducts communicate with the supply duct and valve means are disposed in the supply duct at at least some of the outlets for automatically channelling a controllable amount of air from the supply duct to the associated outlet regardless of the direction of air flow within the supply duct. The valve means comprises an automatic air volume control apparatus for distribution within the air supply duct into which air may be introduced from two opposite directions. The apparatus incorporates a freely swinging movable vane in the supply duct to automatically channel into the associated outlet only the deflected air flow which has the higher relative pressure.

  1. A tension-torsional fatigue testing apparatus for micro-scale components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sichao; Wang, Lei; Chen, Gang; Yu, Dunji; Chen, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical characterization of micro-scale components under complex loading conditions is a great challenge. To meet such a challenge, a microtension-torsional fatigue testing apparatus is developed in this study that specializes in the evaluation of multiaxial fatigue behavior of thin stent wires. The actuation and measurement in two controlled directions are incorporated in the tensile and torsional load frames, respectively, and a thrust air bearing is applied for the coupling of the two frames. The axial deformation of specimens measured by a grating sensor built in the linear motor and by a non-contact displacement detect system is compared and corrected. The accuracy of the torque measurement is proved by torsion tests on thin wires of 316L stainless steel in nominal diameters of 100 μm. Multistep torsion test, multiaxial ratcheting test, and a fully strain controlled multiaxial cyclic test are performed on 100 μm and 200 μm-diameter 316L wires using this apparatus. The capability of the equipment in tension-torsional cyclic tests for micro-scale specimens is demonstrated by the experimental results.

  2. NSTX Progress and Plan of Interest to Component Test Facility (CTF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2006-10-01

    Continued rapid progress on NSTX and more broadly in Tokamak and ST plasma science has indicated relatively robust physics conditions in a broad number of topical areas for a compact CTF [1], which is included in the DOE Office of Science Strategic Plan [2]. This progress has enabled an updated projection of the practical CTF plasma conditions. The results indicate appropriate designs with R0 = 1.1-1.2 m, A = 1.5, elongation ˜ 3, BT ˜ 1.5-2.5 T, and a range of Ip = 6-12 MA to deliver a fusion neutron flux of 0.5-4.0 MW/m2, requiring a range of 30-70 MW of combined neutral beam and RF heating and current drive power. Database is evaluated to be adequate in Macroscopic Plasma Physics; Multi-scale Plasma Physics; Waves and Energetic Particles; and Physics Integration; but not yet adequate in Plasma Boundary Interface (high divertor heat flux) and Solenoid-Free Operations (current initiation and ramp-up). Near-term ST research to strengthen and fill in the needed database will be described, including a discussion on how the CTF testing program could begin with plasma facing component testing in D-D at low currents followed by fusion component testing in D-T at higher currents. [1] Plasma Phys. Contol. Fusion {47} (2005) B263. [2] http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/archives/plans/SCSP/12FEB04.pdf.

  3. WIPP/SRL in-situ tests: MIIT program--The effects of metal package components

    SciTech Connect

    Covington, J.A. ); Wicks, G.G. ); Molecke, M.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The Materials Interface Interactions Tests or MIIT is the largest in-situ testing program in progress, involving burial of many simulated nuclear waste systems and accompanying package components. In MIIT, waste glass samples were fabricated into the shape of pineapple slices', polished on one side. Proposed package components were also made into a similar configuration and the various glasses, metals, and geologic samples were than stacked onto heater elements within Teflon assemblies. This produced interactions of interest by creating glass/glass, glass/salt, and glass/metal interfaces. Since the outer diameter of the metal was smaller than the outer diameter of the glass, a lip was created which was also produced a glass/liquid interface, which was also studied. Overall, a total of 50 stacks or assemblies of pineapple slices were created in seven different stacking arrangements. Each individual assembly was then installed in an instrumented borehole at WIPP. Brine was then added to most of boreholes and the assemblies heated and maintained at 90{degrees}C. This was achieved by energizing the central heating and rod that traversed through the middle opening of each of the pineapple slices in each assembly. Due to the design of these units, glass, metal and geologic samples could be removed at time intervals of 6 mos., 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years. Currently, all but the 5 year samples have been removed from test and are being evaluated in laboratories of MIIT participants.

  4. WIPP/SRL in-situ tests: MIIT program--The effects of metal package components

    SciTech Connect

    Covington, J.A.; Wicks, G.G.; Molecke, M.A.

    1991-12-31

    The Materials Interface Interactions Tests or MIIT is the largest in-situ testing program in progress, involving burial of many simulated nuclear waste systems and accompanying package components. In MIIT, waste glass samples were fabricated into the shape of `pineapple slices`, polished on one side. Proposed package components were also made into a similar configuration and the various glasses, metals, and geologic samples were than stacked onto heater elements within Teflon assemblies. This produced interactions of interest by creating glass/glass, glass/salt, and glass/metal interfaces. Since the outer diameter of the metal was smaller than the outer diameter of the glass, a lip was created which was also produced a glass/liquid interface, which was also studied. Overall, a total of 50 stacks or assemblies of pineapple slices were created in seven different stacking arrangements. Each individual assembly was then installed in an instrumented borehole at WIPP. Brine was then added to most of boreholes and the assemblies heated and maintained at 90{degrees}C. This was achieved by energizing the central heating and rod that traversed through the middle opening of each of the pineapple slices in each assembly. Due to the design of these units, glass, metal and geologic samples could be removed at time intervals of 6 mos., 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years. Currently, all but the 5 year samples have been removed from test and are being evaluated in laboratories of MIIT participants.

  5. Chlorine-36 data at Yucca Mountain: Statistical tests of conceptual models for unsaturated-zone flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, K.; Wolfsberg, A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Sweetkind, D.

    2003-01-01

    An extensive set of chlorine-36 (36Cl) data has been collected in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), an 8-km-long tunnel at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the purpose of developing and testing conceptual models of flow and transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at this site. At several locations, the measured values of 36Cl/Cl ratios for salts leached from rock samples are high enough to provide strong evidence that at least a small component of bomb-pulse 36Cl, fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear devices in the 1950s and 1960s, was measured, implying that some fraction of the water traveled from the ground surface through 200-300 m of unsaturated rock to the level of the ESF during the last 50 years. These data are analyzed here using a formal statistical approach based on log-linear models to evaluate alternative conceptual models for the distribution of such fast flow paths. The most significant determinant of the presence of bomb-pulse 36Cl in a sample from the welded Topopah Spring unit (TSw) is the structural setting from which the sample was collected. Our analysis generally supports the conceptual model that a fault that cuts through the nonwelded Paintbrush tuff unit (PTn) that overlies the TSw is required in order for bomb-pulse 36Cl to be transmitted to the sample depth in less than 50 years. Away from PTn-cutting faults, the ages of water samples at the ESF appear to be a strong function of the thickness of the nonwelded tuff between the ground surface and the ESF, due to slow matrix flow in that unit. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Operational evaluation of a proppeller test stand in the quiet flow facility at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, P. J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Operational proof tests of a propeller test stand (PTS) in a quiet flow facility (QFF) are presented. The PTS is an experimental test bed for acoustic propeller research in the quiet flow environment of the QFF. These proof tests validate thrust and torque predictions, examine the repeatability of measurements on the PTS, and determine the effect of applying artificial roughness to the propeller blades. Since a thrusting propeller causes an open jet to contract, the potential flow core was surveyed to examine the magnitude of the contraction. These measurements are compared with predicted values. The predictions are used to determine operational limitations for testing a given propeller design in the QFF.

  7. Experimental system and component performance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, K.

    1984-10-01

    A prototype dye laser flow loop was constructed to flow test large power amplifiers in Building 169. The flow loop is designed to operate at supply pressures up to 900 psig and flow rates up to 250 GPM. During the initial startup of the flow loop experimental measurements were made to evaluate component and system performance. Three candidate dye flow loop pumps and three different pulsation dampeners were tested.

  8. Getting into the flow: Red cells go on a roll, two-component vesicles swing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallat, Annie; Dupire, Jules; Khelloufi, Kamel; Al Halifa, Al Hair; Adhesion and Inflammation Team

    2013-11-01

    Red blood cells are soft capsules. Under shear flow, their two known motions were ``tumbling'' and ``swinging-tank treading,'' depending on cell mechanics and flow conditions. We reveal new wobbling regimes, among which the ``rolling'' regime, where red cells move as wheels on a road. We show, by coupling two video-microscopy approaches providing multi-directional cell pictures that the orientation of cells flipping into the flow is determined by the shear rate. Rolling permits to avoid energetically costly cellular deformations and is a true signature of the cytoskeleton elasticity. We highlight two transient dynamics: an intermittent regime during the ``tank-treading-to-flipping'' transition and a Frisbee-like ``spinning'' regime during the ``rolling-to-tank-treading'' transition. We find that the biconcave red cell shape is very stable under moderate shear stresses, and we interpret this result in terms of shape memory and elastic buckling. Finally, we generate lipid vesicles with a shape memory by using two lipids with different bending rigidities. These vesicles swing in shear flow similarly to red blood cells but their non-axisymmetric stress-free shape changes the periodicity of the motion and induces specific features.

  9. Experimental testing of flexible barriers for containment of debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeNatale, Jay S.; Iverson, Richard M.; Major, Jon J.; LaHusen, Richard G.; Fliegel, Gregg L.; Duffy, John D.

    1999-01-01

    In June 1996, six experiments conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey Debris Flow Flume demonstrated that flexible, vertical barriers constructed of wire rope netting can stop small debris flows. All experimental debris flows consisted of water-saturated gravelly sand with less than two percent finer sediment by weight. All debris flows had volumes of about 10 cubic meters, masses of about 20 metre tons, and impact velocities of 5 to 9 meters per second. In four experiments, the debris flow impacted pristine, unreformed barriers of varying design; in the other two experiments, the debris flow impacted barriers already loaded with sediment from a previous flow. Differences in barrier design led to differences in barrier performance. Experiments were conducted with barriers constructed of square-mesh wire-rope netting with 30centimeter, 20centimeter, and 15 centimeter mesh openings as well as 30centimeter diameter interlocking steel rings. In all cases, sediment cascading downslope at the leading edge of the debris flows tended to spray through the nets. Nets fitted with finer-mesh chain link or chicken wire liners contained more sediment than did unlined nets, and a ring net fitted with a synthetic silt screen liner contained nearly 100 percent of the sediment. Irreversible net displacements of up to 2 meters and friction brake engagement on the support and anchor cables dissipated some of the impact energy. However, substantial forces developed in the steel support columns and the lateral and tie-back anchor cables attached to these columns. As predicted by elementary mechanics, the anchor cables experienced larger tensile forces when the support columns were hinged at the base rather than bolted rigidly to the foundation. Measured loads in the lateral anchor cables exceeded those in the tie-back anchor cables and the load cell capacity of 45 kilo-Newtons. Measurements also indicated that the peak loads in the tie- back anchors were highly transient and occurred at

  10. Preliminary vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the HEAO-A spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    These vibration, acoustic, and shock specifications provide the qualification test criteria for spacecraft components and subassemblies and for the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-A) experiments. The HEAO-A was divided into zones and subzones to obtain simple component groupings. Zones are designated primarily to assist in determining the applicable specification. A Subzone is available for use when the location of the component is known but component design and weight are not well defined. When the location, weight, and mounting configuration of the component are known, the appropriate Subzone weight ranges are available. Experiment and specific component specifications are available.

  11. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152 Section 75.152 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Qualified and Certified Persons § 75.152 Tests of air flow; qualified person....

  12. Quality assurance and functionality tests on electrical components during the ATLAS IBL production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzsch, J.

    2013-02-01

    To improve performance of the ATLAS inner tracker, a fourth Pixel layer, called the Insertable B-layer (IBL), will be installed in 2014 on a new beam pipe. A new read out chip generation, FE-I4, has been developed and two different sensor designs, a rather conventional planar and a 3D design, have been flip chipped to these front ends. New staves holding new stave and module flex circuits have been developed as well. Therefore, a production QA test bench has been established to test all production staves before integration with the new beam pipe. This setup combines former ATLAS Pixel services and a new readout system, namely the RCE (Reconfigurable Cluster Element) system developed at SLAC. With this setup all production staves will be tested to ensure the installation of only those staves which fulfill the IBL criteria. Quality assurance measurements under cleanroom conditions, including temperature and humidity control, are performed on the individual components during the various production steps of the IBL, namely connectivity as well as electrical tests and signal probing on individual parts and assembled subsystems. The pre-assembly QC procedures, the capabilities of the stave qualification setup, and recent results from testing a prototype stave are presented and discussed.

  13. Implementation of Leak Test Methods for the International Space Station (ISS) Elements, Systems and Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Steve; Lvovsky, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS has Qualification and Acceptance Environmental Test Requirements document, SSP 41172 that includes many environmental tests such as Thermal vacuum & Cycling, Depress/Repress, Sinusoidal, Random, and Acoustic Vibration, Pyro Shock, Acceleration, Humidity, Pressure, Electromatic Interference (EMI)/Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMCO), etc. This document also includes (13) leak test methods for Pressure Integrity Verification of the ISS Elements, Systems, and Components. These leak test methods are well known, however, the test procedure for specific leak test method shall be written and implemented paying attention to the important procedural steps/details that, if omitted or deviated, could impact the quality of the final product and affect the crew safety. Such procedural steps/details for different methods include, but not limited to: - Sequence of testing, f or example, pressurization and submersion steps for Method I (Immersion); - Stabilization of the mass spectrometer leak detector outputs fo r Method II (vacuum Chamber or Bell jar); - Proper data processing an d taking a conservative approach while making predictions for on-orbit leakage rate for Method III(Pressure Change); - Proper Calibration o f the mass spectrometer leak detector for all the tracer gas (mostly Helium) Methods such as Method V (Detector Probe), Method VI (Hood), Method VII (Tracer Probe), Method VIII(Accumulation); - Usage of visibl ility aides for Method I (Immersion), Method IV (Chemical Indicator), Method XII (Foam/Liquid Application), and Method XIII (Hydrostatic/Visual Inspection); While some methods could be used for the total leaka ge (either internal-to-external or external-to-internal) rate requirement verification (Vacuum Chamber, Pressure Decay, Hood, Accumulation), other methods shall be used only as a pass/fail test for individual joints (e.g., welds, fittings, and plugs) or for troubleshooting purposes (Chemical Indicator, Detector Probe

  14. Standardization Efforts for Mechanical Testing and Design of Advanced Ceramic Materials and Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Jenkins, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced aerospace systems occasionally require the use of very brittle materials such as sapphire and ultra-high temperature ceramics. Although great progress has been made in the development of methods and standards for machining, testing and design of component from these materials, additional development and dissemination of standard practices is needed. ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics and ISO TC 206 have taken a lead role in the standardization of testing for ceramics, and recent efforts and needs in standards development by Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics will be summarized. In some cases, the engineers, etc. involved are unaware of the latest developments, and traditional approaches applicable to other material systems are applied. Two examples of flight hardware failures that might have been prevented via education and standardization will be presented.

  15. The large-area hybrid-optics CLAS12 RICH detector: Tests of innovative components

    SciTech Connect

    Contalbrigo, M; Baltzell, N; Benmokhtar, F; Barion, L; Cisbani, E; El Alaoui, A; Hafidi, K; Hoek, M; Kubarovsky, V; Lagamba, L; Lucherini, V; Malaguti, R; Mirazita, M; Montgomery, R; Movsisyan, A; Musico, P; Orecchini, D; Orlandi, A; Pappalardo, L L; Pereira, S; Perrino, R; Phillips, J; Pisano, S; Rossi, P; Squerzanti, S; Tomassini, S; Turisini, M; Viticchiè, A

    2014-07-01

    A large area ring-imaging Cherenkov detector has been designed to provide clean hadron identification capability in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 8 GeV/c for the CLAS12 experiments at the upgraded 12 GeV continuous electron beam accelerator facility of Jefferson Lab to study the 3D nucleon structure in the yet poorly explored valence region by deep-inelastic scattering, and to perform precision measurements in hadronization and hadron spectroscopy. The adopted solution foresees a novel hybrid optics design based on an aerogel radiator, composite mirrors and densely packed and highly segmented photon detectors. Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly (forward tracks) or after two mirror reflections (large angle tracks). The preliminary results of individual detector component tests and of the prototype performance at test-beams are reported here.

  16. Shock Desensitization Effect in the STANAG 4363 Confined Explosive Component Water Gap Test

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A S; Lee, R S; Tarver, C M

    2006-06-07

    The Explosive Component Water Gap Test (ECWGT) in the Stanag 4363 has been recently investigated to assess the shock sensitivity of lead and booster components having a diameter less than 5 mm. For that purpose, Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) based pellets having a height and diameter of 3 mm have been confined by a steel annulus of wall thickness 1-3.5 mm and with the same height as the pellet. 1-mm wall thickness makes the component more sensitive (larger gap). As the wall thickness is increased to 2-mm, the gap increases a lesser amount, but when the wall thickness is increased to 3.5-mm a decrease in sensitivity is observed (smaller gap). This decrease of the water gap has been reproduced experimentally by many nations. Numerical simulations using Ignition and Growth model have been performed in this paper and have reproduced the experimental results for the steel confinement up to 2 mm thick and aluminum confinement. A stronger re-shock following the first input shock from the water is focusing on the axis due to the confinement. The double shock configuration is well-known to lead in some cases to shock desensitization.

  17. Relationship Between the Clinical Components of the Boder Test of Reading-Spelling Patterns and the Stanford Achievement Test: Validity of the Boder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    Investigated the concurrent validity of the diagnostic components of the Boder Test of Reading-Spelling Patterns with the reading and spelling measures of the Stanford Achievement Reading Test (SAT) in 87 reading-disabled elementary school students. Results indicated the relationship between the reading components of the Boder and SAT were…

  18. Testing MODFLOW-LGR for simulating flow around buried Quaternary valleys - synthetic test cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelmsen, T. N.; Christensen, S.

    2009-12-01

    In this study the Local Grid Refinement (LGR) method developed for MODFLOW-2005 (Mehl and Hill, 2005) is utilized to describe groundwater flow in areas containing buried Quaternary valley structures. The tests are conducted as comparative analysis between simulations run with a globally refined model, a locally refined model, and a globally coarse model, respectively. The models vary from simple one layer models to more complex ones with up to 25 model layers. The comparisons of accuracy are conducted within the locally refined area and focus on water budgets, simulated heads, and simulated particle traces. Simulations made with the globally refined model are used as reference (regarded as “true” values). As expected, for all test cases the application of local grid refinement resulted in more accurate results than when using the globally coarse model. A significant advantage of utilizing MODFLOW-LGR was that it allows increased numbers of model layers to better resolve complex geology within local areas. This resulted in more accurate simulations than when using either a globally coarse model grid or a locally refined model with lower geological resolution. Improved accuracy in the latter case could not be expected beforehand because difference in geological resolution between the coarse parent model and the refined child model contradicts the assumptions of the Darcy weighted interpolation used in MODFLOW-LGR. With respect to model runtimes, it was sometimes found that the runtime for the locally refined model is much longer than for the globally refined model. This was the case even when the closure criteria were relaxed compared to the globally refined model. These results are contradictory to those presented by Mehl and Hill (2005). Furthermore, in the complex cases it took some testing (model runs) to identify the closure criteria and the damping factor that secured convergence, accurate solutions, and reasonable runtimes. For our cases this is judged to

  19. Three-dimensional NDE of VHTR core components via simulation-based testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Guzina, Bojan; Kunerth, Dennis

    2014-09-30

    A next generation, simulation-driven-and-enabled testing platform is developed for the 3D detection and characterization of defects and damage in nuclear graphite and composite structures in Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs). The proposed work addresses the critical need for the development of high-fidelity Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) technologies for as-manufactured and replaceable in-service VHTR components. Centered around the novel use of elastic (sonic and ultrasonic) waves, this project deploys a robust, non-iterative inverse solution for the 3D defect reconstruction together with a non-contact, laser-based approach to the measurement of experimental waveforms in VHTR core components. In particular, this research (1) deploys three-dimensional Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometry (3D SLDV) as a means to accurately and remotely measure 3D displacement waveforms over the accessible surface of a VHTR core component excited by mechanical vibratory source; (2) implements a powerful new inverse technique, based on the concept of Topological Sensitivity (TS), for non-iterative elastic waveform tomography of internal defects - that permits robust 3D detection, reconstruction and characterization of discrete damage (e.g. holes and fractures) in nuclear graphite from limited-aperture NDE measurements; (3) implements state-of-the art computational (finite element) model that caters for accurately simulating elastic wave propagation in 3D blocks of nuclear graphite; (4) integrates the SLDV testing methodology with the TS imaging algorithm into a non-contact, high-fidelity NDE platform for the 3D reconstruction and characterization of defects and damage in VHTR core components; and (5) applies the proposed methodology to VHTR core component samples (both two- and three-dimensional) with a priori induced, discrete damage in the form of holes and fractures. Overall, the newly established SLDV-TS testing platform represents a next-generation NDE tool that surpasses

  20. Modelling of evaporation of a dispersed liquid component in a chemically active gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, V. G.; Naumov, V. I.; Kotov, V. Yu.

    1994-01-01

    A model has been developed to investigate evaporation of dispersed liquids in chemically active gas flow. Major efforts have been directed at the development of algorithms for implementing this model. The numerical experiments demonstrate that, in the boundary layer, significant changes in the composition and temperature of combustion products take place. This gives the opportunity to more correctly model energy release processes in combustion chambers of liquid-propellant rocket engines, gas-turbine engines, and other power devices.

  1. Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) before Upgrade to Component Test Facility (CTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2010-01-01

    The compact (R0~1.2-1.3m) Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is aimed at providing a fully integrated, continuously driven fusion nuclear environment of copious fusion neutrons. This facility would be used to test, discover, understand, and innovate scientific and technical solutions for the challenges facing DEMO, by addressing the multi-scale synergistic interactions involving fusion plasma material interactions, tritium fuel cycle, power extraction, and the nuclear effects on materials. Such a facility properly designed would provide, initially at the JET-level plasma pressure (~30%T2) and conditions (e.g., Hot-Ion H-Mode), an outboard fusion neutron flux of 0.25 MW/m2 while requiring a fusion power of 19 MW. If and when this research operation is successful, its performance can be extended to 1 MW/m2 and 76 MW by reaching for twice the JET plasma pressure and Q. High-safety factor q and moderate- plasmas would minimize plasma-induced disruptions, helping to deliver reliably a neutron fluence of 1 MW-yr/m2 and a duty factor of 10% presently anticipated for the FNS research. Success of this research will depend on achieving time-efficient installation and replacement of all components using extensive remote handling (RH). This in turn requires modular designs for all internal components, including the single-turn toroidal field coil center-post with RH-compatible bi-directional sliding joints. Such device goals would further dictate placement of support structures and vacuum seal welds behind the internal and shielding components. If these further goals could be achieved, the FNSF would provide a ready upgrade path to the Component Test Facility (CTF), which would aim to test, at higher neutron fluence and duty cycle, the demanding fusion nuclear engineering and technologies for DEMO. This FNSF-CTF strategy would be complementary to the ITER and the Broader Approach programs, and thereby help mitigate the risks of an aggressive world fusion DEMO R&D Program

  2. Component flow processes at four streams in the Catskill Mountains, New York, analysed using episodic concentration/discharge relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C.; Davies, T. D.; Murdoch, P. S.

    1999-03-01

    Plots of solute concentration against discharge have been used to relate stream hydrochemical variations to processes of flow generation, using data collected at four streams in the Catskill Mountains, New York, during the Episodic Response Project of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Results suggest that a two-component system of shallow and deep saturated subsurface flow, in which the two components respond simultaneously during hydrologic events, may be applicable to the study basins. Using a large natural sea-salt sodium input as a tracer for precipitation, it is argued that an additional distinction can be made between pre-event and event water travelling along the shallow subsurface flow path. Pre-event water is thought to be displaced by infiltrating event water, which becomes dominant on the falling limb of the hydrograph. Where, as appears to be the case for sulfate, a solute equilibrates rapidly within the soil, the pre-event-event water distinction is unimportant. However, for some solutes there are clear and consistent compositional differences between water from the two sources, evident as a hysteresis loop in concentration-discharge plots. Nitrate and acidity, in particular, appear to be elevated in event water following percolation through the organic horizon. Consequently, the most acidic, high nitrate conditions during an episode generally occur after peak discharge. A simple conceptual model of episode runoff generation is presented on the basis of these results.

  3. Characterization of GX 339-4 outburst of 2010-11: analysis by XSPEC using two component advective flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Dipak; Mondal, Santanu; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2015-02-01

    We study spectral properties of GX 339-4 during its 2010-11 outburst with two component advective flow (TCAF) model after its inclusion in XSPEC as a table model. We compare results fitted by TCAF model with combined disc blackbody and power-law model. For a spectral fit, we use 2.5-25 keV spectral data of the Proportional Counter Array instrument onboard RXTE satellite. From our fit, accretion flow parameters such as Keplerian (disc) rate, sub-Keplerian (halo) rate, location and strength of shock are extracted. We quantify how the disc and the halo rates vary during the entire outburst. We study how the halo to disc accretion rate ratio (ARR), quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), shock locations and its strength vary when the system passes through hard, hard-intermediate, soft-intermediate and soft states. We find pieces of evidence of monotonically increasing and decreasing nature of QPO frequencies depending on the variation of ARR during rising and declining phases. Interestingly, on days of transition from hard state to hard-intermediate spectral state (during the rising phase) or vice-versa (during decline phase), ARR is observed to be locally maximum. Non-constancy of ARR while obtaining reasonable fits points to the presence of two independent components in the flow.

  4. Performance Testing of Lidar Components Subjected to Space Exposure in Space via MISSE 7 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2012-01-01

    .The objective of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) is to study the performance of novel materials when subjected to the synergistic effects of the harsh space environment for several months. MISSE missions provide an opportunity for developing space qualifiable materials. Several laser and lidar components were sent by NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) as a part of the MISSE 7 mission. The MISSE 7 module was transported to the international space station (ISS) via STS 129 mission that was launched on Nov 16, 2009. Later, the MISSE 7 module was brought back to the earth via the STS 134 that landed on June 1, 2011. The MISSE 7 module that was subjected to exposure in space environment for more than one and a half year included fiber laser, solid-state laser gain materials, detectors, and semiconductor laser diode. Performance testing of these components is now progressing. In this paper, the current progress on post-flight performance testing of a high-speed photodetector and a balanced receiver is discussed. Preliminary findings show that detector characteristics did not undergo any significant degradation.

  5. Low-flow operation and testing of pumps in nuclear plants

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstreet, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    Low-flow operation of centrifugal pumps introduces hydraulic instability and other factors that can cause damage to these machines. The resulting degradation has been studied and recorded for pumps in electric power plants. The objectives of this paper are to (1) describe the damage-producing phenomena, including their sources and consequences; (2) relate these observations to expectations for damage caused by low-flow operation of pumps in nuclear power plants; and (3) assess the utility of low-flow testing. Hydraulic behavior during low-flow operation is reviewed for a typical centrifugal pump stage, and the damage-producing mechanisms are described. Pump monitoring practices, in conjunction with pump performance characteristics, are considered; experience data are reviewed; and the effectiveness of low-flow surveillance monitoring is examined. Degradation caused by low-flow operation is shown to be an important factor, and low-flow surveillance testing is shown to be inadequate. 18 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. The n-component cubic model and flows: Subgraph break-collapse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Magalhães, A. C. N.; Essam, J. W.

    1990-03-01

    We specialize to the n-component cubic model the subgraph break-collapse method which we recently developed for the Z(λ) model. The cubic model has less symmetry than the Potts model, for which the method was originally developed, but nevertheless it is still possible to reduce considerably the computational complexity of the general Z(λ) model. Our recursive algorithm is similar, for n=2, to the break-collapse method for the Z(4) model proposed by Mariz and co-workers. It allows the exact calculation for the partition function and correlation functions for n-component cubic clusters, with n as a variable, without the need to examine all of the spin configurations. An important application is therefore in real-space renormalization-group calculations.

  7. Numerical Calibration of Mass Flow Plug for Inlet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan; Barnhart, Paul; Davis, David O.

    2015-01-01

    A simple control volume model has been developed to calculate the discharge coefficient through a mass flow plug (MFP) and validated with a calibration experiment. The maximum error of the model within the operating region of the MFP is 0.54%. The control volume analysis developed work is comprised of a sequence of flow calculations through the MFP. The model uses the MFP geometry and operating pressure and temperature to couple continuity, momentum, energy, an equation of state, and wall shear. The discharge coefficient calculation also includes the effects of boundary layer growth, including the reduction in cross-sectional flow area as characterized by the boundary layer displacement thickness. The last calculation in the sequence uses an integral method to calculate the growth of the boundary layer, from which the displacement thickness is then determined. The result of these successive calculations is an accurate one-dimension model of the velocity, pressure, and temperature through the MFP. For comparison, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calibration is shown, which when compared to the presented numerical model, had a lower accuracy with a maximum error of 1.35% in addition to being slower by a factor of 100."

  8. A test of a proposed method for estimating validity of a multivariate composite predictor: extending the job component validity model.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Calvin C; Morris, David; Luck, Gypsi

    2009-12-01

    In this study, a proposed extension to the job component validity model from the Position Analysis Questionnaire was tested. Job component validity, a form of synthetic validation, allows researchers to select useful predictors and to estimate the criterion-related validity of tests based on conducting a job analysis which includes the Position Analysis Questionnaire. Morris and colleagues described a method for estimating the multiple correlation of a test battery assembled via job component validity estimates. In the current study, job component validity estimates, derived from the multiple correlation procedure proposed by Morris, et al., were compared to unit-weighted validity estimates obtained in a criterion-related validity study of six job progressions. The multivariate job component validity estimates were comparable to unit-weighted validity coefficients obtained using supervisory ratings as criteria. Multivariate job component validity estimates were conservative compared to corrected unit-weighted validity coefficients.

  9. The Reliability of an Instrumented Device for Measuring Components of the Star Excursion Balance Test

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Paul P.; Butler, Robert J.; Kiesel, Kyle B.; Underwood, Frank B.; Elkins, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    Background The Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) is a dynamic test that requires strength, flexibility, and proprioception and has been used to assess physical performance, identify chronic ankle instability, and identify athletes at greater risk for lower extremity injury. In order to improve the repeatability in measuring components of the SEBT, the Y Balance Test™ has been developed. Objective The purpose of this paper is to report the development and reliability of the Y Balance Test™. Methods Single limb stance excursion distances were measured using the Y Balance Test™ on a sample of 15 male collegiate soccer players. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC) were used to determine the reliability of the test. Results The ICC for intrarater reliability ranged from 0.85 to 0.91 and for interrater reliability ranged from 0.99 to 1.00. Composite reach score reliability was 0.91 for intrarater and 0.99 for interrater reliability. Discussion This study demonstrated that the Y Balance Test™ has good to excellent intrarater and interrater reliability. The device and protocol attempted to address the common sources of error and method variation in the SEBT including whether touch down is allowed with the reach foot, where the stance foot is aligned, movement allowed of the stance foot, instantaneous measurement of furthest reach distance, standard reach height from the ground, standard testing order, and well defined pass/fail criteria. Conclusion The Y Balance Test™ is a reliable test for measuring single limb stance excursion distances while performing dynamic balance testing in collegiate soccer players. PMID:21509114

  10. Pre-test CFD Calculations for a Bypass Flow Standard Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Johnson

    2011-11-01

    The bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is the flow that occurs between adjacent graphite blocks. Gaps exist between blocks due to variances in their manufacture and installation and because of the expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. Although the temperature of fuel compacts and graphite is sensitive to the presence of bypass flow, there is great uncertainty in the level and effects of the bypass flow. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program at the Idaho National Laboratory has undertaken to produce experimental data of isothermal bypass flow between three adjacent graphite blocks. These data are intended to provide validation for computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of the bypass flow. Such validation data sets are called Standard Problems in the nuclear safety analysis field. Details of the experimental apparatus as well as several pre-test calculations of the bypass flow are provided. Pre-test calculations are useful in examining the nature of the flow and to see if there are any problems associated with the flow and its measurement. The apparatus is designed to be able to provide three different gap widths in the vertical direction (the direction of the normal coolant flow) and two gap widths in the horizontal direction. It is expected that the vertical bypass flow will range from laminar to transitional to turbulent flow for the different gap widths that will be available.

  11. Seismic monitoring of a flow test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Johnston, C.

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface, using both conventional seismic network techniques and relatively newer array techniques. These methods allowed us to detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous sources of seismic energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. We have observed some continuous seismic noise sources that may be attributed to the flow test. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Construction and component testing of TAMU3, a 14 Tesla stress-managed Nb3Sn model dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, Eddie Frank, III; Benson, Chris; Blackburn, Raymond; Diaczenko, Nick; Elliott, Timothy; Jaisle, Andrew; McInturff, A.; McIntyre, P.; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2012-06-01

    We report the construction and testing of components of TAMU3, a 14 Tesla Nb3Sn block-coil dipole. A primary goal in developing this model dipole is to test a method of stress management in which Lorentz stress is intercepted within the coil assembly and bypassed so that it cannot accumulate to a level that would cause strain degradation in the superconducting windings. Details of the fabrication, tooling, and results of construction and magnet component testing will be presented.

  13. Analysis of complex cardiovascular flow with three-component acceleration-encoded MRI.

    PubMed

    Barker, Alex J; Staehle, Felix; Bock, Jelena; Jung, Bernd A; Markl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Functional information regarding cardiac performance, pressure gradients, and local flow derangement are available from blood acceleration fields. Thus, this study examines a 2D and 3D phase contrast sequence optimized to efficiently encode three-directional, time-resolved acceleration in vitro and in vivo. Stenosis phantom acceleration measurements were compared to acceleration derived from standard velocity encoded phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (i.e., "velocity-derived acceleration"). For in vivo analysis, three-directional 2D acceleration maps were compared to velocity-derived acceleration using regions proximal and distal to the aortic valve in six healthy volunteers at 1.5 and 3.0 T (voxel size = 1.4 × 2.1 × 8 mm, temporal resolution = 16-20 ms). In addition, a 4D acceleration sequence was evaluated for feasibility in a healthy volunteer and postrepair biscuspid aortic valve patient with an ascending aortic aneurysm. The phantom magnetic resonance acceleration measurements were more accurate (nonturbulent root mean square error = 2.2 vs. 5.1 m/s(2) for phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging) and 10 times less noisy (nonturbulent σ = 0.9 vs. 13.6 m/s(2) for phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging) than velocity-derived acceleration. Acceleration mapping of the left ventricular outflow tract and aortic arch exhibited signal voids colocated with complex flow events such as vortex formation and high order motion. 4D acceleration data, visualized in combination with the velocity data, may provide new insight into complex flow phenomena.

  14. Test of pressure transducer for measuring cotton-mass flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, a cotton harvester yield monitor was developed based on the relationship between air pressure and the mass of seed cotton conveyed. The sensor theory was verified by laboratory tests. The sensor was tested on a cotton picker with seed cotton at two moisture contents, 5.9% and 8.5% we...

  15. The use of Tecnomatix software to simulate the manufacturing flows in an industrial enterprise producing hydrostatic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrila, S.; Brabie, G.; Chirita, B.

    2016-08-01

    The analysis performed on manufacturing flows within industrial enterprises producing hydrostatic components twos made on a number of factors that influence smooth running of production such: distance between pieces, waiting time from one surgery to another; time achievement of setups on CNC machines; tool changing in case of a large number of operators and manufacturing complexity of large files [2]. To optimize the manufacturing flow it was used the software Tecnomatix. This software represents a complete portfolio of manufacturing solutions digital manufactured by Siemens. It provides innovation by linking all production methods of a product from process design, process simulation, validation and ending the manufacturing process. Among its many capabilities to create a wide range of simulations, the program offers various demonstrations regarding the behavior manufacturing cycles. This program allows the simulation and optimization of production systems and processes in several areas such as: car suppliers, production of industrial equipment; electronics manufacturing, design and production of aerospace and defense parts.

  16. A two-stage approach for a multi-objective component assignment problem for a stochastic-flow network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Kuei; Yeh, Cheng-Ta

    2013-03-01

    Many real-life systems, such as computer systems, manufacturing systems and logistics systems, are modelled as stochastic-flow networks (SFNs) to evaluate network reliability. Here, network reliability, defined as the probability that the network successfully transmits d units of data/commodity from an origin to a destination, is a performance indicator of the systems. Network reliability maximization is a particular objective, but is costly for many system supervisors. This article solves the multi-objective problem of reliability maximization and cost minimization by finding the optimal component assignment for SFN, in which a set of multi-state components is ready to be assigned to the network. A two-stage approach integrating Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II and simple additive weighting are proposed to solve this problem, where network reliability is evaluated in terms of minimal paths and recursive sum of disjoint products. Several practical examples related to computer networks are utilized to demonstrate the proposed approach.

  17. Validation of non-Darcian flow effects in slug tests conducted in fractured rock boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Patryk M.; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryA series of rising and falling head slug tests with different initial applied head differentials (ΔHo) were conducted in open fractured dolostone and sandstone boreholes using straddle packers isolating specific depth intervals (1.5 m length) to examine the influence of non-Darcian flow. The open holes were developed and inspected using video and acoustic televiewing (ATV) to ensure that evidence of skin effects due to drilling were absent. The transmissivity (T) values obtained from both the rising and falling head slug tests were very similar at low initial applied head; however, the T values were progressively smaller at larger ΔHo, suggesting error due to non-Darcian flow. Non-Darcian flow behavior was confirmed by constant head step tests conducted in the same test intervals where the injection rate (Q) vs. applied head (dH) relationship became non-linear at relatively low injection rates, and the non-Darcian data also resulted in lower T values. For a series of slug tests conducted at different ΔHo, non-Darcian flow effects gradually increased as ΔHo increased, consistent with the trends for constant head step tests conducted in the same test intervals. To maintain Darcian flow conditions in the fractured dolostone and sandstone tested in this study, ΔHo must be kept small, generally less than 0.2 m. This study demonstrates that by conducting both "stepped" slug tests and constant head step tests, the Darcian flow assumption for both types of tests can be rigorously validated. However, when only slug tests are conducted, it is necessary to conduct a series of "stepped" slug tests, including tests with small applied head differentials, to avoid errors due to non-Darcian flow.

  18. Well-test analysis for non-Newtonian fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Vongvuthipornchai, S.

    1985-01-01

    This dissertation examines pressure behavior subsequent to the injection of a non-Newtonian power-law pseudoplastic fluid. Responses at an unfractured well and at a well intercepting a planar fracture or a finite-conductivity fracture are studied. A rigorous examination of both injection and falloff responses is presented. Two approximate solutions for the transient (radial) flow presented in the literature are examined. The use of these solutions to analyze falloff data and correction factors needed are investigated. The influence of injection time on falloff data is documented. The influence of wellbore storage and skin on pressure responses is considered. The effective wellbore radius concept is used to combine the wellbore storage constant and the skin factor. Infinite-conductivity and uniform-flux idealizations are used to examine responses at wells intercepting planar fractures. Procedures to identify flow regimes are discussed. The solutions presented here may be used to determine fluid mobility, fracture half-length and the power-law index. Procedures to analyze pressure data during pseudoradial flow are also discussed. The effective wellbore radius concept is used to relate the skin factor with fracture half-length. Also, the utility of the pressure derivative techniques and the influence of injection time on the ability to analyze falloff data are documented. Lastly, pressure responses at a well intercepting a finite-conductivity fracture are examined. The parameters that govern the well response are identified. The solutions presented here may be used to obtain fracture half-length, fluid mobility and fracture conductivity, provided that the power-law index is known. All solutions were obtained by using standard finite-difference techniques.

  19. [Flow field test on the tangential section of polypropylene tubular membrane module annular gap in rotating linear tangential flow].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengduan; Chen, Wenmei; Li, Jianming; Jiang, Guangming

    2002-07-01

    A new type of polypropylene tubular membrane apparatus of rotating cross flow was designed to study experimentally the flow field characteristics of the tangential section of the membrane annular gap. The authors designed rotary linear tangential flow tubular membrane separator and its test system for the first time. Through the system, the flow field of rotary linear tangential flow with the advanced Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was tested for the first time. A lot of streamlines and vorticity maps of the tangential section of separator in different operation conditions were obtained. The velocity distribution characteristics were analyzed quantitatively: 1. At non-vortex area, no matter how the operation parameters change, the velocity near to rotary tangential flow entrance was higher than the velocity far from entrance at the same radial coordinates. At vortex area, generally the flow velocity of inner vortex was lower than the outer vortex. At the vortex center, the velocity was lowest, the tangential velocity were equal to zero generally. At the vortex center zone, the tangential velocity was less than the axial velocity. 2. Under test operations, the tangential velocity and axial velocity of vortices borders are 1-2 times of average axial velocity of membrane module annular gap. The maximum tangential velocity and axial velocity of ellipse vortices were 2-6 times of average axial velocity of membrane module annular gap. 3. The vortices that are formed on the tangential section, there existed mass transfer between inner and outer parts of fluid. Much fluid of outer vortices got into the inner ones, which was able to prevent membrane tube from particles blocking up very soon. PMID:12371104

  20. Non-Newtonian Liquid Flow through Small Diameter Piping Components: CFD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Tarun Kanti; Das, Sudip Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis have been carried out to evaluate the frictional pressure drop across the horizontal pipeline and different piping components, like elbows, orifices, gate and globe valves for non-Newtonian liquid through 0.0127 m pipe line. The mesh generation is done using GAMBIT 6.3 and FLUENT 6.3 is used for CFD analysis. The CFD results are verified with our earlier published experimental data. The CFD results show the very good agreement with the experimental values.

  1. Thermal mixing tests in a semiannular downcomer with interacting flows from cold legs: International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tuomisto, H; Mustonen, P

    1986-10-01

    This report describes the test facility and test program for studying thermal mixing of high-pressure injection (HPI) water in the two-fifths scale model of three cold legs, semiannular downcomer and lower plenum of a pressurized water reactor. This test series has been carried out by mutual agreement on the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) information exchange between the US Nuclear Regulation Commission and Imatran Voima Oy. The test facility was originally designed to model the Finnish Loviisa plant but it was redesigned and modified for this test program. The facility can be operated at atmospheric pressure with loop and HPI flows from different cold legs in the area of interest to PTS. Transparent materials were used to allow flow visualization during the tests. The choice of transparent materials limit the upper temperature to 75/sup 0/C. The full buoyancy effect was induced by salt addition and the HPI temperature was used as a tracer. The test matrix consists of 20 tests. The varied parameters were flow rates and the number and configuration of cold legs with HPI and loop flows. Four tests were done with decreasing loop flow temperature to simulate primary flows during steam line breaks.

  2. Core Dynamics Analysis for Reactivity Insertion and Loss of Coolant Flow Tests Using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Takeda, Tetsuaki

    Safety demonstration tests using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) are in progress to verify its inherent safety features and improve the safety technology and design methodology for High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The reactivity insertion test is one of the safety demonstration tests for the HTTR. This test simulates the rapid increase in the reactor power by withdrawing the control rod without operating the reactor power control system. In addition, the loss of coolant flow tests has been conducted to simulate the rapid decrease in the reactor power by tripping one, two or all out of three gas circulators. The experimental results have revealed the inherent safety features of HTGRs, such as the negative reactivity feedback effect. The numerical analysis code, which was named-ACCORD-, was developed to analyze the reactor dynamics including the flow behavior in the HTTR core. We have modified this code to use a model with four parallel channels and twenty temperature coefficients. Furthermore, we added another analytical model of the core for calculating the heat conduction between the fuel channels and the core in the case of the loss of coolant flow tests. This paper describes the validation results for the newly developed code using the experimental results. Moreover, the effect of the model is formulated quantitatively with our proposed equation. Finally, the pre-analytical result of the loss of coolant flow test by tripping all gas circulators is also discussed.

  3. Peroxynitrite reduces the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor component of coronary flow-mediated dilation in PECAM-1-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanping; Bubolz, Aaron H; Shi, Yang; Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K; Gutterman, David D

    2006-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) is capable of transducing signals in endothelial cells exposed to shear; however, the biological consequences of this signal transduction are unknown. Because shear stress elicits flow-mediated dilation (FMD), we examined whether steady-state FMD in mouse coronary arteries (MCAs) is affected in the PECAM-1 knockout (KO) mouse. MCAs were isolated from wild-type (WT) or KO mice and prepared for videomicroscopy, histofluorescence, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. FMD was examined in the absence and presence of N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and l-NAME+indomethacin (INDO). FMD was reduced in KO relative to WT MCAs, but the l-NAME-inhibitable portion of FMD was similar between the two. The INDO-sensitive component of FMD was diminished in KO MCAs. In contrast, the residual component of dilation, presumably because of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), was abolished in KO MCAs. Histofluorescence showed relatively more superoxide (O2-.; oxy-ethidium fluorescence) and peroxide production (dihydrochlorofluorescene fluoresecence) in KO MCAs at rest. Flow augmented O2-. and peroxide production in WT MCAs but had little effect on KO MCAs. Enhanced nitric oxide generation was observed in arteries from KO mice, accompanied with increased eNOS S1177 phosphorylation. In vessels from KO mice, treatment with ebselen decreased peroxynitrite (ONOO-) formation and improved the reduced FMD, largely due to restoration of the presumed EDHF component. These results suggest that PECAM-1 is necessary for normal FMD in the mouse coronary circulation. In the absence of this adhesion and signaling molecule, ONOO- production is increased concomitant with a reduction in both the EDHF and INDO-sensitive components of FMD. PMID:16166207

  4. Three-dimensional two-component velocity measurement of the flow field induced by the Vorticella picta microorganism using a confocal microparticle image velocimetry technique

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Moeto; Oishi, Masamichi; Oshima, Marie; Asai, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the biological feeding strategy and characteristics of a microorganism as an actuator requires the detailed and quantitative measurement of flow velocity and flow rate induced by the microorganism. Although some velocimetry methods have been applied to examine the flow, the measured dimensions were limited to at most two-dimensional two-component measurements. Here we have developed a method to measure three-dimensional two-component flow velocity fields generated by the microorganism Vorticella picta using a piezoscanner and a confocal microscope. We obtained the two-component velocities of the flow field in a two-dimensional plane denoted as the XY plane, with an observation area of 455×341 μm2 and the resolution of 9.09 μm per each velocity vector by a confocal microparticle image velocimetry technique. The measurement of the flow field at each height took 37.5 ms, and it was repeated in 16 planes with a 2.50 μm separation in the Z direction. We reconstructed the three-dimensional two-component flow velocity field. From the reconstructed data, the flow velocity field [u(x,y,z),v(x,y,z)] in an arbitrary plane can be visualized. The flow rates through YZ and ZX planes were also calculated. During feeding, we examined a suction flow to the mouth of the Vorticella picta and measured it to be to 300 pl∕s. PMID:19693398

  5. Notes on Well-Posed, Ensemble Averaged Conservation Equations for Multiphase, Multi-Component, and Multi-Material Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ray A. Berry

    2005-07-01

    At the INL researchers and engineers routinely encounter multiphase, multi-component, and/or multi-material flows. Some examples include: Reactor coolant flows Molten corium flows Dynamic compaction of metal powders Spray forming and thermal plasma spraying Plasma quench reactor Subsurface flows, particularly in the vadose zone Internal flows within fuel cells Black liquor atomization and combustion Wheat-chaff classification in combine harvesters Generation IV pebble bed, high temperature gas reactor The complexity of these flows dictates that they be examined in an averaged sense. Typically one would begin with known (or at least postulated) microscopic flow relations that hold on the “small” scale. These include continuum level conservation of mass, balance of species mass and momentum, conservation of energy, and a statement of the second law of thermodynamics often in the form of an entropy inequality (such as the Clausius-Duhem inequality). The averaged or macroscopic conservation equations and entropy inequalities are then obtained from the microscopic equations through suitable averaging procedures. At this stage a stronger form of the second law may also be postulated for the mixture of phases or materials. To render the evolutionary material flow balance system unique, constitutive equations and phase or material interaction relations are introduced from experimental observation, or by postulation, through strict enforcement of the constraints or restrictions resulting from the averaged entropy inequalities. These averaged equations form the governing equation system for the dynamic evolution of these mixture flows. Most commonly, the averaging technique utilized is either volume or time averaging or a combination of the two. The flow restrictions required for volume and time averaging to be valid can be severe, and violations of these restrictions are often found. A more general, less restrictive (and far less commonly used) type of averaging known

  6. Material selection for lightweight optical components in fieldable military optical test set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell E.; Ahmad, Anees; Lewis, George R.; George, Gene

    1994-10-01

    Material selection and suitable low cost manufacturing processes for production of rugged man-portable lightweight optical test set components are described. Field requirements for an ultra lightweight optical test set comprised of an off-axis two mirror collimator plus source and detector optics mandated selection of extremely stable materials. The requirements include temporal, thermal and mechanical performance suitable for portable and transportable military applications. The environmental stability requirement includes operating over a temperature range of 130 degrees fahrenheit. Also military shock and vibration requirements for transportable equipment are imposed on the entire test set. The total weight budget is 5 pounds for the mirrors and the large supporting structure. The structure volume is only about 1% of the occupied space. A near-net fabrication process such as casting or HIP fabrication was required. A comparison of materials and manufacturing methods has resulted in the selection of a hypereutectic aluminum alloy containing 23% by weight silicon with stabilizing elements. This material can be cast and heat treated to produce uniform properties at low cost. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is much lower than other aluminum alloys and the modulus of elasticity is 50% higher. The alloy was machined with conventional tools and plated with nickel phosphorous of the same CTE to produce stable optics.

  7. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Synthetic Instrument Capabilities Assessment and Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    The role of synthetic instruments (SIs) for Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) is to provide an external lower-level diagnostic and functional test capability beyond the built-in-test capabilities of spacecraft electronics. Built-in diagnostics can report faults and symptoms, but isolating the root cause and performing corrective action requires specialized instruments. Often a fault can be revealed by emulating the operation of external hardware. This implies complex hardware that is too massive to be accommodated in spacecraft. The SI strategy is aimed at minimizing complexity and mass by employing highly reconfigurable instruments that perform diagnostics and emulate external functions. In effect, SI can synthesize an instrument on demand. The SI architecture section of this document summarizes the result of a recent program diagnostic and test needs assessment based on the International Space Station. The SI architecture addresses operational issues such as minimizing crew time and crew skill level, and the SI data transactions between the crew and supporting ground engineering searching for the root cause and formulating corrective actions. SI technology is described within a teleoperations framework. The remaining sections describe a lab demonstration intended to show that a single SI circuit could synthesize an instrument in hardware and subsequently clear the hardware and synthesize a completely different instrument on demand. An analysis of the capabilities and limitations of commercially available SI hardware and programming tools is included. Future work in SI technology is also described.

  8. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  9. Flow Quality Studies of the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel Circuit (1995 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen; Kee-Bowling, Bonnie A.; Gonsalez, Jose C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of conducting the flow-field surveys described in this report was to more fully document the flow quality in several areas of the tunnel circuit in the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel. The results from these surveys provide insight into areas of the tunnel that were known to exhibit poor flow quality characteristics and provide data that will be useful to the design of flow quality improvements and a new heat exchanger for the facility. An instrumented traversing mechanism was used to survey the flow field at several large cross sections of the tunnel loop over the entire speed range of the facility. Flow-field data were collected at five stations in the tunnel loop, including downstream of the fan drive motor housing, upstream and downstream of the heat exchanger, and upstream and downstream of the spraybars located in the settling chamber upstream of the test section. The data collected during these surveys greatly expanded the data base describing the flow quality in each of these areas. The new data matched closely the flow quality trends recorded from earlier tests. Data collected downstream of the heat exchanger and in the settling chamber showed how the configuration of the folded heat exchanger affected the pressure, velocity, and flow angle distributions in these areas. Smoke flow visualization was also used to qualitatively study the flow field in an area downstream of the drive fan and in the settling chamber/contraction section.

  10. Photogrammetric Deflection Measurements for the Tiltrotor Test Rig (TTR) Multi-Component Rotor Balance Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solis, Eduardo; Meyn, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Calibrating the internal, multi-component balance mounted in the Tiltrotor Test Rig (TTR) required photogrammetric measurements to determine the location and orientation of forces applied to the balance. The TTR, with the balance and calibration hardware attached, was mounted in a custom calibration stand. Calibration loads were applied using eleven hydraulic actuators, operating in tension only, that were attached to the forward frame of the calibration stand and the TTR calibration hardware via linkages with in-line load cells. Before the linkages were installed, photogrammetry was used to determine the location of the linkage attachment points on the forward frame and on the TTR calibration hardware. Photogrammetric measurements were used to determine the displacement of the linkage attachment points on the TTR due to deflection of the hardware under applied loads. These measurements represent the first photogrammetric deflection measurements to be made to support 6-component rotor balance calibration. This paper describes the design of the TTR and the calibration hardware, and presents the development, set-up and use of the photogrammetry system, along with some selected measurement results.

  11. Design, process development, manufacture, test and evaluation of boron-aluminum for space shuttle components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, R. A.; Niemann, J. T.; Otto, O. R.; Brown, N. M.; Heinrich, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    A multi phase boron-aluminum design and evaluation program for space shuttle components was conducted, culminating in the fabrication of a 1.22 m (48 inch) x 1.83 m (72 inch) boron-aluminum compression panel capable of distributing a point load of 1555 kN (350,000 lbs) into a uniform running load at a temperature of 589 K (600 F). This panel was of the skin-stringer construction with two intermediate frame supports; seven unidirectional stringers varied in thickness from 5 plies to 52 plies and the skin was contoured to thicknesses ranging from 10 plies to 62 plies. Both the stringers and the skin incorporated Ti-6Al-4V titanium interleaves to increase bearing and in-plane shear strength. The discrete program phases were materials evaluation, design studies, process technology development, fabrication and assembly, and test and evaluation.

  12. Fluctuating Pressure Data from 2-D Nozzle Cold Flow Tests (Dual Bell)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.

    2001-01-01

    Rocket engines nozzle performance changes as a vehicle climbs through the atmosphere. An altitude compensating nozzle, ACN, is intended to improve on a fixed geometry bell nozzle that performs at optimum at only one trajectory point. In addition to nozzle performance, nozzle transient loads are an important consideration. Any nozzle experiences large transient toads when shocks pass through the nozzle at start and shutdown. Additional transient toads will occur at transitional flow conditions. The objectives of cold flow nozzle testing at MSFC are CFD benchmark / calibration and Unsteady flow / sideloads. Initial testing performed with 2-D inserts to 14" transonic wind tunnel. Recent review of 2-D data in preparation for nozzle test facility 3-D testing. This presentation shows fluctuating pressure data and some observations from 2-D dual-bell nozzle cold flow tests.

  13. Simulation of sharp interface multi-material flows involving an arbitrary number of components through an extended five-equation model

    SciTech Connect

    Billaud Friess, Marie; Kokh, Samuel

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we present an anti-diffusive method dedicated to the simulation of interface flows on Cartesian grids involving an arbitrary number m of compressible components. Our work is two-fold: first, we introduce a m-component flow model that generalizes a classic two material five-equation model. In that way, interfaces are localized using color function discontinuities and a pressure equilibrium closure law is used to complete this new model. The resulting model is demonstrated to be hyperbolic under simple assumptions and consistent. Second, we present a discretization strategy for this model relying on a Lagrange–Remap scheme. Here, the projection step involves an anti-dissipative mechanism allowing to prevent numerical diffusion of the material interfaces. The proposed solver is built ensuring consistency and stability properties but also that the sum of the color functions remains equal to one. The resulting scheme is first order accurate and conservative for the mass, momentum, energy and partial masses. Furthermore, the obtained discretization preserves Riemann invariants like pressure and velocity at the interfaces. Finally, validation computations of this numerical method are performed on several tests in one and two dimensions. The accuracy of the method is also compared to results obtained with the upwind Lagrange–Remap scheme.

  14. Wear Scar Similarities between Retrieved and Simulator-Tested Polyethylene TKR Components: An Artificial Neural Network Approach.

    PubMed

    Orozco Villaseñor, Diego A; Wimmer, Markus A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how representative wear scars of simulator-tested polyethylene (PE) inserts compare with retrieved PE inserts from total knee replacement (TKR). By means of a nonparametric self-organizing feature map (SOFM), wear scar images of 21 postmortem- and 54 revision-retrieved components were compared with six simulator-tested components that were tested either in displacement or in load control according to ISO protocols. The SOFM network was then trained with the wear scar images of postmortem-retrieved components since those are considered well-functioning at the time of retrieval. Based on this training process, eleven clusters were established, suggesting considerable variability among wear scars despite an uncomplicated loading history inside their hosts. The remaining components (revision-retrieved and simulator-tested) were then assigned to these established clusters. Six out of five simulator components were clustered together, suggesting that the network was able to identify similarities in loading history. However, the simulator-tested components ended up in a cluster at the fringe of the map containing only 10.8% of retrieved components. This may suggest that current ISO testing protocols were not fully representative of this TKR population, and protocols that better resemble patients' gait after TKR containing activities other than walking may be warranted. PMID:27597955

  15. Wear Scar Similarities between Retrieved and Simulator-Tested Polyethylene TKR Components: An Artificial Neural Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how representative wear scars of simulator-tested polyethylene (PE) inserts compare with retrieved PE inserts from total knee replacement (TKR). By means of a nonparametric self-organizing feature map (SOFM), wear scar images of 21 postmortem- and 54 revision-retrieved components were compared with six simulator-tested components that were tested either in displacement or in load control according to ISO protocols. The SOFM network was then trained with the wear scar images of postmortem-retrieved components since those are considered well-functioning at the time of retrieval. Based on this training process, eleven clusters were established, suggesting considerable variability among wear scars despite an uncomplicated loading history inside their hosts. The remaining components (revision-retrieved and simulator-tested) were then assigned to these established clusters. Six out of five simulator components were clustered together, suggesting that the network was able to identify similarities in loading history. However, the simulator-tested components ended up in a cluster at the fringe of the map containing only 10.8% of retrieved components. This may suggest that current ISO testing protocols were not fully representative of this TKR population, and protocols that better resemble patients' gait after TKR containing activities other than walking may be warranted.

  16. Wear Scar Similarities between Retrieved and Simulator-Tested Polyethylene TKR Components: An Artificial Neural Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how representative wear scars of simulator-tested polyethylene (PE) inserts compare with retrieved PE inserts from total knee replacement (TKR). By means of a nonparametric self-organizing feature map (SOFM), wear scar images of 21 postmortem- and 54 revision-retrieved components were compared with six simulator-tested components that were tested either in displacement or in load control according to ISO protocols. The SOFM network was then trained with the wear scar images of postmortem-retrieved components since those are considered well-functioning at the time of retrieval. Based on this training process, eleven clusters were established, suggesting considerable variability among wear scars despite an uncomplicated loading history inside their hosts. The remaining components (revision-retrieved and simulator-tested) were then assigned to these established clusters. Six out of five simulator components were clustered together, suggesting that the network was able to identify similarities in loading history. However, the simulator-tested components ended up in a cluster at the fringe of the map containing only 10.8% of retrieved components. This may suggest that current ISO testing protocols were not fully representative of this TKR population, and protocols that better resemble patients' gait after TKR containing activities other than walking may be warranted. PMID:27597955

  17. Bentonite borehole plug flow testing with five water types

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudette, M.V.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1988-04-01

    The hydraulic conductivity has been determined of plugs constructed with commercial precompressed bentonite pellets. Bentonite has been hydrated and tested with waters of five different chemical compositions, including one groundwater (Ogallala aquifer, Texas). The groundwater contained a significant amount of solids: waters prepared in the laboratory did not. Prepared waters used for testing included distilled water, a high (1000 ppM) and a low (45 ppM) calcium solution, and a 39 ppM sodium water. Uncompacted plugs were constructed by dropping bentonite tablets into waterfilled cylinders, or by mixing powdered bentonite with preselected water volumes in order to obtain controlled initial water contents. The hydraulic conductivity of all plugs tested with all waters would result in a classification of practically impervious, by conventional soil mechanics standards. Variations of several orders of magnitude of the hydraulic conductivity are observed.

  18. Design and Implementation of a Characterization Test Rig for Evaluating High Bandwidth Liquid Fuel Flow Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saus, Joseph R.; Chang, Clarence T.; DeLaat, John C.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    A test rig was designed and developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) for the purpose of characterizing high bandwidth liquid fuel flow modulator candidates to determine their suitability for combustion instability control research. The test rig is capable of testing flow modulators at up to 600 psia supply pressure and flows of up to 2 gpm. The rig is designed to provide a quiescent flow into the test section in order to isolate the dynamic flow modulations produced by the test article. Both the fuel injector orifice downstream of the test article and the combustor are emulated. The effect of fuel delivery line lengths on modulator dynamic performance can be observed and modified to replicate actual fuel delivery systems. For simplicity, water is currently used as the working fluid, although future plans are to use jet fuel. The rig is instrumented for dynamic pressures and flows and a high-speed data system is used for dynamic data acquisition. Preliminary results have been obtained for one candidate flow modulator.

  19. Field testing the hypothesis of Darcian flow through a carbonate aquifer.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The acceptability of the hypothesis of Darcian flow through a semiconfined carbonate aquifer was tested prior to running a multiple-day aquifer test in Pinellas County, Florida. The approach used to test the hypothesis was to run a number of hour-long aquifer tests at different discharges with drawdown measured at the same time during each test in two observation wells, one at 35 feet and the other at 733 feet from the pumped well. The hypothesis of Darcian flow through the semiconfined carbonate aquifer was deemed acceptable.-from Author

  20. 10 CFR 431.264 - Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Valves Test Procedures § 431.264 Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial..., the water consumption flow rate of commercial prerinse spray valves. (b) Testing and Calculations. The test procedure to determine the water consumption flow rate for prerinse spray valves, expressed...

  1. 10 CFR 431.264 - Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Valves Test Procedures § 431.264 Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial..., the water consumption flow rate of commercial prerinse spray valves. (b) Testing and Calculations. The test procedure to determine the water consumption flow rate for prerinse spray valves, expressed...

  2. Flight service evaluation of composite components on the Bell Helicopter model 206L: Design, fabrication and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinberg, H.

    1982-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing phases of a program to obtain long term flight service experience on representative helicopter airframe structural components operating in typical commercial environments are described. The aircraft chosen is the Bell Helicopter Model 206L. The structural components are the forward fairing, litter door, baggage door, and vertical fin. The advanced composite components were designed to replace the production parts in the field and were certified by the FAA to be operable through the full flight envelope of the 206L. A description of the fabrication process that was used for each of the components is given. Static failing load tests on all components were done. In addition fatigue tests were run on four specimens that simulated the attachment of the vertical fin to the helicopter's tail boom.

  3. Interactions between soil texture and placement of dairy slurry application: I. Flow characteristics and leaching of nonreactive components.

    PubMed

    Glaesner, Nadia; Kjaergaard, Charlotte; Rubaek, Gitte H; Magid, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Land application of manure can exacerbate nutrient and contaminant transfers to the aquatic environment. This study examined the effect of injecting a dairy cattle (Bostaurus L.) manure slurry on mobilization and leaching of dissolved, nonreactive slurry components across a range of agricultural soils. We compared leaching of slurry-applied bromide through intact soil columns (20 cm diam., 20 cm high) of differing textures following surface application or injection of slurry. The volumetric fraction of soil pores >30 microm ranged from 43% in a loamy sand to 28% in a sandy loam and 15% in a loam-textured soil. Smaller active flow volumes and higher proportions of preferential flow were observed with increasing soil clay content. Injection of slurry in the loam soil significantly enhanced diffusion of applied bromide into the large fraction of small pores compared with surface application. The resulting physical protection against leaching of bromide was reflected by 60.2% of the bromide tracer was recovered in the effluent after injection, compared with 80.6% recovery after surface application. No effect of slurry injection was observed in the loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Our findings point to soil texture as an important factor influencing leaching of dissolved, nonreactive slurry components in soils amended with manure slurry. PMID:21520740

  4. Interactions between soil texture and placement of dairy slurry application: I. Flow characteristics and leaching of nonreactive components.

    PubMed

    Glaesner, Nadia; Kjaergaard, Charlotte; Rubaek, Gitte H; Magid, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Land application of manure can exacerbate nutrient and contaminant transfers to the aquatic environment. This study examined the effect of injecting a dairy cattle (Bostaurus L.) manure slurry on mobilization and leaching of dissolved, nonreactive slurry components across a range of agricultural soils. We compared leaching of slurry-applied bromide through intact soil columns (20 cm diam., 20 cm high) of differing textures following surface application or injection of slurry. The volumetric fraction of soil pores >30 microm ranged from 43% in a loamy sand to 28% in a sandy loam and 15% in a loam-textured soil. Smaller active flow volumes and higher proportions of preferential flow were observed with increasing soil clay content. Injection of slurry in the loam soil significantly enhanced diffusion of applied bromide into the large fraction of small pores compared with surface application. The resulting physical protection against leaching of bromide was reflected by 60.2% of the bromide tracer was recovered in the effluent after injection, compared with 80.6% recovery after surface application. No effect of slurry injection was observed in the loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Our findings point to soil texture as an important factor influencing leaching of dissolved, nonreactive slurry components in soils amended with manure slurry.

  5. Cerebral blood flow response pattern during balloon test occlusion of the internal carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, J.P.; Yonas, H.; Jungreis, C.

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate the risk of temporary or permanent internal carotid artery occlusion. In 156 patients intraarterial balloon test occlusion in combination with a stable xenon-enhanced CT cerebral blood flow study was performed before radiologic or surgical treatment. All 156 patients passed the clinical balloon test occlusion and underwent a xenon study in combination with a second balloon test. Quantitative flow data were analyzed for absolute changes as well as changes in symmetry. Fourteen patients exhibited reduced flow values between 20 and 30 mL/100 g per minute, an absolute decrease in flow, and significant asymmetry in the middle cerebral artery territory during balloon test occlusion. These patients would be considered at high risk for cerebral infarction if internal carotid artery occlusion were to be performed. With one exception they belonged to a group (class I) of 61 patients who showed bilateral or ipsilateral flow decrease and significant asymmetry with lower flow on the side of occlusion. The other 95 patients, who showed a variety of cerebral blood flow response patterns including ipsilateral or bilateral flow increase, were at moderate (class II) or low (class III) stroke risk. In contrast to these findings, exclusively qualitative flow analysis failed to identify the patients at high risk: a threshold with an asymmetry index of 10% revealed only 16% specificity whereas an asymmetry index of 45% showed only 61% sensitivity for detection of low flow areas (<30 mL/100 g per minute). For achieving a minimal hemodynamic related-stroke rate associated with permanent clinical internal carotid artery occlusion we suggest integration of a thorough analysis of quantitative cerebral blood flow data before and during balloon test occlusion. 68 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Multi-component Magnetization Of The Late Pliocene Pyroclastic Flow Deposit In Central Japan, Indicating Early Early Pleistocene Fault Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Funaki, M.; Hoshi, H.

    2003-12-01

    The Late Pliocene Ichiuda Welded Tuff Bed in central Japan acquired three magnetization components. All of primary reverse intermediate temperature component, and secondary normal low and high temperature components show positive fold tests, indicating that fault-related folding structure postdated the Olduvai normal subchron. The northern segment of Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line that bounds the North American and Eurasian Plates in central Japan, comprises the geological Otari-Nakayama and active Kamishiro faults. The Ichiuda Welded Tuff Bed intruded by the 2.1 Ma Taro-yama Andesite is subjected to the NE-SW trending folding structure adjacent to the Otari-Nakayama fault. PAFD and PThD were performed to the drilled samples of Taro-yama Andesite and the Ichiuda Welded Tuff Bed at three and five sites on both limbs of the syncline, respectively. Positive fold test for the tilt-corrected site-mean directions of the andesite indicates prefolding magnetization. The fresh welded tuff bed at one site yields similar reverse direction. Whereas the greenly altered beds at four sites shows normal tilt-corrected site-mean directions by PAFD, and following three temperature-dependent directional components by PThD: normal below 350 degree, reverse from 350 to 530 degree, and normal above 530 degree, all which show positive fold test. IRM acquisition, thermal demagnetization of three orthogonal IRM, thermomagnetic analysis with VSM, and low temperature magnetization measurements with MPMS indicate that the Ichiuda Welded Tuff Bed with single and three magnetization components contains titanomagnetites, and both titanomagnetites and magnetite, respectively. Magnetization of the Taro-yama Andesite is dominated by titanomagnetites under high temperature oxidation state and minor proportion of titanomaghemites. The Taro-yama Andesite and the Ichiuda Welded Tuff Bed exhibit primary reverse magnetism corresponding to the Matsuyama Chron. The Ichiuda Welded Tuff Bed additionally

  7. Component flow processes at four streams in the Catskill Mountains, New York, analysed using episodic concentration/discharge relationship

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, C.; Davies, T.D.; Murdoch, Peter S.

    1999-01-01

    Plots of solute concentration against discharge have been used to relate stream hydrochemical variations to processes of flow generation, using data collected at four streams in the Catskill Mountains, New York, during the Episodic Response Project of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Results suggest that a two-component system of shallow and deep saturated subsurface flow, in which the two components respond simultaneously during hydrologic events, may be applicable to the study basins. Using a large natural sea-salt sodium input as a tracer for precipitation, it is argued that an additional distinction can be made between pre-event and event water travelling along the shallow subsurface flow path. Pre-event water is thought to be displaced by infiltrating event water, which becomes dominant on the falling limb of the hydrograph. Where, as appears to be the case for sulfate, a solute equilibrates rapidly within the soil, the pre-event-event water distinction is unimportant. However, for some solutes there are clear and consistent compositional differences between water from the two sources, evident as a hysteresis loop in concentration-discharge plots. Nitrate and acidity, in particular, appear to be elevated in event water following percolation through the organic horizon. Consequently, the most acidic, high nitrate conditions during an episode generally occur after peak discharge. A simple conceptual model of episode runoff generation is presented on the basis of these results.Plots of solute concentration against discharge have been used to relate stream hydrochemical variations to processes of flow generation, using data collected at four streams in the Catskill Mountains, New York, during the Episodic Response Project of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Results suggest that a two-component system of shallow and deep saturated subsurface flow, in which the two components respond simultaneously during hydrologic events, may be applicable to the

  8. Components for Atomistic-to-Continuum Multiscale Modeling of Flow in Micro- and Nanofluidic Systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adalsteinsson, Helgi; Debusschere, Bert J.; Long, Kevin R.; Najm, Habib N.

    2008-01-01

    Micro- and nanofluidics pose a series of significant challenges for science-based modeling. Key among those are the wide separation of length- and timescales between interface phenomena and bulk flow and the spatially heterogeneous solution properties near solid-liquid interfaces. It is not uncommon for characteristic scales in these systems to span nine orders of magnitude from the atomic motions in particle dynamics up to evolution of mass transport at the macroscale level, making explicit particle models intractable for all but the simplest systems. Recently, atomistic-to-continuum (A2C) multiscale simulations have gained a lot of interest as an approach to rigorously handle particle-levelmore » dynamics while also tracking evolution of large-scale macroscale behavior. While these methods are clearly not applicable to all classes of simulations, they are finding traction in systems in which tight-binding, and physically important, dynamics at system interfaces have complex effects on the slower-evolving large-scale evolution of the surrounding medium. These conditions allow decomposition of the simulation into discrete domains, either spatially or temporally. In this paper, we describe how features of domain decomposed simulation systems can be harnessed to yield flexible and efficient software for multiscale simulations of electric field-driven micro- and nanofluidics.« less

  9. A Study of a Network-Flow Algorithm and a Noncorrecting Algorithm for Test Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, R. D.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    When the network-flow algorithm (NFA) and the average growth approximation algorithm (AGAA) were used for automated test assembly with American College Test and Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery item banks, results indicate that reasonable error in item parameters is not harmful for test assembly using NFA or AGAA. (SLD)

  10. Fast and slow components of cerebral blood flow response to step decreases in end-tidal PCO2 in humans.

    PubMed

    Poulin, M J; Liang, P J; Robbins, P A

    1998-08-01

    This study examined the dynamics of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow response to hypocapnia in humans (n = 6) by using transcranial Doppler ultrasound. In a control protocol, end-tidal PCO2 (PETCO2) was held near eucapnia (1.5 Torr above resting) for 40 min. In a hypocapnic protocol, PETCO2 was held near eucapnia for 10 min, then at 15 Torr below eucapnia for 20 min, and then near eucapnia for 10 min. During both protocols, subjects hyperventilated throughout and PETCO2 and end-tidal PO2 were controlled by using the dynamic end-tidal forcing technique. Beat-by-beat values were calculated for the intensity-weighted mean velocity (VIWM), signal power (P), and their instantaneous product (P.VIWM). A simple model consisting of a delay, gain terms, time constants (tauf,on, tauf, off) and baseline levels of flow for the on- and off-transients, and a gain term (gs) and time constant (taus) for a second slower component was fitted to the hypocapnic protocol. The cerebral blood flow response to hypocapnia was characterized by a significant (P < 0.001) slow progressive adaptation in P.VIWM, with gs = 1.26 %/Torr and taus = 427 s, that persisted throughout the hypocapnic period. Finally, the responses at the onset and relief of hypocapnia were asymmetric (P < 0.001), with tauf,on (6.8 s) faster than tauf,off (14.3 s).

  11. 30 CFR 36.48 - Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of the cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of surface temperature of engine and... temperature of engine and components of the cooling system. (a) The surface temperatures of the engine... components shall have reached their respective equilibrium temperatures. The exhaust cooling system shall...

  12. 30 CFR 36.48 - Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of the cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tests of surface temperature of engine and... temperature of engine and components of the cooling system. (a) The surface temperatures of the engine... components shall have reached their respective equilibrium temperatures. The exhaust cooling system shall...

  13. 30 CFR 36.48 - Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of the cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tests of surface temperature of engine and... temperature of engine and components of the cooling system. (a) The surface temperatures of the engine... components shall have reached their respective equilibrium temperatures. The exhaust cooling system shall...

  14. 30 CFR 36.48 - Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of the cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tests of surface temperature of engine and... temperature of engine and components of the cooling system. (a) The surface temperatures of the engine... components shall have reached their respective equilibrium temperatures. The exhaust cooling system shall...

  15. 30 CFR 36.48 - Tests of surface temperature of engine and components of the cooling system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tests of surface temperature of engine and... temperature of engine and components of the cooling system. (a) The surface temperatures of the engine... components shall have reached their respective equilibrium temperatures. The exhaust cooling system shall...

  16. Ideal MHD stability of a spherical tokamak power plant and a component test facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Hole, M. J.; Wilson, H. R.; Abeysuriya, R.; Larson, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    We have investigated ideal MHD stability of two advanced spherical tokamak confinement concepts: the spherical tokamak power plant (STPP), a 3 GW concept fusion power plasma producing 1 GW of electric power, and the component test facility (CTF), a concept designed for in situ materials testing for ITER and beyond. Detailed stability studies for toroidal mode number n = 1, 2, 3 displacements are presented as a function of conformal wall radius R{sub w} and on-axis safety factor q{sub 0}. For the STPP marginal stability scans held the current profile fixed, but varied the total plasma current. For the CTF we have extended and parallelized earlier marginal stability scans to scan over both the plasma beta and q{sub 0} by varying the current profile to preserve the total plasma current. These confirm that both concepts are stable provided that the wall is sufficiently close and q{sub 0} sufficiently large (q{sub 0} > 2.8 for the power plant and q{sub 0} > 2.1 for the CTF). Both power plant and CTF configurations are found to be ballooning stable.

  17. Flow for Exercise Adherence: Testing an Intrinsic Model of Health Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petosa, R. Lingyak; Holtz, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health behavior theory generally does not include intrinsic motivation as a determinate of health practices. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the flow theory of exercise adherence. Flow theory posits that exercise can be intrinsically rewarding if the experiences of self/time transcendence and control/mastery are achieved…

  18. 42 CFR 84.94 - Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus. 84.94 Section 84.94 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.94 Gas flow...

  19. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93 Section 84.93 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow...

  20. Extraction of the acoustic component of a turbulent flow exciting a plate by inverting the vibration problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoq, D.; Pézerat, C.; Thomas, J.-H.; Bi, W. P.

    2014-06-01

    An improvement of the Force Analysis Technique (FAT), an inverse method of vibration, is proposed to identify the low wavenumbers including the acoustic component of a turbulent flow that excites a plate. This method is a significant progress since the usual techniques of measurements with flush-mounted sensors are not able to separate the acoustic and the aerodynamic energies of the excitation because the aerodynamic component is too high. Moreover, the main cause of vibration or acoustic radiation of the structure might be due to the acoustic part by a phenomenon of spatial coincidence between the acoustic wavelengths and those of the plate. This underlines the need to extract the acoustic part. In this work, numerical experiments are performed to solve both the direct and inverse problems of vibration. The excitation is a turbulent boundary layer and combines the pressure field of the Corcos model and a diffuse acoustic field. These pressures are obtained by a synthesis method based on the Cholesky decomposition of the cross-spectra matrices and are used to excite a plate. Thus, the application of the inverse problem FAT that requires only the vibration data shows that the method is able to identify and to isolate the acoustic part of the excitation. Indeed, the discretization of the inverse operator (motion equation of the plate) acts as a low-pass wavenumber filter. In addition, this method is simple to implement because it can be applied locally (no need to know the boundary conditions), and measurements can be carried out on the opposite side of the plate without affecting the flow. Finally, an improvement of FAT is proposed. It regularizes optimally and automatically the inverse problem by analyzing the mean quadratic pressure of the reconstructed force distribution. This optimized FAT, in the case of the turbulent flow, has the advantage of measuring the acoustic component up to higher frequencies even in the presence of noise. the aerodynamic component

  1. In vitro blood flow model with physiological wall shear stress for hemocompatibility testing-An example of coronary stent testing.

    PubMed

    Engels, Gerwin Erik; Blok, Sjoerd Leendert Johannes; van Oeveren, Willem

    2016-01-01

    Hemocompatibility of blood contacting medical devices has to be evaluated before their intended application. To assess hemocompatibility, blood flow models are often used and can either consist of in vivo animal models or in vitro blood flow models. Given the disadvantages of animal models, in vitro blood flow models are an attractive alternative. The in vitro blood flow models available nowadays mostly focus on generating continuous flow instead of generating a pulsatile flow with certain wall shear stress, which has shown to be more relevant in maintaining hemostasis. To address this issue, the authors introduce a blood flow model that is able to generate a pulsatile flow and wall shear stress resembling the physiological situation, which the authors have coined the "Haemobile." The authors have validated the model by performing Doppler flow measurements to calculate velocity profiles and (wall) shear stress profiles. As an example, the authors evaluated the thrombogenicity of two drug eluting stents, one that was already on the market and one that was still under development. After identifying proper conditions resembling the wall shear stress in coronary arteries, the authors compared the stents with each other and often used reference materials. These experiments resulted in high contrast between hemocompatible and incompatible materials, showing the exceptional testing capabilities of the Haemobile. In conclusion, the authors have developed an in vitro blood flow model which is capable of mimicking physiological conditions of blood flow as close as possible. The model is convenient in use and is able to clearly discriminate between hemocompatible and incompatible materials, making it suitable for evaluating the hemocompatible properties of medical devices. PMID:27435456

  2. PIV characterization of high-Reynolds flow in turbine test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikishev, L. M.; Gobyzov, O. A.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Kravtsov, Z. D.; Dulin, V. M.; Bilsky, A. V.; Markovich, D. M.

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports on application of Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (Stereo PIV) to measure flow characteristics at high-Reynolds number flow in turbine test facility. The test rig "TS-2" at The Central Institute of Aviation Motors was operated at the pressure up to 2.5 bar, temperature 450°C and flow rates up to 36 kg/s. The main goal of the study was to characterize turbulence intensity and to estimate turbulence integral scale using correlation functions in a test rig immediately before the low pressure aviation turbine. It was found that for different operation pressure (from 1.44 to 2.5 bar) and different flow configuration (with or without turbulent screens) the local turbulence intensity at the inlet of low pressure turbine is about 20 %, but the turbulence integral scale is strongly dependent on the turbine test facility configuration.

  3. A flight test of laminar flow control leading-edge systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, M. C.; Wright, A. S., Jr.; Wagner, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    NASA's program for development of a laminar flow technology base for application to commercial transports has made significant progress since its inception in 1976. Current efforts are focused on development of practical reliable systems for the leading-edge region where the most difficult problems in applying laminar flow exist. Practical solutions to these problems will remove many concerns about the ultimate practicality of laminar flow. To address these issues, two contractors performed studies, conducted development tests, and designed and fabricated fully functional leading-edge test articles for installation on the NASA JetStar aircraft. Systems evaluation and performance testing will be conducted to thoroughly evaluate all system capabilities and characteristics. A simulated airline service flight test program will be performed to obtain the operational sensitivity, maintenance, and reliability data needed to establish that practical solutions exist for the difficult leading-edge area of a future commercial transport employing laminar flow control.

  4. Experimental onset of flow instability testing by Creare, Inc. Book 1

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.

    1992-11-01

    Flow excursions can occur during subcooled heated flow if the supply system is not adequate to meet the heated channel pressure demand. Available experimental flow instability (FI) data for ribbed annuli such as used in the SRS production reactors is very limited. Creare Inc. completed a series of FI tests which included two annular geometries; one of these included metallic ribs which separated the annulus into four sub-channels. This report summarizes the results of the onset of flow instability (OFI) testing which was completed by Creare in support of the SRS Reactor Restart Program. A copy of the final test report has been attached and the archival locations for the supporting documentation and electronic test data is also included. The purpose of this report is to: Archive the Creare Program data; inspect the data which has been archived; review the results presented by Creare; and evaluate if the Creare Program data may be used in critical applications.

  5. Computer tomography of flows external to test models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prikryl, I.; Vest, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    Computer tomographic techniques for reconstruction of three-dimensional aerodynamic density fields, from interferograms recorded from several different viewing directions were studied. Emphasis is on the case in which an opaque object such as a test model in a wind tunnel obscures significant regions of the interferograms (projection data). A method called the Iterative Convolution Method (ICM), existing methods in which the field is represented by a series expansions, and analysis of real experimental data in the form of aerodynamic interferograms are discussed.

  6. TYBO/BENHAM: Model Analysis of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration from Underground Nuclear Tests in Southwestern Pahute Mesa, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Wolfsberg; Lee Glascoe; Guoping Lu; Alyssa Olson; Peter Lichtner; Maureen McGraw; Terry Cherry; Guy Roemer

    2002-09-01

    Recent field studies have led to the discovery of trace quantities of plutonium originating from the BENHAM underground nuclear test in two groundwater observation wells on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site. These observation wells are located 1.3 km from the BENHAM underground nuclear test and approximately 300 m from the TYBO underground nuclear test. In addition to plutonium, several other conservative (e.g. tritium) and reactive (e.g. cesium) radionuclides were found in both observation wells. The highest radionuclide concentrations were found in a well sampling a welded tuff aquifer more than 500m above the BENHAM emplacement depth. These measurements have prompted additional investigations to ascertain the mechanisms, processes, and conditions affecting subsurface radionuclide transport in Pahute Mesa groundwater. This report describes an integrated modeling approach used to simulate groundwater flow, radionuclide source release, and radionuclide transport near the BENHAM and TYBO underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. The components of the model include a flow model at a scale large enough to encompass many wells for calibration, a source-term model capable of predicting radionuclide releases to aquifers following complex processes associated with nonisothermal flow and glass dissolution, and site-scale transport models that consider migration of solutes and colloids in fractured volcanic rock. Although multiple modeling components contribute to the methodology presented in this report, they are coupled and yield results consistent with laboratory and field observations. Additionally, sensitivity analyses are conducted to provide insight into the relative importance of uncertainty ranges in the transport parameters.

  7. Numerical tests of constitutive laws for dense granular flows.

    PubMed

    Lois, Gregg; Lemaître, Anaël; Carlson, Jean M

    2005-11-01

    We numerically and theoretically study the macroscopic properties of dense, sheared granular materials. In this process we first consider an invariance in Newton's equations, explain how it leads to Bagnold's scaling, and discuss how it relates to the dynamics of granular temperature. Next we implement numerical simulations of granular materials in two different geometries--simple shear and flow down an incline--and show that measurements can be extrapolated from one geometry to the other. Then we observe nonaffine rearrangements of clusters of grains in response to shear strain and show that fundamental observations, which served as a basis for the shear transformation zone (STZ) theory of amorphous solids [M. L. Falk and J. S. Langer, Phys. Rev. E. 57, 7192 (1998); M.R.S. Bull 25, 40 (2000)], can be reproduced in granular materials. Finally we present constitutive equations for granular materials as proposed by Lemaître [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 064303 (2002)], based on the dynamics of granular temperature and STZ theory, and show that they match remarkably well with our numerical data from both geometries.

  8. Models, assumptions, and experimental tests of flows near magnetized boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, M. Umair

    2015-11-01

    We present a history of research on the magnetized plasma boundary and recent first measurements of particle flows in such structures in laboratory plasmas using multi-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Our measurements show that the canonical model for this boundary proposed in 1982 [Chodura, Phys. Fluids (1982)] is inaccurate for systems where the ion-neutral collision length is less than at least 4 times the ion gyro radius. Rather, our measurements validate more sophisticated plasma boundary fluid models that take neutral collisions into account [Riemann, Phys. Plasmas (1994); Ahedo, Phys. Plasmas (1997); Siddiqui et al., Phys. Plasmas (2014)]. In light of these results, we show that both three-dimensional ion and neutral velocity distribution functions are strongly affected near the boundary. We discuss effects of these perturbed distributions on wall loading and erosion in experiments and applications such as divertor tokamak scrape-off layers and Hall thrusters. Finally, we propose modern definitions of the oft-used term, ``magnetic presheath.'' This work is supported by U.S. National Science Foundation grant number PHY-1360278.

  9. Low cycle thermal fatigue testing of beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L.; Dombrowski, D.E.; Guiniatouline, R.N.; Kupriynov, I.B.

    1996-02-01

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium, which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 kW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ``spike`` of 750{degree}C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stresses in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m{sup 2}. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S- 65H, S-200F, S-200F-H, SR-200, I-400, extruded high purity, HIP`d spherical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe{sub 12}. Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be (SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis.

  10. NOTE: Wavelet analysis of blood flow dynamics: effect on the individual oscillatory components of iontophoresis with pharmacologically neutral electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veber, Mitja; Bandrivskyy, Andriy; Clarkson, Peter B. M.; McClintock, Peter V. E.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2004-04-01

    Iontophoresis currents are used in the transcutaneous delivery of vasoactive substances for noninvasive assessment of skin vascular properties. The blood flow rate can be recorded by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), its average value and the amplitudes of its oscillatory components being used to evaluate the effect of the drugs. Because non-drug-specific, current-induced, vasodilation could confound the interpretation of the response, we have investigated the effect of currents of both polarities on the spectral components of the LDF signal in the absence of vasoactive substances. It was recorded for healthy volunteers with both high conductance (5 mol/l NaCl) and low conductance (deionized water) electrolytes. The oscillatory components were analysed by wavelet transform within 0.0095 1.6 Hz, divided into five sub-intervals. Only cathodal iontophoresis with deionized water increased the oscillatory energy and amplitude. It did so at all frequencies, but none of the sub-intervals associated with vasodilation (0.0095 0.145 Hz) was selectively affected compared to the others.

  11. Experiment 2074: post-drilling reservoir flow testing through EE-3A first revision

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.; Robinson, Bruce A.

    1987-11-20

    As previously outlined in memorandum ESS-4-87-305 (11/12/87), EE-3A will be pressurized with the Kobe pumps for the next week, and then a sequence of reservoir flow tests and logs will be conducted for a one to two week period beginning Tuesday, 12/1/87. The purpose of this memorandum is to better define this flow test and sequence of logs, organized as a "formal" experiment.

  12. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques free secretory component (normally a portion of the secretory IgA antibody molecule) in body fluids. Measurement of free secretory component (protein molecules) aids in the diagnosis...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques free secretory component (normally a portion of the secretory IgA antibody molecule) in body fluids. Measurement of free secretory component (protein molecules) aids in the diagnosis...

  14. A mercury flow meter for ion thruster testing. [response time, thermal sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of operation of the thermal flow meter is presented, and a theoretical model is used to determine design parameters for a device capable of measuring mercury flows in the range of 0 to 5 gm/hr. Flow meter construction is described. Tests performed using a positive displacement mercury pump as well as those performed with the device in the feed line of an operating thruster are discussed. A flow meter response time of about a minute and a sensitivity of about 10 mv/gm/hr are demonstrated. Additional work to relieve a sensitivity of the device to variations in ambient temperature is indicated to improve its quantitative performance.

  15. Hot-Film and Hot-Wire Anemometry for a Boundary Layer Active Flow Control Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenahan, Keven C.; Schatzman, David M.; Wilson, Jacob Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Unsteady active flow control (AFC) has been used experimentally for many years to minimize bluff-body drag. This technology could significantly improve performance of rotorcraft by cleaning up flow separation. It is important, then, that new actuator technologies be studied for application to future vehicles. A boundary layer wind tunnel was constructed with a 1ft-x-3ft test section and unsteady measurement instrumentation to study how AFC manipulates the boundary layer to overcome adverse pressure gradients and flow separation. This unsteady flow control research requires unsteady measurement methods. In order to measure the boundary layer characteristics, both hot-wire and hot-film Constant Temperature Anemometry is used. A hot-wire probe is mounted in the flow to measure velocity while a hot-film array lays on the test surface to measure skin friction. Hot-film sensors are connected to an anemometer, a Wheatstone bridge circuit with an output that corresponds to the dynamic flow response. From this output, the time varying flow field, turbulence, and flow reversal can be characterized. Tuning the anemometers requires a fan test on the hot-film sensors to adjust each output. This is a delicate process as several variables drastically affect the data, including control resistance, signal input, trim, and gain settings.

  16. Methods and computer program documentation for determining anisotropic transmissivity tensor components of two-dimensional ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maslia, M.L.; Randolph, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of anisotropic aquifer hydraulic properties and a computer program, written in Fortran 77, developed to compute the components of the anisotropic transmissivity tensor of two-dimensional groundwater flow are described. To determine the tensor components using one pumping well and three observation wells, the type-curve and straight-line approximation methods are developed. These methods are based on the equation of drawdown developed for two-dimensional nonsteady flow in an infinite anisotropic aquifer. To determine tensor components using more than three observation wells, a weighted least squares optimization procedure is described for use with the type-curve and straight-line approximation methods. The computer program described in this report allows the type-curve, straight-line approximation, and weighted least squares optimization methods to be used in conjunction with data from observation and pumping wells. Three example applications using the computer program and field data gathered during geohydrologic investigations at a site near Dawsonville, Georgia , are provided to illustrate the use of the computer program. The example applications demonstrate the use of the type-curve method using three observation wells, the weighted least squares optimization method using eight observation wells and equal weighting, and the weighted least squares optimization method using eight observation wells and unequal weighting. Results obtained using the computer program indicate major transmissivity in the range of 347-296 sq ft/day, minor transmissivity in the range of 139-99 sq ft/day, aquifer anisotropy in the range of 3.54 to 2.14, principal direction of flow in the range of N. 45.9 degrees E. to N. 58.7 degrees E., and storage coefficient in the range of 0.0063 to 0.0037. The numerical results are in good agreement with field data gathered on the weathered crystalline rocks underlying the investigation site. Supplemental material provides definitions of

  17. [Discussion on testing of flow rate of infusion device about industry standard].

    PubMed

    Hua, Songhe

    2014-07-01

    Carried on the exploration testing of flow rate of infusion device about industry standard YY 0451-2010. Engaged in flow rate experiments adopting different method that are provided by new and old industry standard for samples of the same type. Compared with the result of the dangerous coefficient by calculating the test data, the old standard can be more sensitive to reflect the situation of product flow rate, so it can be applied to conventional control of the products. The method which provided by the new industry standard is suitable for evaluating periodicity the level of product contaminated. PMID:25330614

  18. Standard test case for a low-speed, turbulent junction vortex flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, F. J.

    1991-01-01

    The mean flow structure upstream, around within, and in the near wake of a turbulent junction or horseshoe vortex is reported for an incompressible subsonic flow. Measurements of the primitive variables of velocity and pressure are reported on all surfaces bounding the region of the vortex flow and on three transverse and one streamwise plane within the flowfield itself for comparisons between the measured and any calculated flow variables. Detailed surface flow visualizations and some direct force measurements of surface shear stress are also available. The data is a highly detailed, coherent, self-consistent set offered to the computational fluid mechanics community as a standard test case for the evaluation of the capability of numerical solvers intended for predicting the flowfield in such a complex, separated, three-dimensional turbulent flow. This data base is available for copying to user supplied tapes or for transmission via BITNET, as well as in two National Technical Information Service (NTIS) reports.

  19. Analysis of space reactor system components: Investigation through simulation and non-nuclear testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    implementation of a virtual reactivity feedback control loop; testing and thermal hydraulic characterization of the coolant flow paths for two space reactor concepts; and analysis of heat pipe operation during start-up and steady state operation.

  20. Miravalles Geothermal Project: Portable Well Flow Test Equipment and Procedures Manual

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    The well flow test program has been designed to facilitate the gathering of information, with portable test equipment, from various wells with regard to their capability of flow, the quality of steam produced at various back pressures, the composition and quantity of noncondensable gases flashed from the wells and the composition and quantity of solids in the well's liquid streams (brine). The test program includes procedures for obtaining the following basic flow data pertinent to the plant power cycle design: (1) Effluent steam and brine flows, pressures and temperatures; (2) Noncondensable and dissolved gas contents in steam and brine; (3) H{sub s}S content in gases formed; and (4) Solids content and chemical analysis of steam and brine.