Science.gov

Sample records for components manufacturing program

  1. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  2. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, program history, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  3. Additive manufacturing of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Andreas; Rank, Manuel; Maillard, Philippe; Suckow, Anne; Bauckhage, Yannick; Rößler, Patrick; Lang, Johannes; Shariff, Fatin; Pekrul, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The development of additive manufacturing methods has enlarged rapidly in recent years. Thereby, the work mainly focuses on the realization of mechanical components, but the additive manufacturing technology offers a high potential in the field of optics as well. Owing to new design possibilities, completely new solutions are possible. This article briefly reviews and compares the most important additive manufacturing methods for polymer optics. Additionally, it points out the characteristics of additive manufactured polymer optics. Thereby, surface quality is of crucial importance. In order to improve it, appropriate post-processing steps are necessary (e.g. robot polishing or coating), which will be discussed. An essential part of this paper deals with various additive manufactured optical components and their use, especially in optical systems for shape metrology (e.g. borehole sensor, tilt sensor, freeform surface sensor, fisheye lens). The examples should demonstrate the potentials and limitations of optical components produced by additive manufacturing.

  4. Heat treating of manufactured components

    SciTech Connect

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2012-05-22

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material is disclosed. The system typically includes an insulating vessel placed within a microwave applicator chamber. A moderating material is positioned inside the insulating vessel so that a substantial portion of the exterior surface of each component for heat treating is in contact with the moderating material.

  5. Passive component manufacturing in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The serious downturn of optical fiber communication industry in the past three years speeds up the consolidation of passive component manufacturing. Automation activity and investment stopped due to no driving force from the volume demand. A lot of skillful but low cost labors must be needed in the future for manufacturing when the demand comes back. Except MEMS based VOA, most of components based on advanced technology seem to get delayed in most applications. Furthermore, the highly integrated products are also delayed and become uncertain, especially AWG technology. Most of the manufacturing of passive components already moved or are moving to Asia especially China. Browave already built its manufacturing factory and is almost doing all the manufacturing in Zhong Shan. Browave tries to optimize the value of Taiwan plus China, i.e., Tawan provides superior management system, quality systems and manufacturing engineering support where China provides a lot of skillful but low cost labors. Browave is now not only providing the basic elements like Couplers, Isolators, TFF add/drop filter, Thin Film based GFF (Gain Flattened Filters), but also providing "Dedicated Lines" for the components/modules/subsystems for the players who need the value as mentioned above.

  6. Additive Manufacturing of Aerospace Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Grady, Joseph E.; Carter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities on additive manufacturing of aerospace propulsion components, which included rocket propulsion and gas turbine engines. Future opportunities on additive manufacturing of hybrid electric propulsion components will be discussed.

  7. 10 CFR 611.207 - Small automobile and component manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Small automobile and component manufacturers. 611.207 Section 611.207 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Facility/Funding Awards § 611.207 Small automobile and...

  8. 10 CFR 611.207 - Small automobile and component manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Small automobile and component manufacturers. 611.207 Section 611.207 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Facility/Funding Awards § 611.207 Small automobile and...

  9. 10 CFR 611.207 - Small automobile and component manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Small automobile and component manufacturers. 611.207 Section 611.207 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Facility/Funding Awards § 611.207 Small automobile and...

  10. 10 CFR 611.207 - Small automobile and component manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Small automobile and component manufacturers. 611.207 Section 611.207 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Facility/Funding Awards § 611.207 Small automobile and...

  11. 10 CFR 611.207 - Small automobile and component manufacturers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Small automobile and component manufacturers. 611.207 Section 611.207 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Facility/Funding Awards § 611.207 Small automobile and...

  12. Computed Tomography Inspection and Analysis for Additive Manufacturing Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) inspection was performed on test articles additively manufactured from metallic materials. Metallic AM and machined wrought alloy test articles with programmed flaws were inspected using a 2MeV linear accelerator based CT system. Performance of CT inspection on identically configured wrought and AM components and programmed flaws was assessed using standard image analysis techniques to determine the impact of additive manufacturing on inspectability of objects with complex geometries.

  13. Microwave heat treating of manufactured components

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2007-01-09

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

  14. Laser rapid manufacturing of Colmonoy-6 components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, C. P.; Jain, A.; Ganesh, P.; Negi, J.; Nath, A. K.

    2006-10-01

    This paper introduces a new manufacturing technique for the fabrication of Colmonoy-6 components using laser rapid manufacturing (LRM). LRM is a upcoming rapid manufacturing technology, being developed at various laboratories around the world. It is similar to laser cladding at the process level with different end applications. In general, laser cladding technique is used to deposit material on the substrate either to improve the surface properties or to refurbish the worn out parts, while LRM is capable of near net shaping the components by layer-by-layer deposition of the material directly from CAD model. In the present study, a high power continuous wave (CW) CO 2 laser system, integrated with a co-axial powder-feeding system and three-axis workstation was used. The effect of processing parameters during multi-layer deposition of Colmonoy-6 has been studied and optimized to fabricate about a dozen bushes. Thus fabricated bushes were finally machined and ground to achieve the desired dimensions and surface finish. These bushes were tested for non-destructive testing (like-ultrasonic testing, Dye-penetrant testing), metallographic examinations, micro-hardness measurement, X-ray diffraction and thermal ageing. Results compared well with those fabricated by deposition of Colmonoy-6 on austenitic stainless steel rods using gas Tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Thus, the new manufacturing technique not only produced quality product, but also minimized machining of hard-faced material and brought significant saving of time and costly Colmonoy-6 material.

  15. Inspection of additive-manufactured layered components.

    PubMed

    Cerniglia, D; Scafidi, M; Pantano, A; Rudlin, J

    2015-09-01

    Laser powder deposition (LPD) is a rapid additive manufacturing process to produce, layer upon layer, 3D geometries or to repair high-value components. Currently there is no nondestructive technique that can guarantee absence of flaws in LPD products during manufacturing. In this paper a laser ultrasonic technique for in-line inspection of LPD components is proposed. Reference samples were manufactured from Inconel and machined flaws were created to establish the sensitivity of the technique. Numerical models of laser-generated ultrasonic waves have been created to gain a deeper understanding of physics, to optimize the set-up and to verify the experimental measurements. Results obtained on two sets of reference samples are shown. A proof-of-concept prototype has been demonstrated on some specific deposition samples with induced flaws, that were confirmed by an ultra-high sensitivity X-ray technique. Experimental outcomes prove that typical micro-defects due to the layer-by-layer deposition process, such as near-surface and surface flaws in a single layer deposit, can be detected.

  16. Component fragility research program

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, N.C.; Mochizuki, G.L.; Holman, G.S.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1989-11-01

    To demonstrate how high-level'' qualification test data can be used to estimate the ultimate seismic capacity of nuclear power plant equipment, we assessed in detail various electrical components tested by the Pacific Gas Electric Company for its Diablo Canyon plant. As part of our Phase I Component Fragility Research Program, we evaluated seismic fragility for five Diablo Canyon components: medium-voltage (4kV) switchgear; safeguard relay board; emergency light battery pack; potential transformer; and station battery and racks. This report discusses our Phase II fragility evaluation of a single Westinghouse Type W motor control center column, a fan cooler motor controller, and three local starters at the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant. These components were seismically qualified by means of biaxial random motion tests on a shaker table, and the test response spectra formed the basis for the estimate of the seismic capacity of the components. The seismic capacity of each component is referenced to the zero period acceleration (ZPA) and, in our Phase II study only, to the average spectral acceleration (ASA) of the motion at its base. For the motor control center, the seismic capacity was compared to the capacity of a Westinghouse Five-Star MCC subjected to actual fragility tests by LLNL during the Phase I Component Fragility Research Program, and to generic capacities developed by the Brookhaven National Laboratory for motor control center. Except for the medium-voltage switchgear, all of the components considered in both our Phase I and Phase II evaluations were qualified in their standard commercial configurations or with only relatively minor modifications such as top bracing of cabinets. 8 refs., 67 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Additive Manufacturing of Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protz, Christopher; Bowman, Randy; Cooper, Ken; Fikes, John; Taminger, Karen; Wright, Belinda

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently developing Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies and design tools aimed at reducing the costs and manufacturing time of regeneratively cooled rocket engine components. These Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion (LCUSP) tasks are funded through NASA's Game Changing Development Program in the Space Technology Mission Directorate. The LCUSP project will develop a copper alloy additive manufacturing design process and develop and optimize the Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) manufacturing process to direct deposit a nickel alloy structural jacket and manifolds onto an SLM manufactured GRCop chamber and Ni-alloy nozzle. In order to develop these processes, the project will characterize both the microstructural and mechanical properties of the SLMproduced GRCop-84, and will explore and document novel design techniques specific to AM combustion devices components. These manufacturing technologies will be used to build a 25K-class regenerative chamber and nozzle (to be used with tested DMLS injectors) that will be tested individually and as a system in hot fire tests to demonstrate the applicability of the technologies. These tasks are expected to bring costs and manufacturing time down as spacecraft propulsion systems typically comprise more than 70% of the total vehicle cost and account for a significant portion of the development schedule. Additionally, high pressure/high temperature combustion chambers and nozzles must be regeneratively cooled to survive their operating environment, causing their design to be time consuming and costly to build. LCUSP presents an opportunity to develop and demonstrate a process that can infuse these technologies into industry, build competition, and drive down costs of future engines.

  18. VIEW OF PRECISION EQUIPMENT USED IN STAINLESS COMPONENT MANUFACTURING. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PRECISION EQUIPMENT USED IN STAINLESS COMPONENT MANUFACTURING. THE FACILITY WAS DESCRIBED AS THE MOST MODERN NON-NUCLEAR MANUFACTURING BUILDING IN THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPLEX, WITH MANY PRECISION INSTRUMENTS. (9/21/83) - Rocky Flats Plant, Stainless Steel & Non-Nuclear Components Manufacturing, Southeast corner of intersection of Cottonwood & Third Avenues, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Another Program Simulates A Modular Manufacturing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroer, Bernard J.; Wang, Jian

    1996-01-01

    SSE5 computer program provides simulation environment for modeling manufacturing systems containing relatively small numbers of stations and operators. Designed to simulate manufacturing of apparel, also used in other manufacturing domains. Valuable for small or medium-size firms, including those lacking expertise to develop detailed mathematical models or have only minimal knowledge in describing manufacturing systems and in analyzing results of simulations on mathematical models. Two other programs available bundled together as SSE (MFS-26245). Each program models slightly different manufacturing scenario. Written in Turbo C v2.0 for IBM PC-series and compatible computers running MS-DOS and successfully compiled using Turbo C++ v3.0.

  20. Industrial waste recycling at an automotive component manufacturing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffurs, J.A.; Hubler, R.L.; Behaylo, D.P.

    1995-09-01

    The AC Rochester Division of General Motors Corporation (GM) develops and manufacturers automotive components for engine management systems at nine facilities in the US. Its largest facility is located in flint, Michigan, and is known as the Flint East site. The Flint East site covers nearly two square miles and consists of several plants housing manufacturing operations for spark plugs, glow plugs, oil filters, air filters, air cleaner assemblies, fuel pumps, fuel level sensors, cruise control systems, and other components. The volume and diversity of the scrap and wastes generated from these operations require skillful waste management to provide environmentally safe and cost-effective disposal options. Over time, a full-scale recycling and waste disposal operation evolved at Flint East. The operation has grown over the past thirty years to handle over 68,000 tons of material annually. Flint East`s program is regarded as a model industrial waste reduction and recycling operation. Elements of the program are presented here as a guide to establishing a successful industrial recycling program.

  1. Integrated flexible manufacturing program for manufacturing automation and rapid prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, S. L.; Brown, C. W.; King, M. S.; Simons, W. R.; Zimmerman, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    The Kansas City Division of Allied Signal Inc., as part of the Integrated Flexible Manufacturing Program (IFMP), is developing an integrated manufacturing environment. Several systems are being developed to produce standards and automation tools for specific activities within the manufacturing environment. The Advanced Manufacturing Development System (AMDS) is concentrating on information standards (STEP) and product data transfer; the Expert Cut Planner system (XCUT) is concentrating on machining operation process planning standards and automation capabilities; the Advanced Numerical Control system (ANC) is concentrating on NC data preparation standards and NC data generation tools; the Inspection Planning and Programming Expert system (IPPEX) is concentrating on inspection process planning, coordinate measuring machine (CMM) inspection standards and CMM part program generation tools; and the Intelligent Scheduling and Planning System (ISAPS) is concentrating on planning and scheduling tools for a flexible manufacturing system environment. All of these projects are working together to address information exchange, standardization, and information sharing to support rapid prototyping in a Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS) environment.

  2. Manufacturing complex silica aerogel target components

    SciTech Connect

    Defriend Obrey, Kimberly Ann; Day, Robert D; Espinoza, Brent F; Hatch, Doug; Patterson, Brian M; Feng, Shihai

    2008-01-01

    Aerogel is a material used in numerous components in High Energy Density Physics targets. In the past these components were molded into the proper shapes. Artifacts left in the parts from the molding process, such as contour irregularities from shrinkage and density gradients caused by the skin, have caused LANL to pursue machining as a way to make the components.

  3. Implementing Computer Integrated Manufacturing Technician Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Roger

    A computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) technician program was developed to provide training and technical assistance to meet the needs of business and industry in the face of the demands of high technology. The Computer and Automated Systems Association (CASA) of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers provided the incentive and guidelines…

  4. Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Karnitz, M.A.; Holcomb, R.S.; Wright, I.G.

    1995-10-01

    The technology based portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) contains several subelements which address generic technology issues for land-based gas-turbine systems. One subelement is the Materials/Manufacturing Technology Program which is coordinated by DOE-Oak Ridge Operations and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from universities and the national laboratories. Projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. A materials/manufacturing plan was developed in FY 1994 with input from gas turbine manufacturers, materials suppliers, universities, and government laboratories. The plan outlines seven major subelements which focus on materials issues and manufacturing processes. Work is currently under way in four of the seven major subelements. There are now major projects on coatings and process development, scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technology, materials characterization, and technology information exchange.

  5. Energy-optimal programming and scheduling of the manufacturing operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, N.; Frumuşanu, G.; Epureanu, A.

    2016-08-01

    The shop floor energy system covers the energy consumed for both the air conditioning and manufacturing processes. At the same time, most of energy consumed in manufacturing processes is converted in heat released in the shop floor interior and has a significant influence on the microclimate. Both these components of the energy consumption have a time variation that can be realistic assessed. Moreover, the consumed energy decisively determines the environmental sustainability of the manufacturing operation, while the expenditure for running the shop floor energy system is a significant component of the manufacturing operations cost. Finally yet importantly, the energy consumption can be fundamentally influenced by properly programming and scheduling of the manufacturing operations. In this paper, we present a method for modeling and energy-optimal programming & scheduling the manufacturing operations. In this purpose, we have firstly identified two optimization targets, namely the environmental sustainability and the economic efficiency. Then, we have defined three optimization criteria, which can assess the degree of achieving these targets. Finally, we have modeled the relationship between the optimization criteria and the parameters of programming and scheduling. In this way, it has been revealed that by adjusting these parameters one can significantly improve the sustainability and efficiency of manufacturing operations. A numerical simulation has proved the feasibility and the efficiency of the proposed method.

  6. Multilayer electronic component systems and methods of manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dane (Inventor); Wang, Guoan (Inventor); Kingsley, Nickolas D. (Inventor); Papapolymerou, Ioannis (Inventor); Tentzeris, Emmanouil M. (Inventor); Bairavasubramanian, Ramanan (Inventor); DeJean, Gerald (Inventor); Li, RongLin (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Multilayer electronic component systems and methods of manufacture are provided. In this regard, an exemplary system comprises a first layer of liquid crystal polymer (LCP), first electronic components supported by the first layer, and a second layer of LCP. The first layer is attached to the second layer by thermal bonds. Additionally, at least a portion of the first electronic components are located between the first layer and the second layer.

  7. Low Cost Manufacturing Approach of High Temperature PMC Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannmacher, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    The overall objective is to develop a satisfactory sheet molding compound (SMC) of a high temperature polyimide, such as PMR-11-50, VCAP-75, or NB2-76, and to develop compression molding processing parameters for a random, chopped fiber, high temperature, sheet molding compound that will be more affordable than the traditional hand lay-up fabrication methods. Compression molding will reduce manufacturing costs of composites by: (1) minimizing the conventional machining required after fabrication due to the use of full 360 deg matched tooling, (2) reducing fabrication time by minimizing the intensive hand lay-up operations associated with individual ply fabrication techniques, such as ply orientation and ply count and (3) possibly reducing component mold time by advanced B-staging prior to molding. This program is an integral part of Allison's T406/AE engine family's growth plan, which will utilize technologies developed under NASA's Sub-sonic Transport (AST) programs, UHPTET initiatives, and internally through Allison's IR&D projects. Allison is aggressively pursuing this next generation of engines, with both commercial and military applications, by reducing the overall weight of the engine through the incorporation of advanced, lightweight, high temperature materials, such as polymer matrix composites. This infusion of new materials into the engine is also a major factor in reducing engine cost because it permits the use of physically smaller structural components to achieve the same thrust levels as the generation that it replaced. A lighter, more efficient propulsion system translates to a substantial cost and weight savings to an airframe's structure.

  8. IMHEX fuel cell repeat component manufacturing continuous improvement accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Jakaitis, L.A.; Petraglia, V.J.; Bryson, E.S.

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power is taking a power generation technology that has been proven in the laboratory and is making it a commercially competitive product. There are many areas in which this technology required scale up and refinement to reach the market entry goals for the IMHEX{reg_sign} molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. One of the primary areas that needed to be addressed was the manufacturing of the fuel cell stack. Up to this point, the fuel cell stack and associated components were virtually hand made for each system to be tested. M-C Power has now continuously manufactured the repeat components for three 250 kW stacks. M-C Power`s manufacturing strategy integrated both evolutionary and revolutionary improvements into its comprehensive commercialization effort. M-C Power`s objectives were to analyze and continuously improve stack component manufacturing and assembly techniques consistent with established specifications and commercial scale production requirements. Evolutionary improvements are those which naturally occur as the production rates are increased and experience is gained. Examples of evolutionary (learning curve) improvements included reducing scrap rates and decreasing raw material costs by buying in large quantities. Revolutionary improvements result in significant design and process changes to meet cost and performance requirements of the market entry system. Revolutionary changes often involve identifying new methods and developing designs to accommodate the new process. Based upon our accomplishments, M-C Power was able to reduce the cost of continuously manufactured fuel cell repeat components from the first to third 250 kW stack by 63%. This paper documents the continuous improvement accomplishments realized by M-C Power during IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell repeat component manufacturing.

  9. Additive Manufacturing Design Considerations for Liquid Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, Dave; Hissam, Andy; Baker, Kevin; Rice, Darron

    2014-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Systems Department has gained significant experience in the last year designing, building, and testing liquid engine components using additive manufacturing. The department has developed valve, duct, turbo-machinery, and combustion device components using this technology. Many valuable lessons were learned during this process. These lessons will be the focus of this presentation. We will present criteria for selecting part candidates for additive manufacturing. Some part characteristics are 'tailor made' for this process. Selecting the right parts for the process is the first step to maximizing productivity gains. We will also present specific lessons we learned about feature geometry that can and cannot be produced using additive manufacturing machines. Most liquid engine components were made using a two-step process. The base part was made using additive manufacturing and then traditional machining processes were used to produce the final part. The presentation will describe design accommodations needed to make the base part and lessons we learned about which features could be built directly and which require the final machine process. Tolerance capabilities, surface finish, and material thickness allowances will also be covered. Additive Manufacturing can produce internal passages that cannot be made using traditional approaches. It can also eliminate a significant amount of manpower by reducing part count and leveraging model-based design and analysis techniques. Information will be shared about performance enhancements and design efficiencies we experienced for certain categories of engine parts.

  10. Innovative Technologies to Manufacture Hybrid Metal Foam/Composite Components

    SciTech Connect

    Carrino, L.; Durante, M.; Franchitti, S.; Sorrentino, L.; Tersigni, L.

    2011-01-17

    The aim of this paper is to verify the technological feasibility to realize hybrid metal-foam/composite component and the mechanical performances of the final structure. The hybrid component is composed by a cylindrical core in aluminum foam, the most used between those commercially available, and an outer layer in epoxy/S2-glass, manufactured by filament winding technology.A set of experimental tests have been carried out, to the aim to estimate the improvement of the hybrid component characteristics, compared to the sum of the single components (metal foam cylinder and epoxy/S2-glass tube).

  11. Material Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert; Draper, Susan; Locci, Ivan; Lerch, Bradley; Ellis, David; Senick, Paul; Meyer, Michael; Free, James; Cooper, Ken; Jones, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    To advance Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies for production of rocket propulsion components the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is applying state of the art characterization techniques to interrogate microstructure and mechanical properties of AM materials and components at various steps in their processing. The materials being investigated for upper stage rocket engines include titanium, copper, and nickel alloys. Additive manufacturing processes include laser powder bed, electron beam powder bed, and electron beam wire fed processes. Various post build thermal treatments, including Hot Isostatic Pressure (HIP), have been studied to understand their influence on microstructure, mechanical properties, and build density. Micro-computed tomography, electron microscopy, and mechanical testing in relevant temperature environments has been performed to develop relationships between build quality, microstructure, and mechanical performance at temperature. A summary of GRCs Additive Manufacturing roles and experimental findings will be presented.

  12. Materials Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert; Draper, Susan; Locci, Ivan; Lerch, Bradley; Ellis, David; Senick, Paul; Meyer, Michael; Free, James; Cooper, Ken; Jones, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    To advance Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies for production of rocket propulsion components the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is applying state of the art characterization techniques to interrogate microstructure and mechanical properties of AM materials and components at various steps in their processing. The materials being investigated for upper stage rocket engines include titanium, copper, and nickel alloys. Additive manufacturing processes include laser powder bed, electron beam powder bed, and electron beam wire fed processes. Various post build thermal treatments, including Hot Isostatic Pressure (HIP), have been studied to understand their influence on microstructure, mechanical properties, and build density. Micro-computed tomography, electron microscopy, and mechanical testing in relevant temperature environments has been performed to develop relationships between build quality, microstructure, and mechanical performance at temperature. A summary of GRC's Additive Manufacturing roles and experimental findings will be presented.

  13. Apparatus for microwave heat treatment of manufactured components

    DOEpatents

    Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC

    2008-04-15

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

  14. Methods for microwave heat treatment of manufactured components

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2010-08-03

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

  15. Fabrication of ceramic components using mold shape deposition manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Alexander G.

    Mold Shape Deposition Manufacturing (Mold SDM) is a new process for the fabrication of geometrically complex, structural ceramic components. This thesis describes the development of the Mold SDM process, including process steps, materials selection, planning strategies and automation. Initial characterization results are presented and these are used to compare the process to competing manufacturing processes. A range of current and potential applications for ceramic, as well as metal and polymer parts are discussed. The benefits and limitations of ceramic materials for structural applications are discussed to motivate the need for a manufacturing process capable of rapidly producing high quality, geometrically complex, structural ceramic components. The Mold SDM process was developed to address this need. Mold SDM is based on Shape Deposition Manufacturing (SDM) and uses SDM techniques to build fugitive wax molds which can then be used to build ceramic parts by gelcasting. SDM is an additive-subtractive layered manufacturing process which allows it to build geometrically complex parts. The subtraction step differentiates Mold SDM from other layered manufacturing processes and allows accurate, high quality surfaces to be produced. The performance of the process was increased by identifying the key material properties and then selecting improved materials combinations. Candidate materials were evaluated in terms of machinability, shrinkage, heat resistance and chemical compatibility. A number of preferred materials combinations were developed and used to produce ceramic, metal and polymer parts. A number of new process planning strategies and build techniques were developed. The manufacturability analysis determines whether a part is manufacturable and the orientation selection guidelines help in the selection of optimum build directions. New decomposition techniques take advantage of process capabilities to improve part quality and build rate. Initial process

  16. Additive manufacturing method for SRF components of various geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert; Frigola, Pedro E; Murokh, Alex Y

    2015-05-05

    An additive manufacturing method for forming nearly monolithic SRF niobium cavities and end group components of arbitrary shape with features such as optimized wall thickness and integral stiffeners, greatly reducing the cost and technical variability of conventional cavity construction. The additive manufacturing method for forming an SRF cavity, includes atomizing niobium to form a niobium powder, feeding the niobium powder into an electron beam melter under a vacuum, melting the niobium powder under a vacuum in the electron beam melter to form an SRF cavity; and polishing the inside surface of the SRF cavity.

  17. The use of Tecnomatix software to simulate the manufacturing flows in an industrial enterprise producing hydrostatic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrila, S.; Brabie, G.; Chirita, B.

    2016-08-01

    The analysis performed on manufacturing flows within industrial enterprises producing hydrostatic components twos made on a number of factors that influence smooth running of production such: distance between pieces, waiting time from one surgery to another; time achievement of setups on CNC machines; tool changing in case of a large number of operators and manufacturing complexity of large files [2]. To optimize the manufacturing flow it was used the software Tecnomatix. This software represents a complete portfolio of manufacturing solutions digital manufactured by Siemens. It provides innovation by linking all production methods of a product from process design, process simulation, validation and ending the manufacturing process. Among its many capabilities to create a wide range of simulations, the program offers various demonstrations regarding the behavior manufacturing cycles. This program allows the simulation and optimization of production systems and processes in several areas such as: car suppliers, production of industrial equipment; electronics manufacturing, design and production of aerospace and defense parts.

  18. Space Technology Mission Directorate Game Changing Development Program FY2015 Annual Program Review: Advanced Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John; Fikes, John

    2015-01-01

    The Advance Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Project supports multiple activities within the Administration's National Manufacturing Initiative. A key component of the Initiative is the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO), which includes participation from all federal agencies involved in U.S. manufacturing. In support of the AMNPO the AMT Project supports building and Growing the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation through a public-private partnership designed to help the industrial community accelerate manufacturing innovation. Integration with other projects/programs and partnerships: STMD (Space Technology Mission Directorate), HEOMD, other Centers; Industry, Academia; OGA's (e.g., DOD, DOE, DOC, USDA, NASA, NSF); Office of Science and Technology Policy, NIST Advanced Manufacturing Program Office; Generate insight within NASA and cross-agency for technology development priorities and investments. Technology Infusion Plan: PC; Potential customer infusion (TDM, HEOMD, SMD, OGA, Industry); Leverage; Collaborate with other Agencies, Industry and Academia; NASA roadmap. Initiatives include: Advanced Near Net Shape Technology Integrally Stiffened Cylinder Process Development (launch vehicles, sounding rockets); Materials Genome; Low Cost Upper Stage-Class Propulsion; Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME); National Center for Advanced Manufacturing.

  19. Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Karnitz, M.A.; Holcomb, R.S.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K.; Hoffman, E.E.

    1995-12-31

    The technology based portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) contains several subelements which address generic technology issues for land-based gas-turbine systems. One subelement is the Materials/ Manufacturing Technology Program which is coordinated by DOE Oak Ridge Operations and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from universities and the national laboratories. Projects in this sub-element are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines.

  20. Application of Additively Manufactured Components in Rocket Engine Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, Marty, Jr.; Hanks, Andrew; Schmauch, Preston; Delessio, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The use of additive manufacturing technology has the potential to revolutionize the development of turbopump components in liquid rocket engines. When designing turbomachinery with the additive process there are several benefits and risks that are leveraged relative to a traditional development cycle. This topic explores the details and development of a 90,000 RPM Liquid Hydrogen Turbopump from which 90% of the parts were derived from the additive process. This turbopump was designed, developed and will be tested later this year at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  1. Research, Design and Manufacture of Functional Components of the Microsatellite's Components "Republica Moldova"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostan, Ion; Canter, Valeriu; Secrieru, Nicolae; Bodean, Ghenadie; Blaja, Valeriu

    2012-06-01

    This paper deals with the main current results of investigation , designing and manufacturing of functional components of microsatellite, obtained in the State investigation programm, "Valoristaion of renewable energy in the Republic of Moldova and development of Moldavian Satellite". The satellite will have a mass of 12.5 kg. The paper contains 8 chapters, 11 figures, 11 bibliographical references.

  2. Neutron Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components. Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Thomas R.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2015-09-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is a collection of promising manufacturing methods that industry is beginning to explore and adopt. Macroscopically complicated and near net shape components are being built using AM, but how the material behaves in service is a big question for industry. Consequently, AM components/materials need further research into exactly what is made and how it will behave in service. This one and a half day workshop included a series of invited presentations from academia, industry and national laboratories (see Appendix A for the workshop agenda and list of talks). The workshop was welcomed by Alan Tennant, Chief Scientist, Neutron Sciences Directorate, ORNL, and opened remotely by Rob Ivestor, Deputy Director, Advanced Manufacturing Office-DOE, who declared AM adoptees as titans who will be able to create customized 3-D structures with 1 million to 1 billion micro welds with locally tailored microstructures. Further he stated that characterization with neutrons is key to be able to bring critical insight/information into the AM process/property/behavior relationship. Subsequently, the presentations spanned a slice of the current state of the art AM techniques and many of the most relevant characterization techniques using neutrons. After the talks, a panel discussion was held; workshop participants (see Appendix B for a list of attendees) providing questions and the panel answers. The main purpose of the panel discussion was to build consensus regarding the critical research needs in AM that can be addressed with neutrons. These needs were placed into three categories: modes of access for neutrons, new capabilities needed, new AM material issues and neutrons. Recommendations from the workshop were determined based on the panel discussion.

  3. The near-net-shape manufacturing of affordable titanium components for the M777 lightweight howitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, Kevin L.; Ucok, Ibrahim; Gungor, Mehmet N.; Guclu, Mustafa; Kramer, Lawrence S.; Tack, Wm. Troy; Nastac, Laurentiu; Martin, Nicholas R.; Dong, Hao; Pickens, Joseph R.

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Marines’ and U.S. Army’s next-generation, titanium-intensive M777 howitzer offers reduced weight, increased mobility, and improved survivability over its aging, M198 steel-based predecessor. The National Center for Excellence in Metalworking Technology (NCEMT), operated by Concurrent Technologies Corporation, is helping to meet M777 program goals for cost, performance, and production schedule by developing near-net-shape manufacturing routes for traditionally machined and welded components. Under two projects sponsored by the Navy Manufacturing Technology Program, the NCEMT has developed investment cast spade and saddle components as well as flowformed tubes and forged bell housings. This paper summarizes the results of the two ongoing projects.

  4. Clean Diesel Component Improvement Program

    SciTech Connect

    2005-06-30

    The research conducted in this program significantly increased the knowledge and understanding in the fields of plasma physics and chemistry in diesel exhaust, the performance and characteristics of multifunctional catalysts in diesel exhaust, and the complexities of controlling a combination of such systems to remove NOx. Initially this program was designed to use an in-line plasma system (know as a plasma assisted catalyst system or PAC) to convert NO {yields} NO{sub 2}, a more catalytically active form of nitrogen oxides, and to crack hydrocarbons (diesel fuel in particular) into active species. The NO{sub 2} and the cracked hydrocarbons were then flowed over an in-line ceramic NOx catalyst that removed NO{sub 2} from the diesel exhaust. Even though the PAC system performed well technically and was able to remove over 95% of NOx from diesel exhaust the plasma component proved not to be practical or commercially feasible. The lack of practical and commercial viability was due to high unit costs and lack of robustness. The plasma system and its function was replaced in the NOx removal process by a cracking reforming catalyst that converted diesel fuel to a highly active reductant for NOx over a downstream ceramic NOx catalyst. This system was designated the ceramic catalyst system (CCS). It was also determined that NO conversion to NO{sub 2} was not required to achieve high levels of NOx reduction over ceramic NOx catalyst if that catalyst was properly formulated and the cracking reforming produced a reductant optimized for that NOx catalyst formulation. This system has demonstrated 92% NOx reduction in a diesel exhaust slipstream and 65% NOx reduction from the full exhaust of a 165 hp diesel engine using the FTP cycle. Although this system needs additional development to be commercial, it is simple, cost effective (does not use precious metals), sulfur tolerant, operates at high space velocities, does not require a second fluid be supplied as a reductant, has low

  5. 48 CFR 235.006-70 - Manufacturing Technology Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Manufacturing Technology... CONTRACTING 235.006-70 Manufacturing Technology Program. In accordance with 10 U.S.C. 2521(d), for acquisitions under the Manufacturing Technology Program— (a) Award all contracts using competitive...

  6. 48 CFR 235.006-70 - Manufacturing Technology Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Manufacturing Technology... CONTRACTING 235.006-70 Manufacturing Technology Program. In accordance with 10 U.S.C. 2521(d), for acquisitions under the Manufacturing Technology Program— (a) Award all contracts using competitive...

  7. 48 CFR 235.006-70 - Manufacturing Technology Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Manufacturing Technology... CONTRACTING 235.006-70 Manufacturing Technology Program. In accordance with 10 U.S.C. 2521(d), for acquisitions under the Manufacturing Technology Program— (a) Award all contracts using competitive...

  8. 48 CFR 235.006-70 - Manufacturing Technology Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Manufacturing Technology... CONTRACTING 235.006-70 Manufacturing Technology Program. In accordance with 10 U.S.C. 2521(d), for acquisitions under the Manufacturing Technology Program— (a) Award all contracts using competitive...

  9. 48 CFR 235.006-70 - Manufacturing Technology Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manufacturing Technology... CONTRACTING 235.006-70 Manufacturing Technology Program. In accordance with 10 U.S.C. 2521(d), for acquisitions under the Manufacturing Technology Program— (a) Award all contracts using competitive...

  10. Advanced manufacturing development of a composite empennage component for L-1011 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alva, T.; Henkel, J.; Johnson, R.; Carll, B.; Jackson, A.; Mosesian, B.; Brozovic, R.; Obrien, R.; Eudaily, R.

    1982-01-01

    This is the final report of technical work conducted during the fourth phase of a multiphase program having the objective of the design, development and flight evaluation of an advanced composite empennage component manufactured in a production environment at a cost competitive with those of its metal counterpart, and at a weight savings of at least 20 percent. The empennage component selected for this program is the vertical fin box of the L-1011 aircraft. The box structure extends from the fuselage production joint to the tip rib and includes front and rear spars. During Phase 4 of the program, production quality tooling was designed and manufactured to produce three sets of covers, ribs, spars, miscellaneous parts, and subassemblies to assemble three complete ACVF units. Recurring and nonrecurring cost data were compiled and documented in the updated producibility/design to cost plan. Nondestruct inspections, quality control tests, and quality acceptance tests were performed in accordance with the quality assurance plan and the structural integrity control plan. Records were maintained to provide traceability of material and parts throughout the manufacturing development phase. It was also determined that additional tooling would not be required to support the current and projected L-1011 production rate.

  11. Simulation of Assembly Line Balancing in Automotive Component Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Muthanna; Mohd Razali, Noraini

    2016-02-01

    This study focuses on the simulation of assembly line balancing in an automotive component in a vendor manufacturing company. A mixed-model assembly line of charcoal canister product that is used in an engine system as fuel's vapour filter was observed and found that the current production rate of the line does not achieve customer demand even though the company practices buffer stock for two days in advance. This study was carried out by performing detailed process flow and time studies along the line. To set up a model of the line by simulation, real data was taken from a factory floor and tested for distribution fit. The data gathered was then transformed into a simulation model. After verification of the model by comparing it with the actual system, it was found that the current line efficiency is not at its optimum condition due to blockage and idle time. Various what-if analysis were applied to eliminate the cause. Proposed layout shows that the line is balanced by adding buffer to avoid the blockage. Whereas, manpower is added the stations to reduce process time therefore reducing idling time. The simulation study was carried out using ProModel software.

  12. Additively Manufactured Combustion Devices Components for LOX/Methane Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Sandra Elam; Protz, Christopher; Garcia, Chance; Goodman, Dwight; Baker, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has designed, fabricated, and hot-fire tested a variety of successful injectors, chambers, and igniters for potential liquid oxygen (LOX) and methane (CH4) systems since 2005. The most recent efforts have focused on components with additive manufacturing (AM) to include unique design features, minimize joints, and reduce final machining efforts. Inconel and copper alloys have been used with AM processes to produce a swirl coaxial injector and multiple methane cooled thrust chambers. The initial chambers included unique thermocouple ports for measuring local coolant channel temperatures along the length of the chamber. Results from hot-fire testing were used to anchor thermal models and generate a regeneratively cooled thruster for a 4,000 lbf LOX/CH4 engine. The completed thruster will be hot-fire tested in the summer of 2016 at MSFC. The thruster design can also be easily scaled and used on a 25,000 lbf engine. To further support the larger engine design, an AM gas generator injector has been designed. Hot-fire testing on this injector is planned for the summer of 2016 at MSFC.

  13. An intuitive concept for manufacturing and inspecting of aspherical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Hsiao-Yu; Chang, Keng-Shou

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we propose an intuitive concept for manufacturing and inspecting of aspherical components. Two types, parabolic and cylinder, of plano-convex and plano-concave aspherical lenses were made by LOH 120S form generation machine. Three form error measurement methods were used known as coordinate measuring machine (CMM), interferometer with CGH null lens and inspection with combined pair lenses. Ultra high accuracy CMM from Panasonic Co., CGH cylinder null and CGH aspheric null from Diffraction International and OWI 150 ASPH CGH interferometer from OptoTech GmbH play the roll for measurement. CMM was used as a surface profiler to inspect the surface shape, and the software GRAPHER was also used as analysis tool to exam asphere numerical datum. The difference between theoretical and practical is as a surface polishing revised reference. The finished plano-convex and plano-concave aspherical lenses can be combined to be a plane lens. The individual and combined lenses were inspected on OPTOTECH OWI 150 ASPH CGH interferometer. The compared interference patterns have shown with the Diffration International CGH Aspheric Null "ASPHERIC 1" and CGH Cylinder Null "H80F2C". Through the procedure, the combined plano-convex and plano-concave aspherical lenses should be a perfect match plane lens and the individual lens might be an aspherical test standard element for quick inspection.

  14. Component Manufacturing Development for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX)

    SciTech Connect

    P.J. Heitzenroeder; T.G. Brown; J.H. Chrzanowski; M.J. Cole; P.L. Goranson; G.H. Neilson; B.E. Nelson; W.T. Reiersen; L.L Sutton; D.E. Williamson; M.E. Viola

    2004-10-28

    NCSX [National Compact Stellarator Experiment] is the first of a new class of stellarators called compact stellarators which hold the promise of retaining the steady state feature of the stellarator but at a much lower aspect ratio and using a quasi-axisymmetric magnetic field to obtain tokamak-like performance. Although much of NCSX is conventional in design and construction, the vacuum vessel and modular coils provide significant engineering challenges due to their complex shapes, need for high dimensional accuracy, and the high current density required in the modular coils due space constraints. Consequently, a three-phase development program has been undertaken. In the first phase, laboratory/industrial studies were performed during the development of the conceptual design to permit advances in manufacturing technology to be incorporated into NCSX's plans. In the second phase, full-scale prototype modular coil winding forms, compacted cable conductors, and 20 degree sectors of the vacuum vessel were fabricated in industry. In parallel, the NCSX project team undertook R&D studies that focused on the windings. The third (production) phase began in September 2004. First plasma is scheduled for January 2008.

  15. NASA Game Changing Development Program Manufacturing Innovation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Carol; Vickers, John

    2011-01-01

    This presentation examines the new NASA Manufacturing Innovation Project. The project is a part of the Game Changing Development Program which is one element of the Space Technology Programs Managed by Office of the Chief Technologist. The project includes innovative technologies in model-based manufacturing, digital additive manufacturing, and other next generation manufacturing tools. The project is also coupled with the larger federal initiatives in this area including the National Digital Engineering and Manufacturing Initiative and the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership. In addition to NASA, other interagency partners include the Department of Defense, Department of Commerce, NIST, Department of Energy, and the National Science Foundation. The development of game-changing manufacturing technologies are critical for NASA s mission of exploration, strengthening America s manufacturing competitiveness, and are highly related to current challenges in defense manufacturing activities. There is strong consensus across industry, academia, and government that the future competitiveness of U.S. industry will be determined, in large part, by a technologically advanced manufacturing sector. This presentation highlights the prospectus of next generation manufacturing technologies to the challenges faced NASA and by the Department of Defense. The project focuses on maturing innovative/high payoff model-based manufacturing technologies that may lead to entirely new approaches for a broad array of future NASA missions and solutions to significant national needs. Digital manufacturing and computer-integrated manufacturing "virtually" guarantee advantages in quality, speed, and cost and offer many long-term benefits across the entire product lifecycle. This paper addresses key enablers and emerging strategies in areas such as: Current government initiatives, Model-based manufacturing, and Additive manufacturing.

  16. WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF SHEET METAL COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. n an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization ssessment Cente...

  17. NEET-AMM Final Technical Report on Laser Direct Manufacturing (LDM) for Nuclear Power Components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Scott; Baca, Georgina; O'Connor, Michael

    2015-12-31

    Final technical report summarizes the program progress and technical accomplishments of the Laser Direct Manufacturing (LDM) for Nuclear Power Components project. A series of experiments varying build process parameters (scan speed and laser power) were conducted at the outset to establish the optimal build conditions for each of the alloys. Fabrication was completed in collaboration with Quad City Manufacturing Laboratory (QCML). The density of all sample specimens was measured and compared to literature values. Optimal build process conditions giving fabricated part densities close to literature values were chosen for making mechanical test coupons. Test coupons whose principal axis is on the x-y plane (perpendicular to build direction) and on the z plane (parallel to build direction) were built and tested as part of the experimental build matrix to understand the impact of the anisotropic nature of the process.. Investigations are described 316L SS, Inconel 600, 718 and 800 and oxide dispersion strengthed 316L SS (Yttria) alloys.

  18. 46 CFR 164.019-15 - Component manufacturer records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: (1) For each test, the serial number of the test instrument used if there is more than one available... manufacturer shall retain the following: (1) Records for all materials used in production, including name...

  19. Automated Manufacturing/Robotics Technology: Certificate and Associate Degree Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuay, Paul L.

    A description is provided of the Automated Manufacturing/Robotics program to be offered at Delaware County Community College beginning in September 1984. Section I provides information on the use of reprogramable industrial robots in manufacturing and the rapid changes in production that can be effected through the application of automated…

  20. Marketing manufactured housing under the ''Super Good Cents'' Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mohler, B.L.; Smith, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this study is to propose a strategy for including manufactured housing (MH) in Bonneville Power Administration's Super Good Cents (SGC) Program. This report presents information on the site-built SGC program, the characterization of MH consumers, the options for including MH in the SGC program, and the recommendations for including MHs in the SGC program. The purposed strategy for including MHs in the SGC program is designed to reduce risks to manufacturers and dealers, stimulate demand, and allow for maximum flexibility.

  1. Component Fragility Research Program: Phase 1 component prioritization

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1987-06-01

    Current probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods for nuclear power plants utilize seismic ''fragilities'' - probabilities of failure conditioned on the severity of seismic input motion - that are based largely on limited test data and on engineering judgment. Under the NRC Component Fragility Research Program (CFRP), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed and demonstrated procedures for using test data to derive probabilistic fragility descriptions for mechanical and electrical components. As part of its CFRP activities, LLNL systematically identified and categorized components influencing plant safety in order to identify ''candidate'' components for future NRC testing. Plant systems relevant to safety were first identified; within each system components were then ranked according to their importance to overall system function and their anticipated seismic capacity. Highest priority for future testing was assigned to those ''very important'' components having ''low'' seismic capacity. This report describes the LLNL prioritization effort, which also included application of ''high-level'' qualification data as an alternate means of developing probabilistic fragility descriptions for PRA applications.

  2. Laboratory Resources Management in Manufacturing Systems Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obi, Samuel C.

    2004-01-01

    Most, if not all, industrial technology (IT) programs have laboratories or workshops. Often equipped with modern equipment, tools, materials, and measurement and test instruments, these facilities constitute a major investment for IT programs. Improper use or over use of program facilities may result in dirty lab equipment, lost or damaged tools,…

  3. Measuring residual stresses in metallic components manufactured with fibre Bragg gratings embedded by selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havermann, Dirk; Mathew, Jinesh; MacPherson, William N.; Hand, Duncan P.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2015-09-01

    Metal clad single mode optical fibres containing Fibre Bragg Gratings are embedded in stainless steel components using bespoke laser based Selective Laser Melting technology (SLM). Significant residual stresses can be created in SLM manufactured components through the strong thermal gradients during the build process. We demonstrate the ability to monitor these internal stresses through embedded optical fibres with FBGs on a layer to layer basis, confirming estimates from models for residual stresses in additive manufactured components.

  4. Affordable Manufacturing Technologies Being Developed for Actively Cooled Ceramic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1999-01-01

    Efforts to improve the performance of modern gas turbine engines have imposed increasing service temperature demands on structural materials. Through active cooling, the useful temperature range of nickel-base superalloys in current gas turbine engines has been extended, but the margin for further improvement appears modest. Because of their low density, high-temperature strength, and high thermal conductivity, in situ toughened silicon nitride ceramics have received a great deal of attention for cooled structures. However, high processing costs have proven to be a major obstacle to their widespread application. Advanced rapid prototyping technology, which is developing rapidly, offers the possibility of an affordable manufacturing approach.

  5. Control of microstructure in soldered, brazed, welded, plated, cast or vapor deposited manufactured components

    SciTech Connect

    Ripley, Edward B.; Hallman, Russell L.

    2015-11-10

    Disclosed are methods and systems for controlling of the microstructures of a soldered, brazed, welded, plated, cast, or vapor deposited manufactured component. The systems typically use relatively weak magnetic fields of either constant or varying flux to affect material properties within a manufactured component, typically without modifying the alloy, or changing the chemical composition of materials or altering the time, temperature, or transformation parameters of a manufacturing process. Such systems and processes may be used with components consisting of only materials that are conventionally characterized as be uninfluenced by magnetic forces.

  6. Program Evolves from Basic CAD to Total Manufacturing Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassola, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Close to a decade ago, John Hersey High School (JHHS) in Arlington Heights, Illinois, made a transition from a traditional classroom-based pre-engineering program. The new program is geared towards helping students understand the entire manufacturing process. Previously, a JHHS student would design a project in computer-aided design (CAD) software…

  7. Manufactured Homes Acquisition Program : Heat Loss Assumptions and Calculations, Heat Loss Coefficient Tables.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Bob; Baylon, David

    1992-05-01

    This manual is intended to assist builders of manufactured homes in assessing the thermal performance of structural components used in the Manufactured Housing Acquisition Program (MAP) sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). U-factors for these components are calculated using the ASHRAE (1989) parallel heat loss method, with adaptations made for the construction practices found in the Pacific Northwest manufactured home industry. This report is divided into two parts. The first part describes the general assumptions and calculation procedures used to develop U-factors and R-values for specific materials used in the construction industry, overall U-factors for component sections, and the impact of complex framing and thermal configurations on various components' heat loss rates. The individual components of manufactured homes are reviewed in terms of overall thermal conductivity. The second part contains tables showing the results of heat loss calculations expressed as U-factors for various configurations of the major building components: floor systems, ceiling systems, wall systems, windows, doors and skylights. These values can be used to establish compliance with the MAP specifications and thermal performance criteria or to compare manufactured homes built to different standards.

  8. Manufactured Homes Acquisition Program : Heat Loss Assumptions and Calculations, Heat Loss Coefficient Tables.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Bob; Baylon, David.

    1992-05-01

    This manual is intended to assist builders of manufactured homes in assessing the thermal performance of structural components used in the Manufactured Housing Acquisition Program (MAP) sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). U-factors for these components are calculated using the ASHRAE (1989) parallel heat loss method, with adaptations made for the construction practices found in the Pacific Northwest manufactured home industry. This report is divided into two parts. The first part describes the general assumptions and calculation procedures used to develop U-factors and R-values for specific materials used in the construction industry, overall U-factors for component sections, and the impact of complex framing and thermal configurations on various components` heat loss rates. The individual components of manufactured homes are reviewed in terms of overall thermal conductivity. The second part contains tables showing the results of heat loss calculations expressed as U-factors for various configurations of the major building components: floor systems, ceiling systems, wall systems, windows, doors and skylights. These values can be used to establish compliance with the MAP specifications and thermal performance criteria or to compare manufactured homes built to different standards.

  9. Materials/manufacturing support element for the Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Karnitz, M.A.; Hoffman, E.E.; Parks, W.P.

    1994-12-31

    In 1993, DOE initiated a program to develop advanced gas turbines for power generation in utility and industrial applications. A materials/manufacturing plan was developed in several stages with input from gas turbine manufacturers, materials suppliers, universities, and government laboratories. This plan was developed by a small advanced materials and turbine technology team over a 6-month period. The technology plan calls for initiation of several high priority projects in FY 1995. The technical program for the materials/manufacturing element focuses on generic materials issues, components, and manufacturing processes. Categories include coatings and process development, turbine airfoil development, ceramics adaptation, directional solidification and single crystal airfoils manufactoring technology, materials characterization, catalytic combustor materials, and technology information exchange.

  10. Public health implications of components of plastics manufacture. Flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Pearce, E M; Liepins, R

    1975-06-01

    The four processes involved in the flammability of materials are described and related to the various flame retardance mechanisms that may operate. Following this the four practical approaches used in improving flame retardance of materials are described. Each approach is illustrated with a number of typical examples of flame retardants or synthetic procedures used. This overview of flammability, flame retardance, and flame retardants used is followed by a more detailed examination of most of the plastics manufactured in the United States during 1973, their consumption patterns, and the primary types of flame retardants used in the flame retardance of the most used plastics. The main types of flame retardants are illustrated with a number of typical commercial examples. Statistical data on flame retardant market size, flame retardant growth in plastics, and price ranges of common flame retardants are presented.

  11. Public health implications of components of plastics manufacture. Flame retardants.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, E M; Liepins, R

    1975-01-01

    The four processes involved in the flammability of materials are described and related to the various flame retardance mechanisms that may operate. Following this the four practical approaches used in improving flame retardance of materials are described. Each approach is illustrated with a number of typical examples of flame retardants or synthetic procedures used. This overview of flammability, flame retardance, and flame retardants used is followed by a more detailed examination of most of the plastics manufactured in the United States during 1973, their consumption patterns, and the primary types of flame retardants used in the flame retardance of the most used plastics. The main types of flame retardants are illustrated with a number of typical commercial examples. Statistical data on flame retardant market size, flame retardant growth in plastics, and price ranges of common flame retardants are presented. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:1175568

  12. The effectiveness of AMT investment in UK metal component manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, David; Nugent, Edward

    1991-11-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the effectiveness of capital investment, particularly investment in Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT). AMT encompasses not only production, but also design and administration areas. The intention was to make recommendations for the future direction of investment in the industry. The structure of the industry which comprises 54 companies is outlined. In order to obtain sufficiently detailed and accurate data, each company was visited. Discussions were held with managers covering the areas of production, engineering, finance, design, sales and marketing, quality and other strategic issues affecting investment decision making. The study conclusions and recommendations are presented. An overview of the industry and the survey sample are given. Company performance, practice relationships which link practice, and performance are discussed.

  13. Energy Efficient Engine: Combustor component performance program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubiel, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Combustor Component Performance analysis as developed under the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) program are presented. This study was conducted to demonstrate the aerothermal and environmental goals established for the EEE program and to identify areas where refinements might be made to meet future combustor requirements. In this study, a full annular combustor test rig was used to establish emission levels and combustor performance for comparison with those indicated by the supporting technology program. In addition, a combustor sector test rig was employed to examine differences in emissions and liner temperatures obtained during the full annular performance and supporting technology tests.

  14. 49 CFR 228.203 - Program components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Program components. 228.203 Section 228.203 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HOURS OF SERVICE OF RAILROAD EMPLOYEES; RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING;...

  15. 49 CFR 228.203 - Program components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Program components. 228.203 Section 228.203 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HOURS OF SERVICE OF RAILROAD EMPLOYEES; RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING;...

  16. 49 CFR 228.203 - Program components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Program components. 228.203 Section 228.203 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HOURS OF SERVICE OF RAILROAD EMPLOYEES; RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING;...

  17. The "Affective Component" of the Reading Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickler, Darryl J.

    1977-01-01

    A balanced reading program must--in addition to providing for children's reading skill needs--include a well-planned "affective component" which provides for the development of their interests, attitudes, and personal values in relation to reading for information and enjoyment. (Author)

  18. IND Regulatory & Manufacturing Resources - Cancer Imaging Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Imaging Program has been creating Investigational New Drug Applications (IND) for imaging agents in order to engage in multi-center clinical trials of these materials. A subset of the documents filed is being made available to the research community to implement routine synthesis of tracers at their own facilities and to assist investigators with the filing of their own INDs. The first of these document sets is for F-18 fluorothymidine (FLT).

  19. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program Specification Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hewes, Tom; Peeks, Brady

    2013-02-01

    The DOE research team Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Northwest Energy Works (NEW), the current Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Home Program (NEEM) program administrator, collaborated to research a new specification that would reduce the energy requirements of a NEEM home.This research identified and developed combinations of cost-effective high performance building assemblies and mechanical systems that can readily can be deployed in the manufacturing setting that reduce energy used for space conditioning, water heating and lighting by 50% over the present NEEM specifications.

  20. On- and offline ultrasonic characterization of components built by SLM additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Hans; Spies, Martin; Bamberg, Joachim; Henkel, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    Additive manufacturing processes have become commercially available and are particularly interesting for the production of free-formed parts. Selective laser melting allows for manufacturing components by localized melting of successive layers of metal powder. In this contribution, we report on investigations in view of the influence of the process parameter `laser power' on the microstructure of the manufactured component. It turned out that the online recorded A-scans allow inferring conclusions about the quality of the SLM process. We also report on offline measurements which have been performed to support the online results.

  1. Evaluating Manufacturing and Assembly Errors in Rotating Machinery to Enhance Component Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; Huff, Edward M.; Swanson, Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Manufacturing and assembly phases play a crucial role in providing products that meet the strict functional specifications associated with rotating machinery components. The errors resulting during the manufacturing and assembly of such components are correlated with the vibration and noise emanating from the final system during its operational lifetime. Vibration and noise are especially unacceptable elements in high-risk systems such as helicopters, resulting in premature component degradation and an unsafe flying environment. In such applications, individual components often are subject to 100% inspection prior to assembly, as well as during operation through rigorous maintenance, resulting in increased product development cycles and high production and operation costs. In this work, we focus on providing designers and manufacturing engineers with a technique to evaluate vibration modes and levels for each component or subsystem prior to putting them into operation. This paper presents a preliminary investigation of the correlation between vibrations and manufacturing and assembly errors using an experimental test rig, which simulates a simple bearing and shaft arrangement. A factorial design is used to study the effects of: 1) different manufacturing instances; 2) different assembly instances; and, 3) varying shaft speeds. The results indicate a correlation between manufacturing or assembly errors and vibrations measured from accelerometers. Challenges in developing a tool for DFM are identified, followed by a discussion of future work, including a real-world application to helicopter transmission vibrations.

  2. Manufacturing Production: An Evaluation Report for the Occupational Exploration Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altschuld, James W.; And Others

    The evaluation report is one of seven produced for the Occupational Exploration Program (OEP), a series of simulated occupational experiences designed for junior high school students. Describing the pilot testing of the simulation dealing with manufacturing production, the report contains sections describing the simulation context, evaluation…

  3. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program: High Performance Manufactured Home Prototyping and Construction Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hewes, Tom; Peeks, Brady

    2013-11-01

    The Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Northwest Energy Works (NEW), the current Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program (NEEM) administrator, have been collaborating to conduct research on new specifications that would improve on the energy requirements of a NEEM home. In its role as administrator, NEW administers the technical specs, performs research and engineering analysis, implements ongoing construction quality management procedures, and maintains a central database with home tracking. This project prototyped and assessed the performances of cost-effective high performance building assemblies and mechanical systems that are not commonly deployed in the manufacturing setting. The package of measures is able to reduce energy used for space conditioning, water heating and lighting by 50% over typical manufactured homes produced in the northwest.

  4. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program: High Performance Manufactured Home Prototyping and Construction Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hewes, T.; Peeks, B.

    2013-11-01

    The Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Northwest Energy Works (NEW), the current Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program (NEEM) administrator, have been collaborating to conduct research on new specifications that would improve on the energy requirements of a NEEM home. In its role as administrator, NEW administers the technical specs, performs research and engineering analysis, implements ongoing construction quality management procedures, and maintains a central database with home tracking. This project prototyped and assessed the performances of cost-effective high performance building assemblies and mechanical systems that are not commonly deployed in the manufacturing setting. The package of measures is able to reduce energy used for space conditioning, water heating and lighting by 50 percent over typical manufactured homes produced in the northwest.

  5. Roll forming technology for manufacturing axisymmetric automotive components

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.; Bieh, T.G.; Yang, H.s.; Brown, K.R.; Kaibyshev, R.O.; Petrov, E.N.

    1997-10-28

    A unique roll forming technology that permits complex axisymmetric components, such as automobile wheels and turbine disks, to be formed in a single forming operation, has been developed by two Russian Institute, the Institute of Technical Physics of the Russian Federal Nuclear Center and the Institute for Metals Superplasticity Problems. This process was used to fabricate automobile wheels from a Russian AVT alloy, a 6010 aluminum alloy equivalent. The process included steps of isothermal roll forming of preforms into wheels shapes, all at 430C for the AVT alloy. The microstructure and mechanical properties were evaluated at various locations in the finished wheels by optical metallography and tensile testing at elevated temperatures. Tensile properties were obtained by stain-rate change tests and tensile tests to failure at high strain rates. Microstructure and mechanical propertied of the preforms and blanks were also evaluated. The results indicate that dynamically recovered microstructures were developed during the processing, which showed relatively high strain rate sensitivity and rendered sufficiently plasticity at the elevated temperature for wheel fabrication process.

  6. Human reliability program: Components and effects

    SciTech Connect

    Baley-Downes, S.

    1986-01-01

    The term ''Human Reliability Program'' (HRP) is defined as a series of selective controls which are implemented and integrated to identify the ''insider threat'' from current and prospective employees who are dishonest, disloyal and unreliable. The HRP, although not a prediction of human behaviour, is an excellent tool for decision making and should compliment security and improve employee quality. The HRP consists of several component applications such as management evaluation; appropriate background investigative requirements; occupational health examination and laboratory testing; drug/alcohol screening; psychological testing and interviews; polygraph examination; job related aberrant behaviour recognition; on-going education and training; document control; drug/alcohol rehabilitation; periodic HRP audit; and implementation of an onsite central clearing house. The components and effects of HRP are discussed in further detail in this paper.

  7. Mixing of components from different manufacturers in total hip arthroplasty: prevalence and comparative outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Keith; Pickford, Martin; Newell, Claire; Howard, Peter; Hunt, Linda P; Blom, Ashley W

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — There have recently been highly publicized examples of suboptimal outcomes with some newer implant designs used for total hip replacement. This has led to calls for tighter regulation. However, surgeons do not always adhere to the regulations already in place and often use implants from different manufacturers together to replace a hip, which is against the recommendations of the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and the directions of the manufacturers. Patients and methods — We used data from the National Joint Registry of England and Wales (NJR) to investigate this practice. Results — Mixing of components was common, and we identified over 90,000 cases recorded between 2003 and 2013. In the majority of these cases (48,156), stems and heads from one manufacturer were mixed with polyethylene cemented cups from another manufacturer. When using a cemented stem and a polyethylene cup, mixing of stems from one manufacturer with cups from another was associated with a lower revision rate. At 8 years, the cumulative percentage of revisions was 1.9% (95% CI: 1.7–2.1) in the mixed group as compared to 2.4% (2.3–2.5) in the matched group (p = 0.001). Mixing of heads from one manufacturer with stems from another was associated with a higher revision rate (p < 0.001). In hip replacements with ceramic-on-ceramic or metal-on-metal bearings, mixing of stems, heads, and cups from different manufacturers was associated with similar revision rates (p > 0.05). Interpretation — Mixing of components from different manufacturers is a common practice, despite the fact that it goes against regulatory guidance. However, it is not associated with increased revision rates unless heads and stems from different manufacturers are used together. PMID:26201845

  8. `Climate wise` program at the Cosmair, Inc. Clark Manufacturing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kraly, K.

    1997-12-31

    Viewgraphs from the conference presentation are reproduced in this paper, which outlines energy efficiency improvements and emissions reductions at a hair care products manufacturing facility. Program management focuses on employee involvement in internal audits, utility tracking, public relations, and preventative maintenance. Energy savings, cost savings, and emission reductions are presented for 1996 and projected to the year 2000. Other program aspects outlined include a summary of utility costs; solid waste; chilled water system modifications; lighting modifications; boiler upgrades; and heating, ventilating, and air conditioning improvements.

  9. Apparatus with moderating material for microwave heat treatment of manufactured components

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2011-05-10

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

  10. Laser rapid manufacturing of special pattern Inco 718 nickel-based alloy component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Minlin; Yang, Lin; Liu, Wenjin; Huang, Ting; He, Jingjiang

    2005-01-01

    Laser rapid manufacturing based on laser cladding is a novel layer additive manufacturing technology, which can be well used for producing specific material, geometry and properties components normally unavailable or very costly by conventional methods. This paper presents a project research work on laser rapid manufacturing of special pattern Inco 718 nickel based alloy component with special pattern for aeronautical application. The required pattern Inco 718 nickel based alloy component was manufactured directly by laser deposition with optimized parameters: laser power: 800W, laser beam diameter: 0.8 mm, scanning speed: 0.5 m/min, powder feeding rate: 3g/min; The basic microstructure of laser deposited sample is directionally solidified columnar structure, with metallurgical bound to the substrate. Laser deposited component has good metallurgical and compositional and hardness homogeneity. The average hardness is about Hv0.2 440. The tensile strength of the laser deposited Inco 718 sample is respectively 121 and 116 kgf/mm2 at room temperature and at 650°C, which are a little bit less than the data of forged Inco 718 plate 142 and 127 kgf/mm2 due to its directional solidified columnar structure perpendicular to the tensile test force.

  11. Modular Engine Noise Component Prediction System (MCP) Program Users' Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Robert A. (Technical Monitor); Herkes, William H.; Reed, David H.

    2004-01-01

    This is a user's manual for Modular Engine Noise Component Prediction System (MCP). This computer code allows the user to predict turbofan engine noise estimates. The program is based on an empirical procedure that has evolved over many years at The Boeing Company. The data used to develop the procedure include both full-scale engine data and small-scale model data, and include testing done by Boeing, by the engine manufacturers, and by NASA. In order to generate a noise estimate, the user specifies the appropriate engine properties (including both geometry and performance parameters), the microphone locations, the atmospheric conditions, and certain data processing options. The version of the program described here allows the user to predict three components: inlet-radiated fan noise, aft-radiated fan noise, and jet noise. MCP predicts one-third octave band noise levels over the frequency range of 50 to 10,000 Hertz. It also calculates overall sound pressure levels and certain subjective noise metrics (e.g., perceived noise levels).

  12. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing Part I: System Analysis, Component Identification, Additive Manufacturing, and Testing of Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Haller, William J.; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Schnulo, Sydney L.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Weir, Don; Wali, Natalie; Vinup, Michael; Jones, Michael G.; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom; Mehl, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The research and development activities reported in this publication were carried out under NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) funded project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing." The objective of the project was to conduct evaluation of emerging materials and manufacturing technologies that will enable fully nonmetallic gas turbine engines. The results of the activities are described in three part report. The first part of the report contains the data and analysis of engine system trade studies, which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. The technical scope of activities included an assessment of the feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composites, which were accomplished by fabricating prototype engine components and testing them in simulated engine operating conditions. The manufacturing process parameters were developed and optimized for polymer and ceramic composites (described in detail in the second and third part of the report). A number of prototype components (inlet guide vane (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door) were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included turbine nozzle components. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  13. Additive manufacture (3d printing) of plasma diagnostic components and assemblies for fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, Paul; Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James; Romero-Talamas, Carlos; Rivera, William; You, Setthivoine; Card, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) is now becoming sufficiently accurate with a large range of materials for use in printing sensors needed universally in fusion energy research. Decreasing production cost and significantly lowering design time of energy subsystems would realize significant cost reduction for standard diagnostics commonly obtained through research grants. There is now a well-established set of plasma diagnostics, but these expensive since they are often highly complex and require customization, sometimes pace the project. Additive manufacturing (3D printing) is developing rapidly, including open source designs. Basic components can be printed for (in some cases) less than 1/100th costs of conventional manufacturing. We have examined the impact that AM can have on plasma diagnostic cost by taking 15 separate diagnostics through an engineering design using Conventional Manufacturing (CM) techniques to determine costs of components and labor costs associated with getting the diagnostic to work as intended. With that information in hand, we set about optimizing the design to exploit the benefits of AM. Work performed under DOE Contract DE-SC0011858.

  14. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program, 10 CFR part 611, subpart C, awards for eligible projects. ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility...

  15. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program, 10 CFR part 611, subpart C, awards for eligible projects. ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility...

  16. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program, 10 CFR part 611, subpart C, awards for eligible projects. ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility...

  17. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program, 10 CFR part 611, subpart C, awards for eligible projects. ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility...

  18. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program, 10 CFR part 611, subpart C, awards for eligible projects. ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility...

  19. 24 CFR 3288.215 - Effect on other manufactured home program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effect on other manufactured home... COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROGRAM State Dispute Resolution Programs in Non-HUD Administered States § 3288.215 Effect on other manufactured...

  20. 24 CFR 3288.215 - Effect on other manufactured home program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Effect on other manufactured home... COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROGRAM State Dispute Resolution Programs in Non-HUD Administered States § 3288.215 Effect on other manufactured...

  1. An Evaluation of the Manufacturing Technology Partnership (MTP) Program. Technical Report No. 96-007.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Kevin

    The Manufacturing Technology Program (MTP) is a partnership between General Motors, the United Auto Workers, and the public schools in Flint, Michigan, that originated as a preapprenticeship program and has since expanded into a program preparing youth for manufacturing. The programs' effectiveness was examined through a comparison group-based…

  2. Low-cost manufacturing of the point focus concentrating module and its key component, the Fresnel lens

    SciTech Connect

    Saifee, T.; Konnerth, A. III )

    1991-11-01

    Solar Kinetics, Inc. (SKI) has been developing point-focus concentrating PV modules since 1986. SKI is currently in position to manufacture between 200 to 600 kilowatts annually of the current design by a combination of manual and semi-automated methods. This report reviews the current status of module manufacture and specifies the required approach to achieve a high-volume manufacturing capability and low cost. The approach taken will include process development concurrent with module design for automated manufacturing. The current effort reviews the major manufacturing costs and identifies components and processes whose improvements would produce the greatest effect on manufacturability and cost reduction. The Fresnel lens is one such key component. Investigating specific alternative manufacturing methods and sources has substantially reduced the lens costs and has exceeded the DOE cost-reduction goals. 15 refs.

  3. Low-cost manufacturing of the point focus concentrating module and its key component, the Fresnel lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saifee, T.; Konnerth, A., III

    1991-11-01

    Solar Kinetics, Inc. (SKI) has been developing point-focus concentrating PV modules since 1986. SKI is currently in position to manufacture between 200 to 600 kilowatts annually of the current design by a combination of manual and semi-automated methods. This report reviews the current status of module manufacture and specifies the required approach to achieve a high-volume manufacturing capability and low cost. The approach taken will include process development concurrent with module design for automated manufacturing. The current effort reviews the major manufacturing costs and identifies components and processes whose improvements would produce the greatest effect on manufacturability and cost reduction. The Fresnel lens is one such key component. Investigating specific alternative manufacturing methods and sources has substantially reduced the lens costs and has exceeded the DOE cost-reduction goals.

  4. Automated packaging platform for low-cost high-performance optical components manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Robert T.

    2004-05-01

    Delivering high performance integrated optical components at low cost is critical to the continuing recovery and growth of the optical communications industry. In today's market, network equipment vendors need to provide their customers with new solutions that reduce operating expenses and enable new revenue generating IP services. They must depend on the availability of highly integrated optical modules exhibiting high performance, small package size, low power consumption, and most importantly, low cost. The cost of typical optical system hardware is dominated by linecards that are in turn cost-dominated by transmitters and receivers or transceivers and transponders. Cost effective packaging of optical components in these small size modules is becoming the biggest challenge to be addressed. For many traditional component suppliers in our industry, the combination of small size, high performance, and low cost appears to be in conflict and not feasible with conventional product design concepts and labor intensive manual assembly and test. With the advent of photonic integration, there are a variety of materials, optics, substrates, active/passive devices, and mechanical/RF piece parts to manage in manufacturing to achieve high performance at low cost. The use of automation has been demonstrated to surpass manual operation in cost (even with very low labor cost) as well as product uniformity and quality. In this paper, we will discuss the value of using an automated packaging platform.for the assembly and test of high performance active components, such as 2.5Gb/s and 10 Gb/s sources and receivers. Low cost, high performance manufacturing can best be achieved by leveraging a flexible packaging platform to address a multitude of laser and detector devices, integration of electronics and handle various package bodies and fiber configurations. This paper describes the operation and results of working robotic assemblers in the manufacture of a Laser Optical Subassembly

  5. 34 CFR 200.28 - Schoolwide program components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... components. A schoolwide program must include the following components: (a) Schoolwide reform strategies. The schoolwide program must incorporate reform strategies in the overall instructional program. Those strategies... accelerated curriculum; (iii) Increase the amount and quality of learning time, such as providing an...

  6. Additive Manufacturing Thermal Performance Testing of Single Channel GRCop-84 SLM Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Chance P.; Cross, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The surface finish found on components manufactured by sinter laser manufacturing (SLM) is rougher (0.013 - 0.0006 inches) than parts made using traditional fabrication methods. Internal features and passages built into SLM components do not readily allow for roughness reduction processes. Alternatively, engineering literature suggests that the roughness of a surface can enhance thermal performance within a pressure drop regime. To further investigate the thermal performance of SLM fabricated pieces, several GRCop-84 SLM single channel components were tested using a thermal conduction rig at MSFC. A 20 kW power source running at 25% duty cycle and 25% power level applied heat to each component while varying water flow rates between 2.1 - 6.2 gallons/min (GPM) at a supply pressure of 550 to 700 psi. Each test was allowed to reach quasi-steady state conditions where pressure, temperature, and thermal imaging data were recorded. Presented in this work are the heat transfer responses compared to a traditional machined OHFC Copper test section. An analytical thermal model was constructed to anchor theoretical models with the empirical data.

  7. 24 CFR 585.3 - Program components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... apprenticeship programs where possible. (b) Leadership training, counseling and other support activities, including: (1) Activities designed to develop employment and leadership skills, including support for...

  8. Additive Manufacturing of Multifunctional Components Using High Density Carbon Nanotube Yarn Filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, John M.; Sauti, Godfrey; Kim, Jae-Woo; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Stelter, Christopher J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Working, Dennis C.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing allows for design freedom and part complexity not currently attainable using traditional manufacturing technologies. Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF), for example, can yield novel component geometries and functionalities because the method provides a high level of control over material placement and processing conditions. This is achievable by extrusion of a preprocessed filament feedstock material along a predetermined path. However if fabrication of a multifunctional part relies only on conventional filament materials, it will require a different material for each unique functionality printed into the part. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an attractive material for many applications due to their high specific strength as well as good electrical and thermal conductivity. The presence of this set of properties in a single material presents an opportunity to use one material to achieve multifunctionality in an additively manufactured part. This paper describes a recently developed method for processing continuous CNT yarn filaments into three-dimensional articles, and summarizes the mechanical, electrical, and sensing performance of the components fabricated in this way.

  9. Energy and emissions saving potential of additive manufacturing: the case of lightweight aircraft components

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Runze; Riddle, Matthew; Graziano, Diane; Warren, Joshua; Das, Sujit; Nimbalkar, Sachin; Cresko, Joe; Masanet, Eric

    2015-05-08

    Additive manufacturing (AM) holds great potential for improving materials efficiency, reducing life-cycle impacts, and enabling greater engineering functionality compared to conventional manufacturing (CM) processes. For these reasons, AM has been adopted by a growing number of aircraft component manufacturers to achieve more lightweight, cost-effective designs. This study estimates the net changes in life-cycle primary energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with AM technologies for lightweight metallic aircraft components through the year 2050, to shed light on the environmental benefits of a shift from CM to AM processes in the U.S. aircraft industry. A systems modeling framework is presented, with integrates engineering criteria, life-cycle environmental data, and aircraft fleet stock and fuel use models under different AM adoption scenarios. Estimated fleetwide life-cycle primary energy savings in a rapid adoption scenario reach 70-174 million GJ/year in 2050, with cumulative savings of 1.2-2.8 billion GJ. Associated cumulative emission reduction potentials of CO2e were estimated at 92.8-217.4 million metric tons. About 95% of the savings is attributed to airplane fuel consumption reductions due to lightweighting. In addition, about 4050 tons aluminum, 7600 tons titanium and 8100 tons of nickel alloys could be saved per year in 2050. The results indicate a significant role of AM technologies in helping society meet its long-term energy use and GHG emissions reduction goals, and highlight barriers and opportunities for AM adoption for the aircraft industry.

  10. Load-dependent Optimization of Honeycombs for Sandwich Components - New Possibilities by Using Additive Layer Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riss, Fabian; Schilp, Johannes; Reinhart, Gunther

    Due to their feasible geometric complexity, additive layer manufacturing (ALM) processes show a highpotential for the production of lightweight components.Therefore, ALM processes enable the realization of bionic-designedcomponents like honeycombs, which are optimized depending upon load and outer boundary conditions.This optimization is based on a closed-loop, three-steps methodology: At first, each honeycomb is conformed to the surface of the part. Secondly, the structure is optimizedfor lightweight design.It is possible to achieve a homogeneous stress distribution in the part by varying the wall thickness, honeycombdiameter and the amount of honeycombs, depending on the subjected stresses and strains. At last, the functional components like threads or bearing carriers are integrated directly into the honeycomb core.Using all these steps as an iterative process, it is possible to reduce the mass of sandwich components about 50 percent compared to conventional approaches.

  11. The application of diffusion bonding in the manufacture of aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, J. A.

    Rolls-Royce has developed and optimized diffusion bonding processes for the manufacture of advanced titanium alloy aeroengine structures and components. Both categories of the joining technique - 'liquid-phase' and 'solid-state' - are being applied in the production of both static fabrications and complex rotating parts. In order to utilize diffusion bonding processes in a production environment, the process parameters which contribute to consistent formation of joints of the required strength have been critically examined. Process variables include temperature, pressure, time, surface roughness and, in the case of liquid-phase diffusion bonding, interlayer composition, density and thickness. Mechanical testing (tensile, impact and fatigue) complemented by metallography has predominantly been used to identify the permitted variations in the processes for the realistic and economical production manufacture of high quality lightweight aeroengine fabrications. The development of a high integrity bond via optimized diffusion bonding processes has been fundamental to the development of Rolls-Royce's unique wide chord fan design concept.

  12. 36 CFR 72.11 - Action program components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... program components. The local government will submit an Action Program which documents the recreation... park and recreation system. The local government must develop the Action Program consistent with and... expressed in its comprehensive plans and other documents. The Action Program consists of two sections...

  13. Automated metrology and NDE measurements for increased throughput in aerospace component manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Charles N.; Pierce, S. Gareth; Morozov, Maxim; Summan, Rahul; Dobie, Gordon; McCubbin, Paul; McCubbin, Coreen; Dearie, Scott; Munro, Gavin

    2015-03-01

    Composite materials, particularly Carbon-Fibre-Reinforced Polymer (CFRP), find extensive use in construction of modern airframe structures. Quality and conformance checks can be a serious limitation on production throughput in aerospace manufacturing. Traditionally Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and metrology measurements are undertaken at different stages of a product manufacture cycle using specific dedicated equipment and personnel. However, since both processes involve direct interaction with the component's surface, an opportunity exists to combine these to potentially reduce overall cycle time. In addition when considering moves towards automation of both inspection processes, it is clear that measured metrology data is an essential input parameter to the automated NDE workflow. The authors present the findings of a proof of concept combined sub-scale NDE and Metrology demonstrator cell for aerospace components. Permitting a maximum part area size of 3 × 1 m2, KUKA KR5 6 degree of freedom robotic manipulators were utilised to deploy two inspection payloads. Firstly automated non-contact photogrammetric metrology measurement was employed to inspect the structure for conformance of dimension in relation to reference designs (available from CAD). Secondly automated phased array technology was deployed to inspect and produce ultrasonic thickness mapping of components of nominal 20mm thickness. Parameters such as overall cycle time, part dimensional accuracy, robotic path accuracy and data registration are assessed in the paper to highlight both the current state of the art performance available and the future direction of required research focus.

  14. Multi-material additive manufacturing of robot components with integrated sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, Matt; Cox, Bryan; Galla, Matt; Krueger, Paul S.; Richer, Edmond; Cohen, Adam L.

    2015-06-01

    Fabricating a robotic component comprising 100s of distributed, connected sensors can be very difficult with current approaches. To address these challenges, we are developing a novel additive manufacturing technology to enable the integrated fabrication of robotic structural elements with distributed, interconnected sensors and actuators. The focus is on resistive and capacitive sensors and electromagnetic actuators, though others are anticipated. Anticipated applications beyond robotics include advanced prosthetics, wearable electronics, and defense electronics. This paper presents preliminary results for printing polymers and conductive material simultaneously to form small sensor arrays. Approaches to optimizing sensor performance are discussed.

  15. 77 FR 10373 - Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program: Electronics Manufacturing: Revisions to Heat Transfer Fluid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... used in the electronics manufacturing industry. The proposal was published on September 9, 2011 (76 FR... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 98 RIN 2060-AR09 Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program: Electronics Manufacturing... rule. SUMMARY: The EPA is finalizing technical revisions to the electronics manufacturing...

  16. Lightweight custom composite prosthetic components using an additive manufacturing-based molding technique.

    PubMed

    Leddy, Michael T; Belter, Joseph T; Gemmell, Kevin D; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are becoming more prominent and cost-effective as 3D printing becomes higher quality and more inexpensive. The idea of 3D printed prosthetics components promises affordable, customizable devices, but these systems currently have major shortcomings in durability and function. In this paper, we propose a fabrication method for custom composite prostheses utilizing additive manufacturing, allowing for customizability, as well the durability of professional prosthetics. The manufacturing process is completed using 3D printed molds in a multi-stage molding system, which creates a custom finger or palm with a lightweight epoxy foam core, a durable composite outer shell, and soft urethane gripping surfaces. The composite material was compared to 3D printed and aluminum materials using a three-point bending test to compare stiffness, as well as gravimetric measurements to compare weight. The composite finger demonstrates the largest stiffness with the lowest weight compared to other tested fingers, as well as having customizability and lower cost, proving to potentially be a substantial benefit to the development of upper-limb prostheses. PMID:26737367

  17. Lightweight custom composite prosthetic components using an additive manufacturing-based molding technique.

    PubMed

    Leddy, Michael T; Belter, Joseph T; Gemmell, Kevin D; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are becoming more prominent and cost-effective as 3D printing becomes higher quality and more inexpensive. The idea of 3D printed prosthetics components promises affordable, customizable devices, but these systems currently have major shortcomings in durability and function. In this paper, we propose a fabrication method for custom composite prostheses utilizing additive manufacturing, allowing for customizability, as well the durability of professional prosthetics. The manufacturing process is completed using 3D printed molds in a multi-stage molding system, which creates a custom finger or palm with a lightweight epoxy foam core, a durable composite outer shell, and soft urethane gripping surfaces. The composite material was compared to 3D printed and aluminum materials using a three-point bending test to compare stiffness, as well as gravimetric measurements to compare weight. The composite finger demonstrates the largest stiffness with the lowest weight compared to other tested fingers, as well as having customizability and lower cost, proving to potentially be a substantial benefit to the development of upper-limb prostheses.

  18. Establishing the relationship between manufacturing and component performance in stretch formed thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santare, Michael H.; Pipes, R. Byron; Beaussart, A. J.; Coffin, D. W.; Otoole, B. J.; Shuler, S. F.

    1993-01-01

    Flexible manufacturing methods are needed to reduce the cost of using advanced composites in structural applications. One method that allows for this is the stretch forming of long discontinuous fiber materials with thermoplastic matrices. In order to exploit this flexibility in an economical way, a thorough understanding of the relationship between manufacturing and component performance must be developed. This paper reviews some of the recent work geared toward establishing this understanding. Micromechanics models have been developed to predict the formability of the material during processing. The latest improvement of these models includes the viscoelastic nature of the matrix and comparison with experimental data. A finite element scheme is described which can be used to model the forming process. This model uses equivalent anisotropic viscosities from the micromechanics models and predicts the microstructure in the formed part. In addition, structural models have been built to account for the material property gradients that can result from the manufacturing procedures. Recent developments in this area include the analysis of stress concentrations and a failure model each accounting for the heterogeneous material fields.

  19. A Component-based Programming Model for Composite, Distributed Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eidson, Thomas M.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The nature of scientific programming is evolving to larger, composite applications that are composed of smaller element applications. These composite applications are more frequently being targeted for distributed, heterogeneous networks of computers. They are most likely programmed by a group of developers. Software component technology and computational frameworks are being proposed and developed to meet the programming requirements of these new applications. Historically, programming systems have had a hard time being accepted by the scientific programming community. In this paper, a programming model is outlined that attempts to organize the software component concepts and fundamental programming entities into programming abstractions that will be better understood by the application developers. The programming model is designed to support computational frameworks that manage many of the tedious programming details, but also that allow sufficient programmer control to design an accurate, high-performance application.

  20. Energy and emissions saving potential of additive manufacturing: the case of lightweight aircraft components

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Runze; Riddle, Matthew; Graziano, Diane; Warren, Joshua; Das, Sujit; Nimbalkar, Sachin; Cresko, Joe; Masanet, Eric

    2015-05-08

    Additive manufacturing (AM) holds great potential for improving materials efficiency, reducing life-cycle impacts, and enabling greater engineering functionality compared to conventional manufacturing (CM) processes. For these reasons, AM has been adopted by a growing number of aircraft component manufacturers to achieve more lightweight, cost-effective designs. This study estimates the net changes in life-cycle primary energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with AM technologies for lightweight metallic aircraft components through the year 2050, to shed light on the environmental benefits of a shift from CM to AM processes in the U.S. aircraft industry. A systems modeling framework is presented, with integratesmore » engineering criteria, life-cycle environmental data, and aircraft fleet stock and fuel use models under different AM adoption scenarios. Estimated fleetwide life-cycle primary energy savings in a rapid adoption scenario reach 70-174 million GJ/year in 2050, with cumulative savings of 1.2-2.8 billion GJ. Associated cumulative emission reduction potentials of CO2e were estimated at 92.8-217.4 million metric tons. About 95% of the savings is attributed to airplane fuel consumption reductions due to lightweighting. In addition, about 4050 tons aluminum, 7600 tons titanium and 8100 tons of nickel alloys could be saved per year in 2050. The results indicate a significant role of AM technologies in helping society meet its long-term energy use and GHG emissions reduction goals, and highlight barriers and opportunities for AM adoption for the aircraft industry.« less

  1. Survey of US Department of Defense Manufacturing Technology Program activities applicable to civilian manufacturing industries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Azimi, S.A.; Conrad, J.L.; Reed, J.E.

    1985-03-01

    Intent of the survey was to identify and characterize activities potentially applicable to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in the civilian manufacturing industries. The civilian industries emphasized were the general manufacturing industries (including fabricated metals, glass, machinery, paper, plastic, textile, and transportation equipment manufacturing) and the primary metals industries (including primary aluminum, copper, steel, and zinc production). The principal steps in the survey were to: develop overview taxonomies of the general manufacturing and primary metals industries as well as specific industry taxonomies; identify needs and opportunities for improving process energy efficiency and productivity in the industries included; identify federal programs, capabilities, and special technical expertise that might be relevant to industry's needs and opportunities; contact federal laboratories/facilities, through visits and other forms of inquiry; prepare formatted profiles (descriptions) potentially applicable work efforts; review findings with industry; and compile and evaluate industry responses.

  2. Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company's hazardous waste program.

    PubMed

    Van Noordwyk, H J; Santoro, M A

    1978-12-01

    This paper discusses the present hazardous waste program of 3M Company (Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company). 3M's definition of hazardous waste and the company's position on hazardous waste disposal are first considered. The company position is that wherever and whenever the disposal of a waste material threatens the environment or public safety, then that waste should be considered a hazardous waste and treated accordingly in terms of its handling and ultimate disposal. The generation of hazardous wastes and the differentiation of "hazardous" and "nonhazardous" wastes are described next. Handling of hazardous wastes from their generation to their disposal is then covered. This includes a definition of internal 3M terminology and a description of the hazard rating system used by the company. Finally, 3M disposal practices are presented. It is 3M's position that thermal destruction of hazardous wastes, where appropriate, is the best method for their disposal. With this in mind, 3M has constructed incineration facilities throughout the country. The rotary kiln incinerator at the 3M Chemolite plant in Cottage Grove, Minnesota is briefly described. Disposal of certain hazardous wastes in controlled secure land disposal sites is then briefly discussed.

  3. NASA OSMA NDE Program Additive Manufacturing Foundational Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Walker, James; Burke, Eric; Wells, Douglas; Nichols, Charles

    2016-01-01

    NASA is providing key leadership in an international effort linking NASA and non-NASA resources to speed adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) to meet NASA's mission goals. Participants include industry, NASA's space partners, other government agencies, standards organizations and academia. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  4. The manufacture of replacement low pressure carrier casings and associated stationary guide vane blading through on site component sample measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    In today`s competitive utility market place, the manufacture of replacement components by alternate manufacturing has become an increasingly important available option for turbine operators seeking to achieve substantive cost and lead time reductions in spare part purchasing. Essential to this strategy--in the absence of a total redesign of the component(s) or their assemblies--is the provision or access to the selected alternate manufacture of the necessary sample parts. This paper details the manufacture by reverse engineering of 3 replacement low pressure carrier guide vane blade casings for a 60 MW steam turbine complete with their associated blading and ancillary parts where the necessary sample parts and assemblies could not be released from site due to outage constraints.

  5. An Assessment of Nondestructive Evaluation Capability for Complex Additive Manufacturing Aerospace Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James; Beshears, Ron; Lambert, Dennis; Tilson, William

    2016-01-01

    The primary focus of this work is to investigate some of the fundamental relationships between processing, mechanical testing, materials characterization, and NDE for additively manufactured (AM) components using the powder bed fusion direct melt laser sintered process. The goal is to understand the criticality of defects unique to the AM process and then how conventional nondestructive evaluation methods as well as some of the more non-traditional methods such as computed tomography, are effected by the AM material. Specific defects including cracking, porosity and partially/unfused powder will be addressed. Besides line-of-site NDE, as appropriate these inspection capabilities will be put into the context of complex AM geometries where hidden features obscure, or inhibit traditional NDE methods.

  6. Energy-consumption and carbon-emission analysis of vehicle and component manufacturing.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J. L.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2010-10-12

    A model is presented for calculating the environmental burdens of the part manufacturing and vehicle assembly (VMA) stage of the vehicle life cycle. The approach is bottom-up, with a special focus on energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. The model is applied to both conventional and advanced vehicles, the latter of which include aluminum-intensive, hybrid electric, plug-in hybrid electric and all-electric vehicles. An important component of the model, a weight-based distribution function of materials and associated transformation processes (casting, stamping, etc.), is developed from the United States Council for Automotive Research Generic Vehicle Life Cycle Inventory Study. As the approach is bottom-up, numerous transformation process data and plant operational data were extracted from the literature for use in representing the many operations included in the model. When the model was applied to conventional vehicles, reliable estimates of cumulative energy consumption (34 GJ/vehicle) and CO{sub 2} emission (2 tonnes/vehicle) were computed for the VMA life-cycle stage. The numerous data sets taken from the literature permitted the development of some statistics on model results. Because the model explicitly includes a greater coverage of relevant manufacturing processes than many earlier studies, our energy estimates are on the higher end of previously published values. Limitations of the model are also discussed. Because the material compositions of conventional vehicles within specific classes (cars, light duty trucks, etc.) are sensibly constant on a percent-by-weight basis, the model can be reduced to a simple linear form for each class dependent only on vehicle weight. For advanced vehicles, the material/transformation process distribution developed above needs to be adjusted for different materials and components. This is particularly so for aluminum-intensive and electric-drive vehicles. In fact, because of their comparatively high manufacturing

  7. 78 FR 4157 - Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND... Agencies and manufacturers request certification labels, track payment, track production, refund monies... INFORMATION CONTACT: Colette Pollard, Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and...

  8. Energy efficient engine component development and integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Accomplishments in the Energy Efficient Engine Component Development and Integration program during the period of April 1, 1981 through September 30, 1981 are discussed. The major topics considered are: (1) propulsion system analysis, design, and integration; (2) engine component analysis, design, and development; (3) core engine tests; and (4) integrated core/low spool testing.

  9. A study of internal structure in components made by additive manufacturing process using 3 D X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Raguvarun, K. Balasubramaniam, Krishnan Rajagopal, Prabhu; Palanisamy, Suresh; Nagarajah, Romesh; Kapoor, Ajay; Hoye, Nicholas; Curiri, Dominic

    2015-03-31

    Additive manufacturing methods are gaining increasing popularity for rapidly and efficiently manufacturing parts and components in the industrial context, as well as for domestic applications. However, except when used for prototyping or rapid visualization of components, industries are concerned with the load carrying capacity and strength achievable by additive manufactured parts. In this paper, the wire-arc additive manufacturing (AM) process based on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been examined for the internal structure and constitution of components generated by the process. High-resolution 3D X-ray tomography is used to gain cut-views through wedge-shaped parts created using this GTAW additive manufacturing process with titanium alloy materials. In this work, two different control conditions for the GTAW process are considered. The studies reveal clusters of porosities, located in periodic spatial intervals along the sample cross-section. Such internal defects can have a detrimental effect on the strength of the resulting AM components, as shown in destructive testing studies. Closer examination of this phenomenon shows that defect clusters are preferentially located at GTAW traversal path intervals. These results highlight the strong need for enhanced control of process parameters in ensuring components with minimal defects and higher strength.

  10. Language Development Component: All Day Kindergarten Program. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jessie

    This document provides the final evaluation report of the language development component of the Columbus, Ohio, Public Schools' Chapter 1 All-Day Kindergarten Program for 1989-1990. The overall goal of the program was to prepare underachieving kindergarten children for first grade. A total of 17 teachers in 17 elementary schools participated in…

  11. Language Development Component: All Day Kindergarten Program. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jessie

    An evaluation was made of the language development component of Columbus, Ohio's All Day Kindergarten Program (ADKP). The ADKP was instituted in Columbus' public schools in January, 1972, to provide a full day of instruction for underachieving kindergarten pupils. The overall goal of the program was to prepare pupils for first grade by providing…

  12. 36 CFR 72.11 - Action program components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Action program components. 72.11 Section 72.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR URBAN PARK AND RECREATION RECOVERY ACT OF 1978 Local Recovery Action Programs § 72.11...

  13. Critical Components of Effective School-Based Feeding Improvement Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Rita L.; Angell, Maureen E.

    2004-01-01

    This article identifies critical components of effective school-based feeding improvement programs for students with feeding problems. A distinction is made between typical school-based feeding management and feeding improvement programs, where feeding, independent functioning, and mealtime behaviors are the focus of therapeutic strategies.…

  14. Component test program for variable-cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, A. G.; Whitlow, J. B.; Stitt, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    Variable cycle engine (VCE) concepts for a supersonic cruise aircraft were studied. These VCE concepts incorporate unique critical components and flow path arrangements that provide good performance at both supersonic and subsonic cruise and appear to be economically and environmentally viable. Certain technologies were identified as critical to the successful development of these engine concepts and require considerable development and testing. The feasibility and readiness of the most critical VCE technologies, was assessed, a VCE component test program was initiated. The variable stream control engine (VSCE) component test program, tested and evaluated an efficient low emission duct burner and a quiet coannular ejector nozzle at the rear of a rematched F100 engine.

  15. 75 FR 54073 - Medicaid Program; Withdrawal of Determination of Average Manufacturer Price, Multiple Source Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... final rule, titled ``Medicaid Program; Prescription Drugs'' in the Federal Register (72 FR 39142...; Withdrawal of Determination of Average Manufacturer Price, Multiple Source Drug Definition, and Upper Limits... determination of average manufacturer price (AMP), and the Federal upper limits (FULs) for multiple source...

  16. Censored-Data Correlation and Principal Component Dynamic Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Maarouf; Turgeon, Andre; Stedinger, Jery R.

    1992-08-01

    A principal component stochastic dynamic programming algorithm for stochastic multireservoir hydropower system operation optimization was proposed by Saad and Turgeon (1988). The dimension of the state space of the system is reduced by using only the major principal components of the system's state as determined by a principal component analysis of the results of a deterministic optimization. A significant refinement of the procedure is to employ censored-data principal component analysis. The more sophisticated statistical analysis provides a better model of the full dynamic range of the reservoir system's state, explains more observed variability of the reservoir volumes, and provides more accurate estimates of the statistical description's parameters. In an example presented of a four-reservoir system, the first component of the censored-data principal component analysis, for a given month, explained all but 7% of the uncensored system's variability, whereas the standard analysis for the same month left 12% of the observed system's variability unexplained.

  17. A Review of Agile and Lean Manufacturing as Issues in Selected International and National Research and Development Programs and Roadmaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Helio; Putnik, Goran D.; Shah, Vaibhav

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to analyze international and national research and development (R&D) programs and roadmaps for the manufacturing sector, presenting how agile and lean manufacturing models are addressed in these programs. Design/methodology/approach: In this review, several manufacturing research and development programs and…

  18. An Analysis of National Surveys: Associate Degree Programs in Manufacturing Engineering and Related Programs. A Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathias, Elizabeth A.

    In 1993, a study was conducted to investigate the responses of associate degree programs in manufacturing and related technical programs to current technical education initiatives. The study focused on the relationships of associate degree programs to secondary and postsecondary education and industry, curricular trends, familiarity with the…

  19. Design, process development, manufacture, test and evaluation of boron-aluminum for space shuttle components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, R. A.; Niemann, J. T.; Otto, O. R.; Brown, N. M.; Heinrich, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    A multi phase boron-aluminum design and evaluation program for space shuttle components was conducted, culminating in the fabrication of a 1.22 m (48 inch) x 1.83 m (72 inch) boron-aluminum compression panel capable of distributing a point load of 1555 kN (350,000 lbs) into a uniform running load at a temperature of 589 K (600 F). This panel was of the skin-stringer construction with two intermediate frame supports; seven unidirectional stringers varied in thickness from 5 plies to 52 plies and the skin was contoured to thicknesses ranging from 10 plies to 62 plies. Both the stringers and the skin incorporated Ti-6Al-4V titanium interleaves to increase bearing and in-plane shear strength. The discrete program phases were materials evaluation, design studies, process technology development, fabrication and assembly, and test and evaluation.

  20. Status and plans of NASA's Materials Science and Manufacturing in Space (MS/MS) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. O.; Bredt, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given of a research and development program on the space shuttle mission designed to prepare the way for possible commercial manufacturing operations on permanently orbiting space stations.

  1. Enrollment Challenges and "Best Practices" of Selected Two-Year College's Electronic and Manufacturing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Gwendolyn; Hall, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    The primary purpose of the study was to identify successful electronic and manufacturing engineering programs at two-year colleges that Northeast Community College (a pseudonym) programs can be benched marked against. The project examined two-year college programs for increased enrollment and the number of graduates for the academic years 2000 to…

  2. Occupational Component. 16-Level Courses. Integrated Occupational Program. Program of Studies/Curriculum Guide. Interim-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Design Branch.

    This curriculum guide provides an overview of the 16-level occupational component of the integrated occupational program for grades 10-12 in Alberta. The integrated occupational program is a vocational education program for students who have experienced difficulty in learning. The program consists of both core and complementary courses designed to…

  3. Artificial intelligence programming languages for computer aided manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieger, C.; Samet, H.; Rosenberg, J.

    1979-01-01

    Eight Artificial Intelligence programming languages (SAIL, LISP, MICROPLANNER, CONNIVER, MLISP, POP-2, AL, and QLISP) are presented and surveyed, with examples of their use in an automated shop environment. Control structures are compared, and distinctive features of each language are highlighted. A simple programming task is used to illustrate programs in SAIL, LISP, MICROPLANNER, and CONNIVER. The report assumes reader knowledge of programming concepts, but not necessarily of the languages surveyed.

  4. NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, T.

    2000-01-01

    Low cost access to space has been a long-time goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Fastrac engine program was begun at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop a 60,000-pound (60K) thrust, liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon (LOX/RP), gas generator-cycle booster engine for a fraction of the cost of similar engines in existence. To achieve this goal, off-the-shelf components and readily available materials and processes would have to be used. This paper will present the Fastrac gas generator (GG) design and the component level hot-fire test program and results. The Fastrac GG is a simple, 4-piece design that uses well-defined materials and processes for fabrication. Thirty-seven component level hot-fire tests were conducted at MSFC's component test stand #116 (TS116) during 1997 and 1998. The GG was operated at all expected operating ranges of the Fastrac engine. Some minor design changes were required to successfully complete the test program as development issues arose during the testing. The test program data results and conclusions determined that the Fastrac GG design was well on the way to meeting the requirements of NASA's X-34 Pathfinder Program that chose the Fastrac engine as its main propulsion system.

  5. Language Development Component: All Day Kindergarten Program. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jessie

    The language development component of Columbus, Ohio's All Day Kindergarten Program (ADKP) was evaluated. The ADKP was instituted in Columbus' public schools in January, 1972, to provide a full day of instruction for underachieving kindergarten pupils. In the 1988-89 school year, 18 teachers served in 18 elementary schools that were eligible for…

  6. Partial Component Analysis of a Comprehensive Smoking Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horan, John J.; Hackett, Gail

    The effects of a comprehensive program for the treatment of cigarette addiction were investigated. Subjects were 18 university students and 12 community members. Abstinence levels of 40 percent, verified by expired air carbon monoxide tests, were achieved in a six to nine month follow-up period. A partial component analysis revealed that the…

  7. Energy efficient engine. Volume 1: Component development and integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Technology for achieving lower installed fuel consumption and lower operating costs in future commercial turbofan engines are developed, evaluated, and demonstrated. The four program objectives are: (1) propulsion system analysis; (2) component analysis, design, and development; (3) core design, fabrication, and test; and (4) integrated core/low spoon design, fabrication, and test.

  8. NASALIFE - Component Fatigue and Creep Life Prediction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2014-01-01

    NASALIFE is a life prediction program for propulsion system components made of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading and creep rupture conditions. Although the primary focus was for CMC components, the underlying methodologies are equally applicable to other material systems as well. The program references empirical data for low cycle fatigue (LCF), creep rupture, and static material properties as part of the life prediction process. Multiaxial stresses are accommodated by Von Mises based methods and a Walker model is used to address mean stress effects. Varying loads are reduced by the Rainflow counting method or a peak counting type method. Lastly, damage due to cyclic loading and creep is combined with Minor's Rule to determine damage due to cyclic loading, damage due to creep, and the total damage per mission and the number of potential missions the component can provide before failure.

  9. SAS program for quantitative stratigraphic correlation by principal components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hohn, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    A SAS program is presented which constructs a composite section of stratigraphic events through principal components analysis. The variables in the analysis are stratigraphic sections and the observational units are range limits of taxa. The program standardizes data in each section, extracts eigenvectors, estimates missing range limits, and computes the composite section from scores of events on the first principal component. Provided is an option of several types of diagnostic plots; these help one to determine conservative range limits or unrealistic estimates of missing values. Inspection of the graphs and eigenvalues allow one to evaluate goodness of fit between the composite and measured data. The program is extended easily to the creation of a rank-order composite. ?? 1985.

  10. The Evaluation and Research of Multi-Project Programs: Program Component Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.

    1977-01-01

    It is difficult to base evaluations on concepts irrelevant to state policy making. Evaluation of a multiproject program requires both time and differentiation of method. Data from the California Early Childhood Program illustrate process variables for program component analysis, and research questions for intraprogram comparison. (CP)

  11. Southern Pennsylvania's Industrial Pipeline: "Pathways" Program Helps Local Manufacturers Find Quality Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, John; Girifalco, Tony; Yakabosky, Walt

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the Applied Engineering Technology (AET) Career and Educational Pathways Program, which helps local manufacturers find quality workers. The program features 32 high schools, three community colleges, and 10 four-year institutions offering an integrated regional system of applied engineering education. The goal is to enroll…

  12. An Introduction to Intelligent Processing Programs Developed by the Air Force Manufacturing Technology Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Paul G.; Sny, Linda C.

    1992-01-01

    The Air Force has numerous on-going manufacturing and integration development programs (machine tools, composites, metals, assembly, and electronics) which are instrumental in improving productivity in the aerospace industry, but more importantly, have identified strategies and technologies required for the integration of advanced processing equipment. An introduction to four current Air Force Manufacturing Technology Directorate (ManTech) manufacturing areas is provided. Research is being carried out in the following areas: (1) machining initiatives for aerospace subcontractors which provide for advanced technology and innovative manufacturing strategies to increase the capabilities of small shops; (2) innovative approaches to advance machine tool products and manufacturing processes; (3) innovative approaches to advance sensors for process control in machine tools; and (4) efforts currently underway to develop, with the support of industry, the Next Generation Workstation/Machine Controller (Low-End Controller Task).

  13. Understanding science teacher enhancement programs: Essential components and a model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, Samuel Albert

    Researchers and practioners alike recognize that "the national goal that every child in the United States has access to high-quality school education in science and mathematics cannot be realized without the availability of effective professional development of teachers" (Hewson, 1997, p. 16). Further, there is a plethora of reports calling for the improvement of professional development efforts (Guskey & Huberman, 1995; Kyle, 1995; Loucks-Horsley, Hewson, Love, & Stiles, 1997). In this study I analyze a successful 3-year teacher enhancement program, one form of professional development, to: (1) identify essential components of an effective teacher enhancement program; and (2) create a model to identify and articulate the critical issues in designing, implementing, and evaluating teacher enhancement programs. Five primary sources of information were converted into data: (1) exit questionnaires, (2) exit surveys, (3) exit interview transcripts, (4) focus group transcripts, and (5) other artifacts. Additionally, a focus group was used to conduct member checks. Data were analyzed in an iterative process which led to the development of the list of essential components. The Components are categorized by three organizers: Structure (e.g., science research experience, a mediator throughout the program), Context (e.g., intensity, collaboration), and Participant Interpretation (e.g., perceived to be "safe" to examine personal beliefs and practices, actively engaged). The model is based on: (1) a 4-year study of a successful teacher enhancement program; (2) an analysis of professional development efforts reported in the literature; and (3) reflective discussions with implementors, evaluators, and participants of professional development programs. The model consists of three perspectives, cognitive, symbolic interaction, and organizational, representing different viewpoints from which to consider issues relevant to the success of a teacher enhancement program. These

  14. Designing ceramic components with the CARES computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Manderscheid, Jane M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1989-01-01

    NASA-Lewis has developed a public-domain computer program, designated 'Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures' (CARES) for calculating the fast-fracture reliability of macroscopically isotropic ceramic components subjected to the complex thermomechanical loadings typical of heat engines. The design methodology employed by CARES encompasses linear elastic fracture mechanics theory, extreme value statistics, and material microstructures; component integrity is conceived as a function of the entire field solution of the stresses, rather than being based solely on the most highly stressed point.

  15. Commercial Electric Vehicle (EV) Development and Manufacturing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Leeve, Dion

    2014-06-30

    Navistar with the Department of Energy’s assistance undertook this effort to achieve the project objectives as listed in the next section. A wholly owned subsidiary of Navistar, Workhorse Sales Corporation was the original grant awardee and upon their discontinuation as a standalone business entity, Navistar assumed the role of principal investigator. The intent of the effort, as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) was to produce zero emission vehicles that could meet the needs of the marketplace while reducing carbon emissions to zero. This effort was predicated upon the assumption that concurrent development activities in the lithium ion battery industry investigations would significantly increase their production volumes thus leading to substantial reductions in their manufacturing costs. As a result of this development effort much was learned about the overall system compatibility between the electric motor, battery pack, and charging capabilities. The original system was significantly revised and improved during the execution of this development effort. The overall approach that was chosen was to utilize a British zero emissions, class 2 truck that had been developed for their market, homologate it and modify it to meet the product requirements as specified in the grant details. All of these specific goals were achieved. During the course of marketing and selling the product valuable information was obtained as relates to customer expectations, price points, and product performance expectations, specifically those customer expectations about range requirements in urban delivery situations. While the grant requirements specified a range of 100 miles on a single charge, actual customer usage logs indicate a range of 40 miles or less is typical for their applications. The price point, primarily due to battery pack costs, was significantly higher than the mass market could bear. From Navistar’s and the overall industry’s perspective

  16. Multiple polymersomes for programmed release of multiple components.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Shum, Ho Cheung; Kim, Jin Woong; Cho, Jun-Cheol; Weitz, David A

    2011-09-28

    Long-term storage and controlled release of multiple components while avoiding cross-contamination have potentially important applications for pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Polymersomes are very promising delivery vehicles but cannot be used to encapsulate multiple independent components and release them in a controlled manner. Here, we report a microfluidic approach to produce multiple polymersomes, or polymersomes-in-polymersome by design, enabling encapsulation and programmed release of multiple components. Monodisperse polymersomes are prepared from templates of double-emulsion drops, which in turn are injected as the innermost phase to form the second level of double-emulsion drops, producing double polymersomes. Using the same strategy, higher-order polymersomes are also prepared. In addition, incorporation of hydrophobic homopolymer into the different bilayers of the multiple polymersomes enables controlled and sequential dissociation of the different bilayer membranes in a programmed fashion. The high encapsulation efficiency of this microfluidic approach, as well as its programmability and the biocompatibility of the materials used to form the polymersomes, will provide new opportunities for practical delivery systems of multiple components. PMID:21838246

  17. Multiple polymersomes for programmed release of multiple components.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Shum, Ho Cheung; Kim, Jin Woong; Cho, Jun-Cheol; Weitz, David A

    2011-09-28

    Long-term storage and controlled release of multiple components while avoiding cross-contamination have potentially important applications for pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Polymersomes are very promising delivery vehicles but cannot be used to encapsulate multiple independent components and release them in a controlled manner. Here, we report a microfluidic approach to produce multiple polymersomes, or polymersomes-in-polymersome by design, enabling encapsulation and programmed release of multiple components. Monodisperse polymersomes are prepared from templates of double-emulsion drops, which in turn are injected as the innermost phase to form the second level of double-emulsion drops, producing double polymersomes. Using the same strategy, higher-order polymersomes are also prepared. In addition, incorporation of hydrophobic homopolymer into the different bilayers of the multiple polymersomes enables controlled and sequential dissociation of the different bilayer membranes in a programmed fashion. The high encapsulation efficiency of this microfluidic approach, as well as its programmability and the biocompatibility of the materials used to form the polymersomes, will provide new opportunities for practical delivery systems of multiple components.

  18. Onsite 40-kilowatt fuel cell power plant manufacturing and field test program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-02-01

    A joint Gas Research Institute and U.S. Department of Energy Program was initiated in 1982 to evaluate the use of fuel cell power systems for on-site energy service. Forty-six 40 kW fuel cell power plants were manufactured at the United Technologies Corporation facility in South Windsor, Connecticut, and are being delivered to host utilities and other program participants in the United States and Japan for field testing. The construction of the 46 fully-integrated power plants was completed in January 1985 within the constraints of the contract plan. The program has provided significant experience in the manufacture, acceptance testing, deployment, and support of on-site fuel cell systems. Initial field test results also show that these experimental power plants meet the performance and environmental requirements of a commercial specification. This Interim Report encompasses the design and manufacturing phases of the 40 kW Power Plant Manufacturing and Field Test program. The contract between UTC and NASA also provides UTC field engineering support to the host utilities, training programs and associated manuals for utility operating and maintenance personnel, spare parts support for a defined test period, and testing at UTC of a power plant made available from a preceding program phase. These activities are ongoing and will be reported subsequently.

  19. Onsite 40-kilowatt fuel cell power plant manufacturing and field test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A joint Gas Research Institute and U.S. Department of Energy Program was initiated in 1982 to evaluate the use of fuel cell power systems for on-site energy service. Forty-six 40 kW fuel cell power plants were manufactured at the United Technologies Corporation facility in South Windsor, Connecticut, and are being delivered to host utilities and other program participants in the United States and Japan for field testing. The construction of the 46 fully-integrated power plants was completed in January 1985 within the constraints of the contract plan. The program has provided significant experience in the manufacture, acceptance testing, deployment, and support of on-site fuel cell systems. Initial field test results also show that these experimental power plants meet the performance and environmental requirements of a commercial specification. This Interim Report encompasses the design and manufacturing phases of the 40 kW Power Plant Manufacturing and Field Test program. The contract between UTC and NASA also provides UTC field engineering support to the host utilities, training programs and associated manuals for utility operating and maintenance personnel, spare parts support for a defined test period, and testing at UTC of a power plant made available from a preceding program phase. These activities are ongoing and will be reported subsequently.

  20. The data collection component of the Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Glantz, C.S.; Islam, M.M.

    1988-09-01

    An intensive program of meteorological monitoring is in place at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Program involves the measurement, observation, and storage of various meteorological data; continuous monitoring of regional weather conditions by a staff of professional meteorologists; and around-the-clock forecasting of weather conditions for the Hanford Site. The objective of this report is to document the data collection component of the program. In this report, each meteorological monitoring site is discussed in detail. Each site's location and instrumentation are described and photographs are presented. The methods for processing and communicating data to the Hanford Meteorology Station are also discussed. Finally, the procedures followed to maintain and calibrate these instruments are presented. 2 refs., 83 figs., 15 tabs.

  1. Environmental research brief: Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of components for outboard motors

    SciTech Connect

    Jendrucko, R.J.; Coleman, T.N.; Looby, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a Pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacture who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lac the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) we established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures outboard motors for water craft. Three basic subunits received from other manufacturing plants undergo primarily painting and assembly operations in order to produce the final product. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that paint overspray waste and spent clean-up solvent are generated in large quantities and that significant cost savings could be achieved by installing robotic paint application equipment. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF REBUILT RAILWAY CARS AND COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium- size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of hazardous waste but lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at se...

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: WASTE MINIMIZATION FOR A MANUFACTURER OF COMPRESSED AIR EQUIPMENT COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of hazardous waste but lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at sel...

  4. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program Specification Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hewes, T.; Peeks, B.

    2013-02-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  5. Low-cost manufacturing of the point focus concentrating module and its key component, the Fresnel lens. Final subcontract report, 31 January 1991--6 May 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Saifee, T.; Konnerth, A. III

    1991-11-01

    Solar Kinetics, Inc. (SKI) has been developing point-focus concentrating PV modules since 1986. SKI is currently in position to manufacture between 200 to 600 kilowatts annually of the current design by a combination of manual and semi-automated methods. This report reviews the current status of module manufacture and specifies the required approach to achieve a high-volume manufacturing capability and low cost. The approach taken will include process development concurrent with module design for automated manufacturing. The current effort reviews the major manufacturing costs and identifies components and processes whose improvements would produce the greatest effect on manufacturability and cost reduction. The Fresnel lens is one such key component. Investigating specific alternative manufacturing methods and sources has substantially reduced the lens costs and has exceeded the DOE cost-reduction goals. 15 refs.

  6. Advanced component research in the solar thermal program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. T.

    The capabilities, equipment, and programs of the DoE advanced components test facility (ACTF) for developing solar thermal technologies are reviewed. The ACTF has a heliostat field, a rigid structural steel test tower at the geometric center of the heliostat field, an experiment platform on the tower, a heat rejection system, and computerized instrumentation. Tests have been performed on a directly-heated fluidized-bed solar receiver, a high pressure single-pass-to-superheat steam generator, a liquid Na heat pipe receiver, a flash pyrolysis biomass gasifier, and a grid-connected Stirling engine powered electrical generator. Helium served as the 720 C working fluid in the Stirling engine, and 18.8 kWe continuous was produced for the grid. Verified components qualified for further development are subjected to larger scale testing at a 5 MW facility in Albuquerque, NM.

  7. The Expedited Remedial Action Program: A case study. The Alhambra Front Street manufactured gas plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Padleschat, J.A.; McMahon, T.D.

    1996-12-31

    Early in 1995, the Department of Toxic Substances Control asked Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas) to enter one of its manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites into the new Expedited Remedial Action Program (ERAP). SoCalGas initially was not enthusiastic about the new program. Nevertheless, SoCalGas submitted an application for its Alhambra MGP site to be selected for the ERAP. The Alhambra Site was accepted into ERAP in November 1995, and was the first ERAP site to have orphan shares. MGP sites are well suited to the ERAP. They often involve few potentially responsible parties and can be expected to have the same primary contaminants: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which are a byproduct of the gas manufacturing process, and petroleum hydrocarbons from the crude oil feedstock used to manufacture the gas.

  8. Development of an Off-Campus 2+2 Manufacturing Program: Case Study of an Innovative Educational Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Todd; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A 2 + 2 manufacturing program enables students to receive associate degrees from colleges in the Lima, Ohio, area. They then can take upper level courses offered by Bowling Green State University and the Ohio State University. The schools responded to requests by Westinghouse and others in the community to prepare employees with necessary skills.…

  9. NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, Tim; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This presentation consists of viewgraph which review the test program and the results of the tests for the Gas Generator (GG) component for the Fastrac Engine. Included are pictures of the Fastrac (MC-1) Engine and the GG, diagrams of the flight configuration, and schematics of the LOX, and the RP-1 systems and the injector assembly. The normal operating parameters are reviewed, as are the test instrumentation. Also shown are graphs of the hot gas temperature, and the test temperature profiles. The results are summarized.

  10. Global R&D through the Intelligent Manufacturing Systems (IMS) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huray, Paul G.

    1997-01-01

    The industry-led, international intelligent manufacturing systems (IMS) program provides a special vehicle for joint research and development between government, industry and academia in the United States, Canada, Japan, Australia, and Europe. Since its beginning in 1989, the IMS program has progressed through a feasibility phase which demonstrated that international legal barriers, trade issues, and intellectual property problems could be overcome. The program is constructed to provide higher quality design, customized products, shorter delivery cycles and lower costs. Interactions between partner companies have led to new business opportunities for mutual profit and some claim to have learned strategic information about their international competitors. The IMS program is growing through the participation of hundreds of corporate and university partners who share responsibilities in specific projects and jointly reap benefits for their manufacturing products and processes. The logic for choosing or not choosing the IMS mechanisms will be discussed and R and D projects will be identified.

  11. Engineering Technology Programs Courses Guide for Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This guide describes the requirements for courses in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) that are part of engineering technology programs conducted in vocational-technical schools in Georgia. The guide is organized in five sections. The first section provides a rationale for occupations in design and in production,…

  12. Assembling a Career: Labor Market Outcomes for Manufacturing Program Students in Two-Year Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheny, Christopher J.; Chan, Hsun-yu; Wang, Xueli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Research on labor market outcomes for individuals who enroll in technical colleges is limited, with even less attention to the effects of short-term certificates than associate degrees. Also, despite the importance of manufacturing programs, there is a lack of research on employment outcomes for individuals who enroll in these programs…

  13. Evaluation Of Electrochemical Machining Technology For Surface Improvements In Additive Manufactured Components

    SciTech Connect

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Carver, Keith

    2015-09-23

    ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration Facility worked with ECM Technologies LLC to investigate the use of precision electro-chemical machining technology to polish the surface of parts created by Arcam electron beam melting. The goals for phase one of this project have been met. The project goal was to determine whether electro-chemical machining is a viable method to improve the surface finish of Inconel 718 parts fabricated using the Arcam EBM method. The project partner (ECM) demonstrated viability for parts of both simple and complex geometry. During the course of the project, detailed process knowledge was generated. This project has resulted in the expansion of United States operations for ECM Technologies.

  14. A Structured Security Assessment Methodology for Manufacturers of Critical Infrastructure Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstetter, Thomas; Knorr, Konstantin; Rosenbaum, Ute

    Protecting our critical infrastructures like energy generation and distribution, telecommunication, production and traffic against cyber attacks is one of the major challenges of the new millennium. However, as security is such a complex and multilayer topic often the necessary structured foundation is missing for a manufacturer to assess the current security level of a system. This paper introduces a methodology for structured security assessments which has been successfully applied during the development of several products for critical infrastructures. The methodology is described in detail and the lessons learnt are given from applying it to several systems during their development.

  15. Roadmap for Lean implementation in Indian automotive component manufacturing industry: comparative study of UNIDO Model and ISM Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, J. R.; Mantha, S. S.; Rane, S. B.

    2014-07-01

    The demands for automobiles increased drastically in last two and half decades in India. Many global automobile manufacturers and Tier-1 suppliers have already set up research, development and manufacturing facilities in India. The Indian automotive component industry started implementing Lean practices to fulfill the demand of these customers. United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) has taken proactive approach in association with Automotive Component Manufacturers Association of India (ACMA) and the Government of India to assist Indian SMEs in various clusters since 1999 to make them globally competitive. The primary objectives of this research are to study the UNIDO-ACMA Model as well as ISM Model of Lean implementation and validate the ISM Model by comparing with UNIDO-ACMA Model. It also aims at presenting a roadmap for Lean implementation in Indian automotive component industry. This paper is based on secondary data which include the research articles, web articles, doctoral thesis, survey reports and books on automotive industry in the field of Lean, JIT and ISM. ISM Model for Lean practice bundles was developed by authors in consultation with Lean practitioners. The UNIDO-ACMA Model has six stages whereas ISM Model has eight phases for Lean implementation. The ISM-based Lean implementation model is validated through high degree of similarity with UNIDO-ACMA Model. The major contribution of this paper is the proposed ISM Model for sustainable Lean implementation. The ISM-based Lean implementation framework presents greater insight of implementation process at more microlevel as compared to UNIDO-ACMA Model.

  16. Evaluation of the Missouri WIC program: prenatal components.

    PubMed

    Stockbauer, J W

    1986-01-01

    A study was performed to evaluate the prenatal components of the Missouri Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Program. The study used WIC prenatal participants delivering in 1980 and their offspring's birth/fetal death certificates. A 93% match rate was acquired with a final study population of 6,732. Three basic methods of overall analysis were used to acquire a comparison group: covariate analysis, standardization, and pair matching. A higher mean birth weight was noted for the WIC total and WIC non-white group when the method of analysis was covariate or standardization; the latter was statistically significant. In either instance, the amount of increase was small. A reduced low-birth-weight rate was noted for the WIC total and the WIC non-white group regardless of the method of analysis used; the differences were statistically significant for the standardization method. Duration in WIC had a positive influence on both mean birth weight and low birth weight, regardless of race. High-risk groups used for program participation also were analyzed. Overall, this study showed that WIC prenatal nutritional supplementation has a positive, though not conclusive, impact on reducing low birth weight and raising mean birth weight.

  17. Small manufacturer concerns. [Potential impacts of DOE's certification and enforcement programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-04

    Visits were made to 4 small manufacturers to ascertain the potential impacts on small consumer-product manufacturers of the certification and enforcement portions of DOE's energy-efficiency-standards program. Particular concern was expressed about the possible need for large capital investments in new test facilities in which to perform the tests and the extent to which manufacturer test facilities and technical staff may be diverted from necessary research and development and quality-control activities. Subsequent to the visits, several requirements were added to the proposed rule for the retention of units of covered basic models, involving such actions as retaining the certification batch sample for various times and measured efficiencies. Discussions and results of the visits are presented in the appendices.

  18. Rapid bonding of polydimethylsiloxane to stereolithographically manufactured epoxy components using a photogenerated intermediary layer.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Elisabeth; Neumann, Christiane; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Schmitt, Tobias; Länge, Kerstin; Rapp, Bastian E

    2013-06-21

    We describe a low cost, photo-induced, room-temperature bonding technique for bonding epoxy components to flexible PDMS membranes in less than half an hour. Bond strengths (~350 kPa) were characterized by ISO-conform tensile testing for a popular stereolithography resin and found comparable bond strengths as reported for PDMS/PDMS bonds.

  19. Rapid bonding of polydimethylsiloxane to stereolithographically manufactured epoxy components using a photogenerated intermediary layer.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Elisabeth; Neumann, Christiane; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Schmitt, Tobias; Länge, Kerstin; Rapp, Bastian E

    2013-06-21

    We describe a low cost, photo-induced, room-temperature bonding technique for bonding epoxy components to flexible PDMS membranes in less than half an hour. Bond strengths (~350 kPa) were characterized by ISO-conform tensile testing for a popular stereolithography resin and found comparable bond strengths as reported for PDMS/PDMS bonds. PMID:23645317

  20. Advanced diesel engine component development program, tasks 4-14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, Tony S.; Weber, Karen E.

    1994-11-01

    This report summarizes the Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development (ADECD) Program to develop and demonstrate critical technology needed to advance the heavy-duty low heat rejection engine concept. Major development activities reported are the design, analysis, and fabrication of monolithic ceramic components; vapor phase and solid film lubrication; electrohydraulic valve actuation; and high pressure common rail injection. An advanced single cylinder test bed was fabricated as a laboratory tool in studying these advanced technologies. This test bed simulates the reciprocator for a system having no cooling system, turbo compounding, Rankine bottoming cycle, common rail injection, and variable valve actuation to achieve fuel consumption of 160 g/kW-hr (.26 lb/hp-hr). The advanced concepts were successfully integrated into the test engine. All ceramic components met their functional and reliability requirements. The firedeck, cast-in-place ports, valves, valve guides, piston cap, and piston ring were made from silicon nitride. Breakthroughs required to implement a 'ceramic' engine included the fabrication of air-gap cylinder heads, elimination of compression gaskets, machining of ceramic valve seats within the ceramic firedeck, fabrication of cast-in-place ceramic port liners, implementation of vapor phase lubrication, and elimination of the engine coolant system. Silicon nitride valves were successfully developed to meet several production abuse test requirements and incorporated into the test bed with a ceramic valve guide and solid film lubrication. The ADECD cylinder head features ceramic port shields to increase insulation and exhaust energy recovery. The combustion chamber includes a ceramic firedeck and piston cap. The tribological challenge posed by top ring reversal temperatures of 550 C was met through the development of vapor phase lubrication using tricresyl phosphate at the ring-liner interface. A solenoid-controlled, variable valve actuation system

  1. Advanced diesel engine component development program, tasks 4-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaushal, Tony S.; Weber, Karen E.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development (ADECD) Program to develop and demonstrate critical technology needed to advance the heavy-duty low heat rejection engine concept. Major development activities reported are the design, analysis, and fabrication of monolithic ceramic components; vapor phase and solid film lubrication; electrohydraulic valve actuation; and high pressure common rail injection. An advanced single cylinder test bed was fabricated as a laboratory tool in studying these advanced technologies. This test bed simulates the reciprocator for a system having no cooling system, turbo compounding, Rankine bottoming cycle, common rail injection, and variable valve actuation to achieve fuel consumption of 160 g/kW-hr (.26 lb/hp-hr). The advanced concepts were successfully integrated into the test engine. All ceramic components met their functional and reliability requirements. The firedeck, cast-in-place ports, valves, valve guides, piston cap, and piston ring were made from silicon nitride. Breakthroughs required to implement a 'ceramic' engine included the fabrication of air-gap cylinder heads, elimination of compression gaskets, machining of ceramic valve seats within the ceramic firedeck, fabrication of cast-in-place ceramic port liners, implementation of vapor phase lubrication, and elimination of the engine coolant system. Silicon nitride valves were successfully developed to meet several production abuse test requirements and incorporated into the test bed with a ceramic valve guide and solid film lubrication. The ADECD cylinder head features ceramic port shields to increase insulation and exhaust energy recovery. The combustion chamber includes a ceramic firedeck and piston cap. The tribological challenge posed by top ring reversal temperatures of 550 C was met through the development of vapor phase lubrication using tricresyl phosphate at the ring-liner interface. A solenoid-controlled, variable valve actuation system

  2. Recommendations for strengthening the infrared technology component of any condition monitoring program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, Jack R., Jr.; Young, R. K.

    1999-03-01

    This presentation provides insights of a long term 'champion' of many condition monitoring technologies and a Level III infra red thermographer. The co-authors present recommendations based on their observations of infra red and other components of predictive, condition monitoring programs in manufacturing, utility and government defense and energy activities. As predictive maintenance service providers, trainers, informal observers and formal auditors of such programs, the co-authors provide a unique perspective that can be useful to practitioners, managers and customers of advanced programs. Each has over 30 years experience in the field of machinery operation, maintenance, and support the origins of which can be traced to and through the demanding requirements of the U.S. Navy nuclear submarine forces. They have over 10 years each of experience with programs in many different countries on 3 continents. Recommendations are provided on the following: (1) Leadership and Management Support (For survival); (2) Life Cycle View (For establishment of a firm and stable foundation for a program); (3) Training and Orientation (For thermographers as well as operators, managers and others); (4) Analyst Flexibility (To innovate, explore and develop their understanding of machinery condition); (5) Reports and Program Justification (For program visibility and continued expansion); (6) Commitment to Continuous Improvement of Capability and Productivity (Through application of updated hardware and software); (7) Mutual Support by Analysts (By those inside and outside of the immediate organization); (8) Use of Multiple Technologies and System Experts to Help Define Problems (Through the use of correlation analysis of data from up to 15 technologies. An example correlation analysis table for AC and DC motors is provided.); (9) Root Cause Analysis (Allows a shift from reactive to proactive stance for a program); (10) Master Equipment Identification and Technology Application (To

  3. Energy efficient engine component development and integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the Energy Efficient Engine Component Development and Integration program is to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate the technology for achieving lower installed fuel consumption and lower operating costs in future commercial turbofan engines. Minimum goals have been set for a 12 percent reduction in thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), 5 percent reduction in direct operating cost (DOC), and 50 percent reduction in performance degradation for the Energy Efficient Engine (flight propulsion system) relative to the JT9D-7A reference engine. The Energy Efficienct Engine features a twin spool, direct drive, mixed flow exhaust configuration, utilizing an integrated engine nacelle structure. A short, stiff, high rotor and a single stage high pressure turbine are among the major enhancements in providing for both performance retention and major reductions in maintenance and direct operating costs. Improved clearance control in the high pressure compressor and turbines, and advanced single crystal materials in turbine blades and vanes are among the major features providing performance improvement. Highlights of work accomplished and programs modifications and deletions are presented.

  4. Metallurgical, manufacturing and surface finish requirements for high purity stainless steel system components.

    PubMed

    Mangan, D

    1991-01-01

    The stainless steel piping systems that distribute water for injection (WFI) and other critical fluids in pharmaceutical and biotechnology plants will be the subject of this paper. We will confine our focus to the two major components of such systems--tubing and fittings. It should be noted that the discussions here can certainly be applied in the selection of other components such as valves, filter housings, pumps, and tanks used in these industries. The purpose of this paper will be to guide user choices with regard to raw material selection, surface preparation, and surface analysis within the context of system requirements. A suggested material specification for stainless steel tubing and fittings will also be presented. PMID:1770409

  5. Low cost P/M manufacture of titanium alloy components for fatigue critical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkowitz, Stanley; Abkowitz, Susan M.; Weihrauch, Paul F.; Wells, Martin G. H.

    The technology of forming near-net shapes from blended elemental titanium P/M by the cold and hot isostatic pressing (CHIP) has proven itself capable of providing fully dense components with static and dynamic mechanical properties equivalent to wrought product. The restrictive cost-performance trade-offs are largely controlled by residual chloride content of the starting elemental titanium powder. This paper describes a study to establish a comprehensive and reliable data base of the static and dynamic mechanical properties as related to chloride impurity level. This is accomplished by a designed experiment at various chloride levels. From this data, a statistical model is developed to predict these properties across all chloride levels. This model of properties along with corresponding material cost estimates will allow designers and planners to evaluate components for application of CHIP fabricated P/M titanium alloys. The model has been applied to a specific helicopter turbine engine bearing housing.

  6. Waste-minimization assessment for a manufacturer of rebuilt railway cars and components. Environmental research brief

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, F.W.; Looby, G.P.

    1991-07-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of hazardous waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual (EPA/625/7-88/003, July 1988). The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee inspected a plant that rebuilds approximately 2,000 railway cars (open, flat, and freight) each year and that refurbishes wheel assemblies and air brake systems. The team's report, detailing their findings and recommendations, indicated that the greatest opportunities to minimize waste came from the railcar painting operation where paint and primer solids and sludge are generated. The team recommended installing an electrostatic spray paint system for priming and painting to reduce the overspray losses. The Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA's Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from the authors.

  7. Next generation grinding spindle for cost-effective manufacture of advanced ceramic components

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, J.A.; Laurich, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Finish grinding of advanced structural ceramics has generally been considered an extremely slow and costly process. Recently, however, results from the High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) program have clearly demonstrated that numerous finish-process performance benefits can be realized by grinding silicon nitride at high wheel speeds. A new, single-step, roughing-process capable of producing high-quality silicon nitride parts at high material removal rates while dramatically reducing finishing costs has been developed.

  8. Chaotic Advection in Multi-component Melts for the Manufacture of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumbrunnen, David

    2011-10-01

    Several forces arise when different liquids are placed into contact. The relative importance of these forces depends on the sizes and shapes of liquid domains and also on molecular characteristics of the liquids. When the liquids are agitated and in the absence of interdiffusion, a composite structure results that is defined by the spatial extent and size of each liquid domain in the presence of the other. Shaking a bottle with about equal parts of water and oil gives a structure that resembles a household sponge, for example. If the oil volume is much smaller than the water volume, oil droplets result instead. In polymer blends and composites, the structure can have feature sizes at the micron scale or smaller. Little has been known about the variety of structural types that can be formed because current information is based on mixing machinery that intrinsically restricts structural outcomes. This shortcoming has important consequences because physical properties of composite materials obtained by solidifying the structured liquids depend appreciably on structure characteristics. A recent approach to overcome this shortcoming makes use of chaotic advection to establish conditions that organize liquid domains into numerous thin layers. A multi-layer construction undergoes morphological changes in situ. Progressive structure development arises, whereby a specific structure leads in sequence to a morphologically different structure. A new manufacturing technology has resulted which allows control of the internal structure in extruded plastic materials. Micro- and nanostructured materials have been obtained. On-line process control allows rapid optimization of physical properties. In this presentation, the underlying physics will be described, examples of novel materials and their applications will be shown, and research opportunities will be highlighted.

  9. Tribological and mechanical performance evaluation of metal prosthesis components manufactured via metal injection molding.

    PubMed

    Melli, Virginia; Juszczyk, Mateusz; Sandrini, Enrico; Bolelli, Giovanni; Bonferroni, Benedetta; Lusvarghi, Luca; Cigada, Alberto; Manfredini, Tiziano; De Nardo, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The increasing number of total joint replacements, in particular for the knee joint, has a growing impact on the healthcare system costs. New cost-saving manufacturing technologies are being explored nowadays. Metal injection molding (MIM) has already demonstrated its suitability for the production of CoCrMo alloy tibial trays, with a significant reduction in production costs, by holding both corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. In this work, mechanical and tribological properties were evaluated on tibial trays obtained via MIM and conventional investment casting. Surface hardness and wear properties were evaluated through Vickers hardness, scratch and pin on disk tests. The MIM and cast finished tibial trays were then subjected to a fatigue test campaign in order to obtain their fatigue load limit at 5 millions cycles following ISO 14879-1 directions. CoCrMo cast alloy exhibited 514 HV hardness compared to 335 HV of MIM alloy, furthermore it developed narrower scratches with a higher tendency towards microploughing than microcutting, in comparison to MIM CoCrMo. The observed fatigue limits were (1,766 ± 52) N for cast tibial trays and (1,625 ± 44) N for MIM ones. Fracture morphologies pointed out to a more brittle behavior of MIM microstructure. These aspects were attributed to the absence of a fine toughening and surface hardening carbide dispersion in MIM grains. Nevertheless, MIM tibial trays exhibited a fatigue limit far beyond the 900 N of maximum load prescribed by ISO and ASTM standards for the clinical application of these devices.

  10. Tribological and mechanical performance evaluation of metal prosthesis components manufactured via metal injection molding.

    PubMed

    Melli, Virginia; Juszczyk, Mateusz; Sandrini, Enrico; Bolelli, Giovanni; Bonferroni, Benedetta; Lusvarghi, Luca; Cigada, Alberto; Manfredini, Tiziano; De Nardo, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The increasing number of total joint replacements, in particular for the knee joint, has a growing impact on the healthcare system costs. New cost-saving manufacturing technologies are being explored nowadays. Metal injection molding (MIM) has already demonstrated its suitability for the production of CoCrMo alloy tibial trays, with a significant reduction in production costs, by holding both corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. In this work, mechanical and tribological properties were evaluated on tibial trays obtained via MIM and conventional investment casting. Surface hardness and wear properties were evaluated through Vickers hardness, scratch and pin on disk tests. The MIM and cast finished tibial trays were then subjected to a fatigue test campaign in order to obtain their fatigue load limit at 5 millions cycles following ISO 14879-1 directions. CoCrMo cast alloy exhibited 514 HV hardness compared to 335 HV of MIM alloy, furthermore it developed narrower scratches with a higher tendency towards microploughing than microcutting, in comparison to MIM CoCrMo. The observed fatigue limits were (1,766 ± 52) N for cast tibial trays and (1,625 ± 44) N for MIM ones. Fracture morphologies pointed out to a more brittle behavior of MIM microstructure. These aspects were attributed to the absence of a fine toughening and surface hardening carbide dispersion in MIM grains. Nevertheless, MIM tibial trays exhibited a fatigue limit far beyond the 900 N of maximum load prescribed by ISO and ASTM standards for the clinical application of these devices. PMID:25577214

  11. The advanced manufacturing science and technology program. FY 95 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.

    1996-03-01

    This is the Fiscal Year 1995 Annual Report for the Advanced Manufacturing Science and Technology (AMST) sector of Los Alamos Tactical Goal 6, Industrial Partnering. During this past fiscal year, the AMST project leader formed a committee whose members represented the divisions and program offices with a manufacturing interest to examine the Laboratory`s expertise and needs in manufacturing. From a list of about two hundred interest areas, the committee selected nineteen of the most pressing needs for weapon manufacturing. Based upon Los Alamos mission requirements and the needs of the weapon manufacturing (Advanced Design and Production Technologies (ADaPT)) program plan and the other tactical goals, the committee selected four of the nineteen areas for strategic planning and possible industrial partnering. The areas selected were Casting Technology, Constitutive Modeling, Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation, and Polymer Aging and Lifetime Prediction. For each area, the AMST committee formed a team to write a roadmap and serve as a partnering technical consultant. To date, the roadmaps have been completed for each of the four areas. The Casting Technology and Polymer Aging teams are negotiating with specific potential partners now, at the close of the fiscal year. For each focus area we have created a list of existing collaborations and other ongoing partnering activities. In early Fiscal Year 1996, we will continue to develop partnerships in these four areas. Los Alamos National Laboratory instituted the tactical goals for industrial partnering to focus our institutional resources on partnerships that enhance core competencies and capabilities required to meet our national security mission of reducing the nuclear danger. The second industry sector targeted by Tactical Goal 6 was the chemical industry. Tactical Goal 6 is championed by the Industrial Partnership Office.

  12. New policy to manage tools in flexible manufacturing systems using network part programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, Andrea; Tolio, Tullio; Grieco, Antonio; Nucci, Francesco

    2000-10-01

    The high investment related to the acquisition of Flexible Manufacturing Systems forces firms to a better utilization of the machines. Different actions can be taken in order to avoid idle times of the machines: reduction of the unproductive times (time dedicated to rapid movements, tool exchange, pallet exchange, etc.), improvement of machines and, not last, a better management of the resources. The paper proposes a new policy for the management of tool operations in parallel machine FMS to minimize the idle times due to the lack of tools. The proposed policy uses new opportunities in manufacturing technology related with the use of network part programs in NC machines. It is already known in literature the potentiality of network part programs, more flexible than traditional sequential part programs that execute simply the rigid list of operations. Network part programs allow the different alternative ways to process each part. The way in which network part programs are executed by machines depends on the state of the tools and availability of the tools. The proposed method has been compared with other existing ones based on a real test case, a parallel machine FMS with two machines and a tool carrier.

  13. Potential of direct metal deposition technology for manufacturing thick functionally graded coatings and parts for reactors components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Laget, B.; Smurov, I.

    2009-03-01

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D deposition process arising from laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection to refine or refurbish parts. Recently DMD has been extended to manufacture large-size near-net-shape components. When applied for manufacturing new parts (or their refinement), DMD can provide tailored thermal properties, high corrosion resistance, tailored tribology, multifunctional performance and cost savings due to smart material combinations. In repair (refurbishment) operations, DMD can be applied for parts with a wide variety of geometries and sizes. In contrast to the current tool repair techniques such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), metal inert gas (MIG) and plasma welding, laser cladding technology by DMD offers a well-controlled heat-treated zone due to the high energy density of the laser beam. In addition, this technology may be used for preventative maintenance and design changes/up-grading. One of the advantages of DMD is the possibility to build functionally graded coatings (from 1 mm thickness and higher) and 3D multi-material objects (for example, 100 mm-sized monolithic rectangular) in a single-step manufacturing cycle by using up to 4-channel powder feeder. Approved materials are: Fe (including stainless steel), Ni and Co alloys, (Cu,Ni 10%), WC compounds, TiC compounds. The developed coatings/parts are characterized by low porosity (<1%), fine microstructure, and their microhardness is close to the benchmark value of wrought alloys after thermal treatment (Co-based alloy Stellite, Inox 316L, stainless steel 17-4PH). The intended applications concern cooling elements with complex geometry, friction joints under high temperature and load, light-weight mechanical support structures, hermetic joints, tubes with complex geometry, and tailored inside and outside surface properties, etc.

  14. Silicon Valley's Processing Needs versus San Jose State University's Manufacturing Systems Processing Component: Implications for Industrial Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obi, Samuel C.

    2004-01-01

    Manufacturing professionals within universities tend to view manufacturing systems from a global perspective. This perspective tends to assume that manufacturing processes are employed equally in every manufacturing enterprise, irrespective of the geography and the needs of the people in those diverse regions. But in reality local and societal…

  15. Advanced computational simulation for design and manufacturing of lightweight material components for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Simunovic, S.; Aramayo, G.A.; Zacharia, T.; Toridis, T.G.; Bandak, F.; Ragland, C.L.

    1997-04-01

    Computational vehicle models for the analysis of lightweight material performance in automobiles have been developed through collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, and George Washington University. The vehicle models have been verified against experimental data obtained from vehicle collisions. The crashed vehicles were analyzed, and the main impact energy dissipation mechanisms were identified and characterized. Important structural parts were extracted and digitized and directly compared with simulation results. High-performance computing played a key role in the model development because it allowed for rapid computational simulations and model modifications. The deformation of the computational model shows a very good agreement with the experiments. This report documents the modifications made to the computational model and relates them to the observations and findings on the test vehicle. Procedural guidelines are also provided that the authors believe need to be followed to create realistic models of passenger vehicles that could be used to evaluate the performance of lightweight materials in automotive structural components.

  16. Component Fragility Research Program: Phase 1, Demonstration tests: Volume 1, Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.; Shipway, G.D.; Glozman, V.

    1987-08-01

    This report describes tests performed in Phase I of the NRC Component Fragility Research Program. The purpose of these tests was to demonstrate procedures for characterizing the seismic fragility of a selected component, investigating how various parameters affect fragility, and finally using test data to develop practical fragility descriptions suitable for application in probabilistic risk assessments. A three-column motor control center housing motor controllers of various types and sizes as well as relays of different types and manufacturers was subjected to seismic input motions up to 2.5g zero period acceleration. To investigate the effect of base flexibility on the structural behavior of the MCC and on the functional behavior of the electrical devices, multiple tests were performed on each of four mounting configurations: four bolts per column with top bracking, four bolts per column with no top brace, four bolts per column with internal diagonal bracking, and two bolts per column with no top or internal bracking. Device fragility was characterized by contact chatter correlated to local in-cabinet response at the device location. Seismic capacities were developed for each device on the basis of local input motion required to cause chatter; these results were then applied to develop probabilistic fragility curves for each type of device, including estimates of the ''high-confidence low probability of failure'' capacity of each.

  17. A Comparative Study to Determine the Efficacy of Two Industrial Arts Program Approaches Upon Pupils' Attitudes Toward Manufacturing Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazzini, Phillip Albert

    This experimental study was designed to determine the differences in attitudes toward the manufacturing industry among pupils enrolled in (1) a conventional industrial arts program, (2) an innovative industrial arts program, and (3) a parochial school having no industrial arts program. A self-constructed attitude scale was administered to 128…

  18. Language Development Component: All Day Kindergarten Program. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jessie

    The All Day Kindergarten Program was instituted in the Columbus Public Schools in January, 1972, for the purpose of providing a full day of instruction for underachieving kindergarten pupils. The 1982-83 program goal was that the average language/reading growth of pupils in program attendance for at least 80 percent of the instructional period…

  19. The Work Experience Component of an Ontario College Baccalaureate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Marguerite M.; Skolnik, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges in Canada began offering baccalaureate programs in the 1990s. Presently community colleges in four of the five largest provinces of Canada are eligible to submit applications to the relevant government ministry or agency for baccalaureate programs. The authors estimate that about 135 baccalaureate programs are now being offered…

  20. Manufacturing methods and technology program for ruggedized tactical fiber optic cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J.; Hand, C.

    1981-04-01

    This report covers manufacturing methods and technology program for ruggedized tactical fiber optic cable. The scope of this effort, as reported herein, includes the following tasks and achievements: (a) Cable process optimization -- (1) Produce trial runs of confirmatory; (2) Complete lay length samples (two lays); (3) Perform optical and mechanical tests on trial confirmatory samples; and (4) Produce samples and evaluate polyurethanes (three types). (b) Use of facilities -- (1) Operate high speed strander, Kevlar braider, and extruder at production speeds. (c) Secondary performance -- (1) Evaluate low temperature performance.

  1. Arousal Model Components in Television Programming: Form Activity and Violent Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, James H., Jr.; Krull, Robert

    In research reported in this paper, an attempt was made to isolate arousal components due to the "form" of a television program from arousal components due to the "content" of the program. The following hypotheses were formulated: (1) emotional arousal will take place in programing segments depicting violent acts, (2) arousal due to the cognitive…

  2. School Counselor Beliefs about ASCA National Model School Counseling Program Components Using the SCPCS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Trish; Chen-Hayes, Stuart F.

    2008-01-01

    A study of 3,000 school counselors was undertaken to assess their beliefs about necessary components of a school counseling program. This study was part of the database that the American School Counselor Association used to develop "The ASCA National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs." The School Counseling Program Component Scale…

  3. 40 CFR 1033.645 - Non-OEM component certification program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Non-OEM component certification program. This section describes a voluntary program that allows you to... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Non-OEM component certification program. 1033.645 Section 1033.645 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  4. 40 CFR 1033.645 - Non-OEM component certification program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Non-OEM component certification program. This section describes a voluntary program that allows you to... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Non-OEM component certification program. 1033.645 Section 1033.645 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  5. 40 CFR 1033.645 - Non-OEM component certification program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Non-OEM component certification program. This section describes a voluntary program that allows you to... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Non-OEM component certification program. 1033.645 Section 1033.645 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  6. 40 CFR 1033.645 - Non-OEM component certification program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Non-OEM component certification program. This section describes a voluntary program that allows you to... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Non-OEM component certification program. 1033.645 Section 1033.645 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  7. 40 CFR 1033.645 - Non-OEM component certification program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Non-OEM component certification program. This section describes a voluntary program that allows you to... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Non-OEM component certification program. 1033.645 Section 1033.645 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  8. Turbine airfoil manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kortovich, C.

    1995-12-31

    The specific goal of this program is to define manufacturing methods that will allow single crystal technology to be applied to complex-cored airfoils components for power generation applications. Tasks addressed include: alloy melt practice to reduce the sulfur content; improvement of casting process; core materials design; and grain orientation control.

  9. Evaluating Components of Behavior-Analytic Training Programs.

    PubMed

    Blydenburg, Dana M; Diller, James W

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the consistency of behavior-analytic training with the Behavior Analysis Certification Board's task list. A survey about the content of behavior-analytic training programs was sent to Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB)-approved training program directors. There were many program directors that felt particular areas do not have sufficient coverage (e.g., Behavioral Pharmacology, Biological Bases of Behavior, Organizational Behavior Management), and several program directors reported that their course sequence does not adequately prepare students in basic research. Results suggest that the evaluation of behavior-analytic training content may be warranted. PMID:27606254

  10. Survey of the US materials processing and manufacturing in space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckannan, E. C.

    1981-01-01

    To promote potential commercial applications of low-g technology, the materials processing and manufacturing in space program is structured to: (1) analyze the scientific principles of gravitational effects on processes used in producing materials; (2) apply the research toward the technology used to control production process (on Earth or in space, as appropriate); and (3) establish the legal and managerial framework for commercial ventures. Presently federally funded NASA research is described as well as agreements for privately funded commercial activity, and a proposed academic participation process. The future scope of the program and related capabilities using ground based facilities, aircraft, sounding rockets, and space shuttles are discussed. Areas of interest described include crystal growth; solidification of metals and alloys; containerless processing; fluids and chemical processes (including biological separation processes); and processing extraterrestrial materials.

  11. Conflict Resolution Education: A Component of Peer Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayorga, Mary G.; Oliver, Marvarene

    2006-01-01

    Conflict resolution programs are one part of peer programs offered in schools to enhance the development of life skills of students. This article addresses the need for and role of conflict resolution education in the schools. It then describes several approaches to conflict resolution education. A review of outcome research concerning conflict…

  12. Commercial Video Programs: A Component to Enhance Language Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linares, H. A.

    After the passage of a resolution by the South Dakota Board of Regents to place greater emphasis on the study of foreign language, Northern State College introduced commercial video programs in Spanish for classroom use. After installing a parabolic antenna and the other necessary equipment, the department selected and edited a series of programs,…

  13. New Teacher Induction Programs in Georgia: Common Components and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Andrea Marshall

    2012-01-01

    With increasing demands on teachers, retaining new teachers has become more difficult in recent decades. New teacher induction programs appear to increase retention rates significantly among new teachers. Many states, including Georgia, have implemented induction programs to support and retain beginning teachers. In response to the Race to the Top…

  14. Root Causes of Component Failures Program: Methods and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Satterwhite, D G; Cadwallader, L C; Vesely, W E; Meale, B M

    1986-12-01

    This report contains information pertaining to definitions, methodologies, and applications of root cause analysis. Of specific interest, and highlighted throughout the discussion, are applications pertaining to current and future Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) light water reactor safety programs. These applications are discussed in view of addressing specific program issues under NRC consideration and reflect current root cause analysis capabilities.

  15. Structural Sizing of the EDIN0620 Body Components Using the APAS Structural Synthesis Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    The use of a structural synthesis computer program to design components for a heavy lift launch vehicle is defined. A loads program was used to determine the vehicle shears, bending moments, and axial loads at two design loading conditions. A comparison was made between results from the structures program and the results of a weight estimating program which used historical data in determining component weights.

  16. The Component Model of Infrastructure: A Practical Approach to Understanding Public Health Program Infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Kimberly; Rieker, Patricia P.

    2014-01-01

    Functioning program infrastructure is necessary for achieving public health outcomes. It is what supports program capacity, implementation, and sustainability. The public health program infrastructure model presented in this article is grounded in data from a broader evaluation of 18 state tobacco control programs and previous work. The newly developed Component Model of Infrastructure (CMI) addresses the limitations of a previous model and contains 5 core components (multilevel leadership, managed resources, engaged data, responsive plans and planning, networked partnerships) and 3 supporting components (strategic understanding, operations, contextual influences). The CMI is a practical, implementation-focused model applicable across public health programs, enabling linkages to capacity, sustainability, and outcome measurement. PMID:24922125

  17. A Guide for Local Nutrition Consultants on the Nutrition Component of Head Start Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Head Start Bureau.

    This handbook has been prepared as a guide for the nutritionist providing services to Head Start and other preschool day care programs. Introductory sections describe Project Head Start; the program's major components and aspects of the program; center-based, home-based, child and family development, and Child Development Associate (CDA) programs;…

  18. Attitude Control Propulsion Components, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Attitude control propulsion components are described, including hydrazine thrusters, hydrazine thruster and cold gas jet valves, and pressure and temperature transducers. Component-ordered data are presented in tabular form; the manufacturer and specific space program are included.

  19. Part A - Advanced turbine systems. Part B - Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Karnitz, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    The DOE Offices of Fossil Energy and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy have initiated a program to develop advanced turbine systems for power generation. The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for utility and industrial applications. One of the supporting elements of the ATS Program is the Materials/Manufacturing Technologies Task. The objective of this element is to address the critical materials and manufacturing issues for both industrial and utility gas turbines.

  20. A Program for the Education of Creativity and Manufacturing Ability Through Designing and Making a Stirling Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shuwei

    This paper presents a program and its results for the education of students' creativity and manufacturing ability in the graduation research. In this program, every two or three students working as a group are required to design and make a Stirling engine their selves, which has to be able to run at least 10 minutes continuously. This program has been designed to stimulate the students' creativity through the planning and designing of the engine as well as through solving almost all problems encountered, and to train their manufacturing ability by creating all the working drawings with 2D/3D-CAD, predicting the engine's performances using thermodynamics, and manufacturing most of the parts needed. Details and results of this program for the recent 7 years are reported.

  1. Family English Literacy Network Program Employability Demonstration Component. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida International Univ., Miami. Coll. of Education.

    The guide contains a competency-based English-as-a-Second-Language/literacy curriculum, including coordinated lesson plans for three instructional levels (beginning, intermediate, pre-literacy) and an employability counseling component. The curriculum is arranged in an order reflecting the job search process. The competencies in the curriculum are…

  2. Engine component improvement program: Performance improvement. [fuel consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaulay, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Fuel consumption of commercial aircraft is considered. Fuel saving and retention components for new production and retrofit of JT9D, JT8D, and CF6 engines are reviewed. The manner in which the performance improvement concepts were selected for development and a summary of the current status of each of the 16 selected concepts are discussed.

  3. Energy efficient engine component development and integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The design of an energy efficient commercial turbofan engine is examined with emphasis on lower fuel consumption and operating costs. Propulsion system performance, emission standards, and noise reduction are also investigated. A detailed design analysis of the engine/aircraft configuration, engine components, and core engine is presented along with an evaluation of the technology and testing involved.

  4. Components of a comprehensive capital equipment planning program.

    PubMed

    Gresch, Alan

    2010-01-01

    As you may have already figured out, there is crossover and gaps between all of these capital equipment components. CE often will, and proactively should, make recommendations based on the CE, clinical, and financial components but rarely has direct knowledge of the strategic element. The clinical, finance, and administrative folks likely have visibility to most of these, but may lack full awareness of at least one component. The key is to engage key stakeholders from all these critical areas and develop a process to pull all this information together in one nice, neat package. Defining the person or persons responsible for taking the lead on this in your organization will depend greatly on the organization's type and size. For a single, standalone community hospital, it will likely be the facility administrator. For an integrated delivery network (IDN), a corporate entity, led by supply chain, finance, or both, may take the lead. Your organization may also employ consultative services or software to help facilitate this function. Regardless of who takes the lead, a weighting or scoring system that assigns certain values in all the outlined component categories, is clearly defined, and is easy to understand for all the contributors will need to be developed. If you are unaware or unclear of what the process is, find out and figure out how you can be a vital contributor to the process. This is one more way you can demonstrate the value you and your department bring to your organization. PMID:20715345

  5. Essential components of a successful doctoral program in nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Anne L; Shann, Mary H; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    The Nanomedicine program at Northeastern University provides a unique interdisciplinary graduate education that combines experiential research, didactic learning, networking, and outreach. Students are taught how to apply nanoscience and nanotechnology to problems in medicine, translate basic research to the development of marketable products, negotiate ethical and social issues related to nanomedicine, and develop a strong sense of community involvement within a global perspective. Since 2006, the program has recruited 50 doctoral students from ten traditional science, technology, and engineering disciplines to participate in the 2-year specialization program. Each trainee received mentoring from two or more individuals, including faculty members outside the student’s home department and faculty members at other academic institutions, and/or clinicians. Both students and faculty members reported a significant increase in interdisciplinary scholarly activities, including publications, presentations, and funded research proposals, as a direct result of the program. Nearly 90% of students graduating with a specialization in nanomedicine have continued on to careers in the health care sector. Currently, 43% of graduates are performing research or developing products that directly involve nanomedicine. This article identifies some key elements of the Nanomedicine program, describes how they were implemented, and reports on the metrics of success. PMID:25565801

  6. Essential components of a successful doctoral program in nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    van de Ven, Anne L; Shann, Mary H; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    The Nanomedicine program at Northeastern University provides a unique interdisciplinary graduate education that combines experiential research, didactic learning, networking, and outreach. Students are taught how to apply nanoscience and nanotechnology to problems in medicine, translate basic research to the development of marketable products, negotiate ethical and social issues related to nanomedicine, and develop a strong sense of community involvement within a global perspective. Since 2006, the program has recruited 50 doctoral students from ten traditional science, technology, and engineering disciplines to participate in the 2-year specialization program. Each trainee received mentoring from two or more individuals, including faculty members outside the student's home department and faculty members at other academic institutions, and/or clinicians. Both students and faculty members reported a significant increase in interdisciplinary scholarly activities, including publications, presentations, and funded research proposals, as a direct result of the program. Nearly 90% of students graduating with a specialization in nanomedicine have continued on to careers in the health care sector. Currently, 43% of graduates are performing research or developing products that directly involve nanomedicine. This article identifies some key elements of the Nanomedicine program, describes how they were implemented, and reports on the metrics of success.

  7. Space manufacturing of surface acoustic wave devices, appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sardella, G.

    1973-01-01

    Space manufacturing of transducers in a vibration free environment is discussed. Fabrication of the masks, and possible manufacturing of the surface acoustic wave components aboard a space laboratory would avoid the inherent ground vibrations and the frequency limitation imposed by a seismic isolator pad. The manufacturing vibration requirements are identified. The concepts of space manufacturing are analyzed. A development program for manufacturing transducers is recommended.

  8. Six Components Necessary for Effective Public Health Program Implementation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Public health programs succeed and survive if organizations and coalitions address 6 key areas. (1) Innovation to develop the evidence base for action; (2) a technical package of a limited number of high-priority, evidence-based interventions that together will have a major impact; (3) effective performance management, especially through rigorous, real-time monitoring, evaluation, and program improvement; (4) partnerships and coalitions with public- and private-sector organizations; (5) communication of accurate and timely information to the health care community, decision makers, and the public to effect behavior change and engage civil society; and (6) political commitment to obtain resources and support for effective action. Programs including smallpox eradication, tuberculosis control, tobacco control, polio eradication, and others have made progress by addressing these 6 areas. PMID:24228653

  9. The Air Force Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH): Technology transfer methodology as exemplified by the radar transmit/receive module program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houpt, Tracy; Ridgely, Margaret

    1991-01-01

    The Air Force Manufacturing Technology program is involved with the improvement of radar transmit/receive modules for use in active phased array radars for advanced fighter aircraft. Improvements in all areas of manufacture and test of these modules resulting in order of magnitude improvements in the cost of and the rate of production are addressed, as well as the ongoing transfer of this technology to the Navy.

  10. Beginning Reading Instruction: Components and Features of a Research-Based Reading Program. Texas Reading Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Meant to guide administrators and teachers as they strive to meet Governor George W. Bush's goal for all students to read on grade level by the end of grade 3, this booklet presents descriptions of components of a research-based beginning reading program. The first section describes 12 essential components of a beginning reading program. In this…

  11. 32 CFR Appendix F to Part 286 - DoD Freedom of Information Act Program Components

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false DoD Freedom of Information Act Program Components F Appendix F to Part 286 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE... REGULATION Pt. 286, App. F Appendix F to Part 286—DoD Freedom of Information Act Program Components Office...

  12. 32 CFR Appendix F to Part 286 - DoD Freedom of Information Act Program Components

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false DoD Freedom of Information Act Program Components F Appendix F to Part 286 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE... REGULATION Pt. 286, App. F Appendix F to Part 286—DoD Freedom of Information Act Program Components Office...

  13. 32 CFR Appendix F to Part 286 - DoD Freedom of Information Act Program Components

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false DoD Freedom of Information Act Program Components F Appendix F to Part 286 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE... REGULATION Pt. 286, App. F Appendix F to Part 286—DoD Freedom of Information Act Program Components Office...

  14. Supplemental Instruction: An Effective Component of Student Affairs Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochenour, E. O.; Jolley, D. S.; Kaup, J. G.; Patrick, D. L.; Roach, K. D.; Wenzler, L. A.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of Supplemental Instruction (SI) using 11,390 participants in eight varied courses at a large Rocky Mountain research university. Results indicate that students participating in SI earned higher average course grades than non-participating students. Findings portray SI as an effective program that can enhance student…

  15. Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Solvent Substitution Program/switch tube assemblies final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, E.P.; Ohlhausen, J.A.; Peebles, D.E.; Benkovich, M.G.

    1995-06-01

    As part of an Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing (ECM) Program, a study was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to identify an alternative cleaning process that would effectively replace trichloroethylene (TCE) for cleaning mechanical piece parts of Switch Tube assemblies. Eight aqueous alkaline cleaners, as well as an isopropyl alcohol and isopropyl alcohol/Cyclohexane cleaning process, were studied as potential replacements. Cleaning efficacy, materials compatibility, etch rate and corrosion studies were conducted and used to screen potential candidates. Cleaning efficacy was determined using visual examination, goniometer/contact angle measurements, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy and an evaporative rate analysis technique known as MESERAN Surface Analysis. Several cleaners were identified as potential replacements for TCE based solely on the cleaning efficacy results. Some of the cleaners, however, left undesirable residues studies were completed, Brulin 815GD (an aqueous alkaline cleaner) was selected as the replacement for TCE.

  16. Effects of a mental health training program for manufacturing company managers.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Kazunori; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Tatsuji; Mafune, Kosuke; Hiro, Hisanori; Nagata, Shoji

    2010-06-01

    We practiced interventional approaches for the promotion of occupational mental health in a manufacturing company with approximately 2,000 workers, between 2005 and 2007. We investigated the long-term effects of our mental health training program--including Active Listening (AL) training for managers--on perceived job stressors, stress reactions and social supports of workers, and mental sick leave. We conducted the mental health training program with AL training for all managers in order to improve their communication skills and support for workers. The investigation was conducted using the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ). In addition, we surveyed the number of workers taking sick leave due to mental problems from 2003 to 2007. Among the categories of "job stressors" in the BJSQ, the scores for "quantitative workload," "qualitative workload" and "physical demands" improved significantly after our interventional approaches. The number of workers taking sick leave had been increasing gradually from 2003 to 2005, but this decreased by approximately half in 2006 and 2007. Our mental health training programs for managers were successful in decreasing some job stressors, stress reactions, and workers' sick leave due to mental problems.

  17. Arthropod Surveillance Programs: Basic Components, Strategies, and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rochon, Kateryn; Duehl, Adrian J.; Anderson, John F.; Barrera, Roberto; Su, Nan-Yao; Gerry, Alec C.; Obenauer, Peter J.; Campbell, James F.; Lysyk, Tim J.; Allan, Sandra A.

    2015-01-01

    Effective entomological surveillance planning stresses a careful consideration of methodology, trapping technologies, and analysis techniques. Herein, the basic principles and technological components of arthropod surveillance plans are described, as promoted in the symposium “Advancements in arthropod monitoring technology, techniques, and analysis” presented at the 58th annual meeting of the Entomological Society of America in San Diego, CA. Interdisciplinary examples of arthropod monitoring for urban, medical, and veterinary applications are reviewed. Arthropod surveillance consists of the three components: 1) sampling method, 2) trap technology, and 3) analysis technique. A sampling method consists of selecting the best device or collection technique for a specific location and sampling at the proper spatial distribution, optimal duration, and frequency to achieve the surveillance objective. Optimized sampling methods are discussed for several mosquito species (Diptera: Culicidae) and ticks (Acari: Ixodidae). The advantages and limitations of novel terrestrial and aerial insect traps, artificial pheromones and kairomones are presented for the capture of red flour beetle (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), small hive beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), bed bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), and Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) respectively. After sampling, extrapolating real world population numbers from trap capture data are possible with the appropriate analysis techniques. Examples of this extrapolation and action thresholds are given for termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) and red flour beetles. PMID:26543242

  18. NFP promotion in the Philippines: all program components covered.

    PubMed

    1983-01-01

    At least 50 of the 105 agencies in the Philippines listed in the "Directory of Agencies with Population Activities" are actively participating in the promotion of natural family planning (NFP). Of these, 40 offer instruction on its use, 22 provide training to clinic personnel or field workers, 19 conduct information/education/communication (IEC) activities, and 6 undertake research. The Population Center Foundation's (PCF's) Information Support to Population Projects (ISP) has prepared a preliminary inventory of programs and projects on NFP, covering some of those that were done in recent years, are being implemented, or have been proposed. Some projects described in the inventory are reviewed. Recent research or research proposals are showhow related, all leading to how the method can be effectively promoted and how couples can be taught its proper use. Instruction on NFP appears in all training activities of Popcom's regional offices, particularly in their refresher courses. Program managers are being trained in managing and monitoring activities to promote the method. In 1980 outreach workers, doctors, nurses, and midwives were trained by Popcom to motivate couples to practice the method and to teach them how to use it correctly. That same year, Popcom's office in the Ilocos region introduced the rhythm dial calendar, a simplified version of the rhythm slide rule. The Ministry of Health National Family Planning Office incorporates natural family planning instruction in its training seminars for the Ministry's health personnel in the regions. As in training, all regional offices of Popcom promote NFP along with other methods that they make available to prospective acceptors. This is in keeping with the program's "cafeteria approach" to family planning. In 1982 Popcom began intensifying the provision of services in NFP, allocating around 4 million pesos to preparations for its effective promotion. In support of service delivery efforts are IEC activities such as

  19. HFIR Pressure Vessel and Structural Components Materials Surveillance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeman, E.D.; Cheverton, R.D.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1999-08-01

    A proposal has been made to increase the size of the HFIR HB-2 and HB-4 beam tubes and to extend the life of the vessel to 50 EFPY(100 MW). Studies indicate that the increase in radiation-induced embrittlement of the vessel can be tolerated, and an appropriate expanded vessel-materials surveillance program has been devised. This program, which is the subject of this report, includes additional beam-tube nozzle-material surveillance specimens, relocation of existing specimens of all materials, and additional dosimetry. As an aid in the placement of specimens and dosimeters, extensive two- and three-dimensional neutron and gamma flux/dpa transport calculations were made. Surveillance data will be added to the HFIR vessel (delta)NDTT vs dpa data base, and dosimetry will be used to normalize the calculated fluxes. The updated (delta)NDTT vs dpa correlation and the normalized dpa values will be used in the calculation of the probability of vessel failure. This procedure, in conjunction with periodic hydrostatic proof testing, is used to determine the useful life of the vessel.

  20. Small Engine Component Technology (SECT) study. Program report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almodovar, E.; Exley, T.; Kaehler, H.; Schneider, W.

    1986-01-01

    The study was conducted to identify high payoff technologies for year 2000 small gas turbine applications and to provide a technology plan for guiding future research and technology efforts. A regenerative cycle turboprop engine was selected for a 19 passenger commuter aircraft application. A series of engines incorporating eight levels of advanced technologies were studied and their impact on aircraft performance was evaluated. The study indicated a potential reduction in fuel burn of 38.3 percent. At $1.00 per gallon fuel price, a potential DOC benefit of 12.5 percent would be achieved. At $2.00 per gallon, the potential DOC benefit would increase to 17.0 percent. Four advanced technologies are recommended and appropriate research and technology programs were established to reach the year 2000 goals.

  1. SETEC/Semiconductor Manufacturing Technologies Program: 1999 Annual and Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    MCBRAYER,JOHN D.

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of work conducted by the Semiconductor Manufacturing Technologies Program at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) during 1999. This work was performed by one working group: the Semiconductor Equipment Technology Center (SETEC). The group's projects included Numerical/Experimental Characterization of the Growth of Single-Crystal Calcium Fluoride (CaF{sub 2}); The Use of High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) Imaging for Certifying Critical-Dimension Reference Materials Fabricated with Silicon Micromachining; Assembly Test Chip for Flip Chip on Board; Plasma Mechanism Validation: Modeling and Experimentation; and Model-Based Reduction of Contamination in Gate-Quality Nitride Reactor. During 1999, all projects focused on meeting customer needs in a timely manner and ensuring that projects were aligned with the goals of the National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors sponsored by the Semiconductor Industry Association and with Sandia's defense mission. This report also provides a short history of the Sandia/SEMATECH relationship and a brief on all projects completed during the seven years of the program.

  2. Language Development Component: All Day Kindergarten Program 1992-1993. Ohio Disadvantaged Pupil Program Fund. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jessie; And Others

    This report describes the All Day Kindergarten (ADK) Program undertaken at 18 elementary schools in Columbus, Ohio, and presents an evaluation of the language development component of the program. ADK provides an extra half day of instruction, using a language-based curriculum to reinforce the skills, concepts, and educational experiences taught…

  3. ATS materials/manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Karnitz, M.A.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K.

    1997-11-01

    The Materials/Manufacturing Technology subelement is a part of the base technology portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from national laboratories and universities. The projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. Work is currently ongoing on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), the scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technologies, materials characterization, and technology information exchange. This paper presents highlights of the activities during the past year. 12 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Manufacturing and producibility technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, J. D.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Activities of the manufacturing/producibility working group within the Advanced High-Pressure O2/H2 Technology Program are summarized. The objectives of the M/P working group are: to develop and evaluate process and manufacturing techniques for advanced propulsion hardware design and selected materials; and to optimize the producibility of (SSME) components and assemblies by improved performance, increased life, greater reliability, and/or reduced cost. The technologies being developed include: plasma arc, laser, and inertia welding; combustion chamber and turbine blade coatings; coating processes; high performance alloy electroforming; and process control technology.

  5. Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Elsner, N. B.; Bass, J. C.; Ghamaty, S.; Krommenhoek, D.; Kushch, A.; Snowden, D.; Marchetti, S.

    2005-03-16

    Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) is currently developing four different auxiliary generator designs that are used to convert a portion (5 to 20%) of the waste heat from vehicle engines exhaust directly to electricity. The four designs range from 200 Watts to 10 kW. The furthest along is the 1 kW Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator (DTTEG) for heavy duty Class 8 Diesel trucks, which, under this program, has been subjected to 543,000 equivalent miles of bouncing and jarring on PACCAR's test track. Test experience on an earlier version of the DTTEG on the same track showed the need for design modifications incorporated in DTTEG Mod 2, such as a heavy duty shock mounting system and reinforcement of the electrical leads mounting system, the thermocouple mounting system and the thermoelectric module restraints. The conclusion of the 543,000 mile test also pointed the way for an upgrading to heavy duty hose or flex connections for the internal coolant connections for the TEG, and consideration of a separate lower temperature cooling loop with its own radiator. Fuel savings of up to $750 per year and a three to five year payback are believed to be possible with the 5 % efficiency modules. The economics are expected to improve considerably to approach a two year payback when the 5 kW to 10 kW generators make it to the market in a few years with a higher efficiency (20%) thermoelectric module system called Quantum Wells, which are currently under development by Hi-Z. Ultimately, as automation takes over to reduce material and labor costs in the high volume production of QW modules, a one year payback for the 5 kW to10 kW generator appears possible. This was one of the stated goals at the beginning of the project. At some future point in time, with the DTTEG becoming standard equipment on all trucks and automobiles, fuel savings from the 25% conversion of exhaust heat to useable electricity nationwide equates to a 10% reduction in the 12 to 15 million barrels per day of

  6. Manufacturing and High Heat Flux Testing of Brazed Flat-Type W/CuCrZr Plasma Facing Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Youyun; Liu, Xiang; Feng, Fan; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Zhengkui; Wang, Jin; Chen, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Water-cooled flat-type W/CuCrZr plasma facing components with an interlayer of oxygen-free copper (OFC) have been developed by using vacuum brazing route. The OFC layer for the accommodation of thermal stresses was cast onto the surface of W at a temperature range of 1150 °C-1200 °C in a vacuum furnace. The W/OFC cast tiles were vacuum brazed to a CuCrZr heat sink at 940 °C using the silver-free filler material CuMnSiCr. The microstructure, bonding strength, and high heat flux properties of the brazed W/CuCrZr joint samples were investigated. The W/Cu joint exhibits an average tensile strength of 134 MPa, which is about the same strength as pure annealed copper. High heat flux tests were performed in the electron beam facility EMS-60. Experimental results indicated that the brazed W/CuCrZr mock-up experienced screening tests of up to 15 MW/m2 and cyclic tests of 9 MW/m2 for 1000 cycles without visible damage. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11205049) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2011GB110004)

  7. IMPROVEMENT OF WEAR COMPONENT'S PERFORMANCE BY UTILIZING ADVANCED MATERIALS AND NEW MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES: CASTCON PROCESS FOR MINING APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaodi Huang; Richard Gertsch

    2003-02-27

    The project was highlighted by continued fabrication of drill bit inserts and testing them: (1) The inserts were subjected to hammer tests to determine brittleness. Selected inserts experienced multiple blows from a 16 pound sledge hammer. The resulting damage was minimal. (2) Three inserts were placed on three different 16.5 inch diameter rotary drill bits, and the bits drilled taconite rock until the entire bit failed. (3) The inserts had somewhat less wear resistance than current art, and exhibited no brittle failures. (4) More work is needed to produce the inserts at near net shape. The test inserts required too much machining. The project next turned to manufacturing 6.5 inch diameter disc cutters. The cutters will feature a core of tungsten carbide (TC) in a disc body composed of H13 tool steel. The TC inserts are in manufacture and the dies for the disc are being designed. The plan for next quarter: (1) Investigate materials and manufacturing changes for the fibrous monolith drill bit inserts that will increase their wear life. (2) Begin manufacturing disc cutters.

  8. IMPROVEMENT OF WEAR COMPONENT'S PERFORMANCE BY UTILIZING ADVANCED MATERIALS AND NEW MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES: CASTCON PROCESS FOR MINING APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaodi Huang; Richard Gertsch

    2004-02-27

    In this reporting period, full disc prototype manufacturing tests continued. The disc size and HIP can problems were corrected. Unfortunately, cracking still occurred on insert interface, possibly due to oxidation film on the particle boundaries. This indicates improper off-gassing.

  9. Essential components of early intervention programs for psychosis: Available intervention services in the United States.

    PubMed

    White, Dominique A; Luther, Lauren; Bonfils, Kelsey A; Salyers, Michelle P

    2015-10-01

    Programs providing interventions for early psychosis are becoming commonplace in the United States (U.S.); however, the characteristics of existing services remain undocumented. We examined program characteristics, clinical services, and program eligibility criteria for outpatient early intervention programs across the U.S. using a semi-structured telephone interview. Content analysis was used to identify the presence or absence of program components, based in part on a recent list of essential evidence-based components recommended for early intervention programs (Addington, MacKenzie, Norman, Wang and Bond, 2013) as well as program characteristics, including eligibility criteria. A total of 34 eligible programs were identified; 31 (91.2%) program representatives agreed to be interviewed. Of the examined components, the most prevalent were individual psychoeducation and outcomes tracking; the least prevalent were outreach services and communication with inpatient units. The populations served by US programs were most frequently defined by restrictions on the duration of psychosis and age. This study provides critical feedback on services for the early psychosis population and identifies research to practice gaps and areas for future improvement.

  10. Adherence to a multi-component weight management program for Mexican American adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined weight loss among Mexican American students in a weight management program. A total of 358 participants completed a 12-week intervention that incorporated four program components: nutrition education (NE), physical activity (PA), sedentary behavior (SB), and a snacking interventi...

  11. Professional Orientation and Structural Components of Early Childhood Programs: A Social-Ecological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorde-Bloom, Paula

    A 1987 study, which involved 26 male and 805 female early childhood workers from 85 center-based programs in 20 states, was conducted to develop a social-ecological perspective on professional orientation and job satisfaction and on structural components of early childhood programs. Professional orientation is characterized by a person's emphasis…

  12. The 1991/92 graduate student researchers program, including the underrepresented minority focus component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Graduate Student Research Program (GSRP) was expanded in 1987 to include the Underrepresented Minority Focus Component (UMFC). This program was designed to increase minority participation in graduate study and research, and ultimately, in space science and aerospace technology careers. This booklet presents the areas of research activities at NASA facilities for the GSRP and summarizes and presents the objectives of the UMFC.

  13. Critical Components of a Summer Enrichment Program for Urban Low-Income Gifted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaul, Corina R.; Johnsen, Susan K.; Witte, Mary M.; Saxon, Terrill F.

    2015-01-01

    Effective program models are needed for low-income youth. This article describes one successful summer enrichment program, University for Young People's Project Promise, and outlines three key components of a Partnership for Promoting Potential in Low-Income Gifted Students (Partnership Model), which is based on Lee, Olszewski-Kubilius, and…

  14. An Inservice Program for Elementary Teachers: Components, Instructional Procedures, and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horak, Willis J.; And Others

    A description and evaluation of a year-long science in-service program for elementary teachers is provided. Consisting of three components, the program was designed to expand teachers' understandings of physics and chemistry concepts and processes and to encourage more science teaching and science activities in their classrooms. The on-campus…

  15. Summary of the NASA Lewis component technology program for Stirling power converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieme, Lanny G.; Swec, Diane M.

    1992-01-01

    An update is presented on the NASA Lewis Stirling component technology program. The component technology program has been organized as part of the NASA Lewis effort to develop Stirling converter technology for space power applications. The Stirling space power project is part of the High Capacity Power element of the NASA Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). Lewis is also providing technical management of a DOE funded project to develop Stirling converter systems for distributed dish solar terrestrial power applications. The primary contractors for the space power and solar terrestrial projects develop component technologies directly related to their project goals. This Lewis component technology program, while coordinated with these main projects, is aimed at longer term issues, advanced technologies, and independent assessments. Topics to be discussed include bearings, linear alternators, controls and load interaction, materials/life assessment, and heat exchangers.

  16. Raising the standard: changes to the Australian Code of Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) for human blood and blood components, human tissues and human cellular therapy products.

    PubMed

    Wright, Craig; Velickovic, Zlatibor; Brown, Ross; Larsen, Stephen; Macpherson, Janet L; Gibson, John; Rasko, John E J

    2014-04-01

    In Australia, manufacture of blood, tissues and biologicals must comply with the federal laws and meet the requirements of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) Manufacturing Principles as outlined in the current Code of Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). The Therapeutic Goods Order (TGO) No. 88 was announced concurrently with the new cGMP, as a new standard for therapeutic goods. This order constitutes a minimum standard for human blood, tissues and cellular therapeutic goods aimed at minimising the risk of infectious disease transmission. The order sets out specific requirements relating to donor selection, donor testing and minimisation of infectious disease transmission from collection and manufacture of these products. The Therapeutic Goods Manufacturing Principles Determination No. 1 of 2013 references the human blood and blood components, human tissues and human cellular therapy products 2013 (2013 cGMP). The name change for the 2013 cGMP has allowed a broadening of the scope of products to include human cellular therapy products. It is difficult to directly compare versions of the code as deletion of some clauses has not changed the requirements to be met, as they are found elsewhere amongst the various guidelines provided. Many sections that were specific for blood and blood components are now less prescriptive and apply to a wider range of cellular therapies, but the general overall intent remains the same. Use of 'should' throughout the document instead of 'must' allows flexibility for alternative processes, but these systems will still require justification by relevant logical argument and validation data to be acceptable to TGA. The cGMP has seemingly evolved so that specific issues identified at audit over the last decade have now been formalised in the new version. There is a notable risk management approach applied to most areas that refer to process justification and decision making. These requirements commenced on 31 May 2013 and a 12 month

  17. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program High-Performance Test Homes - Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-01

    This project represents the third phase of a multi-year effort to develop and bring to market a High Performance Manufactured Home (HPMH). In this project, the Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program worked with Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction and Bonneville Power Administration to help four factory homebuilders build prototype zero energy ready manufactured homes, resulting in what is expected to be a 30% savings relative to the Building America Benchmark. (The actual % savings varies depending on choice of heating equipment and climate zone). Previous phases of this project created a HPMH specification and prototyped individual measures from the package to obtain engineering approvals and develop preliminary factory construction processes. This case study describes the project team's work during 2014 to build prototype homes to the HPMH specifications and to monitor the homes for energy performance and durability. Monitoring is expected to continue into 2016.

  18. IMPROVEMENT OF WEAR COMPONENT'S PERFORMANCE BY UTILIZING ADVANCED MATERIALS AND NEW MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES: CASTCON PROCESS FOR MINING APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaodi Huang; Richard Gertsch

    2005-02-04

    Michigan Technological University, together with The Robbins Group, Advanced Ceramic Research, Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing, and Superior Rock Bits, evaluated a new process and a new material for producing drill bit inserts and disc cutters for the mining industry. Difficulties in the material preparation stage slowed the research initially. Prototype testing of the drill bit inserts showed that the new inserts did not perform up to the current state of the art. Due to difficulties in the prototype production of the disc cutters, the disc cutter was manufactured but not tested. Although much promising information was obtained as a result of this project, the objective of developing an effective means for producing rock drill bits and rock disc cutters that last longer, increase energy efficiency and penetration rate, and lower overall production cost was not met.

  19. A nonlinear programming optimization model to maximize net revenue in cheese manufacture.

    PubMed

    Papadatos, A; Berger, A M; Pratt, J E; Barbano, D M

    2002-11-01

    A nonlinear programming optimization model was developed to maximize net revenue in cheese manufacture and is described in this paper. The model identifies the optimal mix of milk resources together with the types of cheeses and co-products that maximize net revenue. It works in Excel while it takes the data specified by the user from a user-friendly interface created in Access. The user can specify any number of resources, cheese types, and co-products. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, we determined the impact of variation in milk price and composition in the period 1998 to 2000 on the optimal mix of resources and optimal type of co-product for Cheddar and low-moisture, part-skim Mozzarella. It was also desired to determine the impact of variation in protein content of nonfat dry milk (NDM) on net revenue, and examine the effect of reconstitution of NDM with water versus milk on net revenue. The optimal mix of resources and the net revenue markedly varied as milk resource prices and composition varied. The net revenue for Mozzarella was much higher than for Cheddar when the price of cream was high. Cheese plants that did not optimize the use of resources in response to variations in prices and composition missed a significant profit opportunity. Whey powder was more profitable than 34% whey protein concentrate and lactose in most months. The use of high-protein NDM led to an appreciable increase in net revenue. When the value of the nonfat portion of raw milk was high, reconstitution of NDM with water rather than milk markedly raised net revenue.

  20. Essential Components of Educational Programs on Biomedical Writing, Editing, and Publishing.

    PubMed

    Barroga, Edward; Vardaman, Maya

    2015-10-01

    The primary objective of educational programs on biomedical writing, editing, and publishing is to nurture ethical skills among local and international researchers and editors from diverse professional backgrounds. The mechanics, essential components, and target outcomes of these programs are described in this article. The mechanics covers the objectives, design, benefits, duration, participants and qualifications, program formats, administrative issues, and mentorship. The essential components consist of three core schedules: Schedule I Basic aspects of biomedical writing, editing, and communications; Schedule II Essential skills in biomedical writing, editing, and publishing; and Schedule III Interactive lectures on relevant topics. The target outcomes of the programs comprise knowledge acquisition, skills development, paper write-up, and journal publication. These programs add to the prestige and academic standing of the host institutions.

  1. NASTRAN Modeling of Flight Test Components for UH-60A Airloads Program Test Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idosor, Florentino R.; Seible, Frieder

    1993-01-01

    Based upon the recommendations of the UH-60A Airloads Program Review Committee, work towards a NASTRAN remodeling effort has been conducted. This effort modeled and added the necessary structural/mass components to the existing UH-60A baseline NASTRAN model to reflect the addition of flight test components currently in place on the UH-60A Airloads Program Test Configuration used in NASA-Ames Research Center's Modern Technology Rotor Airloads Program. These components include necessary flight hardware such as instrument booms, movable ballast cart, equipment mounting racks, etc. Recent modeling revisions have also been included in the analyses to reflect the inclusion of new and updated primary and secondary structural components (i.e., tail rotor shaft service cover, tail rotor pylon) and improvements to the existing finite element mesh (i.e., revisions of material property estimates). Mode frequency and shape results have shown that components such as the Trimmable Ballast System baseplate and its respective payload ballast have caused a significant frequency change in a limited number of modes while only small percent changes in mode frequency are brought about with the addition of the other MTRAP flight components. With the addition of the MTRAP flight components, update of the primary and secondary structural model, and imposition of the final MTRAP weight distribution, modal results are computed representative of the 'best' model presently available.

  2. Manual development: A strategy for identifying core components of integrated health programs.

    PubMed

    Mooss, Angela; Hartman, Megan; Ibañez, Gladys

    2015-12-01

    Integrated care models are gaining popularity as a clinical strategy to reduce costs and improve client outcomes; however, implementation of such complex models requires an understanding of programmatic core components essential to producing positive outcomes. To promote this understanding, evaluators can work collaboratively with organization staff and leaderships to gather information on program implementation, adaptations, organizational buy-in, and project outcomes. In 2011, SAMHSA funded two Miami health clinics to implement integrated care models in co-located settings. Changes in the federal healthcare landscape, non-Medicaid expansion for Florida, and the complexity of projects goals led evaluators to facilitate a core component review as part of evaluation. A manual was developed throughout the project and captured a description, adaptations, inputs needed, lessons learned, and sustainability for each integrated care component. To increase chances for program success, evaluators should institute a method to better define core components of new programs and implementation adaptations, while keeping program replication in mind. Breaking down the program structurally gave the evaluation utility for stakeholders, and ultimately served as a resource for organizations to better understand their program model. The manual also continues to serve as a dissemination and replication source for other providers looking to implement integrated care.

  3. 77 FR 26509 - Request for Information on Proposed New Program: National Network for Manufacturing Innovation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... sensors into manufacturing processes, enabling operators to make real-time use of ``big data'' flows from... empirical data that are not widely published should include copies of the referenced materials. All...

  4. 40 CFR 59.506 - How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Aerosol...

  5. 40 CFR 59.506 - How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Aerosol...

  6. 40 CFR 59.506 - How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Aerosol...

  7. 40 CFR 59.506 - How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Aerosol...

  8. 40 CFR 59.506 - How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Aerosol...

  9. The NAVIGATE Program for First Episode Psychosis: Rationale, Overview, and Description of Psychosocial Components

    PubMed Central

    Mueser, Kim T; Penn, David; Addington, Jean; Brunette, Mary F.; Gingerich, Susan; Glynn, Shirley M.; Lynde, David W.; Gottlieb, Jennifer D; Meyer-Kalos, Piper; McGurk, Susan R.; Cather, Corinne; Saade, Sylvia; Robinson, Delbert G.; Schooler, Nina R.; Rosenheck, Robert A.; Kane, John M

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive coordinated specialty care programs for first episode psychosis have been widely implemented in other countries, but not in the U.S. The National Institute of Mental Health’s (NIMH) Recovery After Initial Schizophrenia Episode (RAISE) initiative focused on the development and evaluation of first episode treatment programs designed for the U.S. healthcare system. This paper describes the background, rationale, and nature of the intervention developed by the Early Treatment Program project, the NAVIGATE program, with a particular focus on its psychosocial components. NAVIGATE is a team-based, multi-component treatment program designed to be implemented in routine mental health treatment settings and aimed at guiding people with a first episode of psychosis (and their families) towards psychological and functional health. The core services provided in the NAVIGATE program include the Family Education Program, Individual Resiliency Training, Supported Employment and Education, and Individualized Medication Treatment. NAVIGATE embraces a shared decision-making approach with a focus on strengths and resiliency, and collaboration with clients and family members in treatment planning and reviews. The NAVIGATE program has the potential to fill an important gap in the U.S. healthcare system by providing a comprehensive intervention specially designed to meet the unique treatment needs of persons recovering from a first episode of psychosis. The program is currently being evaluated in cluster randomized controlled trial comparing NAVIGATE to usual community care. PMID:25772766

  10. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K.L.

    1997-02-01

    The specific goals of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area are to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes, to construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability, to document our findings and models in journals, to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues, and to develop continuing relationships with industrial and academic communities to advance our collective understanding of fabrication processes. Advances in four projects are described here, namely Design of a Precision Saw for Manufacturing, Deposition of Boron Nitride Films via PVD, Manufacturing and Coating by Kinetic Energy Metallization, and Magnet Design and Application.

  11. Description and evaluation of the smoking cessation component of a multiple risk factor intervention program.

    PubMed

    Malotte, C K; Fielding, J E; Danaher, B G

    1981-08-01

    The smoking cessation component of a residential program which attempts to concurrently intervene on several risk factors related to chronic disease is described. Seventy-two per cent of the 43 smokers in the first 13 cohorts were abstinent at discharge. Fifty-five per cent were abstinent at two months. Six-month data for the first nine cohorts show 53 per cent abstinence. Possible advantages and disadvantages of a multiple behavior change program in a residential setting are discussed. PMID:7258447

  12. IMPROVEMENT OF WEAR COMPONENT'S PERFORMANCE BY UTILIZING ADVANCED MATERIALS AND NEW MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES: CASTCON PROCESS FOR MINING APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaodi Huang; Richard Gertsch

    2002-08-27

    The project has seen quite a bit of activity in this quarter, highlighted by the fabrication of a bit insert for field testing. In addition: (1) Several alternative process techniques were attempted to prevent bloating, cracking and delamination of FM material that occurs during binder burnout. The approaches included fabrication of FM material by three pass extrusion and warm isostatic pressing of green material, slow and confined burnouts as well as, burnout of thin plate instead of rod stock. Happily, a confined burnout followed by HIPing, produced FM button inserts without bloating or delamination. (2) Four rock bit inserts were produced from FM material and are ready for use on blast hole bits in the field. (3) Six of the project participants from Michigan Technological University, Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing, and The Robbins Group visited the Superior Rock Bit Company in Minnesota and planned the field test of FM inserts.

  13. Design, manufacture, development, test, and evaluation of boron/aluminum structural components for space shuttle. Volume 4: Repairability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. F.; Christian, J. L.; Doyal, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    The repairability of boron/aluminum structural components was investigated. It was demonstrated that metal matrix composite material, damaged in service, can be repaired by techniques that are not very different from those currently in use for conventional materials. A list of repair guidelines was prepared to aid in determining the proper repair techniques for a given structure. The guidelines include specifying types of repair material and their applicability, corrosion prevention procedures, design criteria, and inspection criteria. Boron/aluminum structural components were repaired and tested to compare as-fabricated and repaired performance. All but one set of specimens, when repaired, exceeded the strength of the original specimens.

  14. GEM detector conductor manufacturing experience

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N.N.; Pace, J.R.; Reardon, P.J.; Richied, D.E.; Camille, R.J.; Marston, P.G.; Smith, B.A.; Deis, G.A.; Bohanan, J.S.; Gertsen, J.H.

    1994-10-07

    Feasibility studies and manufacturing experience on the GEM Magnet superconductor are presented, including all components - NbTi strand, cable, conduit manufacture, cable pulling, and aluminum sheath application.

  15. A Program to Improve the Triangulated Surface Mesh Quality Along Aircraft Component Intersections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.

    2005-01-01

    A computer program has been developed for improving the quality of unstructured triangulated surface meshes in the vicinity of component intersections. The method relies solely on point removal and edge swapping for improving the triangulations. It can be applied to any lifting surface component such as a wing, canard or horizontal tail component intersected with a fuselage, or it can be applied to a pylon that is intersected with a wing, fuselage or nacelle. The lifting surfaces or pylon are assumed to be aligned in the axial direction with closed trailing edges. The method currently maintains salient edges only at leading and trailing edges of the wing or pylon component. This method should work well for any shape of fuselage that is free of salient edges at the intersection. The method has been successfully demonstrated on a total of 125 different test cases that include both blunt and sharp wing leading edges. The code is targeted for use in the automated environment of numerical optimization where geometric perturbations to individual components can be critical to the aerodynamic performance of a vehicle. Histograms of triangle aspect ratios are reported to assess the quality of the triangles attached to the intersection curves before and after application of the program. Large improvements to the quality of the triangulations were obtained for the 125 test cases; the quality was sufficient for use with an automated tetrahedral mesh generation program that is used as part of an aerodynamic shape optimization method.

  16. Importance-Performance Evaluation: A Method of Discerning Successful Program Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenhorst, Steven; Ewert, Alan

    Questionnaires completed by 53 high school age students from the Voyaguer Outward Bound School (VOBS) were analyzed to determine how well the program met the perceived needs/expectations of the students. Prior to the course, participants ranked the 17 course components in order of perceived importance, and following the course they indicated how…

  17. A Progress Report on an Exploratory Mathematics Course: Incorporating a Programming Component

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Robert; Waxman, Jerry

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on an ongoing effort to incorporate a programming component into exploratory mathematics courses and analyzes some of the many practical considerations required for successfully managing such a course in large lecture hall classes. Two pedagogical paradigms (top-down and bottom-up) are compared and contrasted for teaching Visual…

  18. The Use of Workforce Assessment as a Component of Career and Technical Education Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Kenneth R.; Schleif, Nicole L.; Bowen, Mauvalyn M.

    2011-01-01

    This research project examined the extent to which Career and Technical Education (CTE)-related programs use workforce needs assessment as a component of their evaluation activities. An employer perspective was used to develop a conceptual framework drawing on strategic human resource management theory. The extent and methods utilized for…

  19. Occupational Component. 36-Level Courses. Teacher Resource Manual. Integrated Occupational Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Branch.

    This 36-level occupational component of Integrated Occupational Program (IOP) consists of 8 occupational clusters composed of 20 occupational courses. Each course contains learning activities so that students in Alberta (Canada) may develop occupational concepts, skills, and attitudes. This teacher's manual consists of the following sections:…

  20. The Reporting of Core Program Components: An Overlooked Barrier for Moving Research into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggin, Daniel M.; Johnson, Austin H.

    2015-01-01

    The successful implementation of school-based behavioral interventions requires school personnel to be competent with program content and procedures. An unfortunate trend within school-based behavioral intervention research is that the core intervention components and implementation features are often not fully described. Without clear…

  1. Evaluation of Distance Education Components of e-MBA Program--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunes, Ali; Altintas, Tugba

    2013-01-01

    By 2008-2009 educational year, distance education e-MBA Program have been added to Graduate School of Social Sciences of Istanbul Aydin University. The distance education components that were used included asynchronous education, synchronous education, exams, the learning management system-web site and a remote live-support desk. At the end of the…

  2. Occupational Component. 26-Level Courses. Teacher Resource Manual. Integrated Occupational Program. Interim-1991: Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Branch.

    This planning and instructional manual is designed to assist teachers in implementing the 20 10-credit-hour courses that make up the 26-level occupational component of the Integrated Occupational Program (IOP) in Alberta, Canada. (The IOP was developed to assist students who experience difficulties in secondary education and to help students make…

  3. A Survey of College Reading Programs in New York State: Diagnosis, Placement and Program Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinowski, Patricia A.

    In February 1988, a survey was conducted to examine placement procedures and developmental reading programs at two- and four-year colleges in New York State. Surveys were mailed to 30 two-year colleges and 28 four-year colleges, requesting information on the placement tests and cut-off scores used; types of additional diagnostic testing; course…

  4. Occupational Component. 36-Level Courses. Program of Studies/Curriculum Guide. Integrated Occupational Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Branch.

    The Integrated Occupational Program (IOP) enables students in Alberta (Canada) who have experienced difficulty in learning to develop essential concepts, skills, and attitudes in the context of one or more occupational clusters. The IOP has four levels: occupational awareness (grades 8-9), career exploration (level 16), occupational orientation…

  5. Career Development in Head Start. Career Development Training Program. Part I: Components, Roles, and Program Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolotsky, Hyman; And Others

    The first booklet of the series Career Development in Head Start gives an overview of career development in this program. Career development, in which training is built into a job and is designed to lead to more responsible and better-paying jobs, involves task analysis, entry level positions, career ladders, training and education, released time,…

  6. An Assessment of Criteria that Will Contribute to a Desirable Industrial Internship Model for the Manufacturing Engineering Technology Program at Ferris State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovans, Gary L.

    A study was conducted to determine if the structure and administration of the manufacturing internship of the Manufacturing Engineering Technology (MET) program at Ferris State University (FSU) was congruent with commonly accepted practice. It examined whether the current internship design was satisfactory in terms of the perspective of industry…

  7. Statistical techniques applied to aerial radiometric surveys (STAARS): principal components analysis user's manual. [NURE program

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, C.D.; Pirkle, F.L.; Schmidt, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    A Principal Components Analysis (PCA) has been written to aid in the interpretation of multivariate aerial radiometric data collected by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. The variations exhibited by these data have been reduced and classified into a number of linear combinations by using the PCA program. The PCA program then generates histograms and outlier maps of the individual variates. Black and white plots can be made on a Calcomp plotter by the application of follow-up programs. All programs referred to in this guide were written for a DEC-10. From this analysis a geologist may begin to interpret the data structure. Insight into geological processes underlying the data may be obtained.

  8. The effects of exercise program on burnout and metabolic syndrome components in banking and insurance workers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Han Hui; Yeh, Ching Ying; Su, Chien Tien; Chen, Chiou Jong; Peng, Shu Mei; Chen, Ruey Yu

    2013-01-01

    To explore the effectiveness of exercise program for banking and insurance workers and clarify the association between exercise, burnout, and metabolic syndrome components. In the process of the study, a practicable worksite exercise program was developed for bank and insurance enterprises. A three-month (12-wk) exercise course was conducted, and its benefits evaluated. Levels of burnout and metabolic syndrome components were analyzed after exercise intervention. After intervention, the indicators of burnout and metabolic syndrome components were significantly improved in both low and high intensity groups, and the improvement were expressed in reduction of waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, person burnout and work-related burnout. A dose-response of burnouts and metabolic syndrome components with exercise intensity are shown (p<0.05). Metabolic syndrome components were independently associated with burnout and exercise intensity in the crude model. After adjustment for potential confounders, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure differences showed significant associations with exercise intensity (p<0.05). This study demonstrated an effective approach to worksite exercise intervention and exercise intensity played an important role to alleviate damage between burnouts and metabolic syndrome components. PMID:23518604

  9. 40 CFR 1054.625 - What requirements apply under the Transition Program for Equipment Manufacturers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW, SMALL NONROAD... specifically to companies that manufacture equipment outside the United States and to companies that import... exempt from the prohibitions in 40 CFR 1068.101(a)(1) with respect to exhaust emissions, subject to...

  10. 40 CFR 1054.625 - What requirements apply under the Transition Program for Equipment Manufacturers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... multiplying the average value by 0.3. The same calculation applies for small-volume equipment manufacturers... engines that are not subject to Phase 3 standards: (1) If you use the provisions of 40 CFR 1068.105(a) to... standards after the Phase 3 emission standards begin to apply. To be eligible to use these provisions,...

  11. 40 CFR 1054.625 - What requirements apply under the Transition Program for Equipment Manufacturers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... multiplying the average value by 0.3. The same calculation applies for small-volume equipment manufacturers... engines that are not subject to Phase 3 standards: (1) If you use the provisions of 40 CFR 1068.105(a) to... standards after the Phase 3 emission standards begin to apply. To be eligible to use these provisions,...

  12. 40 CFR 91.803 - Manufacturer in-use testing program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... either the engine or the vessel; or (3) Other compelling circumstances associated with the structure of... from each engine family. Manufacturers shall submit data from this in-use testing to EPA. (c) Number of... emission data and has been previously tested under paragraph (c) (1) or (2) of this section (and EPA...

  13. Active vision system for planning and programming of industrial robots in one-of-a-kind manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Ulrich; Schmidt, Achim

    1995-10-01

    The aspects of automation technology in industrial one-of-a-kind manufacturing are discussed. An approach to improve the quality and cost relation is developed and an overview of an 3D- vision supported automation system is given. This system is based on an active vision sensor for 3D-geometry feedback. Its measurement principle, the coded light approach, is explained. The experimental environment for the technical validation of the automation approach is demonstrated, where robot based processes (assembly, arc welding and flame cutting) are graphically simulated and off-line programmed. A typical process sequence for automated one- of-a-kind manufacturing is described. The results of this research development are applied to a project on the automated disassembling of car parts for recycling using industrial robots.

  14. An analysis of the procedural components of supported employment programs associated with employment outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, J; Nofs, D; Hardman, M; Chambless, C

    1989-01-01

    This study examined the relation between the procedural components of supported employment programs and employment outcomes for 120 individuals with disabilities. These individuals were involved in supported employment programs established through the Utah Supported Employment Project. The results suggest that successful implementation of supported employment services led to ongoing employment of study participants in community work sites, increased wages, and ongoing opportunities for workers to interact with nondisabled peers. In addition, several procedural components were found to be strongly associated with successful employment outcomes for workers. Results of the study are discussed in terms of the training needs of supported employment program staff and future research for the dissemination of a cohesive technology of supported employment. PMID:2613600

  15. Advanced manufacturing development of a composite empennage component for L-1011 aircraft. Phase 4: Full scale ground test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Dorwald, F.

    1982-01-01

    The ground tests conducted on the advanced composite vertical fin (ACVF) program are described. The design and fabrication of the test fixture and the transition structure, static test of Ground Test Article (GTA) No. 1, rework of GTA No. 2, and static, damage tolerance, fail-safe and residual strength tests of GTA No. 2 are described.

  16. Cloud manufacturing: a new manufacturing paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Luo, Yongliang; Tao, Fei; Li, Bo Hu; Ren, Lei; Zhang, Xuesong; Guo, Hua; Cheng, Ying; Hu, Anrui; Liu, Yongkui

    2014-03-01

    Combining with the emerged technologies such as cloud computing, the Internet of things, service-oriented technologies and high performance computing, a new manufacturing paradigm - cloud manufacturing (CMfg) - for solving the bottlenecks in the informatisation development and manufacturing applications is introduced. The concept of CMfg, including its architecture, typical characteristics and the key technologies for implementing a CMfg service platform, is discussed. Three core components for constructing a CMfg system, i.e. CMfg resources, manufacturing cloud service and manufacturing cloud are studied, and the constructing method for manufacturing cloud is investigated. Finally, a prototype of CMfg and the existing related works conducted by the authors' group on CMfg are briefly presented.

  17. Creating synergy: Essential components of a successful R25E cancer education program.

    PubMed

    Gronemeyer, Suzanne A

    2011-06-01

    For an R25E cancer research program to be a resounding success for both participating students and faculty, and to maintain federal funding, many synergistic elements are necessary. Essential components of the R25E Pediatric Oncology Education Program at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital include (1) a unique focus, (2) a program director who is passionate about the program and who is enthusiastically supported by the institution, (3) committed and involved faculty mentors, (4) a current and complete program website with an online application process, (5) a large external network referring top students to the program, (6) an extensive, diverse, and highly qualified applicant pool with rigorous application requirements, (7) meticulous matching of faculty mentors with mentees, (8) adequate financial support for participants (stipend and housing), (9) an outstanding basic science and clinical research infrastructure, (10) training in the protection of human subjects, the responsible conduct of research, and research with vertebrate animals, (11) a comprehensive lunch and learn seminar series, (12) oral and written participant presentations of their research results, (13) ongoing internal and external program evaluation, (14) long-term tracking of participants, and (15) continuing program innovation.

  18. Essential components of an infection prevention program for outpatient hemodialysis centers.

    PubMed

    Hess, Sally; Bren, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    Infections are a significant complication for dialysis patients. The CDC estimates that 37,000 central line-related bloodstream infections occurred in hemodialysis patients in 2008 and dialysis-associated outbreaks of hepatitis C continue to be reported. While established hospital-based infection prevention programs have existed since the 1970s, few dialysis facilities have an established in-center program, unless the dialysis facility is hospital-associated. This review focuses on essential core components required for an effective infection prevention program, extrapolating from acute-care programs and building on current dialysis guidelines and recommendations. An effective infection prevention program requires infrastructure, including leaders who place infection prevention as a top priority, active involvement from a multidisciplinary team, surveillance of outcomes and processes with feedback, staff and patient education, and consistent use of evidence-based practices. The program must be integrated into the existing Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement program. Best practice recommendations for the prevention of infection, specific to dialysis, continue to evolve as the epidemiology of dialysis-associated infections is further researched and new evidence is gathered. A review of case studies illustrates that with an effective program in place, infection prevention becomes part of the culture, reduces infection risk, and improves patient safety. PMID:23808676

  19. Advanced manufacturing development of a composite empennage component for L-1011 aircraft. Phase 3: Production readiness verification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A.; Sandifer, J.; Sandorff, P.; Vancleave, R.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-two specimens of each of two key structural elements of the Advance Composite Vertical Fin (ACVF) were fabricated and tested. One element represented the front spar at the fuselage attachment area and the other element represented the cover at the fuselage joint area. Ten specimens of each element were selected for static testing. The coefficient of variation resulting from the tests was 3.28 percent for the ten cover specimens and 6.11 percent for the ten spar specimens, which compare well with metallic structures. The remaining twelve cover and twelve spar specimens were durability tested in environmental chambers which permitted the temperature and humidity environment to be cycled as well as the applied loads. Results of the durability tests indicated that such components will survive the service environment.

  20. A Study on the Influence of Process Parameters on the Viscoelastic Properties of ABS Components Manufactured by FDM Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakshinamurthy, Devika; Gupta, Srinivasa

    2016-06-01

    Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) is a fast growing Rapid Prototyping (RP) technology due to its ability to build parts having complex geometrical shape in reasonable time period. The quality of built parts depends on many process variables. In this study, the influence of three FDM process parameters namely, slice height, raster angle and raster width on viscoelastic properties of Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) RP-specimen is studied. Statistically designed experiments have been conducted for finding the optimum process parameter setting for enhancing the storage modulus. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis has been used to understand the viscoelastic properties at various parameter settings. At the optimal parameter setting the storage modulus and loss modulus of the ABS-RP specimen was 1008 and 259.9 MPa respectively. The relative percentage contribution of slice height and raster width on the viscoelastic properties of the FDM-RP components was found to be 55 and 31 % respectively.

  1. Collaborative Technology Assessments Of Transient Field Processing And Additive Manufacturing Technologies As Applied To Gas Turbine Components

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Szabo, Attila; Ucok, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    ORNL partnered with GE Power & Water to investigate the effect of thermomagnetic processing on the microstructure and mechanical properties of GE Power & Water newly developed wrought Ni-Fe-Cr alloys. Exploration of the effects of high magnetic field process during heat treatment of the alloys indicated conditions where applications of magnetic fields yields significant property improvements. The alloy aged using high magnetic field processing exhibited 3 HRC higher hardness compared to the conventionally-aged alloy. The alloy annealed at 1785 F using high magnetic field processing demonstrated an average creep life 2.5 times longer than that of the conventionally heat-treated alloy. Preliminary results show that high magnetic field processing can improve the mechanical properties of Ni-Fe-Cr alloys and potentially extend the life cycle of the gas turbine components such as nozzles leading to significant energy savings.

  2. XCT analysis of the influence of melt strategies on defect population in Ti–6Al–4V components manufactured by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    SciTech Connect

    Tammas-Williams, S.; Zhao, H.; Léonard, F.; Derguti, F.; Todd, I.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2015-04-15

    Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM) is a promising powder bed Additive Manufacturing technique for near-net-shape manufacture of high-value titanium components. However without post-manufacture HIPing the fatigue life of SEBM parts is currently dominated by the presence of porosity. In this study, the size, volume fraction, and spatial distribution of the pores in model samples have been characterised in 3D, using X-ray Computed Tomography, and correlated to the process variables. The average volume fraction of the pores (< 0.2%) was measured to be lower than that usually observed in competing processes, such as selective laser melting, but a strong relationship was found with the different beam strategies used to contour, and infill by hatching, a part section. The majority of pores were found to be small spherical gas pores, concentrated in the infill hatched region; this was attributed to the lower energy density and less focused beam used in the infill strategy allowing less opportunity for gas bubbles to escape the melt pool. Overall, increasing the energy density or focus of the beam was found to correlate strongly to a reduction in the level of gas porosity. Rarer irregular shaped pores were mostly located in the contour region and have been attributed to a lack of fusion between powder particles. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Vast majority of defects detected were small spherical gas pores. • Gas bubbles trapped in the powder granules expand and coalesce in the melt pool. • Pores have been shown not to be randomly distributed. • Larger and deeper melt pools give more opportunity for gas to escape. • Minor changes to melt strategy result in significant reductions in pore population.

  3. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components (base program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Bak, M. J.; Nakazawa, S.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    A 3-D Inelastic Analysis Method program is described. This program consists of a series of new computer codes embodying a progression of mathematical models (mechanics of materials, special finite element, boundary element) for streamlined analysis of: (1) combustor liners, (2) turbine blades, and (3) turbine vanes. These models address the effects of high temperatures and thermal/mechanical loadings on the local (stress/strain)and global (dynamics, buckling) structural behavior of the three selected components. Three computer codes, referred to as MOMM (Mechanics of Materials Model), MHOST (Marc-Hot Section Technology), and BEST (Boundary Element Stress Technology), have been developed and are briefly described in this report.

  4. Microgravity Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Ken; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Manufacturing capability in outer space remains one of the critical milestones to surpass to allow humans to conduct long-duration manned space exploration. The high cost-to-orbit for leaving the Earth's gravitational field continues to be the limiting factor in carrying sufficient hardware to maintain extended life support in microgravity or on other planets. Additive manufacturing techniques, or 'chipless' fabrication, like RP are being considered as the most promising technologies for achieving in situ or remote processing of hardware components, as well as for the repair of existing hardware. At least three RP technologies are currently being explored for use in microgravity and extraterrestrial fabrication.

  5. Advanced manufacturing development of a composite empennage component for L-1011 aircraft. Phase 2: Design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Crocker, J. F.; Ekvall, J. C.; Eudaily, R. R.; Mosesian, B.; Vancleave, R. R.; Vanhamersveld, J.

    1981-01-01

    The composite fin design consists of two one-piece cocured covers, two one-piece cocured spars and eleven ribs. The lower ribs are truss ribs with graphite/epoxy caps and aluminum truss members. The upper three ribs are a sandwich design with graphite/epoxy face sheets and a syntactic epoxy core. The design achieves a 27% weight saving compared to the metal box. The fastener count has been reduced from over 40,000 to less than 7000. The structural integrity of the composite fin was verified by analysis and test. The static, fail-safe and flutter analyses were completed. An extensive test program has established the material behavior under a range of conditions and critical subcomponents were tested to verify the structural concepts.

  6. Additive Manufacturing of IN100 Superalloy Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair: Process Development, Modeling, Microstructural Characterization, and Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Das, Suman

    2015-09-01

    This article describes additive manufacturing (AM) of IN100, a high gamma-prime nickel-based superalloy, through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE), aimed at the creation of thick deposits onto like-chemistry substrates for enabling repair of turbine engine hot-section components. SLE is a metal powder bed-based laser AM technology developed for nickel-base superalloys with equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal microstructural morphologies. Here, we combine process modeling, statistical design-of-experiments (DoE), and microstructural characterization to demonstrate fully metallurgically bonded, crack-free and dense deposits exceeding 1000 μm of SLE-processed IN100 powder onto IN100 cast substrates produced in a single pass. A combined thermal-fluid flow-solidification model of the SLE process compliments DoE-based process development. A customized quantitative metallography technique analyzes digital cross-sectional micrographs and extracts various microstructural parameters, enabling process model validation and process parameter optimization. Microindentation measurements show an increase in the hardness by 10 pct in the deposit region compared to the cast substrate due to microstructural refinement. The results illustrate one of the very few successes reported for the crack-free deposition of IN100, a notoriously "non-weldable" hot-section alloy, thus establishing the potential of SLE as an AM method suitable for hot-section component repair and for future new-make components in high gamma-prime containing crack-prone nickel-based superalloys.

  7. Self-Help Program Components and Linkage to Aftercare Following Inpatient Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Frydrych, Lynne M.; Greene, Benjamin J.; Blondell, Richard D.; Purdy, Christopher H.

    2009-01-01

    Many patients fail to initiate aftercare for addictive disease rehabilitation following detoxification. This study of 136 inpatients compared characteristics of those who initiated aftercare (behavior therapy or self-help programs) during the week following discharge with those who did not. Among this group of patients, 77% (91/119) linked to aftercare. Self-help treatment related components were associated with increased aftercare treatment attendance rates and included: having a copy of the “12 Steps” (81% vs. 46%, P = .002), having read self-help literature (73% vs. 42%, P = .007) and having telephone numbers of self-help program members (50% vs. 18%, P = .008). Those who initiated aftercare treatment were also more likely to have remained abstinent from drugs and alcohol (81% vs. 39%, P <.001). Having self-help treatment-related components were associated with increased rates of aftercare attendance following hospital inpatient detoxification. PMID:19197592

  8. Energy efficient engine: Low-pressure turbine subsonic cascade component development and integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, O. P.; Kopper, F. C.; Knudsen, L. K.; Yustinich, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A subsonic cascade test program was conducted to provide technical data for optimizing the blade and vane airfoil designs for the Energy Efficient Engine Low-Pressure Turbine component. The program consisted of three parts. The first involved an evaluation of the low-chamber inlet guide vane. The second, was an evaluation of two candidate aerodynamic loading philosophies for the fourth blade root section. The third part consisted of an evaluation of three candidate airfoil geometries for the fourth blade mean section. The performance of each candidate airfoil was evaluated in a linear cascade configuration. The overall results of this study indicate that the aft-loaded airfoil designs resulted in lower losses which substantiated Pratt & Whitney Aircraft's design philosophy for the Energy Efficient Engine low-pressure turbine component.

  9. A program of direct assistance for small and medium-size manufacturers. Quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    During the quarter ending March 31, 1997, the IACs in the Western Region performed a total of 97 industrial assessments under the contract continuation beginning October 1, 1996. Industrial assessments reports were issued to 43 clients for the 1995-96 program period and 57 clients for the 1996-97 program period. The attached summary shows the aggregate number of audits performed by, number of reports received from, number of critiques completed and returned to, and implementation reports completed by each of the Western Region EADCs/IACs under the 1994-95 program period through the quarter ending March 31, 1997. Also shown are the number of industrial assessments performed by, reports completed by each of the Western Region IACs under the 1994-95 program period. Also shown is the information for industrial assessments for the 1995-96 program period and the information for the 1996-97 program period.

  10. Generic aging management programs for license renewal of BWR reactor coolant systems components.

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-02-15

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  11. Generic Aging Management Programs for License Renewal of BWR Reactor Coolant System Components

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-07-01

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  12. AGT 101: Ceramic component development: Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Topical report, October 1979-July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Eyck, M.O.; MacBeth, J.W.; Sweeting, T.B.

    1987-11-01

    This topical report summarizes the ceramic component technology development activity conducted by Standard Oil Engineered Materials Company. Standard Oil, acting as a principal subcontractor and supplier of ceramic components, directed its efforts toward the development of ceramic materials in the silicon-carbide family. Various shape forming and fabrication methods, and non-destructive evaluation techniques were explored to produce the static structural components for the ceramic engine. This enabled engine testing to proceed without program slippage, and developed the approaches for producing low-cost, production quantity processes. Standard Oil contributed to the acceptance of ceramics as a viable approach for automotive gas turbine engines and to the advancement of this vital ceramic technology. 174 figs., 33 tabs.

  13. A program for the transfer of manufacturing technology from the national laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Shackson, R.H.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to test a needs-driven approach to transfer of manufacturing technology from the National Laboratories. The first task was the development of a 250-page book, describing the durable goods industry and its technological needs. This book was used in three engagements with DOE labs, in which researchers were briefed on needs, and asked to nominate technologies to meet these needs. Of 47 nominations, approximately one-third were technologies that has not been recognized as having value, and were not listed on the Laboratory's data base. After several evaluation steps, commercialization planning is underway for six, and one is being considered for prototype development.

  14. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Littleton, Harry; Griffin, John

    2011-07-31

    This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU's/year and 6.46 trillion BTU's/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

  15. Microstructural architecture developed in the fabrication of solid and open-cellular copper components by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Diana Alejandra

    The fabrication of Cu components were first built by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM) from low-purity, atomized Cu powder containing a high density of Cu2O precipitates leading to a novel example of precipitate-dislocation architecture. These microstructures exhibit cell-like arrays (1-3microm) in the horizontal reference plane perpendicular to the build direction with columnar-like arrays extending from ~12 to >60 microm in length and corresponding spatial dimensions of 1-3 microm. These observations were observed by the use of optical metallography, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The hardness measurements were taken both on the atomized powder and the Cu components. The hardness for these architectures ranged from ~HV 83 to 88, in contrast to the original Cu powder microindentation hardness of HV 72 and the commercial Cu base plate hardness of HV 57. These observations were utilized for the fabrication of open-cellular copper structures by additive manufacturing using EBM and illustrated the ability to fabricate some form of controlled microstructural architecture by EBM parameter alteration or optimizing. The fabrication of these structures ranged in densities from 0.73g/cm3 to 6.67g/cm3. These structures correspond to four different articulated mesh arrays. While these components contained some porosity as a consequence of some unmelted regions, the Cu2O precipitates also contributed to a reduced density. Using X-ray Diffraction showed the approximate volume fraction estimated to be ~2%. The addition of precipitates created in the EBM melt scan formed microstructural arrays which contributed to hardening contributing to the strength of mesh struts and foam ligaments. The measurements of relative stiffness versus relative density plots for Cu compared very closely with Ti-6Al-4V open cellular structures - both mesh and foams. The Cu reticulated mesh structures exhibit a slope of n = 2 in contrast to a slope of n = 2

  16. Initiating long-term modernization programs in low-technology manufacturing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, D.R.; Paul, B.K.; Doherty, T.J.; Billo, R.E.

    1990-11-01

    In this paper, a planning approach is discussed for initiating and expediting modernization efforts in manufacturing environments. The approach consists of six major steps. First, staff employees from a variety of functional organizations are involved in modernization planning activities through the formation of site modernization teams used to organize and facilitate modernization planning activities. Second, initial planning exercises are expedited by identifying high-priority areas for improvement through a functional assessment. Third, data acquired from the initial assessment described above are used as input to a strategic planning workshop aimed at building managerial support for modernization plans and integrating the plant's strategic objectives with its operational modernization plan. Fourth, the site modernization team receives training in the specific modernization technologies to aid them in the selection, design, implementation and maintenance of the appropriate modernization technology. Fifth, as a means for initiating modernization efforts, the planning approach produces preliminary versions of action-oriented implementation plans thus enabling improvement actions to begin more quickly. Sixth, an overall cost-benefit analysis is done to assess the feasibility of modernization projects. Finally, by meeting the above objectives, the approach provides a foundation for future modernization efforts. Results from implementing this methodology in six manufacturing environments are discussed along with a review of benefits of the approach. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Vocational Training and Skills Recertification: Program Components and Models of Vocational Training and Skills Recertification for Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Tipawan Troung-Quang

    This guide describes program components and models for the provision of vocational training and skills recertification for refugees. Necessary service components are identified, and possible delivery strategies are outlined with reference to successful programs throughout the United States. The document is intended to help service providers in…

  18. Through the Lens of Teacher Professional Development Components: The "Dialogic Video Cycle" as an Innovative Program to Foster Classroom Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gröschner, Alexander; Seidel, Tina; Kiemer, Katharina; Pehmer, Ann-Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    For developing professional development (PD) programs, research suggests referring to effective components. In developing a PD program on classroom dialogue, we explored to what extent effective components could be addressed. We conducted a study with two groups. In the "Dialogic Video Cycle" (DVC), six German teachers participated in a…

  19. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program High-Performance Test Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Hewes, Tom; Peeks, Brady

    2015-09-15

    ?This project represents the third phase of a multi-year effort to develop and bring to market a High Performance Manufactured Home (HPMH). The scope of this project involved building four HPMH prototypes, resulting in what is expected to be a 30% savings relative to the Building America Benchmark. (The actual % savings varies depending on choice of heating equipment and climate zone). The HPMH home is intended to make significant progress toward performing as zero-net-energy ready. Previous phases of this project created a HPMH specification and prototyped individual measures from the package to obtain engineering approvals and develop preliminary factory construction processes. This report describes the project team's work during 2014 to build prototype homes to the HPMH specifications and to monitor the homes for energy performance and durability during 2014. Monitoring is expected to continue into 2016.

  20. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program High-Performance Test Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Hewes, Tom; Peeks, Brady

    2015-09-01

    This project represents the third phase of a multi-year effort to develop and bring to market a High Performance Manufactured Home (HPMH), which is intended to make significant progress toward performing as zero-net-energy ready. The scope of this project involved building four HPMH prototypes, resulting in what is expected to be a 30% savings relative to the Building America Benchmark. (The actual percent savings varies depending on choice of heating equipment and climate zone). Previous phases of this project created a HPMH specification and prototyped individual measures from the package to obtain engineering approvals and develop preliminary factory construction processes. This report describes the project team's work during 2014 to build prototype homes to the HPMH specifications and to monitor the homes for energy performance and durability during 2014. Monitoring is expected to continue into 2016.

  1. Mathematical model and manufacture programming of loxodromic-type normal circular-arc spiral bevel gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhenyun; Chen, Houjun; Ju, Zhilan; Liu, Jian

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, loxodromic-type normal circulararc spiral bevel gear is proposed as a novel application of the circular-arc tooth profile at the gear transmission with intersecting axes. Based on the principle of molding-surface conjugation, the study develops a mathematical model for the tooth alignment curve and the computational flow at the design stage to enable the generation of the tooth surface. Machining of the tooth surface is then carried out to determine the interference-free tool path of the numerical control (NC). Moreover, a pair of loxodromic-type normal circular-arc spiral bevel gears is manufactured on computer numerical control (CNC) machine tools. The proposed theory and method are experimentally investigated, and the obtained results primarily reflect the superior performance of the proposed novel gear.

  2. Development of Integrated Programs for Aerospace-vehicle Design (IPAD): Product manufacture interactions with the design process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowell, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The product manufacturing interactions with the design process and the IPAD requirements to support the interactions are described. The data requirements supplied to manufacturing by design are identified and quantified. Trends in computer-aided manufacturing are discussed and the manufacturing process of the 1980's is anticipated.

  3. Moving Bed, Granular Bed Filter Development Program: Option 1, Component Test Facility. Task 3, Test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, J.C.; Purdhomme, J.W.; Wilson, K.B.

    1994-04-01

    In the base contract, Combustion Power Co. developed commercial designs for a moving granular-bed filter (GBF). The proposed filter is similar to previous designs in terms of its shape and method of filtration. The commercial designs have scaled the filter from a 5 ft diameter to as large as a 20 ft diameter filter. In Task 2 of the Moving Bed-Granular Filter Development Program, all technical concerns related to the further development of the filter are identified. These issues are discussed in a Topical Report which has been issued as part of Task 2. Nineteen issues are identified in this report. Along with a discussion of these issues are the planned approaches for resolving each of these issues. These issues will be resolved in either a cold flow component test facility or in pilot scale testing at DOE`s Power System Development Facility (PSDF) located at Southem Company Services` Wilsonville facility. Task 3 presents a test plan for resolving those issues which can be addressed in component test facilities. The issues identified in Task 2 which will be addressed in the component test facilities are: GBF scale-up; effect of filter cone angle and sidewall materials on medium flow and ash segregation; maximum gas filtration rate; lift pipe wear; GBF media issues; mechanical design of the gas inlet duct; and filter pressure drop. This document describes a test program to address these issues, with testing to be performed at Combustion Power Company`s facility in Belmont, California.

  4. NASALife-Component Fatigue and Creep Life Prediction Program and Illustrative Examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.

    2005-01-01

    NASALife is a life prediction program for propulsion system components made of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading and creep rupture conditions. Although, the primary focus was for CMC components the underlying methodologies are equally applicable to other material systems as well. The program references data for low cycle fatigue (LCF), creep rupture, and static material properties as part of the life prediction process. Multiaxial stresses are accommodated by Von Mises based methods and a Walker model is used to address mean stress effects. Varying loads are reduced by the Rainflow counting method. Lastly, damage due to cyclic loading (Miner s rule) and creep are combined to determine the total damage per mission and the number of missions the component can survive before failure are calculated. Illustration of code usage is provided through example problem of a CMC turbine stator vane made of melt-infiltrated, silicon carbide fiber-reinforced, silicon carbide matrix composite (MI SiC/SiC)

  5. Design of ceramic components with the NASA/CARES computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Manderscheid, Jane M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1990-01-01

    The ceramics analysis and reliability evaluation of structures (CARES) computer program is described. The primary function of the code is to calculate the fast-fracture reliability or failure probability of macro-scopically isotropic ceramic components. These components may be subjected to complex thermomechanical loadings, such as those found in heat engine applications. CARES uses results from MSC/NASTRAN or ANSYS finite-element analysis programs to evaluate how inherent surface and/or volume type flaws component reliability. CARES utilizes the Batdorf model and the two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function to describe the effects of multiaxial stress states on material strength. The principle of independent action (PIA) and the Weibull normal stress averaging models are also included. Weibull material strength parameters, the Batdorf crack density coefficient, and other related statistical quantities are estimated from four-point bend bar or uniform uniaxial tensile specimen fracture strength data. Parameter estimation can be performed for a single or multiple failure modes by using a least-squares analysis or a maximum likelihood method. Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling goodness-to-fit-tests, 90 percent confidence intervals on the Weibull parameters, and Kanofsky-Srinivasan 90 percent confidence band values are also provided. Examples are provided to illustrate the various features of CARES.

  6. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950's are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  7. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950`s are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  8. 40 CFR 91.803 - Manufacturer in-use testing program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES In-Use Testing and Recall... not ordered a recall for that family), then only one engine for that family must be tested. If that... pursue remedial action under this subpart. The Administrator may order a recall pursuant to §§...

  9. 40 CFR 91.803 - Manufacturer in-use testing program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES In-Use Testing and Recall... not ordered a recall for that family), then only one engine for that family must be tested. If that... pursue remedial action under this subpart. The Administrator may order a recall pursuant to §§...

  10. 40 CFR 91.803 - Manufacturer in-use testing program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES In-Use Testing and Recall... not ordered a recall for that family), then only one engine for that family must be tested. If that... pursue remedial action under this subpart. The Administrator may order a recall pursuant to §§...

  11. 75 FR 57230 - 340B Drug Pricing Program Manufacturer Civil Monetary Penalties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... are required by section 1927(a) of the Social Security Act to enter in agreements with the Secretary... comments will be used to help draft a proposed rule that will be published in the Federal Register for... rebate program, pursuant to section 1927(b)(3)(C)(i) of the Social Security Act, and seek...

  12. Multi-cultural components and keys for European worldwide space programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    1991-12-01

    The role of different cultures in space missions is considered with regard to NASA and ESA astronauts and Russian cosmonauts. The identification of all the psychological and socio-anthropological components in the behavior of human groups in space is extremely important to understand and solve different problems and obtain the mission's success. In this light, the creation of a multicultural atmosphere aboard is considered a positive aspect for future space programs, and the synthesis of European cultural elements is a definite key to develop morale and productivity.

  13. Boeing Helicopters Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) Program summary of component tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenski, Joseph W., Jr.; Valco, Mark J.

    1992-07-01

    The principal objectives of the ART program are briefly reviewed, and the results of advanced technology component tests are summarized. The tests discussed include noise reduction by active cancellation, hybrid bidirectional tapered roller bearings, improved bearing life theory and friction tests, transmission lube study with hybrid bearings, and precision near-net-shape forged spur gears. Attention is also given to the study of high profile contact ratio noninvolute tooth form spur gears, parallel axis gear noise study, and surface modified titanium accessory spur gears.

  14. Ceramic component reliability with the restructured NASA/CARES computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Lynn M.; Starlinger, Alois; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1992-01-01

    The Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (CARES) integrated design program on statistical fast fracture reliability and monolithic ceramic components is enhanced to include the use of a neutral data base, two-dimensional modeling, and variable problem size. The data base allows for the efficient transfer of element stresses, temperatures, and volumes/areas from the finite element output to the reliability analysis program. Elements are divided to insure a direct correspondence between the subelements and the Gaussian integration points. Two-dimensional modeling is accomplished by assessing the volume flaw reliability with shell elements. To demonstrate the improvements in the algorithm, example problems are selected from a round-robin conducted by WELFEP (WEakest Link failure probability prediction by Finite Element Postprocessors).

  15. Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development Program, final report - tasks 4-14

    SciTech Connect

    Kaushal, T.S.; Weber, K.E.

    1994-11-01

    The Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development (ADECD) Program is a multi-year, multi-phase effort to develop and demonstrate the critical technology needed to advance the heavy-duty low heat rejection (LHR) engine concept for the long-haul, heavy-duty truck market. The ADECD Program has been partitioned into two phases. The first phase, Phase 1, was completed in 1986, resulting in definition of the Advanced Diesel Reference Engine (ADRE)III. The second phase, Phase 11/111, examines the feasibility of the ADRE concepts for application to the on-highway diesel engine. Phase 11/111 is currently underway. This project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies. The work has been performed by the Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) under Contract DEN3-329 with the NASA Lewis Research Center, who provide project management and technical direction.

  16. The Feed Materials Program of the Manhattan Project: A Foundational Component of the Nuclear Weapons Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2014-12-01

    The feed materials program of the Manhattan Project was responsible for procuring uranium-bearing ores and materials and processing them into forms suitable for use as source materials for the Project's uranium-enrichment factories and plutonium-producing reactors. This aspect of the Manhattan Project has tended to be overlooked in comparison with the Project's more dramatic accomplishments, but was absolutely vital to the success of those endeavors: without appropriate raw materials and the means to process them, nuclear weapons and much of the subsequent cold war would never have come to pass. Drawing from information available in Manhattan Engineer District Documents, this paper examines the sources and processing of uranium-bearing materials used in making the first nuclear weapons and how the feed materials program became a central foundational component of the postwar nuclear weapons complex.

  17. US Department of Energy`s continuous fiber ceramic composite program - components for industrial use

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkouski, J.

    1997-12-31

    U.S. industry has a critical need for materials that are light, strong, corrosion resistant, and capable of performing in high temperature environments. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) Program is addressing this critical industrial need. Although many traditional ceramics perform well at high temperature, they typically fail in a catastrophic manner in industrial service. CFCCs are the solution to this problem. A CFCC is made by placing a ceramic matrix around reinforcing continuous fibers that have been placed or woven into a preform. The resulting CFCC is a high temperature resistant material that exhibits tough behavior with better in-service reliability. Various CFCC components and sub-elements are being fabricated and tested in simulated and/or actual service environments during Phase II of this program.

  18. Apparel Manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center teamed with the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) in 1989 on a program involving development of advanced simulation software. Concurrently, the State of Alabama chartered UAH to conduct a technology advancement program in support of the state's apparel manufacturers. In 1992, under contract to Marshall, UAH developed an apparel-specific software package that allows manufacturers to design and analyze modules without making an actual investment -- it functions on ordinary PC equipment. By 1995, Marshall had responded to requests for the package from more than 400 companies in 36 states; some of which reported savings up to $2 million. The National Garment Company of Missouri, for example, uses the system to design and balance a modular line before committing to expensive hardware; for setting up sewing lines; and for determining the composition of a new team.

  19. A Mixed-Method Case Study of Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports Pilot Program: Examination of Program Components and Implementation across Elementary and Secondary Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havercroft, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the components of a PBIS pilot program facilitated by a team at a special services cooperative in the Midwest. This study identified the goals of the program and looked at the fidelity of implementation over a three year period for the first cohort of schools to participate in the program. For this study…

  20. Surface flaw reliability analysis of ceramic components with the SCARE finite element postprocessor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John P.; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1987-01-01

    The SCARE (Structural Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation) computer program on statistical fast fracture reliability analysis with quadratic elements for volume distributed imperfections is enhanced to include the use of linear finite elements and the capability of designing against concurrent surface flaw induced ceramic component failure. The SCARE code is presently coupled as a postprocessor to the MSC/NASTRAN general purpose, finite element analysis program. The improved version now includes the Weibull and Batdorf statistical failure theories for both surface and volume flaw based reliability analysis. The program uses the two-parameter Weibull fracture strength cumulative failure probability distribution model with the principle of independent action for poly-axial stress states, and Batdorf's shear-sensitive as well as shear-insensitive statistical theories. The shear-sensitive surface crack configurations include the Griffith crack and Griffith notch geometries, using the total critical coplanar strain energy release rate criterion to predict mixed-mode fracture. Weibull material parameters based on both surface and volume flaw induced fracture can also be calculated from modulus of rupture bar tests, using the least squares method with known specimen geometry and grouped fracture data. The statistical fast fracture theories for surface flaw induced failure, along with selected input and output formats and options, are summarized. An example problem to demonstrate various features of the program is included.

  1. Progress in SiC/SiC Ceramic Composite Development for Gas Turbine Hot-Section Components under NASA EPM and UEET Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, J. A.; Yun, Hee Mann; Morscher, Gregory N.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2002-01-01

    The successful application of ceramic matrix composites as hot-section components in advanced gas turbine engines will require the development of constituent materials and processes that can provide the material systems with the key thermostructural properties required for long-term component service. Much initial progress in identifying these materials and processes was made under the former NASA Enabling Propulsion Materials Program using stoichiometric Sylramic (trademark) silicon-carbide (SiC) fibers, 2D (two dimensional)-woven fiber architectures, chemically vapor-infiltrated (CVI) BN fiber coatings (interphases), and SiC-based matrices containing CVI SiC interphase over-coatings, slurry-infiltrated SiC particulate, and melt-infiltrated (MI) silicon. The objective of this paper is to discuss the property benefits of this SiC/SiC composite system for high-temperature engine components and to elaborate on further progress in SiC/SiC development made under the new NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology Program. This progress stems from the recent development of advanced constituent materials and manufacturing processes, including specific treatments at NASA that improve the creep, rupture, and environmental resistance of the Sylramic fiber as well as the thermal conductivity and creep resistance of the CVI SiC over-coatings. Also discussed are recent observations concerning the detrimental effects of inadvertent carbon in the fiber-BN interfacial region and the beneficial effects of certain 2D-architectures for thin-walled SiC/SiC panels.

  2. Brayton-cycle heat-recovery system characterization program. Component test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-19

    The critical components of the glass furnace subject to corrosion/erosion are: the valve gate and the valve seat bottom and sides which can also be subject to warpage causing subsequent leakage and the furnace flues (or ducting). The Brayton System will be added to the glass furnace just downstream of the reversal valve. Hence, the inlet air to the flues will no longer be at ambient temperature but at a higher level between 800 to 1000/sup 0/F. Also, the exhaust gas for the Brayton System is required to be 1500 to 1600/sup 0/F at these locations. Thus, the flues and valve components will be exposed to a much higher average temperature operating with the Brayton System. The possibility of cracking of the refractory linings and warpage and scaling of the switching valve, with consequent leakage to the exhaust stream should be avoided or decreased as much as feasible because of its effect of lowering the turbine inlet temperature and thus the total system value. On the inlet side, leakage dilutes the heat added to the air (which is preheated) and reduces the expected fuel savings. Assessment of such effects and determination of potential solutions and/or improvements in these areas is the purpose of this component system analysis and testing. The materials, mechanics and operations of the two areas of concern and the program for testing alternative approaches including test hardware, objectives, conditions and locations are described.

  3. Steam turbine generators -from NC manufacturing to CAD/CAM

    SciTech Connect

    Searle, D.R.; King, F.E.; Kiniskern, J.M.

    1985-04-01

    A program has been designed to integrate engineering, manufacturing, and business systems using a common data base. There has been a significant increase in benefits obtained by extending the automation of the design/drafting function to include manufacturing operations. This extension would have been difficult without the existence of highly developed family-of-parts NC programs. The integration concept has also been applied to turbine buckets and is being extended to other turning-generator components.

  4. A program for control of repetitive trauma disorders associated with hand tool operations in a telecommunications manufacturing facility.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, F; Storment, J; Van Hook, P; Armstrong, T J

    1985-11-01

    This paper summarizes efforts to control the incidence and severity of repetitive trauma disorders associated with hand tool operations in a telecommunications manufacturing facility with 6,600 employees. Repetitive trauma disorders--including strains, tendinitis, ganglions and carpal tunnel syndrome--were the leading cause of lost time and workers' compensation expenses at this plant in 1979. The plant-wide incidence rate of OSHA reportable repetitive trauma disorders was 2.2 cases per 200,000 workhours and resulted in 1,001 lost workdays. Incidence rates as high as 4.6 were reported in some areas, but were believed to be much higher among persons who actually perform repetitive work in these areas. In the spring of 1981, the plant safety and health committee undertook a control program that included creation of a task force, a training program, improvements in the design of workstations and tooling, and management of restricted workers. During 1982, the incidence rate of repetitive motion disorders has decreased to .53 cases per 200,000 workhours and resulted in only 129 lost workdays.

  5. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, V.K.

    2001-04-05

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration. A high-power diesel engine valve for the DDC Series 149 engine was chosen as the demonstration part for this program. This was determined to be an ideal component type to demonstrate cost-effective process enhancements, the beneficial impact of advanced ceramics on transportation systems, and near-term commercialization potential. The baseline valve material was NAC's NT451 SiAION. It was replaced, later in the program, by an alternate silicon nitride composition (NT551), which utilized a lower cost raw material and a simplified powder-processing approach. The material specifications were defined based on DDC's engine requirements, and the initial and final component design tasks were completed.

  6. Green Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, John

    2013-12-31

    Green Manufacturing Initiative (GMI): The initiative provides a conduit between the university and industry to facilitate cooperative research programs of mutual interest to support green (sustainable) goals and efforts. In addition to the operational savings that greener practices can bring, emerging market demands and governmental regulations are making the move to sustainable manufacturing a necessity for success. The funding supports collaborative activities among universities such as the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Purdue University and among 40 companies to enhance economic and workforce development and provide the potential of technology transfer. WMU participants in the GMI activities included 20 faculty, over 25 students and many staff from across the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences; the College of Arts and Sciences' departments of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Geology; the College of Business; the Environmental Research Institute; and the Environmental Studies Program. Many outside organizations also contribute to the GMI's success, including Southwest Michigan First; The Right Place of Grand Rapids, MI; Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth; and the Michigan Manufacturers Technical Center.

  7. 34 CFR 694.10 - What are the requirements for awards under the program's scholarship component under section 404E...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...'s scholarship component under section 404E of the HEA? 694.10 Section 694.10 Education Regulations... What are the requirements for awards under the program's scholarship component under section 404E of the HEA? (a) Amount of scholarship. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section,...

  8. The JT8D and JT9D engine component improvement: Performance improvement program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffin, W. O.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA sponsored Engine Component Improvement - Performance Improvement Program at Pratt & Whitney Aircraft advanced the state of the art of thermal barrier coatings and ceramic seal systems, demonstrated the practicality of an advanced turbine clearance control system and an advanced fan design in the JT9D engine, and demonstrated the advantages of modern cooling, sealing, and aerodynamic designs in the high pressure turbine and compressor of the JT8D engine. Several of these improvements are already in airline service in JT8D and JT9D engines, and others will enter service soon in advanced models of these engines. In addition, the technology advances are being transferred to completely new engine configurations, the PW2037 engine and the NASA sponsored Energy Efficient Engine.

  9. Laser generating metallic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-04-01

    Recent developments in rapid prototyping have led to the concept of laser generating, the first additive manufacturing technology. This paper presents an innovative process of depositing multi-layer tracks, by fusing successive powder tracks, to generate three dimensional components, thereby offering an alternative to casting for small metal component manufacture. A coaxial nozzle assembly has been designed and manufactured enabling consistent omni-directional multi-layer deposition. In conjunction with this the software route from a CAD drawing to machine code generation has been established. The part is manufactured on a six axes machining center incorporating a 1.8 kW carbon-dioxide laser, providing an integrated opto-mechanical workstation. The part build-up program is controlled by a P150 host computer, linked directly to the DNC machining center. The direct manufacturing route is shown, including initial examples of simple objects (primitives -- cube, cylinder, cone) leading to more complex turbine blade generation, incorporating build-up techniques and the associated mechanical properties.

  10. WIPP/SRL in-situ tests: MIIT program--The effects of metal package components

    SciTech Connect

    Covington, J.A. ); Wicks, G.G. ); Molecke, M.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The Materials Interface Interactions Tests or MIIT is the largest in-situ testing program in progress, involving burial of many simulated nuclear waste systems and accompanying package components. In MIIT, waste glass samples were fabricated into the shape of pineapple slices', polished on one side. Proposed package components were also made into a similar configuration and the various glasses, metals, and geologic samples were than stacked onto heater elements within Teflon assemblies. This produced interactions of interest by creating glass/glass, glass/salt, and glass/metal interfaces. Since the outer diameter of the metal was smaller than the outer diameter of the glass, a lip was created which was also produced a glass/liquid interface, which was also studied. Overall, a total of 50 stacks or assemblies of pineapple slices were created in seven different stacking arrangements. Each individual assembly was then installed in an instrumented borehole at WIPP. Brine was then added to most of boreholes and the assemblies heated and maintained at 90{degrees}C. This was achieved by energizing the central heating and rod that traversed through the middle opening of each of the pineapple slices in each assembly. Due to the design of these units, glass, metal and geologic samples could be removed at time intervals of 6 mos., 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years. Currently, all but the 5 year samples have been removed from test and are being evaluated in laboratories of MIIT participants.

  11. WIPP/SRL in-situ tests: MIIT program--The effects of metal package components

    SciTech Connect

    Covington, J.A.; Wicks, G.G.; Molecke, M.A.

    1991-12-31

    The Materials Interface Interactions Tests or MIIT is the largest in-situ testing program in progress, involving burial of many simulated nuclear waste systems and accompanying package components. In MIIT, waste glass samples were fabricated into the shape of `pineapple slices`, polished on one side. Proposed package components were also made into a similar configuration and the various glasses, metals, and geologic samples were than stacked onto heater elements within Teflon assemblies. This produced interactions of interest by creating glass/glass, glass/salt, and glass/metal interfaces. Since the outer diameter of the metal was smaller than the outer diameter of the glass, a lip was created which was also produced a glass/liquid interface, which was also studied. Overall, a total of 50 stacks or assemblies of pineapple slices were created in seven different stacking arrangements. Each individual assembly was then installed in an instrumented borehole at WIPP. Brine was then added to most of boreholes and the assemblies heated and maintained at 90{degrees}C. This was achieved by energizing the central heating and rod that traversed through the middle opening of each of the pineapple slices in each assembly. Due to the design of these units, glass, metal and geologic samples could be removed at time intervals of 6 mos., 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years. Currently, all but the 5 year samples have been removed from test and are being evaluated in laboratories of MIIT participants.

  12. Soya: a Programming Model and Runtime Environment for Component Composition using SSDL

    SciTech Connect

    Fornasier, Patrick; Webber, James; Gorton, Ian

    2007-08-14

    The SOAP Service Description Language (SSDL) is a SOAPcentric language for describing Web Service contracts. SSDL focuses on message abstraction as the building block for creating service-oriented applications and provides an extensible range of protocol frameworks that can be used to describe and formally model component composition based on Web Service interactions. Given its novel approach, implementing support for SSDL contracts presents interesting challenges to middleware developers. At one end of the spectrum, programming abstractions that support message-oriented designs need to be created. At the other end, new functionality and semantics must be added to existing SOAP engines. In this paper we explain how component developers can create message-oriented Web Service interfaces with contemporary tool support (specifically the Windows Communication Foundation) using SSDL. We show how SSDL can be used as an alternative and powerful metadata language natively alongside existing tooling without imposing additional burdens on application developers. Moreover, we describe the design and architecture of the Soya middleware which supports

  13. Interact for What? The Relationship between Interpersonal Interaction Based on Motivation and Educational Outcomes among Students in Manufacturing Programs at Two-Year Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Hsun-yu; Wang, Xueli

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the relationship between different types of interpersonal interaction, characterized by their underlying motivations, and educational outcomes among students in manufacturing programs at two-year colleges. While there exist several ways to classify interaction, motivation as an inherent attribute that fuels behaviors…

  14. A Multi-Component Social Skills Intervention for Children with Asperger Syndrome: The Junior Detective Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaumont, Renae; Sofronoff, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Background: The study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a new multi-component social skills intervention for children with Asperger syndrome (AS): The Junior Detective Training Program. This 7-week program included a computer game, small group sessions, parent training sessions and teacher handouts. Method: Forty-nine children with AS were…

  15. The Infant-Toddler Component and Child Impact. Evaluation of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Affholter, Dennis; And Others

    Fifth in a series of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP) evaluation reports, this volume focuses on the infant/toddler component of CFRP and its impact on children approximately a year and a half after they enter the program. A brief summary of the CFRP evaluation design and preliminary findings presented in previous evaluation reports is…

  16. Lean Manufacturing Auto Cluster at Chennai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskaran, E.

    2012-10-01

    Due the presence of lot of automotive Industry, Chennai is known as Detroit of India, that producing over 40 % of the Indian vehicle and components. Lean manufacturing concepts have been widely recognized as an important tool in improving the competitiveness of industries. This is a continuous process involving everyone, starting from management to the shop floor. Automotive Component Industries (ACIs) in Ambattur Industrial Estate, Chennai has formed special purpose vehicle (SPV) society namely Ambattur Industrial Estate Manufacturers Association (AIEMA) Technology Centre (ATC) lean manufacturing cluster (ATC-LMC) during July 2010 under lean manufacturing competitiveness scheme, that comes under National Manufacturing Competitiveness Programme of Government of India. The Tripartite Agreement is taken place between National Productivity Council, consultants and cluster (ATC-LMC). The objective is to conduct diagnostic study, study on training and application of various lean manufacturing techniques and auditing in ten ACIs. The methodology adopted is collection of primary data/details from ten ACIs. In the first phase, diagnostic study is done and the areas for improvement in each of the cluster member companies are identified. In the second phase, training programs and implementation is done on 5S and other areas. In the third phase auditing is done and found that the lean manufacturing techniques implementation in ATC-LMC is sustainable and successful in every cluster companies, which will not only enhance competitiveness but also decrease cost, time and increase productivity. The technical efficiency of LMC companies also increases significantly.

  17. Manufacturing Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2007-01-01

    According to the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), "manufacturing is the engine that drives American prosperity". When NAM and its research and education arm, The Manufacturing Institute, released the handbook, "The Facts About Modern Manufacturing," in October 2006, NAM President John Engler noted, that manufacturing output in America…

  18. Applications of gauge duality in robust principal component analysis and semidefinite programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, ShiQian; Yang, JunFeng

    2016-08-01

    Gauge duality theory was originated by Freund [Math. Programming, 38(1):47-67, 1987] and was recently further investigated by Friedlander, Mac{\\^e}do and Pong [SIAM J. Optm., 24(4):1999-2022, 2014]. When solving some matrix optimization problems via gauge dual, one is usually able to avoid full matrix decompositions such as singular value and/or eigenvalue decompositions. In such an approach, a gauge dual problem is solved in the first stage, and then an optimal solution to the primal problem can be recovered from the dual optimal solution obtained in the first stage. Recently, this theory has been applied to a class of \\emph{semidefinite programming} (SDP) problems with promising numerical results [Friedlander and Mac{\\^e}do, SIAM J. Sci. Comp., to appear, 2016]. In this paper, we establish some theoretical results on applying the gauge duality theory to robust \\emph{principal component analysis} (PCA) and general SDP. For each problem, we present its gauge dual problem, characterize the optimality conditions for the primal-dual gauge pair, and validate a way to recover a primal optimal solution from a dual one. These results are extensions of [Friedlander and Mac{\\^e}do, SIAM J. Sci. Comp., to appear, 2016] from nuclear norm regularization to robust PCA and from a special class of SDP which requires the coefficient matrix in the linear objective to be positive definite to SDP problems without this restriction. Our results provide further understanding in the potential advantages and disadvantages of the gauge duality theory.

  19. A Trend Analysis of Manufacturing-Related Program Graduates of Community and Technical Colleges: Great Lakes and Plains Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eighmy, Myron A.

    2009-01-01

    Manufacturers in the United States are struggling to recruit and hire high-skilled workers needed to maintain productivity and to compete globally. While the total number employed in the manufacturing sector is shrinking, the demand for high-skilled workers has increased. Community and technical colleges have traditionally been an important source…

  20. Blade Manufacturing Improvement: Remote Blade Manufacturing Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this program was to investigate manufacturing improvements for wind turbine blades. The program included a series of test activities to evaluate the strength, deflection, performance, and loading characteristics of the prototype blades. The original contract was extended in order to continue development of several key blade technologies identified in the project. The objective of the remote build task was to demonstrate the concept of manufacturing wind turbine blades at a temporary manufacturing facility in a rural environment. TPI Composites successfully completed a remote manufacturing demonstration in which four blades were fabricated. The remote demonstration used a manufacturing approach which relied upon material ''kits'' that were organized in the factory and shipped to the site. Manufacturing blades at the wind plant site presents serious logistics difficulties and does not appear to be the best approach. A better method appears to be regional manufacturing facilities, which will eliminate most of the transportation cost, without incurring the logistical problems associated with fabrication directly onsite. With this approach the remote facilities would use commonly available industrial infrastructure such as enclosed workbays, overhead cranes, and paved staging areas. Additional fatigue testing of the M20 root stud design was completed with good results. This design provides adhesive bond strength under fatigue loading that exceeds that of the fastener. A new thru-stud bonding concept was developed for the M30 stud design. This approach offers several manufacturing advantages; however, the test results were inconclusive.

  1. SA3654 Component characterization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meir, G.W.

    1996-06-01

    AlliedSignal Inc., Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T), was provided with production capability assurance program (PCAP) funding to develop, characterize, and qualify purchased product components for use on the PRESS-A program. The SA3654, N-Channel, Power MOSFET was identified as a component needing such activity to support PRESS-A. This report presents the characterization activities and results for the SA3654.

  2. FORTRAN programs to process Magsat data for lithospheric, external field, and residual core components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsdorf, Douglas E.; Vonfrese, Ralph R. B.

    1994-01-01

    The FORTRAN programs supplied in this document provide a complete processing package for statistically extracting residual core, external field and lithospheric components in Magsat observations. To process the individual passes: (1) orbits are separated into dawn and dusk local times and by altitude, (2) passes are selected based on the variance of the magnetic field observations after a least-squares fit of the core field is removed from each pass over the study area, and (3) spatially adjacent passes are processed with a Fourier correlation coefficient filter to separate coherent and non-coherent features between neighboring tracks. In the second state of map processing: (1) data from the passes are normalized to a common altitude and gridded into dawn and dusk maps with least squares collocation, (2) dawn and dusk maps are correlated with a Fourier correlation efficient filter to separate coherent and non-coherent features; the coherent features are averaged to produce a total field grid, (3) total field grids from all altitudes are continued to a common altitude, correlation filtered for coherent anomaly features, and subsequently averaged to produce the final total field grid for the study region, and (4) the total field map is differentially reduced to the pole.

  3. FAILPROB--A Computer Program to Compute the Probability of Failure of a Brittle Component

    SciTech Connect

    WELLMAN, GERALD W.

    2002-02-01

    FAILPROB is a computer program that applies the Weibull statistics characteristic of brittle failure of a material along with the stress field resulting from a finite element analysis to determine the probability of failure of a component. FAILPROB uses the statistical techniques for fast fracture prediction (but not the coding) from the N.A.S.A. - CARES/life ceramic reliability package. FAILPROB provides the analyst at Sandia with a more convenient tool than CARES/life because it is designed to behave in the tradition of structural analysis post-processing software such as ALGEBRA, in which the standard finite element database format EXODUS II is both read and written. This maintains compatibility with the entire SEACAS suite of post-processing software. A new technique to deal with the high local stresses computed for structures with singularities such as glass-to-metal seals and ceramic-to-metal braze joints is proposed and implemented. This technique provides failure probability computation that is insensitive to the finite element mesh employed in the underlying stress analysis. Included in this report are a brief discussion of the computational algorithms employed, user instructions, and example problems that both demonstrate the operation of FAILPROB and provide a starting point for verification and validation.

  4. Manufacturing Mississippi's Workforce: An Assessment of Employability Skills as Perceived by Faculty and Senior Students of Four Year Manufacturing Related Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Mamie Yvette

    2012-01-01

    A worldwide concern exists that undergraduate programs are not producing graduates with the kind of lifelong learning and professional skills needed for workplace success. Numerous research studies indicate new employees lack needed employability skills such as teamwork, decision-making, and communication. Similarly, recent national and state…

  5. Adaptation of Curriculum, Instructional Methods, and Materials Component: Instructional Aide Program. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jessie

    Funded through the Ohio Disadvantaged Pupil Program Fund, the Columbus Public Schools' Instructional Aide (IA) Program served 276 kindergarten children and 1,780 first-grade students during the 1987-88 school year. The goal of the IA program was to provide an educational support program for underachieving pupils. Instructional aides were trained…

  6. Federal High Performance Computing and Communications Program. The Department of Energy Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Energy Research.

    This report, profusely illustrated with color photographs and other graphics, elaborates on the Department of Energy (DOE) research program in High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC). The DOE is one of seven agency programs within the Federal Research and Development Program working on HPCC. The DOE HPCC program emphasizes research in…

  7. BTSA Program Directors' Perceptions on the Relationship between Components of Mentor Assessment and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maricich, Patricia Sheehan

    2014-01-01

    California's Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment program (BTSA) is a high stakes induction program; a new teacher's completion of a BTSA induction program leads to the California clear credential. The cornerstone of the BTSA induction program is the mentor, also known as a support provider. Mentors provide a variety of services to new…

  8. National Center for Manufacturing Sciences: Environmentally conscious manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinton, Clare

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to share the results and some of the thinking of the Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing - Strategic Initiative Group (ECM-SIG) at the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS). NCMS is a consortium of more than 185 North American Manufacturing organizations comprised of about 75 percent for profit manufacturing companies and about 25 percent nonprofit organizations that support manufacturing activities. NCMS conducts collaborative R&D programs designed to improve global competitiveness of its members and other North American manufacturers to address common issues that are important to manufacturing industries. NCMS is an industry driven organization whose agenda is established by industry with input from appropriate government agencies.

  9. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 3: Systems' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The internal structure is discussed of the MHOST finite element program designed for 3-D inelastic analysis of gas turbine hot section components. The computer code is the first implementation of the mixed iterative solution strategy for improved efficiency and accuracy over the conventional finite element method. The control structure of the program is covered along with the data storage scheme and the memory allocation procedure and the file handling facilities including the read and/or write sequences.

  10. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L

    1998-01-01

    The mission of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been to have an adequate base of manufacturing technology, not necessarily resident at LLNL, to conduct their future business. The specific goals were (1) to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes; (2) to construct general purpose process models that have wide applicability; (3) to document their findings and models in journals; (4) to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues; and (5) to develop continuing relationships with the industrial and academic communities to advance their collective understanding of fabrication processes. In support of this mission, two projects were reported here, each of which explores a way to bring higher precision to the manufacturing challenges that we face over the next few years. The first, ''A Spatial-Frequency-Domain Approach to Designing a Precision Machine Tools,'' is an overall view of how they design machine tools and instruments to make or measure workpieces that are specified in terms of the spatial frequency content of the residual errors of the workpiece surface. This represents an improvement of an ''error budget,'' a design tool that saw significant development in the early 1980's, and has been in active use since then. The second project, ''Micro-Drilling of ICF Capsules,'' is an attempt to define the current state in commercial industry for drilling small holes, particularly laser-drilling. The report concludes that 1-{micro}m diameter holes cannot currently be drilled to high aspect ratios, and then defines the engineering challenges that will have to be overcome to machine holes small enough for NIF capsules.

  11. Achieving the Impossible? Teaching Practice Component of a Pre-Service Distance English Language Teacher Training Program in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kecik, Ilknur; Aydin, Belgin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the model developed for the teaching practice component of the pre-service Distance English Language Teacher Training Program (DELTT) at Anadolu University, Eskisehir, Turkey. The steps taken to improve the model over a six-year period will be explained and the recent developments in the teaching practice…

  12. A Safety Program that Integrated Behavior-Based Safety and Traditional Safety Methods and Its Effects on Injury Rates of Manufacturing Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Jaime A.; Ibarra, Guillermo V.; Hopkins, B. L.

    2010-01-01

    The present research examines the effects of a complex safety program that combined Behavior-Based Safety (BBS) and traditional safety methods. The study was conducted in an automobile parts plant in Mexico. Two sister plants served as comparison. Some of the components of the safety programs addressed behaviors of managers and included methods…

  13. Energy efficient engine. Volume 2. Appendix A: Component development and integration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moracz, D. J.; Cook, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    The large size and the requirement for precise lightening cavities in a considerable portion of the titanium fan blades necessitated the development of a new manufacturing method. The approach which was selected for development incorporated several technologies including HIP diffusion bonding of titanium sheet laminates containing removable cores and isothermal forging of the blade form. The technology bases established in HIP/DB for composite blades and in isothermal forging for fan blades were applicable for development of the manufacturing process. The process techniques and parameters for producing and inspecting the cored diffusion bonded titanium laminate blade preform were established. The method was demonstrated with the production of twelve hollow simulated blade shapes for evaluation. Evaluations of the critical experiments conducted to establish procedures to produce hollow structures by a laminate/core/diffusion bonding approach are included. In addition the transfer of this technology to produce a hollow fan blade is discussed.

  14. Language Development Component: All Day Kindergarten Program. Final Evaluation Report, 1986-87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jessie

    The All Day Kindergarten (ADK) Program of the Columbus (Ohio) Public Schools was established to provide a full day of instruction for underachieving kindergarten pupils. The program concentrated on preparing pupils for successful learning experiences in first grade by providing them with an extra half day of instruction. The program served 571…

  15. [THE FUNCTIONAL CONSTITUENT OF A BIOLOGICAL COMPONENT IN PROGRAMS FOR TRAINING SPECIALISTS IN THE AREA OF PARASITOLOGY FOR ACCREDITATION].

    PubMed

    Dovgalev, A S; Astanina, S Yu; Andreeva, N D

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers the functional aspects of a biological component in programs for training specialists in the area of Parasitology for accreditation within the current enactments, including those on modernization of public health and additional professional education. The working program of the module "Fundamental Disciplines" has been used as an example to outline approaches to molding a medical parasitologist's capacity and readiness to solve professional tasks on the basis of knowledge of fundamental disciplines: biology, immunology, and medical geography. Education fundamentalization is shown to suggest more unsupervised work of a learner in the teaching process. The fundamental constituent of a biological component of the 'programs for training learners in the specialty of Parasitology for accreditation is shown in the interaction of all sections of this area with special and allied subjects.

  16. Agile manufacturing prototyping system (AMPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, P.

    1998-05-09

    The Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System (AMPS) is being integrated at Sandia National Laboratories. AMPS consists of state of the industry flexible manufacturing hardware and software enhanced with Sandia advancements in sensor and model based control; automated programming, assembly and task planning; flexible fixturing; and automated reconfiguration technology. AMPS is focused on the agile production of complex electromechanical parts. It currently includes 7 robots (4 Adept One, 2 Adept 505, 1 Staubli RX90), conveyance equipment, and a collection of process equipment to form a flexible production line capable of assembling a wide range of electromechanical products. This system became operational in September 1995. Additional smart manufacturing processes will be integrated in the future. An automated spray cleaning workcell capable of handling alcohol and similar solvents was added in 1996 as well as parts cleaning and encapsulation equipment, automated deburring, and automated vision inspection stations. Plans for 1997 and out years include adding manufacturing processes for the rapid prototyping of electronic components such as soldering, paste dispensing and pick-and-place hardware.

  17. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; et al

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  18. Core Intervention Components: Identifying and Operationalizing What Makes Programs Work. ASPE Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blase, Karen; Fixsen, Dean

    2013-01-01

    This brief is part of a series that explores key implementation considerations. It focuses on the importance of identifying, operationalizing, and implementing the "core components" of evidence-based and evidence-informed interventions that likely are critical to producing positive outcomes. The brief offers a definition of "core components",…

  19. The Puerto Rico Component of the National Tsunami Hazard and Mitigation Program (PR-NTHMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanacore, E. A.; Huerfano Moreno, V. A.; Lopez, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Caribbean region has a documented history of damaging tsunamis that have affected coastal areas. Of particular interest is the Puerto Rico - Virgin Islands (PRVI) region, where the proximity of the coast to prominent tectonic faults would result in near-field tsunamis. Tsunami hazard assessment, detection capabilities, warning, education and outreach efforts are common tools intended to reduce loss of life and property. It is for these reasons that the PRSN is participating in an effort with local and federal agencies to develop tsunami hazard risk reduction strategies under the NTHMP. This grant supports the TsunamiReady program, which is the base of the tsunami preparedness and mitigation in PR. In order to recognize threatened communities in PR as TsunamiReady by the US NWS, the PR Component of the NTHMP have identified and modeled sources for local, regional and tele-tsunamis and the results of simulations have been used to develop tsunami response plans. The main goal of the PR-NTHMP is to strengthen resilient coastal communities that are prepared for tsunami hazards, and recognize PR as TsunamiReady. Evacuation maps were generated in three phases: First, hypothetical tsunami scenarios of potential underwater earthquakes were developed, and these scenarios were then modeled through during the second phase. The third phase consisted in determining the worst-case scenario based on the Maximum of Maximums (MOM). Inundation and evacuation zones were drawn on GIS referenced maps and aerial photographs. These products are being used by emergency managers to educate the public and develop mitigation strategies. Maps and related evacuation products, like evacuation times, can be accessed online via the PR Tsunami Decision Support Tool. Based on these evacuation maps, tsunami signs were installed, vulnerability profiles were created, communication systems to receive and disseminate tsunami messages were installed in each TWFP, and tsunami response plans were

  20. Rapid small lot manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1998-05-09

    The direct connection of information, captured in forms such as CAD databases, to the factory floor is enabling a revolution in manufacturing. Rapid response to very dynamic market conditions is becoming the norm rather than the exception. In order to provide economical rapid fabrication of small numbers of variable products, one must design with manufacturing constraints in mind. In addition, flexible manufacturing systems must be programmed automatically to reduce the time for product change over in the factory and eliminate human errors. Sensor based machine control is needed to adapt idealized, model based machine programs to uncontrolled variables such as the condition of raw materials and fabrication tolerances.

  1. Pyrotechnic hazards classification and evaluation program. Phase 2, segment 3: Test plan for determining hazards associated with pyrotechnic manufacturing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A comprehensive test plan for determining the hazards associated with pyrotechnic manufacturing processes is presented. The rationale for each test is based on a systematic analysis of historical accounts of accidents and a detailed study of the characteristics of each manufacturing process. The most hazardous manufacturing operations have been determined to be pressing, mixing, reaming, and filling. The hazard potential of a given situation is evaluated in terms of the probabilities of initiation, communication, and transition to detonation (ICT). The characteristics which affect the ICT probabilities include the ignition mechanisms which are present either in normal or abnormal operation, the condition and properties of the pyrotechnic material, and the configuration of the processing equipment. Analytic expressions are derived which describe the physical conditions of the system, thus permitting a variety of processes to be evaluated in terms of a small number of experiments.

  2. Essential components of a tuberculosis prevention and control program. Recommendations of the Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) rates declined steadily for decades in the United States, but several complex social and medical factors caused TB morbidity to increase 14% from 1985 through 1993. The recent increases in TB morbidity have placed additional demands on state and local TB control programs, which already had been substantially weakened by inadequate staffing and funding support. TB programs throughout the nation must be revitalized if they are to provide core TB control activities that enable effective responses to this public health challenge. This report describes a model for TB control programs and the essential components of a successful TB control program, including three priority strategies for TB prevention and control: a) identifying and treating persons who have active TB, b) finding and screening persons who have had contact with TB patients to determine whether they are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or have active TB and providing appropriate treatment, and c) screening populations at high risk for TB infection and the development of TB disease to detect infected persons and providing therapy to prevent progression to active TB. State and local health departments have primary responsibility for preventing and controlling TB. To meet this challenge successfully, TB control programs should be able to administer activities that include the following core components: conducting overall planning and development of policy, identifying persons who have clinically active TB, managing persons who have or who are suspected of having disease, identifying and managing persons infected with M. tuberculosis, providing laboratory and diagnostic services, collecting and analyzing data, and providing training and education. The Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis has prepared this report to provide a national standard by which policymakers, TB control program managers, and others evaluating TB programs can assess individual TB control programs

  3. Creep Life of Ceramic Components Using a Finite-Element-Based Integrated Design Program (CARES/CREEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Powers, L. M.; Jadaan, O. M.

    1998-01-01

    The desirable properties of ceramics at high temperatures have generated interest in their use for structural applications such as in advanced turbine systems. Design lives for such systems can exceed 10,000 hours. The long life requirement necessitates subjecting the components to relatively low stresses. The combination of high temperatures and low stresses typically places failure for monolithic ceramics in the creep regime. The objective of this paper is to present a design methodology for predicting the lifetimes of structural components subjected to creep rupture conditions. This methodology utilized commercially available finite element packages and takes into account the time-varying creep strain distributions (stress relaxation). The creep life of a component is discretized into short time steps, during which the stress and strain distributions are assumed constant. The damage is calculated for each time step based on a modified Monkman-Grant creep rupture criterion. Failure is assumed to occur when the normalized accumulated damage at any point in the component is greater than or equal to unity. The corresponding time will be the creep rupture life for that component. Examples are chosen to demonstrate the CARES/CREEP (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/CREEP) integrated design programs, which is written for the ANSYS finite element package. Depending on the component size and loading conditions, it was found that in real structures one of two competing failure modes (creep or slow crack growth) will dominate. Applications to benechmark problems and engine components are included.

  4. Creep Life of Ceramic Components Using a Finite-Element-Based Integrated Design Program (CARES/CREEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. M.; Jadaan, O. M.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    The desirable properties of ceramics at high temperatures have generated interest in their use for structural application such as in advanced turbine engine systems. Design lives for such systems can exceed 10,000 hours. The long life requirement necessitates subjecting the components to relatively low stresses. The combination of high temperatures and low stresses typically places failure for monolithic ceramics in the creep regime. The objective of this paper is to present a design methodology for predicting the lifetimes of structural components subjected to creep rupture conditions. This methodology utilizes commercially available finite element packages and takes into account the time-varying creep strain distributions (stress relaxation). The creep life, of a component is discretized into short time steps, during which the stress and strain distributions are assumed constant. The damage is calculated for each time step based on a modified Monkman-Grant creep rupture criterion. Failure is assumed to occur when the normalized accumulated damage at any point in the component is greater than or equal to unity. The corresponding time will be the creep rupture life for that component. Examples are chosen to demonstrate the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/CREEP (CARES/CREEP) integrated design program, which is written for the ANSYS finite element package. Depending on the component size and loading conditions, it was found that in real structures one of two competing failure modes (creep or slow crack growth) will dominate. Applications to benchmark problems and engine components are included.

  5. Energy 101: Clean Energy Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-09

    Most of us have a basic understanding of manufacturing. It's how we convert raw materials, components, and parts into finished goods that meet our essential needs and make our lives easier. But what about clean energy manufacturing? Clean energy and advanced manufacturing have the potential to rejuvenate the U.S. manufacturing industry and open pathways to increased American competitiveness. Watch this video to learn more about this exciting movement and to see some of these innovations in action.

  6. Increasing Student Access and Success in Dual Enrollment Programs: 13 Model State-Level Policy Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinth, Jennifer Dounay

    2014-01-01

    Dual enrollment or concurrent enrollment programs allow eligible high school students to take postsecondary courses for college and, usually, high school credit. Programs are nearly ubiquitous--in 2014, courses for dual or concurrent enrollment credit are offered in every state and the District of Columbia. Statewide policies govern these programs…

  7. Adaptation of Curriculum, Instructional Methods, and Materials Component: Instructional Aide Program. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jessie

    The goal of the Columbus Public Schools' instructional aide program is to provide an educational support program for underachieving pupils in kindergarten and first grade. The evaluation was based on objectives addressing gains in reading achievement and staff development for the aides. The evaluation design provided for the collection of data in…

  8. Adaptation of Curriculum, Instructional Methods, and Materials Component Instructional Aide Program. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jessie

    During the 1985-1986 school year the Instructional Aide Program served 2,370 pupils in kindergarten and first grade in the Columbus Public Schools. The program provided educational support for underachieving pupils by training and placing 124 aides in the classrooms of 227 teachers. The aides provided direct instruction to pupils under the…

  9. Critical Educational Program Components for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Science, Policy, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Richard L.; Peterson, Reece L.; Smith, Carl R.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of recent education reform and reorganization efforts requiring the use of research-based methods, the fundamental elements of an effective program for children and youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) have not been succinctly identified. This article presents the essential features of programs for students with EBD.…

  10. Language Development Component, Compensatory Language Experiences and Reading Program. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, Ed; And Others

    This report evaluates the 1982-83 Compensatory Language Experience and Reading Program (CLEAR), which served 5392 Ohio students, grades K-8, whose reading skills achievement was at or below the 36th percentile. The program featured individual or small group instruction. Instructional techniques and materials based on skill-centered objectives were…

  11. Multi-component access to a community-based weight loss program: 12 week results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current study examined weight loss between a comprehensive lifestyle modification program (Weight Watchers PointsPlus program) that included three ways to access and a self-help (SH) condition. A total of 293 participants were randomized to either a Weight Watchers condition (WW) (n=148) or a SH...

  12. Chrysler Partners with North Lake High School in an Advanced Manufacturing Technology Program for Special Needs Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karbon, Patrick J.; Kuhn, Cynthia

    1996-01-01

    Chrysler Corporation and North Lake High School cooperated to develop and deploy Advanced Manufacturing Technology for high school students identified as at risk or hard to serve. Chrysler provided curriculum that was delivered by training center instructors; teachers ensured student competence in academic areas. (JOW)

  13. The SHOOT cryogenic components - Testing and applicability to other flight programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dipirro, Michael J.; Schein, Michael E.; Boyle, Robert F.; Figueroa, Orlando; Lindauer, David A.; Mchugh, Daniel C.; Shirron, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    Cryogenic components and techniques for the superfluid helium on-orbit transfer (SHOOT) flight demonstration are described. Instrumentation for measuring liquid quantity, position, flow rate, temperature, and pressure has been developed using the data obtained from the IRAS, Cosmic Background Explorer, and Spacelab 2 helium dewars. Topics discussed include valves and burst disks, fluid management devices, structural/thermal components, instrumentation, and ground support equipment and performance test apparatus.

  14. 23. The long-term care component of the Massachusetts Cooperative Health Statistics Program.

    PubMed

    Caso, E; Freedman, L; Gruenberg, L

    1976-05-01

    The Office of Health Planning and Statistics of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, with the support of the National Center for Health Statistics, has over the past two years established two data programs in long-term care. The first of these involves experimentation with large-scale collection of patient-specific data from long-term care facilities, with the goal of developing statistically valid algorithms to predict the most appropirate level of care for individual patients. The second program has been the development of a data base for home health care agencies, the elements of which are an agency-specific annual statistical report and a patient-specific discharge abstract program. These two programs mark an effort to document home health care activities so as to provide a base of information for program development and evaluation.

  15. Manufacturing Curriculum Grant. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarborough, Jule Dee

    A manufacturing curriculum for secondary vocational programs was designed to bridge the gap between grades 9-10 level courses and the community college-level curriculum of the Illinois Plan for Industrial Education. During the project, a literature review of manufacturing curriculum materials was conducted, a manufacturing conceptual framework was…

  16. The Effects of a Social Program: Executive Summary of CFRP's Infant-Toddler Component. Child & Family Resource Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nauta, Marrit J.; And Others

    In 1973, the Head Start Division of the Administration for Children, Youth and Families (ACYF) initiated a Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP) demonstration. As part of Head Start, CFRP had as its primary goal enhancing children's development. The demonstration was designed to develop models for service delivery that could be adapted by…

  17. Building a Successful Infection Prevention Program: Key Components, Processes, and Economics.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Sorabh; Cook, Evelyn; Oden, Mary; Kaye, Keith S

    2016-09-01

    Infection control is the discipline responsible for preventing health care-associated infections (HAIs) and has grown from an anonymous field, to a highly visible, multidisciplinary field of incredible importance. There has been increasing focus on prevention rather than control of HAIs. Infection prevention programs (IPPs) have enormous scope that spans multiple disciplines. Infection control and the prevention and elimination of HAIs can no longer be compartmentalized. This article discusses the structure and responsibilities of an IPP, the regulatory pressures and opportunities that these programs face, and how to build and manage a successful program. PMID:27515138

  18. Establishing a Program for Behaviorally Disordered Students: Alternatives to Consider, Components to Include, and Strategies for Building Support: Monograph 3. Monograph Series in Behavior Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilman, Lanelle

    The types of programs that can be established for behaviorally disordered (BD) students are discussed, along with behavioral monitoring systems and approaches to establishing staff and administrative support for programs. In addition, a checklist of program components for BD students is included. The following program alternatives are described:…

  19. Assessment of temporal variance components and implications for trend assessment in biological monitoring programs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of temporal trends in biological monitoring programs is often undertaken without an understanding of temporal variability of biological communities. Typically, the within-site variance is unknown and included as part of sampling error. This investigation – designed jo...

  20. A structured approach to the integration of the clinical and didactic components of health career programs.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, N S; Feifer, I

    1980-02-01

    This paper presents a tested approach to a systematic progression of learning from the classroom to the clinical internship. The approach uses workbooks to integrate all facets of the training continuum. The basic model is training continuum. The basic model is called TAR. T refers to theory or teaching; A to application, which occurs during the clinical component; and R to reinforcement provided through seminars scheduled concurrently with fieldwork. The entire concept is introduced to students during a required weekly fieldwork preparation component scheduled prior to the first theory course. Clinicians and academicians participated in all phases of the three-year, HEW-funded project, which included development of interrelated performance objectives for the teaching, application and reinforcement components. Analysis of data from clinicians, students and faculty indicated that the TAR model provides a needed integrating structure.

  1. Manufacturing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is at the core of Sandia National Laboratories' advanced manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process. The center's capabilities in product and process development are summarized in the following disciplines: (1) mechanical - rapid prototyping, manufacturing engineering, machining and computer-aided manufacturing, measurement and calibration, and mechanical and electronic manufacturing liaison; (2) electronics - advanced packaging for microelectronics, printed circuits, and electronic fabrication; and (3) materials - ceramics, glass, thin films, vacuum technology, brazing, polymers, adhesives, composite materials, and process analysis.

  2. Preliminary design and manufacturing feasibility study for a machined Zircaloy triangular pitch fuel rod support system (grids) (AWBA development program)

    SciTech Connect

    Horwood, W A

    1981-07-01

    General design features and manufacturing operations for a high precision machined Zircaloy fuel rod support grid intended for use in advanced light water prebreeder or breeder reactor designs are described. The grid system consists of a Zircaloy main body with fuel rod and guide tube cells machined using wire EDM, a separate AM-350 stainless steel insert spring which fits into a full length T-slot in each fuel rod cell, and a thin (0.025'' or 0.040'' thick) wire EDM machined Zircaloy coverplate laser welded to each side of the grid body to retain the insert springs. The fuel rods are placed in a triangular pitch array with a tight rod-to-rod spacing of 0.063 inch nominal. Two dimples are positioned at the mid-thickness of the grid (single level) with a 90/sup 0/ included angle. Data is provided on the effectiveness of the manufacturing operations chosen for grid machining and assembly.

  3. Manufacturing Skills Succession Program Embracing Year 2007 Problem as a New Teaching Opportunity in Hakodate National College of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Junya; Yaegashi, Kosuke; Hama, Katsumi

    The advanced courses of Hakodate National College of Technology perform “Manufacturing skills succession program” with students and retired engineers who used to work for enterprises. We aim at inheriting “consciousness for delivery deadline, consciousness of cost, ability to plan and ability to grasp progress of work” throughout this activity. The author presumes that this activity realizes all of the engineering educations for students, utilization of retired engineers and contributions to the local community.

  4. Using Indices of Fidelity to Intervention Core Components to Identify Program Active Ingredients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abry, Tashia; Hulleman, Chris S.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the active ingredients of an intervention--intervention-specific components serving as key levers of change--is crucial for unpacking the intervention black box. Measures of intervention fidelity can be used to identify specific active ingredients, yet such applications are rare. We illustrate how fidelity measures can be used to…

  5. Study and program plan for improved heavy duty gas turbine engine ceramic component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel economy in a commercially viable gas turbine engine was demonstrated through use of ceramic materials. Study results show that increased turbine inlet and generator inlet temperatures, through the use of ceramic materials, contribute the greatest amount to achieving fuel economy goals. Improved component efficiencies show significant additional gains in fuel economy.

  6. Focus Groups and Exit Interviews Are Components of Chemistry Department Program Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreisbach, Joseph H.; Hogan, Thomas P.; Stamford, Anne Marie; Greggo, John W.

    1998-10-01

    The Chemistry Department, in conjunction with the Assessment and Institutional Research Office (AIRO) and the Department of Counseling and Human Services developed an assessment plan which incorporates use of focus groups and exit interviews. As part of the five-year departmental review, a number of student focus groups were facilitated to evaluate (a) the freshman and sophomore organic chemistry programs which also service other departments and (b) the upper division lecture and laboratory program for majors. Use of direct conversation in program assessment yields less ambiguous results compared with other methods because responses can be clarified with careful follow up questions. Success of this project gave rise to use of annual exit interviews with graduating seniors from the chemistry department. The approach described can easily be modified to meet the needs of any academic setting.

  7. Multi-component access to a commercially available weight loss program: A randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined weight loss between a community-based, intensive behavioral counseling program (Weight Watchers PointsPlus that included three treatment access modes and a self-help condition. A total of 292 participants were randomized to a Weight Watchers (WW; n=147) or a self-help condition (...

  8. Assessment of Adherence to Eating Habit and Exercise Components in a Behavioral Weight Control Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zegman, Marilyn A.

    Although the augmental value of exercise to behavioral weight control programs has been suggested, demonstration of this value is dependent upon an assessment of adherence to change in eating habits and activity patterns. Self-report measures of adherence were obtained from overweight college women undergoing treatment that involved either dietary…

  9. Components Needed for the Design of a Sustainable Career and Technical Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassiter, Vann Mizzelle

    2012-01-01

    As education has changed to meet the needs of society and has been shaped by the enactment of new laws, various aspects included under the massive umbrella of education have also changed to maintain momentum One such educational program is career and technical education (CTE). Changes to CTE have been made to continually meet the needs of all…

  10. Progress Report, October, 1967, through April, 1968: Educational Component of the Public Service Careers Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Univ. of New York, NY. Office of Community Coll. Affairs.

    Parallel with on-the-job training, this program provides remedial courses in High School Equivalency (HSE), Human Relations (HR), English as a Second Language (ESL) to help qualify candidates for public service careers in the Department of Hospitals and Department of Social Services, and Board of Education. HSE develops language, math, and reading…

  11. Operation Storefront. A Computer-Assisted Instruction Component of the Reading Assistance Program (RAP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasco County District School Board, Land O'Lakes, FL.

    This document contains teacher's materials that accompany Operation Storefront, the computer-assisted instruction package used in the Reading Assistance Program (RAP) that serves nonreading adults in Pasco County, Florida, who are 16 years or older and not in school. The target population for Operation Storefront is adults reading at or below the…

  12. Evaluation of the Implementation of the General Education Component of Programs of Studies. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaumier, Jean-Paul

    The Commission d'evaluation de l'enseignement collegial in Quebec evaluated the implementation of general education in all of the institutions offering programs leading to a Diploma of College Studies (DEC). Seventy-five institutions were covered by the evaluation: 49 public colleges, 20 subsidized private colleges, and six institutions reporting…

  13. Olweus Bullying Prevention Program: Components Implemented by Elementary Classroom and Specialist Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cecil, Heather; Molnar-Main, Stacie

    2015-01-01

    We investigated implementation fidelity of programmatic activities of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (OBPP) among 2,022 teachers, 88.5% female, from 88 elementary schools located in Pennsylvania. Results indicated that the majority of respondents had attended the school kick-off event, posted the rules in the classroom, and explained the…

  14. A component analysis based on serial results analyzing performance of parallel iterative programs

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, S.C.

    1994-12-31

    This research is concerned with the parallel performance of iterative methods for solving large, sparse, nonsymmetric linear systems. Most of the iterative methods are first presented with their time costs and convergence rates examined intensively on sequential machines, and then adapted to parallel machines. The analysis of the parallel iterative performance is more complicated than that of serial performance, since the former can be affected by many new factors, such as data communication schemes, number of processors used, and Ordering and mapping techniques. Although the author is able to summarize results from data obtained after examining certain cases by experiments, two questions remain: (1) How to explain the results obtained? (2) How to extend the results from the certain cases to general cases? To answer these two questions quantitatively, the author introduces a tool called component analysis based on serial results. This component analysis is introduced because the iterative methods consist mainly of several basic functions such as linked triads, inner products, and triangular solves, which have different intrinsic parallelisms and are suitable for different parallel techniques. The parallel performance of each iterative method is first expressed as a weighted sum of the parallel performance of the basic functions that are the components of the method. Then, one separately examines the performance of basic functions and the weighting distributions of iterative methods, from which two independent sets of information are obtained when solving a given problem. In this component approach, all the weightings require only serial costs not parallel costs, and each iterative method for solving a given problem is represented by its unique weighting distribution. The information given by the basic functions is independent of iterative method, while that given by weightings is independent of parallel technique, parallel machine and number of processors.

  15. Engine structures analysis software: Component Specific Modeling (COSMO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Schwartz, S.

    1994-08-01

    A component specific modeling software program has been developed for propulsion systems. This expert program is capable of formulating the component geometry as finite element meshes for structural analysis which, in the future, can be spun off as NURB geometry for manufacturing. COSMO currently has geometry recipes for combustors, turbine blades, vanes, and disks. Component geometry recipes for nozzles, inlets, frames, shafts, and ducts are being added. COSMO uses component recipes that work through neutral files with the Technology Benefit Estimator (T/BEST) program which provides the necessary base parameters and loadings. This report contains the users manual for combustors, turbine blades, vanes, and disks.

  16. Engine Structures Analysis Software: Component Specific Modeling (COSMO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Schwartz, S.

    1994-01-01

    A component specific modeling software program has been developed for propulsion systems. This expert program is capable of formulating the component geometry as finite element meshes for structural analysis which, in the future, can be spun off as NURB geometry for manufacturing. COSMO currently has geometry recipes for combustors, turbine blades, vanes, and disks. Component geometry recipes for nozzles, inlets, frames, shafts, and ducts are being added. COSMO uses component recipes that work through neutral files with the Technology Benefit Estimator (T/BEST) program which provides the necessary base parameters and loadings. This report contains the users manual for combustors, turbine blades, vanes, and disks.

  17. Advanced optical manufacturing digital integrated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Li, Wei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    It is necessarily to adapt development of advanced optical manufacturing technology with modern science technology development. To solved these problems which low of ration, ratio of finished product, repetition, consistent in big size and high precision in advanced optical component manufacturing. Applied business driven and method of Rational Unified Process, this paper has researched advanced optical manufacturing process flow, requirement of Advanced Optical Manufacturing integrated System, and put forward architecture and key technology of it. Designed Optical component core and Manufacturing process driven of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Digital Integrated System. the result displayed effective well, realized dynamic planning Manufacturing process, information integration improved ratio of production manufactory.

  18. Manufacturers' support policies.

    PubMed

    1992-09-01

    Choosing an effective plan for supporting a medical device is critical to its safe use, cost-effectiveness, and longevity. Hospitals can choose from a variety of support providers, including manufacturers, third-party service vendors, or hospital clinical engineering (CE) departments. However, if the hospital plans to use a third-party service vendor or its own CE department to provide support, the manufacturer's cooperation or assistance will still be needed to implement the support plan effectively. Over the years, ECRI has received many comments from hospitals about the way in which manufacturers respond to their equipment support needs. We have learned that some manufacturers are not willing to assist third-party service vendors or in-house service programs or do not always deliver the support they promise. Also, hospitals do not always consider their support needs before purchase, when they have the most leverage to negotiate flexible support arrangements. To help foster better equipment support and customer satisfaction, we polled manufacturers that have participated in recent Health Devices Evaluations to obtain detailed information about their policies toward manufacturers' contract, third-party, and in-house support. Ready access to this information will help hospitals evaluate whether manufacturers' support policies will meet their needs, and it will allow them to minimize problems by working with the manufacturer to negotiate optimal support arrangements during the purchase process. In this article, we briefly discuss the factors to consider when evaluating support alternatives and manufacturers' support policies. We also present the questions posed to each manufacturer on our Manufacturers' Support Policies Questionnaire, along with a summary of the responses that we received for each question.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1428903

  19. The Restitution Experience in Youth Employment. A Monograph and Training Guide to Jobs Components. Restitution Education, Specialized Training and Technical Assistance Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazemore, S. Gordon

    This document is a model curriculum for the development of employment components for juvenile restitution programs. It provides a practical discussion of the experiences of five restitution projects around the country, lists their job components, and presents an overview of the common features of successful employment components. A step-by-step…

  20. Cable manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, P.

    1972-01-01

    A survey is presented of flat electrical cable manufacturing, with particular reference to patented processes. The economics of manufacture based on an analysis of material and operating costs is considered for the various methods. Attention is given to the competitive advantages of the several processes and their resulting products. The historical area of flat cable manufacture is presented to give a frame of reference for the survey.

  1. Structured behavioral observation techniques as components of an effective fitness-for-duty program

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, J.T.; Barnes, V.E.; Moore, C.J.; Toquam, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Performance-based tests are designed to evaluate physical and cognitive performance and have several attractive features that may be useful in nuclear power plant fitness-for-duty programs. Three types of performance-based testing that may eventually be useful in the nuclear power industry are reviewed in this paper: (a) the Los Angeles Police Department's Drug Recognition Expert program, (b) performance assessment batteries, and (c) performance assessment devices. Each of these techniques is evaluated here in terms of the following measures of effectiveness: (1) scope, or the range of potential problems that can be detected; (2) reliability, or the consistency of results; (3) sensitivity, or the ability of the test to detect impairment or the presence of drugs at low levels; (4) specificity, or the ability of the test to correctly identify the source of impairment or the drug present; (5) implementation, or the practicality of using the technique in the nuclear power plant setting. This information analyzed in this paper indicates that although performance and cognitive assessment techniques currently lack the reliability, sensitivity, and specificity of random chemical screening to detect and deter substance abuse, they can address a variety of fitness-for-duty concerns that may not be adequately addressed by a urinalysis testing program alone. These include detection of drug use not detected by urinalysis, psychological stress, or physical injury or illness.

  2. Mixed waste chemical compatibility: A testing program for plastic packaging components

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of hazardous and radioactive materials packaging is to enable these materials to be transported without posing a threat to the health or property of the general public. To achieve this aim, regulations in the United States have been written establishing general design requirements for such packagings. While no regulations have been written specifically for mixed waste packaging, regulations for the constituents of mixed wastes, i.e., hazardous and radioactive substances, have been codified by the US Department of Transportation (DOT, 49 CFR 173) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, 10 CFR 71). The design requirements for both hazardous [49 CFR 173.24 (e)(1)] and radioactive [49 CFR 173.412 (g)] materials packaging specify packaging compatibility, i.e., that the materials of the packaging @d any contents be chemically compatible with each other. Furthermore, Type A [49 CFR 173.412 (g)] and Type B (10 CFR 71.43) packaging design requirements stipulate that there be no significant chemical, galvanic, or other reaction between the materials and contents of the package. Based on these requirements, a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program was developed in the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The program attempts to assure any regulatory body that the issue of packaging material compatibility towards hazardous and radioactive materials has been addressed. This program has been described in considerable detail in an internal SNL document, the Chemical Compatibility Test Plan & Procedure Report (Nigrey 1993).

  3. Effectiveness of a Multi-Component Intervention for Overweight and Obese Children (Nereu Program): A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Paya, Noemi; Ensenyat, Assumpta; Castro-Viñuales, Iván; Real, Jordi; Sinfreu-Bergués, Xènia; Zapata, Amalia; Mur, Jose María; Galindo-Ortego, Gisela; Solé-Mir, Eduard; Teixido, Concepció

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of childhood obesity is a complex challenge for primary health care professionals. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of the Nereu Program in improving anthropometric parameters, physical activity and sedentary behaviours, and dietary intake. Methods Randomized, controlled, multicentre clinical trial comparing Nereu Program and usual counselling group interventions in primary care settings. The 8-month study recruited 113 children aged 6 to 12 years with overweight/obesity. Before recruitment, eligible participants were randomly allocated to an intensive, family-based multi-component behavioural intervention (Nereu Program group) or usual advice from their paediatrician on healthy eating and physical activity. Anthropometric parameters, objectively measured sedentary and physical activity behaviours, and dietary intake were evaluated pre- and post-intervention. Results At the end of the study period, both groups achieved a similar decrease in body mass index (BMIsd) compared to baseline. Nereu Program participants (n = 54) showed greater increases in moderate-intense physical activity (+6.27% vs. -0.61%, p<0.001) and daily fruit servings (+0.62 vs. +0.13, p<0.026), and decreased daily soft drinks consumption (-0.26 vs. -0.02, p<0.047), respectively, compared to the counselling group (n = 59). Conclusions At the end of the 8-month intervention, participants in the Nereu Program group showed improvement in physical activity and dietary behaviours, compared to the counselling group. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01878994 PMID:26658988

  4. Program for the development of high temperature electrical materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, W. S.; Lowry, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    Evaluation of high temperature, space-vacuum performance of selected electrical materials and components, high temperature capacitor development, and evaluation, construction, and endurance testing of compression sealed pyrolytic boron nitride slot insulation are described. The first subject above covered the aging evaluation of electrical devices constructed from selected electrical materials. Individual materials performances were also evaluated and reported. The second subject included study of methods of improving electrical performance of pyrolytic boron nitride capacitors. The third portion was conducted to evaluate the thermal and electrical performance of pyrolytic boron nitride as stator slot liner material under varied temperature and compressive loading. Conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  5. Rates and Determinants of Uptake and Use of an Internet Physical Activity and Weight Management Program in Office and Manufacturing Work Sites in England: Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hurling, Robert; Bataveljic, Ogi; Fairley, Bruce W; Hurst, Tina L; Murray, Peter; Rennie, Kirsten L; Tomkins, Chris E; Finn, Anne; Cobain, Mark R; Pearson, Dympna A; Foreyt, John P

    2008-01-01

    Background Internet-based physical activity (PA) and weight management programs have the potential to improve employees’ health in large occupational health settings. To be successful, the program must engage a wide range of employees, especially those at risk of weight gain or ill health. Objective The aim of the study was to assess the use and nonuse (user attrition) of a Web-based and monitoring device–based PA and weight management program in a range of employees and to determine if engagement with the program was related to the employees’ baseline characteristics or measured outcomes. Methods Longitudinal observational study of a cohort of employees having access to the MiLife Web-based automated behavior change system. Employees were recruited from manufacturing and office sites in the North West and the South of England. Baseline health data were collected, and participants were given devices to monitor their weight and PA via data upload to the website. Website use, PA, and weight data were collected throughout the 12-week program. Results Overall, 12% of employees at the four sites (265/2302) agreed to participate in the program, with 130 men (49%) and 135 women (51%), and of these, 233 went on to start the program. During the program, the dropout rate was 5% (11/233). Of the remaining 222 Web program users, 173 (78%) were using the program at the end of the 12 weeks, with 69% (153/222) continuing after this period. Engagement with the program varied by site but was not significantly different between the office and factory sites. During the first 2 weeks, participants used the website, on average, 6 times per week, suggesting an initial learning period after which the frequency of website log-in was typically 2 visits per week and 7 minutes per visit. Employees who uploaded weight data had a significant reduction in weight (−2.6 kg, SD 3.2, P< .001). The reduction in weight was largest for employees using the program’s weight loss mode (−3

  6. Hazardous Materials Pharmacies - A Vital Component of a Robust P2 Program

    SciTech Connect

    McCarter, S.

    2006-07-01

    Integrating pollution prevention (P2) into the Department of Energy Integrated Safety Management (ISM) - Environmental Management System (EMS) approach, required by DOE Order 450.1, leads to an enhanced ISM program at large and complex installations and facilities. One of the building blocks to integrating P2 into a comprehensive environmental and safety program is the control and tracking of the amounts, types, and flow of hazardous materials used on a facility. Hazardous materials pharmacies (typically called HazMarts) provide a solid approach to resolving this issue through business practice changes that reduce use, avoid excess, and redistribute surplus. If understood from concept to implementation, the HazMart is a powerful tool for reducing pollution at the source, tracking inventory storage, controlling usage and flow, and summarizing data for reporting requirements. Pharmacy options can range from a strict, single control point for all hazardous materials to a virtual system, where the inventory is user controlled and reported over a common system. Designing and implementing HazMarts on large, diverse installations or facilities present a unique set of issues. This is especially true of research and development (R and D) facilities where the chemical use requirements are extensive and often classified. There are often multiple sources of supply; a wide variety of chemical requirements; a mix of containers ranging from small ampoules to large bulk storage tanks; and a wide range of tools used to track hazardous materials, ranging from simple purchase inventories to sophisticated tracking software. Computer systems are often not uniform in capacity, capability, or operating systems, making it difficult to use a server-based unified tracking system software. Each of these issues has a solution or set of solutions tied to fundamental business practices. Each requires an understanding of the problem at hand, which, in turn, requires good communication among all

  7. Implementation and testing of a real-time 3-component phase picking program for Earthworm using the CECM algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, B. I.; Friberg, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Modern seismic networks typically deploy three component (3C) sensors, but still fail to utilize all of the information available in the seismograms when performing automated phase picking for real-time event location. In most cases a variation on a short term over long term average threshold detector is used for picking and then an association program is used to assign phase types to the picks. However, the 3C waveforms from an earthquake contain an abundance of information related to the P and S phases in both their polarization and energy partitioning. An approach that has been overlooked and has demonstrated encouraging results is the Component Energy Comparison Method (CECM) by Nagano et al. as published in Geophysics 1989. CECM is well suited to being used in real-time because the calculation is not computationally intensive. Furthermore, the CECM method has fewer tuning variables (3) than traditional pickers in Earthworm such as the Rex Allen algorithm (N=18) or even the Anthony Lomax Filter Picker module (N=5). In addition to computing the CECM detector we study the detector sensitivity by rotating the signal into principle components as well as estimating the P phase onset from a curvature function describing the CECM as opposed to the CECM itself. We present our results implementing this algorithm in a real-time module for Earthworm and show the improved phase picks as compared to the traditional single component pickers using Earthworm.

  8. A testing program to evaluate the effects of simulant mixed wastes on plastic transportation packaging components

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.; Dickman, P.T.

    1997-08-01

    Based on regulatory requirements for Type A and B radioactive material packaging, a Testing Program was developed to evaluate the effects of mixed wastes on plastic materials which could be used as liners and seals in transportation containers. The plastics evaluated in this program were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile rubber), cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorohydrin, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbons, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), butyl rubber, polypropylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). These plastics were first screened in four simulant mixed wastes. The liner materials were screened using specific gravity measurements and seal materials by vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements. For the screening of liner materials, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE were found to offer the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals. The tests also indicated that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. Those materials which passed the screening tests were subjected to further comprehensive testing in each of the simulant wastes. The materials were exposed to four different radiation doses followed by exposure to a simulant mixed waste at three temperatures and four different exposure times (7, 14, 28, 180 days). Materials were tested by measuring specific gravity, dimensional, hardness, stress cracking, VTR, compression set, and tensile properties. The second phase of this Testing Program involving the comprehensive testing of plastic liner has been completed and for seal materials is currently in progress.

  9. Postabortion Care: 20 Years of Strong Evidence on Emergency Treatment, Family Planning, and Other Programming Components

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Douglas; Curtis, Carolyn; Irani, Laili; Pappa, Sara; Arrington, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Worldwide 75 million women need postabortion care (PAC) services each year following safe or unsafe induced abortions and miscarriages. We reviewed more than 550 studies on PAC published between 1994 and 2013 in the peer-reviewed and gray literature, covering emergency treatment, postabortion family planning, organization of services, and related topics that impact practices and health outcomes, particularly in the Global South. In this article, we present findings from studies with strong evidence that have major implications for programs and practice. For example, vacuum aspiration reduced morbidity, costs, and time in comparison to sharp curettage. Misoprostol 400 mcg sublingually or 600 mcg orally achieved 89% to 99% complete evacuation rates within 2 weeks in multiple studies and was comparable in effectiveness, safety, and acceptability to manual vacuum aspiration. Misoprostol was safely introduced in several PAC programs through mid-level providers, extending services to secondary hospitals and primary health centers. In multiple studies, postabortion family planning uptake before discharge increased by 30–70 percentage points within 1–3 years of strengthening postabortion family planning services; in some cases, increases up to 60 percentage points in 4 months were achieved. Immediate postabortion contraceptive acceptance increased on average from 32% before the interventions to 69% post-intervention. Several studies found that women receiving immediate postabortion intrauterine devices and implants had fewer unintended pregnancies and repeat abortions than those who were offered delayed insertions. Postabortion family planning is endorsed by the professional organizations of obstetricians/gynecologists, midwives, and nurses as a standard of practice; major donors agree, and governments should be encouraged to provide universal access to postabortion family planning. Important program recommendations include offering all postabortion women

  10. Postabortion Care: 20 Years of Strong Evidence on Emergency Treatment, Family Planning, and Other Programming Components.

    PubMed

    Huber, Douglas; Curtis, Carolyn; Irani, Laili; Pappa, Sara; Arrington, Lauren

    2016-09-28

    Worldwide 75 million women need postabortion care (PAC) services each year following safe or unsafe induced abortions and miscarriages. We reviewed more than 550 studies on PAC published between 1994 and 2013 in the peer-reviewed and gray literature, covering emergency treatment, postabortion family planning, organization of services, and related topics that impact practices and health outcomes, particularly in the Global South. In this article, we present findings from studies with strong evidence that have major implications for programs and practice. For example, vacuum aspiration reduced morbidity, costs, and time in comparison to sharp curettage. Misoprostol 400 mcg sublingually or 600 mcg orally achieved 89% to 99% complete evacuation rates within 2 weeks in multiple studies and was comparable in effectiveness, safety, and acceptability to manual vacuum aspiration. Misoprostol was safely introduced in several PAC programs through mid-level providers, extending services to secondary hospitals and primary health centers. In multiple studies, postabortion family planning uptake before discharge increased by 30-70 percentage points within 1-3 years of strengthening postabortion family planning services; in some cases, increases up to 60 percentage points in 4 months were achieved. Immediate postabortion contraceptive acceptance increased on average from 32% before the interventions to 69% post-intervention. Several studies found that women receiving immediate postabortion intrauterine devices and implants had fewer unintended pregnancies and repeat abortions than those who were offered delayed insertions. Postabortion family planning is endorsed by the professional organizations of obstetricians/gynecologists, midwives, and nurses as a standard of practice; major donors agree, and governments should be encouraged to provide universal access to postabortion family planning. Important program recommendations include offering all postabortion women family planning

  11. Postabortion Care: 20 Years of Strong Evidence on Emergency Treatment, Family Planning, and Other Programming Components.

    PubMed

    Huber, Douglas; Curtis, Carolyn; Irani, Laili; Pappa, Sara; Arrington, Lauren

    2016-09-28

    Worldwide 75 million women need postabortion care (PAC) services each year following safe or unsafe induced abortions and miscarriages. We reviewed more than 550 studies on PAC published between 1994 and 2013 in the peer-reviewed and gray literature, covering emergency treatment, postabortion family planning, organization of services, and related topics that impact practices and health outcomes, particularly in the Global South. In this article, we present findings from studies with strong evidence that have major implications for programs and practice. For example, vacuum aspiration reduced morbidity, costs, and time in comparison to sharp curettage. Misoprostol 400 mcg sublingually or 600 mcg orally achieved 89% to 99% complete evacuation rates within 2 weeks in multiple studies and was comparable in effectiveness, safety, and acceptability to manual vacuum aspiration. Misoprostol was safely introduced in several PAC programs through mid-level providers, extending services to secondary hospitals and primary health centers. In multiple studies, postabortion family planning uptake before discharge increased by 30-70 percentage points within 1-3 years of strengthening postabortion family planning services; in some cases, increases up to 60 percentage points in 4 months were achieved. Immediate postabortion contraceptive acceptance increased on average from 32% before the interventions to 69% post-intervention. Several studies found that women receiving immediate postabortion intrauterine devices and implants had fewer unintended pregnancies and repeat abortions than those who were offered delayed insertions. Postabortion family planning is endorsed by the professional organizations of obstetricians/gynecologists, midwives, and nurses as a standard of practice; major donors agree, and governments should be encouraged to provide universal access to postabortion family planning. Important program recommendations include offering all postabortion women family planning

  12. Manufacturing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  13. Manufacturing Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, James L.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist junior high school industrial arts teachers in planning new courses and revising existing courses in manufacturing technology. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: introduction to manufacturing, materials processing, personnel management, production management,…

  14. Seasonal components of avian population change: Joint analysis of two large-scale monitoring programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Sauer, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of data from two large-scale surveys of bird populations. The North American Breeding Bird Survey is conducted each summer; the Christmas Bird Count is conducted in early winter. The temporal staggering of these surveys allows investigation of seasonal components of population change, which we illustrate with an examination of the effects of severe winters on the Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus). Our analysis uses a hierarchical log-linear model with controls for survey-specific sampling covariates. Temporal change in population size is modeled seasonally, with covariates for winter severity. Overall, the winter?spring seasons are associated with 82% of the total population variation for Carolina Wrens, and an additional day of snow cover during winter?spring is associated with an incremental decline of 1.1% of the population.

  15. Seasonal components of avian population change: joint analysis of two large-scale monitoring programs.

    PubMed

    Link, William A; Sauer, John R

    2007-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of data from two large-scale surveys of bird populations. The North American Breeding Bird Survey is conducted each summer; the Christmas Bird Count is conducted in early winter. The temporal staggering of these surveys allows investigation of seasonal components of population change, which we illustrate with an examination of the effects of severe winters on the Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus). Our analysis uses a hierarchical log-linear model with controls for survey-specific sampling covariates. Temporal change in population size is modeled seasonally, with covariates for winter severity. Overall, the winter-spring seasons are associated with 82% of the total population variation for Carolina Wrens, and an additional day of snow cover during winter-spring is associated with an incremental decline of 1.1% of the population.

  16. Assessing intervention fidelity in a multi-level, multi-component, multi-site program: the Children's Healthy Living (CHL) program.

    PubMed

    Butel, Jean; Braun, Kathryn L; Novotny, Rachel; Acosta, Mark; Castro, Rose; Fleming, Travis; Powers, Julianne; Nigg, Claudio R

    2015-12-01

    Addressing complex chronic disease prevention, like childhood obesity, requires a multi-level, multi-component culturally relevant approach with broad reach. Models are lacking to guide fidelity monitoring across multiple levels, components, and sites engaged in such interventions. The aim of this study is to describe the fidelity-monitoring approach of The Children's Healthy Living (CHL) Program, a multi-level multi-component intervention in five Pacific jurisdictions. A fidelity-monitoring rubric was developed. About halfway during the intervention, community partners were randomly selected and interviewed independently by local CHL staff and by Coordinating Center representatives to assess treatment fidelity. Ratings were compared and discussed by local and Coordinating Center staff. There was good agreement between the teams (Kappa = 0.50, p < 0.001), and intervention improvement opportunities were identified through data review and group discussion. Fidelity for the multi-level, multi-component, multi-site CHL intervention was successfully assessed, identifying adaptations as well as ways to improve intervention delivery prior to the end of the intervention.

  17. Building the Interest of High School Students for Science- A PACT Ambassador Program To Investigate Soap Manufacturing and Industrial Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Matthew; Geary, Nicholas; Hagaman, Karen; Munson, Anne; Sabo, Mark

    1999-02-01

    The Ambassador Program of the Partnership for the Advancement of Chemical Technology (PACT) brings industrial applications of technology into high schools to enhance the student's perception of the chemical industry and industrial careers in chemistry. This article details a two-year effort (1996 and 1997) in which ambassadors from the Procter and Gamble Company and Miami University-Middletown worked with Finneytown High School students. The program entailed following a typical product development cycle for fabricating commercially viable soap products. It exposed students to as many aspects of science and science careers as possible, from traditional research and development to product research. The objective of the article is to inform the reader about the program with sufficient detail to encourage similar efforts. Thus, it includes a discussion of the initiation, organization, and curriculum of the program and also provides a critique as an evaluation of its effectiveness.

  18. The Puerto Rico Component of the National Tsunami Hazard and Mitigation Program Pr-Nthmp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerfano Moreno, V. A.; Hincapie-Cardenas, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunami hazard assessment, detection, warning, education and outreach efforts are intended to reduce losses to life and property. The Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN) is participating in an effort with local and federal agencies, to developing tsunami hazard risk reduction strategies under the National Tsunami Hazards and Mitigation Program (NTHMP). This grant supports the TsunamiReady program which is the base of the tsunami preparedness and mitigation in PR. The Caribbean region has a documented history of damaging tsunamis that have affected coastal areas. The seismic water waves originating in the prominent fault systems around PR are considered to be a near-field hazard for Puerto Rico and the Virgin islands (PR/VI) because they can reach coastal areas within a few minutes after the earthquake. Sources for local, regional and tele tsunamis have been identified and modeled and tsunami evacuation maps were prepared for PR. These maps were generated in three phases: First, hypothetical tsunami scenarios on the basis of the parameters of potential underwater earthquakes were developed. Secondly, each of these scenarios was simulated. The third step was to determine the worst case scenario (MOM). The run-ups were drawn on GIS referenced maps and aerial photographs. These products are being used by emergency managers to educate the public and develop mitigation strategies. Online maps and related evacuation products are available to the public via the PR-TDST (PR Tsunami Decision Support Tool). Currently all the 44 coastal municipalities were recognized as TsunamiReady by the US NWS. The main goal of the program is to declare Puerto Rico as TsunamiReady, including two cities that are not coastal but could be affected by tsunamis. Based on these evacuation maps, tsunami signs were installed, vulnerability profiles were created, communication systems to receive and disseminate tsunami messages were installed in each TWFP, and tsunami response plans were approved

  19. Methods and computer program documentation for determining anisotropic transmissivity tensor components of two-dimensional ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maslia, M.L.; Randolph, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of anisotropic aquifer hydraulic properties and a computer program, written in Fortran 77, developed to compute the components of the anisotropic transmissivity tensor of two-dimensional groundwater flow are described. To determine the tensor components using one pumping well and three observation wells, the type-curve and straight-line approximation methods are developed. These methods are based on the equation of drawdown developed for two-dimensional nonsteady flow in an infinite anisotropic aquifer. To determine tensor components using more than three observation wells, a weighted least squares optimization procedure is described for use with the type-curve and straight-line approximation methods. The computer program described in this report allows the type-curve, straight-line approximation, and weighted least squares optimization methods to be used in conjunction with data from observation and pumping wells. Three example applications using the computer program and field data gathered during geohydrologic investigations at a site near Dawsonville, Georgia , are provided to illustrate the use of the computer program. The example applications demonstrate the use of the type-curve method using three observation wells, the weighted least squares optimization method using eight observation wells and equal weighting, and the weighted least squares optimization method using eight observation wells and unequal weighting. Results obtained using the computer program indicate major transmissivity in the range of 347-296 sq ft/day, minor transmissivity in the range of 139-99 sq ft/day, aquifer anisotropy in the range of 3.54 to 2.14, principal direction of flow in the range of N. 45.9 degrees E. to N. 58.7 degrees E., and storage coefficient in the range of 0.0063 to 0.0037. The numerical results are in good agreement with field data gathered on the weathered crystalline rocks underlying the investigation site. Supplemental material provides definitions of

  20. Monitoring programs to assess reintroduction efforts: A critical component in recovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Dreitz, V.

    2008-01-01

    Reintroduction is a powerful tool in our conservation toolbox. However, the necessary follow-up, i.e. long-term monitoring, is not commonplace and if instituted may lack rigor. We contend that valid monitoring is possible, even with sparse data. We present a means to monitor based on demographic data and a projection model using the Wyoming toad (Bufo baxten) as an example. Using an iterative process, existing data is built upon gradually such that demographic estimates and subsequent inferences increase in reliability. Reintroduction and defensible monitoring may become increasingly relevant as the outlook for amphibians, especially in tropical regions, continues to deteriorate and emergency collection, captive breeding, and reintroduction become necessary. Rigorous use of appropriate modeling and an adaptive approach can validate the use of reintroduction and substantially increase its value to recovery programs. ?? 2008 Museu de Cie??ncies Naturals.

  1. High Fidelity System Simulation of Multiple Components in Support of the UEET Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plybon, Ronald C.; VanDeWall, Allan; Sampath, Rajiv; Balasubramaniam, Mahadevan; Mallina, Ramakrishna; Irani, Rohinton

    2006-01-01

    The High Fidelity System Simulation effort has addressed various important objectives to enable additional capability within the NPSS framework. The scope emphasized High Pressure Turbine and High Pressure Compressor components. Initial effort was directed at developing and validating intermediate fidelity NPSS model using PD geometry and extended to high-fidelity NPSS model by overlaying detailed geometry to validate CFD against rig data. Both "feedforward" and feedback" approaches of analysis zooming was employed to enable system simulation capability in NPSS. These approaches have certain benefits and applicability in terms of specific applications "feedback" zooming allows the flow-up of information from high-fidelity analysis to be used to update the NPSS model results by forcing the NPSS solver to converge to high-fidelity analysis predictions. This apporach is effective in improving the accuracy of the NPSS model; however, it can only be used in circumstances where there is a clear physics-based strategy to flow up the high-fidelity analysis results to update the NPSS system model. "Feed-forward" zooming approach is more broadly useful in terms of enabling detailed analysis at early stages of design for a specified set of critical operating points and using these analysis results to drive design decisions early in the development process.

  2. Using Discrete Event Simulation for Programming Model Exploration at Extreme-Scale: Macroscale Components for the Structural Simulation Toolkit (SST).

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, Jeremiah J; Kenny, Joseph P.

    2015-02-01

    Discrete event simulation provides a powerful mechanism for designing and testing new extreme- scale programming models for high-performance computing. Rather than debug, run, and wait for results on an actual system, design can first iterate through a simulator. This is particularly useful when test beds cannot be used, i.e. to explore hardware or scales that do not yet exist or are inaccessible. Here we detail the macroscale components of the structural simulation toolkit (SST). Instead of depending on trace replay or state machines, the simulator is architected to execute real code on real software stacks. Our particular user-space threading framework allows massive scales to be simulated even on small clusters. The link between the discrete event core and the threading framework allows interesting performance metrics like call graphs to be collected from a simulated run. Performance analysis via simulation can thus become an important phase in extreme-scale programming model and runtime system design via the SST macroscale components.

  3. Specialized core stability exercise: a neglected component of anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dong-liang; Li, Jing-long; Zhai, Hua; Wang, Hui-fang; Meng, Han; Wang, Yu-bin

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury has continued to increase over the last two decades. This injury is associated with abnormal gait patterns and osteoarthritis of the knee. In order to accelerate recovery, the introduction of core stability exercises into the rehabilitation program is proposed. The theory underlying the use of core stability exercise relates to the neuroplasticity that follows anterior cruciate ligament injury. Neuroplasticity in lumbar, thoracic, cervical and brain regions diminish activation in the contralateral thalamus, postparietal cortex, SM1, basal ganglia-external globus pallidus, SII, cingulated motor area, premotor cortex, and in the ipsilateral cerebellum and SM1 and increase activation in pre-SMA, SIIp, and pITG, indicating modifications of the CNS. In addition, the neuroplasticity can regulate the movement of trunk muscles, for example, sternocleidomastoid and lower trapezius muscles. Core stability also demonstrates a negative correlation with the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Therefore, we propose that core stability exercises may improve the rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries by increasing core motor control. Specialized core stability exercises aimed at rectifying biomechanical problems associated with gait and core stability may play a key role in the management of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  4. Full Parallel Implementation of an All-Electron Four-Component Dirac-Kohn-Sham Program.

    PubMed

    Rampino, Sergio; Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Storchi, Loriano

    2014-09-01

    A full distributed-memory implementation of the Dirac-Kohn-Sham (DKS) module of the program BERTHA (Belpassi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2011, 13, 12368-12394) is presented, where the self-consistent field (SCF) procedure is replicated on all the parallel processes, each process working on subsets of the global matrices. The key feature of the implementation is an efficient procedure for switching between two matrix distribution schemes, one (integral-driven) optimal for the parallel computation of the matrix elements and another (block-cyclic) optimal for the parallel linear algebra operations. This approach, making both CPU-time and memory scalable with the number of processors used, virtually overcomes at once both time and memory barriers associated with DKS calculations. Performance, portability, and numerical stability of the code are illustrated on the basis of test calculations on three gold clusters of increasing size, an organometallic compound, and a perovskite model. The calculations are performed on a Beowulf and a BlueGene/Q system.

  5. The Mach 10 Component of NASA's Hyper-X Ground Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakos, R. J.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Rogers, R. C.; Shih, A. T.

    1999-01-01

    The Mach 10 Hyper-X ground test program is described, in which experimental flowpath parametric testing is being done in the HYPULSE facility. This facility has been upgraded for this effort by adding a reflected-shock-tunnel operating mode to access test conditions at Mach 10 and below. A large test section and hypersonic nozzle have been installed to provide full-scale engine test capability and the instrumentation systems have been expanded. A model of the Hyper-X engine flowpath has been built for freejet testing in the shock tunnel at both Mach 7 and 10 flight conditions. The model has over 180 instrumentation ports, a pitot rake mountable at the engine inlet or exit, and optical windows for visualization of the isolator, combustor, and nozzle. Testing in HYPULSE has been completed at Mach 7 conditions to provide a link between pulse facility data and the large Hyper-X performance database that is being accumulated in long-duration facilities. Comparisons of Mach 7 data with computational predictions and with data recently acquired for an identical flowpath being tested in the NASA 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel are presented.

  6. Full Parallel Implementation of an All-Electron Four-Component Dirac-Kohn-Sham Program.

    PubMed

    Rampino, Sergio; Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Storchi, Loriano

    2014-09-01

    A full distributed-memory implementation of the Dirac-Kohn-Sham (DKS) module of the program BERTHA (Belpassi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2011, 13, 12368-12394) is presented, where the self-consistent field (SCF) procedure is replicated on all the parallel processes, each process working on subsets of the global matrices. The key feature of the implementation is an efficient procedure for switching between two matrix distribution schemes, one (integral-driven) optimal for the parallel computation of the matrix elements and another (block-cyclic) optimal for the parallel linear algebra operations. This approach, making both CPU-time and memory scalable with the number of processors used, virtually overcomes at once both time and memory barriers associated with DKS calculations. Performance, portability, and numerical stability of the code are illustrated on the basis of test calculations on three gold clusters of increasing size, an organometallic compound, and a perovskite model. The calculations are performed on a Beowulf and a BlueGene/Q system. PMID:26588521

  7. Temperature Programmed Desorption of Quench-condensed Krypton and Acetone in Air; Selective Concentration of Ultra-trace Gas Components.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Taku T; Sakaguchi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Selective concentration of ultra-trace components in air-like gases has an important application in analyzing volatile organic compounds in the gas. In the present study, we examined quench-condensation of the sample gas on a ZnO substrate below 50 K followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) (low temperature TPD) as a selective gas concentration technique. We studied two specific gases in the normal air; krypton as an inert gas and acetone as a reactive gas. We evaluated the relationship between the operating condition of low temperature TPD and the lowest detection limit. In the case of krypton, we observed the selective concentration by exposing at 6 K followed by thermal desorption at about 60 K. On the other hand, no selectivity appeared for acetone although trace acetone was successfully concentrated. This is likely due to the solvent effect by a major component in the air, which is suggested to be water. We suggest that pre-condensation to remove the water component may improve the selectivity in the trace acetone analysis by low temperature TPD.

  8. Temperature Programmed Desorption of Quench-condensed Krypton and Acetone in Air; Selective Concentration of Ultra-trace Gas Components.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Taku T; Sakaguchi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Selective concentration of ultra-trace components in air-like gases has an important application in analyzing volatile organic compounds in the gas. In the present study, we examined quench-condensation of the sample gas on a ZnO substrate below 50 K followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) (low temperature TPD) as a selective gas concentration technique. We studied two specific gases in the normal air; krypton as an inert gas and acetone as a reactive gas. We evaluated the relationship between the operating condition of low temperature TPD and the lowest detection limit. In the case of krypton, we observed the selective concentration by exposing at 6 K followed by thermal desorption at about 60 K. On the other hand, no selectivity appeared for acetone although trace acetone was successfully concentrated. This is likely due to the solvent effect by a major component in the air, which is suggested to be water. We suggest that pre-condensation to remove the water component may improve the selectivity in the trace acetone analysis by low temperature TPD. PMID:27063719

  9. Process for manufacturing multilayer capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1996-01-01

    The invention is directed to a method of manufacture of multilayer electrical components, especially capacitors, and components made by such a method. High capacitance dielectric materials and low cost metallizations layered with such dielectrics may be fabricated as multilayer electrical components by sintering the metallizations and the dielectrics during the fabrication process by application of microwave radiation.

  10. Process for manufacturing multilayer capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1996-01-02

    The invention is directed to a method of manufacture of multilayer electrical components, especially capacitors, and components made by such a method. High capacitance dielectric materials and low cost metallizations layered with such dielectrics may be fabricated as multilayer electrical components by sintering the metallizations and the dielectrics during the fabrication process by application of microwave radiation. 4 figs.

  11. Smart Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jim; Edgar, Thomas; Graybill, Robert; Korambath, Prakashan; Schott, Brian; Swink, Denise; Wang, Jianwu; Wetzel, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Historic manufacturing enterprises based on vertically optimized companies, practices, market share, and competitiveness are giving way to enterprises that are responsive across an entire value chain to demand dynamic markets and customized product value adds; increased expectations for environmental sustainability, reduced energy usage, and zero incidents; and faster technology and product adoption. Agile innovation and manufacturing combined with radically increased productivity become engines for competitiveness and reinvestment, not simply for decreased cost. A focus on agility, productivity, energy, and environmental sustainability produces opportunities that are far beyond reducing market volatility. Agility directly impacts innovation, time-to-market, and faster, broader exploration of the trade space. These changes, the forces driving them, and new network-based information technologies offering unprecedented insights and analysis are motivating the advent of smart manufacturing and new information technology infrastructure for manufacturing. PMID:25898070

  12. Smart Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jim; Edgar, Thomas; Graybill, Robert; Korambath, Prakashan; Schott, Brian; Swink, Denise; Wang, Jianwu; Wetzel, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Historic manufacturing enterprises based on vertically optimized companies, practices, market share, and competitiveness are giving way to enterprises that are responsive across an entire value chain to demand dynamic markets and customized product value adds; increased expectations for environmental sustainability, reduced energy usage, and zero incidents; and faster technology and product adoption. Agile innovation and manufacturing combined with radically increased productivity become engines for competitiveness and reinvestment, not simply for decreased cost. A focus on agility, productivity, energy, and environmental sustainability produces opportunities that are far beyond reducing market volatility. Agility directly impacts innovation, time-to-market, and faster, broader exploration of the trade space. These changes, the forces driving them, and new network-based information technologies offering unprecedented insights and analysis are motivating the advent of smart manufacturing and new information technology infrastructure for manufacturing.

  13. Manufacturing Aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-01-01

    Contractor's work for Lewis Research Center on "thermal barrier" coatings designed to improve aircraft engine efficiency resulted in two related but separate spinoffs. The Materials and Manufacturing Technology Center of TRW, Inc. invented a robotic system for applying the coating, and in the course of that research found it necessary to develop a new, extremely accurate type of optical gage that offers multiple improvements in controlling the quality of certain manufactured parts.

  14. SCARE: A post-processor program to MSC/NASTRAN for the reliability analysis of structural ceramic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program was developed for calculating the statistical fast fracture reliability and failure probability of ceramic components. The program includes the two-parameter Weibull material fracture strength distribution model, using the principle of independent action for polyaxial stress states and Batdorf's shear-sensitive as well as shear-insensitive crack theories, all for volume distributed flaws in macroscopically isotropic solids. Both penny-shaped cracks and Griffith cracks are included in the Batdorf shear-sensitive crack response calculations, using Griffith's maximum tensile stress or critical coplanar strain energy release rate criteria to predict mixed mode fracture. Weibull material parameters can also be calculated from modulus of rupture bar tests, using the least squares method with known specimen geometry and fracture data. The reliability prediction analysis uses MSC/NASTRAN stress, temperature and volume output, obtained from the use of three-dimensional, quadratic, isoparametric, or axisymmetric finite elements. The statistical fast fracture theories employed, along with selected input and output formats and options, are summarized. An example problem to demonstrate various features of the program is included.

  15. Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components Report from the Program’s Steering Committee: Inspection of Bottom-Mounted Instrumentation Nozzles Round Robin

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Doctor, Steven R.; Taylor, Theodore T.

    2009-11-13

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) executed agreements with organizations in Japan, Sweden, South Korea, Finland, and the United States to establish the Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC).

  16. Industrial Arts 7-9. Manufacturing: Metalwork, Plastics, Woodwork, Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for the industrial arts (grades 7-9) subject cluster of manufacturing. This subject cluster has four areas of study: metalwork, plastics, woodwork, and manufacturing. Introductory materials include an overview of the industrial arts curriculum in its entirety, a listing of program objectives for each of the…

  17. Directory of IEC Assistance. Sources and Types of Aid Available for the Information, Education, Communication Components of Population/Family Planning Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. East-West Center.

    This directory is intended as a source of information on the types and sources of assistance available to support the information, education, communication (IEC) components of population/family planning programs in developing countries. Forty international agencies are identified as involved in supporting the IEC components of population/family…

  18. NASA NDE Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Ed; Burke, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The current activities in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Program are presented. The topics covered include organizational communications, orbital weld inspection, electric field imaging, fracture critical probability of detection validation, monitoring of thermal protection systems, physical and document standards, image quality indicators, integrity of composite pressure vessels, and NDE for additively manufactured components.

  19. 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components (base program). [turbine blades, turbine vanes, and combustor liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Bak, M. J.; Nakazawa, S.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    A 3-D inelastic analysis methods program consists of a series of computer codes embodying a progression of mathematical models (mechanics of materials, special finite element, boundary element) for streamlined analysis of combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. These models address the effects of high temperatures and thermal/mechanical loadings on the local (stress/strain) and global (dynamics, buckling) structural behavior of the three selected components. These models are used to solve 3-D inelastic problems using linear approximations in the sense that stresses/strains and temperatures in generic modeling regions are linear functions of the spatial coordinates, and solution increments for load, temperature and/or time are extrapolated linearly from previous information. Three linear formulation computer codes, referred to as MOMM (Mechanics of Materials Model), MHOST (MARC-Hot Section Technology), and BEST (Boundary Element Stress Technology), were developed and are described.

  20. Manufacturing information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D. K.; Smith, P. R.; Smart, M. J.

    1983-12-01

    The size and cost of manufacturing equipment has made it extremely difficult to perform realistic modeling and simulation of the manufacturing process in university research laboratories. Likewise the size and cost factors, coupled with many uncontrolled variables of the production situation has even made it difficult to perform adequate manufacturing research in the industrial setting. Only the largest companies can afford manufacturing research laboratories; research results are often held proprietary and seldom find their way into the university classroom to aid in education and training of new manufacturing engineers. It is the purpose for this research to continue the development of miniature prototype equipment suitable for use in an integrated CAD/CAM Laboratory. The equipment being developed is capable of actually performing production operations (e.g. drilling, milling, turning, punching, etc.) on metallic and non-metallic workpieces. The integrated CAD/CAM Mini-Lab is integrating high resolution, computer graphics, parametric design, parametric N/C parts programmings, CNC machine control, automated storage and retrieval, with robotics materials handling. The availability of miniature CAD/CAM laboratory equipment will provide the basis for intensive laboratory research on manufacturing information systems.

  1. Manufacturing process applications team (MATeam)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangs, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in the transfer of aerospace technology to solve key problems in the manufacturing sector of the economy is reported. Potential RTOP programs are summarized along with dissemination activities. The impact of transferred NASA manufacturing technology is discussed. Specific areas covered include aircraft production, robot technology, machining of alloys, and electrical switching systems.

  2. Graphical simulation for aerospace manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babai, Majid; Bien, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    Simulation software has become a key technological enabler for integrating flexible manufacturing systems and streamlining the overall aerospace manufacturing process. In particular, robot simulation and offline programming software is being credited for reducing down time and labor cost, while boosting quality and significantly increasing productivity.

  3. Intelligent machining of rough components from optimized CAD models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Geoff; Thompson, William

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes a technique for automatically generating NC machine programs from CAD images of a rough work piece and an optimally positioned component. The paper briefly compares the generative and variant methods of automatic machine program development and then presents a technique based on the variant method where a reference machine program is transformed to machine the optimized component. The transformed machine program is examined to remove any redundant cutter motions and correct any invalid cutter motions. The research is part of a larger project on intelligent manufacturing systems and is being conducted at the CIM Centre, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Australia.

  4. A Decade of Evolution in the Practice Teaching Component of a Canadian Teacher Education Program: What Drove Change, What Insights Were Gleaned, and What Challenges Lie Ahead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Fiona; Hooton, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the many and diverse factors that have driven changes to the field-based component of a program of teacher education in a large Canadian university over the past 10 years. We look at key contexts of influence to any work in program change; that of internal and external bodies at the institutional level, the operational or…

  5. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  6. Initial Evaluation tests of 20.0 amphere-hour sealed nickel-cadmium cells manufactured for NASA's standard cell program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    Evaluation tests of 116 nickel cadmium cells provided by four manufacturers are described. Each manufacturer's group of cells, on the average, indicated an increase in plate stack thickness following the test. No limits or requirements were exceeded by any of the cells manufactured by General Electric. Limits/requirements exceeded during the charge portion of the testing are given.

  7. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 1: Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1991-01-01

    Formulations and algorithms implemented in the MHOST finite element program are discussed. The code uses a novel concept of the mixed iterative solution technique for the efficient 3-D computations of turbine engine hot section components. The general framework of variational formulation and solution algorithms are discussed which were derived from the mixed three field Hu-Washizu principle. This formulation enables the use of nodal interpolation for coordinates, displacements, strains, and stresses. Algorithmic description of the mixed iterative method includes variations for the quasi static, transient dynamic and buckling analyses. The global-local analysis procedure referred to as the subelement refinement is developed in the framework of the mixed iterative solution, of which the detail is presented. The numerically integrated isoparametric elements implemented in the framework is discussed. Methods to filter certain parts of strain and project the element discontinuous quantities to the nodes are developed for a family of linear elements. Integration algorithms are described for linear and nonlinear equations included in MHOST program.

  8. Manufacturing overview at the Department of Energy Oak Ridge facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Riepe, R.C.

    1993-08-20

    Recent changes in the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant mission make possible the access by industry to a national resource with a history of manufacturing high precision components from conventional, exotic, and hazardous materials. Turning, milling, grinding, and many nontraditional machining techniques combined with high- accuracy dimensional inspection, nontraditional testing, and a broad range of surface treatments/coatings support national programs requiring the highest possible quality. The Centers for Manufacturing Technology (1-800-356-4USA) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant site provide an impressive mix of resources and opportunities to American industry.

  9. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Reserve Select; TRICARE Dental Program; Early Eligibility for TRICARE for Certain Reserve Component Members. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-09-15

    TRICARE Reserve Select (TRS) is a premium-based TRICARE health plan available for purchase worldwide by qualified members of the Ready Reserve and by qualified survivors of TRS members. TRICARE Dental Program (TDP) is a premium-based TRICARE dental plan available for purchase worldwide by qualified Service members. This final rule revises requirements and procedures for the TRS program to specify the appropriate actuarial basis for calculating premiums in addition to making other minor clarifying administrative changes. For a member who is involuntarily separated from the Selected Reserve under other than adverse conditions this final rule provides a time-limited exception that allows TRS coverage in effect to continue for up to 180 days after the date on which the member is separated from the Selected Reserve and TDP coverage in effect to continue for no less than 180 days after the separation date. It also expands early TRICARE eligibility for certain Reserve Component members from a maximum of 90 days to a maximum of 180 days prior to activation in support of a contingency operation for more than 30 days. PMID:26387151

  10. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Reserve Select; TRICARE Dental Program; Early Eligibility for TRICARE for Certain Reserve Component Members. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-09-15

    TRICARE Reserve Select (TRS) is a premium-based TRICARE health plan available for purchase worldwide by qualified members of the Ready Reserve and by qualified survivors of TRS members. TRICARE Dental Program (TDP) is a premium-based TRICARE dental plan available for purchase worldwide by qualified Service members. This final rule revises requirements and procedures for the TRS program to specify the appropriate actuarial basis for calculating premiums in addition to making other minor clarifying administrative changes. For a member who is involuntarily separated from the Selected Reserve under other than adverse conditions this final rule provides a time-limited exception that allows TRS coverage in effect to continue for up to 180 days after the date on which the member is separated from the Selected Reserve and TDP coverage in effect to continue for no less than 180 days after the separation date. It also expands early TRICARE eligibility for certain Reserve Component members from a maximum of 90 days to a maximum of 180 days prior to activation in support of a contingency operation for more than 30 days.

  11. Ceramic automotive Stirling engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

  12. Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

  13. Ceramic component manufacturing process development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.

    1996-09-30

    Ceramic materials are well suited for applications where temperature, wear, and corrosion resistance are necessary. The toughness and wear resistance properties that make ceramics desirable, also make fabrication of parts difficult. The objective of this CRADA was to increase the grinding efficiency on Ceradyne Incorporated silicon nitride. This was to be accomplished through optimization of grinding wheel life and increasing silicon nitride material removal rates. Experiments were conducted to determine the relationship between grinding parameters, wheel wear, and material removal rates. Due to excessive, unexplained variation in the experimental results, a consistent relationship between the selected grinding parameters and wheel wear could not be established. Maximum material removal rates were limited by spindle and table drive power. Additional experiments were conducted to evaluate high speed grinding. When compared to conventional grinding speeds, the material removal rates using high speed grinding (13,000 SFM) increased by a factor of five to ten with no degradation of fracture strength.

  14. Ramp Technology and Intelligent Processing in Small Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rentz, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    To address the issues of excessive inventories and increasing procurement lead times, the Navy is actively pursuing flexible computer integrated manufacturing (FCIM) technologies, integrated by communication networks to respond rapidly to its requirements for parts. The Rapid Acquisition of Manufactured Parts (RAMP) program, initiated in 1986, is an integral part of this effort. The RAMP program's goal is to reduce the current average production lead times experienced by the Navy's inventory control points by a factor of 90 percent. The manufacturing engineering component of the RAMP architecture utilizes an intelligent processing technology built around a knowledge-based shell provided by ICAD, Inc. Rules and data bases in the software simulate an expert manufacturing planner's knowledge of shop processes and equipment. This expert system can use Product Data Exchange using STEP (PDES) data to determine what features the required part has, what material is required to manufacture it, what machines and tools are needed, and how the part should be held (fixtured) for machining, among other factors. The program's rule base then indicates, for example, how to make each feature, in what order to make it, and to which machines on the shop floor the part should be routed for processing. This information becomes part of the shop work order. The process planning function under RAMP greatly reduces the time and effort required to complete a process plan. Since the PDES file that drives the intelligent processing is 100 percent complete and accurate to start with, the potential for costly errors is greatly diminished.

  15. 16 CFR 1505.4 - Manufacturing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Manufacturing requirements. 1505.4 Section... USE BY CHILDREN Regulations § 1505.4 Manufacturing requirements. (a) General. (1) Only materials safe...-equipped manufacturing establishment. Each component of a toy shall comply with the requirements set...

  16. 16 CFR 1505.4 - Manufacturing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Manufacturing requirements. 1505.4 Section... USE BY CHILDREN Regulations § 1505.4 Manufacturing requirements. (a) General. (1) Only materials safe...-equipped manufacturing establishment. Each component of a toy shall comply with the requirements set...

  17. 16 CFR 1505.4 - Manufacturing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Manufacturing requirements. 1505.4 Section... USE BY CHILDREN Regulations § 1505.4 Manufacturing requirements. (a) General. (1) Only materials safe...-equipped manufacturing establishment. Each component of a toy shall comply with the requirements set...

  18. 16 CFR 1505.4 - Manufacturing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Manufacturing requirements. 1505.4 Section... USE BY CHILDREN Regulations § 1505.4 Manufacturing requirements. (a) General. (1) Only materials safe...-equipped manufacturing establishment. Each component of a toy shall comply with the requirements set...

  19. 16 CFR 1505.4 - Manufacturing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Manufacturing requirements. 1505.4 Section... USE BY CHILDREN Regulations § 1505.4 Manufacturing requirements. (a) General. (1) Only materials safe...-equipped manufacturing establishment. Each component of a toy shall comply with the requirements set...

  20. The Ceramic Manufacturability Center: A new partnership with US industry

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Morris, T.O.

    1993-12-01

    The Ceramic Manufacturability Center (CMC) is a new facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) established as a direct response to current US industry needs. It was created as part of a highly integrated program jointly funded by the US Department of Energy Defense Programs, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and Energy Research divisions. The CMC is staffed by personnel from ORNL and the Y-12 Plant, both managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Its mission is to improve the technology needed to manufacture high-precision ceramic components inexpensively and reliably. This mission can be accomplished by strengthening the US machine tool industry and by joining with ceramic material suppliers and end users to provide a path to commercialization of these ceramic components.

  1. Economic Returns to Sub-Baccalaureate Technical Education: A Study of Labor Market Outcomes for Manufacturing Engineering Technologist and Technician Education (METTE) Programs in the Wisconsin Technical College System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheny, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the labor market outcomes of sub-baccalaureate education for individuals attending Manufacturing Engineering Technologist and Technician Education (METTE) programs in the Wisconsin Technical College System. Increasingly, public policy for postsecondary education and economic development, as well as decisions…

  2. Free-piston Stirling engine diaphragm-coupled Heat-Actuated Heat Pump component technology program. Volume 1: Technical discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of an effort to develop and demonstrate the technical feasibility of a residential size Stirling-engine-driven diaphragm-coupled compressor for a heat pump application. The heat pump module consists of a 3-kW free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE), an efficient hydraulic transmission, and a nominal 3-ton capacity refrigerant (R-22) reciprocating compressor. During earlier Phase 1 activity, the lower end (hydraulic transmission and compressor) was designed, fabricated, mated to an existing Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) FPSE, and tested. After several years of development, this heat pump module achieved a capacity of 2.5 refrigeration tons at 95 F ambient conditions. While this was below the module's rated 3.0-ton capacity, it demonstrated the potential of the FPSE heat pump (FPSE/HP) and identified a lack of engine power as the main reason for the low capacity. During a companion engine development program sponsored by the Gas Research Institute, the engine was improved by developing a new displacer drive that increased the FPSE's power capability. During Phase 2, the new engine, the Mark I, was mated to the lower end (transmission/compressor) and tested. The testing of the Mark I FPSE/HP module was very successful, with the system achieving its 3.0-ton capacity goal and all other proof-of-concepts targets. Included herein is a discussion of the Phase 2 activity, including the results of the Mark I FPSE/HP module testing, a component design effort of several key lower end components that was performed to optimize the design, and the Lennox evaluation.

  3. A Model Articulation Program: Component A for Grade Six Special Needs Students and Component B for Grade Eight Special Needs Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiter, Roberta T.

    An articulation program was developed in Reading, Massachusetts, for the progression of special needs students from elementary school to junior high school and from junior high school to senior high school. The procedure involved inservice workshops, interschool conferences between special needs and regular education staff, and parent involvement…

  4. 24 CFR 3286.9 - Manufacturer shipment responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the time that each manufactured home is shipped by a manufacturer, the manufacturer must provide HUD... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION PROGRAM Generally Applicable Provisions and... label number of the home; (2) The manufacturer of the home; and (3) The name and address of the...

  5. Connecting Curriculums: Marketing What You Manufacture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havice, Bill; Simmons, Bryan

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how students can apply the concepts from the communications component of their class with instruction in the manufacturing component. Includes goals and objectives, materials and resources, and procedures and outcomes. (Author/JOW)

  6. Pioneering a learning partnership: the University of Texas, SPIE, and the federal government together extend a hand to semiconductor manufacturers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakekes, Meg; Chen, Ray T.

    1995-10-01

    Semiconductors (the process of making computer chips) is the most competitive component of the electronics industry. To stay competitive, semiconductor manufacturers need employees who continually learn. In an industry in which the knowledge base turns over every three years, keeping engineering professionals on the cutting edge is a challenge. This paper specifically examines the first year activity and outcomes of a regionally based pilot program serving the continuing eduction needs of semiconductor manufacturing engineers. The experimental program's success depends on effective partnering among The University of Texas, The International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE), the Federal Government, organizations representing displaced engineers, and semiconductor manufacturers in the Southwest.

  7. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J.A.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L.

    1993-08-01

    This bulletin depicts current research on manufacturing technology at Sandia laboratories. An automated, adaptive process removes grit overspray from jet engine turbine blades. Advanced electronic ceramics are chemically prepared from solution for use in high- voltage varistors. Selective laser sintering automates wax casting pattern fabrication. Numerical modeling improves performance of photoresist stripper (simulation on Cray supercomputer reveals path to uniform plasma). And mathematical models help make dream of low- cost ceramic composites come true.

  8. Plasma-Materials Interactions (PMI) and High-Heat-Flux (HHF) component research and development in the US Fusion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.W.

    1986-10-01

    Plasma particle and high heat fluxes to in-vessel components such as divertors, limiters, RF launchers, halo plasma scrapers, direct converters, and wall armor, and to the vacuum chamber itself, represent central technical issues for fusion experiments and reactors. This is well recognized and accepted. It is also well recognized that the conditions at the plasma boundary can directly influence core plasma confinement. This has been seen most dramatically, on the positive side, in the discovery of the H-mode using divertors in tokamaks. It is also reflected in the attention devoted worldwide to the problems of impurity control. Nowadays, impurities are controlled by wall conditioning, special discharge cleaning techniques, special coatings such as carbonization, the use of low-Z materials for limiters and armor, a careful tailoring of heat loads, and in some machines, through the use of divertors. All programs, all experiments, and all designers are now keenly aware that PMI and HHF issues are key to the successful performance of their machines. In this brief report we present general issues in Section 2, critical issues in Section 3, existing US PMI/HHF experiments and facilities in Section 4, US International Cooperative PMI/HHF activities in Section 5, and conclude with a discussion on major tasks in PMI/HHF in Section 6.

  9. Marshall Space Flight Center Digital Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arays, Edward; Phillips, Steven

    2008-01-01

    This presentation highlights the history of DELMIA at MSFC; provides an overview of the Constellation Program; examines the manufacturing of Ares 1 Upper Stage; explains the digital manufacturing implementation for Ares 1 Upper Stage; and, discusses manufacturing and development problems and challenges.

  10. Environmental challenges in computer manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Sieben, C

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the environmental policies and programs that have been instituted by four large computer manufacturers. These environmental concerns, while not highly publicized, present an extremely important challenge to computer manufacturers, as well as to our society in general. Though the environmental programs of these computer manufacturers have been in place for several years, the topic of environmental health and safety (EHS) in computer manufacturing is still a relatively new one. Four major computer manufacturers that have instituted environmental programs are selected in this research. Their environmental policies and programs are examined in detail and compared with each other to show the relative strength and weakness. The result of this research highlights that with the amazing growth of computer use for both business and in our daily life, it will only be a matter of time before the issue -- the environmental challenges in computer manufacturing -- gains prominence and exposure in our society on a large-scale basis.

  11. Manufacturing of glassy thin shell for adaptive optics: results achieved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poutriquet, F.; Rinchet, A.; Carel, J.-L.; Leplan, H.; Ruch, E.; Geyl, R.; Marque, G.

    2012-07-01

    Glassy thin shells are key components for the development of adaptive optics and are part of future & innovative projects such as ELT. However, manufacturing thin shells is a real challenge. Even though optical requirements for the front face - or optical face - are relaxed compared to conventional passive mirrors, requirements concerning thickness uniformity are difficult to achieve. In addition, process has to be completely re-defined as thin mirror generates new manufacturing issues. In particular, scratches and digs requirement is more difficult as this could weaken the shell, handling is also an important issue due to the fragility of the mirror. Sagem, through REOSC program, has recently manufactured different types of thin shells in the frame of European projects: E-ELT M4 prototypes and VLT Deformable Secondary Mirror (VLT DSM).

  12. CNC Preparation Meets Manufacturing Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassola, Joel

    2006-01-01

    This article features the machining technology program at Cape Fear Community College (CFCC) of Wilmington, North Carolina. North Carolina's Cape Fear Community College is working to meet diverse industry needs through its CNC training. The school's program has gained the attention of the local manufacturing community and students when it shifted…

  13. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    In a NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) sponsored program entitled "A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing," evaluation of emerging materials and additive manufacturing technologies was carried out. These technologies may enable fully non-metallic gas turbine engines in the future. This paper highlights the results of engine system trade studies which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. In addition, feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composite were demonstrated. A wide variety of prototype components (inlet guide vanes (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door, were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included first stage nozzle segments and high pressure turbine nozzle segments for a cooled doublet vane. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  14. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    In a NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) sponsored program entitled "A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing", evaluation of emerging materials and additive manufacturing technologies was carried out. These technologies may enable fully non-metallic gas turbine engines in the future. This paper highlights the results of engine system trade studies which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. In addition, feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composite were demonstrated. A wide variety of prototype components (inlet guide vanes (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door) were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included first stage nozzle segments and high pressure turbine nozzle segments for a cooled doublet vane. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  15. Electronic Component Obsolescence

    SciTech Connect

    Sohns, Carl William; Ward, Christina D

    2010-01-01

    Electronic component obsolescence occurs when parts are no longer available to support the manufacture and/or repair of equipment still in service. Future instrumentation containing complex components WILL face obsolescence issues as technology advances. This paper describes hardware and software obsolescence as well as factors to consider when designing new instrumentation.

  16. Essential Components of Educational Programming for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. Standards for Special Education, Amended June 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This document is intended for classroom teachers, resource personnel, administrators and parents. It is one of a series of documents developed to facilitate programming for students in grades 1 to 12 who have special education needs. The six essential components listed in this document are contained in "Standards for Special Education, Amended…

  17. Public Commitment, Resistance to Advertising, and Leisure Promotion in a School-Based Drug Abuse Prevention Program: A Component Dismantling Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernández-Serrano, Olga; Griffin, Kenneth W.; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Espada, Mireia; Orgilés José P.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the contribution of three intervention components (public commitment, resistance to advertising, and leisure promotion) on alcohol and protective variables in a school-based substance use prevention program. Participants included 480 Spanish students aged from 14 to 16 who received the…

  18. Components and Characteristics of Youth Development Programs: The Voices of Youth-Serving Policymakers, Practitioners, Researchers, and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban, Jennifer Brown

    2008-01-01

    Due to its increasing popularity, youth development (YD) has become a buzzword that is attached to a variety of programs. Several attempts have been made to articulate a unified definition of YD that would enable the field to progress toward measuring the effectiveness of YD programs. In order to determine what constitutes a YD program, we must…

  19. Technology choice and development in Brazil: An assessment of Brazil's alternative fuel program and the agriculture, manufacturing, energy, and service sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Lucy A.

    Technology choice profoundly affects a country's development process because capital-intensive and labor-intensive technologies have different socioeconomic linkages within the economy. This research examines the impacts of technology choice through the use of a social accounting matrix (SAM) framework. SAM-based modeling determines the direct and indirect effects of technology choice on development, particularly poverty alleviation in Brazil. Brazil's alternative fuel program was analyzed as a special example of technology choice. Two ethanol production technologies and the gasoline sector were compared; to make the study more robust, labor and capital intensive technologies were evaluated in the production of agriculture, manufacturing, energy, and services. Growth in these economic sectors was examined to assess the effects on employment, factor and household income, energy intensity, and carbon dioxide costs. Poverty alleviation was a focus, so income to unskilled agriculture labor, unskilled non-agriculture labor, and income to rural and urban households in poverty was also analyzed. The major research finding is that overall, labor-intensive technologies generate more employment, factor and household income, environmental and energy benefits to Brazil's economy than capital-intensive technologies. In addition, labor-intensive technologies make a particular contribution to poverty alleviation. The results suggest that policies to encourage the adoption of these technologies, especially in the agriculture and renewable energy sectors, are important because of their intersectoral linkages within the economy. Many studies have shown that Brazil's fuel ethanol program has helped to realize multiple macroeconomic objectives. However, this is the first empirical study to quantify its household income effects. The ethanol industry generated the most household income of the energy sectors. The research confirms a key finding of the appropriate technology literature

  20. The Effects of a Social Program: Final Report of the Child and Family Resource Program's Infant-Toddler Component, Fall 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travers, Jeffrey; And Others

    A longitudinal evaluation of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP) was conducted to describe programs and their operations, identify program models, link family outcomes to participation or nonparticipation, and relate family outcomes to aspects of CFRP treatment and family characteristics. An experimental design supplemented by descriptive…