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Sample records for composite system reinforced

  1. Fiber reinforced composite resin systems.

    PubMed

    Giordano, R

    2000-01-01

    The Targis/Vectris and Sculpture/FibreKor systems were devised to create a translucent maximally reinforced resin framework for fabrication of crowns, bridges, inlays, and onlays. These materials are esthetic, have translucency similar to castable glass-ceramics such as OPC and Empress, and have fits that are reported to be acceptable in clinical and laboratory trials. These restorations rely on proper bonding to the remaining tooth structure; therefore, careful attention to detail must be paid to this part of the procedure. Cementation procedures should involve silane treatment of the cleaned abraded internal restoration surface, application of bonding agent to the restoration as well as the etched/primed tooth, and finally use of a composite resin. Each manufacturer has a recommended system which has been tested for success with its resin system. These fiber reinforced resins are somewhat different than classical composites, so not all cementation systems will necessarily work with them. Polishing of the restoration can be accomplished using diamond or alumina impregnated rubber wheels followed by diamond paste. The glass fibers can pose a health risk. They are small enough to be inhaled and deposited in the lungs, resulting in a silicosis-type problem. Therefore, if fibers are exposed and ground on, it is extremely important to wear a mask. Also, the fibers can be a skin irritant, so gloves also should be worn. If the fibers become exposed intraorally, they can cause gingival inflammation and may attract plaque. The fibers should be covered with additional composite resin. If this cannot be accomplished, the restoration should be replaced. The bulk of these restorations are formed using a particulate filled resin, similar in structure to conventional composite resins. Therefore, concerns as to wear resistance, color stability, excessive expansion/contraction, and sensitivity remain until these materials are proven in long-term clinical trials. They do hold the

  2. Peptide Nanotube Reinforced Polymers: A System for Tunable, Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-30

    mechanical reinforcement of polymeric materials used in the fabrication of implantable medical devices. Our results show that the high aspect ratio... polymers like poly-D,L-lactic acid (PDLLA), a common polymer used in resorbable load bearing 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Peptide nanotube reinforced polymers : A system for tunable, composite materials The

  3. Epoxy Nano-Reinforced Composite Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching...existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection information. Send comments regarding...and thus more surface area of the stiffening clay exposed to the matrix (8). Addition of the organoclay in all cases reduced the Tg of the composite

  4. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Harik, Vasyl M.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a technique has been proposed for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Since the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties of the SWNT/polymer composites can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber retains the local molecular structure and bonding information and serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube sizes and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyethylene composite systems, one with continuous and aligned SWNT and the other with discontinuous and randomly aligned nanotubes.

  5. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Harik, Vasyl M.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a technique has been proposed for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Since the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties of the SWNT/polymer composites can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber retains the local molecular structure and bonding information and serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube sizes and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyethylene composite systems, one with continuous and aligned SWNT and the other with discontinuous and randomly aligned nanotubes.

  6. Composite Intersection Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misciagna, David T. (Inventor); Fuhrer, Jessica J. (Inventor); Funk, Robert S. (Inventor); Tolotta, William S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An assembly and method for manufacturing a composite reinforcement for unitizing a structure are provided. According to one embodiment, the assembly includes a base having a plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom to define a structure about which a composite fiber is wound to define a composite reinforcement preform. The assembly also includes a plurality of mandrels positioned adjacent to the base and at least a portion of the composite reinforcement preform, and a cap that is positioned over at least a portion of the plurality of mandrels. The cap is configured to engage each of the mandrels to support the mandrels and the composite reinforcement preform during a curing process to form the composite reinforcement.

  7. Composite intersection reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misciagna, David T. (Inventor); Fuhrer, Jessica J. (Inventor); Funk, Robert S. (Inventor); Tolotta, William S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An assembly and method for manufacturing a composite reinforcement for unitizing a structure are provided. According to one embodiment, the assembly includes a base having a plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom to define a structure about which a composite fiber is wound to define a composite reinforcement preform. The assembly also includes a plurality of mandrels positioned adjacent to the base and at least a portion of the composite reinforcement preform, and a cap that is positioned over at least a portion of the plurality of mandrels. The cap is configured to engage each of the mandrels to support the mandrels and the composite reinforcement preform during a curing process to form the composite reinforcement.

  8. Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite Materials Systems to Enhance Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    and low temperature evaluation of FRP performance. Field demonstrations included evaluation of carbon fiber reinforced polymer tendons for post...glass fiber reinforced polymer cables as tie back tension members, and a test fixture was designed and fabricated to evaluate post stressing tendon

  9. Self reinforcing polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kenig, S.

    1993-12-31

    In the advent of liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs), self reinforcing polymer composites comprising a polymer matrix and an LCP reinforcement, have become a reality. The so called self reinforcement is due to the LCPs orientability characteristics resulting from their rigid molecular backbone and anisotropy structure in the fluid state. Orientation development takes place during melt processing of the LCP composite blends where shear as well as elongational flows occur prior to consolidation to the solid state. By proper flow control anisotropy develops and in-situ composites are obtained. Polymer composites comprising self-reinforcement by LCPs during processing induced flow, were analyzed and studied with respect to their orientation development and resultant mechanical properties. The analysis commenced with the hydrodynamics of immiscible fluids in shear and elongational flows. Based on the analysis, orientation and morphology development in capillary extrusion was studied, using a variety of thermoplastic polymer matrices like amorphous and crystalline polyamides, polycarbonate and polyester in conjunction of a naphthalene based thermotropic LCP. Based on the flow-morphology relationship the amorphous polyamide/LCP composite was further investigated as it exhibited enhanced properties. Laminated composites based on LCP/amorphous polyamide were developed composed of unidirectional extruded and drawn sheets that were subsequently compression molded. Unidirectional, +45/{minus}45 and quasi-isotropic laminates were prepared and analyzed as to their microstructure and mechanical properties.

  10. Fiber reinforced PMR polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Winters, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Commercially obtained PMR-15 polyimide prepregs with S-glass and graphite fiber reinforcements were evaluated along with in-house prepared glass and graphite cloth PMR 2 materials. A novel autoclave approach was conceived and used to demonstrate that both the PMR systems respond to 1.4 MPa (200 psi) autoclave pressures to produce void free composites equivalent to die molded laminates. Isothermal gravimetric analysis and subsequent mechanical property tests indicated that the PMR 2 system was significantly superior in thermo-oxidative stability, and that S-glass reinforcements may contribute to the accelerated degradation of composites at 316 C (600 F) when compared to graphite fiber reinforced composites. Fully reversed bending fatigue experiments were conducted with a type of fixture unused for organic matrix composites. These studies indicated that the graphite fiber composites were clearly superior in fatigue resistance to the glass fiber reinforced material and that PMR matrix composite systems yield performance of the same order as composite materials employing other families of matrices.

  11. Mechanical and thermal properties of composite material system reinforced with micro glass balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Y.; Watanabe, M.; Kikuchi, T.; Ishiwatari, H.

    2010-06-01

    The mechanical and thermal properties of polymer composites reinforced with micro glass balloons are investigated in temperature conditions. The matrix resin of the composite is epoxy resin and its dispersion is micro glassy spherical shells of Sirasu Balloon. The composite system developed is a kind of micro porous materials with lightweight. From the experimental data of bending and tension tests, mechanical behaviours of the composites were clarified, and the effects of material properties and configurations on the mechanical properties of composites were discussed from the viewpoint of micromechanical study. A homogenization theory with multi-scale analytical method has been applied in order to evaluate the composite material system in temperature conditions. Numerical calculations were performed by using a model of micro porous materials and setting properties of each material at the temperature. Analytical results for the mechanical behaviour made a good agreement with experimental result of the composites in temperature conditions.

  12. Single anterior tooth restoration using a self-etching adhesive system and a reinforced microfill composite.

    PubMed

    Feigenbaum, Norman

    2003-08-01

    Treatment for a single discolored anterior tooth may involve placement of a direct composite veneer to enhance a patient's smile and mask underlying discoloration. Among the challenges clinicians may face in this endeavor are the selection of suitable composite materials, application of an adhesive bonding system, and re-creation of the natural shade variations inherent in natural teeth. This article discusses the characteristics and placement protocol for a recently introduced self-etching adhesive system and a reinforced microfill composite when they are used to restore a single discolored central incisor.

  13. Design and analysis of a novel latch system implementing fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Arreola, Francisco Javier

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite materials have increased in the last four decades in high technology applications due to their exceptional mechanical properties and low weight. In the automotive industry carbon fiber have become popular exclusively in luxury cars because of its high cost. However, Carbon-glass hybrid composites offer an effective alternative to designers to implement fiber-reinforced composites into several conventional applications without a considerable price increase maintaining most of their mechanical properties. A door latch system is a complex mechanism that is under high loading conditions during car accidents such as side impacts and rollovers. Therefore, the Department of Transportation in The United States developed a series of tests that every door latch system comply in order to be installed in a vehicle. The implementation of fiber-reinforced composite materials in a door latch system was studied by analyzing the material behavior during the FMVSS No. 206 transverse test using computational efforts and experimental testing. Firstly, a computational model of the current forkbolt and detent structure was developed. Several efforts were conducted in order to create an effective and time efficient model. Two simplified models were implemented with two different contact interaction approaches. 9 composite materials were studied in forkbolt and 5 in detent including woven carbon fiber, unidirectional carbon fiber, woven carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites and unidirectional carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites. The computational model results showed that woven fiber-reinforced composite materials were stiffer than the unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite materials. For instance, a forkbolt made of woven carbon fibers was 20% stiffer than a forkbolt made of unidirectional fibers symmetrically stacked in 0° and 90° alternating directions. Furthermore, Hybrid composite materials behaved as expected in forkbolt noticing a decline

  14. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  15. Demonstration and Validation of a Composite Grid Reinforcement System for Bridge Decks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    System for Bridge Decks Final Report on Project F12-AR01 Co ns tr uc tio n En gi ne er in g R es ea rc h La bo ra to ry Steven C. Sweeney...TR-16-21 September 2016 Demonstration and Validation of a Composite Grid Reinforcement System for Bridge Decks Final Report on Project F12-AR01...Defense Pentagon Washington, DC 20301-3090 Under Project F12-AR01, “Demonstration and Validation of 3-D Gridform for Bridges ” ERDC/CERL TR-16-21 ii

  16. Analysis of pultrusion processing for long fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tso, W.; Hou, T. H.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Pultrusion is one of the composite processing technology, commonly recognized as a simple and cost-effective means for the manufacturing of fiber-reinforced, resin matrix composite parts with different regular geometries. Previously, because the majority of the pultruded composite parts were made of thermosetting resin matrix, emphasis of the analysis on the process has been on the conservation of energy from various sources, such as heat conduction and the curing kinetics of the resin system. Analysis on the flow aspect of the process was almost absent in the literature for thermosetting process. With the increasing uses of thermoplastic materials, it is desirable to obtain the detailed velocity and pressure profiles inside the pultrusion die. Using a modified Darcy's law for flow through porous media, closed form analytical solutions for the velocity and pressure distributions inside the pultrusion die are obtained for the first time. This enables us to estimate the magnitude of viscous dissipation and it's effects on the pultruded parts. Pulling forces refined in the pultrusion processing are also analyzed. The analytical model derived in this study can be used to advance our knowledge and control of the pultrusion process for fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite parts.

  17. Fatigue Behaviour of Glass Fibre Reinforced Composites for Ocean Energy Conversion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisseau, A.; Davies, P.; Thiebaud, F.

    2013-04-01

    The development of ocean energy conversion systems places more severe requirements on materials than similar land-based structures such as wind turbines. Intervention and maintenance at sea are very costly, so for ocean energy supply to become economically viable long term durability must be guaranteed. Cyclic loading is a common feature of most energy conversion devices and composites are widely used, but few data are available concerning the fatigue behaviour in sea water of composite materials. This paper presents the results from an experimental study to fill this gap. The fatigue behavior of composite materials reinforced with different types of glass fibre is characterized in air and in sea water; the influence of testing in sea water rather than air is shown to be small. However, sea water ageing is shown to reduce the fatigue lifetime significantly and strongly depends on matrix formulation.

  18. Micromechanics for particulate reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    1996-01-01

    A set of micromechanics equations for the analysis of particulate reinforced composites is developed using the mechanics of materials approach. Simplified equations are used to compute homogenized or equivalent thermal and mechanical properties of particulate reinforced composites in terms of the properties of the constituent materials. The microstress equations are also presented here to decompose the applied stresses on the overall composite to the microstresses in the constituent materials. The properties of a 'generic' particulate composite as well as those of a particle reinforced metal matrix composite are predicted and compared with other theories as well as some experimental data. The micromechanics predictions are in excellent agreement with the measured values.

  19. CNT reinforced epoxy foamed and electrospun nano-fiber interlayer systems for manufacturing lighter and stronger featherweight(TM) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakonakis, Vasileios M.

    Multiple works have been performed in improving carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites especially in terms of strength so delamination, which is the major defect in laminated composites, is prevented. Nevertheless, there is not much focus on improving conventional CFRP systems in terms of weight especially when these are used in primary structures. This work questions whether lighter and at the same time stronger CFRP composites can be manufactured in order to replace conventional CFRP systems in major applications. Under this perspective, this study demonstrates that inducing controlled porosity may offer a systemic approach for manufacturing light weight carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) matrix composites. Additionally, towards this scope, this work has focused on analyzing and describing the related matrix systems utilizing mostly classic viscoelastic theory. An in-depth characterization of the thermosetting matrix systems viscoelasticity kinetics as well as of the impregnation process towards its improvement in terms of lower cost is explored. Overall, this work makes an effort to establish the fundamentals for creating the next generation of light weight structural composites, the featherweight composites, by introducing porosity through several controlled reinforcements in a systemic and reproducible manner at the macro- micro- and nano- scales in the interlayer. By extensively describing the matrix system and the manufacturing processes and focusing on analytically testing the interlayer reinforcement systems, it is expected that featherweight CFRP will achieve lighter weight and at the same time higher mechanical properties.

  20. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1978-01-01

    A composite that can be used at temperatures up to 875 K with mechanical properties equal or superior to graphite fiber reinforced epoxy composites is presented. The composite system consist of graphite fiber, uniaxially or biaxially, reinforced borosilicate glass. The mechanical and thermal properties of such a graphite fiber reinforced glass composite are described, and the system is shown to offer promise as a high performance structural material. Specific properties that were measured were: a modified borosilicate glass uniaxially reinforced by Hercules HMS graphite fiber has a three-point flexural strength of 1030 MPa, a four-point flexural strength of 964 MPa, an elastic modulus of 199 GPa and a failure strain of 0.0052. The preparation and properties of similar composites with Hercules HTS, Celanese DG-102, Thornel 300 and Thornel Pitch graphite fibers are also described.

  1. Material characterization of several resin systems for high temperature carbon fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung Ho; Oh, Jin Oh; Choi, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Woo

    2011-11-01

    Material characterization of several resin systems for high temperature carbon fiber reinforced composites was performed through a series of the tensile test, the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) test, and the strand test. The modified tensile specimens and the DMA specimens were used to evaluate the tensile and thermal analysis properties of resin systems. The strand specimens were used to evaluate the tensile properties and load transfer efficiencies of the specimens. Four types of resin systems were considered. One was a conventional resin system currently used for filament wound structures and other three were high temperature resin systems. According to the tensile and DMA test results, the tensile modulus decreases slightly and the tensile strength decreases rapidly until the temperature reaches glass transition temperature. The tensile modulus and tensile strength are almost negligible above glass transition temperature. The tensile modulus obtained from the tensile test is consistent with that from the DMA test at different temperatures. From the strand test results, considering, the load transfer efficiency is found to be around 87 to 90 % of the tensile strength of T800H-12K carbon fibers for all resin systems except the specimen with the Type 2. Finally we found that the Type 4 is the best candidate for high temperature resin system applicable to filament wound structures in the view of the glass transition temperature as well as the tensile properties.

  2. Material characterization of several resin systems for high temperature carbon fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung Ho; Oh, Jin Oh; Choi, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Woo

    2012-04-01

    Material characterization of several resin systems for high temperature carbon fiber reinforced composites was performed through a series of the tensile test, the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) test, and the strand test. The modified tensile specimens and the DMA specimens were used to evaluate the tensile and thermal analysis properties of resin systems. The strand specimens were used to evaluate the tensile properties and load transfer efficiencies of the specimens. Four types of resin systems were considered. One was a conventional resin system currently used for filament wound structures and other three were high temperature resin systems. According to the tensile and DMA test results, the tensile modulus decreases slightly and the tensile strength decreases rapidly until the temperature reaches glass transition temperature. The tensile modulus and tensile strength are almost negligible above glass transition temperature. The tensile modulus obtained from the tensile test is consistent with that from the DMA test at different temperatures. From the strand test results, considering, the load transfer efficiency is found to be around 87 to 90 % of the tensile strength of T800H-12K carbon fibers for all resin systems except the specimen with the Type 2. Finally we found that the Type 4 is the best candidate for high temperature resin system applicable to filament wound structures in the view of the glass transition temperature as well as the tensile properties.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo. PMID:24707488

  4. Carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo.

  5. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  6. Nanocellulose reinforcement of Transparent Composites

    Treesearch

    Joshua Steele; Hong Dong; James F. Snyder; Josh A. Orlicki; Richard S. Reiner; Alan W. Rudie

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the impact of nanocellulose reinforcement on transparent composite properties. Due to the small diameter, high modulus, and high strength of cellulose nanocrystals, transparent composites that utilize these materials should show improvement in bulk mechanical performances without a corresponding reduction in optical properties. In this study...

  7. Analysis of Graphite-Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    Strategically embedding graphite meshes in a compliant cementitious matrix produces a composite material with relatively high tension and compressive properties as compared to steel-reinforced structures fabricated from a standard concrete mix. Although these composite systems are somewhat similar, the methods used to analyze steel-reinforced composites often fail to characterize the behavior of their more advanced graphite-reinforced counterparts. This Technical Memorandum describes some of the analytical methods being developed to determine the deflections and stresses in graphite-reinforced cementitious composites. It is initially demonstrated that the standard transform section method fails to provide accurate results when the elastic moduli ratio exceeds 20. An alternate approach is formulated by using the rule of mixtures to determine a set of effective material properties for the composite. Tensile tests are conducted on composite samples to verify this approach. When the effective material properties are used to characterize the deflections of composite beams subjected to pure bending, an excellent agreement is obtained. Laminated composite plate theory is investigated as a means for analyzing even more complex composites, consisting of multiple graphite layers oriented in different directions. In this case, composite beams are analyzed using the laminated composite plate theory with material properties established from tensile tests. Then, finite element modeling is used to verify the results. Considering the complexity of the samples, a very good agreement is obtained.

  8. Considerations regarding the volume fraction influence on the wear behavior of the fiber reinforced composite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliman, R.

    2017-08-01

    This paper contains an analysis of the factors that have an influence on the tribological characteristics of the composite material sintered with metal matrix reinforced with carbon fibers. These composites are used generally if it’s needed the wear resistant materials, whereas these composites have high specific strength in conjunction with a good corrosion resistance at low densities and some self-lubricating properties. Through the knowledge of the better tribological properties of the materials and their behavior to wear, can be generated by dry and the wet friction. Thus, where necessary the use of high temperature resistant material with low friction between the elements, carbon fiber composite materials are very suitable because they have: mechanical strength and good ductility, melting temperature on the higher values, higher electrical and thermal conductivity, lower wear speed and lower friction forces. For this purpose, this paper also contains an experimental program based on the evidence of formaldehyde resin made from fiber reinforced Cu-carbon with the aim to specifically determine the volume of fibers fraction for the consolidation of the composite material. In order to determine the friction coefficient and the wear rates of the various fiber reinforced polymer mixtures of carbon have been used special devices with needle-type with steel disc. These tests were conducted in the atmosphere at the room temperature without external lubrication study taking into consideration the sliding different speeds with constant loading task.

  9. Comparison of 2 bonding systems and survival of fiber-reinforced composite inlay fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Carlo; Ferrari, Marco; Caldari, Mauro; Baldissara, Paolo; Scotti, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    This pilot clinical trial evaluated the clinical behavior of 3-unit inlay fixed partial dentures (IFPDs) made of the glass-fiber composite system SR Adoro/Vectris and luted with 2 different bonding systems over an observation period of 2 years. Thirty-nine glass-fiber-reinforced composite IFPDs were made to replace 1 missing maxillary or mandibular tooth. Nineteen IFPDs were randomly assigned to group A and luted with a 2-step bonding system (Excite DSC), while the other 20 IFPDs of group B were cemented with a 3-step adhesive (Syntac). Events such as partial or total debonding of the IFPDs, fracture of the framework, or veneer and fiber exposures were considered failures. Color match, marginal discoloration, secondary caries, marginal adaptation, postoperative sensitivity, and surface texture were evaluated according to the United States Public Health Service modified criteria. Two debondings and 2 fiber exposures occurred during the observation period. All failures occurred in group A. Some fatigue microcracks in the pontic area of the 2 detached IFPDs were observed under scanning electron microscopy. The postoperative sensitivity of group A was much higher than that of group B, and the abutments luted with Excite DCS showed postoperative sensitivity during the first month in 42.2% of cases. The sensitivity disappeared completely after 6 months. Statistical analysis indicated significant differences in postoperative sensitivity (P < .05) between the 2 groups. The IFPDs bonded with a 3-step adhesive demonstrated good clinical service in the short observation period. The microfractures of the layering material observed on the debonded IFPDs may suggest excessive flexibility of the fiber structures, which occurs if the framework is fabricated without observing the recommended dimensions.

  10. Shear Bond Strength between Fiber-Reinforced Composite and Veneering Resin Composites with Various Adhesive Resin Systems.

    PubMed

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different laboratory resin composites bonded to a fiber-reinforced composite substrate with some intermediate adhesive resins. Mounted test specimens of a bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate (StickNet) were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Three types of commercially available veneering resin composites - BelleGlass®, Sinfony®, and GC Gradia® were bonded to these specimens using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group were stored for 24 hours; the remaining were stored for 30 days. There were 10 specimens in the test group (n). The shear bond strengths were calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed statistically, and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Shear bond values of those composites are influenced by the different bonding resins and different indirect composites. There was a significant difference in the shear bond strengths using different types of adhesive resins (p = 0.02) and using different veneering composites (p < 0.01). Belle-Glass® had the highest mean shear bond strength when bonded to StickNet substrate using both Prime & Bond NT and OptiBond Solo Plus. Sinfony® composite resin exhibited the lowest shear bond strength values when used with the same adhesive resins. The adhesive mode of failure was higher than cohesive with all laboratory composite resins bonded to the StickNet substructure at both storage times. Water storage had a tendency to lower the bond strengths of all laboratory composites, although the statistical differences were not significant. Within the limitations of this study, it was found that bonding of the veneering composite to bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate is influenced by the brand of the adhesive resin and veneering composite. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  11. Alumina-Reinforced Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Alumina-reinforced zirconia composites, used as electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells, were fabricated by hot pressing 10 mol percent yttria-stabilized zirconia (10-YSZ) reinforced with two different forms of alumina particulates and platelets each containing 0 to 30 mol percent alumina. Major mechanical and physical properties of both particulate and platelet composites including flexure strength, fracture toughness, slow crack growth, elastic modulus, density, Vickers microhardness, thermal conductivity, and microstructures were determined as a function of alumina content either at 25 C or at both 25 and 1000 C. Flexure strength and fracture toughness at 1000 C were maximized with 30 particulate and 30 mol percent platelet composites, respectively, while resistance to slow crack growth at 1000 C in air was greater for 30 mol percent platelet composite than for 30 mol percent particulate composites.

  12. Sapphire reinforced alumina matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Setlock, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectionally reinforced A1203 matrix composites have been fabricated by hot pressing. Approximately 30 volume % of either coated or uncoated sapphire fiber was used as reinforcement. Unstabilized ZrO2 was applied as the fiber coating. Composite mechanical behavior was analyzed both after fabrication and after additional heat treatment. The results of composite tensile tests were correlated with fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths determined from fiber push-out tests. Substantially higher strength and greater fiber pull-out were observed for the coated fiber composites for all processing conditions studied. The coated fiber composites retained up to 95% and 87% of their as-fabricated strength when heat treated at 14000C for 8 or 24 hours, respectively. Electron microscopy analysis of the fracture surfaces revealed extensive fiber pull-out both before and after heat treatment.

  13. Braided reinforced composite rods for the internal reinforcement of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonilho Pereira, C.; Fangueiro, R.; Jalali, S.; Araujo, M.; Marques, P.

    2008-05-01

    This paper reports on the development of braided reinforced composite rods as a substitute for the steel reinforcement in concrete. The research work aims at understanding the mechanical behaviour of core-reinforced braided fabrics and braided reinforced composite rods, namely concerning the influence of the braiding angle, the type of core reinforcement fibre, and preloading and postloading conditions. The core-reinforced braided fabrics were made from polyester fibres for producing braided structures, and E-glass, carbon, HT polyethylene, and sisal fibres were used for the core reinforcement. The braided reinforced composite rods were obtained by impregnating the core-reinforced braided fabric with a vinyl ester resin. The preloading of the core-reinforced braided fabrics and the postloading of the braided reinforced composite rods were performed in three and two stages, respectively. The results of tensile tests carried out on different samples of core-reinforced braided fabrics are presented and discussed. The tensile and bending properties of the braided reinforced composite rods have been evaluated, and the results obtained are presented, discussed, and compared with those of conventional materials, such as steel.

  14. Kevlar reinforced neoprene composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, B. G.; Daniels, J. G.; White, W. T.; Thompson, L. M.; Clemons, L. M.

    1985-01-01

    Kevlar/neoprene composites were prepared by two techniques. One method involved the fabrication of a composite from a rubber prepreg prepared by coating Kevlar with viscous neoprene solution and then allowing the solvent to evaporate (solution impregnation technique). The second method involved heating a stack of Kevlar/neoprene sheets at a temperature sufficient to cause polymer flow (melt flow technique). There was no significant difference in the breaking strength and percent elongation for samples obtained by the two methods; however the shear strength obtained for samples fabricated by the solution impregnation technique (275 psi) was significantly higher than that found for the melt flow fabricated samples (110 psi).

  15. Kevlar reinforced neoprene composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, B. G.; Daniels, J. G.; White, W. T.; Thompson, L. M.; Clemons, L. M.

    1985-01-01

    Kevlar/neoprene composites were prepared by two techniques. One method involved the fabrication of a composite from a rubber prepreg prepared by coating Kevlar with viscous neoprene solution and then allowing the solvent to evaporate (solution impregnation technique). The second method involved heating a stack of Kevlar/neoprene sheets at a temperature sufficient to cause polymer flow (melt flow technique). There was no significant difference in the breaking strength and percent elongation for samples obtained by the two methods; however the shear strength obtained for samples fabricated by the solution impregnation technique (275 psi) was significantly higher than that found for the melt flow fabricated samples (110 psi).

  16. Kevlar reinforced neoprene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, B.G.; Daniels, J.G.; White, W.T.; Thompson, L.M.; Clemons, L.M.

    1985-04-01

    Kevlar/neoprene composites were prepared by two techniques. One method involved the fabrication of a composite from a rubber prepreg prepared by coating kevlar with viscous neoprene solution and then allowing the solvent to evaporate (solution impregnation technique). The second method involved heating a stack of kevlar/neoprene sheets at a temperature sufficient to cause polymer flow (melt flow technique). There was no significant difference in the breaking strength and percent elongation for samples obtained by the two methods; however the shear strength obtained for samples fabricated by the solution impregnation technique (275 psi) was significantly higher than that found for the melt flow fabricated samples (110 psi). 1 reference, 2 tables.

  17. Machining fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komanduri, Ranga

    1993-04-01

    Compared to high tool wear and high costs of tooling of fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs), noncontact material-removal processes offer attractive alternative. Noncontact machining methods can also minimize dust, noise, and extensive plastic deformation and consequent heat generation associated with conventional machining of FRCs, espacially those with an epoxy matrix. The paper describes the principles involved in and the details of machining of FRCs by laser machining, water jet-cutting and abrasive water jet-cutting, and electrical discharge machining of composites, as well as the limitations of each method.

  18. Graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.; Dicus, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system is described. Although this composite is not yet a mature material, it possesses low density, attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, and good environmental stability. Properties are reported for a borosilicate glass matrix unidirectionally reinforced with 60 volume percent HMS graphite fiber. The flexural strength and fatigue characteristics at room and elevated temperature, resistance to thermal cycling and continuous high temperature oxidation, and thermal expansion characteristics of the composite are reported. The properties of this new composite are compared to those of advanced resin and metal matrix composites showing that graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are attractive for aerospace applications.

  19. Graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.; Dicus, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system is described. Although this composite is not yet a mature material, it possesses low density, attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, and good environmental stability. Properties are reported for a borosilicate glass matrix unidirectionally reinforced with 60 volume percent HMS graphite fiber. The flexural strength and fatigue characteristics at room and elevated temperature, resistance to thermal cycling and continuous high temperature oxidation, and thermal expansion characteristics of the composite are reported. The properties of this new composite are compared to those of advanced resin and metal matrix composites showing that graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are attractive for aerospace applications.

  20. Microstructural characterization of fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Summerscales, J.

    1998-12-31

    In the past 50 years, great progress has been made in developing artificial fiber-reinforced composite materials, generally using filaments with microscopic diameters. An array of reinforcement forms can be used in commercial applications--with the microstructure being a critical factor in realizing the required properties in a material. This book comprehensively examines the application of advanced microstructural characterization techniques to fiber-reinforced composites. Its contents include: (1) flexible textile composite microstructure; (2) 3-D confocal microscopy of glass fiber-reinforced composites; (3) geometric modeling of yarn and fiber assemblies; (4) characterization of yarn shape in woven fabric composites; (5) quantitative microstructural analysis for continuous fiber composites; (6) electron microscopy of polymer composites; (7) micromechanics of reinforcement using laser raman spectroscopy; and (8) acoustic microscopy of ceramic fiber composites.

  1. FIBER-REINFORCED METALLIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    COMPOSITE MATERIALS), (*FIBER METALLURGY, TITANIUM ALLOYS , NICKEL ALLOYS , REINFORCING MATERIALS, TUNGSTEN, WIRE, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS , COBALT ALLOYS , CHROMIUM ALLOYS , ALUMINUM ALLOYS , MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, POWDER METALLURGY.

  2. The effect of adhesive systems on the pullout strength of a fiberglass-reinforced composite post system in bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Filho, Osvaldo Daniel Andreatta; Valera, Márcia Carneiro; de Araujo, Maria Amélia Maximo

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the pullout strength of a glass fiber-reinforced composite post (glass FRC) cemented with three different adhesive systems and one resin cement. The null hypothesis was that pullout strengths yielded by the adhesive systems are similar. Thirty bovine teeth were selected. The size of the specimens was standardized at 16 mm by sectioning off the coronal portion and part of the root. The specimens were divided into three groups, according to the adhesive system, which were applied following the manufacturers' instructions: G1, ScotchBond Multi-Purpose Plus; G2, Single Bond; G3, Tyrian SPE/One-Step Plus. The glass FRCs (Reforpost) were etched with 37% H3PO4 for 1 min and silanized (Porcelain Primer). Thereafter, they were cemented with the dual resin cement En-Force. The specimens were stored for 24 h, attached to an adapted device, and submitted to the pullout test in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). The data were submitted to the one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). G1 (30.2 +/- 5.8 Kgf) displayed the highest pullout strength (p < 0.001) when compared to G2 (18.6 +/- 5.8 Kgf) and G3 (14.3 +/- 5.8 Kgf), which were statistically similar. Analysis of the specimens revealed that all failures occurred between the adhesive system and the root dentin (pullout of the post cement), regardless of group. The multiple-bottle, total-etch adhesive system provided higher pullout strength of the glass FRC when compared to the single-bottle, total-etch, and single-step self-etching adhesive systems. The null hypothesis was rejected (p < 0.001).

  3. Marginal adaptation of 1 fiber-reinforced composite and 2 all-ceramic inlay fixed partial denture systems.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Carlo; Krejci, Ivo; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Perakis, Nikolaos; Ferrari, Marco; Scotti, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation and retention of inlay fixed partial dentures (IFPDs) made with 1 fiber-reinforced composite and 2 different ceramic materials using quantitative scanning electron microscope analysis after thermal cycling and mechanical loading, which simulated approximately 5 years of oral service. Eighteen IFPDs made with fiber-reinforced composite (SR Adoro/Vectris), zirconium oxide-TZP (Cercon), and magnesia partially stabilized zirconia (DC-Leolux) covered with silica-based ceramics were tested in this study. The specimens were mechanically loaded in the vestibular cusp of the pontic element in a computer-controlled masticator with 1,200,000 half-sinusoid mechanical cycles of maximum 49 N each at a frequency of 1.7 Hz. A total of 3,000 thermocycles at 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C, 2 minutes each, were performed simultaneously. The marginal adaptation was analyzed at the interface of the luting composite and the abutment inlay/onlay (CI) and at the interface of the tooth and the luting composite (TC). The percentages of continuous margin at the CI interface were 94.6 +/- 3.1 and 88 +/- 6.7 for Adoro/Vectris, 92.9 +/- 5 and 85.7 +/- 6.1 for Cercon, and 96.2 +/- 2.1 and 82.2 +/- 9.8 for DC-Leolux, respectively, before and after loading. The percentages of continuous margin at the TC interface were 86.7 +/- 6.7 and 62.5 +/- 16.4 for Adoro/Vectris, 93.3 +/- 3.4 and 83.2 +/- 5.9 for Cercon, and 96.1 +/- 2.4 and 75.3 +/- 7 for DC-Leolux. Statistically significant differences were found after loading between the fiber-reinforced composite and the 2 ceramic systems at the TC interface. Within the limitations of this experimental study with regard to the sample size and contacting vectors, the results showed that flexibility of the framework may play an important role in the marginal adaptation of the IFPDs. More rigid materials may transfer less stress to the margins, thus promoting a more stable adhesion to the

  4. Microtensile bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite with semi-interpenetrating polymer matrix to dentin using various bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) to dentin using various adhesive systems. Forty eight (n = 8/group) human molars were flattened to expose dentin. A layer of preimpregnated unidirectional FRC (everStick) was applied on the dentin surface after treatment with either a single-step self-etching adhesive, two-step self-etching system, or a conventional three-step adhesive system. For the control, particulate filler composite (PFC) (Filtek Z250) layering without FRC was used. After 24-hour water storage at 37 degrees C, the specimens were sectioned, further water-stored at 37 degrees C for 30 days and then tested. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test, and reliability was analyzed with Weibull distribution. microTBS values differed significantly according to the adhesive material used (p < 0.05). Single-step self-etching adhesive showed the lowest bond reliability and microTBS values with both FRC and PFC, whereas conventional three-step and two-step self-etching systems showed higher bond reliability and microTBS with both materials.

  5. Validation of Framework Code Approach to a Life Prediction System for Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravett, Phillip

    1997-01-01

    The grant was conducted by the MMC Life Prediction Cooperative, an industry/government collaborative team, Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI) acted as the prime contractor on behalf of the Cooperative for this grant effort. See Figure I for the organization and responsibilities of team members. The technical effort was conducted during the period August 7, 1995 to June 30, 1996 in cooperation with Erwin Zaretsky, the LERC Program Monitor. Phil Gravett of Pratt & Whitney was the principal technical investigator. Table I documents all meeting-related coordination memos during this period. The effort under this grant was closely coordinated with an existing USAF sponsored program focused on putting into practice a life prediction system for turbine engine components made of metal matrix composites (MMC). The overall architecture of the NMC life prediction system was defined in the USAF sponsored program (prior to this grant). The efforts of this grant were focussed on implementing and tailoring of the life prediction system, the framework code within it and the damage modules within it to meet the specific requirements of the Cooperative. T'he tailoring of the life prediction system provides the basis for pervasive and continued use of this capability by the industry/government cooperative. The outputs of this grant are: 1. Definition of the framework code to analysis modules interfaces, 2. Definition of the interface between the materials database and the finite element model, and 3. Definition of the integration of the framework code into an FEM design tool.

  6. Aluminum-Alloy-Matrix/Alumina-Reinforcement Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday; Rozenoyer, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Isotropic composites of aluminum-alloy matrices reinforced with particulate alumina have been developed as lightweight, high-specific-strength, less-expensive alternatives to nickel-base and ferrous superalloys. These composites feature a specific gravity of about 3.45 grams per cubic centimeter and specific strengths of about 200 MPa/(grams per cubic centimeter). The room-temperature tensile strength is 100 ksi (689 MPa) and stiffness is 30 Msi (206 GPa). At 500 F (260 C), these composites have shown 80 percent retention in strength and 95 percent retention in stiffness. These materials also have excellent fatigue tolerance and tribological properties. They can be fabricated in net (or nearly net) sizes and shapes to make housings, pistons, valves, and ducts in turbomachinery, and to make structural components of such diverse systems as diesel engines, automotive brake systems, and power-generation, mining, and oil-drilling equipment. Separately, incorporation of these metal matrix composites within aluminum gravity castings for localized reinforcement has been demonstrated. A composite part of this type can be fabricated in a pressure infiltration casting process. The process begins with the placement of a mold with alumina particulate preform of net or nearly net size and shape in a crucible in a vacuum furnace. A charge of the alloy is placed in the crucible with the preform. The interior of the furnace is evacuated, then the furnace heaters are turned on to heat the alloy above its liquidus temperature. Next, the interior of the furnace is filled with argon gas at a pressure about 900 psi (approximately equal to 6.2 MPa) to force the molten alloy to infiltrate the preform. Once infiltrated, the entire contents of the crucible can be allowed to cool in place, and the composite part recovered from the mold.

  7. Fabricating fiber-reinforced composite posts.

    PubMed

    Manhart, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    Endodontic posts do not increase the strength of the remaining tooth structure in endodontically treated teeth. On the contrary, depending on the post design employed (tapered versus parallel-sided), the root can be weakened relative to the amount of tooth removed during preparation. In many cases, if there has been a high degree of damage to the clinical crown, conservative preparation for an anatomic tapered (biomimetic) post with the incorporation of a ferrule on solid tooth structure is necessary to protect the reaming root structure as well as for the long-term retention of the composite resin core and the definitive restoration. Adhesively luted endodontic posts reinforced with glass or quartz fiber lead to better homogeneous tension distribution when loaded than rigid metal or zirconium oxide ceramic posts. Fiber-reinforced posts also possess advantageous optical properties over metal or metal oxide post systems. The clinician should realize that there are admittedly substantial differences in the mechanical loading capacity of the different fiber-reinforced endodontic posts and should be aware of such differences in order to research and select a suitable post system for use.

  8. Boron Nitride Nanotubes-Reinforced Glass Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam; Hurst, Janet B.; Choi, Sung R.

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes of significant lengths were synthesized by reaction of boron with nitrogen. Barium calcium aluminosilicate glass composites reinforced with 4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated by hot pressing. Ambient-temperature flexure strength and fracture toughness of the glass-BN nanotube composites were determined. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90 and 35 percent, respectively, than those of the unreinforced glass. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces showed pullout of the BN nanotubes. The preliminary results on the processing and improvement in mechanical properties of BN nanotube reinforced glass matrix composites are being reported here for the first time.

  9. Interface characteristics of nanorope reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Khondaker S.; Keng, Ang K.

    2013-09-01

    A shear-lag model is proposed to obtain interface characteristics of nanorope reinforced polymer composites using representative volume element (RVE) concept. In the axisymmetric RVE, the nanorope is modelled as a closed-packed cylindrical lattice consisting seven single-walled carbon nanotubes. In the model, rope is considered to be perfectly bonded with the polymer resin where the nanotubes are assumed to be chemically non-bonded with each other in the rope system. Since, nanotubes are considered to be non-bonded in the nanorope there must exist a van der Waals interaction in terms of Lennard-Jones potential. A separate model is also proposed to determine the cohesive stress caused by this interaction. Closed form analytical solutions are derived for stress components of rope, resin and individual carbon nanotubes in the rope system. Parametric study has also been conducted to investigate the influences of key composite factors involved at both perfectly bonded and non-bonded interfaces.

  10. Fiber reinforced composites orthodontic retainers.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, A; Manuelli, M; Bassani, L; Albertini, P; Matarese, G; Perillo, L; Gastaldi, G; Gherlone, E F

    2015-12-01

    Retention is the phase of orthodontic treatment that attempts to hold teeth in their corrected positions after orthodontic therapy is completed. The aim of this study was to consider fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) as a possible alternative to conventional multistranded stainless steel wire for retention through SEM analysis. Two different FRC orthodontic retainers were investigated, i.e. Everstick® (Stick Tech Ltd, Turku, Finland) (type A, 24 samples), with a diameter of 0.76 mm made of glass fibers and a Young's modulus of elasticity of 28 gpa, and Ribbond® (Ribbond, Inc., Seattle, Washington, WA, USA) (type B, 24 samples), with ultra high molecular weight and with an high Young's modulus of elasticity by polyethylene fibers cold treated with plasma gas. Six groups were created: control groups A1 and B1, composed by 8 type A and 8 type B samples without impregnation and only with fluid resin before curing; groups A2 and B2, composed respectively by 8 type A and 8 type B samples impregnated with fluid resin Heliobond for 6 seconds; groups A3 and B3, composed respectively by 8 type A and 8 type B samples impregnated with fluid resin Heliobond for 6 minutes before curing. Cross- and lengthwise SEM analysis of the sectioned samples made showed that fiber without impregnation with fluid resin, before curing, showed interwoven and straight directed cylindrical fibers. The SEM analysis denoted that the two types of fiber shows structural characteristics differing in dimension, number, diameter and orientation of FRC without a preliminary treatment through impregnation of the fibers with fluid resin. An impregnation time of 6 seconds could considerably reduced voids, crazes and microcracks of the fibers, making them more resistant to the other oral and bacterial agents. A larger time of impregnation (6 minutes), with fluid resin before hardening, further enhances the morphological characteristics of the FRC.

  11. Effect of fiber-reinforced composite at the interface on bonding of resin core system to dentin.

    PubMed

    Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Ergun, Gulfem; Tezvergil, Arzu; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) at the interface on bonding of resin core systems to bovine dentin using different adhesive systems. To this end, the labial surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces and then divided into two groups according to the adhesive system used: total-etching (Solobond Plus) versus self-etching (Clearfil SE Bond). Resin core systems were bonded to tooth structure either without or with a FRC layer (everStick Net, StickTech). For groups with FRC layer, a silicon forming aid was used to adapt the latter on the dentin surfaces. After resin core was polymerized with Optilux 501 for 40 seconds, the specimens were tested in a universal testing machine. ANOVA revealed that presence of FRC at the interface had a significantly positive effect on bond strength (p < 0.001). However, differences between groups were not significant for either adhesive system (p = 0.076) or with the use of silicon forming aid (p = 0.348).

  12. An Analysis of the Macroscopic Tensile Behavior of a Nonlinear Nylon Reinforced Elastomeric Composite System Using MAC/GMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assaad, Mahmoud; Arnold, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A special class of composite laminates composed of soft rubbery matrices and stiff reinforcements made of steel wires or synthetic fibers is examined, where each constituent behaves in a nonlinear fashion even in the small strain domain. Composite laminates made of piles stacked at alternating small orientation angles with respect to the applied axial strain are primarily dominated by the nonlinear behavior of the reinforcing fibers. However; composites with large ply orientations or those perpendicular to the loading axis, will approximate the behavior of the matrix phase and respond in even a more complex fashion for arbitrarily stacked piles. The geometric nonlinearity due to small cord rotations during loading was deemed here to have a second order effect and consequently dropped from any consideration. The user subroutine USRMAT within the Micromechanics Analysis Code with the Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), was utilized to introduce the constituent material nonlinear behavior. Stress-strain behavior at the macro level was experimentally generated for single and multi ply composites comprised of continuous Nylon-66 reinforcements embedded in a carbon black loaded rubbery matrix. Comparisons between the predicted macro composite behavior and experimental results are excellent when material nonlinearity is included in the analysis. In this paper, a brief review of GMC is provided, along with a description of the nonlinear behavior of the constituents and associated constituent constitutive relations, and the improved macro (or composite) behavior predictions are documented and illustrated.

  13. Nanostructured metal composites reinforced with fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Hernández, Francisco C.; Calderon, H. A.

    2010-02-01

    This work presents the results of the characterization of nanostructured Al or Fe matrix composites reinforced with fullerenes. The fullerene used is a mix of 15 wt%C60, 5 wt.%C70, and 80 wt.% soot that is the product of the primary synthesis of C60. The composites were produced by mechanical alloying and sintered by spark plasma sintering (SPS). It was found that in both composites, C60 withstands mechanical alloying, and acts as a control agent, reducing the agglomeration of the particles. In both composite systems the as-mechanically alloyed powders as well as the SPS sintered products are nanostructured. During the SPS process the effect of the metal (Al or Fe) matrix with the fullerene is different for each composite. For instance, Al reacts with all the carbon in the fullerene mix and forms Al4C3; on the contrary, in the Fe-fullerene composite, Fe sponsors the synthesis of C60 during the SPS process. The synthesis of the C60 is presumably assisted by the catalytic nature of Fe and the electric field generated during the SPS sintering process.

  14. Evaluation of capillary reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, J. E.; Halase, J. F.; South, W. K.; Stoffer, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Anti-icing of the inlet of jet engines is generally performed with high pressure heated air that is directed forward from the compressor through a series of pipes to various manifolds located near the structures to be anti-iced. From these manifolds, the air is directed to all flowpath surfaces that may be susceptible to ice formation. There the anti-icing function may be performed by either heat conduction or film heating. Unfortunately, the prospect of utilizing lighweight, high strength composites for inlet structures of jet engines has been frustrated by the low transverse thermal conductivity of such materials. It was the objective of this program to develop an advanced materials and design concept for anti-icing composite structures. The concept that was evaluated used capillary glass tubes embedded on the surface of a composite structure with heated air ducted through the tubes. An analytical computer program was developed to predict the anti-icing performance of such tubes and a test program was conducted to demonstrate actual performance of this system. Test data and analytical code results were in excellent agreement. Both indicate feasibility of using capillary tubes for surface heating as a means for composite engine structures to combat ice accumulation.

  15. Continuous fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Brindley, P. K.; Froes, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the fabrication techniques, microstructural characteristics, and mechanical behavior of a lightweight, high service temperature SiC-reinforced alpha-2 Ti-14Al-21Nb intermetallic-matrix composite. Fabrication techniques under investigation to improve the low-temperature ductility and environmental resistance of this material system, while reducing manufacturing costs to competitive levels, encompass powder-cloth processing, foil-fiber-foil processing, and thermal-spray processing. Attention is given to composite microstructure problems associated with fiber distribution and fiber-matrix interfaces, as well as with mismatches of thermal-expansion coefficient; major improvements are noted to be required in tensile properties, thermal cycling effects, mechanical damage, creep, and environmental effects.

  16. Continuous fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Brindley, P. K.; Froes, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the fabrication techniques, microstructural characteristics, and mechanical behavior of a lightweight, high service temperature SiC-reinforced alpha-2 Ti-14Al-21Nb intermetallic-matrix composite. Fabrication techniques under investigation to improve the low-temperature ductility and environmental resistance of this material system, while reducing manufacturing costs to competitive levels, encompass powder-cloth processing, foil-fiber-foil processing, and thermal-spray processing. Attention is given to composite microstructure problems associated with fiber distribution and fiber-matrix interfaces, as well as with mismatches of thermal-expansion coefficient; major improvements are noted to be required in tensile properties, thermal cycling effects, mechanical damage, creep, and environmental effects.

  17. Assessment of microcapsule—catalyst particles healing system in high performance fibre reinforced polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolimowski, P. A.; Wass, D. F.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Autonomous self-healing in carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) is demonstrated using epoxy resin filled microcapsules and a solid-state catalyst. Microcapsules filled with oligomeric epoxy resin (20-450 μm) and particles of Sc(OTf)3 are embedded in an interleave region of a unidirectional CFRP laminate and tested under mode I loading. Double cantilever beam (DCB) test specimens containing variable concentrations of microcapsules and catalyst were prepared, tested and compared to those healed by manual injection with corresponding healing resin formulation. The healing efficiency was evaluated by comparing the maximum peak load recorded on load-displacement curves for pristine and healed specimens. A 44% maximum recovery was observed for specimens containing 10 wt% of solid phase catalyst and 11 wt% of epoxy microcapsules. However, a significant (80%) decrease in initial strain energy release rate (G IC) was observed for specimens with the embedded healing chemistries.

  18. Opportunities and challenges for textile reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Christopher M.

    2000-03-01

    For several decades researchers have been interested in textile processes for the production of composite reinforcement. These technologies have offered several promises: reduced fabrication costs, 3-D multiaxial reinforcement, and damage tolerance. Despite these advantages, textile composites have not reached the level of implementation of laminated composites. In this paper, the opportunities provided by textile reinforced composites and the challenges that limit their implementation will be discussed in detail. Textile composites refer to a family of processes: weaving, braiding, knitting, and hybrids thereof. The various families of textiles will be defined and the basics of fabric formation for each family will be detailed. In particular, the strengths and weaknesses of each manufacturing technique will be addressed to provide a view of the applicability of each technology. This will include some guidance on shape formation capability, property ranges, size limitations, and estimates of cost to produce. Potential applications for these materials will be presented. Among the limitations on the application of textile reinforced composites is the lack of adequate modeling capabilities for these materials. Textile composites have rather large unit cell structures and are highly inhomogeneous throughout their volumes. These features provide benefits in manufacturing, but require novel modeling techniques to correctly understand the mechanical behavior. A review of analytical techniques applied to textile composites will be presented along with a discussion of the benefits and weaknesses of each of these methods. The enabling technologies needed to further the implementation of textile composites in structural applications will be discussed.

  19. 3-D textile reinforcements in composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miravete, A.

    1999-11-01

    Laminated composite materials have been used in structural applications since the 1960s. However, their high cost and inability to accommodate fibers in the laminate`s thickness direction greatly reduce their damage tolerance and impact resistance. The second generation of materials--3-D textile reinforced composites--offers significant cost reduction, and by incorporating reinforcement in the thickness direction, dramatically increases damage tolerance and impact resistance. However, methods for predicting mechanical properties of 3-D textile reinforced composite materials tend to be more complex. These materials also have disadvantages--particularly in regard to crimps in the yarns--that require more research. Textile preforms, micro- and macromechanical modeling, manufacturing processes, and characterization all need further development. As researchers overcome these problems, this new generation of composites will emerge as a highly competitive family of materials. This book provides a state-of-the-art account of this promising technology. In it, top experts describe the manufacturing processes, highlight the advantages, identify the main applications, analyze methods for predicting mechanical properties, and detail various reinforcement strategies, including grid structure, knitted fabric composites, and the braiding technique. Armed with the information in this book, readers will be prepared to better exploit the advantages of 3-D textile reinforced composites, overcome its disadvantages, and contribute to the further development of the technology.

  20. Ceramic whisker reinforcement of dental resin composites.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Martin, T A; Antonucci, J M; Eichmiller, F C

    1999-02-01

    Resin composites currently available are not suitable for use as large stress-bearing posterior restorations involving cusps due to their tendencies toward excessive fracture and wear. The glass fillers in composites provide only limited reinforcement because of the brittleness and low strength of glass. The aim of the present study was to reinforce dental resins with ceramic single-crystalline whiskers of elongated shapes that possess extremely high strength. A novel method was developed that consisted of fusing silicate glass particles onto the surfaces of individual whiskers for a two-fold benefit: (1) to facilitate silanization regardless of whisker composition; and (2) to enhance whisker retention in the matrix by providing rougher whisker surfaces. Silicon nitride whiskers, with an average diameter of 0.4 microm and length of 5 microm, were coated by the fusion of silica particles 0.04 microm in size to the whisker surface at temperatures ranging from 650 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. The coated whiskers were silanized and manually blended with resins by spatulation. Flexural, fracture toughness, and indentation tests were carried out for evaluation of the properties of the whisker-reinforced composites in comparison with conventional composites. A two-fold increase in strength and toughness was achieved in the whisker-reinforced composite, together with a substantially enhanced resistance to contact damage and microcracking. The highest flexural strength (195+/-8 MPa) and fracture toughness (2.1+/-0.3 MPa x m(1/2)) occurred in a composite reinforced with a whisker-silica mixture at whisker:silica mass ratio of 2:1 fused at 800 degrees C. To conclude, the strength, toughness, and contact damage resistance of dental resin composites can be substantially improved by reinforcement with fillers of ceramic whiskers fused with silica glass particles.

  1. Understanding the interdiffusion behavior and determining the long term stability of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium-base matrix composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, John K.

    1990-01-01

    The long term interdiffusional stability of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium alloy composites is addressed. The matrix alloy that is most promising for use as a high temperature structural material for reliable long-term space power generation is Nb1Zr. As an ancillary project to this program, efforts were made to assess the nature and kinetics of interphase reaction between selected beryllide intermetallics and nickel and iron aluminides.

  2. Composite Grids for Reinforcement of Concrete Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    spiral deformation to provide a good bond between reinforcement and concrete. Research conducted by Larralde et al. (1989) investigated the...the stiffness of the steel-reinforced beams. Larralde and Zervai (1991) took a different approach by comparing the flexural behavior of FRP grating...Cincinnati, OH, Jan 30- Feb 1,1995. Session 21C. Larralde , AM. and Zerva, A., (1991). "Load/deflection Performance of FRP Grating-Concrete Composites

  3. Continuous and short fiber reinforced composite in root post-core system of severely damaged incisors.

    PubMed

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2009-03-18

    The aim of this study was to determine the static load-bearing capacity of endodontically treated maxillary incisors restored with post-core complex made of experimental fiber composite resin (FC) and complete crown made of particulate filler composite (PFC). Further aim was to evaluate the effect of FC resin on the failure mode of the restoration. The experimental composite resin (FC) was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers (3 mm in length) and 22.5 wt% of semi-interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) resin with 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers. Thirty extracted sound upper central incisors were used. Twenty teeth were prepared by cutting the clinical crown 2 mm above the cemento-enamel junction horizontally. Restorations were made by two techniques (n=10). Group A (control group) contained samples of sound incisor teeth. Group B had teeth restored using glass fiber post (everStick, Stick- Teck) and PFC (Filtek Z250, 3M-ESPE) to build up core and complete crown. In Group C, the teeth were restored with FC as post-core and complete crown of PFC. The root canals were prepared and posts were cemented with a dual cure resin cement. The restorations were polymerized with a hand-light curing unit. All restored teeth were stored in water at room temperature for 24 h before they were statically loaded with speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p=0.05). Failure modes were visually examined. ANOVA revealed that restored incisors (Group B and C) had a statistically significantly lower load-bearing capacity (p<0.05) than the control group. Restorations made from FC post-core and PFC coverage (Group C) gave force value of 363 N (112 SD), which was higher than the value of Group B (211 N, 50 SD). Within the limitations of this study, the teeth restored with experimental fiber composite post-core demonstrated higher load bearing capacity than those with fiber post and PFC core.

  4. Flammabilities Of Graphite-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes tests and comparisons of flammabilities, thermal properties, and selected mechanical properties of composite materials made of epoxy and other matrices reinforced by graphite fibers. Composites also compared with baseline epoxy/fiberglass composite. Considers such properties as limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, products of thermal degradation, total heat release, heat-release rate, loss of mass, spread of flames, resistance to ignition, and thermal stability.

  5. Carbon Nanomaterials as Reinforcements for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials including fellerenes, nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers have been proposed for many applications. One of applications is to use the carbon nanomaterials as reinforcements for composites, especially for polymer matrices. Carbon nanotubes is a good reinforcement for lightweight composite applications due to its low mass density and high Young's modulus. Two obscures need to overcome for carbon nanotubes as reinforcements in composites, which are large quantity production and functioning the nanotubes. This presentation will discuss the carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition. In order to reduce the cost of producing carbon nanotubes as well as preventing the sliding problems, carbon nanotubes were also synthesized on carbon fibers. The synthesis process and characterization results of nanotubes and nanotubes/fibers will be discussed in the presentation.

  6. Buckling of Fiber Reinforced Composite Plates with Nanofiber Reinforced Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2010-01-01

    Anisotropic composite plates were evaluated with nanofiber reinforced matrices (NFRM). The nanofiber reinforcement volumes ratio in the matrix was 0.01. The plate dimensions were 20 by 10 by 1.0 in. (508 by 254 by 25.4 mm). Seven different loading condition cases were evaluated: three for uniaxial loading, three for pairs of combined loading, and one with three combined loadings. The anisotropy arose from the unidirectional plates having been at 30 from the structural axis. The anisotropy had a full 6 by 6 rigidities matrix which were satisfied and solved by a Galerkin buckling algorithm. The buckling results showed that the NFRM plates buckled at about twice those with conventional matrix.

  7. Thermoforming of Continuous Fibre Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCool, Raurí; Murphy, Adrian; Wilson, Ryan; Jiang, Zhenyu; Price, Mark

    2011-05-01

    The introduction of new materials, particularly for aerospace products, is not a simple, quick or cheap task. New materials require extensive and expensive qualification and must meet challenging strength, stiffness, durability, manufacturing, inspection and maintenance requirements. Growth in industry acceptance for fibre reinforced thermoplastic composite systems requires the determination of whole life attributes including both part processing and processed part performance data. For thermoplastic composite materials the interactions between the processing parameters, in-service structural performance and end of life recyclability are potentially interrelated. Given the large number and range of parameters and the complexity of the potential relationships, understanding for whole life design must be developed in a systematic building block approach. To assess and demonstrate such an approach this article documents initial coupon level thermoforming trials for a commercially available fibre reinforced thermoplastic laminate, identifying the key interactions between processing and whole life performance characteristics. To examine the role of the thermoforming process parameters on the whole life performance characteristics of the formed part requires a series of manufacturing trials combined with a series of characterisation tests on the manufacturing trial output. Using a full factorial test programme and considering all possible process parameters over a range of potential magnitudes would result in a very large number of manufacturing trials and accompanying characterisation tests. Such an approach would clearly be expensive and require significant time to complete, therefore failing to address the key requirement for a future design methodology capable of rapidly generating design knowledge for new materials and processes. In this work the role of mould tool temperature and blank forming temperature on the thermoforming of a commercially available

  8. Thermoforming of Continuous Fibre Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    McCool, Rauri; Murphy, Adrian; Wilson, Ryan; Jiang Zhenyu; Price, Mark

    2011-05-04

    The introduction of new materials, particularly for aerospace products, is not a simple, quick or cheap task. New materials require extensive and expensive qualification and must meet challenging strength, stiffness, durability, manufacturing, inspection and maintenance requirements. Growth in industry acceptance for fibre reinforced thermoplastic composite systems requires the determination of whole life attributes including both part processing and processed part performance data. For thermoplastic composite materials the interactions between the processing parameters, in-service structural performance and end of life recyclability are potentially interrelated. Given the large number and range of parameters and the complexity of the potential relationships, understanding for whole life design must be developed in a systematic building block approach. To assess and demonstrate such an approach this article documents initial coupon level thermoforming trials for a commercially available fibre reinforced thermoplastic laminate, identifying the key interactions between processing and whole life performance characteristics. To examine the role of the thermoforming process parameters on the whole life performance characteristics of the formed part requires a series of manufacturing trials combined with a series of characterisation tests on the manufacturing trial output. Using a full factorial test programme and considering all possible process parameters over a range of potential magnitudes would result in a very large number of manufacturing trials and accompanying characterisation tests. Such an approach would clearly be expensive and require significant time to complete, therefore failing to address the key requirement for a future design methodology capable of rapidly generating design knowledge for new materials and processes. In this work the role of mould tool temperature and blank forming temperature on the thermoforming of a commercially available

  9. Fiber Reinforced Composite Cores and Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Stephen W. (Inventor); Campbell, G. Scott (Inventor); Tilton, Danny E. (Inventor); Stoll, Frederick (Inventor); Sheppard, Michael (Inventor); Banerjee, Robin (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A fiber reinforced core panel is formed from strips of plastics foam helically wound with layers of rovings to form webs which may extend in a wave pattern or may intersect transverse webs. Hollow tubes may replace foam strips. Axial rovings cooperate with overlying helically wound rovings to form a beam or a column. Wound roving patterns may vary along strips for structural efficiency. Wound strips may alternate with spaced strips, and spacers between the strips enhance web buckling strength. Continuously wound rovings between spaced strips permit folding to form panels with reinforced edges. Continuously wound strips are helically wrapped to form annular structures, and composite panels may combine both thermoset and thermoplastic resins. Continuously wound strips or strip sections may be continuously fed either longitudinally or laterally into molding apparatus which may receive skin materials to form reinforced composite panels.

  10. Formability of tufted 3-dimensional composite reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ling Shan; Wang, Peng; Legrand, Xavier; Soulat, Damien

    2016-10-01

    In the aerospace industry, more and more complex preform for composite parts are needed. Traditionally, laminated reinforcement is largely used as the method. The development of tufting technology has now advanced to a stage whereby it can be employed to produce the 3D textile composite reinforcements. Because the tufting technology is user-friendly, in this study, the tufting parameters (tufting density, tufting length, tufting yarn orientations…) are varied, in order to improve the understanding of formability of the tufted 3D fabric during manufacturing, in particular the influence of the tufting yarns, the present work is performed to analyse the preforming behaviours of tufted 3D reinforcement in the hemispherical stamping process. The preforming behaviours are also compared with the ones of the multilayered forming. Interply sliding and winkling phenomenon during forming are fully influenced by tufting yarns on the material draw-in, by the orientations of tufting yarn, …

  11. Diamond-Reinforced Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-10

    stainless steel retorts and evacuated to a level 17 of -40 mTorr. Samples were HIPped to full density at 600"C at 18 30 Ksi for 30 minutes. These...composite bulk 12 materials and composite coatings) having high strength and 13 stiffness. These articles can be used, for example, in dental 14 materials...fabricated using standard powder metallurgy 8 techniques. The materials used to synthesize the DRCs were -230 9 mesh , 1100 aluminum powder and 30 jim

  12. The Microstructure-Processing-Property Relationships in an Al Matrix Composite System Reinforced by Al-Cu-Fe Alloy Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Fei

    2004-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC), especially Al matrix composites, received a lot of attention during many years of research because of their promise for the development of automotive and aerospace materials with improved properties and performance, such as lighter weight and better structural properties, improved thermal conductivity and wear resistance. In order to make the MMC materials more viable in various applications, current research efforts on the MMCs should continue to focus on two important aspects, including improving the properties of MMCs and finding more economical techniques to produce MMCs. Solid state vacuum sintering was studied in tap densified Al powder and in hot quasi-isostatically forged samples composed of commercial inert gas atomized or high purity Al powder, generated by a gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) technique. The GARS process results in spherical Al powder with a far thinner surface oxide. The overall results indicated the enhanced ability of GARS-processed Al and Al alloy powders for solid state sintering, which may lead to simplification of current Al powder consolidation processing methods. Elemental Al-based composites reinforced with spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders were produced by quasi-isostatic forging and vacuum hot pressing (VHP) consolidation methods. Microstructures and tensile properties of AYAl-Cu-Fe composites were characterized. It was proved that spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders can serve as an effective reinforcement particulate for elemental Al-based composites, because of their high hardness and a preferred type of matrix/reinforcement interfacial bonding, with reduced strain concentration around the particles. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength of the composites were increased over the corresponding Al matrix values, far beyond typical observations. This remarkable strengthening was achieved without precipitation hardening and without severe strain hardening during consolidation because of

  13. [The systems process of reinforcement].

    PubMed

    Sudakov, K V

    1996-01-01

    The process of reinforcement is considered in the context of the general theory of functional systems as an important part of behavioural act organization closely interacting with the dominant motivation. It is shown that reinforcement substantially changes the activities of separate neurons in different brain structures involved in dominant motivation. After a preliminary reinforcement under the influence of corresponding motivation the ribosomal apparatus of neurons begins to synthesize special molecular engrams of the action acceptor. The sensory mechanisms of reinforcement and, especially, the role of emotions are considered in details in the paper.

  14. Interfacial contributions in lignocellulosic firber-reinforced polyurethane composites

    Treesearch

    Timothy G. Rials; Michael P. Wolcott; John M. Nassar

    2001-01-01

    Whereas lignocellulosic fibers have received considerable attention as a reinforcing agent in thermoplastic composites, their applicability to reactive polymer systems remains of considerable interest. The hydroxyl-rich nature of natural lignocellulosic fibers suggests that they are particularly useful in thermsetting systems such as polyurethanes. To further this...

  15. Development of high-speed reactive processing system for carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 composite: In-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Seong, Dong Gi; Yi, Jin-Woo; Um, Moon-Kwang

    2016-05-18

    In order to manufacture carbon fiber-reinforced polyamide-6 (PA-6) composite, we optimized the reactive processing system. The in-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactam was utilized with proper catalyst and initiator for PA-6 matrix. The mechanical properties such as tensile strength, inter-laminar shear strength and compressive strength of the produced carbon fiber-reinforced PA-6 composite were measured, which were compared with the corresponding scanning electron microscope (SEM) images to investigate the polymer properties as well as the interfacial interaction between fiber and polymer matrix. Furthermore, kinetics of in-situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactam will be discussed in the viewpoint of increasing manufacturing speed and interfacial bonding between PA-6 matrix and carbon fiber during polymerization.

  16. A systems process of reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Sudakov, K V

    1997-01-01

    Functional systems theory was used to consider the process of reinforcement of the actions on the body of reinforcing factors, i.e., the results of behavior satisfying the body's original needs. The systems process of reinforcement includes reverse afferentation entering the CNS from receptors acted upon by various parameters of the desired results, and mechanisms for comparing reverse afferentation with the apparatus which accepts the results of the action and the corresponding emotional component. A tight interaction between reinforcement and the dominant motivation is generated on the basis of the hologram principle. Reinforcement forms an apparatus for predicting a desired result, i.e. a result-of-action acceptor. Reinforcement procedures significant changes in the activities of individual neurons in the various brain structures involved in dominant motivation, transforming their spike activity for a burst pattern to regular discharges; there are also molecular changes in neuron properties. After preliminary reinforcement, the corresponding motivation induces the ribosomal system of neurons to start synthesizing special effector molecules, which organize molecular engrams of the acceptor of the action's result. Sensory mechanisms of reinforcement are considered, with particular reference to the information role of emotions.

  17. Analysis of Graphite Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Robert E.; Gilbert, John A.; Spanyer, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes analytical methods that can be used to determine the deflections and stresses in highly compliant graphite-reinforced cementitious composites. It is demonstrated that the standard transform section fails to provide accurate results when the elastic modulus ratio exceeds 20. So an alternate approach is formulated by using the rule of mixtures to determine a set of effective material properties for the composite. Tensile tests are conducted on composite samples to verify this approach; and, when the effective material properties are used to characterize the deflections of composite beams subject to pure bending, an excellent agreement is obtained. Laminated composite plate theory is also investigated as a means for analyzing even more complex composites, consisting of multiple graphite layers oriented in different directions. In this case, composite beams are analyzed by incorporating material properties established from tensile tests. Finite element modeling is used to verity the results and, considering the complexity of the samples, a very good agreement is obtained.

  18. Fatigue evaluation of composite-reinforced, integrally stiffened metal panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumesnil, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of composite-reinforced, integrally stiffened metal panels was investigated in combined metal and composite materials subjected to fatigue loading. The systems investigated were aluminum-graphite/epoxy, and aluminum-S glass/epoxy. It was found that the composite material would support the total load at limit stress after the metal had completely failed, and the weight of the composite-metal system would be equal to that of an all metal system which would carry the same total load at limit stress.

  19. Reinforcing masonry walls with composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jai, John Chia-Han

    1999-10-01

    In this investigation, a procedure is developed for determining the effectiveness of composite materials in retrofitting masonry buildings to reduce seismic damage. The reinforcement considered is a thin layer of fiber-reinforced composite applied to the wall in a wallpaper-like fashion. Models were developed which predicts the behavior of masonry walls reinforced in such a fashion and subjected to static, in-plane normal and shear loads. Solid walls, as well as walls with openings (such as windows and doors), were considered. The models estimate the load-deflection characteristic of the wall, the load set at which the wall fails, and the deflection of the wall at the instant of failure. The models were verified by tests performed with walls constructed of clay bricks and mortar, and with walls made of wood bricks. In these tests, the load versus deflection, the failure load, and the failure deflection were measured. Reasonable agreements were found between the values calculated by the models and the data. Parametric studies were also performed. The results of these studies indicate that composite reinforcement applied in a wallpaper-like fashion may increase substantially the load carrying capacities of masonry walls.

  20. Development of Flax Fibre based Textile Reinforcements for Composite Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goutianos, S.; Peijs, T.; Nystrom, B.; Skrifvars, M.

    2006-07-01

    Most developments in the area of natural fibre reinforced composites have focused on random discontinuous fibre composite systems. The development of continuous fibre reinforced composites is, however, essential for manufacturing materials, which can be used in load-bearing/structural applications. The current work aims to develop high-performance natural fibre composite systems for structural applications using continuous textile reinforcements like UD-tapes or woven fabrics. One of the main problems in this case is the optimisation of the yarn to be used to manufacture the textile reinforcement. Low twisted yarns display a very low strength when tested dry in air and therefore they cannot be used in processes such as pultrusion or textile manufacturing routes. On the other hand, by increasing the level of twist, a degradation of the mechanical properties is observed in impregnated yarns (e.g., unidirectional composites) similar to off-axis composites. Therefore, an optimum twist should be used to balance processability and mechanical properties. Subsequently, different types of fabrics (i.e., biaxial plain weaves, unidirectional fabrics and non-crimp fabrics) were produced and evaluated as reinforcement in composites manufactured by well established manufacturing techniques such as hand lay-up, vacuum infusion, pultrusion and resin transfer moulding (RTM). Clearly, as expected, the developed materials cannot directly compete in terms of strength with glass fibre composites. However, they are clearly able to compete with these materials in terms of stiffness, especially if the low density of flax is taken into account. Their properties are however very favourable when compared with non-woven glass composites.

  1. Glass matrix composites. I - Graphite fiber reinforced glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental program is described in which graphite fibers of Hercules HMS and HTS, Thornel 300, and Celanese DG-12 were used to reinforce, both uniaxially and biaxially, borosilicate pyrex glass. Composite flexural strength distribution, strength as a function of test temperature, fracture toughness and oxidative stability were determined and shown to be primarily a function of fiber type and the quality of fiber-matrix bond formed during composite fabrication. It is demonstrated that the graphite fiber reinforced glass system offers unique possibilities as a high performance structural material.

  2. Failure behavior of a glass-fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiaai; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar

    2017-05-01

    In this work, experiments were conducted to stamp form glass-fiber reinforced thermoplastics with different widths of hour-glass shapes. A forming limit diagram (FLD) is established based on the experimental data for this material, depicting strain forming limits at different deformation modes. The material system involved in the study is a glass-fiber reinforced polypropylene composite (TWINTEX®) with a fiber orientation of 0°/90° along the warp and weft directions. In this study, the conventional FLD method is adapted to use on thermoplastic composites and it is found that the major principle strain limit is the highest when the strain ratio is around -0.5.

  3. Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composites: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, David L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix (W/Cu) composites have served as an ideal model system with which to analyze the properties of metal matrix composites. A series of research programs were conducted to investigate the stress-strain behavior of W/Cu composites; the effect of fiber content on the strength, modulus, and conductivity of W/Cu composites; and the effect of alloying elements on the behavior of tungsten wire and of W/Cu composites. Later programs investigated the stress-rupture, creep, and impact behavior of these composites at elevated temperatures. Analysis of the results of these programs as allows prediction of the effects of fiber properties, matrix properties, and fiber content on the properties of W/Cu composites. These analyses form the basis for the rule-of-mixtures prediction of composite properties which was universally adopted as the criteria for measuring composite efficiency. In addition, the analyses allows extrapolation of potential properties of other metal matrix composites and are used to select candidate fibers and matrices for development of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite materials for high temperature aircraft and rocket engine turbine applications. The W/Cu composite efforts are summarized, some of the results obtained are described, and an update is provided on more recent work using W/Cu composites as high strength, high thermal conductivity composite materials for high heat flux, elevated temperature applications.

  4. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of research for the origination of graphite-fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are presented. The method selected to form the composites consisted of pulling the graphite fiber through a slurry containing powdered glass, winding up the graphite fiber and the glass it picks up on a drum, drying, cutting into segments, loading the tape segment into a graphite die, and hot pressing. During the course of the work, composites were made with a variety of graphite fibers in a glass matrix.

  5. Machining of fiber-reinforced composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Myong-Shik

    As fiber-reinforced composite laminates are becoming considerably popular in a wide range of applications, the necessity for machining such materials is increasing rapidly. Due to their microscopical inhomogeneity, anisotropy, and highly abrasive nature, composite laminates exhibit some peculiar types of machining damage. Consequently, the machining of composite laminates requires a different approach from that used for metals and offers a challenge from both an academic and application point of view. In the present work, the drilling of composite laminated plates and the edge trimming of tubular composite laminates were investigated through theoretical analyses and their experimental verification. First, a drilling process model using linear elastic fracture mechanics and classical plate bending theory was developed to predict the critical thrust value responsible for the onset of delamination during the drilling of composite laminates with pre-drilled pilot holes. Experiments using stepped drills, which can utilize the effectiveness of such pilot holes, were conducted on composite laminates. Reasonably good agreement was found between the results of the process model and the tests. Second, the development of a model-based intelligent control strategy for the efficient drilling of composite laminates was explored by experiments and analyses. In this investigation, mathematical models were created to relate the drilling forces to cutting parameters and to identify the different process stages. These models predicted the degree of thrust force regulation to prevent delamination. Third, the edge trimming of thin-walled tubular composite laminates was modeled and analyzed for estimating the critical cutting force at the initiation of longitudinal cracking. A series of full-scale edge trimming tests were conducted on tubular composite specimens to assess the current approach and to obtain basic machining data for various composite laminates. The present study provides

  6. Impact behavior of hydroxyapatite reinforced polyethylene composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Tanner, K E

    2003-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite particulate reinforced high density polyethylene composite (HA-HDPE) has been developed as a bone replacement material. The impact behavior of the composites at 37 degrees C has been investigated using an instrumented falling weight impact testing machine. The fracture surfaces were examined using SEM and the fracture mechanisms are discussed. It was found that the fracture toughness of HA-HDPE composites increased with HDPE molecular weight, but decreased with increasing HA volume fraction. Examination of fracture surfaces revealed weak filler/matrix interfaces which can debond easily to enable crack initiation and propagation. Increasing HA volume fraction increases the interface area, and more cracks can form and develop, thus decreasing the impact resistance of the composites. Another important factor for the impact behavior of the composites is the matrix. At higher molecular weight, HDPE is able to sustain more plastic deformation and dissipates more impact energy, hence improving the impact property.

  7. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    High levels of mechanical performance in tension, flexure, fatigue, and creep loading situations of graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are discussed. At test temperatures of up to 813 K it was found that the major limiting factor was the oxidative instability of the reinforcing graphite fibers. Particular points to note include the following: (1) a wide variety of graphite fibers were found to be comparable with the glass matrix composite fabrication process; (2) choice of fiber, to a large extent, controlled resultant composite performance; (3) composite fatigue performance was found to be excellent at both 300 K and 703 K; (4) composite creep and stress rupture at temperatures of up to 813 K was limited by the oxidative stability of the fiber; (5) exceptionally low values of composite thermal expansion coefficient were attributable to the dimensional stability of both matrix and fiber; and (6) component fabricability was demonstrated through the hot pressing of hot sections and brazing using glass and metal joining phases.

  8. Influence of veneering composite composition on the efficacy of fiber-reinforced restorations (FRR).

    PubMed

    Ellakwa, A; Shortall, A; Shehata, M; Marquis, P

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of fiber reinforcement on the flexural properties of four commercial (Artglass, Belleglass HP, Herculite XRV and Solidex) veneering composites (Series A) and two experimental composites (Series B&C). This study investigated how the composition of the veneering composites influenced the enhancement of strength and modulus produced by fiber reinforcement. The formulation of the experimental composites were varied by changing the filler load (Series B) or the resin matrix chemistry (Series C) to assess the effect these changes would have on the degree of reinforcement. In Series A, the commercial veneering composites were reinforced by an Ultra-High-Molecular-Weight Polyethylene fiber (UHMW-PE/Connect) to evaluate flexural properties after 24 hours and six months. In Series B, experimental composites with the same organic matrix but with different filler loads (40% to 80% by weight) were also reinforced by Connect fiber to evaluate flexural properties. In Series C, experimental composites (Systems 1-4) with the same filler load (76.5% by weight) but with different organic matrix compositions were reinforced by Connect fiber to evaluate flexural properties. For Series B and C, flexural properties were evaluated after 24 hours water storage. All the samples were prepared in a mold 2 mm x 2 mm x 25 mm and stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C until they were ready for flexural testing in an Instron Universal Testing Machine using a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The results showed no significant differences in the flexural strength (FS) between any of the commercial reinforced composites in Series A. The flexural modulus (FM) of the fiber-reinforced Belleglass HP group was significantly higher than for Artglass and Solidex. Water storage for six months had no significant (p>0.05) effect on the flexural strength of three of the four reinforced veneering composites. The flexural strength for Artglass was significantly reduced (p<0

  9. Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials Used for Tankage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Christy

    2005-01-01

    The Nonmetallic Materials and Processes Group is presently working on several projects to optimize cost while providing effect materials for the space program. One factor that must be considered is that these materials must meet certain weight requirements. Composites contribute greatly to this effort. Through the use of composites the cost of launching payloads into orbit will be reduced to one-tenth of the current cost. This research project involved composites used for aluminum pressure vessels. These tanks are used to store cryogenic liquids during flight. The tanks need some type of reinforcement. Steel was considered, but added too much weight. As a result, fiber was chosen. Presently, only carbon fibers with epoxy resin are wrapped around the vessels as a primary source of reinforcement. Carbon fibers are lightweight, yet high strength. The carbon fibers are wet wound onto the pressure vessels. This was done using the ENTEC Filament Winding Machine. It was thought that an additional layer of fiber would aid in reinforcement as well as containment and impact reduction. Kevlar was selected because it is light weight, but five times stronger that steel. This is the same fiber that is used to make bullet-proof vests trampolines, and tennis rackets.

  10. Elastic properties of woven fabric reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramnath, V.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical model for the realistic representation of a woven fabric reinforced composite is presented in this paper. The approach uses a variable cross-section geometric model in order to achieve geometric compatibility at the yarn cross-over regions. Admissible displacement and stress fields are used to determine bounds on the fabric elastic properties. The approach adopted enables the determination of the complete three-dimensional woven fabric composite properties. The in-plane fabric properties obtained through this approach have been compared with results obtained from other approaches existing in the literature. Also, comparisons made with available experimental data indicate good agreement.

  11. Titanium reinforced boron-polyimide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. A.; Clayton, K. I.

    1969-01-01

    Processing techniques for boron polyimide prepreg were developed whereby composites could be molded under vacuum bag pressure only. A post-cure cycle was developed which resulted in no loss in room temperature mechanical properties of the composite at any time during up to 16 hours at 650 F. A design utilizing laminated titanium foil was developed to achieve a smooth transition of load from the titanium attachment points into the boron-reinforced body of the structure. The box beam test article was subjected to combined bending and torsional loads while exposed to 650 F. Loads were applied incrementally until failure occurred at 83% design limit load.

  12. Creep deformation characteristics of ductile discontinuous fiber reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1993-10-01

    Role of material parameters and geometric parameters of ductile reinforcing phase on the creep deformation behavior of 20% discontinuously reinforced composite was numerically investigated including debonding and pull-out mechanisms. Results indicate that for rigidly bonded interfaces, the creep rate of the composite is not significantly influenced by the material properties and geometric parameters of the ductile reinforcing phase due to development of large hydrostatic stress and constrained deformation in the reinforcement. For debonding interfaces, the geometric parameters of the reinforcing phase are important; however, event with very weak interfacial behavior low composite creep rates can be achieved by suitable selection of the geometric parameters of the ductile reinforcing phase.

  13. Reinforcing of Cement Composites by Estabragh Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merati, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The influence of Estabragh fibres has been studied to improve the performance characteristics of the reinforced cement composites. The concrete shrinkage was evaluated by counting the number of cracks and measuring the width of cracks on the surface of concrete specimens. Although, the Estabragh fibres lose their strength in an alkali environment of cement composites, but, the ability of Estabragh fibres to bridge on the micro cracks in the concrete matrix causes to decrease the width of the cracks on the surface of the concrete samples in comparison with the plain concrete. However, considering the mechanical properties of specimens such as bending strength and impact resistance, the specimens with 0.25 % of Estabragh fibre performed better in all respects compared to the physical and mechanical properties of reinforced cement composite of concrete. Consequently, by adding 0.25 % of Estabragh fibres to the cement composite of concrete, a remarkable improvement in physical and mechanical properties of fibre-containing cement composite is achieved.

  14. Fiber reinforced thermoplastic resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); Chang, Glenn E. C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Polyimide polymer composites having a combination of enhanced thermal and mechanical properties even when subjected to service temperatures as high as 700.degree. F. are described. They comprise (a) from 10 to 50 parts by weight of a thermoplastic polyimide resin prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and (b) from 90 to 50 parts by weight of continuous reinforcing fibers, the total of (a) and (b) being 100 parts by weight. Composites based on polyimide resin formed from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and pyromellitic dianhydride and continuous carbon fibers retained at least about 50% of their room temperature shear strength after exposure to 700.degree. F. for a period of 16 hours in flowing air. Preferably, the thermoplastic polyimide resin is formed in situ in the composite material by thermal imidization of a corresponding amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. It is also preferred to initially size the continuous reinforcing fibers with up to about one percent by weight of an amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. In this way imidization at a suitable elevated temperature results in the in-situ formation of a substantially homogeneous thermoplastic matrix of the polyimide resin tightly and intimately bonded to the continuous fibers. The resultant composites tend to have optimum thermo-mechanical properties.

  15. Comparison of shear bond strength of resin reinforced chemical cure glass ionomer, conventional chemical cure glass ionomer and chemical cure composite resin in direct bonding systems: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Kolasani Srinivasa; Reddy, T Praveen Kumar; Yugandhar, Garlapati; Kumar, B Sunil; Reddy, S N Chandrasekhar; Babu, Devatha Ashok

    2013-01-01

    The acid pretreatment and use of composite resins as the bonding medium has disadvantages like scratching and loss of surface enamel, decalcification, etc. To overcome disadvantages of composite resins, glass ionomers and its modifications are being used for bonding. The study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of resin reinforced glass ionomer as a direct bonding system with conventional glass ionomer cement and composite resin. The study showed that shear bond strength of composite resin has the higher value than both resin reinforced glass ionomer and conventional glass ionomer cement in both 1 and 24 hours duration and it increased from 1 to 24 hours in all groups. The shear bond strength of resin reinforced glass ionomer cement was higher than the conventional glass ionomer cement in both 1 and 24 hours duration. Conditioning with polyacrylic acid improved the bond strength of resin reinforced glass ionomer cement significantly but not statistically significant in the case of conventional glass ionomer cement.

  16. Properties of glass/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy hybrid polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Sevkani, V. R.; Patel, B. R.; Patel, V. B.

    2016-05-01

    Composite Materials are well known for their tailor-made properties. For the fabrication of composites different types of reinforcements are used for different applications. Sometimes for a particular application, one type of reinforcement may not fulfill the requirements. Therefore, more than one type of reinforcements may be used. Thus, the idea of hybrid composites arises. Hybrid composites are made by joining two or more different reinforcements with suitable matrix system. It helps to improve the properties of composite materials. In the present work glass/carbon fiber reinforcement have been used with a matrix triglycidyl ether of tris(m-hydroxy phenyl) phosphate epoxy resin using amine curing agent. Different physical and mechanical properties of the glass, carbon and glass/carbon fiber reinforced polymeric systems have been found out.

  17. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  18. Flexural behavior of a glass fiber reinforced wood fiber composite

    SciTech Connect

    Smulski, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The static and dynamic flexural properties of a wood fiber matrix internally reinforced with continuous glass fibers were investigated. When modeled as sandwich composite, the static flexural modulus of elasticity (MOE) of glass fiber reinforced hardboard could be successfully predicted from the static flexural MOE of the wood fiber matrix, and the tensile MOE and effective volume fraction of the glass fiber reinforcement. Under the same assumption, the composite modulus of rupture (MOR) was a function of the reinforcement tensile MOE and effective volume fraction, and the matrix stress at failure. The composite MOR was predicted on this basis with limited success. The static flexural modulus of elasticity, dynamic modulus of elasticity, and modulus of rupture of glass fiber reinforced hardboard increased with increasing effective reinforcement volume fraction. The logarithmic decrement of the composite decreased with increasing effective reinforcement volume fraction. The short-term flexural creep behavior of glass fiber reinforced hardboard was accurately described by a 4-element linear viscoelastic model.

  19. Modified glass fibre reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yumei

    A high ratio of strength to density and relatively low-cost are some of the significant features of glass fibre reinforced polymer composites (GFRPCs) that made them one of the most rapidly developed materials in recent years. They are widely used as the material of construction in the areas of aerospace, marine and everyday life, such as airplane, helicopter, boat, canoe, fishing rod, racket, etc. Traditionally, researchers tried to raise the mechanical properties and keep a high strength/weight ratio using all or some of the following methods: increasing the volume fraction of the fibre; using different polymeric matrix material; or changing the curing conditions. In recent years, some new techniques and processing methods were developed to further improve the mechanical properties of glass fibre (GF) reinforced polymer composite. For example, by modifying the surface condition of the GF, both the interface strength between the GF and the polymer matrix and the shear strength of the final composite can be significantly increased. Also, by prestressing the fibre during the curing process of the composite, the tensile, flexural and the impact properties of the composite can be greatly improved. In this research project, a new method of preparing GFRPCs, which combined several traditional and modern techniques together, was developed. This new method includes modification of the surface of the GF with silica particles, application of different levels of prestressing on the GF during the curing process, and the change of the fibre volume fraction and curing conditions in different sets of experiments. The results of the new processing were tested by the three-point bend test, the short beam shear test and the impact test to determine the new set of properties so formed in the composite material. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) was used to study the fracture surface of the new materials after the mechanical tests were performed. By taking advantages of the

  20. Damage tolerance in discontinuously reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, H.J.; Ratnaparkhi, P.

    1988-11-01

    Properly designed discontinuously-reinforced MMCs have been projected by linear-elastic fracture mechanics to be competitive, on both cost and performance bases, with cross-plied graphite-reinforced polymer-matrix composites and continuously-reinforced MMCs. With respect to the latter, discontinuously-reinforced MMCs achieve considerable advantages in virtue of their lower-cost reinforcements and their fabricability by standard metal-working practices. Discontinuously reinforced MMC billets can also be produced through powder-blending and direct-spraying techniques. SiC short fibers, whiskers, and particulates are typical of the discontinuous reinforcements used in 2124 and 6061 aluminum matrices. 18 references.

  1. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  2. Nano polypeptide particles reinforced polymer composite fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiashen; Li, Yi; Zhang, Jing; Li, Gang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Zhi; Liu, Xuqing; Han, Yanxia; Zhao, Zheng

    2015-02-25

    Because of the intensified competition of land resources for growing food and natural textile fibers, there is an urgent need to reuse and recycle the consumed/wasted natural fibers as regenerated green materials. Although polypeptide was extracted from wool by alkaline hydrolysis, the size of the polypeptide fragments could be reduced to nanoscale. The wool polypeptide particles were fragile and could be crushed down to nano size again and dispersed evenly among polymer matrix under melt extrusion condition. The nano polypeptide particles could reinforce antiultraviolet capability, moisture regain, and mechanical properties of the polymer-polypeptide composite fibers.

  3. Evaluation of capillary reinforced composites for anti-icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardullo, Samuel W.; Mitchell, Stephen C.; Zerkle, Ronald D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the evaluation of glass capillary reinforced advanced composite structures for anti-icing purposes. The concept involves embedding glass capillary tubes on the surface of a composite structure and ducting heated air through the tubes. A computer program was developed to predict the anti-icing performance of such tubes and a test program was conducted to demonstrate the actual performance of this system. Test data and analytical code results were in excellent agreement. Both indicate the feasibility of using capillary tubes for surface heating in order to combat ice accumulation on advanced composite structures.

  4. Starch composites reinforced by bamboo cellulosic crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dagang; Zhong, Tuhua; Chang, Peter R; Li, Kaifu; Wu, Qinglin

    2010-04-01

    Using a method of combined HNO(3)-KClO(3) treatment and sulfuric acid hydrolysis, bamboo cellulose crystals (BCCs) were prepared and used to reinforce glycerol plasticized starch. The structure and morphology of BCCs were investigated using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and solid-state (13)C NMR. Results showed that BCCs were of typical cellulose I structure, and the morphology was dependent on its concentration in the suspension. BCC of 50-100 nm were assembled into leaf nervations at low concentration (i.e. 0.1 wt.% of solids), but congregated into a micro-sized "flower" geometry at high concentration (i.e. 10.0 wt.% of solids). Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the starch/BCC composite films (SBC) were enhanced by the incorporation of the crystals due to reinforcement of BCCs and reduction of water uptake. BCCs at the optimal 8% loading level exhibited a higher reinforcing efficiency for plasticized starch plastic than any other loading level.

  5. In situ self-sensing fibre reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, S.; Liu, T.; Brooks, D.; Monteith, S.; Ralph, B.; Vickers, S.; Fernando, G. F.

    1997-08-01

    This paper discusses the development of a novel composite system in which some of the reinforcing fibres act as the light guide. The reinforcing fibre light guide was made by applying an appropriate cladding material onto commercially available 9 0964-1726/6/4/007/img1m diameter silica fibres. The resultant light guide was termed a `self-sensing' fibre. The self-sensing fibres were embedded within a 16-ply carbon fibre reinforced epoxy prepreg system and cured to produce a composite panel. The composite panels were impact tested to investigate the feasibility of using the self-sensing fibres as an impact damage sensor system. Similarly, three types of conventional optical fibre, with outer diameters of 30, 50 and 125 0964-1726/6/4/007/img1m respectively, were also embedded within composite panels. The results indicated that the self-sensing fibres were capable of detecting impact damage as low as 2 J for impacts carried out using a 20 mm hemispherical tup. The self-sensing fibres proved more sensitive to impact damage than the conventional optical fibres used in this study.

  6. Bioinspired Composites with Spatial and Orientational Control of Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiroers, Ahmet; Studart, Andre; Complex Materials Team

    Living organisms combine soft and hard components to fabricate composite materials with out-standing mechanical properties. The optimum design and assembly of the anisotropic components reinforce the material in specific directions against multidirectional external loads. Although nature does it quite readily, it is still a challenge for material scientists to control the orientation and position of the colloidal components in a matrix. Here, we use external electric and magnetic fields to achieve positional and orientational control over colloid-polymer composites to fabricate mechanically robust materials to capture some of the essential features of natural systems. We first investigated the assembly of spherical micron-sized colloids using dielectrophoresis, as these particles provided an easily accessible and instructive length scale for performing initial experiments. We used dielectrophoresis for spatial control of reinforcing anisotropic components and magnetic fields to provide control over the orientation of these reinforcing constituents. The obtained composites with different orientational and spatial reinforcement showed enhanced mechanical properties, such as wear resistance, which exhibits similarities to tooth enamel. SNSF Ambizione Grant PZ00P2_148040.

  7. Fabrication of Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Setlock, John A.

    2000-01-01

    A method has been developed for the fabrication of small diameter, multifilament tow fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites. Its application has been successfully demonstrated for the Hi-Nicalon/celsian system. Strong and tough celsian matrix composites, reinforced with BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers, have been fabricated by infiltrating the fiber tows with the matrix slurry, winding the tows on a drum, cutting and stacking of the prepreg tapes in the desired orientation, and hot pressing. The monoclinic celsian phase in the matrix was produced in situ, during hot pressing, from the 0.75BaO-0.25SrO-Al2O3-2SiO2 mixed precursor synthesized by solid state reaction from metal oxides. Hot pressing resulted in almost fully dense fiber-reinforced composites. The unidirectional composites having approx. 42 vol% of fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout in three-point bend tests at room temperature. Values of yield stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01 percent, respectively, and ultimate strengths of 900 +/- 60 MPa were observed. The Young's modulus of the composites was measured to be 165 +/- 5 GPa.

  8. Fuselage structure using advanced technology fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. K.; Tomlinson, H. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fuselage structure is described in which the skin is comprised of layers of a matrix fiber reinforced composite, with the stringers reinforced with the same composite material. The high strength to weight ratio of the composite, particularly at elevated temperatures, and its high modulus of elasticity, makes it desirable for use in airplane structures.

  9. Damage Detection in Composite Interfaces through Carbon Nanotube Reinforcement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-12

    63 iv B. RESISTANCE MEASUREMENTS FOR CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES WITH AND WITHOUT...CNT REINFORCEMENT ......................................64 C. CRITICAL STRAIN ENERGY RELEASE RATES FOR CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES WITH AND WITHOUT CNT...68 G. PHASE V RESISTANCE TESTING FOR CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES WITH CNT REINFORCEMENT

  10. Initial evaluation of continuous fiber reinforced NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.; Eldridge, J. I.

    1990-01-01

    NiAl is being evaluated as a potential matrix material as part of an overall program to develop and understand high-temperature structural composites. Currently, continuous fiber composites have been fabricated by the powder cloth technique incorporating either W(218) or single crystal Al2O3 fibers as reinforcements in both binary NiAl and a solute strengthened NiAl(.05 at. pct Zr) matrix. Initial evaluation of these composite systems have included: fiber push-out testing to measure matrix/fiber bond strengths, bend testing to determine strength as a function of temperature and composite structure, and thermal cycling to establish the effect of matrix and fiber properties on composite life. The effect of matrix/fiber bond strength and matrix strength on several composite properties will be discussed.

  11. Initial evaluation of continuous fiber reinforced NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.; Eldridge, J. I.

    1990-01-01

    NiAl is being evaluated as a potential matrix material as part of an overall program to develop and understand high-temperature structural composites. Currently, continuous fiber composites have been fabricated by the powder cloth technique incorporating either W(218) or single crystal Al2O3 fibers as reinforcements in both binary NiAl and a solute strengthened NiAl(.05 at. pct Zr) matrix. Initial evaluation of these composite systems have included: fiber push-out testing to measure matrix/fiber bond strengths, bend testing to determine strength as a function of temperature and composite structure, and thermal cycling to establish the effect of matrix and fiber properties on composite life. The effect of matrix/fiber bond strength and matrix strength on several composite properties will be discussed.

  12. Fibre reinforced composites in aircraft construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soutis, C.

    2005-02-01

    Fibrous composites have found applications in aircraft from the first flight of the Wright Brothers’ Flyer 1, in North Carolina on December 17, 1903, to the plethora of uses now enjoyed by them on both military and civil aircrafts, in addition to more exotic applications on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), space launchers and satellites. Their growing use has risen from their high specific strength and stiffness, when compared to the more conventional materials, and the ability to shape and tailor their structure to produce more aerodynamically efficient structural configurations. In this paper, a review of recent advances using composites in modern aircraft construction is presented and it is argued that fibre reinforced polymers, especially carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) can and will in the future contribute more than 50% of the structural mass of an aircraft. However, affordability is the key to survival in aerospace manufacturing, whether civil or military, and therefore effort should be devoted to analysis and computational simulation of the manufacturing and assembly process as well as the simulation of the performance of the structure, since they are intimately connected.

  13. Trans-Laminar-Reinforced (TLR) Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinders, Mark; Dickinson, Larry

    1997-01-01

    A Trans-Laminar-Reinforced (TLR) composite is defined as composite laminate with up to five percent volume of fibrous reinforcement oriented in a 'trans-laminar' fashion in the through-thickness direction. The TLR can be continuous threads as in 'stitched laminates', or it can be discontinuous rods or pins as in 'Z-Fiber(TM) materials. It has been repeatedly documented in the literature that adding TLR to an otherwise two dimensional laminate results in the following advantages: substantially improved compression-after-impact response; considerably increased fracture toughness in mode 1 (double cantilever beam) and mode 2 (end notch flexure); and severely restricted size and growth of impact damage and edge delamination. TLR has also been used to eliminate catastrophic stiffener disbonding in stiffened structures. TLR directly supports the 'Achilles heel' of laminated composites, that is delamination. As little as one percent volume of TLR significantly alters the mechanical response of laminates. The objective of this work was to characterize the effects of TLR on the in-plane and inter-laminar mechanical response of undamaged composite laminates. Detailed finite element models of 'unit cells', or representative volumes, were used to study the effects of adding TLR on the elastic constants; the in-plane strength; and the initiation of delamination. Parameters investigated included TLR material, TLR volume fraction, TLR diameter, TLR through-thickness angle, ply stacking sequence, and the microstructural features of pure resin regions and curved in-plane fibers. The work was limited to the linear response of undamaged material with at least one ply interface. An inter-laminar dominated problem of practical interest, a flanged skin in bending, was also modeled.

  14. Apparatus and process for freeform fabrication of composite reinforcement preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Junsheng (Inventor); Wu, Liangwei (Inventor); Liu, Junhai (Inventor); Jang, Bor Z. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A solid freeform fabrication process and apparatus for making a three-dimensional reinforcement shape. The process comprises the steps of (1) operating a multiple-channel material deposition device for dispensing a liquid adhesive composition and selected reinforcement materials at predetermined proportions onto a work surface; (2) during the material deposition process, moving the deposition device and the work surface relative to each other in an X-Y plane defined by first and second directions and in a Z direction orthogonal to the X-Y plane so that the materials are deposited to form a first layer of the shape; (3) repeating these steps to deposit multiple layers for forming a three-dimensional preform shape; and (4) periodically hardening the adhesive to rigidize individual layers of the preform. These steps are preferably executed under the control of a computer system by taking additional steps of (5) creating a geometry of the shape on the computer with the geometry including a plurality of segments defining the preform shape and each segment being preferably coded with a reinforcement composition defining a specific proportion of different reinforcement materials; (6) generating programmed signals corresponding to each of the segments in a predetermined sequence; and (7) moving the deposition device and the work surface relative to each other in response to these programmed signals. Preferably, the system is also operated to generate a support structure for any un-supported feature of the 3-D preform shape.

  15. NDT of fiber-reinforced composites with a new fiber-optic pump-probe laser-ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Buma, Takashi; Xia, Jinjun; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    Laser-ultrasonics is an attractive and powerful tool for the non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) of composite materials. Current systems for non-contact detection of ultrasound have relatively low sensitivity compared to contact peizotransducers. They are also expensive, difficult to adjust, and strongly influenced by environmental noise. Moreover, laser-ultrasound (LU) systems typically launch only about 50 firings per second, much slower than the kHz level pulse repetition rate of conventional systems. As demonstrated here, most of these drawbacks can be eliminated by combining a new generation of compact, inexpensive, high repetition rate nanosecond fiber lasers with new developments in fiber telecommunication optics and an optimally designed balanced probe beam detector. In particular, a modified fiber-optic balanced Sagnac interferometer is presented as part of a LU pump-probe system for NDT&E of aircraft composites. The performance of the all-optical system is demonstrated for a number of composite samples with different types and locations of inclusions.

  16. Cohesive Zone Approach to Multiscale Modeling of Nanotube Reinforced Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-18

    2007 FINAL Aug 1, 2004 to July 31 , 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cohesive Zone Approach to Multiscale Modeling of Nanotube Reinforced... 8050 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT ~ NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION I AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Unlimited AFRL-SR-AR-TR-07_0 43 6 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14...been applied to study CNTs and CNT based composites, which are essentially nanoscale systems. For example, Yakobson [ 5 ] has shown that predictions of

  17. An improved compression molding technology for continuous fiber reinforced composite laminate. Part 1: AS-4/LaRC-TPI 1500 (HFG) Prepreg system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Kidder, Paul W.; Reddy, Rakasi M.

    1991-01-01

    Poor processability of fiber reinforced high performance polyimide thermoplastic resin composites is a well recognized issue which, in many cases, prohibits the fabrication of composite parts with satisfactorily consolidated quality. Without modifying the resin matrix chemistry, improved compression modeling procedures were proposed and investigated with the AS-4/LaRC-TPI 1500 High Flow Grade (HFG) prepreg system. Composite panels with excellent C-scans can be consistently molded by this method under 700 F and a consolidation pressure as low as 100 psi. A mechanism for the consolidation of the composite under this improved molding technique is discussed. This mechanism reveals that a certain degree of matrix shear and tow filament slippage and nesting between plies occur during consolidation, which leads to a reduction of the consolidating pressure necessary to offset the otherwise intimate inter fiber-fiber contact and consequently achieves a better consolidation quality. Outstanding short beam shear strength and flexural strength were obtained from the molded panels. A prolonged consolidation step under low pressure, i.e., 100 psi at 700 F for 75 minutes, was found to significantly enhance the composite mechanical properties.

  18. Extrinsic toughening of discontinuously reinforced aluminum composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Lisa Yost

    Discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) composites can exhibit desirable specific stiffness and strength properties as compared to monolithic aluminum alloys. Unfortunately, the addition of ceramic particulates to the aluminum matrix results in decreased fracture resistance. In this dissertation, DRA composites containing discrete regions of unreinforced aluminum (where these unreinforced aluminum regions are subsequently referred to as 'ductile phase' regions or DP regions) were studied with the objective of enhancing damage tolerance compared to the conventional DRA composite. The effects of 'ductile phase' size, shape and mechanical properties as well as the SiCp reinforcement distribution on crack initiation and growth were examined. The incorporation of properly selected DP regions can result in increased crack growth resistance of the DRA composite under monotonic loading conditions. In such cases, stable crack propagation (i.e. R-curve behavior) was observed in contrast to the behavior of the conventional DRA composite which failed catastrophically at about 20 MPasurdm. Increased size and ductility of the 'ductile phase' resulted in improved toughness over the range tested. For instance, materials with small DP regions (10-60 mum in thickness) did not show improvements in fracture toughness compared to the conventional composites while those materials containing large DP regions (80-400 mum in thickness) demonstrated stable crack propagation at elevated levels of stress intensity. The details of the R-curve as well as the dominant toughening mechanisms were also affected by test geometry (i.e. crack arrestor vs. crack divider). In the crack arrestor orientation, toughening was associated primarily with the renucleation of the crack across the DP regions, provided the DP regions possessed sufficient ductility. Apparent stress intensities of 30-50 MPasurdm resulted. In the crack divider orientation, rising R-curves resulted from the bridging action of

  19. Mechanical properties of bone-shaped-short-fiber reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.T.; Valdez, J.A.; Beyerlein, I.J.; Zhou, S.J.; Liu, C.; Stout, M.G.; Butt, D.P.; Lowe, T.C.

    1999-04-23

    Short-fiber composites usually have low strength and toughness relative to continuous fiber composites, an intrinsic problem caused by discontinuities at fiber ends and interfacial debonding. In this work a model polyethylene bone-shaped-short (BSS) fiber-reinforced polyester-matrix composite was fabricated to prove that fiber morphology, instead of interfacial strength, solves this problem. Experimental tensile and fracture toughness test results show that BSS fibers can bridge matrix cracks more effectively, and consume many times more energy when pulled out, than conventional straight short (CSS) fibers. This leads to both higher strength and fracture toughness for the BSS-fiber composites. A computational model was developed to simulate crack propagation in both BSS- and CSS-fiber composites, accounting for stress concentrations, interface debonding, and fiber pull-put. Model predictions were validated by experimental results and will be useful in optimizing BSS-fiber morphology and other material system parameters.

  20. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic glass matrix composites for use at 1000 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Minford, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    The fabrication and properties of the graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system are described. By reinforcing borosilicate glass with graphite fibers it has been possible to develop a composite whose properties can be compared favorably with resin matrix counterparts. Both high elastic modulus and strength can be obtained and maintained to temperatures of approximately 600 C. In addition, composite dimensional stability is superior to resin or metal matrix systems due to the low thermal expansion behavior of the glass matrix.

  1. Coupled heating/forming optimization of knitted reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancrace, Johann

    The feasibility of knitted fabric reinforcement for highly flexible composites has been investigated for the thermoforming process. The composite sheets were made through compression molding before being shaped. We used thermoplastic elastomers as matrices: Thermoplastic Elastomers and Thermoplastic Olefins. The knit reinforcement was provided by jersey knitted fabrics of polyester fibers. We first introduced the fundamentals involved in the study. The manufacturing is presented through compression molding and thermoforming. The latter is a two-step process: IR heating and plug/pressure assisted deformations. For the IR heating phase, several material properties have been characterized: the emissivity of matrices, absorption, reflection and transmission of radiations in the composite structure have been studied. We particularly paid attention to the reflection on the composite surfaces. The non-reflected or useful radiations leading to the heating are quantified and simulated for three emitter-composite configurations. It has been found that the emitter temperatures and the angle of incidence have significant roles in the IR heating phase. Thermal properties such as calorific capacity and thermal conductivity of the composites were also presented. Thermograms were carried out with an IR camera. Equipment and Thermogram acquisitions were both presented. Optimization of emitters was performed for a three emitter system. The objective function method has been illustrated. Regarding mechanical purposes, the characterizations of the matrices, reinforcements and flexible composites have been carried out. The studied loadings were uniaxial traction, pure shear and biaxial inflation. For the uniaxial extension, both the reinforcement and the composite were found highly anisotropic regarding the orientation of the loading toward the coursewise of the fabric. The resulting strains and stresses to rupture are also found anisotropic. However, for pure shear loading we observed

  2. [Fiber-reinforced composite in fixed prosthodontics].

    PubMed

    Pilo, R; Abu Rass, Z; Shmidt, A

    2010-07-01

    Fiber reinforced composite (FRC) is composed of resin matrix and fibers filler. Common types of fibers: polyethylene, carbon and glass. Fibers can be continuous and aligned, discontinuous and aligned, discontinuous and randomly oriented. The architecture of the fibers is unidirectional, woven or braided. The two main types are: dry fibers or impregnated. Inclusion of fibers to resin composite increased its average flexural strength in 100-200 MPa. FRC can be utilized by the dentist in direct approach (splinting, temporary winged bridge) or indirect approach (laboratory made fixed partial denture). Laboratory fixed partial denture (FPD) is made from FRC substructure and Hybrid/Microfill particulate composite veneer. Main indications: interim temporary FPD or FPD in cases of questionable abutment teeth, in aesthetic cases where All Ceram FPD is not feasible. Retention is attained by adhesive cementation to minimally prepared teeth or to conventionally prepared teeth; other options are inlay-onlay bridges or hybrid bridges. Contraindications are: poor hygiene, inability to control humidity, parafunction habits, and more than two pontics. Survival rate of FRC FPD over 5 years is 75%, lower compared to porcelain fused to metal FPD which is 95%. Main reasons for failure are: fracture of framework and delamination of the veneer. Part of the failures is repairable.

  3. Trans-laminar-reinforced (TLR) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Larry Charles

    1997-11-01

    A Trans-Laminar-Reinforced (TLR) composite is defined as composite laminate with up to five percent volume of fibrous reinforcement oriented in a "trans-laminar" fashion in the through-thickness direction. The TLR can be continuous threads as in "stitched laminates", or it can be discontinuous rods or pins as in "Z-FiberspTM" materials. Adding TLR to an otherwise two dimensional laminate results in the following advantages: substantially improved compression-after-impact response; considerably increased fracture toughness in mode I (double cantilever beam) and mode II (end notch flexure); and severely restricted size and growth of impact damage and edge delamination. TLR has also been used to eliminate catastrophic stiffener disbonding in stiffened structures. As little as one percent volume of TLR significantly alters the mechanical response of laminates. The objective of this work was to characterize the effects of TLR on the in-plane and inter-laminar mechanical response of undamaged composite laminates. Detailed finite element models were made of "unit cells," or representative volumes, and an inter-laminar dominated problem of practical interest. The work was limited to the linear response of undamaged material with at least one ply interface. Adding a few percent TLR had a small negative effect on the in-plane extensional and shear moduli, Esbx, Esby and Gsbxy, but had a large positive effect (up to 60 percent) on the thickness direction extensional modulus, Esbz. The out-of-plane shear moduli, Gsbxz and Gsbyz, were significantly affected only with the use of a TLR with a shear modulus an order of magnitude greater than that of the composite lamina. A simple stiffness averaging method for calculating the elastic constants was found to compare closely with the finite element results, with the greatest difference being found in the inter-laminar shear moduli, Gsbxz and Gsbyz. Delamination initiation was studied with a strength of materials approach in the unit

  4. Thermal Analysis of Filler Reinforced Polymeric Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadge, Mahesh Devidas

    compared with that predicted by mean field theories. At low volume fractions the FEM and mean field theory results are matching. However, at high volume fractions, the results obtained by the two methods are not in agreement. This is due to the fact that mean field theory do not consider the particle interactions happening at higher volume fractions. The present analysis can be used to tailor the thermal properties of ESBR for required thermal conductivity for a wide range of applications such as racing tires, electronic gadgets or aeronautical components. In addition, the proposed FEM models can be used to design and optimize the properties of new composite materials providing more insight into the thermal conductivity of composite polymers and aid in understanding heat transfer mechanism of reinforced polymers.

  5. Fracture of fiber-reinforced composites analyzed via acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Ereifej, Nadia S; Oweis, Yara G; Altarawneh, Sandra K

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the fracture resistance of composite resins using a three-point bending test and acoustic emission (AE) analysis. Three groups of specimens (n=15) were prepared: non-reinforced BelleGlass HP composite (NRC), unidirectional (UFRC) and multidirectional (MFRC) fiber-reinforced groups which respectively incorporated unidirectional Stick and multidirectional StickNet fibers. Specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine while an AE system was used to detect audible signals. Initial fracture strengths and AE amplitudes were significantly lower than those at final fracture in all groups (p<0.05). Initial fracture strength of UFRC (170.0 MPa) was significantly higher than MFRC (124.6 MPa) and NRC (87.9 MPa). Final fracture strength of UFRC (198.1 MPa) was also significantly higher than MFRC (151.0 MPa) and NRC (109.2 MPa). Initial and final fracture strengths were significantly correlated (r=0.971). It was concluded that fiber reinforcement improved the fracture resistance of composite resin materials and the monitoring of acoustic signals revealed significant information regarding the fracture process.

  6. Mullite-whisker reinforced molybdenum disilicide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFayden, Andre Anthony

    Molybdenum disilicide (MoSisb2) is a potential high temperature structural material. The use of such materials may raise the operating temperatures of heat engines and therefore their efficiencies, leading to fuel savings. Molybdenum disilicide has good oxidation resistance to 1650sp°C and high temperature strength to about 1000sp°C. This work was an attempt to improve the poor room temperature toughness and high temperature creep resistance of this material. Mullite was used as a reinforcement in the form of whiskers. Whiskers may increase the toughness of a matrix by extrinsic mechanisms, while mullite has intrinsically high creep resistance. Mechanical property predictions were made for the proposed composite material. The toughening mechanisms examined were crack bridging, pullout, crack deflection and microcracking. For the bridging model alone, a doubling of the fracture toughness was expected for a 40 percent mullite whisker volume. The creep models examined were the isostress, isostrain, shear-lag and self-consistent scheme. The shear-lag model predicted a factor of five decrease in the creep rate compared to pure MoSisb2. Composites of MoSisb2 containing 0, 20 and 40 volume percent of mullite were fabricated by means of a powder processing route. This involved mixing powders of the component materials, followed by hot-pressing and hot isostatic pressing to form a composite body. Both equi-axed particles and elongated whiskers of mullite were used. The mullite whisker size, powder mixing time, and glass content of the initial MoSisb2 powder were also varied. The resulting materials were subjected to mechanical testing. At room temperature, indentation testing was used to determine the toughness and modulus of the composites. Indented beams were subjected to four-point bending until failure to determine the toughness. The maximum fracture toughness measured was 1.7 MPasurdm, compared to 1.6 MPasurdm for the matrix, with very little variation with

  7. Research on Graphite Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    This report contains the results obtained in the first twelve months of research under NASA Langley Contract NAS1-14346 for the origination of graphite-fiber reinforced glass matrix composites. Included in the report is a summary of the research by other investigators in this area. The method selected to form the composites consisted of pulling the graphite fiber through a slurry containing powdered glass, winding up the graphite fiber and the glass it picks up on a drum, drying, cutting into segments, loading the tape segment into a graphite die, and hot pressing. During the course of the work, composites were made with a variety of graphite fibers in a C.G.W. 7740 (Pyrex) glass matrix. The graphite fibers used included Hercules HMS, Hercules HTS, Thornel 300S, and Celanese DG-102 and, of these, the Hercules HMS and Celanese DG-102 graphite fibers in C.G.W. 7740 gave the most interesting but widely different results. Hercules HMS fiber in C.G.W. 7740 glass (Pyrex) showed an average four-point flexural strength of 848 MPa or 127,300 psi. As the test temperature was raised from room temperature to 560 C in argon or vacuum, the strength was higher by 50 percent. However, in air, similar tests at 560 C gave a severe loss in strength. These composites also have good thermal cycle properties in argon or vacuum, greatly increased toughness compared to glass, and no loss in strength in a 100 cycle fatigue test. Celanese DG-102 fiber in C.G.W. 7740 glass (Pyrex) had a much lower flexural strength but did not suffer any loss in this strength when samples were heated to 560 C in air for 4 hrs.

  8. Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologies Project - Preliminary Manufacturing Demonstration Articles for Ares V Payload Shroud Barrel Acreage Structure

  9. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni L.

    1992-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  10. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, T. L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared on a strength to density basis. The effect of fiber orientation on the creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending on the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  11. Reinforcement of flowable dental composites with titanium dioxide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dafar, Manal O; Grol, Matthew W; Canham, Peter B; Dixon, S Jeffrey; Rizkalla, Amin S

    2016-06-01

    Flowable dental composites are used as restorative materials due to their excellent esthetics and rheology. However, they suffer from inferior mechanical properties compared to conventional composites. The aim of this study was to reinforce a flowable dental composite with TiO2 nanotubes (n-TiO2) and to assess the effect of n-TiO2 surface modifications on the mechanical properties of the reinforced composite. n-TiO2 were synthesized using an alkaline hydrothermal process and then functionalized with silane or methacrylic acid (MA). Nanotubes were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Commercially available flowable composite (Filtek™ Supreme Ultra Flowable Restorative, 3M ESPE) was reinforced with varying amounts of nanotubes (0-5wt%). Flowability of the resulting composites was evaluated using a Gillmore needle method. Dynamic Young's modulus (E) was measured using an ultrasonic technique. Fracture toughness (KIc) was assessed using a notchless triangular prism and radiopacity was quantified. Viability of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts was evaluated following incubation on composite specimens for 24h. Electron microscopy revealed a tubular morphology of n-TiO2. All reinforced composites exhibited significantly greater values of E than unreinforced composite. Composites reinforced with 3wt% n-TiO2 functionalized with MA exhibited the greatest values of E and KIc. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that reinforced composites were biocompatible. Taken together, flowable composites reinforced with n-TiO2 exhibited mechanical properties superior to those of unreinforced composite, with minimal effects on flowability and radiopacity. n-TiO2-reinforced flowable composites are promising materials for use in dental restorations. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nanographene reinforced carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Dhruv

    Carbon/Carbon Composites (CCC) are made of carbon reinforcement in carbon matrix and have high thermal stability and fatigue resistance. CCC are used in nose cones, heat shields and disc brakes of aircrafts due to their exceptional mechanical properties at high temperature. The manufacturing process of CCC involves a carbonization stage in which unwanted elements, except carbon, are eliminated from the polymer precursor. Carbonization results in the formation of voids and cracks due to the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix and expulsion of volatiles from the polymer matrix. Thermal cracks and voids decrease the density and mechanical properties of the manufactured CCC. In this work, Nanographene Platelets (NGP) were explored as nanofillers to fill the voids/cracks and reduce thermal shrinkage in CCC. They were first compared with Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofibers (VGCNF) by dispersion of different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%) in resole-type phenolic resin and were characterized to explore their effect on rheology, heat of reaction and wetting behavior. The dispersions were then cured to form nanocomposites and were characterized for morphology, flexure and thermal properties. Finally, NGP were introduced into the carbon/carboncomposites in two stages, first by spraying in different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%, 5wt %) during the prepreg formation and later during densification by directly mixing in the corresponding densification mix. The manufactured NGP reinforced CCC were characterized for microstructure, porosity, bulk density and mechanical properties (Flexure and ILSS) which were further cross-checked by non-destructive techniques (vibration and ultrasonic). In this study, it was further found that at low concentration (≤ 1.5 wt%) NGP were more effective in increasing the heat of reaction and in decreasing the viscosity of the phenolic resin. The decrease in viscosity led to better wetting properties of NGP / phenolic

  13. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittenber, David B.

    theory, finite element method, and Castigliano's method in unidirectional tension and compression, but are less accurate for the more bond-dependent flexural and shear properties. With the acknowledged NFRP matrix bonding issues, the over-prediction of these theoretical models indicates that the flexural stiffness of the kenaf composite may be increased by up to 40% if a better bond between the fiber and matrix can be obtained. The sustainability of NFRPs was examined from two perspectives: environmental and socioeconomic. While the kenaf fibers themselves possess excellent sustainability characteristics, costing less while possessing a lesser environmental impact than the glass fibers, the vinyl ester resin used in the composites is environmentally hazardous and inflated the cost and embodied energy of the composite SIPs. Consistent throughout all the designs was a correlation between the respective costs of the raw materials and the respective environmental impacts. The socioeconomic study looked at the sustainability of natural fiber reinforced composite materials as housing materials in developing countries. A literature study on the country of Bangladesh, where the fibers in this study were grown, showed that the jute and kenaf market would benefit from the introduction of a value-added product like natural fiber composites. The high rate of homeless and inadequately housed in Bangladesh, as well as in the US and throughout the rest of the world, could be somewhat alleviated if a new, affordable, and durable material were introduced. While this study found that natural fiber composites possess sufficient mechanical properties to be adopted as primary structural members, the two major remaining hurdles needing to be overcome before natural fiber composites can be adopted as housing materials are the cost and sustainability of the resin system and the moisture resistance/durability of the fibers. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  14. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for future automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, K.

    2016-05-01

    After a brief introduction to polymer composite properties and markets, the state of the art activities in the field of manufacturing of advanced composites for automotive applications are elucidated. These include (a) long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) for secondary automotive components, and (b) continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermosetting composites for car body applications. It is followed by future possibilities of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for e.g. (i) crash elements, (ii) racing car seats, and (iii) production and recycling of automotive fenders.

  15. The properties of 5-D braided reinforced organic silicon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, L.; Li, J.; Dong, F.

    1994-12-31

    A study of the mechanical properties of braided reinforced composites is presented. Three braided structures 1 * 1, 1 * 2, 1 * 3 braids with and without axially layed-in yarns have been adopted. It is found that the different braided structures greatly affect the tensile strength , flexural strength and modulus of braided fabric reinforced composites; 1 * 1 4-D braided composite has the highest tensile and flexural strengths. The fiber fraction volume and surface geometries of braids changed greatly corresponding to the braiding process chosen. By laying in non-braiding yarns in the longitudinal direction, the tensile, and flexural strengths of 5-D braided reinforced composite increase.

  16. Analysis of woven fabrics for reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Norris F.; Ramnath, V.; Rosen, B. Walter

    1987-01-01

    The use of woven fabrics as reinforcements for composites is considered. Methods of analysis of properties are reviewed and extended, with particular attention paid to three-dimensional constructions having through-the-thickness reinforcements. Methodology developed is used parametrically to evaluate the performance potential of a wide variety of reinforcement constructions including hybrids. Comparisons are made of predicted and measured properties of representative composites having biaxial and triaxial woven, and laminated tape lay-up reinforcements. Overall results are incorporated in advanced weave designs.

  17. Finite element analysis of the stiffness of fabric reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foye, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is the prediction of all three dimensional elastic moduli of textile fabric reinforced composites. The analysis is general enough for use with complex reinforcing geometries and capable of subsequent improvements. It places no restrictions on fabric microgeometry except that the unit cell be determinate and rectangular. The unit cell is divided into rectangular subcells in which the reinforcing geometries are easier to define and analyze. The analysis, based on inhomogeneous finite elements, is applied to a variety of weave, braid, and knit reinforced composites. Some of these predictions are correlated to test data.

  18. Composites Reinforced in Three Dimensions by Using Low Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erb, Randall M.; Libanori, Rafael; Rothfuchs, Nuria; Studart, André R.

    2012-01-01

    The orientation and distribution of reinforcing particles in artificial composites are key to enable effective reinforcement of the material in mechanically loaded directions, but remain poor if compared to the distinctive architectures present in natural structural composites such as teeth, bone, and seashells. We show that micrometer-sized reinforcing particles coated with minimal concentrations of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (0.01 to 1 volume percent) can be controlled by using ultralow magnetic fields (1 to 10 milliteslas) to produce synthetic composites with tuned three-dimensional orientation and distribution of reinforcements. A variety of structures can be achieved with this simple method, leading to composites with tailored local reinforcement, wear resistance, and shape memory effects.

  19. Toughening reinforced epoxy composites with brominated polymeric additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Gilwee, W. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polyfunctional epoxy resins including tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane triglycidyl ether are toughened by addition of polybrominated polymeric additives having an EE below 1500 to the pre-cure composition. Carboxy terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber is optionally present in the precure mixture as such or as a pre-formed copolymer with other reactants. Reinforced composites, particularly carbon reinforced composites, of these resins are disclosed and shown to have improved toughness.

  20. Toughening reinforced epoxy composites with brominated polymeric additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z. (Inventor); Gilwee, W. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polyfunctional epoxy resins including tris(hydroxyphenyl)methane triglycidyl ether are toughened by addition of polybrominated polymeric additives having an EE below 1500 to the pre-cure composition. Carboxy-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber is optionally present in the pre-cure mixture as such or as a pre-formed copolymer with other reactants. Reinforced composites, particularly carbon-reinforced composites, of these resins are disclosed and shown to have improved toughness.

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Composites. A State-of-the-Art Survey. Volume 1. NDE of Graphite Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Composites. Part 1. Radiography and Ultrasonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    composites (Ref. 1) and by the can be large, and secondary operations can be mini- Army on glass fiber reinforced composites (Ref. 2). This mized. Composites...structural characteristics of ceramic materials, and updates of carbon/carbon com- composites. posites and glass fiber reinforced composites. Because of...the large amount of literature available on graphite While glass fiber reinforced plastic composites fiber reinforced composites, this particular volume

  2. Reinforcement stresses during deformation of sphere- and particulate-reinforced Al-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Justice, I.; Poza, P.; Martinez, J.L.; Llorca, J.

    1996-02-01

    Recent experimental results showed that reinforcement fracture is very often the dominant damage mechanism during ambient temperature deformation of discontinuously reinforced Al-matrix composites (DRAC). The reinforcements are broken by cracks perpendicular to the loading axis, and the fraction of broken reinforcements increases during plastic deformation as the load transferred from the matrix to the ceramic particulates increases. This process continues until a criteria fraction of broken reinforcements is reached, and then fracture takes place suddenly by a ductile mechanism involving localized necking of the intervoid matrix. The rate of reinforcement fracture depends on the strength of the ceramic reinforcements and on the stresses acting on them, and the modeling of the processes of damage accumulation in DRAC requires the knowledge of both. In particular, the stresses acting on the reinforcements during monotonic tensile deformation are a function of the applied strain, of the matrix and reinforcement properties, and of the volume fraction and shape of the ceramic reinforcements. A parametrical study is presented in this article of the influence of these factors on the stress acting on the reinforcements. The numerical results covered the whole range of matrix strengths which are typical in DRAC and were fitted to simple analytical expressions to facilitate their use by other researchers.

  3. SiC Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Celsian is a promising matrix material for fiber-reinforced composites for high temperature structural applications. Processing and fabrication of small diameter multifilament silicon carbide tow reinforced celsian matrix composites are described. Mechanical and microstructural properties of these composites at ambient and elevated temperatures are presented. Effects of high-temperature exposures in air on the mechanical behavior of these composites are also given. The composites show mechanical integrity up to 1100 C but degrade at higher temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres. A model has been proposed for the degradation of these composites in oxidizing atmospheres at high temperatures.

  4. Joining and reinforcing a composite bumper beam and a composite crush can for a vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Berger, Elisabeth; Decker, Leland; Armstrong, Dale; Truskin, James; Pasupuleti, Praveen; Dwarmpudi, Ramesh; Doroudian, Mark

    2017-03-21

    A front bumper beam and crush can (FBCC) system is provided for a vehicle. A bumper beam has an interior surface with a plurality of ribs extending therefrom. The ribs and the interior surface are made of a chopped fiber composite and cooperate to engage a crush can. The chopped fiber composite reinforces the engaging surfaces of the crush can and the interior surface of the bumper beam. The crush can has a tubular body made of a continuous fiber composite. The crush can has outwardly-extending flanges at an end spaced away from the bumper beam. The flanges are at least partially provided with a layer of chopped fiber composite to reinforce a joint between the outwardly-extending flange and the vehicle frame.

  5. Reinforced polypropylene composites: effects of chemical compositions and particle size.

    PubMed

    Ashori, Alireza; Nourbakhsh, Amir

    2010-04-01

    In this work, the effects of wood species, particle sizes and hot-water treatment on some physical and mechanical properties of wood-plastic composites were studied. Composites of thermoplastic reinforced with oak (Quercus castaneifolia) and pine (Pinus eldarica) wood were prepared. Polypropylene (PP) and maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (MAPP) were used as the polymer matrix and coupling agent, respectively. The results showed that pine fiber had significant effect on the mechanical properties considered in this study. This effect is explained by the higher fiber length and aspect ratio of pine compared to the oak fiber. The hot-water treated (extractive-free) samples, in both wood species, improved the tensile, flexural and impact properties, but increased the water absorption for 24h. This work clearly showed that lignocellulosic materials in both forms of fiber and flour could be effectively used as reinforcing elements in PP matrix. Furthermore, extractives have marked effects on the mechanical and physical properties. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  7. An ideal reinforcement for structural composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kevorkijan, V.M.

    1997-12-01

    Different criteria and accumulated data lead to the conclusion that discontinuously reinforced metal-matrix composites (DR MMCs) will become an engineering material of general use. At the end of 1970s, the automobile and transport industries had a strong interest in and high expectations for DR-MMCs because of their superior specific strength and rigidity when compared with conventional aluminum alloys. After two decades of development, the first DR-MMC application, an engine connecting-rod, is ready to market. Major applications in the automobile industry, such as brake rotors and drive shafts, are now in the later stages of development, and other engineering applications are well advanced. DR-MMC technology is now recognized worldwide, and research groups are able to introduce remarkable applications of these materials to the market. Three main problems must be solved to facilitate the expanding application of DR-MMCs with light-metal-alloy matrices. They are: (1) superior cost performances; (2) active implementation of environmental concerns; (3) improved ductility. The immediate solution of these problems is impossible. However, many researchers and managers firmly believe that solutions will be found if the same amount of energy is devoted to solving these problems as has been expended during the past two decades of DR-MMCs R and D.

  8. Effective reinforcement in carbon nanotube-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Ciselli, P; Kuznetsov, E; Peijs, T; Barber, A H

    2008-05-13

    Carbon nanotubes have mechanical properties that are far in excess of conventional fibrous materials used in engineering polymer composites. Effective reinforcement of polymers using carbon nanotubes is difficult due to poor dispersion and alignment of the nanotubes along the same axis as the applied force during composite loading. This paper reviews the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes and their polymer composites to highlight how many previously prepared composites do not effectively use the excellent mechanical behaviour of the reinforcement. Nanomechanical tests using atomic force microscopy are carried out on simple uniaxially aligned carbon nanotube-reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibres prepared using electrospinning processes. Dispersion of the carbon nanotubes within the polymer is achieved using a surfactant. Young's modulus of these simple composites is shown to approach theoretically predicted values, indicating that the carbon nanotubes are effective reinforcements. However, the use of dispersant is also shown to lower Young's modulus of the electrospun PVA fibres.

  9. Fracture behavior of glass fiber reinforced polymer composite

    SciTech Connect

    Avci, A.; Arikan, H.; Akdemir, A

    2004-03-01

    Chopped strand glass fiber reinforced particle-filled polymer composite beams with varying notch-to-depth ratios and different volume fractions of glass fibers were investigated in Mode I fracture using three-point bending tests. Effects of polyester resin content and glass fiber content on fracture behavior was also studied. Polyester resin contents were used 13.00%%, 14.75%, 16.50%, 18.00% and 19.50%, and glass fiber contents were 1% and 1.5% of the total weight of the polymer composite system. Flexural strength of the polymer composite increases with increase in polyester and fiber content. The critical stress intensity factor was determined by using several methods such as initial notch depth method, compliance method and J-integral method. The values of K{sub IC} obtained from these methods were compared.

  10. EB treatment of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebényi, G.; Romhány, G.; Vajna, B.; Czvikovszky, T.

    2012-09-01

    A small amount — less than 0.5% — carbon nanotube reinforcement may improve the mechanical properties of epoxy based composite materials significantly. The basic technical problem on one side is the dispersion of the nanotubes into the viscous matrix resin, namely, the fine powder-like — less than 100 nanometer diameter — nanotubes are prone to form aggregates. On the other side, the good connection between the nanofiber and matrix, which is determining the success of the reinforcement, requires some efficient adhesion promoting treatment. The goal of our research was to give one such treatment capable of industrial size application. A two step curing epoxy/vinylester resin process technology has been developed where the epoxy component has been cured conventionally, while the vinylester has been cured by electron treatment afterwards. The sufficient irradiation dose has been selected according to Raman spectroscopy characterization. Using the developed hybrid resin system hybrid composites containing carbon fibers and multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been prepared. The effect of the electron beam induced curing of the vinylester resin on the mechanical properties of the composites has been characterized by three point bending and interlaminar shear tests, which showed clearly the superiority of the developed resin system. The results of the mechanical tests have been supported by AFM studies of the samples, which showed that the difference in the viscoelastic properties of the matrix constituents decreased significantly by the electron beam treatment.

  11. [Fiber reinforced composite posts: literature review].

    PubMed

    Frydman, G; Levatovsky, S; Pilo, R

    2013-07-01

    FRC (Fiber-reinforced composite) posts have been used since the beginning of the 90s with the introduction of carbon fiber posts. Fiber posts are widely used to restore endodontically treated teeth that have insufficient coronal tooth structure. Many in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the advantage of using FRC over prefabricated and cast metal post especially indicated in narrow root canals which are prone to vertically root fracture. The most frequent failure of FRC is debonding of a post at the resin cement/dentin interface. Bonding to dentin may be achieved by using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives. The bond strength formed by self-adhesive cements is noticeably lower in comparison to the bond strength formed with resin cements applied in combination with etch-and-rinse adhesives. In an attempt to maximize resin bonding to fiber posts, several surface treatments have been suggested. Sandblasting with alumina particles results in an increased surface roughness and surface area without affecting the integrity of the post as long as it is applied by 50 microm alumina particles at 2.5 bars for maximally 5 seconds at a distance of 30 mm. The efficiency of post salinization is controversial and its contribution to the retention is of minor importance. Hydrofluoric acid has recently been proposed for etching glass fiber posts but this technique produced substantial damage to the glass fibers and affected the integrity of the post. Delayed cementation of fiber post (at least 24h post endodontic treatment) resulted in higher retentive strengths in comparison to immediate cementation and the best results were obtained when the luting agent was brought into the post space with lentulo spirals or specific syringes. The resin cement film thickness also influences the pullout strengths of fiber-reinforced posts .The highest bond strength values were obtained when the cement layer oversized the post spaces but not larger than 0.3 mm. The use of core build

  12. Development and clinical applications of a light-polymerized fiber-reinforced composite.

    PubMed

    Freilich, M A; Karmaker, A C; Burstone, C J; Goldberg, A J

    1998-09-01

    After 0 years of intermittent reports in the literature, the use of fiber reinforcement is just now experiencing rapid expansion in dentistry. This article describes the development and use of a continuous, unidirectional fiber reinforced composite as a framework for the fabrication of fixed prostheses. By using various matrix materials and fibers, a number of fiber-reinforced composite formulations were evaluated with the goal of creating a system with optimized mechanical properties and handling characteristics. Fiber-reinforced composite based on a light polymerized BIS-GMA matrix has been used clinically to make 2-phase prostheses comprised of an internal glass fiber-reinforced composite substructure covered by a particulate composite. The clinical and laboratory procedures required for the fabrication and use of reinforced composite fixed prostheses are described for laboratory-fabricated complete or partial coverage fixed prosthesis and chairside prosthesis. Although additional clinical experience is needed, fiber-reinforced composite materials can be used to make metal-free prostheses with excellent esthetic qualities.

  13. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites for Space Based Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-31

    Nardone , "Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites for Space Based Applications", Office of Naval Research Contract N00014-85-C-0332, Report R86... Nardone and K M. Prewo, "Tensile Performance of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass", J. Mater. Sci. accepted for publication, 1987. 27. R. F. Cooper and K

  14. Neutron scattering as a probe of liquid crystal polymer-reinforced composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelm, R.P.; Douglas, E.P.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Langlois, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This research project sought to obtain nanoscale and molecular level information on the mechanism of reinforcement in liquid crystal polymer (LCP)-reinforced composites, to realize molecular-reinforced LCP composites, and to test the validity of the concept of molecular reinforcement. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to study the structures in the ternary phase diagram of LCP with liquid crystal thermosets and solvent on length scales ranging from 1-100 nm. The goal of the scattering measurements is to understand the phase morphology and degree of segregation of the reinforcing and matrix components. This information helps elucidate the physics of self assembly in these systems. This work provides an experimental basis for a microengineering approach to composites of vastly improved properties.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sayuti, M.; Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A.; Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

    2011-01-17

    This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayuti, M.; Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A.; Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

  17. NDE Elastic Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are increasingly replacing metallic alloys as structural materials for primary components of fracture-critical structures. This trend is a result of the growing understanding of material behavior and recognition of the desirable properties of composites. A research program was conducted on NDE methods for determining the elastic properties of composites.

  18. Tensile Properties of Epoxy Composites Reinforced with Continuous PALF Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glória, Gabriel O.; Altoé, Giulio R.; Moraes, Ygor M.; Loyola, Rômulo L.; Margem, Frederico M.; Monteiro, Sergio N.

    The tensile properties of DGEBA/TETA epoxy matrix composites reinforced with different amounts of PALF fibers were evaluated. Composites reinforced with up to 30% in volume of long, continuous and aligned PALF fibers were tested in an Instron machine at room temperature. The fracture was analyzed by SEM. This one revealed a weak fiber/matrix interface, which could be responsible for the performance of some properties. The results showed significant changes in the mechanical properties with the amount of PALF fibers.

  19. Fracture and fatigue of discontinuously reinforced copper/tungsten composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, B.; Ramani, S. V.

    1975-01-01

    The strength, toughness and resistance to cyclic crack propagation of composites consisting of copper reinforced with short tungsten wires of various lengths have been studied and the results compared with the behavior of continuously reinforced composites manufactured by the same method, i.e., by vacuum hot-pressing. It has been found that whereas the resistance to fatigue crack growth of continuously reinforced composites is very similar to that of continuous Al/stainless steel composites reported elsewhere, the addition of short fibers completely changes the mode of fracture, and no direct comparisons are possible. In effect, short fibers inhibit single crack growth by causing plastic flow to be distributed rather than localized, and although these composites are much less strong than continuous fiber composites, they nevertheless have much greater fatigue resistance.

  20. Fracture and fatigue of discontinuously reinforced copper/tungsten composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, B.; Ramani, S. V.

    1975-01-01

    The strength, toughness and resistance to cyclic crack propagation of composites consisting of copper reinforced with short tungsten wires of various lengths have been studied and the results compared with the behavior of continuously reinforced composites manufactured by the same method, i.e., by vacuum hot-pressing. It has been found that whereas the resistance to fatigue crack growth of continuously reinforced composites is very similar to that of continuous Al/stainless steel composites reported elsewhere, the addition of short fibers completely changes the mode of fracture, and no direct comparisons are possible. In effect, short fibers inhibit single crack growth by causing plastic flow to be distributed rather than localized, and although these composites are much less strong than continuous fiber composites, they nevertheless have much greater fatigue resistance.

  1. Preliminary evaluation of fiber composite reinforcement of truck frame rails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of graphite fiber/resin matrix composite to effectively reinforce a standard steel truck frame rail is studied. A preliminary design was made and it was determined that the reinforcement weight could be reduced by a factor of 10 when compared to a steel reinforcement. A section of a 1/3 scale reinforced rail was fabricated to demonstrate low cost manufacturing techniques. The scale rail section was then tested and increased stiffness was confirmed. No evidence of composite fatigue was found after 500,000 cycles to a fiber stress of 34,000 psi. The test specimen failed in bending in a static test at a load 50 percent greater than that predicted for a non-reinforced rail.

  2. Investigating Filler Reinforcement and Nonlinear Viscoelastic Behavior in Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhiyong; Wang, Shi-Qing; von Meerwall, Ernst

    2004-03-01

    Solid fillers have been known to enhance the linear viscoelastic responses of polymer melts and elastomers. Nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of such systems is closely related to the reinforcement of the linear viscoelascity. Understanding such phenomena as the Payne effect (where the storage modulus is measured to decrease in oscillatory shear with the amplitude of the oscillation and with time for a fixed amplitude) requires a better understanding of the filler reinforcement mechanism. Recent publications, from two different groups (a) (b) prompted our present study. Using monodisperse 1,4-polybutadiene melts as the matrix and nano-silicon oxide particles of 15 nm diameter as the fillers, we carried out a variety of viscoelastic and NMR-spin-echo diffusion measurements to elucidate the important role of the filler-filler networking in controlling the observed linear and nonlinear behavior at temperatures over 100 degrees above the glass transition temperature of PBD. (a)S.S. Sternstein and A. Zhu, Macromolecules 35, 7262 (2002); Composites Sci. and Techn. 63, 1113 (2003). This work claims that the reinforcement arises primarily from the entrapped chain entanglement due to chain adsorption on filler surfaces instead of the filler-filler networking. (b) H. Montes, F. Lequeux and J. Berriot, Macromolecules, 36, 8107 (2003). This work advocates that a glassy layer formed around each filler is responsible for the enhanced linear viscoelascity and for the observed nonlinear viscoelastic behavior such as the Payne effect.

  3. Reinforcing effect of glass fiber-reinforced composite reinforcement on flexural strength at proportional limit of a repaired denture base resin

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kaneyoshi; Takahashi, Yutaka; Hamanaka, Ippei; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Hirono; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study evaluated the reinforcing effect of glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) reinforcement on flexural strength at the proportional limit (FS-PL) of a repaired denture base resin. Materials and methods: Repaired denture base resins reinforced with metal and with FRC reinforcement, and that without reinforcement were tested. The ultimate flexural strength, the FS-PL and the elastic modulus of repaired denture base resins were tested. The joint efficiency (times) of the repaired denture base resins on the intact denture base resin was evaluated. Results: The repaired denture base resins reinforced with metal reinforcement and with FRC reinforcement had significantly higher ultimate flexural strength than the repaired denture base resin without reinforcement (p < 0.05) and were not significantly different from each other (p > 0.05). The FS-PL of a repaired denture base resin reinforced with the FRC reinforcement was similar to that with the metal reinforcement (p > 0.05), and these were significantly higher than the FS-PL of a repaired denture base resin without reinforcement (p < 0.05). The elastic modulus of the repaired denture base resin reinforced with the FRC reinforcement was significantly lower than that with metal reinforcement (p < 0.05) and was significantly higher than that without reinforcement (p < 0.05). The joint efficiency of the FRC reinforced specimen was 0.98. Conclusion: The FRC reinforcement had a reinforcing effect on the FS-PL of a repaired denture base resin. PMID:28642906

  4. CODIFICATION OF FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITE PIPING

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, G.

    2012-10-10

    The goal of the overall project is to successfully adapt spoolable FRP currently used in the oil industry for use in hydrogen pipelines. The use of FRP materials for hydrogen service will rely on the demonstrated compatibility of these materials for pipeline service environments and operating conditions. The ability of the polymer piping to withstand degradation while in service, and development of the tools and data required for life management are imperative for successful implementation of these materials for hydrogen pipeline. The information and data provided in this report provides the technical basis for the codification for fiber reinforced piping (FRP) for hydrogen service. The DOE has invested in the evaluation of FRP for the delivery for gaseous hydrogen to support the development of a hydrogen infrastructure. The codification plan calls for detailed investigation of the following areas: System design and applicable codes and standards; Service degradation of FRP; Flaw tolerance and flaw detection; Integrity management plan; Leak detection and operational controls evaluation; Repair evaluation. The FRP codification process started with commercially available products that had extensive use in the oil and gas industry. These products have been evaluated to assure that sufficient structural integrity is available for a gaseous hydrogen environment.

  5. Behavior systems and reinforcement: an integrative approach.

    PubMed Central

    Timberlake, W

    1993-01-01

    Most traditional conceptions of reinforcement are based on a simple causal model in which responding is strengthened by the presentation of a reinforcer. I argue that reinforcement is better viewed as the outcome of constraint of a functioning causal system comprised of multiple interrelated causal sequences, complex linkages between causes and effects, and a set of initial conditions. Using a simplified system conception of the reinforcement situation, I review the similarities and drawbacks of traditional reinforcement models and analyze the recent contributions of cognitive, regulatory, and ecological approaches. Finally, I show how the concept of behavior systems can begin to incorporate both traditional and recent conceptions of reinforcement in an integrative approach. PMID:8354963

  6. Improved compression molding technology for continuous fiber reinforced composite laminates. Part 2: AS-4/Polyimidesulfone prepreg system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Kidder, Paul W.; Reddy, Rakasi M.

    1991-01-01

    AS-4/polyimidesulfone (PISO2) composite prepreg was utilized for the improved compression molding technology investigation. This improved technique employed molding stops which advantageously facilitate the escape of volatile by-products during the B-stage curing step, and effectively minimize the neutralization of the consolidating pressure by intimate interply fiber-fiber contact within the laminate in the subsequent molding cycle. Without the modifying the resin matrix properties, composite panels with both unidirectional and angled plies with outstanding C-scans and mechanical properties were successfully molded using moderate molding conditions, i.e., 660 F and 500 psi, using this technique. The size of the panels molded were up to 6.00 x 6.00 x 0.07 in. A consolidation theory was proposed for the understanding and advancement of the processing science. Processing parameters such as vacuum, pressure cycle design, prepreg quality, etc. were explored.

  7. Designing bioinspired composite reinforcement architectures via 3D magnetic printing

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joshua J.; Fiore, Brad E.; Erb, Randall M.

    2015-01-01

    Discontinuous fibre composites represent a class of materials that are strong, lightweight and have remarkable fracture toughness. These advantages partially explain the abundance and variety of discontinuous fibre composites that have evolved in the natural world. Many natural structures out-perform the conventional synthetic counterparts due, in part, to the more elaborate reinforcement architectures that occur in natural composites. Here we present an additive manufacturing approach that combines real-time colloidal assembly with existing additive manufacturing technologies to create highly programmable discontinuous fibre composites. This technology, termed as ‘3D magnetic printing', has enabled us to recreate complex bioinspired reinforcement architectures that deliver enhanced material performance compared with monolithic structures. Further, we demonstrate that we can now design and evolve elaborate reinforcement architectures that are not found in nature, demonstrating a high level of possible customization in discontinuous fibre composites with arbitrary geometries. PMID:26494282

  8. Designing bioinspired composite reinforcement architectures via 3D magnetic printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua J.; Fiore, Brad E.; Erb, Randall M.

    2015-10-01

    Discontinuous fibre composites represent a class of materials that are strong, lightweight and have remarkable fracture toughness. These advantages partially explain the abundance and variety of discontinuous fibre composites that have evolved in the natural world. Many natural structures out-perform the conventional synthetic counterparts due, in part, to the more elaborate reinforcement architectures that occur in natural composites. Here we present an additive manufacturing approach that combines real-time colloidal assembly with existing additive manufacturing technologies to create highly programmable discontinuous fibre composites. This technology, termed as `3D magnetic printing', has enabled us to recreate complex bioinspired reinforcement architectures that deliver enhanced material performance compared with monolithic structures. Further, we demonstrate that we can now design and evolve elaborate reinforcement architectures that are not found in nature, demonstrating a high level of possible customization in discontinuous fibre composites with arbitrary geometries.

  9. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Marc (Technical Monitor); Shivakumar, Kunigal N.

    2003-01-01

    Fiber reinforced ceramic composites are materials of choice for gas turbine engines because of their high thermal efficiency, thrust/weight ratio, and operating temperatures. However, the successful introduction of ceramic composites to hot structures is limited because of excessive cost of manufacturing, reproducibility, nonuniformity, and reliability. Intense research is going on around the world to address some of these issues. The proposed effort is to develop a comprehensive status report of the technology on processing, testing, failure mechanics, and environmental durability of carbon fiber reinforced ceramic composites through extensive literature study, vendor and end-user survey, visits to facilities doing this type of work, and interviews. Then develop a cooperative research plan between NASA GRC and NCA&T (Center for Composite Materials Research) for processing, testing, environmental protection, and evaluation of fiber reinforced ceramic composites.

  10. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Marc (Technical Monitor); Shivakumar, Kunigal N.

    2003-01-01

    Fiber reinforced ceramic composites are materials of choice for gas turbine engines because of their high thermal efficiency, thrust/weight ratio, and operating temperatures. However, the successful introduction of ceramic composites to hot structures is limited because of excessive cost of manufacturing, reproducibility, nonuniformity, and reliability. Intense research is going on around the world to address some of these issues. The proposed effort is to develop a comprehensive status report of the technology on processing, testing, failure mechanics, and environmental durability of carbon fiber reinforced ceramic composites through extensive literature study, vendor and end-user survey, visits to facilities doing this type of work, and interviews. Then develop a cooperative research plan between NASA GRC and NCA&T (Center for Composite Materials Research) for processing, testing, environmental protection, and evaluation of fiber reinforced ceramic composites.

  11. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, which allows a shape to be formed prior to the cure, and is then pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Basalt fibers are used for the reinforcement in the composite system. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material.

  12. Short-term microdamageability of a fibrous composite with physically nonlinear matrix and microdamaged reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoroshun, L. P.; Shikula, E. N.

    2006-02-01

    A structural theory of short-term microdamage is proposed for a fibrous composite with physically nonlinear matrix and microdamaged reinforcement. The theory is based on the stochastic elasticity equations of a fibrous composite with porous fibers. Microvolumes of the fiber material are damaged in accordance with the Huber-Mises failure criterion. A balance equation for damaged microvolumes in the reinforcement is derived. This equation together with the equations relating macrostresses and macrostrains of a fibrous composite with porous reinforcement and physically nonlinear matrix constitute a closed-form system. This system describes the coupled processes of physically nonlinear deformation and microdamage that occur in different components of the composite. Algorithms are proposed for computing the dependences of microdamage on macrostrains and macrostresses on macrostrains. Uniaxial tension curves are plotted for a fibrous composite with a linearly hardening matrix

  13. Mechanical properties of fiber reinforced lightweight concrete composites

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Pena, M. ); Mobasher, B. )

    1994-01-01

    Hybrid composites with variable strength/toughness properties can be manufactured using combinations of brittle or ductile mesh in addition to brittle and ductile matrix reinforcements. The bending and tensile properties of thin sheet fiber cement composites made from these mixtures were investigated. Composites consisted of a woven mesh of either polyvinyl chloride (PVC) coated E-glass or polypropylene (PP) fibers for the surface reinforcement. In addition, chopped polypropylene, acrylic, nylon, and alkali-resistant (AR) glass fibers were used for the core reinforcement. It is shown that by controlling fiber contents, types, and combinations, design objectives such as strength, stiffness and toughness, can be achieved. Superior post-cracking behavior was measured for composites reinforced both with glass mesh and PP mesh. Load carrying capacity of PP mesh composites can be increased with the use of 1% or higher chopped PP fibers. Glass mesh composites with short AR glass fibers as matrix reinforcement indicate an increased matrix cracking strength and modulus of rupture. Combinations of PP mesh/short AR glass did not show a substantial improvement in the matrix ultimate strength. An increased nylon fiber surface area resulted in improved post peak response.

  14. Multilayered Glass Fibre-reinforced Composites In Rotational Moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W. C.; Harkin-Jones, E.; Kearns, M.; McCourt, M.

    2011-05-01

    The potential of multiple layer fibre-reinforced mouldings is of growing interest to the rotational moulding industry because of their cost/performance ratio. The particular problem that arises when using reinforcements in this process relate to the fact that the process is low shear and good mixing of resin and reinforcement is not optimum under those conditions. There is also a problem of the larger/heavier reinforcing agents segregating out of the powder to lay up on the inner part surface. In this study, short glass fibres were incorporated and distributed into a polymer matrix to produce fibre-reinforced polymer composites using the rotational moulding process and characterised in terms of morphology and mechanical properties.

  15. Multilayered Glass Fibre-reinforced Composites In Rotational Moulding

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W. C.; Harkin-Jones, E.; Kearns, M.; McCourt, M.

    2011-05-04

    The potential of multiple layer fibre-reinforced mouldings is of growing interest to the rotational moulding industry because of their cost/performance ratio. The particular problem that arises when using reinforcements in this process relate to the fact that the process is low shear and good mixing of resin and reinforcement is not optimum under those conditions. There is also a problem of the larger/heavier reinforcing agents segregating out of the powder to lay up on the inner part surface. In this study, short glass fibres were incorporated and distributed into a polymer matrix to produce fibre-reinforced polymer composites using the rotational moulding process and characterised in terms of morphology and mechanical properties.

  16. Mechanical properties of woven glass fiber-reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Kanie, Takahito; Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Koichi; Ban, Seiji

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to measure the flexural and compressive strengths and the corresponding moduli of cylindrical composite specimens reinforced with woven glass fiber. Test specimens were made by light-curing urethane dimethacrylate oligomer with woven glass fiber of 0.18-mm standard thickness. Tests were conducted using four reinforcement methods and two specimen diameters. Flexural strength and modulus of woven glass fiber-reinforced specimens were significantly greater than those without woven glass fiber (p < 0.01). Likewise, compressive strength of reinforced specimens was significantly greater than those without woven glass fiber (p < 0.01), except for specimens reinforced with woven glass fiber oriented at a tilt direction in the texture (p > 0.05). In terms of comparison between the two specimen diameters, no statistically significant differences in flexural strength and compressive strength (p > 0.05) were observed.

  17. Designing with figer-reinforced plastics (planar random composites)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of composite mechanics to predict the hygrothermomechanical behavior of planar random composites (PRC) is reviewed and described. These composites are usually made from chopped fiber reinforced resins (thermoplastics or thermosets). The hygrothermomechanical behavior includes mechanical properties, physical properties, thermal properties, fracture toughness, creep and creep rupture. Properties are presented in graphical form with sample calculations to illustrate their use. Concepts such as directional reinforcement and strip hybrids are described. Typical data that can be used for preliminary design for various PRCs are included. Several resins and molding compounds used to make PRCs are described briefly. Pertinent references are cited that cover analysis and design methods, materials, data, fabrication procedures and applications.

  18. Laser-surface-alloyed carbon nanotubes reinforced hydroxyapatite composite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yao; Gan Cuihua; Zhang Tainua; Yu Gang; Bai Pucun; Kaplan, Alexander

    2005-06-20

    Carbon-nanotube (CNT)-reinforced hydroxyapatite composite coatings have been fabricated by laser surface alloying. Microstructural observation using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that a large amount of CNTs remained with their original tubular morphology, even though some CNTs reacted with titanium element in the substrate during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the elastic modulus and hardness of the composite coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of CNTs in the starting precursor materials. Therefore, CNT-reinforced hydroxyapatite composite is a promising coating material for high-load-bearing metal implants.

  19. Laser-surface-alloyed carbon nanotubes reinforced hydroxyapatite composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Gan, Cuihua; Zhang, Tainua; Yu, Gang; Bai, Pucun; Kaplan, Alexander

    2005-06-01

    Carbon-nanotube (CNT)-reinforced hydroxyapatite composite coatings have been fabricated by laser surface alloying. Microstructural observation using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that a large amount of CNTs remained with their original tubular morphology, even though some CNTs reacted with titanium element in the substrate during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the elastic modulus and hardness of the composite coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of CNTs in the starting precursor materials. Therefore, CNT-reinforced hydroxyapatite composite is a promising coating material for high-load-bearing metal implants.

  20. An Assessment of Self-Healing Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Several reviews and books have been written concerning self-healing polymers over the last few years. These have focused primarily on the types of self-healing materials being studied, with minor emphasis given to composite properties. The purpose of this review is to assess the self-healing ability of these materials when utilized in fiber reinforced composites

  1. Coir fiber reinforced polypropylene composite panel for automotive interior applications

    Treesearch

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Songklod Jarusombuti; Vallayuth Fueangvivat; Piyawade Bauchongkol; Robert H. White

    2011-01-01

    In this study, physical, mechanical, and flammability properties of coconut fiber reinforced polypropylene (PP) composite panels were evaluated. Four levels of the coir fiber content (40, 50, 60, and 70 % based on the composition by weight) were mixed with the PP powder and a coupling agent, 3 wt % maleic anhydride grafted PP (MAPP) powder. The water resistance and the...

  2. Recent progress in NASA Langley textile reinforced composites program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson; Harris, Charles E.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA LaRC is conducting and sponsoring research to explore the benefits of textile reinforced composites for civil transport aircraft primary structures. The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate the potential of affordable textile reinforced composite materials to meet design properties and damage tolerance requirements of advanced aircraft structural concepts. In addition to in-house research, the program was recently expanded to include major participation by the aircraft industry and aerospace textile companies. The major program elements include development of textile preforms, processing science, mechanics of materials, experimental characterization of materials, and development and evaluation of textile reinforced composite structural elements and subcomponents. The NASA Langley in-house focus is as follows: development of a science-based understanding of resin transfer molding (RTM), development of powder-coated towpreg processes, analysis methodology, and development of a performance database on textile reinforced composites. The focus of the textile industry participation is on development of multidirectional, damage-tolerant preforms, and the aircraft industry participation is in the areas of design, fabrication and testing of textile reinforced composite structural elements and subcomponents. Textile processes such as 3D weaving, 2D and 3D braiding, and knitting/stitching are being compared with conventional laminated tape processes for improved damage tolerance. Through-the-thickness reinforcements offer significant damage tolerance improvements. However, these gains must be weighed against potential loss in in-plane properties such as strength and stiffness. Analytical trade studies are underway to establish design guidelines for the application of textile material forms to meet specific loading requirements. Fabrication and testing of large structural components are required to establish the full potential of textile reinforced

  3. Mechanical Properties of Nonwoven Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyurethane Composites

    PubMed Central

    Tausif, Muhammad; Pliakas, Achilles; O’Haire, Tom; Goswami, Parikshit; Russell, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Reinforcement of flexible fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) composites with standard textile fibres is a potential low cost solution to less critical loading applications. The mechanical behaviour of FRPs based on mechanically bonded nonwoven preforms composed of either low or high modulus fibres in a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) matrix were compared following compression moulding. Nonwoven preform fibre compositions were selected from lyocell, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyamide (PA) as well as para-aramid fibres (polyphenylene terephthalamide; PPTA). Reinforcement with standard fibres manifold improved the tensile modulus and strength of the reinforced composites and the relationship between fibre, fabric and composite’s mechanical properties was studied. The linear density of fibres and the punch density, a key process variable used to consolidate the nonwoven preform, were varied to study the influence on resulting FRP mechanical properties. In summary, increasing the strength and degree of consolidation of nonwoven preforms did not translate to an increase in the strength of resulting fibre reinforced TPU-composites. The TPU composite strength was mainly dependent upon constituent fibre stress-strain behaviour and fibre segment orientation distribution. PMID:28772977

  4. Fatigue strengths of particulate filler composites reinforced with fibers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji-Myung; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Hattori, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Koji; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dynamic fatigue strengths at 10(5) cycles and the strains of particulate filler composite resins with and without reinforcing fibers. An UHMWPE (Ribbond), a polyaromatic polyamide fiber (Fibreflex), and three glass fibers (GlasSpan, FibreKor, Vectris Frame) were used to reinforce the particulate filler composite resins. The fatigue properties were measured in three-point bending mode using a servohydraulic universal testing machine at a frequency of 5 Hz, until failure occurred or 10(5) cycles had been completed. The fatigue strengths at 10(5) cycles were determined by the staircase method. The fractured aspects of specimens were evaluated by an optical and scanning electron microscope. The fatigue strengths of particulate filler composite resins were 49-57 MPa, and those of fiber-reinforced were 90-209 MPa. Unidirectional glass fibers showed higher reinforcing effects on the fatigue strengths of composite resins. The strain of UHMWPE-reinforced composite was largest.

  5. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Wise, K. E.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique is presented for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Because the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated by using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube shapes, sizes, concentrations, and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/LaRC-SI (with a PmPV interface) composite systems, one with aligned SWNTs and the other with three-dimensionally randomly oriented SWNTs. The Young's modulus and shear modulus have been calculated for the two systems for various nanotube lengths and volume fractions.

  6. Processing and characterization of redmud reinforced polypropylene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugavel, R.; Jayamani, M.; Nagarajan, R.; Irullappasamy, S.; Cardona, F.; Sultan, M. T. H.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the redmud reinforced polypropylene composites were fabricated by compression molding setup. The effects of the redmud content on the mechanical, melting and crystalline behavior of the composites was investigated. The melting and crystalline behavior of the composites were investigated using Digital Scanning Calorimeter. The test results show that hardness of the composites increases with increasing redmud content while incorporation of redmud content decreases tensile and impact strength of the composites. It is determined that the addition of redmud on the polypropylene does not affect the crystalline behavior of the composites.

  7. Load-bearing capacity of fiber reinforced fixed composite bridges.

    PubMed

    Göncü Başaran, Emine; Ayna, Emrah; Üçtaşli, Sadullah; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reinforcing effect of differently oriented fibers on the load-bearing capacity of three-unit fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Forty-eight composite FDPs were fabricated. Specimens were divided into eight groups (n = 6/group; codes 1-8). Groups 1 and 5 were plain restorative composites (Grandio and Z100) without fiber reinforcement, groups 2 and 6 were reinforced with a continuous unidirectional fiber substructure, groups 3 and 7 were reinforced with a continuous bidirectional fiber and groups 4 and 8 were reinforced with a continuous bidirectional fiber substructure and continuous unidirectional fiber. FDPs were polymerized incrementally with a handheld light curing unit for 40 s and statically loaded until final fracture. Kruskal-Wallis analysis revealed that all groups had significantly different load-bearing capacities. Group 4 showed the highest mean load-bearing capacity and Group 7 the lowest. The results of this study suggest that continuous unidirectional fiber increased the mechanical properties of composite FDPs and bidirectional reinforcement slowed crack propagation on abutments.

  8. Rapid Prototyping of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, R.; Green, C.; Phillips, T.; Cipriani, R.; Yarlagadda, S.; Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Effinger, M.; Cooper, K. C.

    2003-01-01

    For ceramics to be used as structural components in high temperature applications, their fracture toughness is improved by embedding continuous ceramic fibers. Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials allow increasing the overall operating temperature, raising the temperature safety margins, avoiding the need for cooling, and improving the damping capacity, while reducing the weight at the same time. They also need to be reliable and available in large quantities as well. In this paper, an innovative rapid prototyping technique to fabricate continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. The process is simple, robust and will be widely applicable to a number of high temperature material systems. This technique was originally developed at the University of Delaware Center for Composite Materials (UD-CCM) for rapid fabrication of polymer matrix composites by a technique called automated tow placement or ATP. The results of mechanical properties and microstructural characterization are presented, together with examples of complex shapes and parts. It is believed that the process will be able to create complex shaped parts at an order of magnitude lower cost than current chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) processes.

  9. Rapid Prototyping of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, R.; Green, C.; Phillips, T.; Cipriani, R.; Yarlagadda, S.; Gillespie, J.; Effinger, M.; Cooper, K. C.; Gordon, Gail (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    For ceramics to be used as structural components in high temperature applications, their fracture toughness is improved by embedding continuous ceramic fibers. Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials allow increasing the overall operating temperature, raising the temperature safety margins, avoiding the need for cooling, and improving the damping capacity, while reducing the weight at the same time. They also need to be reliable and available in large quantities as well. In this paper, an innovative rapid prototyping technique to fabricate continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. The process is simple, robust and will be widely applicable to a number of high temperature material systems. This technique was originally developed at the University of Delaware Center for Composite Materials (UD-CCM) for rapid fabrication of polymer matrix composites by a technique called automated tow placement or ATP. The results of mechanical properties and microstructural characterization are presented, together with examples of complex shapes and parts. It is believed that the process will be able to create complex shaped parts at an order of magnitude lower cost than current CVI and PIP processes.

  10. Reinforced composite sealants for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Sonja M.; Federmann, Dirk; Remmel, Josef; Pap, Michael

    Glass-ceramic sealants are commonly used as joining materials for planar solid oxide fuel cells stacks. Several requirements need to be fulfilled by these materials: beside of electrical insulation and appropriate thermal expansion, a good adhesion on the ceramic and metallic components of a SOFC stack is necessary to form a gas-tight joint. Even though the joining process might have been successful, failures and leaks often occur during the stack operation due to fracture of the brittle material under thermal stresses or during thermal cycling of the components. This study focusses on composite materials consisting of a glass matrix based on the system of BaO-CaO-SiO 2 and various filler materials, e.g. yttria-stabilized zirconia fibres or particles and silver particles. In order to evaluate a possible reinforcing influence of the filler material of the composite, tensile strength tests were carried out on circular butt joints. The highest strength values were found for the composite material with addition of silver particles, followed by the glass matrix itself without any filler addition and the lowest values were measured for the composite with YSZ particles. SEM investigations of cross-sections of the joints elucidated these results by the microstructure of the glass-ceramic sealants.

  11. Fabrication of tungsten wire reinforced nickel-base alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentnall, W. D.; Toth, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fabrication methods for tungsten fiber reinforced nickel-base superalloy composites were investigated. Three matrix alloys in pre-alloyed powder or rolled sheet form were evaluated in terms of fabricability into composite monotape and multi-ply forms. The utility of monotapes for fabricating more complex shapes was demonstrated. Preliminary 1093C (2000F) stress rupture tests indicated that efficient utilization of fiber strength was achieved in composites fabricated by diffusion bonding processes. The fabrication of thermal fatigue specimens is also described.

  12. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    A broad group of fibers and matrices were combined to create a wide range of composite properties. Primary material fabrication procedures were developed which readily permit the fabrication of flat plate and shaped composites. Composite mechanical properties were measured under a wide range of test conditions. Tensile, flexure mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth resistance were evaluated. Selected fiber-matrix combinations were shown to maintain their strength at up to 1300 K when tested in an inert atmosphere. Composite high temperature mechanical properties were shown to be limited primarily by the oxidation resistance of the graphite fibers. Composite thermal dimensional stability was measured and found to be excellent.

  13. Process of Making Boron-Fiber Reinforced Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composition from powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and then are processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with the boron fibers become a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite tape. A driving mechanism pulls the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with boron fibers through the processing line of the apparatus and a take-up spool collects the formed hybrid boron-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite tape.

  14. Thermal shock behavior of fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Singh, R.N.; Beecher, S.C.; Dinwiddie, R.B.

    1995-02-01

    The thermal shock behavior of three types of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites (Nextel{trademark} or Nicalon{trademark} fiber-reinforced chemical vapor infiltrated or polymer-derived SiC matrix composites) was studied using the water quench technique. The thermal shock induced damage was characterized by both destructive and nondestructive techniques. As compared with monolithic ceramics, the continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites were capable of preventing catastrophic failure caused by thermal shock and were able to retain a significant portion of their original strength at {Delta}{Tau} = 1000{degrees}C. The nondestructive techniques involved measuring the thermal diffusivity by the flash technique and determining the Young`s modulus by the dynamic resonance method. It has been demonstrated that these nondestructive techniques can detect damage induced by thermal shock and are more sensitive in detecting damage in the early stage than the conventional destructive technique of measuring the retained strength.

  15. Process of Making Boron-Fiber Reinforced Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composition from powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and then are processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with the boron fibers become a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite tape. A driving mechanism pulls the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with boron fibers through the processing line of the apparatus and a take-up spool collects the formed hybrid boron-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite tape.

  16. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Wise, K. E.; Park, C.; Siochi, E. J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique is presented for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Because the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated by using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube lengths, concentrations, and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyimide composite systems.

  17. Continuous-fiber preform reinforcement of dental resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H K; Schumacher, G E; Eichmiller, F C; Peterson, R C; Antonucci, J M; Mueller, H J

    2003-09-01

    Direct-filling resin composites are used in relatively small restorations and are not recommended for large restorations with severe occlusal-stresses. The aim of this study was to reinforce composites with fiber preforms, and to investigate the effects of layer thickness and configurations on composite properties. It was hypothesized that fiber preforms would significantly increase the composite's flexural strength, work-of-fracture (toughness) and elastic modulus. Glass fibers were silanized, impregnated with a resin, cured, and cut to form inserts for tooth cavity restorations. Also fabricated were three groups of specimens of 2mm x 2mm x 25 mm: a fiber preform rod in the center of a hybrid composite; a thin fiber layer on the tensile side of the specimens; and a thin fiber layer sandwiched in between layers of a hybrid composite. These specimens were tested in three-point flexure to measure strength, work-of-fracture and modulus. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine the restorations and the fiber distributions. Microscopic examinations of insert-filled tooth cavities showed that the fibers were relatively uniform in distribution within the preform, and the inserts were well bonded with the surrounding hybrid composite. Specimens consisting of a fiber preform rod in the center of a hybrid composite had a flexural strength (mean (SD); n=6) of 313 (19)MPa, significantly higher than 120 (16)MPa of the hybrid composite without fibers (Tukey's at family confidence of 0.95). The work-of-fracture was increased by nearly seven times, and the modulus was doubled, due to fiber preform reinforcement. Similar improvements were obtained for the other two groups of specimens. Substantial improvements in flexural strength, toughness and stiffness were achieved for dental resin composites reinforced with fiber preforms. The method of embedding a fiber preform insert imparts superior reinforcement to restorations and should improve the performance of

  18. Tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite high temperature component design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winsa, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composites (TFRS) are intended for use in high temperature turbine components. Current turbine component design methodology is based on applying the experience, sometimes semiempirical, gained from over 30 years of superalloy component design. Current composite component design capability is generally limited to the methodology for low temperature resin matrix composites. Often the tendency is to treat TFRS as just another superalloy or low temperature composite. However, TFRS behavior is significantly different than that of superalloys, and the high environment adds consideration not common in low temperature composite component design. The methodology used for preliminary design of TFRS components are described. Considerations unique to TFRS are emphasized.

  19. Composition and method for making polyimide resin-reinforced fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A composition for making polyimide resin reinforced fibers or fabric is discussed. The composition includes a polyfunctional ester, a polyfunctional amine, and an end capping agent. The composition is impregnated into fibers or fabric and heated to form prepreg material. The tack retention characteristics of this prepreg material are improved by incorporating into the composition a liquid olefinic material compatible with the other ingredients of the composition. The prepreg material is heated at a higher temperature to effect formation of the polyimide resin and the monomeric additive is incorporated in the polyimide polymer structure.

  20. Fatigue in selectively fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurty, U.

    1999-08-01

    Many applications of the Ti alloy matrix composites (TMCs) reinforced with SiC fibers are expected to use the selective reinforcement concept in order to optimize the processing and increase the cost-effectiveness. In this work, unnotched fatigue behavior of a Ti-6Al-4V matrix selectively reinforced with SCS-6 SiC fibers has been examined. Experiments have been conducted on two different model panels. Results show that the fatigue life of the selectively reinforced composites is far inferior to that of the all-TMC panel. The fatigue life decreases with the decreasing effective fiber volume fraction. Suppression of multiple matrix cracking in the selectively reinforced panels was identified as the reason for their lack of fatigue resistance. Fatigue endurance limit as a function of the clad thickness was calculated using the modified Smith-Watson-Topper (SWT) parameter and the effective fiber volume fraction approach. The regime over which multiple matrix cracking occurs is identified using the bridging fiber fracture criterion. A fatigue failure map for the selectively reinforced TMCs is constructed on the basis of the observed damage mechanisms. Possible applications of such maps are discussed.

  1. Unified micromechanics of damping for unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated micromechanics methodology for the prediction of damping capacity in fiber-reinforced polymer matrix unidirectional composites has been developed. Explicit micromechanics equations based on hysteretic damping are presented relating the on-axis damping capacities to the fiber and matrix properties and volume fraction. The damping capacities of unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis loading are synthesized from thermal effect on the damping performance of unidirectional composites due to temperature and moisture variations is also modeled. The damping contributions from interfacial friction between broken fibers and matrix are incorporated. Finally, the temperature rise in continuously vibrating composite plies is estimated. Application examples illustrate the significance of various parameters on the damping performance of unidirectional and off-axis fiber reinforced composites.

  2. Effects of Fiber Reinforcement on Clay Aerogel Composites.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Katherine A; Gawryla, Matthew D; Schiraldi, David A

    2015-08-21

    Novel, low density structures which combine biologically-based fibers with clay aerogels are produced in an environmentally benign manner using water as solvent, and no additional processing chemicals. Three different reinforcing fibers, silk, soy silk, and hemp, are evaluated in combination with poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix polymer combined with montmorillonite clay. The mechanical properties of the aerogels are demonstrated to increase with reinforcing fiber length, in each case limited by a critical fiber length, beyond which mechanical properties decline due to maldistribution of filler, and disruption of the aerogel structure. Rather than the classical model for reinforced composite properties, the chemical compatibility of reinforcing fibers with the polymer/clay matrix dominated mechanical performance, along with the tendencies of the fibers to kink under compression.

  3. Effects of Fiber Reinforcement on Clay Aerogel Composites

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, Katherine A.; Gawryla, Matthew D.; Schiraldi, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Novel, low density structures which combine biologically-based fibers with clay aerogels are produced in an environmentally benign manner using water as solvent, and no additional processing chemicals. Three different reinforcing fibers, silk, soy silk, and hemp, are evaluated in combination with poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix polymer combined with montmorillonite clay. The mechanical properties of the aerogels are demonstrated to increase with reinforcing fiber length, in each case limited by a critical fiber length, beyond which mechanical properties decline due to maldistribution of filler, and disruption of the aerogel structure. Rather than the classical model for reinforced composite properties, the chemical compatibility of reinforcing fibers with the polymer/clay matrix dominated mechanical performance, along with the tendencies of the fibers to kink under compression. PMID:28793515

  4. Holland Environments as Reinforcement Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, John C.

    1985-01-01

    A longitudinal study of over 2,000 graduates from eight college types generally supports the validity of Holland's premise: that model environments reinforce the characteristic predispositions and attitudes of their corresponding personality types. There are implications for the study of inter- and intra-institutional diversity. (MSE)

  5. Drive-Reinforcement Learning System Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-31

    evidence suggests that D-R would be effective in control system applications outside the robotics arena.... Drive- Reinforcement Learning , Neural Network Controllers, Robotics, Manipulator Kinematics, Dynamics and Control.

  6. Effect of pressure on the formation of superelastic hard particles in a metal-fullerene system and the tribological properties of composite materials reinforced with such particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, O. P.; Drozdova, E. I.; Blinov, V. M.; Ovchinnikova, I. N.

    2011-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and microhardness and modulus of elasticity measurements are used to study the influence of compacting pressure (5, 8 GPa) on the structure and properties of the phases prepared from fullerene soot extract (mixture of C60 and C70 crystallites) in a mixture with a cobalt powder. Carbon particles synthesized during high-temperature treatment at a pressure of 5 or 8 GPa and reinforcing composite samples have a universal hardness H u (hardness measured from the total (elastic and plastic) strain under loading) of 12 or 25 GPa, respectively. After heating of samples to 900°C, the values of H u of the particles decrease to 9-11 GPa at elastic recovery of the phase more than 85%. The dry friction coefficients of iron- and cobalt-based composite materials in contact with tool steel are 0.08 and 0.04, respectively.

  7. Fiber-reinforced bioactive and bioabsorbable hybrid composites.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Mikko; Törmälä, Pertti; Godinho, Pedro; Kellomäki, Minna

    2008-09-01

    Bioabsorbable polymeric bone fracture fixation devices have been developed and used clinically in recent decades to replace metallic implants. An advantage of bioabsorbable polymeric devices is that these materials degrade in the body and the degradation products exit via metabolic routes. Additionally, the strength properties of the bioabsorbable polymeric devices decrease as the device degrades, which promotes bone regeneration (according to Wolff's law) as the remodeling bone tissue is progressively loaded. The most extensively studied bioabsorbable polymers are poly-alpha-hydroxy acids. The major limitation of the first generation of bioabsorbable materials and devices was their relatively low mechanical properties and brittle behavior. Therefore, several reinforcing techniques have been used to improve the mechanical properties. These include polymer chain orientation techniques and the use of fiber reinforcements. The latest innovation for bioactive and fiber-reinforced bioabsorbable composites is to use both bioactive and bioresorbable ceramic and bioabsorbable polymeric fiber reinforcement in the same composite structure. This solution of using bioactive and fiber-reinforced bioabsorbable hybrid composites is examined in this study.

  8. Systems of reinforcement and drug dependence.

    PubMed

    Valdman, A V; Zvartau, E E

    1982-12-01

    Experimental data are presented in support of the hypothesis on the role of positive and negative reinforcing systems in the mechanism of drug dependence. Drugs with abuse potential (DAP) may change the manner of response to negative emotional stimuli, activate positive emotional reactions in animals, and possess primary reinforcing properties. Reward and punishment systems respond sensitively to withdrawal from DAP or antagonist administration. Catecholaminergic and peptidergic processes are of importance in the mechanisms of the emotionally positive action of DAP.

  9. High-strength fiber-reinforced plastic reinforcement of wood and wood composite

    SciTech Connect

    Tingley, D.A.; Eng, P.

    1996-12-31

    Research and development underway since 1982 has led to the development of a method of reinforcing wood and wood composite structural products (WWC) using high-strength fiber-reinforced plastic. This method allows the use of less wood fiber and lower grade wood fiber for a given load capacity. The first WWC in which reinforcement has been marketed is glulam beams. Marketed under the trade name FiRP{trademark} Reinforced glulam, the product has gained code approval and is now being used in the construction of buildings and bridges in the United States, Japan and other countries. The high-strength fiber-reinforced plastic (FiRP{trademark} Reinforced panel (RP)) has specific characteristics that are required to provide for proper use in WWC`s. This paper discusses these characteristics and the testing requirements to develop code approved allowable design values for carbon, aramid and fiberglass RP`s for such uses. Specific issues such as in-service characteristics, i.e. long term creep tests and tension-tension fatigue tests, are discussed.

  10. How to make auxetic fibre reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderson, K. L.; Simkins, V. R.; Coenen, V. L.; Davies, P. J.; Alderson, A.; Evans, K. E.

    2005-03-01

    Auxetic composite materials can be produced either from conventional components via specially designed configurations or from auxetic components. This paper reviews manufacturing methods for both these scenarios. It then looks at the possibility of property enhancements in both low velocity impact and fibre pull out due to the negative Poisson's ratio. Tests revealed that auxetic carbon fibre composites made from commercially available prepreg show evidence of increased resistance to low velocity impact and static indentation with a smaller area of damage. Also, using auxetic fibres in composite materials is shown to produce a higher resistance to fibre pullout.

  11. NATURAL FIBER OR GLASS REINFORCED POLYPROPYLENE COMPOSITES?

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzi, W.; Di Landro, L.; Casiraghi, A.; Pagano, M. R.

    2008-08-28

    Problems related to the recycle of conventional composite materials are becoming always more relevant for many industrial fields. Natural fiber composites (NFC) have recently gained much attention due to their low cost, environmental gains (eco-compatibility), easy disposal, reduction in volatile organic emissions, and their potential to compete with glass fiber composites (GFC). Interest in natural fibers is not only based over ecological aspects. NFC have good mechanical performances in relation to their low specific weight and low price. A characterization of mechanical properties, dynamic behavior, and moisture absorption is presented.

  12. Natural Fiber or Glass Reinforced Polypropylene Composites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzi, W.; Di Landro, L.; Casiraghi, A.; Pagano, M. R.

    2008-08-01

    Problems related to the recycle of conventional composite materials are becoming always more relevant for many industrial fields. Natural fiber composites (NFC) have recently gained much attention due to their low cost, environmental gains (eco-compatibility), easy disposal, reduction in volatile organic emissions, and their potential to compete with glass fiber composites (GFC). Interest in natural fibers is not only based over ecological aspects. NFC have good mechanical performances in relation to their low specific weight and low price. A characterization of mechanical properties, dynamic behavior, and moisture absorption is presented.

  13. Natural Curaua Fiber-Reinforced Composites in Multilayered Ballistic Armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Trindade, Willian; Elias, Carlos Nelson; Ferreira, Carlos Luiz; de Sousa Lima, Eduardo; Weber, Ricardo Pondé; Miguez Suarez, João Carlos; da Silva Figueiredo, André Ben-Hur; Pinheiro, Wagner Anacleto; da Silva, Luis Carlos; Lima, Édio Pereira

    2015-10-01

    The performance of a novel multilayered armor in which the commonly used plies of aramid fabric layer were replaced by an equal thickness layer of distinct curaua fiber-reinforced composites with epoxy or polyester matrices was assessed. The investigated armor, in addition to its polymeric layer (aramid fabric or curaua composite), was also composed of a front Al2O3 ceramic tile and backed by an aluminum alloy sheet. Ballistic impact tests were performed with actual 7.62 caliber ammunitions. Indentation in a clay witness, simulating human body behind the back layer, attested the efficacy of the curaua-reinforced composite as an armor component. The conventional aramid fabric display a similar indentation as the curaua/polyester composite but was less efficient (deeper indentation) than the curaua/epoxy composite. This advantage is shown to be significant, especially in favor of the lighter and cheaper epoxy composite reinforced with 30 vol pct of curaua fiber, as possible substitute for aramid fabric in multilayered ballistic armor for individual protection. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the mechanism associated with the curaua composite ballistic performance.

  14. Translucency of glass-fibre-reinforced composite materials.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Tanaka, H; Kawamura, Y; Wakabayashi, K

    2004-08-01

    summary The purpose of this study was to examine the translucency of glass-fibre-reinforced composite framework materials. Vectris and FibreKor, as well as an experimental material, were the glass-fibre-reinforced framework materials used. Targis, Sculpture and Estenia were the types of particulate filler composites veneered onto frameworks. Specimens were fabricated from each material, 0.5 and 1.0 mm thick. In addition, laminate specimens, 1.5 mm thick, were fabricated. The translucency of each specimen was evaluated by determining its contrast ratio. The laminate specimens were examined for colour differences. The experimental framework material was more translucent than the enamel composite when it was not coloured, and was nearly as translucent as the dentine composite when coloured. The commercial tooth-coloured framework materials were nearly as translucent as the dentine composite. It was found that it was possible to reproduce the same colour as the veneering dentine composite, when the framework thickness was 0.5 mm, except in the case of FibreKor. Within the limitations of this study, tooth-coloured, glass-fibre-reinforced framework materials are nearly as translucent as the veneering dentine composite, but these materials affect the colour of the prosthesis if the thickness of the framework material is increased beyond a certain point. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Fiber Reinforced Composites for Insulation and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broughton, Roy M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The work involves two areas: Composites, optimum fiber placement with initial construction of a pressure vessel, and the general subject of insulation, a continual concern in harsh thermal environments. Insulation

  16. Plastic matrix composites with continuous fiber reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-19

    Most plastic resins are not suitable for structural applications. Although many resins are extremely tough, most lack strength, stiffness, and deform under load with time. By mixing strong, stiff, fibrous materials into the plastic matrix, a variety of structural composite materials can be formed. The properties of these composites can be tailored by fiber selection, orientation, and other factors to suit specific applications. The advantages and disadvantages of fiberglass, carbon-graphite, aramid (Kevlar 49), and boron fibers are summarized.

  17. Comparative study of nanomaterials for interlaminar reinforcement of fiber-composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Karen Rachel; Duenas, Terrisa; Dzenis, Yuris; Kaser, Jase; Bakis, Charles E.; Roberts, J. Keith; Carter, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites offer benefits of reduced weight and increased specific strength; however, these materials can have relatively weak interlaminar toughness. The first modes of composite material failure often remain undetected, since failure is not always visually apparent on the surface of composite materials. In this study, several nano-sized materials and integration approaches are investigated as nanoreinforcement for composite materials. Performance is characterized by the ability of each nanoreinforced composite type to improve Mode I interlaminar toughness. The nanomaterials include 1) commercially available surface-modified silica nanoparticles and 2) continuous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers. Test articles are manufactured using hand-layup vacuum bagging and feature either reinforced unidirectional carbon fiber or woven carbon fiber material and one of two investigated epoxy-based resin systems. The nanosilica particles were integrated into the fiber composite structure by mixing with the resin system prior to layup. The PAN nanofibers were produced by an electrospinning process; these fibers were integrated by either collecting the fibers of various areal densities as respective "nanomats" on an interim substrate for subsequent transfer during layup, or directly electrospun onto dry carbon fiber ply surfaces. Test articles were characterized according to ASTM D5528 for finding Mode I strain energy release rates. Results were compared to baseline coupons to determine fracture toughness performance. Results showed that the nanosilica-reinforced coupons increased an average of 35% and 25% in strain energy release rates for the coupons featuring unidirectional fibers and woven fibers, respectively, as compared to the corresponding baseline, whereas the nanomat-reinforced and directly deposited nanofiber-reinforced composites decreased. Low strain energy release rates for the PAN nanofiber-reinforced coupons is attributed

  18. A Fully Contained Resin Infusion Process for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite Fabrication and Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) process is applicable for fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite fabrication and repair. However, VARTM in...scenario is a fully enclosed VARTM system that limits the need for laboratory or manufacturing equipment. The Bladder-Bag VARTM (BBVARTM) technique...composite fabrication, VARTM , composite repair, in-field repair 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER

  19. Studies on natural fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Kapatel, P. M.; Machchhar, A. D.; Kapatel, Y. A.

    2016-05-01

    Natural fiber reinforced composites show increasing importance in day to days applications because of their low cost, lightweight, easy availability, non-toxicity, biodegradability and environment friendly nature. But these fibers are hydrophilic in nature. Thus they have very low reactivity and poor compatibility with polymers. To overcome these limitations chemical modifications of the fibers have been carried out. Therefore, in the present work jute fibers have chemically modified by treating with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions. These treated jute fibers have been used to fabricate jute fiber reinforced epoxy composites. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and impact strength have been found out. Alkali treated composites show better properties compare to untreated composites.

  20. Tensile Strength of Epoxy Composites Reinforced with Fique Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altoé, Giulio Rodrigues; Netto, Pedro Amoy; Teles, Maria Carolina Andrade; Borges, Luiz Gustavo Xavier; Margem, Frederico Muylaert; Monteiro, Sergio Neves

    Environmentally friendly composites, made from natural fibers, are among the most investigated and applied today. Natural fibers have showed advantages, such as, flexibility and toughness, if compared with synthetic fibers. This work investigates the tensile strength of epoxy composites reinforced with Fique fibers. The Fique fiber was extracted from Fique leaf presents some significant characteristic, but until now only few studies on Fique fiber were performed. Composites reinforced with up to 30% in volume of long, continuous and aligned Fique fibers were tested in an Instron machine at room temperature. The incorporation of Fique fibers increases the tensile strength of the composite. After fracture the specimens were analyzed by a SEM (scanning electron microscope).

  1. Fatigue behavior of SiC reinforced titanium composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Grimes, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The low cycle axial fatigue properties of 25 and 44 fiber volume percent SiC/Ti(6Al-4V) composites were measured at room temperature and at 650 deg C. The S-N curves for the composites showed no anticipated improvement over bulk matrix behavior at room temperature. Although axial and transverse tensile strength results suggest a degradation in SiC fiber strength during composite fabrication, it appears that the poor fatigue life of the composites was caused by a reduced fatigue resistance of the reinforced Ti(6Al-4V) matrix. The reduced matrix behavior was due, to the presence of flawed and fractured fibers created near the specimen surfaces by preparation techniques and to the large residual tensile stresses that can exist in fiber reinforced matrices. The effects of fatigue testing at high temperature are discussed.

  2. Fracture criteria for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rack, H. J.; Goree, J. G.; Albritton, J.; Ratnaparkhi, P.

    1988-01-01

    Summarized is the progress achieved during the period September 16, 1987 to August 15, l988 on NASA Grant NAG1-724, Fracture Criteria for Discontinuously Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites. Appended are copies of three manuscripts prepared under NASA funding during the performance period.

  3. Fracture criteria for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rack, H. J.; Goree, J. G.; Albritton, J.; Ratnarparkhi, P.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of sample configuration on the details of initial crack propagation in discontinuously whisker reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites was investigated. Care was taken to allow direct comparison of fracture toughness values utilizing differing sample configurations and orientations, holding all materials variables constant, e.g., extrusion ration, heat treatment, and chemistry.

  4. Laminated sheet composites reinforced with modular filament sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reece, O. Y.

    1968-01-01

    Aluminum and magnesium composite sheet laminates reinforced with low density, high strength modular filament sheets are produced by diffusion bonding and explosive bonding. Both processes are accomplished in normal atmosphere and require no special tooling or cleaning other than wire brushing the metal surfaces just prior to laminating.

  5. Elastic/viscoplastic constitutive model for fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, T. S.; Sun, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    A constitutive model to describe the elastic/viscoplastic behavior of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites under plane stress conditions is presented. Formulations are given for quasi-static plasticity and time-dependent viscoplasticity. Experimental procedures required to generate the necessary material constants are explained, and the experimental data is compared to the predicted behavior.

  6. Guided waves characterization of bamboo fibers reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, L. De; Marzani, A.; Perelli, A.; Testoni, N.; Speciale, N.

    2012-05-01

    In the present study, an inverse procedure based on ultrasonic guided wave propagation is proposed for the bamboo fibers reinforced composites characterization. The procedure consists of an optimization problem in which the discrepancy between the experimental dispersion curves and those predicted through a numerical formulation is minimized.

  7. Crushing characteristics of continuous fiber-reinforced composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Jones, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Composite tubes can be reinforced with continuous fibers. When such tubes are subjected to crushing loads, the response is complex and depends on interaction between the different mechanisms that control the crushing process. The modes of crushing and their controlling mechanisms are described. Also, the resulting crushing process and its efficiency are addressed.

  8. Fiber reinforced composites in prosthodontics – A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Ganesh, R.; Santhosh, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC), prostheses offer the potential advantages of optimized esthetics, low wear of the opposing dentition and the ability to bond the prosthesis to the abutment teeth, thereby compensating for less-than-optimal abutment tooth retention and resistance form. These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: Fiber-composites to build the substructure and hybrid or micro fill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This article reviews the various types of FRCs and its mechanical properties. PMID:26015717

  9. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  10. Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Md. Iftekhar; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites with low thermal expansion of 15 ppm/k are prepared by hot pressing vacuum-filtered Pickering emulsions of hydrophobic acrylic resin monomer, hydrophilic chitin nanofibers and water. The coalescence of acrylic monomer droplets in the emulsion is prevented by the chitin nanofibers network. This transparent composite has 3D shape moldability, making it attractive for optical precision parts.

  11. Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites

    PubMed Central

    Shams, Md. Iftekhar; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites with low thermal expansion of 15 ppm/k are prepared by hot pressing vacuum-filtered Pickering emulsions of hydrophobic acrylic resin monomer, hydrophilic chitin nanofibers and water. The coalescence of acrylic monomer droplets in the emulsion is prevented by the chitin nanofibers network. This transparent composite has 3D shape moldability, making it attractive for optical precision parts. PMID:26552990

  12. Determining Fiber Orientation in Graphite-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, J. G.; Ledbetter, Frank E., III; Clemon, J. M.; Penn, B. G.; White, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    Orientation of fibers in graphite-fiber-reinforced plastics easily determined with new method. Materials scientists thus ensure that fibers, usually not visible after graphite/plastic composite has been cured, properly oriented in test specimens and test results accurately represent the characteristics of composite. Method based on fact that continuous graphite fibers embeded in cured polymer matrix actually parallel conductors. Thus, resistance measured across laminate is at minimum when probes of ohmmeter connected to opposite ends of fibers.

  13. Investigations on composites reinforced with HEA particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcea, I.; Chelariu, R.; Asavei, L.; Cimpoeşu, N.; Florea, R. M.

    2017-08-01

    This work reports the results of investigations on the fortification with high entropy alloys particles of aluminium matrix composite materials. The properties of these materials processed by Vortex techniques primarily depend on the matrix and the volume fraction of the constituent phase. The mechanical properties, toughening mechanisms and potential applications are briefly reviewed. Traditional methods were used for the basic characterization of the composite. The microstructure of the composites were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopy (OM, SEM). SEM analysis was performed in order to observe the microstructural evolution as a function of the HEA particles content and to identify some reasons of the presence of porosity or any irregularities within the metal matrix.

  14. The assessment of metal fiber reinforced polymeric composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Wenchiang R.

    1990-01-01

    Because of their low cost, excellent electrical conductivity, high specific strength (strength/density), and high specific modulus (modulus/density) short metal fiber reinforced composites have enjoyed a widespread use in many critical applications such as automotive industry, aircraft manufacturing, national defense, and space technology. However, little data has been found in the study of short metal fibrous composites. Optimum fiber concentration in a resin matrix and fiber aspect ratio (length-to-diameter ratio) are often not available to a user. Stress concentration at short fiber ends is the other concern when the composite is applied to a load-bearing application. Fracture in such composites where the damage will be initiated or accumulated is usually difficult to be determined. An experimental investigation is therefore carefully designed and undertaken to systematically evaluate the mechanical properties as well as electrical properties. Inconel 601 (nickel based) metal fiber with a diameter of eight microns is used to reinforce commercially available thermoset polyester resin. Mechanical testing such as tensile, impact, and flexure tests along with electrical conductivity measurements is conducted to study the feasibility of using such composites. The advantages and limitations of applying chopped metal fiber reinforced polymeric composites are also discussed.

  15. Friction Stir Processing of Particle Reinforced Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Yong X.; Solomon, Daniel; Reinbolt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide a review of friction stir processing (FSP) technology and its application for microstructure modification of particle reinforced composite materials. The main focus of FSP was on aluminum based alloys and composites. Recently, many researchers have investigated this technology for treating other alloys and materials including stainless steels, magnesium, titanium, and copper. It is shown that FSP technology is very effective in microstructure modification of reinforced metal matrix composite materials. FSP has also been used in the processing and structure modification of polymeric composite materials. Compared with other manufacturing processes, friction stir processing has the advantage of reducing distortion and defects in materials. The layout of this paper is as follows. The friction stir processing technology will be presented first. Then, the application of this technology in manufacturing and structure modification of particle reinforced composite materials will be introduced. Future application of friction stir processing in energy field, for example, for vanadium alloy and composites will be discussed. Finally, the challenges for improving friction stir processing technology will be mentioned.

  16. New generation fiber reinforced polymer composites incorporating carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Eslam

    The last five decades observed an increasing use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites as alternative construction materials for aerospace and infrastructure. The high specific strength of FRP attracted its use as non-corrosive reinforcement. However, FRP materials were characterized with a relatively low ductility and low shear strength compared with steel reinforcement. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced in the last decade as a material with minimal defect that is capable of increasing the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. This dissertation reports experimental investigations on the use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce a new generation of FRP composites. The experiments showed significant improvements in the flexure properties of the nanocomposite when functionalized MWCNTs were used. In addition, MWCNTs were used to produce FRP composites in order to examine static, dynamic, and creep behavior. The MWCNTs improved the off-axis tension, off-axis flexure, FRP lap shear joint responses. In addition, they reduced the creep of FRP-concrete interface, enhanced the fracture toughness, and altered the impact resistance significantly. In general, the MWCNTs are found to affect the behaviour of the FRP composites when matrix failure dominates the behaviour. The improvement in the mechanical response with the addition of low contents of MWCNTs would benefit many industrial and military applications such as strengthening structures using FRP composites, composite pipelines, aircrafts, and armoured vehicles.

  17. Ageing characteristics of aluminium alloy aluminosilicate discontinuous fiber reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, D.; Singh, V.

    1999-03-05

    Development of continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites is aimed at providing high specific strength and stiffness needed for aerospace and some critical high temperature structural applications. Considerable efforts have been made, during the last decade, to improve the strength of age-hardening aluminium alloy matrix composites by suitable heat treatment. It has also been well established that age-hardenable aluminium alloy composites show accelerated ageing behavior because of enhanced dislocation density at the fiber/matrix interface resulting from thermal expansion mismatch between ceramic fiber and the metal matrix. The accelerated ageing of aluminium alloy composites either from dislocation density or the residual stress, as a result of thermal expansion mismatch is dependent on the size of whisker and particulate. Investigations have also been made on the effect of volume fraction of particulate on the ageing behavior of aluminium alloys. The present investigation is concerned with characterization of age-hardening behavior of an Al-Si-Cu-Mg(AA 336) alloy alumino-silicate discontinuous fiber-reinforced composites (referred to as aluminium MMCs in the present text) being developed for automotive pistons. An effort is made to study the effect of volume fraction of the reinforcement on age-hardening behavior of this composite.

  18. Fracture toughness of woven kenaf fibre reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, AE; Masran, SH; Jamian, S.; Kamarudin, KA; Mohd Nor, MK; Muhd Nor, NH; Mohd Tobi, AL; Awang, MK

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the role of fibre orientations on the woven-type kenaf fibre reinforced composites. According to literature survey, lack of information regarding to the fracture toughness of woven kenaf fibre reinforced composites. Fracture toughness tests were performed using ASTM D5045. Four fibre orientations were used such as 0/15/0/-15/0, 0/30/0/-30/0, 0/45/0/-45/0 and 0/90/0/-90/0 and on the other hand virgin polyester and unidirectional fibre reinforced composites were also used for comparisons. Based on the experimental works, woven-typed composites produced lower fracture toughness compared with the unidirectional fiber composite. Fracture toughness obtained from different fibre orientations composites are almost identical however 0/30/0/-30/0 and 0/90/0/-90/0 produced higher toughness relative with others. Fracture mechanisms revealed that as expected the fibres aligned along the stress direction capable to sustain better mechanical deformation and therefore producing higher fracture toughness.

  19. Thermoforming continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiang.

    1990-01-01

    In this research the forming process was first decomposed into basic deformation elements with simple geometries, and models were then developed for these elements. A series-parallel model was developed for predicting the upper and lower bounds of composite shear modulus at forming temperature based on the fiber content, fiber distribution, and matrix shear modulus. A shear-flexure model was proposed to describe the initial load-deflection behavior of thermoplastic composites in bending. A ply buckling model was developed which included the contributions from both a surface tension term and a ply buckling term.

  20. Mechanical response of composite materials with through-the-thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Dickinson, Larry C.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to identify the key geometrical parameters and quantify their influence on the mechanical response of through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforced composite materials. Composite laminates with TTT reinforcement fibers were fabricated using different TTT reinforcement materials and reinforcement methods and laminates were also fabricated of similar construction but without TTT reinforcement fibers. Coupon specimens were machined from these laminates and were destructively tested. TTT reinforcement yarns enhance damage tolerance and improve interlaminar strength. Thick-layer composites with TTT reinforcement yarns have equal or superior mechanical properties to thin-layer composites without TTT reinforcement yarns. A significant potential exists for fabrication cost reduction by using thick-layer composites with TTT reinforcement yarns. Removal of the surface loop of the TTT reinforcement improves compression strength. Stitching provides somewhat higher mechanical properties than integral weaving.

  1. Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-09

    while retaining the nanotube structure. This project involves the use of computational quantum chemistry to study interactions of aluminium (Al...small clusters of 1–4 metal atoms. The effect of varying the radius of the nanotubes and the size of aluminium and titanium clusters was considered...15. SUBJECT TERMS Boron Nitride Nanotubes, composite materials, Aluminum Alloys , Titanium Alloy , Theoretical Chemistry 16. SECURITY

  2. Laser Processing of Discontinuously Reinforced Aluminum Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    have attractive potential as engineering materials due to the combination of good mechanical properties and relatively low cost, howeve utilization of...are attractive materials because they combine good mechanical properties , the ability to be formed by standard metalworking techniques, and lower...the constituent materials, fabrication procedures, and secondary processing on the mechanical properties . Early DRA composites used standard wrought

  3. Development of Textile Reinforced Composites for Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson

    1998-01-01

    NASA has been a leader in development of composite materials for aircraft applications during the past 25 years. In the early 1980's NASA and others conducted research to improve damage tolerance of composite structures through the use of toughened resins but these resins were not cost-effective. The aircraft industry wanted affordable, robust structures that could withstand the rigors of flight service with minimal damage. The cost and damage tolerance barriers of conventional laminated composites led NASA to focus on new concepts in composites which would incorporate the automated manufacturing methods of the textiles industry and which would incorporate through-the-thickness reinforcements. The NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program provided the resources to extensively investigate the application of textile processes to next generation aircraft wing and fuselage structures. This paper discusses advanced textile material forms that have been developed, innovative machine concepts and key technology advancements required for future application of textile reinforced composites in commercial transport aircraft. Multiaxial warp knitting, triaxial braiding and through-the-thickness stitching are the three textile processes that have surfaced as the most promising for further development. Textile reinforced composite structural elements that have been developed in the NASA ACT Program are discussed. Included are braided fuselage frames and window-belt reinforcements, woven/stitched lower fuselage side panels, stitched multiaxial warp knit wing skins, and braided wing stiffeners. In addition, low-cost processing concepts such as resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI), and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are discussed. Process modeling concepts to predict resin flow and cure in textile preforms are also discussed.

  4. Novel Dental Composites Reinforced with Zirconia-Silica Ceramic Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Guangqing; Fan, Yuwei; Zhang, Jian-Feng; Hagan, Joseph; Xu, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Objective To fabricate and characterize dental composites reinforced with various amounts of zirconia-silica (ZS) or zirconia-yttria-silica (ZYS) ceramic nanofibers. Methods Control composites (70 wt% glass particle filler, no nanofibers) and experimental composites (2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 wt% ZS or ZYS nanofibers replacing glass particle filler) were prepared by blending 29 wt% dental resin monomers, 70 wt% filler, and 1.0 wt% initiator, and polymerized by either heat or dental curing light. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), energy at break (EAB), and fracture toughness (FT) were tested after the specimens were stored in 37 °C deionized water for 24 h, 3 months, or 6 months. Degree of conversion (DC) of monomers in composites was measured using Fourier transformed near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy. Fractured surfaces were observed by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The data were analyzed using ANOVA with Tukey’s Honestly Significant Differences test used for post hoc analysis. Results Reinforcement of dental composites with ZS or ZYS nanofibers (2.5% or 5.0%) can significantly increase the FS, FM and EAB of dental composites over the control. Further increase the content of ZS nanofiber (7.5%), however, decreases these properties (although they are still higher than those of the control). Addition of nanofibers did not decrease the long-term mechanical properties of these composites. All ZS reinforced composites (containing 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% ZS nanofibers) exhibit significantly higher fracture toughness than the control. The DC of the composites decreases with ZS nanofiber content. Significance Incorporation of ceramic nanofibers in dental composites can significantly improve their mechanical properties and fracture toughness and thus may extend their service life. PMID:22153326

  5. Novel dental composites reinforced with zirconia-silica ceramic nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guangqing; Fan, Yuwei; Zhang, Jian-Feng; Hagan, Joseph L; Xu, Xiaoming

    2012-04-01

    To fabricate and characterize dental composites reinforced with various amounts of zirconia-silica (ZS) or zirconia-yttria-silica (ZYS) ceramic nanofibers. Control composites (70 wt% glass particle filler, no nanofibers) and experimental composites (2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 wt% ZS or ZYS nanofibers replacing glass particle filler) were prepared by blending 29 wt% dental resin monomers, 70 wt% filler, and 1.0 wt% initiator, and polymerized by either heat or dental curing light. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), energy at break (EAB), and fracture toughness (FT) were tested after the specimens were stored in 37°C deionized water for 24h, 3 months, or 6 months. Degree of conversion (DC) of monomers in composites was measured using Fourier transformed near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy. Fractured surfaces were observed by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The data were analyzed using ANOVA with Tukey's Honestly Significant Differences test used for post hoc analysis. Reinforcement of dental composites with ZS or ZYS nanofibers (2.5% or 5.0%) can significantly increase the FS, FM and EAB of dental composites over the control. Further increase the content of ZS nanofiber (7.5%), however, decreases these properties (although they are still higher than those of the control). Addition of nanofibers did not decrease the long-term mechanical properties of these composites. All ZS reinforced composites (containing 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% ZS nanofibers) exhibit significantly higher fracture toughness than the control. The DC of the composites decreases with ZS nanofiber content. Incorporation of ceramic nanofibers in dental composites can significantly improve their mechanical properties and fracture toughness and thus may extend their service life. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fabrication of fibre reinforced nickel aluminide matrix composites by reactive processing

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, M.; Horsfall, I.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the fabrication by reactive processing of short, and continuous, alumina fibre reinforced nickel aluminide matrix composites. The fibre is introduced into the aluminide system to increase toughness and high temperature strength. The short fibre reinforced nickel aluminide is formed by squeeze casting a porous preform containing nickel powder and SAFFIL fibre with an aluminium or aluminium alloy melt. The continuous fibre reinforced nickel aluminide is formed by squeeze casting a jig containing nickel coated ALMAX fibre. The short fibre reinforced composite (containing 10% and 20% volume fibre) reacted during infiltration with an aluminium melt to form a single phase intermetallic. Using an aluminium-copper melt the intermetallic formation was inhibited and a multi-phase composite was obtained. A preliminary study into reactive processing of this system by utilising a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) cycle is presented. HIP was required to prevent the formation of porosity due to an imbalance in the diffusive mobility of the various components. It was found that HIP was only effective on canned samples, the preferred encapsulation material being glass. The continuous fibre reinforced composite did not react to an intermetallic phase when infiltrated with an aluminum melt. Use of an aluminum-copper melt resulted in partial nickel-melt reaction producing various nickel-aluminum (-copper) phases. HIP was then used to form a two phase intermetallic matrix with no evidence of fibre damage.

  7. Wear Behaviour of Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Nanocrystalline AA 4032 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil Saravanari, M. S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.; Sivaprasad, K.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper emphasizes the friction and wear properties of Carbon Nanotubes reinforced AA 4032 nanocomposites prepared by powder metallurgy technique. CNTs are multi-wall in nature and prepared by electric arc discharge method. Multi-walled CNTs are blended with AA 4032 elemental powders and compaction followed by sintering to get bulk nanocomposites. The strength of the composites has been evaluated by microhardness and the surface contact between the nanocomposites and EN 32 steel has been evaluated by Pin on disk tester. The results are proven that reinforcement of CNTs play a major role in the enhancement of hardness and wear.

  8. Applications of azidosilane coupling agents in reinforced thermoplastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kolpak, F.J.

    1986-10-01

    Treatment of mica, glass microspheres, milled glass fibers and commercial chopped fiberglass with azidosilane coupling agents is shown to significantly improve the mechanical properties of these fillers/reinforcements in polyolefins relative to untreated controls. The unique chemistry of the azido groups allows for coupling with a wide variety of thermoplastic polymers. Surface characterization of native and modified fillers has proven to be a valuable adjunct to composite testing in optimizing the performance of acidosilanes coupling agents in filled or reinforced thermoplastics. 9 references, 9 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Simulation of Damage Evolution in Discontinously Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.; Hu, Shenyang Y.

    2009-08-01

    First, a phase-field model for elastic-plastic solids obeying von Mises yield criterion will be described. Then, this phase-field model will be extended to simulate the damage evolution due to nucleation and growth of voids in ductile matrix for discontinuously reinforced composites. The role of reinforcement morphology and the modulus effects leading to final failure all included in the simulations in an effort to make a parametric investigation. The advantages and disadvantages of such phase-field modeling approach in comparison to well established other continuum methods will be elucidated.

  10. Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-15

    known to have desirable properties for use as a structural material. Metal atoms , tetra- atomic metal clusters and metal surfaces comprising Al, Ti...nitride nanotubes change with the presence of atomic oxygen were also carried out. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS Nanotubes, Boron Nitride, Composites, Theoretical...copper alloys are known to have desirable properties for use as a structural material. Metal atoms , tetra- atomic metal clusters and metal surfaces

  11. MODELING FUNCTIONALLY GRADED INTERPHASE REGIONS IN CARBON NANOTUBE REINFORCED COMPOSITES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, G. D.; Lagoudas, D. C.; Frankland, S. J. V.; Gates, T. S.

    2006-01-01

    A combination of micromechanics methods and molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain the effective properties of the carbon nanotube reinforced composites with functionally graded interphase regions. The multilayer composite cylinders method accounts for the effects of non-perfect load transfer in carbon nanotube reinforced polymer matrix composites using a piecewise functionally graded interphase. The functional form of the properties in the interphase region, as well as the interphase thickness, is derived from molecular dynamics simulations of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix. Results indicate that the functional form of the interphase can have a significant effect on all the effective elastic constants except for the effective axial modulus for which no noticeable effects are evident.

  12. Fibre reinforced composite dental bridge. Part I: Experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Swain, M V; Li, Q; Ironside, J; Steven, G P

    2004-09-01

    This experimental investigation aims at revealing the mechanical behaviour and failure pattern of direct fibre-reinforced resin-bonded dental bridge with various designs. To evaluate the overall effects of some newly developed dental materials, in the experiment, genuine composite dental bridge specimens are prepared and tested. The ultimate load, stiffness and mode at the failure of the bridges are measured and compared with the design variations. A good agreement between test and some clinical observations is demonstrated. It is verified that the weakest region appears across the pontic-abutment interface in the composite bridges. This study suggests that the composite bridges reinforced by fibres and supported by adjacent teeth could be of a higher structural strength and stiffness; therefore would provide better clinical performances.

  13. Effect of thermal shock on fiber-reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, J. L.; Schnittgrund, G. D.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of the thermal shock behavior of tungsten fiber-reinforced superalloy (FRS) composites with respect to the turbine blade requirements of rocket engine turbopumps. Each composite was reinforced unidirectionally with 40-volume-pct continuous tungsten fibers. The start-up conditions of the first-stage turbine blades of the high-pressure fuel turbopump in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) were used to investigate the thermal shock behavior of these materials. The FRS composites showed excellent thermal shock resistance, two to nine times better than the turbine blade material used in the SSME. Thermal shock cycling produced microcracks on the surfaces of the irradiated area that were less than 0.13 mm long and 0.005 mm deep. Neither fiber/matrix debonding nor microvoiding was observed.

  14. Mechanical Behaviour of Alumina Silicon Carbide Reinforced Particulate Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghu Ram, K. S.; Sweanney Bandi, Sharon Rose; Sivarama Krishna, Ch.

    2017-08-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the effect of hardness and impact strength of Aluminum Al2O3SiC particulate reinforced Composites. These AMCs with multiple reinforcement (hybrid MMCs) are finding increased applications in aerospace, automobile, space, underwater and transportation applications. An effort is made to enhance the Hardness, flexural strength and Impact properties of AMCs by reinforcing Aluminum matrix with Varying Proportion of small particles of Al2O3SiC by stir casting method. Aluminum alloy matrix varying proportions of Al2O3SiC particulates were fabricated. The microstructure, hardness and impact strength properties of the fabricated AMCs were analyzed. The optical microstructure study revealed the homogeneous dispersion of Al2O3SiC particles in the matrix. Based on the results obtained from the Hardness and Impact of the metal matrix composites it is observed that, the hardness and impact strength increases with increase in the amount of reinforcement content.

  15. Carbon aerogel composites prepared by ambient drying and using oxidized polyacrylonitrile fibers as reinforcements.

    PubMed

    Feng, Junzong; Zhang, Changrui; Feng, Jian; Jiang, Yonggang; Zhao, Nan

    2011-12-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon aerogel composites (C/CAs) for thermal insulators were prepared by copyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels reinforced by oxidized polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber felts. The RF aerogel composites were obtained by impregnating PAN fiber felts with RF sols, then aging, ethanol exchanging, and drying at ambient pressure. Upon carbonization, the PAN fibers shrink with the RF aerogels, thus reducing the difference of shrinkage rates between the fiber reinforcements and the aerogel matrices, and resulting in C/CAs without any obvious cracks. The three point bend strength of the C/CAs is 7.1 ± 1.7 MPa, and the thermal conductivity is 0.328 W m(-1) K(-1) at 300 °C in air. These composites can be used as high-temperature thermal insulators (in inert atmospheres or vacuum) or supports for phase change materials in thermal protection system. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Development of Cu Reinforced SiC Particulate Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harshpreet; Kumar, Lailesh; Nasimul Alam, Syed

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the results of Cu-SiCp composites developed by powder metallurgy route and an attempt has been made to make a comparison between the composites developed by using unmilled Cu powder and milled Cu powder. SiC particles as reinforcement was blended with unmilled and as-milled Cu powderwith reinforcement contents of 10, 20, 30, 40 vol. % by powder metallurgy route. The mechanical properties of pure Cu and the composites developed were studied after sintering at 900°C for 1 h. Density of the sintered composites were found out based on the Archimedes' principle. X-ray diffraction of all the composites was done in order to determine the various phases in the composites. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDS (electron diffraction x-ray spectroscopy) was carried out for the microstructural analysis of the composites. Vickers microhardness tester was used to find out the hardness of the samples. Wear properties of the developed composites were also studied.

  17. Seam bonding of graphite reinforced composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D.; Fox, Robert L.; Tyeryar, James R.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the design features and operating characteristics of a method for the joining of composite parts, at a rate of 2 to 6 inches/min, in which the heating process responsible for adhesive flow at 800 F is focused upon the overlapped seam. The heating element is a self-tuning solid state power oscillator whose ferrite's toroid geometry generates a uniform, concentrated magnetic flux in the component to be bonded. Specimens cut from graphite/epoxy panels bonded with epoxy-phenolic adhesive by this process have exhibited average lap-shear strengths of the order of 3400 lbs/sq in.

  18. Ductility of nonmetallic hybrid fiber composite reinforcement for concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepfers, R.; Tamužs, V.; Apinis, R.; Vilks, U.; Modniks, J.

    1996-03-01

    Reinforcing units, FRP, of unidirectional fiber composites for concrete have elastic behavior up to tensile failure. For safety reasons an elongation of 3% at maximum load is usually required for the reinforcement. Ductile behavior with the necessary elongation and stress hardening could be obtained with braided fiber strands around a core of foam plastic, thin glass fiber cylindrical shell, or unidirectional carbon fibers. Braids around a porous core reveal the ductility when epoxy resin breaks up and collapse of core enables the braids to rotate. The same seems to happen at that cross section, where carbon fiber core breaks in tension. The best result is obtained using a cylindrical glass fiber reinforced core shell surrounded with aramid fiber braid.

  19. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal; Argade, Shyam

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a critical review of the processing techniques for fabricating continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs for possible applications at elevated temperatures. Some of the issues affecting durability of the composite materials such as fiber coatings and cracking of the matrix because of shrinkage in PIP-process are also examined. An assessment of the potential inexpensive processes is also provided. Finally three potential routes of manufacturing C/SiC composites using a technology that NC A&T developed for carbon/carbon composites are outlined. Challenges that will be encountered are also listed.

  20. Impact behavior of extrinsically toughened discontinuously reinforced aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Irfan, M.A.; Liou, N.; Prakash, V.

    1996-12-31

    Discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) composites with enhanced fracture toughness have recently been developed at Alcoa. The approach consists of producing a composite microstructure in which discrete ductile phases have been incorporated into the DRA through traditional powder processing routes. In the present paper, the high strain rate behavior of these toughened composites is investigated by obtaining (1) the dynamic flow characteristics at various levels of elevated strain rates using a split Hopkinson compression bar, and (2) energy absorption during dynamic crack initiation and crack propagation using three-point bend specimens loaded on a modified Hopkinson bar configuration.

  1. Thermal shock of fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Herbell, Thomas P.; Generazio, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    Monolithic silicon carbide and silicon nitride and a Nicalon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composite were subjected to severe thermal shock conditions via impingement of a hydrogen-oxygen flame. Surface heating rates of 1000 C/sec to 2500 C/sec were generated. The performance of the monolithic reference materials are compared and contrasted to the significantly greater thermal shock resistance of the composite. Ultrasonic and radiographic NDE techniques were used to evaluate the integrity of the composite subsequent to thermal shock. Tensile tests were performed to determine the residual tensile strength and modulus. Physical property changes are discussed as a function of number and severity of thermal shock cycles.

  2. Analysis/design of strip reinforced random composites (strip hybrids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Advanced analysis methods and composite mechanics were applied to a strip-reinforced random composite square panel with fixed ends to illustrate the use of these methods for the a priori assessment of the composite panel when subjected to complex loading conditions. The panel was assumed to be of E-glass random composite. The strips were assumed to be of three advanced unidirectional composites to cover a range of low, intermediate, and high modulus stiffness. The panels were assumed to be subjected to complex loadings to assess their adequacy as load-carrying members in auto body, aircraft engine nacelle and windmill blade applications. The results show that strip hybrid panels can be several times more structurally efficient than the random composite base materials. Some of the results are presented in graphical form and procedures are described for use of these graphs as guides for preliminary design of strip hybrids.

  3. Analysis/design of strip reinforced random composites /strip hybrids/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Results are described which were obtained by applying advanced analysis methods and composite mechanics to a strip-reinforced random composite square panel with fixed ends. This was done in order to illustrate the use of these methods for the apriori assessment of the composite panel when subjected to complex loading conditions. The panel was assumed to be of E-Glass/Random Composite. The strips were assumed to be of three advanced unidirectional composites to cover a range of low, intermediate, and high modulus stiffness. The panels were assumed to be subjected to complex loadings to assess their adequacy as load-carrying members in auto body, aircraft engine nacelle, and windmill blade applications. The results show that strip hybrid panels can be several times more structurally efficient than the random composite base materials. Some of the results are presented in graphical form and procedures are described for use of these graphs as guides for preliminary design of strip hybrids.

  4. Metal-bonded, carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    DOEpatents

    Sastri, Suri A.; Pemsler, J. Paul; Cooke, Richard A.; Litchfield, John K.; Smith, Mark B.

    1996-01-01

    Metal bonded carbon fiber-reinforced composites are disclosed in which the metal and the composite are strongly bound by (1) providing a matrix-depleted zone in the composite of sufficient depth to provide a binding site for the metal to be bonded and then (2) infiltrating the metal into the matrix-free zone to fill a substantial portion of the zone and also provide a surface layer of metal, thereby forming a strong bond between the composite and the metal. The invention also includes the metal-bound composite itself, as well as the provision of a coating over the metal for high-temperature performance or for joining to other such composites or to other substrates.

  5. Metal-bonded, carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    DOEpatents

    Sastri, S.A.; Pemsler, J.P.; Cooke, R.A.; Litchfield, J.K.; Smith, M.B.

    1996-03-05

    Metal bonded carbon fiber-reinforced composites are disclosed in which the metal and the composite are strongly bound by (1) providing a matrix-depleted zone in the composite of sufficient depth to provide a binding site for the metal to be bonded and then (2) infiltrating the metal into the matrix-free zone to fill a substantial portion of the zone and also provide a surface layer of metal, thereby forming a strong bond between the composite and the metal. The invention also includes the metal-bound composite itself, as well as the provision of a coating over the metal for high-temperature performance or for joining to other such composites or to other substrates. 2 figs.

  6. Dynamic mechanical analysis of fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, K. E.

    1979-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical and thermal properties were determined for unidirectional epoxy/glass composites at various fiber orientation angles. Resonant frequency and relative logarithmic decrement were measured as functions of temperature. In low angle and longitudinal specimens a transition was observed above the resin glass transition temperature which was manifested mechanically as an additional damping peak and thermally as a change in the coefficient of thermal expansion. The new transition was attributed to a heterogeneous resin matrix induced by the fiber. The temperature span of the glass-rubber relaxation was found to broaden with decreasing orientation angle, reflecting the growth of fiber contribution and exhibiting behavior similar to that of Young's modulus. The change in resonant frequency through the glass transition was greatest for samples of intermediate fiber angle, demonstrating behavior similar to that of the longitudinal shear modulus.

  7. Electrical behavior of carbon whisker reinforced elastomer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chellappa, V.; Chiou, Z.W.; Jang, B.Z.

    1994-12-31

    The electrical and mechanical properties of carbon whisker reinforced thermoplastic elastomer composites were investigated. The reinforcement whisker was made by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) process and the polymer matrix was from a thermoplastic elastomer (TPE, a butadiene-styrene block co-polymer). The electrical resistivity ({rho}) of the CCVD carbon whisker-elastomer composites can be varied by uniaxial deformation (10{sup 1}-10{sup 8}{Omega}-cm) and by changing the temperature (10{sup 1}-10{sup 5}{Omega}-cm). The temperature-resistivity studies indicate, that the resistivity of these composites depend on the physical property of the elastomer. The {rho} vs 1/T curves exhibit two distinct slopes intersected at the T{sub g} of the elastomer (-50{degrees}C). Further uniaxial deformation studies at room temperature (20{degrees}C) demonstrated that the resistivity increased exponentially with the deformation. The dependence of resistivity (or conductivity) of the composites with respect to deformation and temperature was explained on the basis of electron tunnelling induced conduction. CCVD carbon whiskers can be used as a reinforcement (filler) for the elastomer and can also make them electrically conductive.

  8. Mullite fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleh, T.; Sayir, A.; Lightfoot, A.; Haggerty, J.

    1996-01-01

    Fracture toughnesses of brittle ceramic materials have been improved by introducing reinforcements and carefully tailored interface layers. Silicon carbide and Si3N4 have been emphasized as matrices of structural composites intended for high temperature service because they combine excellent mechanical, chemical, thermal and physical properties. Both matrices have been successfully toughened with SiC fibers, whiskers and particles for ceramic matrix composite (CMC) parts made by sintering, hot pressing or reaction forming processes. These SiC reinforced CMCs have exhibited significantly improved toughnesses at low and intermediate temperature levels, as well as retention of properties at high temperatures for selected exposures; however, they are vulnerable to attack from elevated temperature dry and wet oxidizing atmospheres after the matrix has cracked. Property degradation results from oxidation of interface layers and/or reinforcements. The problem is particularly acute for small diameter (-20 tim) polymer derived SiC fibers used for weavable toes. This research explored opportunities for reinforcing Si3N4 matrices with fibers having improved environmental stability; the findings should also be applicable to SiC matrix CMCs.

  9. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Probst, K.J.; Anderson, T.J.; Starr, T.L.

    1997-12-01

    Silicon carbide-based heat exchanger tubes are of interest to energy production and conversion systems due to their excellent high temperature properties. Fiber-reinforced SiC is of particular importance for these applications since it is substantially tougher than monolithic SiC, and therefore more damage and thermal shock tolerant. This paper reviews a program to develop a scaled-up system for the chemical vapor infiltration of tubular shapes of fiber-reinforced SiC. The efforts include producing a unique furnace design, extensive process and system modeling, and experimental efforts to demonstrate tube fabrication.

  10. Direct-write 3D printing of composite materials with magnetically aligned discontinuous reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua J.; Caunter, Andrew; Dendulk, Amy; Goodrich, Scott; Pembroke, Ryan; Shores, Dan; Erb, Randall M.

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing of fiber reinforced composites represents an enabling technology that may bring toughness and specific strength to complex parts. Recently, direct-write 3D printing has been offered as a promising route to manufacturing fiber reinforced composites that show high specific strength. These approaches primarily rely on the use of shear-alignment during the extrusion process to align fibers along the printing direction. Shear alignment prevents fibers from being oriented along principle stress directions of the final designed part. This paper describes a new direct-write style 3D printing system that incorporates magnetic fields to actively control the orientation of reinforcing fibers during the printing of fiber reinforced composites. Such a manufacturing system is fraught with complications from the high shear dominated alignment experienced by the fibers during extrusion to the slow magnetic alignment dynamics of fibers in viscous media. Here we characterize these issues and suggest effective operating windows in which magnetic alignment is a viable approach to orienting reinforcing particles during direct-write 3D printing.

  11. Indirect aesthetic adhesive restoration with fibre-reinforced composite resin.

    PubMed

    Corona, S A M; Garcia, P P N S; Palma-Dibb, R G; Chimello, D T

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes the restoration of an endodontically treated upper first molar with a fibre-reinforced onlay indirect composite resin restoration. The clinical and radiographic examination confirmed that the tooth had suffered considerable loss of structure. Therefore, an indirect restoration was indicated. First, a core was built with resin-modified glass ionomer cement, followed by onlay preparation, mechanical/chemical gingival retraction and impression with addition-cured silicone. After the laboratory phase, the onlay was tried in, followed by adhesive bonding and occlusal adjustment. It can be concluded that fibre-reinforced aesthetic indirect composite resin restoration represented, in the present clinical case, an aesthetic and conservative treatment option. However, the use of fibres should be more extensively studied to verify the real improvement in physical and mechanical properties.

  12. Interface Characterization in Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naya, F.; Molina-Aldareguía, J. M.; Lopes, C. S.; González, C.; LLorca, J.

    2017-01-01

    A novel methodology is presented and applied to measure the shear interface strength of fiber-reinforced polymers. The strategy is based in fiber push-in tests carried out on the central fiber of highly-packed fiber clusters with hexagonal symmetry, and it is supported by a detailed finite element analysis of the push-in test to account for the influence of hygrothermal residual stresses, fiber constraint and fiber anisotropy on the interface strength. Examples of application are presented to determine the shear interface strength in carbon and glass fiber composites reinforced with either thermoset or thermoplastic matrices. In addition, the influence of the environment (either dry or wet conditions) on the interface strength in C/epoxy composites is demonstrated.

  13. Computational simulation of reinforced concrete structures enhanced with fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gotsis, P.K.; Chamis, C.C.

    1998-12-31

    Laminate analogy is applied in the structural sections by discretizing them in layers through the thickness. Different layers are used for the concrete, for the reinforcing steel in the concrete, and for the fiber composite laminates. The reinforced concrete structure is synthesized with finite elements where the element stiffness is obtained by using laminate theory to the discretized structural section mentioned earlier. The load carrying capacity of the structure is determined by progressive structural fracture. Results show that with relatively small laminate thickness, equal to 5% of the total thickness, the select arch structure enhanced with fiber composites, improved their strength in fracture, the buckling load and the natural frequencies due to the free vibration.

  14. Thermal conductivity of boron nitride reinforced polyethylene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Wenying Qi Shuhua; An Qunli; Zhao Hongzhen; Liu Nailiang

    2007-10-02

    The thermal conductivity of boron nitride (BN) particulates reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites was investigated under a special dispersion state of BN particles in HDPE, i.e., BN particles surrounding HDPE particles. The effects of BN content, particle size of HDPE and temperature on the thermal conductivity of the composites were discussed. The results indicate that the special dispersion of BN in matrix provides the composites with high thermal conductivity; moreover, the thermal conductivity of composites is higher for the larger size HDPE than for the smaller size one. The thermal conductivity increases with increasing filler content, and significantly deviates the predictions from the theoretic models. It is found also that the combined use of BN particles and alumina short fiber obtains higher thermal conductivity of composites compared to the BN particles used alone.

  15. Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites made by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, A.J.; Lowden, R.A.; Stinton, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    A process was developed for the fabrication of ceramic-fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites by chemical vapor infiltration. The ceramic composites were prepared by making fibrous preforms from multiple layers of SiC cloth and forming the silicon-carbide matrix for each component specimen by infiltrating the fibrous preform by a chemical vapor deposition process. A major goal of the work was achieved when infiltration was accomplished in hours instead of weeks by combining the thermal-gradient and forced-gas-flow techniques. Composites that possessed moderate flexural strength and high strain to failure were produced. In addition, the strength of the composites decreased gradually after the maximum strength was obtained, demonstrating that the composites had the desired high toughness and avoided the typical brittle behavior of monolithic ceramics.

  16. Elastoplastic transverse properties of a unidirectional fibre reinforced composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, W.-C.

    1973-01-01

    An approximate theoretical study is made to predict the overall transverse elastoplastic properties of a unidirectional fibre reinforced composite. Based on the simplest deformation theory of plasticity, the overall transverse polyaxial elastoplastic constitutive equations for an incompressible composite are obtained. A simple formula is suggested to evaluate the average stress in the fibres. Furthermore, with the prediction of the overall transverse elastic moduli of a compressible composite, the overall transverse uniaxial stress-strain curve for a compressible composite in the entire elastic-plastic range is obtained. A detailed example is given for a Boron-Aluminum composite. Comparison is made with the experimental and theoretical work done by General Dynamics and Adams respectively.

  17. Glass fibres reinforced polyester composites degradation monitoring by surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, Catalin; Patachia, Silvia; Papancea, Adina; Baltes, Liana; Tierean, Mircea

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents a novel method for quantification of the modifications that occur on the surface of different types of gel-coated glass fibre-reinforced polyester composites under artificial UV-ageing at 254 nm. The method implies the adsorption of an ionic dye, namely methylene blue, on the UV-aged composite, and computing the CIELab colour space parameters from the photographic image of the coloured composite's surface. The method significantly enhances the colour differences between the irradiated composites and the reference, in contrast with the non-coloured ones. The colour modifications that occur represent a good indicative of the surface degradation, alteration of surface hydrophily and roughness of the composite and are in good correlation with the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy results. The proposed method is easier, faster and cheaper than the traditional ones.

  18. Dynamic Mechanical Behavior of Nickel-Aluminum Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M.; Hanagud, S.; Thadhani, N. N.

    2006-07-01

    Epoxy-based composites reinforced with micron-sized Ni and micron or nano-sized Al powders were fabricated by casting/curing. The mechanical behavior of the composites was evaluated using elastic and plastic property measurements performed on rod-shaped samples. Dynamic reverse Taylor anvil-on-rod impact tests gave qualitative and quantitative information about the transient deformation and failure response of the composites. The composite containing 20wt% epoxy and nano-sized Al powder showed the most superior mechanical properties in terms of elastic modulus, static compressive strength, and dynamic incremental areal and axial strains, as compared to the other cast materials. The results illustrate that nano-sized Al particles alter the deformation response of the composite and provide significant enhancement to the strength by dispersing in the epoxy and generating a nano Al-containing epoxy matrix with embedded Ni particles.

  19. Study of Composite Joint Strength with Carbon Nanotube Reinforcement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    carbon fiber composite specimens which involves minimal laboratory equipment. After proving the theory that fracture toughness is affected by CNT...test equipment. B. PHASE II Phase II was completed to test the theory that fracture toughness is affected by CNT reinforcement. This phase consisted...critical energy release rate, G, was calculated. C. PHASE III After proving the theory , samples were constructed via the hand lay-up method and

  20. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-06-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  1. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Matlin, W.M.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-08-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  2. Antiplane shear wave propagation in fiber-reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Yeon

    2003-05-01

    A self-consistent method for analyzing antiplane shear wave propagation in two-dimensional inhomogeneous media is presented. For applications in the high-frequency range, the self-consistent condition for the effective medium is solved being supplemented with the theory of quasidynamic effective density. Comparisons with other theoretical calculations and experimental data for fiber-reinforced composites demonstrate the merits of using the present method.

  3. Elastic/viscoplastic behavior of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C.; Sun, C. T.; Gates, T. S.

    1990-01-01

    An elastic/viscoplastic constitutive model was used to characterize the nonlinear and rate dependent behavior of a continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composite. This model was incorporated into a finite element program for the analysis of laminated plates and shells. Details on the finite element formulation with the proposed constitutive model were presented. The numerical results were compared with experimental data for uniaxial tension and three-point bending tests of (+ or - 45 deg)3s APC-2 laminates.

  4. Rate dependent constitutive models for fiber reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    1990-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to assess the state-of-the-art in rate dependent constitutive models for continuous fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials. Several recent models which include formulations for describing plasticity, viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity, and rate-dependent phenomenon such as creep and stress relaxation are outlined and compared. When appropriate, these comparisons include brief descriptions of the mathematical formulations, the test procedures required for generating material constants, and details of available data comparing test results to analytical predictions.

  5. Characterization of Thick Glass Reinforced Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    24 ounces per square yard. The matrices were different polyester resin systems from American Cyanamid and Owens Corning . Specimen thicknesses ranged...fab- ricated similar size plates using the American Cyanamid resin. The Owens Corning plates con- tained 53% volume fraction fiber while the American...thicknesses for the Owens Corning and four for the American Cyanamid. Specimens were loaded in three point bending at a displacement rate that was changed

  6. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, R. D.; Fornes, R. E.; Memory, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of high energy radiation on mechanical properties and on the molecular and structural properties of graphite fiber reinforced composites are assessed so that durability in space applications can be predicted. A listing of composite systems irradiated along with the maximum radiation dose applied and type of mechanical tests performed is shown. These samples were exposed to 1/2 MeV electrons.

  7. Interfacial stresses in shape memory alloy-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, S. R.; Prajapati, Maulik; Rakesh, S.; Roy Mahapatra, D.

    2014-03-01

    Debonding of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) wires in SMA reinforced polymer matrix composites is a complex phenomenon compared to other fabric fiber debonding in similar matrix composites. This paper focuses on experimental study and analytical correlation of stress required for debonding of thermal SMA actuator wire reinforced composites. Fiber pull-out tests are carried out on thermal SMA actuator at parent state to understand the effect of stress induced detwinned martensites. An ASTM standard is followed as benchmark method for fiber pull-out test. Debonding stress is derived with the help of non-local shear-lag theory applied to elasto-plastic interface. Furthermore, experimental investigations are carried out to study the effect of Laser shot peening on SMA surface to improve the interfacial strength. Variation in debonding stress due to length of SMA wire reinforced in epoxy are investigated for non-peened and peened SMA wires. Experimental results of interfacial strength variation due to various L/d ratio for non-peened and peened SMA actuator wires in epoxy matrix are discussed.

  8. Modeling of short fiber reinforced injection moulded composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, A.; Aswini, N.; Dandekar, C. R.; Makhe, S.

    2012-09-01

    A micromechanics based finite element model (FEM) is developed to facilitate the design of a new production quality fiber reinforced plastic injection molded part. The composite part under study is composed of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix reinforced with 30% by volume fraction of short carbon fibers. The constitutive material models are obtained by using micromechanics based homogenization theories. The analysis is carried out by successfully coupling two commercial codes, Moldflow and ANSYS. Moldflow software is used to predict the fiber orientation by considering the flow kinetics and molding parameters. Material models are inputted into the commercial software ANSYS as per the predicted fiber orientation and the structural analysis is carried out. Thus in the present approach a coupling between two commercial codes namely Moldflow and ANSYS has been established to enable the analysis of the short fiber reinforced injection moulded composite parts. The load-deflection curve is obtained based on three constitutive material model namely an isotropy, transversely isotropy and orthotropy. Average values of the predicted quantities are compared to experimental results, obtaining a good correlation. In this manner, the coupled Moldflow-ANSYS model successfully predicts the load deflection curve of a composite injection molded part.

  9. Nondestructive testing of externally reinforced structures for seismic retrofitting using flax fiber reinforced polymer (FFRP) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Sfarra, S.; Paoletti, D.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.

    2013-05-01

    Natural fibers constitute an interesting alternative to synthetic fibers, e.g. glass and carbon, for the production of composites due to their environmental and economic advantages. The strength of natural fiber composites is on average lower compared to their synthetic counterparts. Nevertheless, natural fibers such as flax, among other bast fibers (jute, kenaf, ramie and hemp), are serious candidates for seismic retrofitting applications given that their mechanical properties are more suitable for dynamic loads. Strengthening of structures is performed by impregnating flax fiber reinforced polymers (FFRP) fabrics with epoxy resin and applying them to the component of interest, increasing in this way the load and deformation capacities of the building, while preserving its stiffness and dynamic properties. The reinforced areas are however prompt to debonding if the fabrics are not mounted properly. Nondestructive testing is therefore required to verify that the fabric is uniformly installed and that there are no air gaps or foreign materials that could instigate debonding. In this work, the use of active infrared thermography was investigated for the assessment of (1) a laboratory specimen reinforced with FFRP and containing several artificial defects; and (2) an actual FFRP retrofitted masonry wall in the Faculty of Engineering of the University of L'Aquila (Italy) that was seriously affected by the 2009 earthquake. Thermographic data was processed by advanced signal processing techniques, and post-processed by computing the watershed lines to locate suspected areas. Results coming from the academic specimen were compared to digital speckle photography and holographic interferometry images.

  10. Multi-scale modeling of fiber and fabric reinforced cement based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soranakom, Chote

    With an increased use of fiber reinforced concrete in structural applications, proper characterization techniques and development of design guides are needed. This dissertation presents a multi-scale modeling approach for fiber and fabric reinforced cement-based composites. A micromechanics-based model of the yarn pullout mechanism due to the failure of the interfacial zone is presented. The effect of mechanical anchorage of transverse yarns is simulated using nonlinear spring elements. The yarn pullout mechanism was used in a meso-scale modeling approach to simulate the yarn bridging force in the crack evolution process. The tensile stress-strain response of a tension specimen that experiences distributed cracking can be simulated using a generalized finite difference approach. The stiffness degradation, tension stiffening, crack spacing evolution, and crack width characteristics of cement composites can be derived using matrix, interface and fiber properties. The theoretical models developed for fabric reinforced cement composites were then extended to cover other types of fiber reinforced concrete such as shotcrete, glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC), steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC), ferrocement and other conventional composite systems. The uniaxial tensile stress-strain response was used to formulate a generalized parametric closed-form solution for predicting flexural behavior of various composites at the macro-structural level. The flexural behaviors of these composites were modeled in a unified manner by means of a moment-curvature relationship based on the uniaxial material models. A variety of theoretical models were developed to address the various mechanisms including: an analytical yarn pullout model; a nonlinear finite difference fabric pullout model; a nonlinear finite difference tension model; closed-form solutions for strain-softening materials; closed-form solutions for strain-softening/hardening materials; and closed-form solutions for

  11. Bond Strength of Composite CFRP Reinforcing Bars in Timber.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Marco; Righetti, Luca; Borri, Antonio

    2015-07-03

    The use of near-surface mounted (NSM) fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars is an interesting method for increasing the shear and flexural strength of existing timber members. This article examines the behaviour of carbon FRP (CFRP) bars in timber under direct pull-out conditions. The objective of this experimental program is to investigate the bond strength between composite bars and timber: bars were epoxied into small notches made into chestnut and fir wood members using a commercially-available epoxy system. Bonded lengths varied from 150 to 300 mm. Failure modes, stress and strain distributions and the bond strength of CFRP bars have been evaluated and discussed. The pull-out capacity in NSM CFRP bars at the onset of debonding increased with bonded length up to a length of 250 mm. While CFRP bar's pull-out was achieved only for specimens with bonded lengths of 150 and 200 mm, bar tensile failure was mainly recorded for bonded lengths of 250 and 300 mm.

  12. Bond Strength of Composite CFRP Reinforcing Bars in Timber

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Marco; Righetti, Luca; Borri, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The use of near-surface mounted (NSM) fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars is an interesting method for increasing the shear and flexural strength of existing timber members. This article examines the behaviour of carbon FRP (CFRP) bars in timber under direct pull-out conditions. The objective of this experimental program is to investigate the bond strength between composite bars and timber: bars were epoxied into small notches made into chestnut and fir wood members using a commercially-available epoxy system. Bonded lengths varied from 150 to 300 mm. Failure modes, stress and strain distributions and the bond strength of CFRP bars have been evaluated and discussed. The pull-out capacity in NSM CFRP bars at the onset of debonding increased with bonded length up to a length of 250 mm. While CFRP bar’s pull-out was achieved only for specimens with bonded lengths of 150 and 200 mm, bar tensile failure was mainly recorded for bonded lengths of 250 and 300 mm. PMID:28793423

  13. Mechanical Properties of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Zirconium Diboride Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuffle, Kevin; Creegan, Peter; Nowell, Steven; Bull, Jeffrey D.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced zirconium diboride matrix composites, SCS-9a-(RBSiCZrB2)matrix, are being developed for leading edge, rocket nozzle and turbine engine applications. Recently, the composite materials have been characterized for tensile properties to 1250 C, the highest temperature tested. The tensile properties are fiber dominated as the matrix is microcracked on fabrication, but favorable failure characteristic are observed. Compression and shear mechanical testing results will be reported if completed. The effects of fiber volume fraction and matrix density on mechanical properties will be discussed. The target applications of the materials will be discussed. Specific testing being performed towards qualification for these applications will be included.

  14. Reinforcement Learning Based Web Service Compositions for Mobile Business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Juan; Chen, Shouming

    In this paper, we propose a new solution to Reactive Web Service Composition, via molding with Reinforcement Learning, and introducing modified (alterable) QoS variables into the model as elements in the Markov Decision Process tuple. Moreover, we give an example of Reactive-WSC-based mobile banking, to demonstrate the intrinsic capability of the solution in question of obtaining the optimized service composition, characterized by (alterable) target QoS variable sets with optimized values. Consequently, we come to the conclusion that the solution has decent potentials in boosting customer experiences and qualities of services in Web Services, and those in applications in the whole electronic commerce and business sector.

  15. High strain-rate model for fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.; Addessio, F.L.

    1995-07-01

    Numerical simulations of dynamic uniaxial strain loading of fiber-reinforced composites are presented that illustrate the wide range of deformation mechanisms that can be captured using a micromechanics-based homogenization technique as the material model in existing continuum mechanics computer programs. Enhancements to the material model incorporate high strain-rate plastic response, elastic nonlinearity, and rate-dependent strength degradation due to material damage, fiber debonding, and delamination. These make the model relevant to designing composite structural components for crash safety, armor, and munitions applications.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Zirconium Diboride Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuffle, Kevin; Creegan, Peter; Nowell, Steven; Bull, Jeffrey D.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced zirconium diboride matrix composites, SCS-9a-(RBSiCZrB2)matrix, are being developed for leading edge, rocket nozzle and turbine engine applications. Recently, the composite materials have been characterized for tensile properties to 1250 C, the highest temperature tested. The tensile properties are fiber dominated as the matrix is microcracked on fabrication, but favorable failure characteristic are observed. Compression and shear mechanical testing results will be reported if completed. The effects of fiber volume fraction and matrix density on mechanical properties will be discussed. The target applications of the materials will be discussed. Specific testing being performed towards qualification for these applications will be included.

  17. Ductility of a continuous fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    The transverse properties of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced by continuous alumina fibers have been investigated. The composite is subjected to both mechanical and cyclic thermal loading. The ductility can vary by an order of magnitude according to the operating conditions. For high mechanical and low thermal loading the ductility is small, for low mechanical and high thermal loading the ductility is an order of magnitude higher. Experiments on a beam in bending confirm that the ductility is strongly dependent on the loading conditions. The observations suggest a means of utilizing the inherent ductility of the matrix.

  18. Buckling and Vibration of Fiber Reinforced Composite Plates With Nanofiber Reinforced Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Anisotropic composite plates were evaluated with nanofiber reinforced matrices (NFRM). The nanofiber reinforcement volumes ratio in the matrix was 0.01. The plate dimensions were 20 by 10 by 1.0 in. (508 by 254 by 25.4 mm). Seven different loading condition cases were evaluated for buckling: three for uniaxial loading, three for pairs of combined loading, and one with three combined loadings. The anisotropy arose from the unidirectional plates having been at 30 from the structural axis. The anisotropy had a full 6 by 6 rigidities matrix which were satisfied and solved by a Galerkin buckling algorithm. For vibration the same conditions were used with the applied cods about a small fraction of the buckling loads. The buckling and vibration results showed that the NFRM plates buckled at about twice those with conventional matrix.

  19. Short fiber-reinforced cementitious composites manufactured by extrusion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Bin

    The use of short fibers in the cement-based composites is more preferable due to the simplicity and economic nature in fabrication. The short fiber-reinforced cementitious composite (SFRCC) manufactured by the extrusion method show a great improvement in both strength and toughness as compared to the fiber-reinforced composites made by traditional casting methods. This improvement can be attributed to the achievement of low porosity and good interfacial bond in SFRCC under high shear and compressive stress during the extrusion process. In the present study, products of cylinders, sheets, pipes and honeycomb panels incorporating various mineral admixtures such as slag, silica fume, and metakaolin have been manufactured by the extrusion technology. Two kinds of short fibers, ductile polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers and stronger but less ductile glass fibers, were used as the reinforcement in the products. After the specimens were extruded, tension, bending and impact tests were performed to study the mechanical properties of these products. The rheology test was performed for each mix to determine its viscoelastic properties. In addition, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) technology were employed to get an insight view of the mechanism. A freezing and thawing experiment (ASTM C666) was also carried to investigate the durability of the specimens. Based on these experimental results, the reinforcing behaviors of these two short fibers were investigated. The enhancing effects of silica fume and metakaolin on the extrudates were compared and discussed. Finally, the optimum amount of silica fume and slag was proposed. Since the key point for a successful extrusion is the properly designed rheology which controls both internal and external flow properties of extrudate, a nonlinear viscoelastic model was applied to investigate the rheological behavior of a movable fresh cementitious composite in an extruder channel. The velocity profile of the

  20. Fracture Analysis of Particulate Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Cornie, James A.

    2013-01-01

    A fracture analysis of highly loaded particulate reinforced composites was performed using laser moire interferometry to measure the displacements within the plastic zone at the tip of an advancing crack. Ten castings were made of five different particulate reinforcement-aluminum alloy combinations. Each casting included net-shape specimens which were used for the evaluation of fracture toughness, tensile properties, and flexure properties resulting in an extensive materials properties data. Measured fracture toughness range from 14.1 MPa for an alumina reinforced 356 aluminum alloy to 23.9 MPa for a silicon carbide reinforced 2214 aluminum alloy. For the combination of these K(sub Ic) values and the measured tensile strengths, the compact tension specimens were too thin to yield true plane strain K(sub Ic) values. All materials exhibited brittle behavior characterized by very small tensile ductility suggesting that successful application of these materials requires that the design stresses be below the elastic limit. Probabilistic design principles similar to those used with ceramics are recommended when using these materials. Such principles would include the use of experimentally determined design allowables. In the absence of thorough testing, a design allowable stress of 60 percent of the measured ultimate tensile stress is recommended.

  1. Objective Surface Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Stuart; Hall, Wayne

    2013-08-01

    The mechanical properties of advanced composites are essential for their structural performance, but the surface finish on exterior composite panels is of critical importance for customer satisfaction. This paper describes the application of wavelet texture analysis (WTA) to the task of automatically classifying the surface finish properties of two fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite construction types (clear resin and gel-coat) into three quality grades. Samples were imaged and wavelet multi-scale decomposition was used to create a visual texture representation of the sample, capturing image features at different scales and orientations. Principal components analysis was used to reduce the dimensionality of the texture feature vector, permitting successful classification of the samples using only the first principal component. This work extends and further validates the feasibility of this approach as the basis for automated non-contact classification of composite surface finish using image analysis.

  2. Three-dimensional printing fiber reinforced hydrogel composites.

    PubMed

    Bakarich, Shannon E; Gorkin, Robert; in het Panhuis, Marc; Spinks, Geoffrey M

    2014-09-24

    An additive manufacturing process that combines digital modeling and 3D printing was used to prepare fiber reinforced hydrogels in a single-step process. The composite materials were fabricated by selectively pattering a combination of alginate/acrylamide gel precursor solution and an epoxy based UV-curable adhesive (Emax 904 Gel-SC) with an extrusion printer. UV irradiation was used to cure the two inks into a single composite material. Spatial control of fiber distribution within the digital models allowed for the fabrication of a series of materials with a spectrum of swelling behavior and mechanical properties with physical characteristics ranging from soft and wet to hard and dry. A comparison with the "rule of mixtures" was used to show that the swollen composite materials adhere to standard composite theory. A prototype meniscus cartilage was prepared to illustrate the potential application in bioengineering.

  3. Development of explosively bonded TZM wire reinforced Columbian sheet composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, H. E.; Carpenter, S. H.

    1972-01-01

    Methods of producing TZM molybdenum wire reinforced C129Y columbium alloy composites by explosive welding were studied. Layers of TZM molybdenum wire were wound on frames with alternate layers of C129Y columbium alloy foil between the wire layers. The frames held both the wire and foils in place for the explosive bonding process. A goal of 33 volume percent molybdenum wire was achieved for some of the composites. Variables included wire diameter, foil thickness, wire separation, standoff distance between foils and types and amounts of explosive. The program was divided into two phases: (1) development of basic welding parameters using 5 x 10-inch composites, and (2) scaleup to 10 x 20-inch composites.

  4. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  5. Mechanical property characterization of polymeric composites reinforced by continuous microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubayar, Ali

    Innumerable experimental works have been conducted to study the effect of polymerization on the potential properties of the composites. Experimental techniques are employed to understand the effects of various fibers, their volume fractions and matrix properties in polymer composites. However, these experiments require fabrication of various composites which are time consuming and cost prohibitive. Advances in computational micromechanics allow us to study the various polymer based composites by using finite element simulations. The mechanical properties of continuous fiber composite strands are directional. In traditional continuous fiber laminated composites, all fibers lie in the same plane. This provides very desirable increases in the in-plane mechanical properties, but little in the transverse mechanical properties. The effect of different fiber/matrix combinations with various orientations is also available. Overall mechanical properties of different micro continuous fiber reinforced composites with orthogonal geometry are still unavailable in the contemporary research field. In this research, the mechanical properties of advanced polymeric composite reinforced by continuous micro fiber will be characterized based on analytical investigation and FE computational modeling. Initially, we have chosen IM7/PEEK, Carbon Fiber/Nylon 6, and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy as three different case study materials for analysis. To obtain the equivalent properties of the micro-hetero structures, a concept of micro-scale representative volume elements (RVEs) is introduced. Five types of micro scale RVEs (3 square and 2 hexagonal) containing a continuous micro fiber in the polymer matrix were designed. Uniaxial tensile, lateral expansion and transverse shear tests on each RVE were designed and conducted by the finite element computer modeling software ANSYS. The formulae based on elasticity theory were derived for extracting the equivalent mechanical properties (Young's moduli, shear

  6. Instrumented impact testing of kenaf fiber reinforced polypropylene composites: effects of temperature and composition

    Treesearch

    Craig Merrill Clemons; Anand R. Sanadi

    2007-01-01

    An instrumented Izod test was used to investigate the effects of fiber content, coupling agent, and temperature on the impact performance of kenaf fiber reinforced polypropylene (PP). Composites containing 0-60% (by weight) kenaf fiber and 0 or 2% maleated polypropylene (MAPP) and PP/wood flour composites were tested at room temperature and between -50 °C and +...

  7. Discontinuous Fiber-reinforced Composites above Critical Length

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Micromechanical physics of critical fiber length, describing a minimum filament distance for resin impregnation and stress transfer, has not yet been applied in dental science. As a test of the hypothesis that 9-micron-diameter, 3-mm-long quartz fibers would increase mechanical strength over particulate-filled composites, photocure-resin-pre-impregnated discontinuous reinforcement was incorporated at 35 wt% into 3M Corporation Z100, Kerr Corporation HerculiteXRV, and an experimental photocure paste with increased radiopaque particulate. Fully articulated four-point bend testing per ASTM C 1161-94 for advanced ceramics and Izod impact testing according to a modified unnotched ASTM D 256-00 specification were then performed. All photocure-fiber-reinforced composites demonstrated significant improvements over particulate-filled compounds (p < 0.001) for flexural strength, modulus, work of fracture, strain at maximum load, and Izod toughness, with one exception for the moduli of Z100 and the experimental reinforced paste. The results indicate that inclusion of pre-impregnated fibers above the critical aspect ratio yields major advancements regarding the mechanical properties tested. PMID:15790745

  8. Discontinuous fiber-reinforced composites above critical length.

    PubMed

    Petersen, R C

    2005-04-01

    Micromechanical physics of critical fiber length, describing a minimum filament distance for resin impregnation and stress transfer, has not yet been applied in dental science. As a test of the hypothesis that 9-micron-diameter, 3-mm-long quartz fibers would increase mechanical strength over particulate-filled composites, photocure-resin-pre-impregnated discontinuous reinforcement was incorporated at 35 wt% into 3M Corporation Z100, Kerr Corporation HerculiteXRV, and an experimental photocure paste with increased radiopaque particulate. Fully articulated four-point bend testing per ASTM C 1161-94 for advanced ceramics and Izod impact testing according to a modified unnotched ASTM D 256-00 specification were then performed. All photocure-fiber-reinforced composites demonstrated significant improvements over particulate-filled compounds (p < 0.001) for flexural strength, modulus, work of fracture, strain at maximum load, and Izod toughness, with one exception for the moduli of Z100 and the experimental reinforced paste. The results indicate that inclusion of pre-impregnated fibers above the critical aspect ratio yields major advancements regarding the mechanical properties tested.

  9. Evaluation of push-out bond strength of two fiber-reinforced composite posts systems using two luting cements in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Ajay; Pujar, Madhu; Patil, Chetan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The concept of using a “post” for the restoration of teeth has been practiced to restore the endodontically treated tooth. Metallic posts have been commonly used, but their delirious effects have led to the development of fiber-reinforced materials that have overcome the limitations of metallic posts. The use of glass and quartz fibers was proposed as an alternative to the dark color of carbon fiber posts as far as esthetics was concerned. “Debonding” is the most common failure in fiber-reinforced composite type of posts. This study was aimed to compare the push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive dual-cured luting agent (RelyX U100) with a total etch resin luting agent (Variolink II) used to cement two different FRC posts. Materials and Methods: Eighty human maxillary anterior single-rooted teeth were decoronated, endodontically treated, post space prepared and divided into four groups (n = 20); Group I: D.T. light post (RTD) and Variolink II (Ivoclare vivadent), Group II: D.T. light post (RTD) and RelyX U100 (3M ESPE), Group III: Glassix post (Nordin) and Variolink II (Ivoclare vivadent) and Group IV: Glassix post (Nordin) and RelyX U100 (3M ESPE). Each root was sectioned to get slices of 2 ± 0.05-mm thickness. Push-out tests were performed using a triaxial loading frame. To express bond strength in megapascals (Mpa), load value recorded in Newton (N) was divided by the area of the bonded interface. After testing the push-out strengths, the samples were analyzed under a stereomicroscope. Results: The mean values of the push-out bond strength show that Group I and Group III had significantly higher values than Group II and Group IV. The most common mode of failure observed was adhesive between dentin and luting material and between post and luting material. Conclusions: The mean push-out bond strengths were higher for Groups I and III where Variolink II resin cement was used for luting the fiber post, which is based on the total etch

  10. Asymptotic Analysis of Fiber-Reinforced Composites of Hexagonal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Andrianov, Igor V.; Pacheco, Pedro M. C. L.; Savi, Marcelo A.; Starushenko, Galina A.

    2016-08-01

    The fiber-reinforced composite materials with periodic cylindrical inclusions of a circular cross-section arranged in a hexagonal array are analyzed. The governing analytical relations of the thermal conductivity problem for such composites are obtained using the asymptotic homogenization method. The lubrication theory is applied for the asymptotic solution of the unit cell problems in the cases of inclusions of large and close to limit diameters, and for inclusions with high conductivity. The lubrication method is further generalized to the cases of finite values of the physical properties of inclusions, as well as for the cases of medium-sized inclusions. The analytical formulas for the effective coefficient of thermal conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composite materials of a hexagonal structure are derived in the cases of small conductivity of inclusions, as well as in the cases of extremely low conductivity of inclusions. The three-phase composite model (TPhM) is applied for solving the unit cell problems in the cases of the inclusions with small diameters, and the asymptotic analysis of the obtained solutions is performed for inclusions of small sizes. The obtained results are analyzed and illustrated graphically, and the limits of their applicability are evaluated. They are compared with the known numerical and asymptotic data in some particular cases, and very good agreement is demonstrated.

  11. Esthetic considerations when splinting with fiber-reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Strassler, Howard E; Serio, Cheryl L

    2007-04-01

    The primary reasons for splinting and stabilizing teeth are to connect them for the purpose of replacing missing teeth or as an adjunct to periodontal therapy. Although the restorations must be planned to withstand the functional requirements of occlusion and mastication, esthetic considerations must also be taken into account. The challenge in creating an esthetic result with fiber-reinforced composite splints is that there is limited space in the connector region to create the three-dimensional effect required to give teeth the appearance of individuality. Careful planning in the diagnosis and treatment of the fiber splint is essential to allow for adequate tooth preparation to give the illusion of nonsplinted teeth. When missing teeth are replaced with a fiber-reinforced, direct, fixed partial denture, the pontic must be created to achieve an esthetically pleasing result.

  12. Dynamic fracture behaviour in fibre-reinforced cementitious composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rena C.; Cifuentes, Héctor; Rivero, Ignacio; Ruiz, Gonzalo; Zhang, Xiaoxin

    2016-08-01

    The object of this work is to simulate the dynamic fracture propagation in fibre-reinforced cementitious composites, in particular, in steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC). Beams loaded in a three-point bend configuration through a drop-weight impact device are considered. A single cohesive crack is assumed to propagate at the middle section; the opening of this crack is governed by a rate-dependent cohesive law; the fibres around the fracture plane are explicitly represented through truss elements. The fibre pull-out behaviour is depicted by an equivalent constitutive law, which is obtained from an analytical load-slip curve. The obtained load-displacement curves and crack propagation velocities are compared with their experimental counterparts. The good agreement with experimental data testifies to the feasibility of the proposed methodology and paves the way to its application in a multi-scale framework.

  13. Scaling effects of defects in fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. S. D.

    1994-01-01

    Material defects may be introduced willingly or unwillingly during material manufacturing and structural component fabrication stages. Their presence in the material plays a dominant role in determining the material's strength and the associate failure mechanisms. In the sense that the size and the number of defects may increase with the volume of the material, the effect of dimensional scaling may manifest itself in the dependence of material strength on volume. Or, alternatively, there may exist a scaling effect of material defects. In fiber-reinforced composites, manufacturing or fabrication defects may come in several forms: matrix voids, matrix microcracks, fiber misalignment, broken fibers, or interface disbonds, just to mention a few. These are interacting and competing defects in the sense that one type of defect may become dominant under one stress condition and another type of defect may become dominant under a different stress condition. This happens because the fiber reinforcement network, together with the distribution of defects, constitutes the prime microstructure of the composite, and there exist continued interactions between the evolving microstructure and the distribution of defects. In the process, the scaling effects of defects are complicated by this interaction. In this presentation, the scaling effects of defects in fiber-reinforced composites will be briefly discussed with the introduction of the concept of effective defects. It is then shown with the aid of some actual experimental and analysis results that the scaling effects are very much present, but they are regulated by the characteristic dimension of the composite microstructure due to the aforementioned microstructure-defect interaction effect.

  14. CP systems for steel reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Soltesz, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are used for cathodic protection (CP) systems in Oregon?s reinforced concrete coastal bridges to prevent chloride-induced corrosion damage. Thermal-sprayed zinc performs well as an ICCP anode but the service life of the zinc anode is directly related to the average current density used to operate the systems. Oregon Department of Transportation (DOT) is investigating ways of monitoring the rebar corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges to identify conditions when protection of the rebar is needed. This approach reflects the fact that external protection may not be needed for all environmental conditions, leading Oregon DOT to examine the use of intermittent, galvanic, and constant voltage cathodic protection systems. Results from these types of systems are reported.

  15. Short Fiber Reinforced Composite: a New Alternative for Direct Onlay Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Mangoush, Enas; Vallittu, Mangoush; Lassila, Lippo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the static load-bearing capacity of direct composite onlay restorations made of novel filling composite resin system which combines short fiber-reinforced composite resin (FC) and conventional particulate filler composite resin (PFC). Methods: Three groups of onlay restorations were fabricated (n = 8/group); Group A: made from conventional particulate filler composite resin (Z250, 3M-ESPE, USA, control), Group B: made from short fiber-reinforced composite resin (EverX posterior, StickTeck Ltd, member of GC group, Turku, Finland) as substructure with 1 mm surface layer of PFC, Group C: made from FC composite resin. The specimens were incrementally polymerized with a hand-light curing unit for 80 s before they were statically loaded with two different sizes (3 & 6 mm) of steel ball until fracture. Failure modes were visually examined. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p = 0.05). Results: ANOVA revealed that onlay restorations made from FC composite resin had statistically significantly higher load-bearing capacity (1733 N) ( p < 0.05) than the control PFC composite resin (1081 N). Onlays made of FC composite resin with a surface layer of PFC gave force values of 1405 N which was statistically higher than control group ( p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference was found in the load-bearing capacity between groups loaded by different ball sizes Significance: Onlay restorations combining base of short fiber reinforced composite resin as substructure and surface layer of conventional composite resin displayed promising performance in high load bearing areas. PMID:24511331

  16. In situ reinforced aluminum composites by reactive infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanabe, Muralidhar R.

    The first part of this work (chapters 3 and 4) describes the development of a new technique to process aluminum (Al) matrix composites. The technique is based on the reactive infiltration of liquid into porous ceramic oxide preforms, resulting in in-situ development of reinforcements, which are micro-composite aluminum oxide (Alsb2Osb3/Al) particles. This work was extended further to investigate the effect of the composition of the preform on the microstructure of the reinforcements. Aluminum matrix composites reinforced with micro-composite, Alsb2Osb3/Al particles were synthesized by reactive infiltration of molten Al into preforms of particulate silica (SiOsb2) or magnesium (Mg) + SiOsb2 mixtures at 1075sp° C. Displacement reactions between silica and magnesium containing oxides lead to in-situ formation of the reinforcements and also aid the infiltration of the melt. In the presence of Mg, it was found that the consistency of infiltration was better and that the transformation of silica to alumina involved intermediate displacement reactions unlike the single step reaction without Mg in the preform. It was observed that the morphology and size scale of the micro-composite Alsb2O/Al particles were affected by the presence of Mg. Without Mg a finer scale Alsb2Osb3/Al microstructure with a tendency to be elongated in the growth direction formed, while a coarser morphology with interconnectivity in both the phases developed from Mg + SiOsb2 preforms. Synthesis of engineered multiphase and functionally gradient Al composites are also presented. The second part (chapter 5) of this research was undertaken to study crack propagation and deformation behavior of the newly developed Al matrix composites. Failure mechanisms were characterized as a function of reinforcement microstructure. It was found in composites (C50), without Mg in the preform, particle cracking was the dominant damage nucleation mechanism. In composites processed from Mg treated preforms (CMg50 and

  17. The composite reinforcement production in digital manufacturing: experimental validation of the heat transfer and cure modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, I.; Krasnovskii, A.; Kutin, A.

    2017-02-01

    The experimental validation of the heat transfer and cure modeling results for 8-mm fiber-reinforced thermosetting composite reinforcement is reported in this article. The temperature and degree of cure of composite reinforcement are predicted using a two-dimensional heat transfer and curing model. The model uses the infrared radiant heating theory and takes into account the heat transfer between the composite rod and the surrounding air. The implicit finite difference method was used to solve the system of governing equations. The results obtained using mathematical model was compared to experimental data: the temperature field inside the composite reinforcement was measured by means of naked thermocouple; Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) was used to measure the degree of cure of the final product. Calculated and measured temperature and degree of cure fields were in good agreement.

  18. Reinforced cementitous composite with in situ shrinking microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eric S.; Lee, Jason K.; Lee, Patrick C.; Huston, Dryver R.; Tan, Ting; Al-Ghamdi, Saleh

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes an innovative fiber reinforcement technology for cementitious composite structures that employs in situ shrinking microfibers to provide supplemental strength-enhancing compressive stresses. Reinforced concrete is one of the most commonly used structural materials in construction industry, primarily due to its cost, durability, ability to be easily fabricated into a variety of shapes on site, and locally abundant raw material availability almost everywhere. Unlike incumbent passive reinforcing microfiber technology, in situ shrinking microfibers that respond to an in situ stimulus such as heat, pH, or moisture variations can induce pre-compression to matrix and create additional resistance from external loads, creating stronger composite structures. In this paper, heat-activated-shrinking (HAS) microfibers made from polyolefin, and pH-activated-shrinking (pHAS) microfibers made from chitosan powder were used to study effects of shrinking microfiber reinforcing in concrete. Shrinking ratios and tensile strengths of both microfibers were measured. Cementitious specimens with active shrinking microfibers, passive non shrinking fibers, as well as control samples were made. Mechanical properties of the samples were compared with compression and three-point bending tests. The optimum microfiber weight percentages for HAS microfibers were 0.5 wt% in compression tests, and 1.0 wt% in three-point bending tests. For pHAS microfibers, the optimum weight percentages were 0.5 wt% in three-point bending tests. Compared to heat passive microfibers specimens, 45% increase in the maximum compression strengths, and 124% increase in the maximum bending strengths were achieved at the optimum weight percentages of HAS microfibers. In addition, with 0.5 wt% of pHAS microfibers, 145% increase in the maximum bending strengths of three-point bending tests resulted compared to pH passive microfibers specimens.

  19. Nanofiber reinforcement of a geopolymer matrix for improved composite materials mechanical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, AKM Samsur

    reduced. By means of SEM, EDS and X-ray diffraction techniques, it was found that the longer and stronger SCW is more capable of reinforcing the microstructurally inhomogeneous geopolymer than the smaller diameter, shorter ANF. After heat treatment at 760 °C, the effectiveness of SCW as reinforcement in both fracture toughness and flexural strength was reduced by ~89% and ~43%, respectively, while, the ANF filled materials performed worse than the neat geopolymer. A strong interaction was suggested between ANF and geopolymer at high temperature by means of chemical reactions and diffusion. SEM & X-ray diffraction results suggested the formation of Al4C3 on the SCW surface, which could reduce the interface strength between SCW and geopolymer. Therefore it is suggested that the interface strength should be as high as required for load transfer and crack bridging. Finally, to investigate the potential synergy of a nano-filled matrix material and the fiber/matrix interface toughening mechanism of a continuous fiber composite, composite specimens were produced and tested. Flexural and shear strengths of Nextel 610 continuous fiber reinforced 2vol% SCW filled geopolymer matrix composites were investigated. Specimens were produced with cleaned Nextel fiber and with carbon-coated fibers to investigate the combinations of nano-filled matrix with continuous reinforcement that is well bonded (cleaned fiber) versus poorly bonded (carbon-coated fiber) to the matrix. The results showed that flexural strength of cleaned and coated fiber composites improved by ~35% and ~21% respectively, while shear strength of the similar composite systems improved by ~39.5% and ~24%. The results verified the effectiveness of SCW in toughening not only the neat geopolymer, but also continuous fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites.

  20. Nano-Fiber Reinforced Enhancements in Composite Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    Nano-fibers are used to reinforce polymer matrices to enhance the matrix dependent properties that are subsequently used in conventional structural composites. A quasi isotropic configuration is used in arranging like nano-fibers through the thickness to ascertain equiaxial enhanced matrix behavior. The nano-fiber volume ratios are used to obtain the enhanced matrix strength properties for 0.01,0.03, and 0.05 nano-fiber volume rates. These enhanced nano-fiber matrices are used with conventional fiber volume ratios of 0.3 and 0.5 to obtain the composite properties. Results show that nano-fiber enhanced matrices of higher than 0.3 nano-fiber volume ratio are degrading the composite properties.

  1. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  2. Bioactive ceramic-reinforced composites for bone augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials have been used to repair the human body for millennia, but it is only since the 1970s that man-made composites have been used. Hydroxyapatite (HA)-reinforced polyethylene (PE) is the first of the ‘second-generation’ biomaterials that have been developed to be bioactive rather than bioinert. The mechanical properties have been characterized using quasi-static, fatigue, creep and fracture toughness testing, and these studies have allowed optimization of the production method. The in vitro and in vivo biological properties have been investigated with a range of filler content and have shown that the presence of sufficient bioactive filler leads to a bioactive composite. Finally, the material has been applied clinically, initially in the orbital floor and later in the middle ear. From this initial combination of HA in PE other bioactive ceramic polymer composites have been developed. PMID:20591846

  3. Formability Analysis of Bamboo Fabric Reinforced Poly (Lactic) Acid Composites.

    PubMed

    M R, Nurul Fazita; Jayaraman, Krishnan; Bhattacharyya, Debes

    2016-07-02

    Poly (lactic) acid (PLA) composites have made their way into various applications that may require thermoforming to produce 3D shapes. Wrinkles are common in many forming processes and identification of the forming parameters to prevent them in the useful part of the mechanical component is a key consideration. Better prediction of such defects helps to significantly reduce the time required for a tooling design process. The purpose of the experiment discussed here is to investigate the effects of different test parameters on the occurrence of deformations during sheet forming of double curvature shapes with bamboo fabric reinforced-PLA composites. The results demonstrated that the domes formed using hot tooling conditions were better in quality than those formed using cold tooling conditions. Wrinkles were more profound in the warp direction of the composite domes compared to the weft direction. Grid Strain Analysis (GSA) identifies the regions of severe deformation and provides useful information regarding the optimisation of processing parameters.

  4. Formability Analysis of Bamboo Fabric Reinforced Poly (Lactic) Acid Composites

    PubMed Central

    M. R., Nurul Fazita; Jayaraman, Krishnan; Bhattacharyya, Debes

    2016-01-01

    Poly (lactic) acid (PLA) composites have made their way into various applications that may require thermoforming to produce 3D shapes. Wrinkles are common in many forming processes and identification of the forming parameters to prevent them in the useful part of the mechanical component is a key consideration. Better prediction of such defects helps to significantly reduce the time required for a tooling design process. The purpose of the experiment discussed here is to investigate the effects of different test parameters on the occurrence of deformations during sheet forming of double curvature shapes with bamboo fabric reinforced-PLA composites. The results demonstrated that the domes formed using hot tooling conditions were better in quality than those formed using cold tooling conditions. Wrinkles were more profound in the warp direction of the composite domes compared to the weft direction. Grid Strain Analysis (GSA) identifies the regions of severe deformation and provides useful information regarding the optimisation of processing parameters. PMID:28773662

  5. Roughness and fibre reinforcement effect onto wettability of composite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénard, Quentin; Fois, Magali; Grisel, Michel

    2007-03-01

    Wettability of glass/epoxy and carbon/epoxy composites materials has been determined via sessile drop technique. Good-Van Oss approach has been used to evaluate surface free energy parameters of smooth and rough surfaces. Results obtained point out the influence of fibre reinforcement on surface free energy of composite materials. In addition, the interest of surface treatment to increase surface roughness has been discussed in terms of wettability. To sum up, results obtained clearly demonstrate the necessity of considering properties of a given composite surface not only as a polymer but a fibre/polymer couple. The drawn conclusions are of great interest as it may have numerous consequences in applications such as adhesion.

  6. Multifunctional composites using reinforced laminae with carbon-nanotube forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veedu, Vinod P.; Cao, Anyuan; Li, Xuesong; Ma, Kougen; Soldano, Caterina; Kar, Swastik; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2006-06-01

    Traditional fibre-reinforced composite materials with excellent in-plane properties fare poorly when out-of-plane through-thickness properties are important. Composite architectures with fibres designed orthogonal to the two-dimensional (2D) layout in traditional composites could alleviate this weakness in the transverse direction, but all of the efforts so far have only produced limited success. Here, we unveil an approach to the 3D composite challenge, without altering the 2D stack design, on the basis of the concept of interlaminar carbon-nanotube forests that would provide enhanced multifunctional properties along the thickness direction. The carbon-nanotube forests allow the fastening of adjacent plies in the 3D composite. We grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the surface of micro-fibre fabric cloth layouts, normal to the fibre lengths, resulting in a 3D effect between plies under loading. These nanotube-coated fabric cloths serve as building blocks for the multilayered 3D composites, with the nanotube forests providing much-needed interlaminar strength and toughness under various loading conditions. For the fabricated 3D composites with nanotube forests, we demonstrate remarkable improvements in the interlaminar fracture toughness, hardness, delamination resistance, in-plane mechanical properties, damping, thermoelastic behaviour, and thermal and electrical conductivities making these structures truly multifunctional.

  7. Ceramic composites reinforced with modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  8. Analytical and experimental investigation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites. Phase 1: Concept development and feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oken, S.; June, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    The analytical and experimental investigations are described in the first phase of a program to establish the feasibility of reinforcing metal aircraft structures with advanced filamentary composites. The interactions resulting from combining the two types of materials into single assemblies as well as their ability to function structurally were studied. The combinations studied were boron-epoxy reinforced aluminum, boron-epoxy reinforced titanium, and boron-polyimide reinforced titanium. The concepts used unidirectional composites as reinforcement in the primary loading direction and metal for carrying the transverse loads as well as its portion of the primary load. The program established that several realistic concepts could be fabricated, that these concepts could perform to a level that would result in significant weight savings, and that there are means for predicting their capability within a reasonable degree of accuracy. This program also encountered problems related to the application of polyimide systems that resulted in their relatively poor and variable performance.

  9. Creep and creep rupture of strongly reinforced metallic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Binienda, W. K.; Miti-Kavuma, M.

    1990-01-01

    A creep and creep damage theory is presented for metallic composites with strong fibers. Application is to reinforced structures in which the fiber orientation may vary throughout but a distinct fiber direction can be identified locally (local transverse isotropy). The creep deformation model follows earlier work and is based on a flow potential function that depends on invariants reflecting stress and the material symmetry. As the focus is on the interaction of creep and damage, primary creep is ignored. The creep rupture model is an extension of continuum damage mechanics and includes an isochronous damage function that depends on invariants specifying the local maximum transverse tension and the maximum longitudinal shear stress. It is posited that at high temperature and low stress, appropriate to engineering practice, these stress components damage the fiber/matrix interface through diffusion controlled void growth, eventually causing creep rupture. Experiments are outlined for characterizing a composite through creep rupture tests under transverse tension and longitudinal shear. Application is made to a thin-walled pressure vessel with reinforcing fibers at an arbitrary helical angle. The results illustrate the usefulness of the model as a means of achieving optimal designs of composite structures where creep and creep rupture are life limiting.

  10. Preparation and properties of cellulose nanocrystals reinforced collagen composite films.

    PubMed

    Li, Weichang; Guo, Rui; Lan, Yong; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Yuanming

    2014-04-01

    Collagen films have been widely used in the field of biomedical engineering. However, the poor mechanical properties of collagen have limited its application. Here, rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) were fabricated and used to reinforce collagen films. A series of collagen/CNCs films were prepared by collagen solution with CNCs suspensions homogeneously dispersed at CNCs: collagen weight ratios of 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10. The morphology of the resulting films was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the enhancement of the thermomechanical properties of the collagen/CNCs composites were demonstrated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and mechanical testing. Among the CNCs contents used, a loading of 7 wt % led to the maximum mechanical properties for the collagen/CNCs composite films. In addition, in vitro cell culture studies revealed that the CNCs have no negative effect on the cell morphology, viability, and proliferation and possess good biocompatibility. We conclude that the incorporation of CNCs is a simple and promising way to reinforce collagen films without impairing biocompatibility. This study demonstrates that the composite films show good potential for use in the field of skin tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Creep of experimental short fiber-reinforced composite resin.

    PubMed

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Kaleem, Muhammad; Shinya, Akikazu; Vallittu, Pekka K; Satterthwaite, Julian D; Watts, David C; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reinforcing effect of short E-glass fiber fillers oriented in different directions on composite resin under static and dynamic loading. Experimental short fiber-reinforced composite resin (FC) was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of resin, and 55 wt% of silane-treated silica fillers. Three groups of specimens (n=5) were tested: FC with isotropic fiber orientation, FC with anisotropic fiber orientation, and particulate-filled composite resin (PFC) as a control. Time-dependent creep and recovery were recorded. ANOVA revealed that after secondary curing in a vacuum oven and after storage in dry condition for 30 days, FC with isotropic fiber orientation (1.73%) exhibited significantly lower static creep value (p<0.05) than PFC (2.54%). For the different curing methods and storage conditions evaluated in this study, FC achieved acceptable static and dynamic creep values when compared to PFC.

  12. Flexural properties untreated and treated kenaf fiber reinforced polypropylene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husin, Muhammad Muslimin; Mustapa, Mohammad Sukri; Wahab, Md Saidin; Arifin, Ahmad Mubarak Tajul; Masirin, Mohd Idrus Mohd; Jais, Farhana Hazwanee

    2017-05-01

    Today natural fiber polymer composites are being extensively used as alternatives in producing furniture to fulfill society demand instead of saving cost and environmentally friendly. The objective of this search is to investigate the untreated fine and rough kenaf fiber (KF) as well as treated KF reinforced with polypropylene (PP) on the flexural strength. Flexural strengths of pure PP, 10%, and 20% of untreated fine and rough KF by weight to PP have been recorded. In addition, flexural strengths of treated KF soaked with 5% and 10% of Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) have also been recorded. KF reinforced PP (PP/KF) untreated and treated composites were melt blended and then injection molded to observe their flexural strengths by measuring their threshold. Three point bending test was apply to determine the flexural stress of the composites. The result show treated fine KF produce better flexural performance at 20% PP/KF. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) is used to observe the morphological surface PP/KF. Overall 5% NaOH with 20% PP/KF (Fine KF) show good interfacial bonding PP/KF and best result with flexural stress value 30.25MPa.

  13. Dynamic Mechanical Behavior of Nickel-Aluminum Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Morgana; Hanagud, Sathyanaraya; Thadhani, Naresh

    2005-07-01

    Epoxy-based composites reinforced with a mixture of micron-sized Ni and micron or nano-sized Al powders were fabricated as bulk materials by cast/curing. The structural/mechanical behavior of these materials was evaluated using elastic and plastic property measurements via static and dynamic compression tests performed on rod shaped samples. Reverse Taylor anvil-on-rod impact tests combined with velocity interferometry gave qualitative and quantitative information about the transient deformation and failure response of the composites. The material containing 20wt% epoxy and nano-sized Al powder showed the most superior mechanical properties in terms of elastic modulus, and static and dynamic compressive strength, and strain before fracture, as compared to the other reinforced cast materials. The results illustrate that nano-sized Al particles provide significant enhancement to strength of epoxy composites by dispersing in the epoxy and generating a nano-Al containing epoxy matrix with embedded Ni particles. Funding for this research was provided by AFOSR/MURI Grant No. F49620-02-1-0382.

  14. Whisker-reinforced ceramic composites for heat engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1988-01-01

    Much work was undertaken to develop techniques of incorporating SiC whiskers into either a Si3N4 or SiC matrix. The result was the fabrication of ceramic composites with ever-increasing fracture toughness and strength. To complement this research effort, the fracture behavior of whisker-reinforced ceramics is studied so as to develop methodologies for the analysis of structural components fabricated from this toughened material. The results, outlined herein, focus on the following areas: the use of micromechanics to predict thermoelastic properties, theoretical aspects of fracture behavior, and reliability analysis.

  15. Fabrication Routes for Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites (CFCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    1998-01-01

    The primary approaches used for fabrication of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) components have been reviewed. The CFCC fabrication issues related to fiber, interface, and matrix have been analyzed. The capabilities, advantages and limitations of the five matrix-infiltration routes have been compared and discussed. Today, the best fabrication route for the CFCC end-user is not clear and compromises need to be made depending on the details of the CFCC application. However, with time, this problem should be reduced as research continues to develop advanced CFCC constituents and fabrication routes.

  16. Fabrication Routes for Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites (CFCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    1998-01-01

    The primary approaches used for fabrication of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) components have been reviewed. The CFCC fabrication issues related to fiber, interface, and matrix have been analyzed. The capabilities. advantages and limitations of the five matrix-infiltration routes have been compared and discussed. Today. the best fabrication route for the CFCC end-user is not clear and compromises need to be made depending on the details of the CFCC application. However, with time, this problem should be reduced as research continues to develop advanced CFCC constituents and fabrication routes.

  17. Tensile Strength of Natural Fiber Reinforced Polyester Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Al Emran; Awang, Muhd. Khairudin; Sa'at, Mohd Hisham

    2007-05-01

    Nowadays, increasing awareness of replacing synthetic fiber such as glass fiber has emerged due to environmental problems and pollutions. Automotive manufacturers also seek new material especially biodegradable material to be non-load bearing application parts. This present work discussed on the effect of silane treatment on coir fiber reinforced composites. From the results of tensile tests, fibers treated with silane have attained maximum material stiffness. However, to achieve maximum ultimate tensile strength and strain at failure performances, untreated fibers work very well through fiber bridging and internal friction between fiber and polymeric matrix. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations have coincided with these results.

  18. Tensile Strength of Polyester Composites Reinforced with Thinner Ramie Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Sergio Neves; de Pontes, Lucas Almeida; Margem, Frederico Muylaert; Ferreira, Jordana; Netto, Pedro Amoy; Margem, Jean Igor

    This study evaluated the tensile properties of polyester composites reinforced with ramie fibers with thinner diameters. Specimens with different ramie fibers percentages (0,10,20 and 30%) in continuous and aligned ramie stalk fibers volume, were tensile tested at room temperature to evaluate the ultimate strength, elastic modulus and total strain. The results indicated that the tensile properties tend to improve with increasing volume fraction of ramie fibers. The role played by the fiber/matrix interaction was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy.

  19. Fiber-reinforced Composite for Chairside Replacement of Anterior Teeth: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Garoushi, S; Vallittu, PK; Lassila, LVJ

    2008-01-01

    A variety of therapeutic modalities, from implant to conventional Maryland prosthesis, can be used for the replacement of a missing anterior tooth. Whenever a minimal tooth reduction is preferred, a fiber reinforced composite (FRC) prosthesis could be a good alternative to conventional prosthetic techniques, chiefly as temporary restoration before making a final decision on the treatment. The purpose of this case report is to describe the clinical procedure of fabricating anterior chairside FRC prosthesis with pre-impregnated unidirectional E-glass fibers and veneered particulate filler composite. Fiber-reinforced composite in combination with adhesive technology appears to be a promising treatment option for replacing missing teeth. However, further and long-term clinical investigation will be required to provide additional information on the survival of directly-bonded anterior fixed prosthesis made with FRC systems. PMID:21499473

  20. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus <15 GPa. Chemical additives can also effectively raise the hardness to as much as 1.34 GPa. Besides>alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with

  1. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1990-01-01

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed.

  2. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1990-05-22

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed. 2 figs.

  3. Development of design data for graphite reinforced epoxy and polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheck, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Processing techniques and design data were characterized for a graphite/epoxy composite system that is useful from 75 K to 450 K, and a graphite/polyimide composite system that is useful from 75 K to 589 K. The Monsanto 710 polyimide resin was selected as the resin to be characterized and used with the graphite fiber reinforcement. Material was purchased using the prepreg specification for the design data generation for both the HT-S/710 and HM-S/710 graphite/polyimide composite system. Lamina and laminate properties were determined at 75 K, 297 K, and 589 K. The test results obtained on the skin-stringer components proved that graphite/polyimide composites can be reliably designed and analyzed much like graphite/epoxy composites. The design data generated in the program includes the standard static mechanical properties, biaxial strain data, creep, fatigue, aging, and thick laminate data.

  4. Shock Interaction Studies on Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. P. J.; Jagadeesh, G.; Jayaram, V.; Reddy, B. Harinath; Madhu, V.; Reddy, C. Jaya Rami

    Glass fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites are being extensively used for structural applications both in civil and defense sectors, owing to their high specific strength, stiffness and good energy absorbing capability. Understanding the dynamic response of these composites on shock loading is very essential for effective design of structures resistant to blast loads. In the present study, E- glass/epoxy composite laminate has been fabricated and evaluated for their mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS). Further, dynamic response of E-glass laminates is presently studied by shock loading. When E-glass composite subjected to peak shock reflected pressure of 7.2 MPa and estimated temperature of about 14000 K for short duration, it underwent surface discolorations and charring of epoxy matrix. Post test analysis of the composite sample was carried out to study the damage analysis using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), changes in thermal properties of composites using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) and Thermo-Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The results of these investigations are discussed in this paper.

  5. Whisker-reinforced dental core buildup composites: effect of filler level on mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Smith, D T; Schumacher, G E; Eichmiller, F C

    2000-12-15

    The strength and toughness of dental core buildup composites in large stress-bearing restorations need to be improved to reduce the incidence of fracture due to stresses from chewing and clenching. The aims of the present study were to develop novel core buildup composites reinforced with ceramic whiskers, to examine the effect of filler level, and to investigate the reinforcement mechanisms. Silica particles were fused onto the whiskers to facilitate silanization and to roughen the whisker surface for improved retention in the matrix. Filler level was varied from 0 to 70%. Flexural strength, compressive strength, and fracture toughness of the composites were measured. A nano-indentation system was used to measure elastic modulus and hardness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the fracture surfaces of specimens. Whisker filler level had significant effects on composite properties. The flexural strength in MPa (mean +/- SD; n = 6) increased from (95+/-15) for the unfilled resin to (193+/- 8) for the composite with 50% filler level, then slightly decreased to (176+/-12) at 70% filler level. The compressive strength increased from (149+/-33) for the unfilled resin to (282+/-48) at 10% filler level, and remained equivalent from 10 to 70% filler level. Both the modulus and hardness increased monotonically with filler level. In conclusion, silica particle-fused ceramic single-crystalline whiskers significantly reinforced dental core buildup composites. The reinforcement mechanisms appeared to be crack deflection and bridging by the whiskers. Whisker filler level had significant effects on the flexural strength, compressive strength, elastic modulus, and hardness of composites.

  6. Fatigue fracture of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures for gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikhamkin, Mikhail; Sazhenkov, Nikolai; Samodurov, Danil

    2017-05-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures are commonly used in different industries. In particular, they are used in the manufacture of gas turbine engines. However, fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures often have a manufacturing flaw. In theory, such flaws due to their rapid propagation reduce the durability of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures. In this paper, bending fatigue tests of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures with manufacturing flaws were conducted. Comparative analysis of fatigue fracture of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich specimens was conducted before and after their bending fatigue tests. The analysis was based on the internal damage X-ray observation of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich specimens.

  7. Mallow Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites in Multilayered Armor for Personal Ballistic Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Lucio Fábio Cassiano; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Lima, Édio Pereira; da Luz, Fernanda Santos

    2017-10-01

    Lighter and less expensive polymer composites reinforced with natural fibers have been investigated as possible components of a multilayered armor system (MAS) for personal protection against high-velocity ammunition. Their ballistic performance was consistently found comparable with that of conventional Kevlar® synthetic aramid fiber. Among the numerous existing natural fibers with the potential for reinforcing polymer composites to replace Kevlar® in MAS, mallow fiber has not been fully investigated. Thus, the objective of this work is to evaluate the ballistic performance of epoxy composites reinforced with 30 vol.% of aligned mallow fibers as a second MAS layer backing a front ceramic plate. The results using high-velocity 7.62 ammunition show a similar indentation to a Kevlar® layer with the same thickness. An impedance matching calculation supports the similar ballistic performance of mallow fiber composite and Kevlar®. Reduced MAS costs associated with the mallow fiber composite are practical advantages over Kevlar®.

  8. Mallow Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites in Multilayered Armor for Personal Ballistic Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Lucio Fábio Cassiano; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Lima, Édio Pereira; da Luz, Fernanda Santos

    2017-08-01

    Lighter and less expensive polymer composites reinforced with natural fibers have been investigated as possible components of a multilayered armor system (MAS) for personal protection against high-velocity ammunition. Their ballistic performance was consistently found comparable with that of conventional Kevlar® synthetic aramid fiber. Among the numerous existing natural fibers with the potential for reinforcing polymer composites to replace Kevlar® in MAS, mallow fiber has not been fully investigated. Thus, the objective of this work is to evaluate the ballistic performance of epoxy composites reinforced with 30 vol.% of aligned mallow fibers as a second MAS layer backing a front ceramic plate. The results using high-velocity 7.62 ammunition show a similar indentation to a Kevlar® layer with the same thickness. An impedance matching calculation supports the similar ballistic performance of mallow fiber composite and Kevlar®. Reduced MAS costs associated with the mallow fiber composite are practical advantages over Kevlar®.

  9. A Deformation Model for Dispersely Failing Elastoplastic Unidirectionally Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagzdins, A.

    2001-09-01

    A calculation model is proposed for unidirectionally reinforced elastoplastic composites capable of gradually accumulating disperse microdamages under loading. The composite is assumed to be a homogeneous transversely isotropic solid. To describe its elastoplastic behavior, an incremental plasticity theory with a nonlinear combined hardening mechanism is invoked. At each point of the solid, its damage is characterized by a centrally symmetric scalar function on a unit sphere. This function is approximated by a fourth-rank tensor, which is used for describing the degradation of the elastic properties of the solid due to the accumulation of disperse microdamages. It is shown how to determine, using the known experimental data, all material constants appearing in the theoretical relations suggested.

  10. Flexural analysis of palm fiber reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Raghav, Dasarath; Santhosh Kiran, R.; Mahesh, Bhargav; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainty in availability of fossil fuels in the future and global warming increased the need for more environment friendly materials. In this work, an attempt is made to fabricate a hybrid polymer matrix composite. The blend is a mixture of General Purpose Resin and Cashew Nut Shell Liquid, a natural resin extracted from cashew plant. Palm fiber, which has high strength, is used as reinforcement material. The fiber is treated with alkali (NaOH) solution to increase its strength and adhesiveness. Parametric study of flexure strength is carried out by varying alkali concentration, duration of alkali treatment and fiber volume. Taguchi L9 Orthogonal array is followed in the design of experiments procedure for simplification. With the help of ANOVA technique, regression equations are obtained which gives the level of influence of each parameter on the flexure strength of the composite.

  11. Fatigue strength of woven kenaf fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, A. E.; Aziz, M. A. Che Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, green composites provide alternative to synthetic fibers for non-bearing and load-bearing applications. According to literature review, lack of information is available on the fatigue performances especially when the woven fiber is used instead of randomly oriented fibers. In order to overcome this problem, this paper investigates the fatigue strength of different fiber orientations and number of layers of woven kenaf fiber reinforced composites. Four types of fiber orientations are used namely 0°, 15°, 30° and 45°. Additionally, two numbers of layers are also considered. It is revealed that the fatigue life has no strong relationship with the fiber orientations. For identical fiber orientations, the fatigue life can be predicted considerably using the normalized stress. However as expected, the fatigue life enhancement occur when the number of layer is increased.

  12. CO2 Laser Cutting of Glass Fiber Reinforce Polymer Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatimah, S.; Ishak, M.; Aqida, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    The lamination, matrix properties, fiber orientation, and relative volume fraction of matrix of polymer structure make this polymer hard to process. The cutting of polymer composite using CO2 laser could involve in producing penetration energy in the process. Identification of the dominant factors that significantly affect the cut quality is important. The objective of this experiment is to evaluate the CO2 spot size of beam cutting for Glass Fiber Reinforce Polymer Composite (GFRP). The focal length selected 9.5mm which gave smallest focus spot size according to the cutting requirements. The effect of the focal length on the cut quality was investigated by monitoring the surface profile and focus spot size. The beam parameter has great effect on both the focused spot size and surface quality.

  13. Fibre reinforced composite dental bridge. Part II: Numerical investigation.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Swain, M V; Li, Q; Ironside, J; Steven, G P

    2004-09-01

    Motivated by the clinical success and limitations on experimental investigation of the fibre-reinforced composite dental bridge, this paper aims at providing a numerical investigation into the bridge structure. The finite element (FE) model adopted here is constructed from computer tomography images of a physical bridge specimen. The stress and strain distributions in the bridge structure especially in the bonding interfaces are analyzed in detail. The peak stresses and their variations with the different bridge designs are evaluated. Due to the lower bond strengths of adhesives and the high stress concentration in the pontic-abutment interface, the likelihood of failure in the interface is predicted by finite element analysis. The validity of the numerical results is established by a good agreement between the FE prediction and the tests in the load-deflection responses, the structural stiffness as well as the failure location of the composite dental bridge.

  14. Ni-Ti SMA-reinforced Al composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, G. A.; Liaw, P. K.; Tiegs, T. N.; Wu, K. H.

    2000-10-01

    A shape-memory alloy, nickel-titanium, has been distributed throughout an aluminum matrix, using powder-metallurgy processing, in the hope of using the shape-memory effect to achieve strengthening and improve the fatigue resistance, as compared to the aluminum matrix. The shape-memory effect was activated by cold rolling the samples at -30°C. Upon reheating to the austenite phase, the Ni-Ti was expected to return to its original shape while embedded in the aluminum matrix. It is thought that this action created residual, internal stresses around each particle, which strengthened the material. The yield and ultimate strengths, and the fatigue lives of the Ni-Ti reinforced aluminum composites, have been improved considerably, as compared to the unreinforced material. The cross-sectional microstructures of the composites, as well as the modes of crack growth, have been examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to identify fatigue and fracture mechanisms.

  15. Synthesis And Characterization Of Reduced Size Ferrite Reinforced Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Borah, Subasit; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2008-04-24

    Small sized Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite particles are synthesized by chemical route. The precursor materials are annealed at 400, 600 and 800 C. The crystallographic structure and phases of the samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The annealed ferrite samples crystallized into cubic spinel structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) micrographs show that the average particle size of the samples are <20 nm. Particulate magneto-polymer composite materials are fabricated by reinforcing low density polyethylene (LDPE) matrix with the ferrite samples. The B-H loop study conducted at 10 kHz on the toroid shaped composite samples shows reduction in magnetic losses with decrease in size of the filler sample. Magnetic losses are detrimental for applications of ferrite at high powers. The reduction in magnetic loss shows a possible application of Co-Ni ferrites at high microwave power levels.

  16. Wear Performance of A356 Matrix Composites Reinforced with Different Types of Reinforcing Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Mostafa; Shojaeefard, Mohammad Hasan; Asadi, Parviz; Khalkhali, Abolfazl

    2017-09-01

    To improve the wear resistance of Al-Si alloys, different types of reinforcing particles such as SiC, TiC, ZrO2, and B4C were used to produce matrix composites by friction stir processing (FSP). First, microstructural properties of different locations of stir zone (SZ) in the FSPed specimens such as advancing side, retreating side, shoulder-affected area, and pin-affected area were investigated. The results demonstrate that Si particles size is not the same in different SZ subdomains. SEM investigation was performed in order to investigate the particles distribution in different areas of the SZ as well as bonding quality between particles and metal matrix. Hardness and wear tests were carried out to determine mechanical and wear properties of the composites. The pin-on-disk wear tests were performed at room temperature, with the normal applied loads of 5, 10, and 20 N and sliding speed of 1 and 2 m/s. All fabricated composites show higher resistance in wear than A356 alloy. Wear test results show, by increasing the normal load and sliding velocity, the wear loss weight of all composites increased gradually.

  17. CO2-laser-assisted processing of glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Schares, Richard Ludwig; Stimpfl, Joffrey

    2013-02-01

    To fully exploit the potential of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites (FRTC) and to achieve a broad industrial application, automated manufacturing systems are crucial. Investigations at Fraunhofer IPT have proven that the use of laser system technology in processing FRTC allows to achieve high throughput, quality, flexibility, reproducibility and out-of-autoclave processing simultaneously. As 90% of the FRP in Europe1 are glass fiber-reinforced a high impact can be achieved by introducing laser-assisted processing with all its benefits to glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics (GFRTC). Fraunhofer IPT has developed the diode laser-assisted tape placement (laying and winding) to process carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites (CFRTC) for years. However, this technology cannot be transferred unchanged to process milky transparent GFRTC prepregs (preimpregnated fibers). Due to the short wavelength (approx. 980 nm) and therefore high transmission less than 20% of the diode laser energy is absorbed as heat into non-colored GFRTC prepregs. Hence, the use of a different wave length, e.g. CO2-laser (10.6 μm) with more than 90% laser absorption, is required to allow the full potential of laser-assisted processing of GFRTC. Also the absorption of CO2-laser radiation at the surface compared to volume absorption of diode laser radiation is beneficial for the interlaminar joining of GFRTC. Fraunhofer IPT is currently developing and investigating the CO2-laser-assisted tape placement including new system, beam guiding, process and monitoring technology to enable a resource and energy efficient mass production of GFRP composites, e.g. pipes, tanks, masts. The successful processing of non-colored glass fiber-reinforced Polypropylene (PP) and Polyphenylene Sulfide (PPS) has already been proven.

  18. Composite reinforced metallic cylinder for? high-speed rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev, , Dr.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to design and development of the composite reinforced thin metallic cylinder to increase the peripheral speed significantly and thereby? improve the separation performance in a centrifugal gas separation processes through? proper optimization of the internal parameters. According to Dirac equation (Cohen? (1951)), the maximum separative work for a centrifugal gas separation process increase? with 4th power of the peripheral speed. Therefore, it has been intended to reinforce the? metallic cylinder with composites (carbon fibers: T-700 and T- 1000 grade with suitable? epoxy resin) to increase the stiffness and hoop stress so that the peripheral speed can? be increased significantly, and thereby enhance the separative output. Here, we have developed the mathematical model to investigate the elastic stresses of? a laminated cylinder subjected to mechanical, thermal and thermo-mechanical loading? A detailed analysis is carried out to underline the basic hypothesis of each formulation? Further, we evaluate the steady state creep response of the rotating cylinder and analyze? the stresses and strain rates in the cylinder.

  19. Abrasive waterjet machining of fiber reinforced composites: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalla, D. K.; Dhanasekaran, P. S.; Zhang, B.; Asmatulu, R.

    2012-04-01

    Machining of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites is a major secondary manufacturing activity in the aircraft and automotive industries. Traditional machining of these composites is difficult due to the high abrasiveness nature of their reinforcing constituents. Almost all the traditional machining processes involve in the dissipation of heat into the workpiece which can be resulted in damage to workpiece and rapid wear of the cutting tool. This serious issue has been overcome by water jetting technologies. Abrasive waterjet machining (AWJM) is a nontraditional method and one of the best options for machining FRPs. This paper presents a review of the ongoing research and development in AWJM of FRPs, with a critical review of the physics of the machining process, surface characterization, modeling and the newer application to the basic research. Variable cutting parameters, limitations and safety aspects of AWJM and the noise related issues due to high flow rate of water jet will be addressed. Further challenges and scope of the future development in AWJM are also presented in detail.

  20. Anomaly detection of microstructural defects in continuous fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricker, Stephen; Simmons, J. P.; Przybyla, Craig; Hardie, Russell

    2015-03-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with continuous fiber reinforcements have the potential to enable the next generation of high speed hypersonic vehicles and/or significant improvements in gas turbine engine performance due to their exhibited toughness when subjected to high mechanical loads at extreme temperatures (2200F+). Reinforced fiber composites (RFC) provide increased fracture toughness, crack growth resistance, and strength, though little is known about how stochastic variation and imperfections in the material effect material properties. In this work, tools are developed for quantifying anomalies within the microstructure at several scales. The detection and characterization of anomalous microstructure is a critical step in linking production techniques to properties, as well as in accurate material simulation and property prediction for the integrated computation materials engineering (ICME) of RFC based components. It is desired to find statistical outliers for any number of material characteristics such as fibers, fiber coatings, and pores. Here, fiber orientation, or `velocity', and `velocity' gradient are developed and examined for anomalous behavior. Categorizing anomalous behavior in the CMC is approached by multivariate Gaussian mixture modeling. A Gaussian mixture is employed to estimate the probability density function (PDF) of the features in question, and anomalies are classified by their likelihood of belonging to the statistical normal behavior for that feature.

  1. Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Polylactic Acid (PLA) Composites Containing Metal Reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuentz, Lily; Salem, Anton; Singh, M.; Halbig, M. C.; Salem, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing of polymeric systems using 3D printing has become quite popular recently due to rapid growth and availability of low cost and open source 3D printers. Two widely used 3D printing filaments are based on polylactic acid (PLA) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) systems. PLA is much more environmentally friendly in comparison to ABS since it is made from renewable resources such as corn, sugarcane, and other starches as precursors. Recently, polylactic acid-based metal powder containing composite filaments have emerged which could be utilized for multifunctional applications. The composite filaments have higher density than pure PLA, and the majority of the materials volume is made up of polylactic acid. In order to utilize functionalities of composite filaments, printing behavior and properties of 3-D printed composites need to be characterized and compared with the pure PLA materials. In this study, pure PLA and composite specimens with different metallic reinforcements (Copper, Bronze, Tungsten, Iron, etc) were 3D printed at various layer heights and resulting microstructures and properties were characterized. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) behavior of filaments with different reinforcements were studied. The microscopy results show an increase in porosity between 3-D printed regular PLA and the metal composite PLA samples, which could produce weaker mechanical properties in the metal composite materials. Tensile strength and fracture toughness behavior of specimens as a function of print layer height will be presented.

  2. Flexural properties of glass fiber reinforced composite with multiphase biopolymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Väkiparta, M; Yli-Urpo, A; Vallittu, P K

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate flexural properties of glass fiber-reinforced composites with a multiphase biopolymer matrix. Continuous unidirectional E-glass fibers were preimpregnated with a novel biopolymer of poly(hydroxyproline) amide and ester. The preimpregnated fibers were then further impregnated in a co-monomer system of Bis-GMA-TEGDMA, which formed semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPN) with the preimpregnated polymer. After light initiated polymerization of the monomer system, rectangular shaped bar specimens (n = 4) were tested by the three-point bending test. The control material was a fiber-reinforced composite with a Bis-GMA-TEDGMA-matrix only. The mean flexural strength of poly(hydroxyproline) amide preimpregnated fiber composite was higher than that of the control (FS = 888 vs. 805 MPa). The poly(hydroxyproline) ester preimpregnated fibers resulted in lower strength (FS = 541 MPa). The results of this study suggest that preimpregnation of glass fibers with poly(hydroxyproline) amide and the use of such fibers in fiber-reinforced composites with IPN polymer matrices, can reach relatively high mechanical properties.

  3. Thermal cycling of tungsten-fibre-reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherhold, Robert C.; Westfall, Leonard J.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal cycling of a tungsten-fiber-reinforced superalloy (TFRS) composite is typical of its application in high-temperature engine environments. The mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients between fiber and matrix causes substantial longitudinal (0 deg) stresses in the composite, which can produce inelastic damage-producing matrix strains. The case of thermal fatigue is explored as a "worst case" of the possible matrix damage, in comparison with specimens which are also mechanically loaded in tension. The thermally generated cyclic stresses and the attendant matrix plasticity may be estimated using a nonlinear finite-element program, by proposing a physical analog to the micromechanics equations. A damage metric for the matrix is proposed using the Coffin-Manson criterion, which metric can facilitate comparisons of damage among different candidate materials, and also comparisons for a given material subjected to different temperature cycles. An experimental program was carried out for thermal cycling of a 37 vol pct TFRS composite to different maximum temperatures. The results confirm the prediction that thermal cycling produces matrix degradation and composite strength reduction, which become more pronounced with increasing maximum cyclic temperature. The strength of the fiber is shown to be identical for the as-fabricated and thermally cycled specimens, suggesting that the reduction in composite strength is due to the loss of matrix contribution and also to notching effects of the matrix voids on the fiber.

  4. Dual-nanoparticulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Cho, Seungchan; Leparoux, Marc; Kawasaki, Akira

    2012-06-01

    Aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNT) and silicon carbide nanoparticles (nano-SiC) were fabricated by mechanical ball milling, followed by hot-pressing. Nano-SiC was used as an active mixing agent for dispersing the CNTs in the Al powder. The hardness of the produced composites was dramatically increased, up to eight times higher than bulk pure Al, by increasing the amount of nano-SiC particles. A small quantity of aluminum carbide (Al4C3) was observed by TEM analysis and quantified using x-ray diffraction. The composite with the highest hardness values contained some nanosized Al4C3. Along with the CNT and the nano-SiC, Al4C3 also seemed to play a role in the enhanced hardness of the composites. The high energy milling process seems to lead to a homogeneous dispersion of the high aspect ratio CNTs, and of the nearly spherical nano-SiC particles in the Al matrix. This powder metallurgical approach could also be applied to other nanoreinforced composites, such as ceramics or complex matrix materials.

  5. Tribological behaviour of unidirectional carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Y.; De Baets, P.

    2017-02-01

    Tribological behaviour of unidirectional carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy composites containing 42wt.% (CU42) and 52wt.% (CU52) carbon fibres fabricated by moulding technique was investigated on a pin-on-flat plate configuration. It is the first time to measure static and dynamic coefficient of frictions and wear rates of epoxy composites under heavy loading conditions. Microstructures of composites were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The experimental results indicated the carbon fiber improved the tribological properties of thermoset epoxy by reducing wear rate, but increased the coefficient of friction. At higher load, average wear rates were about 10.8x10-5 mm3/N.m for composites while it was about 38.20x10-5 mm3/N.m for epoxy resin. The wear rate decreased with decreasing load while friction coefficient increased with decreasing load. Moreover, friction coefficient of composites of CU42 tested at 90 N load was measured to be in the range 0.35 and 0.13 for static and dynamic component, respectively.

  6. Fiber-reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses with various pontics.

    PubMed

    Perea, Leila; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Tolvanen, Mimmi; Lassila, Lippo V; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the load-bearing capacities of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed dental prostheses (FDP) with pontics of various materials and thicknesses. Inlay preparations for retaining FDPs were made in a polymer phantom model. Seventy-two FDPs with frameworks made of continuous unidirectional glass fibers (everStick C&B) were fabricated. Three different pontic materials were used: glass ceramics, polymer denture teeth, and composite resin. The FDPs were divided into 3 categories based on the occlusal thicknesses of the pontics (2.5 mm, 3.2 mm, and 4.0 mm). The framework's vertical positioning varied respectively. Each pontic material category contained 3 groups (n = 8/group). In group 1, pontics were fabricated conventionally with composite resin (G-ӕnial, GC) with one additional transversal fiber reinforcement. In group 2, the pontics were polymer denture teeth (Heraeus- Kulzer). Group 3 had an IPS-Empress CAD pontic (Ivoclar Vivadent) milled using a Cerec CAD/CAM unit. Groups 1 and 2 served as controls. Each FDP was statically loaded from the pontic until initial fracture (IF) and final fracture (FF). Initial-fracture data were collected from the load-deflection graph. ANOVA indicated statistically significant differences between the materials and occlusal thicknesses (p < 0.001). Quadratic analysis demonstrated the highest correlation between the thickness of the pontic and IF and FF values with ceramic pontics (IF: p < 0.001; R2 = 0.880; FF: p < 0.001; R2 = 0.953). By increasing the occlusal thickness of the pontic, the load-bearing capacity of the FRC FDPs may be increased. The highest load-bearing capacity was obtained with 4.0 mm thickness in the ceramic pontic. However, with thinner pontics, polymer denture teeth and composite pontics resulted in higher load-bearing values.

  7. Interfacial studies in fiber-reinforced thermoplastic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The major theme of this dissertation is structure/property relationships in fiber-reinforced thermoplastic-matrix composites. Effort has been focused on the interface: interfacial crystallization and fiber/matrix adhesion. Included are investigations on interfacial nucleation and morphology, measurement of fiber/matrix adhesion, effects of interfacial adsorption and crystallization on fiber/matrix adhesion, and composites reinforced with thermotropic liquid crystal copolyester fibers. Crystallization of a copolyester and polybutylene terephthalate with glass, carbon, or aramid fibers has been studied with regard to interfacial morphology. Techniques employed included hot-stage optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Nucleation by the fibers was found to be a general phenomenon. Morphology could be varied by changing the cooling rate. In order to better monitor fiber /matrix adhesion, a buckled plate test has been developed. The test measures transverse toughness as the parameter characterizing interfacial adhesion in unidirectional, continuous-fiber composites. The test is simple to perform yet has advantages over other interfacial evaluation techniques. The buckled plate test was found to be a sensitive measure of fiber/matrix adhesion. The buckled plate test has been used along with the transverse tensile test to examine how interfacial adsorption and crystallization affect fiber/matrix adhesion in polycarbonate/carbon fiber composites. Adsorption was found to be of primary importance in developing adhesion, while crystallization is a secondary effect. The toughness data have been fit successfully for annealing time and temperature dependence. The dependence of adsorption and transverse toughness on matrix molecular weight was found to be large, with higher molecular weights adsorbing more effectively.

  8. Radiation processing of carbon fibre-reinforced advanced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajit

    2001-12-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced advanced composites are being used for a variety of structural applications, because of their useful mechanical properties, including high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Thermal curing of composite products results in internal stresses, due to the mismatch of the coefficients of expansion of the tools and the composite products. Because radiation curing can be done at ambient temperatures, the possibility that the residual stresses might be absent, or much lower in the radiation-cured products, originally led to the start of work on radiation curing of advanced composites at AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories in Pinawa, Canada, in 1985. Research work during the last two decades has shown that advanced composites can be radiation-cured with electron beams or γ radiation. Many of the advantages of radiation curing, as compared to thermal curing, which include curing at ambient temperature, reduced curing time, improved resin stability and reduced volatile emissions, have now been demonstrated. The initial work focussed on electron curing of acrylated epoxy matrices. Since then, procedures have been developed to radiation cure conventional aerospace epoxies, as well. Electron beam cured advanced composites are now being developed for use in the aircraft and aerospace industry. Repair of advanced composite structures is also possible using radiation curing technology. Radiation curing work is continuing at Pinawa and has also been done by Aerospatiale, who have facilities for electron curing composite rocket motor casings and by Chappas and co-workers who have electron cured part of a boat hull. In this paper, the work done on this emerging new technology by the various groups is briefly reviewed.

  9. Method of producing particulate-reinforced composites and composites produced thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Qingyou; Liu, Zhiwei

    2015-12-29

    A process for producing particle-reinforced composite materials through utilization of an in situ reaction to produce a uniform dispersion of a fine particulate reinforcement phase. The process includes forming a melt of a first material, and then introducing particles of a second material into the melt and subjecting the melt to high-intensity acoustic vibration. A chemical reaction initiates between the first and second materials to produce reaction products in the melt. The reaction products comprise a solid particulate phase, and the high-intensity acoustic vibration fragments and/or separates the reaction products into solid particles that are dispersed in the melt and are smaller than the particles of the second material. Also encompassed are particle-reinforced composite materials produced by such a process.

  10. Method of producing particulate-reinforced composites and composites produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Han, Qingyou; Liu, Zhiwei

    2013-12-24

    A process for producing particle-reinforced composite materials through utilization of an in situ reaction to produce a uniform dispersion of a fine particulate reinforcement phase. The process includes forming a melt of a first material, and then introducing particles of a second material into the melt and subjecting the melt to high-intensity acoustic vibration. A chemical reaction initiates between the first and second materials to produce reaction products in the melt. The reaction products comprise a solid particulate phase, and the high-intensity acoustic vibration fragments and/or separates the reaction products into solid particles that are dispersed in the melt and are smaller than the particles of the second material. Also encompassed are particle-reinforced composite materials produced by such a process.

  11. Biodegradable self-reinforced composite materials; manufacturing structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Törmälä, P

    1992-01-01

    Biodegradable (or absorbable), self-reinforced polymeric composites fulfill the demands of secure orthopaedic fixation materials because of their high strength, appropriate stiffness and strength retention which can be tailored according to the healing rate of damaged tissues. Ultra-high strength, self-reinforced, macroscopical biodegradable polymeric composites can be manufactured by creating the polymeric microstructure, where oriented reinforcing elements and matrix material, which have the same chemical element composition, are bound together. Biodegradable, self-reinforced composites have attractive application possibilities in surgery. The materials can be processed into the form of rods, screws, tacks, cerclages, clamps, plates, spirals, etc., which have versatile applications in traumatology and in orthopaedic surgery.

  12. Multi-Scale CNT-Based Reinforcing Polymer Matrix Composites for Lightweight Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberly, Daniel; Ou, Runqing; Karcz, Adam; Skandan, Ganesh; Mather, Patrick; Rodriguez, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Reinforcing critical areas in carbon polymer matrix composites (PMCs), also known as fiber reinforced composites (FRCs), is advantageous for structural durability. Since carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have extremely high tensile strength, they can be used as a functional additive to enhance the mechanical properties of FRCs. However, CNTs are not readily dispersible in the polymer matrix, which leads to lower than theoretically predicted improvement in mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of CNT composites. The inability to align CNTs in a polymer matrix is also a known issue. The feasibility of incorporating aligned CNTs into an FRC was demonstrated using a novel, yet commercially viable nanofiber approach, termed NRMs (nanofiber-reinforcing mats). The NRM concept of reinforcement allows for a convenient and safe means of incorporating CNTs into FRC structural components specifically where they are needed during the fabrication process. NRMs, fabricated through a novel and scalable process, were incorporated into FRC test panels using layup and vacuum bagging techniques, where alternating layers of the NRM and carbon prepreg were used to form the reinforced FRC structure. Control FRC test panel coupons were also fabricated in the same manner, but comprised of only carbon prepreg. The FRC coupons were machined to size and tested for flexural, tensile, and compression properties. This effort demonstrated that FRC structures can be fabricated using the NRM concept, with an increased average load at break during flexural testing versus that of the control. The NASA applications for the developed technologies are for lightweight structures for in-space and launch vehicles. In addition, the developed technologies would find use in NASA aerospace applications such as rockets, aircraft, aircraft/spacecraft propulsion systems, and supporting facilities. The reinforcing aspect of the technology will allow for more efficient joining of fiber composite parts, thus offering

  13. Properties of discontinuous S2-glass fiber-particulate-reinforced resin composites with two different fiber length distributions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiting; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lin, Zhengmei; He, Jingwei; Qin, Wei; Liu, Fang; Vallittu, Pekka Kalevi; Lassila, Lippo Veli Juhana

    2017-03-23

    To investigate the reinforcing efficiency and light curing properties of discontinuous S2-glass fiber-particulate reinforced resin composite and to examine length distribution of discontinuous S2-glass fibers after a mixing process into resin composite. Experimental S2-glass fiber-particulate reinforced resin composites were prepared by mixing 10wt% of discontinuous S2-glass fibers, which had been manually cut into two different lengths (1.5 and 3.0mm), with various weight ratios of dimethacrylate based resin matrix and silaned BaAlSiO2 filler particulates. The resin composite made with 25wt% of UDMA/SR833s resin system and 75wt% of silaned BaAlSiO2 filler particulates was used as control composite which had similar composition as the commonly used resin composites. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM) and work of fracture (WOF) were measured. Fractured specimens were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Double bond conversion (DC) and fiber length distribution were also studied. Reinforcement of resin composites with discontinuous S2-glass fibers can significantly increase the FS, FM and WOF of resin composites over the control. The fibers from the mixed resin composites showed great variation in final fiber length. The mean aspect ratio of experimental composites containing 62.5wt% of particulate fillers and 10wt% of 1.5 or 3.0mm cutting S2-glass fibers was 70 and 132, respectively. No difference was found in DC between resin composites containing S2-glass fibers with two different cutting lengths. Discontinuous S2-glass fibers can effectively reinforce the particulate-filled resin composite and thus may be potential to manufacture resin composites for high-stress bearing application. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Numerical simulation of multi-layered textile composite reinforcement forming

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Hamila, N.; Boisse, P.

    2011-05-04

    One important perspective in aeronautics is to produce large, thick or/and complex structural composite parts. The forming stage presents an important role during the whole manufacturing process, especially for LCM processes (Liquid Composites Moulding) or CFRTP (Continuous Fibre Reinforcements and Thermoplastic resin). Numerical simulations corresponding to multi-layered composite forming allow the prediction for a successful process to produce the thick parts, and importantly, the positions of the fibres after forming to be known. This paper details a set of simulation examples carried out by using a semi-discrete shell finite element made up of unit woven cells. The internal virtual work is applied on all woven cells of the element taking into account tensions, in-plane shear and bending effects. As one key problem, the contact behaviours of tool/ply and ply/ply are described in the numerical model. The simulation results not only improve our understanding of the multi-layered composite forming process but also point out the importance of the fibre orientation and inter-ply friction during formability.

  15. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide (C-SiC) composites offer high strength at high temperatures and good oxidation resistance. However, these composites present some matrix microcracks which allow the path of oxygen to the fiber. The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of a new Silicon Carbide (SiC) coating developed by DUPONT-LANXIDE to enhance the oxidation resistance of C-SiC composites. A thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine the oxidation rate of the samples at different temperatures and pressures. The Dupont coat proved to be a good protection for the SiC matrix at temperatures lower than 1240 C at low and high pressures. On the other hand, at temperatures above 1340 C the Dupont coat did not seem to give good protection to the composite fiber and matrix. Even though some results of the tests have been discussed, because of time restraints, only a small portion of the desired tests could be completed. Therefore, no major conclusions or results about the effectiveness of the coat are available at this time.

  16. Numerical simulation of multi-layered textile composite reinforcement forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Hamila, N.; Boisse, P.

    2011-05-01

    One important perspective in aeronautics is to produce large, thick or/and complex structural composite parts. The forming stage presents an important role during the whole manufacturing process, especially for LCM processes (Liquid Composites Moulding) or CFRTP (Continuous Fibre Reinforcements and Thermoplastic resin). Numerical simulations corresponding to multi-layered composite forming allow the prediction for a successful process to produce the thick parts, and importantly, the positions of the fibres after forming to be known. This paper details a set of simulation examples carried out by using a semi-discrete shell finite element made up of unit woven cells. The internal virtual work is applied on all woven cells of the element taking into account tensions, in-plane shear and bending effects. As one key problem, the contact behaviours of tool/ply and ply/ply are described in the numerical model. The simulation results not only improve our understanding of the multi-layered composite forming process but also point out the importance of the fibre orientation and inter-ply friction during formability.

  17. The grindability of glass fibre reinforced polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chockalingam, P.

    The use of glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials is extensive due to their favourable mechanical properties and near net shape production. However, almost all composite structures require post-processing operations such as grinding to meet surface finish requirements during assembly. Unlike that of conventional metal, grinding of GFRP composite needs special tools and parameters due to the abrasive nature of fibres and the delamination of the workpiece. Therefore, proper selection of the tools and parameters is important. This research aims to investigate the effects of wheel speed, feed, depth of cut, grinding wheel and coolant on the grindability of chopped strand mat (CSM) GFRP. Grinding was carried out in a precision CNC (Master-10HVA) high-speed machining centre under three conditions, namely dry, and wet conditions with synthetic coolant and emulsion coolant, using alumina wheel (OA46QV) and CBN wheel (B46QV). The grinding experiments were conducted per the central composite design of design of experiments. The grindability aspects investigated were surface area roughness (Sa) and cutting force ratio (µ). The responses were analyzed by developing fuzzy logic models. The surface area roughness and cutting force ratio values predicted by the fuzzy logic models are mostly in good agreement with experimental data, and hence conclusion was made that these models were reliable.

  18. Studies on Effective Elastic Properties of CNT/Nano-Clay Reinforced Polymer Hybrid Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Arvind Kumar; Kumar, Puneet; Srinivas, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a computational approach to predict elastic propertiesof hybrid nanocomposite material prepared by adding nano-clayplatelets to conventional CNT-reinforced epoxy system. In comparison to polymers alone/single-fiber reinforced polymers, if an additional fiber is added to the composite structure, it was found a drastic improvement in resultant properties. In this regard, effective elastic moduli of a hybrid nano composite are determined by using finite element (FE) model with square representative volume element (RVE). Continuum mechanics based homogenization of the nano-filler reinforced composite is considered for evaluating the volumetric average of the stresses and the strains under different periodic boundary conditions.A three phase Halpin-Tsai approach is selected to obtain the analytical result based on micromechanical modeling. The effect of the volume fractions of CNTs and nano-clay platelets on the mechanical behavior is studied. Two different RVEs of nano-clay platelets were used to investigate the influence of nano-filler geometry on composite properties. The combination of high aspect ratio of CNTs and larger surface area of clay platelets contribute to the stiffening effect of the hybrid samples. Results of analysis are validated with Halpin-Tsai empirical formulae.

  19. Heat transfer mechanisms in fiber-reinforced polymer composites bonded to concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jeff; Baker, Rebecca; Kallemeyn, Lisa

    2007-04-01

    This research project investigated heat transfer mechanisms that occur during radiant heating of glass/epoxy composites bonded to concrete. The ultimate goal is to develop a field procedure for estimating the thickness of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites used to strengthen existing reinforced concrete structures. Thickness is an important parameter in the design and implementation of nondestructive testing procedures that evaluate bond in FRP systems. Four concrete samples (15 cm x 30 cm x 5 cm) were constructed with glass/epoxy composite bonded to the surface. The thickness of the composite varied from 1mm to 4mm and thermocouples were placed at 1mm intervals through the depth of the composite. Experimental data was compared with a simple theoretical model that predicts the surface temperature response of a layered system subjected to a uniform heat flux. Two factors were shown to significantly influence the heat transfer mechanism: surface absorptivity of the FRP composite and convective cooling. Additional analytical modeling using the finite element method was performed to account for these affects in an effort to obtain a better estimate of FRP thickness based on experimental data.

  20. RC beams shear-strengthened with fabric-reinforced-cementitious-matrix (FRCM) composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loreto, Giovanni; Babaeidarabad, Saman; Leardini, Lorenzo; Nanni, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    The interest in retrofit/rehabilitation of existing concrete structures has increased due to degradation and/or introduction of more stringent design requirements. Among the externally-bonded strengthening systems fiber-reinforced polymers is the most widely known technology. Despite its effectiveness as a material system, the presence of an organic binder has some drawbacks that could be addressed by using in its place a cementitious binder as in fabric-reinforced cementitious matrix (FRCM) systems. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened in shear with U-wraps made of FRCM. An extensive experimental program was undertaken in order to understand and characterize this composite when used as a strengthening system. The laboratory results demonstrate the technical viability of FRCM for shear strengthening of RC beams. Based on the experimental and analytical results, FRCM increases shear strength but not proportionally to the number of fabric plies installed. On the other hand, FRCM failure modes are related with a high consistency to the amount of external reinforcement applied. Design considerations based on the algorithms proposed by ACI guidelines are also provided.

  1. Factors Controlling Stress Rupture of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, J. A.; Yun, H. M.

    1999-01-01

    The successful application of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) depends strongly on maximizing material rupture life over a wide range of temperatures and applied stresses. The objective of this paper is to examine the various intrinsic and extrinsic factors that control the high-temperature stress rupture of CMC for stresses below and above those required for cracking of the 0 C plies (Regions I and II, respectively). Using creep-rupture results for a variety of ceramic fibers and rupture data for CMC reinforced by these fibers, it is shown that in those cases where the matrix carries little structural load, CMC rupture conditions can be predicted very well from the fiber behavior measured under the appropriate test environment. As such, one can then examine the intrinsic characteristics of the fibers in order to develop design guidelines for selecting fibers and fiber microstructures in order to maximize CMC rupture life. For those cases where the fiber interfacial coatings are unstable in the test environment, CMC lives are generally worse than those predicted by fiber behavior alone. For those cases where the matrix can support structural load, CMC life can even be greater provided matrix creep behavior is properly controlled. Thus the achievement of long CMC rupture life requires understanding and optimizing the behavior of all constituents in the proper manner.

  2. Creep Forming of Carbon-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.; Scotti, Stephan J.; Ashe, Melissa P.; Connolly, Liz

    2007-01-01

    A set of lecture slides describes an investigation of creep forming as a means of imparting desired curvatures to initially flat stock plates of carbon-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite (C-CMC) materials. The investigation is apparently part of a continuing effort to develop improved means of applying small CCMC repair patches to reinforced carbon-carbon leading edges of aerospace vehicles (e.g., space shuttles) prior to re-entry into the atmosphere of the Earth. According to one of the slides, creep forming would be an intermediate step in a process that would yield a fully densified, finished C-CMC part having a desired size and shape (the other steps would include preliminary machining, finish machining, densification by chemical vapor infiltration, and final coating). The investigation included experiments in which C-CMC disks were creep-formed by heating them to unspecified high temperatures for time intervals of the order of 1 hour while they were clamped into single- and double-curvature graphite molds. The creep-formed disks were coated with an oxidation- protection material, then subjected to arc-jet tests, in which the disks exhibited no deterioration after exposure to high-temperature test conditions lasting 490 seconds.

  3. Online reinforcement learning for dynamic multimedia systems.

    PubMed

    Mastronarde, Nicholas; van der Schaar, Mihaela

    2010-02-01

    In our previous work, we proposed a systematic cross-layer framework for dynamic multimedia systems, which allows each layer to make autonomous and foresighted decisions that maximize the system's long-term performance, while meeting the application's real-time delay constraints. The proposed solution solved the cross-layer optimization offline, under the assumption that the multimedia system's probabilistic dynamics were known a priori, by modeling the system as a layered Markov decision process. In practice, however, these dynamics are unknown a priori and, therefore, must be learned online. In this paper, we address this problem by allowing the multimedia system layers to learn, through repeated interactions with each other, to autonomously optimize the system's long-term performance at run-time. The two key challenges in this layered learning setting are: (i) each layer's learning performance is directly impacted by not only its own dynamics, but also by the learning processes of the other layers with which it interacts; and (ii) selecting a learning model that appropriately balances time-complexity (i.e., learning speed) with the multimedia system's limited memory and the multimedia application's real-time delay constraints. We propose two reinforcement learning algorithms for optimizing the system under different design constraints: the first algorithm solves the cross-layer optimization in a centralized manner and the second solves it in a decentralized manner. We analyze both algorithms in terms of their required computation, memory, and interlayer communication overheads. After noting that the proposed reinforcement learning algorithms learn too slowly, we introduce a complementary accelerated learning algorithm that exploits partial knowledge about the system's dynamics in order to dramatically improve the system's performance. In our experiments, we demonstrate that decentralized learning can perform equally as well as centralized learning, while

  4. An in vitro investigation of bond strength of veneering composite resin to glass fibre veil reinforced composite.

    PubMed

    Keski-Nikkola, M S; Lassila, L V J; Vallittu, P K

    2004-06-01

    Experimental light-curing polymer-monomer-gel-impregnated E-glass-fibre veil reinforced composite (i.e. a composite with randomly oriented fibres) was used as an adhesional substrate for veneering composite resin (VCR). Continuous unidirectional glass fibre composite was used as a control substrate. Both the fibre-reinforced composite substrate surfaces were ground or, optionally, the substrate surface was left untreated (containing oxygen-inhibited resin layer) before attaching to the VCR. No adhesive resin was used between the composites. Shear bond strength of VCR to the substrate was determined for dry and thermocycled specimens. The results of this study suggested that the VCR can better be bonded to the randomly oriented veil fibre-reinforced composite substrate than to the continuous unidirectional fibre-reinforced composite substrate.

  5. Bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of short fiber-reinforced resin composite in comparison with other composite restoratives.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free-energy (SFE) of short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC), using different adhesive systems, in comparison with other composite restoratives. The resin composites used were everX Posterior (EP), Clearfil AP-X (CA), and Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal Restorative (FS). The adhesive systems used were Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and G-Premio Bond (GB). Resin composite was bonded to dentin, and SBS was determined after 24 h of storage in distilled water and after 10,000 thermal cycles (TCs). The SFEs of the resin composites and the adhesives were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. The SFE values and SFE characteristics were not influenced by the type of resin composite, but were influenced by the type of adhesive system. The results of this study suggest that the bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of SFRC are the same as for other composite restoratives, but that these parameters are affected by the type of adhesive system. The bonding performance of SFRC was enhanced by thermal cycling in a manner similar to that for other composite restoratives. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  6. Parametric Study of End Milling Glass Fibre Reinforced Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Azmi, Azwan I.; Lin, Richard J. T.; Bhattacharyya, Debes

    2011-01-17

    This paper discusses the application of Taguchi 'Design of Experiment' method to investigate the effects of end milling parameters on machinability characteristics of unidirectional E-glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. A series of milling experiments were conducted using tungsten carbide end milling cutters at various spindle speeds, feed rates and depths of cut. Taguchi analysis was carried out and the signal to noise (S/N) ratio with analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to analyse the effects of those parameters on GFRP machinability. Overall, the results of the current investigations present some desirable combinations of the machining parameters that can further enhance the end milling machinability characteristics to suit the final requirements of the finished GFRP products.

  7. Dynamic stability of unidirectional fiber-reinforced viscoelastic composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandiramani, N. K.; Librescu, L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper deals with a dynamic stability analysis of unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite viscoelastic plates subjected to compressive edge loads. The integrodifferential equations governing the stability problem are obtained by using, in conjunction with a Boltzmann hereditary constitutive law for a three-dimensional viscoelastic medium, a higher-order shear deformation theory of orthotropic plates. Such a theory incorporates transverse shear deformation, transverse normal stress, and rotatory inertia effects. The solution of the stability problem as considered within this paper concerns the determination of the critical in-plane edge loads yielding the asymptotic instability. Numerical applications, based on material properties derived within the framework of Aboudi's micromechanical model, are presented and pertinent conclusions concerning the nature of the loss of stability and the influence of various parameters are outlined.

  8. Machining analysis of natural fibre reinforced composites using fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, K.; Sultan, M. T. H.; Cardona, F.; Rajeswari, N.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a new composite plate with natural jute fibre as the reinforcement fibres and isophthalic polyester as the resin was manufactured and subjected to a series of end milling operation by changing three input factors namely speed, feed rate and depth of cut. During each operation, the output responses namely thrust force and torque were measured. The responses were analyzed using Taguchi method to examine the relation between the input factors and output responses, and also to know the most influencing factors on the responses. The data was also analyzed using fuzzy rule model for prediction of responses for a range of input factors. The results showed that all three factors chosen have significant effect on the responses. The fuzzy model data in comparison with the experimental values shows only a marginal error and hence the prediction was highly satisfactory.

  9. Simulation of Forming and Wrinkling of Textile Composite Reinforcements

    SciTech Connect

    Hamila, N.; Wang, P.; Vidal-Salle, E.; Boisse, P.

    2011-05-04

    Because of the very weak textile bending stiffness, wrinkles are frequent during composite reinforcement forming. The simulation of the shape of these wrinkles during the forming process permits to verify there is no wrinkle in the useful part of the preform. In this paper the role of tensions, in-plane shear and bending rigidities in wrinkling development are analyzed. In-plane shear plays a main role for onset of wrinkles in double-curved shape forming but wrinkling is a global phenomenon depending on all strains and stiffnesses and on boundary conditions. The bending stiffness mainly determines the shape of the wrinkles and a membrane approach it is not sufficient to simulate wrinkles.

  10. Clinical evaluation of fiber-reinforced composite inlay FPDs.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Carlo; Ferrari, Marco; Miceli, Gian Paolo; Scotti, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the behavior of inlay fixed partial dentures (IFPD) with conventional and modified framework designs over a period of 12 to 48 months. Forty-one glass fiber-reinforced composite IFPDs were made to replace one missing maxillary or mandibular tooth. The frameworks were made only with parallel fibers in 19 restorations (group 1) and built with parallel and woven fibers modifying the design of the pontic element in 22 IFPDs (group 2) according to the manufacturer's instructions. All restorations were evaluated by color match, marginal discoloration, secondary caries, surface texture, marginal adaptation, fracture, and postoperative sensitivity. Three partial adhesive-cohesive veneering composite fractures occurred in the pontic element in group 1 after 3, 4, and 8 months, respectively. One cohesive fracture occurred in an abutment in group 2 after 46 months. Group 1 showed a 16% fracture failure rate; group 2 showed a 5% failure rate. However, no statistical difference was detected between the groups. IFPDs received the highest score at the following rates: color match 71%, marginal discoloration 96%, secondary caries 99%, surface texture 88%, marginal adaptation 98%, fracture 90%, and postoperative sensitivity 100%. Statistical analysis indicated significant deterioration of color match from baseline to last recall. There were nonsignificantly fewer fractures of the veneering composite with the modified design of the framework than with the conventional design. Repair of the fractured veneer of IFPDs may lengthen the lifespan of the restorations, but it is advisable only for slight damage.

  11. Hybrid Composites Based on Carbon Fiber/Carbon Nanofilament Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Mehran; Yari Boroujeni, Ayoub; Luhrs, Claudia; Phillips, Jonathan; Al-Haik, Marwan S.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanofilament and nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promise for enhancing the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites (FRPs) and imparting multi-functionalities to them. While direct mixing of carbon nanofilaments with the polymer matrix in FRPs has several drawbacks, a high volume of uniform nanofilaments can be directly grown on fiber surfaces prior to composite fabrication. This study demonstrates the ability to create carbon nanofilaments on the surface of carbon fibers employing a synthesis method, graphitic structures by design (GSD), in which carbon structures are grown from fuel mixtures using nickel particles as the catalyst. The synthesis technique is proven feasible to grow nanofilament structures—from ethylene mixtures at 550 °C—on commercial polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy were employed to characterize the surface-grown carbon species. For comparison purposes, a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) technique was also utilized to grow multiwall CNTs (MWCNTs) on carbon fiber yarns. The mechanical characterization showed that composites using the GSD-grown carbon nanofilaments outperform those using the CCVD-grown CNTs in terms of stiffness and tensile strength. The results suggest that further optimization of the GSD growth time, patterning and thermal shield coating of the carbon fibers is required to fully materialize the potential benefits of the GSD technique. PMID:28788671

  12. Hybrid Composites Based on Carbon Fiber/Carbon Nanofilament Reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Mehran; Yari Boroujeni, Ayoub; Luhrs, Claudia; Phillips, Jonathan; Al-Haik, Marwan S

    2014-05-28

    Carbon nanofilament and nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promise for enhancing the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites (FRPs) and imparting multi-functionalities to them. While direct mixing of carbon nanofilaments with the polymer matrix in FRPs has several drawbacks, a high volume of uniform nanofilaments can be directly grown on fiber surfaces prior to composite fabrication. This study demonstrates the ability to create carbon nanofilaments on the surface of carbon fibers employing a synthesis method, graphitic structures by design (GSD), in which carbon structures are grown from fuel mixtures using nickel particles as the catalyst. The synthesis technique is proven feasible to grow nanofilament structures-from ethylene mixtures at 550 °C-on commercial polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy were employed to characterize the surface-grown carbon species. For comparison purposes, a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) technique was also utilized to grow multiwall CNTs (MWCNTs) on carbon fiber yarns. The mechanical characterization showed that composites using the GSD-grown carbon nanofilaments outperform those using the CCVD-grown CNTs in terms of stiffness and tensile strength. The results suggest that further optimization of the GSD growth time, patterning and thermal shield coating of the carbon fibers is required to fully materialize the potential benefits of the GSD technique.

  13. Modeling and simulation of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bheemreddy, Venkata

    Finite element modeling framework based on cohesive damage modeling, constitutive material behavior using user-material subroutines, and extended finite element method (XFEM), are developed for studying the failure behavior of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CFCCs) by the example of a silicon carbide matrix reinforced with silicon carbide fiber (SiC/SiCf) composite. This work deals with developing comprehensive numerical models for three problems: (1) fiber/matrix interface debonding and fiber pull-out, (2) mechanical behavior of a CFCC using a representative volume element (RVE) approach, and (3) microstructure image-based modeling of a CFCC using object oriented finite element analysis (OOF). Load versus displacement behavior during a fiber pull-out event was investigated using a cohesive damage model and an artificial neural network model. Mechanical behavior of a CFCC was investigated using a statistically equivalent RVE. A three-step procedure was developed for generating a randomized fiber distribution. Elastic properties and damage behavior of a CFCC were analyzed using the developed RVE models. Scattering of strength distribution in CFCCs was taken into account using a Weibull probability law. A multi-scale modeling framework was developed for evaluating the fracture behavior of a CFCC as a function of microstructural attributes. A finite element mesh of the microstructure was generated using an OOF tool. XFEM was used to study crack propagation in the microstructure and the fracture behavior was analyzed. The work performed provides a valuable procedure for developing a multi-scale framework for comprehensive damage study of CFCCs.

  14. Thermomechanical fatigue cracking in fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, G.; McMeeking, R. M.

    1995-09-01

    A theoretical model is developed for thermomechanical fatigue cracking in fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites. Interfacial debonding is assumed to occur readily, allowing fibers to slide relative to the matrix resisted by a uniform shear stress. The fibers therefore bridge any matrix crack which develops. The crack bridging traction law is obtained, including the effect of thermal expansion mismatch between the fiber and the matrix and a temperature dependence of the frictional shear stress. Any combination of thermal and mechanical cycling is considered as long as the slip zone along the fiber increases in length monotonically during each increment of cycling. However, for clarity, the results are presented in terms of in-phase and out-of-phase cycling of the thermal and mechanical loads at the same frequency. For each case, the stress distributions in the bridging zone as well as the stress intensity factors at the crack tip are computed for relevant regimes of the thermal and mechanical loading conditions. Predictions are made of the matrix fatigue crack growth under combined thermal and mechanical loading conditions. It is found that when the thermal expansion coefficient of the fiber is less than that of the matrix, a significant increase in the crack growth rate results in out-of-phase thermomechanical fatigue. On the other hand, there is decreased tendency for fibers to fail in this case. For in-phase thermomechanical fatigue, the crack growth rate is reduced but the stress in the fiber is larger than that due to mechanical loading alone, resulting in an increased tendency for fiber failure. The implications for life prediction for fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites are discussed.

  15. Hypervelocity Impact Experiments on Epoxy/Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Composite Panels Reinforced with Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatiwada, Suman; Laughman, Jay W.; Armada, Carlos A.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Barrera, Enrique V.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced composites with multi-functional capabilities are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) reinforced with high strength fibers provide a lightweight and high strength alternative to metals and metal alloys conventionally used in aerospace architectures. Novel reinforcements such as nanofillers offer potential to improve the mechanical properties and add multi-functionality such as radiation resistance and sensing capabilities to the PMCs. This paper reports the hypervelocity impact (HVI) test results on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber composites reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT). Woven UHMWPE fabrics, in addition to providing excellent impact properties and high strength, also offer radiation resistance due to inherent high hydrogen content. SWCNT have exceptional mechanical and electrical properties. BNNT (figure 1) have high neutron cross section and good mechanical properties that add multi-functionality to this system. In this project, epoxy based UHMWPE composites containing SWCNT and BNNT are assessed for their use as bumper shields and as intermediate plates in a Whipple Shield for HVI resistance. Three composite systems are prepared to compare against one another: (I) Epoxy/UHMWPE, (II) Epoxy/UHMWPE/SWCNT and (III) Epoxy/UHMWPE/SWCNT/BNNT. Each composite is a 10.0 by 10.0 by 0.11 cm3 panel, consisting of 4 layers of fabrics arranged in cross-ply orientation. Both SWCNT and BNNT are 0.5 weight % of the fabric preform. Hypervelocity impact tests are performed using a two-stage light gas gun at Rice University

  16. Magnesium coated phosphate glass fibers for unidirectional reinforcement of polycaprolactone composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoling; Grant, David M; Palmer, Graham; Parsons, Andrew J; Rudd, Chris D; Ahmed, Ifty

    2015-10-01

    Bioresorbable composites have shown much potential for bone repair applications, as they have the ability to degrade completely over time and their degradation and mechanical properties can be tailored to suit the end application. In this study, phosphate glass fiber (from the system 45% P2 O5-16% CaO-24% MgO-11% Na2 O-4% Fe2 O3 (given in mol%)) were used to reinforce polycaprolactone (PCL) with approximately 20% fiber volume fraction. The glass fiber surfaces were coated with magnesium (Mg) through magnetron sputtering to improve the fiber-matrix interfacial properties. The Mg coating provided a rough fiber surface (roughness (Ra) of about 44nm). Both noncoated and Mg-coated fiber-reinforced composites were assessed. The water uptake and mass loss properties for the composites were assessed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 37°C for up to 28 days, and ion release profiles were also investigated in both water and PBS media. Inhibition of media influx was observed for the Mg-coated composites. The composite mechanical properties were characterized on the basis of both tensile and flexural tests and their retention in PBS media at 37°C was also investigated. A higher retention of the mechanical properties was observed for the Mg-coated composites over the 28 days degradation period.

  17. Friction and wear behavior of short fiber-reinforced poly(amide-imide) composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Youn, J.R. )

    1992-06-01

    Tribological behavior of short fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Short carbon fiber and glass fiber reinforced poly(amide-imide) composites were tested. Titanium oxide powder-filled composite was also tested for comparison with the fiber composites. Block-on-ring type wear testing was performed for 24 h at three different sliding conditions. Frictional force was measured and stored by a data acquisition system and wear was measured as weight loss after the test. Wear tracks on the specimen and the counterface were examined with an optical microscope to observe fiber damage and formation of wear film. The equivalent stress distribution around each fiber at the sliding surface was calculated by employing a finite element program. The lowest friction and wear was obtained for the carbon fiber composite, the highest friction for the glass fiber composite, and the highest wear for TiO2-filled one. It was observed that the glass fibers are damaged and removed from the surface more easily than the carbon fibers, and the finite element analysis also suggests easier debonding of glass fibers. 23 refs.

  18. Laser cladding of Inconel 625-based composite coatings reinforced by porous chromium carbide particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Damian

    2017-09-01

    Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings were produced via a laser cladding process using Cr3C2 reinforcing particles presenting an open porosity of about 60%. A laser cladding system used consisted of a direct diode laser with a rectangular beam spot and the top-hat beam profile, and an off-axis powder injection nozzle. The microstructural characteristics of the coatings was investigated with the use of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. A complete infiltration of the porous structure of Cr3C2 reinforcing particles and low degree of their dissolution have been achieved in a very narrow range of processing parameters. Crack-free composite coatings having a uniform distribution of the Cr3C2 particles and their fraction up to 36 vol% were produced. Comparative erosion tests between the Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings and the metallic Inconel 625 coatings were performed following the ASTM G 76 standard test method. It was found that the composite coatings have a significantly higher erosion resistance to that of metallic coatings for both 30° and 90° impingement angles. Additionally, the erosion performances of composite coatings were similar for both the normal and oblique impact conditions. The erosive wear behaviour of composite coatings is discussed and related to the unique microstructure of these coatings.

  19. Spectroscopic determination of the in-situ composition of epoxy matrices in glass fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoon, M. K.; Zehner, B. E.; Koenig, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Computerized infrared analysis is applied to the characterization of a glass-reinforced crosslinked polyester. The method of factor analysis determines the number of independent components which constitute the polymeric matrix. Subsequently, the spectra of those components are fitted by a least-squares criterion to spectra of the multicomponent matrix, or, if the glass spectrum is included as an additional component, to the spectra of composites. The least-squares coefficients yield the matrix composition in terms of the initial reactant composition and the extent of crosslinking.

  20. Evaluating the Marginal Integrity of Bulk Fill Fibre Reinforced Composites in Bio-mimetically Restored Tooth.

    PubMed

    Patnana, Arun Kumar; Vanga, V Narsimha Rao; Chandrabhatla, Srinivas Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Over the past years, composites in aesthetic dentistry are showing a considerable progress, but mechanical strength and polymerization shrinkage are the two main drawbacks, which limit their use in high stress bearing areas. To evaluate the marginal integrity of short glass fibre reinforced composite restorations, fibre reinforced composites with composite superficial layer, and fibre reinforced composites with underlying flowable composite layer. This study was done on twenty eight sound premolar teeth with standardized class V cavities restored under four groups as Group I: Particulate filler composite (Filtek Z 250 XT, 3M ESPE); Group II: Short glass fibre reinforced composite (everX Posterior, GC); Group III: Short glass fibre reinforced composite with an overlying layer of particulate filler composite; Group IV: Short glass fibre reinforced composite with an underlying layer of flowable composite (Filtek Z 250 XT, 3M ESPE). Test samples were immersed in a 2% methylene blue dye for 24 hours at 37°C and each tooth was sectioned bucco-lingually. Staining along the tooth restoration interface was recorded and results were analysed statistically using Independent sample t-test and Tukey's post-hoc one-way ANOVA. The results showed significant difference in the dye penetration between the restorative materials in the occlusal and gingival margins (p=0.02). Short fibre reinforced composites showed a statistically significant difference in the microleakage scores when compared with the particulate filler composites (p=0.01). Short glass fibre reinforced composite restorations showed an improved marginal integrity when compared to the traditional particulate filler composite restorations.

  1. Comparison of mechanical properties of a new fiber reinforced composite and bulk filling composites

    PubMed Central

    Pradelle, Nelly; Villat, Cyril; Attik, Nina; Colon, Pierre; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical and physical properties of a newly developed fiber reinforced dental composite. Materials and Methods Fiber reinforced composite EverX Posterior (EXP, GC EUROPE), and other commercially available bulk fill composites, including Filtek Bulk Fill (FB, 3M ESPE), SonicFill (SF, Kerr Corp.), SureFil (SDR, Dentsply), Venus Bulk Fill (VB, HerausKultzer), Tetric evoceram bulk fill (TECB, Ivoclar Vivadent), and Xtra Base (XB, Voco) were characterized. Composite samples light-cured with a LED device were evaluated in terms of flexural strength, flexural modulus (ISO 4049, n = 6), fracture toughness (n = 6), and Vickers hardness (0, 2, and 4 mm in depth at 24 hr, n = 5). The EXP samples and the fracture surface were observed under a scanning electron microscopy. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and unpaired t-test. Results EXP, FB, and VB had significantly higher fracture toughness value compared to all the other bulk composite types. SF, EXP, and XB were not statistically different, and had significantly higher flexural strength values compared to other tested composite materials. EXP had the highest flexural modulus, VB had the lowest values. Vickers hardness values revealed SF, EXP, TECB, and XB were not statistically different, and had significantly higher values compared to other tested composite materials. SEM observations show well dispersed fibers working as a reinforcing phase. Conclusions The addition of fibers to methacrylate-based matrix results in composites with either comparable or superior mechanical properties compared to the other bulk fill materials tested. PMID:26587411

  2. Investigations on Void Formation in Composite Molding Processes and Structural Damping in Fiber-Reinforced Composites with Nanoscale Reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeValve, Caleb Joshua

    Fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) offer a stronger and lighter weight alternative to traditional materials used in engineering components such as wind turbine blades and rotorcraft structures. Composites for these applications are often fabricated using liquid molding techniques, such as injection molding or resin transfer molding. One significant issue during these processing methods is void formation due to incomplete wet-out of the resin within the fiber preform, resulting in discontinuous material properties and localized failure zones in the material. A fundamental understanding of the resin evolution during processing is essential to designing processing conditions for void-free filling, which is the first objective of the dissertation. Secondly, FRCs used in rotorcraft experience severe vibrational loads during service, and improved damping characteristics of the composite structure are desirable. To this end, a second goal is to explore the use of matrix-embedded nanoscale reinforcements to augment the inherent damping capabilities in FRCs. The first objective is addressed through a computational modeling and simulation of the infiltrating dual-scale resin flow through the micro-architectures of woven fibrous preforms, accounting for the capillary effects within the fiber bundles. An analytical model is developed for the longitudinal permeability of flow through fibrous bundles and applied to simulations which provide detailed predictions of local air entrapment locations as the resin permeates the preform. Generalized design plots are presented for predicting the void content and processing time in terms of the Capillary and Reynolds Numbers governing the molding process. The second portion of the research investigates the damping enhancement provided to FRCs in static and rotational configurations by different types and weight fractions of matrix-embedded carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in high fiber volume fraction composites. The damping is measured using

  3. Strong and tough magnesium wire reinforced phosphate cement composites for load-bearing bone replacement.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Reinhard; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Ewald, Andrea; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Groll, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    Calcium phosphate cements are brittle biomaterials of low bending strength. One promising approach to improve their mechanical properties is reinforcement with fibers. State of the art degradable reinforced composites contain fibers made of polymers, resorbable glass or whiskers of calcium minerals. We introduce a new class of composite that is reinforced with degradable magnesium alloy wires. Bending strength and ductility of the composites increased with aspect ratio and volume content of the reinforcements up to a maximal bending strength of 139±41MPa. Hybrid reinforcement with metal and polymer fibers (PLA) further improved the qualitative fracture behavior and gave indication of enhanced strength and ductility. Immersion tests of composites in SBF for seven weeks showed high corrosion stability of ZEK100 wires and slow degradation of the magnesium calcium phosphate cement by struvite dissolution. Finally, in vitro tests with the osteoblast-like cell line MG63 demonstrate cytocompatibility of the composite materials.

  4. Smart damping of laminated fuzzy fiber reinforced composite shells using 1-3 piezoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundalwal, S. I.; Kumar, R. Suresh; Ray, M. C.

    2013-10-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) of smart laminated continuous fuzzy fiber reinforced composite (FFRC) shells. The distinct constructional feature of a novel FFRC is that the uniformly spaced short carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are radially grown on the circumferential surfaces of the continuous carbon fiber reinforcements. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of vertically/obliquely reinforced 1-3 piezoelectric composite materials. A finite element (FE) model is developed for the laminated FFRC shells integrated with the two patches of the ACLD treatment to investigate the damping characteristics of the laminated FFRC shells. The effect of variation of the orientation angle of the piezoelectric fibers on the damping characteristics of the laminated FFRC shells has been studied when the piezoelectric fibers are coplanar with either of the two mutually orthogonal vertical planes of the piezoelectric composite layer. It is revealed that radial growth of CNTs on the circumferential surfaces of the carbon fibers enhances the attenuation of the amplitude of vibrations and the natural frequencies of the laminated FFRC shells over those of laminated base composite shells without CNTs.

  5. Effects of Fiber Coating Composition on Mechanical Behavior of Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Elderidge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    Celsian matrix composites reinforced with Hi-Nicalon fibers, precoated with a dual layer of BN/SiC by chemical vapor deposition in two separate batches, were fabricated. Mechanical properties of the composites were measured in three-point flexure. Despite supposedly identical processing, the composite panels fabricated with fibers coated in two batches exhibited substantially different mechanical behavior. The first matrix cracking stresses (sigma(sub mc)) of the composites reinforced with fibers coated in batch 1 and batch 2 were 436 and 122 MPa, respectively. This large difference in sigma(sub mc) was attributed to differences in fiber sliding stresses(tau(sub friction)), 121.2+/-48.7 and 10.4+/-3.1 MPa, respectively, for the two composites as determined by the fiber push-in method. Such a large difference in values of tau(sub friction) for the two composites was found to be due to the difference in the compositions of the interface coatings. Scanning Auger microprobe analysis revealed the presence of carbon layers between the fiber and BN, and also between the BN and SiC coatings in the composite showing lower tau(sub friction). This resulted in lower sigma(sub mc) in agreement with the ACK theory. The ultimate strengths of the two composites, 904 and 759 MPa, depended mainly on the fiber volume fraction and were not significantly effected by tau(sub friction) values, as expected. The poor reproducibility of the fiber coating composition between the two batches was judged to be the primary source of the large differences in performance of the two composites.

  6. Micromechanics analysis of space simulated thermal deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Space simulated thermally induced deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites were investigated with a micromechanics analysis. The investigation focused on two primary areas. First, available explicit expressions for predicting the effective coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) for a composite were compared with each other, and with a finite element (FE) analysis, developed specifically for this study. Analytical comparisons were made for a wide range of fiber/matrix systems, and predicted values were compared with experimental data. The second area of investigation focused on the determination of thermally induced stress fields in the individual constituents. Stresses predicted from the FE analysis were compared to those predicted from a closed-form solution to the composite cylinder (CC) model, for two carbon fiber/epoxy composites. A global-local formulation, combining laminated plate theory and FE analysis, was used to determine the stresses in multidirectional laminates. Thermally induced damage initiation predictions were also made.

  7. Diode laser cladding of Co-based composite coatings reinforced by spherical WC particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Damian; Górka, Jacek; Czupryński, Artur; Kwaśny, Waldemar; Żuk, Marcin

    2016-12-01

    A laser cladding system consisting of a direct diode laser with the flat-top beam profile and an off-axis powder injection nozzle has been used to fabricate Co-based (Satellite 6) metal matrix composite coatings reinforced by spherical-shaped WC particles. Non-porous coatings with the WC fraction of about 50 vol.% and a low dissolution of the WC particles in the matrix have been obtained. The heat input level affects the degree of WC dissolution and the matrix mean free path between the embedded WC particles. Comparative erosion tests between the metallic Satellite 6 and composite Satellite 6/WC coatings showed that the composite coatings exhibit a superior erosion resistance only at the oblique impingement condition. Generally, a low erosion resistance of the composite coatings at the normal impingement is mainly attributed to a very smooth interface between the spherical-shaped WC particles and the matrix alloy.

  8. Multisensor monitoring of drilling in advanced fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okafor, Anthony C.; El-Gizawy, A. Sherif; Enemuoh, E. U.

    1997-06-01

    This paper investigates the main effects of drilling parameters (cutting speed, feed rate, tool geometry, and tool material) on cutting force and hole quality during drilling of magnamite graphite fiber reinforced polyether ether ketone (AS4/PEEK) composites. The AS4/PEEK is a one hundred and ninety nine-ply [0 degree(s)/45 degree(s)/90 degree(s)/-45 degree(s)]s laminate composite. Taguchi orthogonal array L9 technique is used to plan a 34 robust experiment. The workpiece is supported on a fixture and mounted on a 3-component piezoelectric transducer Kistler type 9257A model. The response signals (cutting force and acoustic emission) are acquired simultaneously during the drilling experiments. The signals are instantaneously sampled and stored in a pentium computer for later processing. The digitized signals are processed in time domain. Surface profilometer is used to measure the surface roughness of the drilled holes. The optimum drilling condition is determined by meticulous examination of the drilling parameter's main effects. The responses are analyzed based on Taguchi's signal-to-noise ratio as opposed to the measurement data and analysis of variance. The results show that sensor signals, delamination and surface roughness measurements are well correlated with the drilling parameters. Optimum drill tool materials, drill point angle and cutting conditions have been determined.

  9. Production of Banana Fiber Yarns for Technical Textile Reinforced Composites

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Zaida; Morón, Moisés; Monzón, Mario D.; Badalló, Pere; Paz, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Natural fibers have been used as an alternative to synthetic ones for their greener character; banana fibers have the advantage of coming from an agricultural residue. Fibers have been extracted by mechanical means from banana tree pseudostems, as a strategy to valorize banana crops residues. To increase the mechanical properties of the composite, technical textiles can be used as reinforcement, instead of short fibers. To do so, fibers must be spun and woven. The aim of this paper is to show the viability of using banana fibers to obtain a yarn suitable to be woven, after an enzymatic treatment, which is more environmentally friendly. Extracted long fibers are cut to 50 mm length and then immersed into an enzymatic bath for their refining. Conditions of enzymatic treatment have been optimized to produce a textile grade of banana fibers, which have then been characterized. The optimum treating conditions were found with the use of Biopectinase K (100% related to fiber weight) at 45 °C, pH 4.5 for 6 h, with bath renewal after three hours. The first spinning trials show that these fibers are suitable to be used for the production of yarns. The next step is the weaving process to obtain a technical fabric for composites production. PMID:28773490

  10. Production of Banana Fiber Yarns for Technical Textile Reinforced Composites.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Zaida; Morón, Moisés; Monzón, Mario D; Badalló, Pere; Paz, Rubén

    2016-05-13

    Natural fibers have been used as an alternative to synthetic ones for their greener character; banana fibers have the advantage of coming from an agricultural residue. Fibers have been extracted by mechanical means from banana tree pseudostems, as a strategy to valorize banana crops residues. To increase the mechanical properties of the composite, technical textiles can be used as reinforcement, instead of short fibers. To do so, fibers must be spun and woven. The aim of this paper is to show the viability of using banana fibers to obtain a yarn suitable to be woven, after an enzymatic treatment, which is more environmentally friendly. Extracted long fibers are cut to 50 mm length and then immersed into an enzymatic bath for their refining. Conditions of enzymatic treatment have been optimized to produce a textile grade of banana fibers, which have then been characterized. The optimum treating conditions were found with the use of Biopectinase K (100% related to fiber weight) at 45 °C, pH 4.5 for 6 h, with bath renewal after three hours. The first spinning trials show that these fibers are suitable to be used for the production of yarns. The next step is the weaving process to obtain a technical fabric for composites production.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of carbon nanotube reinforced magnesium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindivan, Harun; Efe, Arife; Kosatepe, A. Hadi; Kayali, E. Sabri

    2014-11-01

    In the present investigation, Mg chips are recycled to produce Mg-6 wt.% Al reinforced with 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 wt.% nanosized CNTs by mechanical ball milling, cold pressing and subsequently hot extrusion process without sintering step. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Mg/Al without CNT (base alloy) and composites were evaluated. The distribution of CNTs was analyzed using a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analyzer and a Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRF). Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs on the Mg chips were present throughout the extrusion direction and the uniform distribution of CNTs at the chip surface decreased with increase in the CNT content. The results of the mechanical and corrosion test showed that small addition of CNTs (0.5 wt.%) evidently improved the hardness and corrosion resistance of the composite by comparing with the base alloy, while increase in the CNT weight fraction in the initial mixture resulted in a significant decrease of hardness, compression strength, wear rate and corrosion resistance.

  12. Solidification of particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanumanth, G. S.; Irons, G. A.

    1996-08-01

    The solidification behavior of ceramic particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites (MMCs) is different from that of the bare matrix, not only because of the presence of the ceramic particles, but also due to their redistribution in the melt that results in nonhomogeneous thermophysical properties. The MMCs comprised of 10-to 15-μm SiC particles of varying volume fractions, dispersed uniformly in a modified aluminum A356 alloy by the melt stirring technique, were solidified unidirectionally in a thermocouple-instrumented cylindrical steel mold. The cooling rates were continually monitored by measuring temperatures at different depths in the melt, and the solidified MMCs were sectioned into disks and chemically analyzed for SiC volume fraction. The results point out that the cooling rate increased with increasing volume fraction of SiC particles. A small increase in the bulk SiC volume fraction of the cast MMC was observed due to particle settling during solidification. A one-dimensional enthalpy model of MMC solidification was formulated, wherein particle settling occurring in the solidifying matrix was coupled to the enthalpy equation by means of the Richardson-Zaki hindered settling correlation. A comparative study of simulations with experiments suggested that the thermal response of SiC particles used in this study was similar to that of single crystals, and their presence increased the effective thermal conductivity of the composite.

  13. Superelement Analysis of Tile-Reinforced Composite Armor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.

    1998-01-01

    Super-elements can greatly improve the computational efficiency of analyses of tile-reinforced structures such as the hull of the Composite Armored Vehicle. By taking advantage of the periodicity in this type of construction, super-elements can be used to simplify the task of modeling, to virtually eliminate the time required to assemble the stiffness matrices, and to reduce significantly the analysis solution time. Furthermore, super-elements are fully transferable between analyses and analysts, so that they provide a consistent method to share information and reduce duplication. This paper describes a methodology that was developed to model and analyze large upper hull components of the Composite Armored Vehicle. The analyses are based on two types of superelement models. The first type is based on element-layering, which consists of modeling a laminate by using several layers of shell elements constrained together with compatibility equations. Element layering is used to ensure the proper transverse shear deformation in the laminate rubber layer. The second type of model uses three-dimensional elements. Since no graphical pre-processor currently supports super-elements, a special technique based on master-elements was developed. Master-elements are representations of super-elements that are used in conjunction with a custom translator to write the superelement connectivities as input decks for ABAQUS.

  14. Superelement Analysis of Tile-Reinforced Composite Armor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.

    1998-01-01

    Super-elements can greatly improve the computational efficiency of analyses of tile-reinforced structures such as the hull of the Composite Armored Vehicle. By taking advantage of the periodicity in this type of construction, super-elements can be used to simplify the task of modeling, to virtually eliminate the time required to assemble the stiffness matrices, and to reduce significantly the analysis solution time. Furthermore, super-elements are fully transferable between analyses and analysts, so that they provide a consistent method to share information and reduce duplication. This paper describes a methodology that was developed to model and analyze large upper hull components of the Composite Armored Vehicle. The analyses are based on two types of superelement models. The first type is based on element-layering, which consists of modeling a laminate by using several layers of shell elements constrained together with compatibility equations. Element layering is used to ensure the proper transverse shear deformation in the laminate rubber layer. The second type of model uses three-dimensional elements. Since no graphical pre-processor currently supports super-elements, a special technique based on master-elements was developed. Master-elements are representations of super-elements that are used in conjunction with a custom translator to write the superelement connectivities as input decks for ABAQUS.

  15. Mechanical Behavior of Electrospun Palmfruit Bunch Reinforced Polylactide Composite Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeosun, S. O.; Akpan, E. I.; Gbenebor, O. P.; Peter, A. A.; Olaleye, Samuel Adebayo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the mechanical characteristics of electrospun palm fruit bunch reinforced poly lactic acid (PLA) nanofiber composites using treated and untreated filler was examined. Poly lactic acid-palm fruit bunch-dichloromethane blends were electrospun by varying the concentration of the palm fruit bunch between 0 wt.% and 8 wt.%. A constant voltage of 26 kV was applied, the tip-to-collector distance was maintained at 27.5 cm and PLA-palm fruit bunch-dichloromethane (DCM) concentration of 12.5% (w/v) was used. The results revealed that the presence of untreated palm fruit bunch fillers in the electrospun PLA matrix significantly reduces the average diameters of the fibers, causing the formation of beads. As a result there are reductions in tensile strengths of the fibers. The presence of treated palm fruit bunch fillers in the electrospun PLA matrix increases the average diameters of the fibers with improvements in the mechanical properties. The optimal mechanical responses were obtained at 3 wt.% of the treated palm fruit bunch fillers in the PLA matrix. However, increase in the palm fruit fillers (treated and untreated) in the PLA matrix promoted the formation of beads in the nanofiber composites.

  16. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  17. Reconstruction of nonvital teeth using direct fiber-reinforced composite resin: a pilot clinical study.

    PubMed

    Deliperi, Simone; Bardwell, David N

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical performance of direct Class II fiber-reinforced composite restorations on nonvital teeth. Thirty patients age 18 or older were included in this clinical trial restoring 35 molars. The inclusion criteria were: two- to four-surface restorations, replacement of composite and amalgam restorations necessary or unrestored teeth with decay reaching the pulp, teeth having homogeneous root canal fillings terminating 0 to 2 mm from the radiographic apex. Teeth with residual cavity walls less than 1 mm or with complete loss of the clinical crown were excluded. Teeth were restored using a combination of Ultra etch 35% phosphoric acid, PQ1 adhesive system, and Vit-l-escence microhybrid composite resin. The enamel peripheral shell of the restoration was built up first; a resin-impregnated piece of polyethylene ribbon fiber (Ribbond Triaxial) was covered with B1 Perma-Flo flowable composite, placed into a prepared canal, folded, and light cured; then, dentin and enamel occlusal surface stratification was completed. All 35 restorations were evaluated at 6 months and 1 year by two independent evaluators using modified USPHS criteria. No failure was reported and alpha scores were recorded for all parameters. Before starting the treatment, 26 out of 35 teeth (74%) had apical periodontitis as diagnosed radiographically. At the 1-year recall, no signs of periapical lesions were detected and radiographs reported neither periodontal ligament widening nor periapical radiolucency. Direct fiber-reinforced composite resin restorations demonstrated excellent clinical performance at 1 year.

  18. In-situ process and condition monitoring of advanced fibre-reinforced composite materials using optical fibre sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, C.; Martin, A.; Liu, T.; Wu, M.; Hayes, S.; Crosby, P. A.; Powell, G. R.; Brooks, D.; Fernando, G. F.

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents a general overview of a number of optical fibre sensor systems which have been developed and used in advanced fibre-reinforced composites for in-situ process and condition monitoring. The in-situ process monitoring techniques were optical-fibre-based evanescent wave spectroscopy, transmission near-infrared spectroscopy and refractive index monitoring. The optical fibre sensors were successful in tracking the cure reaction. The condition monitoring of advanced fibre-reinforced composites was carried out using two intensity-based optical fibre sensor systems: an extrinsic multi-mode Fabry-Pérot sensor and Bragg gratings. In addition to this, the feasibility of using the reinforcing fibre as a light guide was demonstrated. These sensor systems were evaluated under quasi-static, impact and fatigue loading. The test specimens consisted of prepreg-based carbon-fibre-reinforced epoxy and glass-fibre-reinforced epoxy filament-wound tubes. Excellent correlation was obtained between surface-mounted strain gauges and the embedded optical fibre sensors. The feasibility of using these sensor systems for the detection of impact damage and stiffness reduction in the composite due to fatigue damage was successfully demonstrated.

  19. Preparation and Characterization of Binder Less Mg/Mg Alloy Infiltrated SiCp Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthu Kumar, S.; Dhindaw, B. K.

    2007-10-01

    SiCp-reinforced commercial pure magnesium and AZ91 alloy MMCs’ were prepared through infiltration route without the use of any special atmospheres. The preform was prepared using a mixture of reinforcement particles and the matrix metal particles. The composites were prepared with various volume percentage of the reinforcement and their properties with the variation of SiCp were analyzed. The interfacial properties of the composites were analyzed using microstructure, microhardness, and wear studies. Calculation of thermal conditions during infiltration was done to study the effect of adding matrix metal particles on the infiltration behavior and its effect on the uniformity distribution of the reinforcements.

  20. Application of composites to the selective reinforcement of metallic aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, W. A., Jr.; Mathauser, E. E.; Pride, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The use of composite materials to selectively reinforce metallic structures provides a low-cost way to reduce weight and a means of minimizing the risks usually associated with the introduction of new materials. An overview is presented of the NASA Langley Research Center programs to identify the advantages and to develop the potential of the selective reinforcement approach to the use of composites. These programs have shown that selective reinforcement provides excellent strength and stiffness improvements to metallic structures. Significant weight savings can be obtained in a cost effective manner. Flight service programs which have been initiated to validate further the merits of selective reinforcement are described.

  1. Development of Ceramic Fibers for Reinforcement in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, L. E.; Lent, W. E.; Teague, W. T.

    1961-01-01

    the. testing apparatus for single fiber tensile strength increased the precision. of tests conducted on nine fibers. The highest mean tensile strength, a value of 295,000 pounds per square inch, was obtained with R-141 fibers. Treatment of R-74 fibers with anhydrous Linde A-1100 silane finish improved its mean fiber tensile strength by 25 percent. The lapse of time after fiber formation had no measurable effect on tensile strength. A static heating test conducted with various high melting fibers indicated that Fiberfrax and R-108 underwent no significant changes in bulk volume or resiliency on exposure to 2750 degrees Fahrenheit (1510 degrees Centigrade) in an oxidizing atmosphere. For fiber-resin composition fabrication, ten fiber materials were selected on the bases of high fiber yield, fusion temperature, and type of composition. Fiberfrax, a commercial ceramic fiber, was included for comparison. A new, more effective method of removing pellets from blown fibers was developed. The de-pelletized fibers were treated with a silane finish and felted into ten-inch diameter felts prior to resin impregnation. Composites containing 30 percent by weight of CTL 91-LD phenolic resin were molded under high pressure from the impregnated felts and post-cured to achieve optimum properties. Flexural strength, flexural modules of elasticity, and punch shear strength tests were conducted on the composite specimens. The highest average flexural strength obtained was 19,958 pounds per square inch with the R-74-fiber-resin composite. This compares very favorably with the military specification of 13,000 pounds per square inch flexural strength for randomly oriented fiber reinforced composites. The highest punch shear strength (11,509 pounds per square inch) was obtained with the R-89 fiber-resin composite. The effects of anhydrous fiber finishes on composite strength were not clearly indicated. Plasma arc tests at a heat flux of 550 British Thermal Units per square foot per second on

  2. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Georgarakis, K; Nakayama, K S; Li, Y; Tsarkov, A A; Xie, G; Dudina, D; Louzguine-Luzgin, D V; Yavari, A R

    2016-04-12

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses.

  3. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Georgarakis, K.; Nakayama, K. S.; Li, Y.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Xie, G.; Dudina, D.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Yavari, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses.

  4. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Georgarakis, K.; Nakayama, K. S.; Li, Y.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Xie, G.; Dudina, D.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Yavari, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses. PMID:27067824

  5. Processing and microstructure of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composite by hot-pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Katsumi; Budiyanto; Imai, Masamitsu; Yano, Toyohiko

    1998-10-01

    Continuous 2D woven fiber-reinforced SiC composites were fabricated by hot-pressing in Ar at 1750°C under a pressure of 40 MPa using Al-B-C or Al 2O 3-Y 2O 3-CaO system as sintering additives. In this study, fracture behavior and microstructure of the composites fabricated by this process were investigated. These composites achieved nearly full density in both cases. In the case of the composite with Al-B-C additives, the load-displacement behavior of the composite with non-coated Hi-Nicalon cloths showed completely brittle fracture, whereas that of the composite with BN-coated Hi-Nicalon cloths showed ductile fracture with a lot of fiber pull-out. On the contrary, in the case of the composite with Al 2O 3-Y 2O 3-CaO additives, the load-displacement behavior of the composite with non-coated Hi-Nicalon cloths showed slight ductile fracture with small tails, whereas that of the composite with BN-coated Hi-Nicalon cloths showed completely brittle fracture.

  6. Mechanical properties and ultrastructural characteristics of a glass fiber-reinforced composite.

    PubMed

    García Barbero, Alvaro Enrique; Vera González, Vicente; García Barbero, Ernesto; Aliaga Vera, Ignacio

    2015-06-01

    To examine the ultrastructural characteristics of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) and its behavior in vitro as a framework for fixed partial dentures (FPDs). A total of 40 specimens were prepared using extracted teeth fixed in methacrylate blocks as supports for the FPD, then the specimens were divided into four groups depending on whether a retaining box was used to fix the FPD to the support teeth, and on whether a composite pontic was assembled on top of the fibers. Fracture testing was performed in a universal testing machine (1 mm/minute). Fracture strength values and failure types were statistically compared for each group. Using retaining boxes did not improve the mechanical behavior of the restorative system. The weakest element of the system was the composite tooth constructed on top of the FRC.

  7. Effect of fiber orientation on the failure behavior of a glass-fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiaai; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar

    2017-05-01

    In this study, hour-glass specimens made of a glass-fiber reinforced polypropylene composite with different fiber orientations were stamp formed in an open die. Strains on the surfaces of these specimens were recorded by a 3D photogrammetric measurement system. Specimens were cut into the designed shapes with two different fiber orientations [0°/90° and 45°/45°]. Based on the forming limit diagrams drawn for these material systems, it is found that change in fiber orientation induces change in deformation mode and different forming limit in strains.

  8. Investigation of the transcrystalline interphase in fiber-reinforced polypropylene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, D.M.; Register, R.A.; Rebenfeld, L.; Hsiao, B.S.

    1996-12-31

    A unique crystalline morphology which develops in certain fiber reinforced thermoplastics has been the focus of numerous investigations in recent years. This unique morphology, termed {open_quotes}transcrystallinity{close_quotes}, occurs as a result of dense nucleation of polymer crystals along the surface of reinforcing fibers. As these fiber-sponsored nuclei grow, they impinge upon one another which forces growth to occur in an anisotropic columnar manner away from the fiber, outward into the thermoplastic matrix. Several mechanisms have been proposed to describe why this dense nucleation occurs at the fiber surface, including epitaxial matches between the fiber and polymer matrix unit cells, thermal conductivity mismatches between fiber and matrix, and shear induced nucleation. Most likely any of these mechanisms would produce a crystalline polymer morphology around the reinforcing fiber which would resemble {open_quotes}transcrystallinity{close_quotes} on the micron scale. To date much of the work conducted at TRI/Princeton regarding this phenomenon has concerned the effect of reinforcing fibers on the isothermal crystallization kinetics of various systems. Other groups have attempted to elucidate the role of the transcrystalline layer (TCL) on the mechanical properties of composites. Much of this work has dealt with model single fiber composites. Relatively little research, however, has been conducted on the molecular and lamellar arrangement of the polymeric material within the TCL. Our current work, therefore, focuses on discerning the nature of the molecular orientation of the TCL in millimeter-thick composites containing realistic fiber loadings, with the goal of relating this structural information to mechanical properties.

  9. Creep behavior of bagasse fiber reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanjun; Wu, Qinglin; Lei, Yong; Yao, Fei

    2010-05-01

    The creep behavior of bagasse-based composites with virgin and recycled polyvinyl chloride (B/PVC) and high density polyethylene (B/HDPE) as well as a commercial wood and HDPE composite decking material was investigated. The instantaneous deformation and creep rate of all composites at the same loading level increased at higher temperatures. At a constant load level, B/PVC composites had better creep resistance than B/HDPE systems at low temperatures. However, B/PVC composites showed greater temperature-dependence. Several creep models (i.e., Burgers model, Findley's power law model, and a simpler two-parameter power law model) were used to fit the measured creep data. Time-temperature superposition (TTS) was attempted for long-term creep prediction. The four-element Burgers model and the two-parameter power law model fitted creep curves of the composites well. The TTS principle more accurately predicted the creep response of the PVC composites compared to the HDPE composites. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Incremental dynamic analysis of concrete moment resisting frames reinforced with shape memory composite bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Adeel; Andrawes, Bassem

    2012-02-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcing bars have been used in concrete structures as an alternative to conventional steel reinforcement, in order to overcome corrosion problems. However, due to the linear behavior of the commonly used reinforcing fibers, they are not considered in structures which require ductility and damping characteristics. The use of superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) fibers with their nonlinear elastic behavior as reinforcement in the composite could potentially provide a solution for this problem. Small diameter SMA wires are coupled with polymer matrix to produce SMA-FRP composite, which is sought in this research as reinforcing bars. SMA-FRP bars are sought in this study to enhance the seismic performance of reinforced concrete (RC) moment resisting frames (MRFs) in terms of reducing their residual inter-story drifts while still maintaining the elastic characteristics associated with conventional FRP. Three story one bay and six story two bay RC MRF prototype structures are designed with steel, SMA-FRP and glass-FRP reinforcement. The incremental dynamic analysis technique is used to investigate the behaviors of the two frames with the three different reinforcement types under a suite of ground motion records. It is found that the frames with SMA-FRP composite reinforcement exhibit higher performance levels including lower residual inter-story drifts, high energy dissipation and thus lower damage, which are important for structures in highly seismic zones.

  11. [Rheological properties of photo-polymerized composite resin reinforced with retentive filler].

    PubMed

    Xu, Pu; Xu, Heng-chang; Wang, Tong

    2003-11-01

    To determine the rheological properties of the photo-polymerized composite resin reinforced with retentive filler (RF) and its rheological difference with normal filler (NF) composite resin. Rheological properties of the composite resins, such as viscosity, shear stress and creep compliance, were measured with dynamic stress rheometer at room temperature (25 degrees C). The viscosity of the composite resin reinforced with RF is higher than that of NF composite resin (P < 0.01); at the beginning, the viscosity of the former has little change with the rising of shear stress and the latter decreases, then the viscosities of the two composite resins increase with the rising of shear stress as soon as over 203.18 Pa of shear stress; the creep compliance of the composite resin reinforced with RF is significant smaller than that of NF composite resin (P < 0.01). The rheological properties of the two composite resins have significant difference, so they have different clinical using properties.

  12. Interfacial contributions in lignocellulosic fiber-reinforced polyurethane composites

    Treesearch

    Timothy G. Rials; Michael P. Wolcott; John M. Nassar

    2001-01-01

    Whereas lignocellulosic fibers have received considerable attention as a rein- forcing agent in thermoplastic composites, their applicability to reactive polymer systems remains of considerable interest. The hydroxyl-rich nature of natural lignocellulosic fibers suggests that they are particularly useful in thermosetting systems such as polyurethanes. To further this...

  13. Carbon fiber-reinforced cyanate ester/nano-ZrW2O8 composites with tailored thermal expansion.

    PubMed

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Rogalski, Mark K; Kessler, Michael R

    2012-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are widely used in the design and fabrication of a variety of high performance aerospace components. The mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) between the high CTE polymer matrix and low CTE fiber reinforcements in such composite systems can lead to dimensional instability and deterioration of material lifetimes due to development of residual thermal stresses. The magnitude of thermally induced residual stresses in fiber-reinforced composite systems can be minimized by replacement of conventional polymer matrices with a low CTE, polymer nanocomposite matrix. Zirconium tungstate (ZrW(2)O(8)) is a unique ceramic material that exhibits isotropic negative thermal expansion and has excellent potential as a filler for development of low CTE polymer nanocomposites. In this paper, we report the fabrication and thermal characterization of novel, multiscale, macro-nano hybrid composite laminates comprising bisphenol E cyanate ester (BECy)/ZrW(2)O(8) nanocomposite matrices reinforced with unidirectional carbon fibers. The results reveal that incorporation of nanoparticles facilitates a reduction in CTE of the composite systems, which in turn results in a reduction in panel warpage and curvature after the cure because of mitigation of thermally induced residual stresses.

  14. Durability of Cement Composites Reinforced with Sisal Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianqiang

    This dissertation focuses mainly on investigating the aging mechanisms and degradation kinetics of sisal fiber, as well as the approaches to mitigate its degradation in the matrix of cement composites. In contrast to previous works reported in the literature, a novel approach is proposed in this study to directly determine the fiber's degradation rate by separately studying the composition changes, mechanical and physical properties of the embedded sisal fibers. Cement hydration is presented to be a crucial factor in understanding fiber degradation behavior. The degradation mechanisms of natural fiber consist of mineralization of cell walls, alkali hydrolysis of lignin and hemicellulose, as well as the cellulose decomposition which includes stripping of cellulose microfibrils and alkaline hydrolysis of amorphous regions in cellulose chains. Two mineralization mechanisms, CH-mineralization and self-mineralization, are proposed. The degradation kinetics of sisal fiber in the cement matrix are also analyzed and a model to predict the degradation rate of cellulose for natural fiber embedded in cement is outlined. The results indicate that the time needed to completely degrade the cellulose in the matrix with cement replacement by 30wt.% metakaolin is 13 times longer than that in pure cement. A novel and scientific method is presented to determine accelerated aging conditions, and to evaluating sisal fiber's degradation rate and durability of natural fiber-reinforced cement composites. Among the static aggressive environments, the most effective approach for accelerating the degradation of natural fiber in cement composites is to soak the samples or change the humidity at 70 °C and higher temperature. However, the dynamic wetting and drying cycling treatment has a more accelerating effect on the alkali hydrolysis of fiber's amorphous components evidenced by the highest crystallinity indices, minimum content of holocellulose, and lowest tensile strength. Based on the

  15. Nondestructive Evaluation of Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites: A Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yolken, H. Thomas; Matzkanin, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their increasing utilization in structural applications, the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites continues to receive considerable research and development attention. Due to the heterogeneous nature of composites, the form of defects is often very different from a metal and fracture mechanisms are more complex. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview and technology assessment of the current state-of-the-art with respect to NDE of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  16. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in...

  17. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment...: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in §§ 63.5800 and...

  18. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in...

  19. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in...

  20. Piezoresistive properties of cement composites reinforced by functionalized carbon nanotubes using photo-assisted Fenton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianlin, Luo; Kwok L, Chung; Qiuyi, Li; Shunjian, Chen; Lu, Li; Dongshuai, Hou; Chunwei, Zhang

    2017-03-01

    A combined chemical technique for surface functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is presented in this paper. The functionalized CNTs (f-CNTs) were employed to reinforce both the mechanical and electromechanical properties of cementitious composites for the purpose of developing intrinsic self-sensing sensors. With moderate functionalization, the f-CNTs were found to easily disperse in an aqueous system while just aiding with low fraction of dispersants: (a) polyethylene oxide (MPEG), (b) Trition X-100 (Tx-100). Both the FTIR and DSC results show that the oxidation effect of this combined technique were not as strong as those when using conventional strong oxidation methods. As a result, the integrity of electronic structure inside the f-CNT reinforced cement matrixes can be effectively maintained. This paper is aimed at exploring the electrical resistivity and piezoresistive properties of the f-CNT reinforced cement composites (f-CNT-RCCs). Both the monoaxial and cyclic compression tests were undertaken on the specimens with different f-CNT doping levels of 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.3%. Experimental results indicated that excellent piezoresistive properties were achieved at the doping level of 0.3%, wherein high strain sensitivity were recorded as 254.9 and 286.6 for the cases of adding small amounts of surfactants, MPEG and combination of MPEG and Tx100, respectively.

  1. Experimental study on mixed mode fracture in unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Kezhuang; Li, Zheng; Fu, Bin

    2008-11-01

    Fiber reinforced composites are applied broadly in aeronautic and astronautic fields as a structural material. But the investigation in dynamic fracture behavior of fiber reinforced composite stands in the breach for scientists due to a large number of aircraft disasters. In this paper, the mixed mode fracture problems in fiber reinforced composites under impact are studied. First, based on the theory of the reflective dynamic caustic method for mixed mode fracture, corresponding experiments are carried out to study the dynamic fracture behaviors of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites under two kinds load conditions. By recording and analyzing the shadow spot patterns during the crack propagation process carefully, the dynamic fracture toughness and crack growth velocity of fiber reinforced composites are obtained. Via the observation of the crack growth routes and fracture sections, we further reveal the fracture mechanism of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites. It concludes that opening mode still is the easier fracture type for the pre-crack initiation in fiber reinforced composites, while the interface between fibers and matrix becomes the fatal vulnerability during the crack propagation.

  2. A comprehensive study of woven carbon fiber-reinforced nylon 6 composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillay, Selvum

    Liquid molding of thermoset composites has become very popular in all industry sectors, including aerospace, automotive, mass transit, and sporting goods, but the cost of materials and processing has limited the use to high-end applications. Thermoplastic composites are relatively cheap; however, the use has been limited to components with short fiber reinforcing. The high melt viscosity and short processing window precludes their use in the liquid molding of large structures and applications with continuous fiber reinforcement. The current research addresses the processing parameters, methodology, and limitations of vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) of carbon fabric-reinforced, thermoplastic polyamide 6 (PA6). The material used is casting grade PA6. The process developed for using VARTM to produce carbon fabric-reinforced PA6 composites is explained in detail. The effects of infusion temperature and flow distance on the fiber weight fraction and crystallinity of the PA6 resin are presented. The degree of conversion from monomer to polymer was determined. Microscopic studies to show the wet-out of the fibers at the filament level are also presented. Tensile, flexural, short beam shear strength (SBSS), and low-velocity impact test results are presented and compared to a equivalent thermoset matrix composite. The rubber toughened epoxy system (SC-15) was chosen for the comparative study because the system has been especially developed to overcome the brittle nature of epoxy composites. The environmental effects of moisture and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the carbon/nylon 6 composite were investigated. The samples were immersed in boiling water for 100 hr, and mechanical tests were conducted. Results showed that moisture causes plasticization of the matrix and attacks the fiber matrix interface. This leads to deterioration of the mechanical properties. The samples were also exposed to UV for up to 600 hr, and post exposure tests were conducted. The

  3. Pyrolysis of reinforced polymer composites: Parameterizing a model for multiple compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Geraldine E.

    A single set of material properties was developed to describe the pyrolysis of fiberglass reinforced polyester composites at multiple composition ratios. Milligram-scale testing was performed on the unsaturated polyester (UP) resin using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to establish and characterize an effective semi-global reaction mechanism, of three consecutive first-order reactions. Radiation-driven gasification experiments were conducted on UP resin and the fiberglass composites at compositions ranging from 41 to 54 wt% resin at external heat fluxes from 30 to 70 kW m -2. The back surface temperature was recorded with an infrared camera and used as the target for inverse analysis to determine the thermal conductivity of the systematically isolated constituent species. Manual iterations were performed in a comprehensive pyrolysis model, ThermaKin. The complete set of properties was validated for the ability to reproduce the mass loss rate during gasification testing.

  4. A study of the composition and microstructure of aluminum matrix composites reinforced with alumina fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotova, D.; Serpova, V.; Prokofiev, M.; Rabinskiy, L.; Shavnev, A.

    2016-04-01

    This article presents the results of a study of the microstructure and the composition of aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC) reinforced with continuous alumina fibers. An Al-Mg-Cu alloy similar to that of AA 2024 was used. X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence analyses were used for investigation of a probable volume fraction of a spinel phase in MMC. Scanning electron microscopy and an X-ray microanalysis were used to study a change of the elemental composition of the composites microstructure on the polished cross sections. The constant mass fractions of magnesium (0.65 wt. %) and copper (1.25 wt. %) were found in the interphase area within radius of 1 μm around fibers.

  5. Evaluation of several micromechanics models for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven; Birt, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic experimental evaluation of whisker and particulate reinforced aluminum matrix composites was conducted to assess the variation in tensile properties with reinforcement type, volume fraction, and specimen thickness. Each material was evaluated in three thicknesses, 1.8, 3.18, and 6.35 mm, to determine the size, distribution, and orientation of the reinforcements. This information was used to evaluate several micromechanical models that predict composite moduli. The longitudinal and transverse moduli were predicted for reinforced aluminum. The Paul model, the Cox model and the Halpin-Tsai model were evaluated. The Paul model gave a good upper bound prediction for the particulate reinforced composites but under predicted whisker reinforced composite moduli. The Cox model gave good moduli predictions for the whisker reinforcement, but was too low for the particulate. The Halpin-Tsai model gave good results for both whisker and particulate reinforced composites. An approach using a trigonometric projection of whisker length to predict the fiber contribution to the modulus in the longitudinal and transverse directions was compared to the more conventional lamination theory approach.

  6. Robotic inspection of fiber reinforced composites using phased array UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, Jeffrey T.; De Odorico, Walter

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasound is the current NDE method of choice to inspect large fiber reinforced airframe structures. Over the last 15 years Cartesian based scanning machines using conventional ultrasound techniques have been employed by all airframe OEMs and their top tier suppliers to perform these inspections. Technical advances in both computing power and commercially available, multi-axis robots now facilitate a new generation of scanning machines. These machines use multiple end effector tools taking full advantage of phased array ultrasound technologies yielding substantial improvements in inspection quality and productivity. This paper outlines the general architecture for these new robotic scanning systems as well as details the variety of ultrasonic techniques available for use with them including advances such as wide area phased array scanning and sound field adaptation for non-flat, non-parallel surfaces.

  7. Effects of Fiber-reinforced Composite Bases on Microleakage of Composite Restorations in Proximal Locations

    PubMed Central

    A, Tezvergil-Mutluay; P.K, Vallittu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of direct restorative composite resin upon the addition of an intermediate glass fiber-reinforced composite (GFRC) layer of various fiber orientations between tooth and particulate filler composite resin (PFRC). Materials and Methods: Cavities were prepared both on the mesial and distal surfaces of sixty extracted human molars with one margin placed below and the other above the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Teeth were assigned to five different groups. Four of the groups received a layer of semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) resin system impregnated E-glass GFRC at the bottom of the cavity: Group 1; unidirectional continuous GFRC (EVS) in buccolingual direction (EVS-BL), Group 2; EVS in mesiodistal direction (EVS-MD), Group 3; bidirectional woven GFRC (EVN), Group 4; multidirectional short GFRC (EXP-MLT), Group 5; PRFC only (control). After acid etching and priming of the cavities and insertion of GFRC layer with the adhesive resin (Scotchbond Multipurpose 3M-ESPE), the cavities were filled incrementally with PRFC (Filtek Z250, 3M-ESPE) and each layer was light cured for 20 s. After finishing and polishing, the restored teeth were water-stored for 24 h at 37 °C and then thermocycled for 6000 cycles between 5-55 °C, before immersion in 0.5 % basic fuchsin dye for 24 h. After sectioning by 3-5 sagittal cuts, each sequential section was imaged and digitally analyzed to determine the stain depth. Results: All GFRC groups in dentin revealed significantly lower microleakage compared to control (p<0.05). The orientation of FRC intermediate layer did not reveal significant differences in microleakage (p>0.05). The microleakeage in enamel was not different between the groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: Use of intermediate GFRC layer between tooth and PFRC could provide alternative method to minimize microleakage. Clinical Relevance: Use of GFRC intermediate layer underneath the particulate filler

  8. Effects of Fiber-reinforced Composite Bases on Microleakage of Composite Restorations in Proximal Locations.

    PubMed

    A, Tezvergil-Mutluay; P K, Vallittu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of direct restorative composite resin upon the addition of an intermediate glass fiber-reinforced composite (GFRC) layer of various fiber orientations between tooth and particulate filler composite resin (PFRC). Cavities were prepared both on the mesial and distal surfaces of sixty extracted human molars with one margin placed below and the other above the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Teeth were assigned to five different groups. Four of the groups received a layer of semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) resin system impregnated E-glass GFRC at the bottom of the cavity: Group 1; unidirectional continuous GFRC (EVS) in buccolingual direction (EVS-BL), Group 2; EVS in mesiodistal direction (EVS-MD), Group 3; bidirectional woven GFRC (EVN), Group 4; multidirectional short GFRC (EXP-MLT), Group 5; PRFC only (control). After acid etching and priming of the cavities and insertion of GFRC layer with the adhesive resin (Scotchbond Multipurpose 3M-ESPE), the cavities were filled incrementally with PRFC (Filtek Z250, 3M-ESPE) and each layer was light cured for 20 s. After finishing and polishing, the restored teeth were water-stored for 24 h at 37 °C and then thermocycled for 6000 cycles between 5-55 °C, before immersion in 0.5 % basic fuchsin dye for 24 h. After sectioning by 3-5 sagittal cuts, each sequential section was imaged and digitally analyzed to determine the stain depth. All GFRC groups in dentin revealed significantly lower microleakage compared to control (p<0.05). The orientation of FRC intermediate layer did not reveal significant differences in microleakage (p>0.05). The microleakeage in enamel was not different between the groups (p>0.05). Use of intermediate GFRC layer between tooth and PFRC could provide alternative method to minimize microleakage. Use of GFRC intermediate layer underneath the particulate filler composite can be used to minimize the leakeage of the restorations.

  9. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed, to be cured, and be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000degC. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200degC, -SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Testing for this included thermal and mechanical testing per ASTM standard tests.

  10. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200C, beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  11. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Wang, Xin; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000 deg C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200 deg C, Beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  12. [Motivation and reinforcement in the systemic mechanisms of behavior: the dynamic engrams of reinforcement].

    PubMed

    Sudakov, K V

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental data are presented which give evidence that in systemic organization of behaviour motivation and reinforcement interact in separate brain neurons. It has been shown that the immunity mechanisms participate in motivation-reinforcement interaction. It is postulated that in the process of learning the reinforcement by means of feedback afferentation forms molecular engrams on the neuronal structures of action acceptor. Such engrams are built by DNA and protein synthesis in ribosomes. Later on these engrams can be activated by the dominant motivation.

  13. Process for making silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salavatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  14. Matrix cracking of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Varun P.; Zok, Frank W.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanics of cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) under general loadings remains incomplete. The present paper addresses one outstanding aspect of this problem: the development of matrix cracks in unidirectional plies under shear loading. To this end, we develop a model based on potential energy differences upstream and downstream of a fully bridged steady-state matrix crack. Through a combination of analytical solutions and finite element simulations of the constituent stresses before and after cracking, we identify the dominant stress components that drive crack growth. We show that, when the axial slip lengths are much larger than the fiber diameter and when interfacial slip precedes cracking, the shear stresses in the constituents are largely unaffected by the presence of the crack; the changes that do occur are confined to a 'core' region within a distance of about one fiber diameter from the crack plane. Instead, the driving force for crack growth derives mainly from the axial stresses-tensile in the fibers and compressive in the matrix-that arise upon cracking. These stresses are well-approximated by solutions based on shear-lag analysis. Combining these solutions with the governing equation for crack growth yields an analytical estimate of the critical shear stress for matrix cracking. An analogous approach is used in deriving the critical stresses needed for matrix cracking under arbitrary in-plane loadings. The applicability of these results to cross-ply CMC laminates is briefly discussed.

  15. Effect of stress on ultrasonic pulses in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, J. H.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    An acoustical-ultrasonic technique was used to demonstrate relationships existing between changes in attenuation of stress waves and tensile stress on an eight ply 0 degree graphite-epoxy fiber reinforced composite. All tests were conducted in the linear range of the material for which no mechanical or macroscopic damage was evident. Changes in attenuation were measured as a function of tensile stress in the frequency domain and in the time domain. Stress wave propagation in these specimens was dispersive, i.e., the wave speed depends on frequency. Wave speeds varied from 267,400 cm/sec to 680,000 cm/sec as the frequency of the signal was varied from 150 kHz to 1.9 MHz which strongly suggests that flexural/lamb wave modes of propagation exist. The magnitude of the attenuation changes depended strongly on tensile stress. It was further observed that the wave speeds increased slightly for all tested frequencies as the stress was increased.

  16. Inelastic Behavior of Randomly Reinforced Polymeric Composites under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. V.; Weitsman, Y. J.

    1997-09-01

    This study examines the development of damage in randomly reinforced polymeric composite materials. The material under consideration was made in a structural reaction injection molding process (SRIM) involving a continuous strand swirl mat of E-glass fibers and a urethane matrix. Theobjective of this work is to establish a predictive deformation model based on principles of viscoelasticity, damage mechanics and plasticity which maybe experimentally verified. Tests involving creep above a threshold stress level and recovery after load removal showed evidence of damage that was uniformly distributed throughout the coupon in the form of multitudes of matrix micro-cracks. Previous studies have shown that the material possesses a void content of about 5% and exhibits material property scatter of about 20%. The effects of damage could be assessed only when the scatter was separated by normalizing the data with individual coupon stiffness. Damage was measured through an increase in compliance and resulted in a permanent strain after load removel. The current study involves repeated loading. Compliance has been observed to increase with load cycle, while the permanent strain remains small and is neglected.Damage, as a function of load cycle, is incorporated into the non-linear viscoelastic model developed previously for creep/recovery response.Comparisons of the predictive model with experimental data are presented and show good agreement.

  17. Improved inhomogeneous finite elements for fabric reinforced composite mechanics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foye, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    There is a need to do routine stress/failure analysis of fabric reinforced composite microstructures to provide additional confidence in critical applications and guide materials development. Conventional methods of 3-D stress analysis are time consuming to set up, run and interpret. A need exists for simpler methods of modeling these structures and analyzing the models. The principal difficulty is the discrete element mesh generation problem. Inhomogeneous finite elements are worth investigating for application to these problems because they eliminate the mesh generation problem. However, there are penalties associated with these elements. Their convergence rates can be slow compared to homogeneous elements. Also, there is no accepted method for obtaining detailed stresses in the constituent materials of each element. This paper shows that the convergence rate can be significantly improved by a simple device which substitutes homogeneous elements for the inhomogeneous ones. The device is shown to work well in simple one and two dimensional problems. However, demonstration of the application to more complex two and three dimensional problems remains to be done. Work is also progressing toward more realistic fabric microstructural geometries.

  18. Life Cycle Assessment of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sujit

    2011-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites is gaining momentum with the pressure to lightweight vehicles, however energy-intensity and cost remain some of the major barriers before this material could be used in large-scale automotive applications. A representative automotive part, i.e., a 30.8 kg steel floor pan having a 17% weight reduction potential with stringent cash performance requirements has been considered for the life cycle energy and emissions analysis based on the latest developments occurring in the precursor type (conventional textile-based PAN vs. renewable-based lignin), part manufacturing (conventional SMC vs. P4) and fiber recycling technologies. Carbon fiber production is estimated to be about 14 times more energy-intensive than conventional steel production, however life cycle primary energy use is estimated to be quite similar to the conventional part, i.e., 18,500 MJ/part, especially when considering the uncertainty in LCI data that exists from using numerous sources in the literature. Lignin P4 technology offers the most life cycle energy and CO2 emissions benefits compared to a conventional stamped steel technology. With a 20% reduction in energy use in the lignin conversion to carbon fiber and free availability of lignin as a by-product of ethanol and wood production, a 30% reduction in life cycle energy use could be obtained. A similar level of life cycle energy savings could also be obtained with a higher part weight reduction potential of 43%.

  19. Influence of Hybridizing Flax and Hemp-Agave Fibers with Glass Fiber as Reinforcement in a Polyurethane Composite.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Pankaj; Bajwa, Dilpreet; Ulven, Chad; Bajwa, Sreekala

    2016-05-19

    In this study, six combinations of flax, hemp, and glass fiber were investigated for a hybrid reinforcement system in a polyurethane (PU) composite. The natural fibers were combined with glass fibers in a PU composite in order to achieve a better mechanical reinforcement in the composite material. The effect of fiber hybridization in PU composites was evaluated through physical and mechanical properties such as water absorption (WA), specific gravity (SG), coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CLTE), flexural and compression properties, and hardness. The mechanical properties of hybridized samples showed mixed trends compared to the unhybridized samples, but hybridization with glass fiber reduced water absorption by 37% and 43% for flax and hemp-agave PU composites respectively.

  20. Influence of Hybridizing Flax and Hemp-Agave Fibers with Glass Fiber as Reinforcement in a Polyurethane Composite

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Pankaj; Bajwa, Dilpreet; Ulven, Chad; Bajwa, Sreekala

    2016-01-01

    In this study, six combinations of flax, hemp, and glass fiber were investigated for a hybrid reinforcement system in a polyurethane (PU) composite. The natural fibers were combined with glass fibers in a PU composite in order to achieve a better mechanical reinforcement in the composite material. The effect of fiber hybridization in PU composites was evaluated through physical and mechanical properties such as water absorption (WA), specific gravity (SG), coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CLTE), flexural and compression properties, and hardness. The mechanical properties of hybridized samples showed mixed trends compared to the unhybridized samples, but hybridization with glass fiber reduced water absorption by 37% and 43% for flax and hemp-agave PU composites respectively. PMID:28773512

  1. Service tough composite structures using the Z-direction reinforcement process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freitas, Glenn; Magee, Constance; Boyce, Joseph; Bott, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Foster-Miller has developed a new process to provide through thickness reinforcement of composite structures. The process reinforces laminates locally or globally on-tool during standard autoclave processing cycles. Initial test results indicate that the method has the potential to significantly reduce delamination in carbon-epoxy. Laminates reinforced with the z-fiber process have demonstrated significant improvements in mode 1 fracture toughness and compression strength after impact. Unlike alternative methods, in-plane properties are not adversely affected.

  2. Damage assessment and residual compression strength of thick composite plates with through-the-thickness reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.

    1990-01-01

    Damage in composite materials was studied with through-the-thickness reinforcements. As a first step it was necessary to develop new ultrasonic imaging technology to better assess internal damage of the composite. A useful ultrasonic imaging technique was successfully developed to assess the internal damage of composite panels. The ultrasonic technique accurately determines the size of the internal damage. It was found that the ultrasonic imaging technique was better able to assess the damage in a composite panel with through-the-thickness reinforcements than by destructively sectioning the specimen and visual inspection under a microscope. Five composite compression-after-impact panels were tested. The compression-after-impact strength of the panels with the through-the-thickness reinforcements was almost twice that of the comparable panel without through-the-thickness reinforcement.

  3. UV radiation effect towards mechanical properties of Natural Fibre Reinforced Composite material: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahzan, Shahruddin; Fitri, Muhamad; Zaleha, M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of natural fibres as reinforcement material have become common in human applications. Many of them are used in composite materials especially in the polymer matrix composites. The use of natural fibres as reinforcement also provide alternative solution of usage instead of being a waste materials. In some applications, these natural reinforced polymer composites were used as the outer layer, making them exposed to ultra violet exposure, hence prone to UV radiation. This paper reviews the effect of UV radiation towards the mechanical properties of natural fibre reinforced polymer matrix composite material. The effect of chemical treatment towards the natural fibre is also investigated. One of the important features that was critically explored was the degradation of the composite materials. The influence of UV radiation on the degradation rate involve several parameters such as wavelength, intensity and exposure time. This review highlights the influence of these parameters in order to provide better solution for polymer matrix composite’s development.

  4. Damage assessment and residual compression strength of thick composite plates with through-the-thickness reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.; Farley, Gary L.; Maiden, Janice; Coogan, Dreux; Moore, Judith G.

    1991-01-01

    Damage in composite materials was studied with through-the-thickness reinforcements. As a first step it was necessary to develop new ultrasonic imaging technology to better assess internal damage of the composite. A useful ultrasonic imaging technique was successfully developed to assess the internal damage of composite panels. The ultrasonic technique accurately determines the size of the internal damage. It was found that the ultrasonic imaging technique was better able to assess the damage in composite panel with through-the-thickness reinforcements than by destructively sectioning the specimen and visual inspection under a microscope. Five composite compression-after-impact panels were tested. The compression-after-impact strength of the panels with the through-the-thickness reinforcements was almost twice that of the comparable panel without through-the-thickness reinforcement.

  5. Evaluation of Effective Material Parameters of CNT-reinforced Composites via 3D BEM

    SciTech Connect

    De Araujo, Francisco Celio

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely employed to build advanced composites. In this work, a Boundary Element Method (BEM) is applied to 3D representative volume elements (RVEs) to estimate mechanical properties of CNT-based composites. To model the thin-walled nanotubes, special integration procedures for calculating nearly-strongly-singular integrals have been developed. The generic BE substructuring algorithm allows modeling complex CNT-reinforced polymers, containing any number of nanotubes of any shape (straight or curved). The subregion-by-subregion strategy, based on Krylov solvers, makes the independent generation, assembly, and storage of the many parts of the complete BE model possible. Thus, significant memory and CPU-time reductions are achieved in avoiding working with an explicit global system of equations. Further CPU-time reduction is obtained by employing a matrix-copy option for repeated subregions. Several applications will illustrate the ability of this algorithm to analyze CNT-based composites.

  6. An in situ Earth reinforcement lateral support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C. K.; Herrmann, L. R.; Romstad, K. M.; Bang, S.; Kim, Y. S.; Denatale, J. S.

    1981-03-01

    An in situ reinforcement lateral support system is composed of an array of reinforcing members that are grouted into the soil mass, a wire-mesh reinforced shotcrete panel facing, and rows of re-bars which form horizontal wales at each reinforcement level. An analytical procedure for evaluating the stability of the system is formulated and the stability analysis is verified by means of a centrifuge model. Studies are presented of the application of this system. The major factors controlling the stability and ground movement of the system were found to be the construction sequence, the soil type, the length, size, and spacing of the reinforcing members, and their orientation with respect to the horizontal ground surface. The system seems to be economical in construction time and cost, and is a viable alternative to more conventional methods for providing temporary support in deep excavation.

  7. Fracture resistance of fiber-reinforced composite crown restorations.

    PubMed

    Ellakwa, Ayman; Thomas, Glyn D; Shortall, Adrian C C; Marquis, Peter M; Burke, F J Trevor

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the laboratory fracture resistance of teeth restored with crowns constructed in one of these materials (BelleGlass HP with and without fiber reinforcement. 40 sound maxillary premolar teeth were chosen and were allocated to four groups of 10 teeth, with the mean size of any group varying by less than 2.5% from other test groups. The teeth were stored in water. Each tooth was fixed in a steel mold and subjected to a standardized crown preparation. Crowns were constructed in belleGlass HP. Group A contained no fiber reinforcement. In Group B, Construct polyethylene braided fibers were applied from the mesial margin over the coronal aspect of the die down to the distal margin, and circumferentially around the preparation, prior to crown construction as in Group A. In Group C, a bundle of experimental S-glass fiber of 9 microm diameter was applied circumferentially prior to crown construction as in Group A. In Group D, two layers of Stick net pre-impregnated woven glass fibers were adapted over the whole surface of the initial thin coping, prior to constructing crowns as in Group A. Crowns were luted with a dual cure resin cement (Nexus), with the dentin surface of the specimens having first been treated with a dentin bonding system. Each specimen was stored under water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours prior to testing, and were then subjected to compressive loading at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/minute in a Universal Testing Machine by way of a 4 mm diameter steel bar placed along the midline fissure of the upper premolar crown. The mean force required (kN) to cause fracture was as follows: Group A 2.0kN, Group B 2.4kN, Group C 2.7kN, Group D 2.3kN. ANOVA showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the groups.

  8. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of CNT and CNF Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadek, M.; Le Foulgoc, B.; Coleman, J. N.; Barron, V.; Sandler, J.; Shaffer, M. S. P.; Fonseca, A.; van Es, M.; Schulte, K.; Blau, W. J.

    2002-10-01

    In this research study carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibres were investigated as possible reinforcements to improve the mechanical and thermal properties of several polymer matrix systems. A range of polymer matrices were examined and include polyvinyl alcohol, poly(9-vinyl carbazole) and polyamide. To compare production methods, polymer composite films and fibres were produced. It was found by adding various mass fractions of nanofillers, that both the Young's modulus and hardness increased dramatically for both films and fibres. In addition, the thermal behaviour was seen to be strongly dependent on the nanofillers added to the polymer matrices.

  9. Esthetic rehabilitation of severely decayed primary incisors using glass fiber reinforced composite: a case report.

    PubMed

    Metha, Deepak; Gulati, Akanksha; Basappa, N; Raju, O S

    2012-01-01

    Restoration of primary maxillary incisors severely damaged by caries or trauma is a clinical challenge in pediatric dental clinics. Early childhood caries is observed in approximately half the child population. In the past, the only treatment option would have been to extract the affected teeth and replace them with prosthetic substitutes. With the introduction of new adhesive systems and restorative materials, alternative approaches in treating these teeth have been proposed. The purpose of this paper was to describe the rehabilitation of primary anterior teeth in a 5-year-old patient using glass fiber reinforced composite resin as an intracanal post.

  10. Longitudinal clinical evaluation of fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Altieri, J V; Burstone, C J; Goldberg, A J; Patel, A P

    1994-01-01

    This report describes a clinical pilot study that monitored a group of 12 patients who have received 14 single tooth replacement experimental restorations made with prefabricated continuous fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) frameworks. Because these restorations represent a purely adhesive restorative system, tooth preparation was not performed. The Kaplan-Meier survival probability at 12 months was approximately 50%. The restoration with the longest service life was a mandibular molar replacement that has remained in service 24 months. With improved survival times, bonded FRC definitive restorations should be plausible.

  11. Assessment of Fracture Toughness of a Discretely-Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepashkin, A. A.; Ozherelkov, D. Yu.; Sazonov, Yu. B.; Komissarov, A. A.; Mozolev, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The stress-strain state at the tip of a crack in a discretely reinforced quasi-isotropic carbon-carbon composite material (CCCM) is studied. The stress intensity factor J 1 c and the J-integral are evaluated in accordance with domestic methods and international standards. The distribution of the fields of displacements and strains on the surface of the specimens is determined by the method of numerical correlation of digital images using a VIC-D system. The applicability of different criteria to evaluation of the fracture toughness of CCCM of type TERMAR is determined.

  12. Reinforcement effect of soy protein and carbohydrates in polymer composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The modulus of soft polymer material can be increased by filler reinforcement. A review of using soy protein and carbohydrates as alternative renewable reinforcement material is presented here. Dry soy protein and carbohydrates are rigid and can form strong filler networks through hydrogen-bonding...

  13. On Healable Polymers and Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Christian Eric

    Polymeric materials capable of healing damage would be valuable in structural applications where access for repair is limited. Approaches to creating such materials are reviewed, with the present work focusing on polymers with thermally reversible covalent cross-links. These special cross-links are Diels-Alder (DA) adducts, which can be separated and re-formed, enabling healing of mechanical damage at the molecular level. Several DA-based polymers, including 2MEP4FS, are mechanically and thermally characterized. The polymerization reaction of 2MEP4FS is modeled and the number of established DA adducts is associated with the glass transition temperature of the polymer. The models are applied to concentric cylinder rotational measurements of 2MEP4FS prepolymer at room and elevated temperatures to describe the viscosity as a function of time, temperature, and conversion. Mechanical damage including cracks and scratches are imparted in cured polymer samples and subsequently healed. Damage due to high temperature thermal degradation is observed to not be reversible. The ability to repair damage without flowing polymer chains makes DA-based healable polymers particularly well-suited for crack healing. The double cleavage drilled compression (DCDC) fracture test is investigated as a useful method of creating and incrementally growing cracks in a sample. The effect of sample geometry on the fracture behavior is experimentally and computationally studied. Computational and empirical models are developed to estimate critical stress intensity factors from DCDC results. Glass and carbon fiber-reinforced composites are fabricated with 2MEP4FS as the matrix material. A prepreg process is developed that uses temperature to control the polymerization rate of the monomers and produce homogeneous prepolymer for integration with a layer of unidirectional fiber. Multiple prepreg layers are laminated to form multi-layered cross-ply healable composites, which are characterized in

  14. Positron annihilation studies of moisture in graphite-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.; Buckingham, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The positron lifetime technique of monitoring absorbed moisture is applied to several composites, including graphite/polymides which are candidates for high-temperature (over 260 C) applications. The experimental setup is a conventional fast-slow coincidence system wherein the positron lifetime is measured with respect to a reference time determined by the detection of a nuclear gamma ray emitted simultaneously with the positron. From the experiments, a rate of change of positron mean lifetime per unit mass of water can be determined for each type of specimen. Positron lifetime spectra are presented for a graphite/polyimide composite and for a pure polyimide.

  15. Load-bearing capacity of human incisor restored with various fiber-reinforced composite posts.

    PubMed

    Le Bell-Rönnlöf, Anna-Maria; Lassila, Lippo V J; Kangasniemi, Ilkka; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the load-bearing capacity and microstrain of incisors restored with posts of various kinds. Both prefabricated titanium posts and different fiber-reinforced composite posts were tested. The crowns of human incisors were cut and post preparation was carried out. The roots were divided into groups: (1) prefabricated serrated titanium posts, (2) prefabricated carbon fiber-reinforced composite posts, (3) individually formed glass fiber-reinforced composite posts with the canal full of fibers, and (4) individually formed "split" glass fiber-reinforced composite posts. The posts were cemented and composite crowns were made. Intact human incisors were used as reference. All roots were embedded in acrylic resin cylinders and stored at room temperature in water. Static load was applied under a loading angle of 45° using a universal testing machine. On half of the specimens microstrain was measured with strain gages and an acoustic emission analysis was carried out. Failure mode assessment was also made. The group with titanium posts showed highest number of unfavorable failures compared to the groups with fiber-reinforced composite posts. With fiber-reinforced composite posts the failures may more often be favorable compared to titanium posts, which clinically means repairable failures. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Matrix free fiber reinforced polymeric composites via high-temperature high-pressure sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao

    2004-11-01

    A novel manufacturing process called high-temperature high-pressure sintering was studied and explored. Solid fiber reinforced composites are produced by consolidating and compacting layers of polymeric fabrics near their melting temperature under high pressure. There is no need to use an additional matrix as a bonding material. Partial melting and recrystallization of the fibers effectively fuse the material together. The product is called a "matrix free" fiber reinforced composite and essentially a one-polymer composite in which the fiber and the matrix have the same chemical composition. Since the matrix is eliminated in the process, it is possible to achieve a high fiber volume fraction and light weight composite. Interfacial adhesion between fibers and matrix is very good due to the molecular continuity throughout the system and the material is thermally shapeable. Plain woven Spectra RTM cloth made of SpectraRTM fiber was used to comprehensively study the process. The intrinsic properties of the material demonstrate that matrix free SpectraRTM fiber reinforced composites have the potential to make ballistic shields such as body armor and helmets. The properties and structure of the original fiber and the cloth were carefully examined. Optimization of the processing conditions started with the probing of sintering temperatures by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Coupled with the information from structural, morphological and mechanical investigations on the samples sintered at different processing conditions, the optimal processing windows were determined to ensure that the outstanding original properties of the fibers translate into high ballistic performance of the composites. Matrix free SpectraRTM composites exhibit excellent ballistic resistance in the V50 tests conducted by the US Army. In the research, process-structure-property relationship is established and correlations between various properties and structures are understood. Thorough knowledge is

  17. Modeling of geosynthetic reinforced capping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanadham, B.V.S.; Koenig, D.; Jessberger, H.L.

    1997-12-31

    The investigation deals with the influence of a geosynthetic reinforcement on the deformation behavior and sealing efficiency of the reinforced mineral sealing layer at the onset of non-uniform settlements. The research program is mainly concentrated in studying the influence of reinforcement inclusion in restraining cracks and crack propagation due to soil-geosynthetic bond efficiency. Centrifuge model tests are conducted in the 500 gt capacity balanced beam Bochum geotechnical Centrifuge (Z1) simulating a differential deformation of a mineral sealing layer of a landfill with the help of trap-door arrangement. By comparing the performance of the deformed mineral sealing layer with and without geogrid, the reinforcement ability of the geogrid in controlling the crack propagation and permeability of the mineral swing layer is evaluated.

  18. An analysis of grain boundary sliding and grain boundary cavitation in discontinuously reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1996-05-01

    In this study, the creep cavitation and rupture characteristics of polycrystalline matrix material and discontinuously reinforced composites are investigated including grain boundary sliding behavior, reinforcement aspect ratio and interfacial behavior between the reinforcement and surrounding matrix grains. Free sliding of the grain boundaries, a continuous nucleation of the grain boundary cavities, their diffusional growth and coalescence to form grain boundary facet cracks are fully accounted for in the analyses. The results indicate that, with sliding grain boundaries, the stress enhancement factor for the composites is much higher than the one observed for the matrix material and its value increases with increasing reinforcement aspect ratio, reduction in the matrix grain size and sliding interfacial behavior between the reinforcement and the matrix. For the composites, the influence of grain boundary sliding on the creep life is reduced by the stress concentration effect that is seen at the end of the reinforcements. In contrast with the behavior of polycrystalline matrix material in composites after the formation of the first facet crack, resulting from the coalescence of the cavities, a significant time is required for the formation of the other grain boundary facet cracks across the ligament to cause final rupture. The results also show that experimentally observed higher creep exponents or stress dependent creep exponent values in discontinuously reinforced composites can occur as a result of creep damage evolution behavior.

  19. Modelling the effect of reinforcement deformation on the filling phase during liquid composite moulding

    SciTech Connect

    Long, A.C.; Rudd, C.D.; Blanchard, P.J.; Smith, P.; Chan, A.W.

    1997-12-31

    In recent years a number of researchers have developed simulations of the filling phase during liquid composite moulding (LCM). These rely on an accurate knowledge of the reinforcement permeability, which is usually determined experimentally using a simple flow experiment based on roll-stock reinforcement samples. However this neglects the effects of reinforcement deformation, which may result in a highly nonuniform distribution of fibre orientations and volume fractions. This paper attempts to account for these variations by integrating fabric drape modelling and LCM flow simulation software packages. Using this approach, the effects of reinforcement deformation on the filling phase are demonstrated on a generic component geometry using alternative injection strategies.

  20. R&D on glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites for superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nannan; Wang, Ke; Ma, Hongming; Pan, Wanjiang; Chen, Qingqing

    2016-01-01

    The glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites play an important role in superconducting Tokamak, which are used to insulate the metal components, such as superconducting winding, cooling pipes, metal electrodes and so on. For the components made of metal and glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites, thermal shrinkage leads to non-ignorable thermal stress, therefore, much attention should be paid on the thermal shrinkage rate of glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites. The structural design of glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites should aim at reducing thermal stress. In this paper, the density, glass fiber content and thermal shrinkage rate of five insulation tubes were tested. The testing results will be applied in structural design and mechanical analysis of isolators for superconducting Tokamak.

  1. Cost effective production techniques for continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, W.D.; Spelz, U.

    1995-09-01

    Cost effective techniques for fabrication of continuous fibre reinforced ceramic matrix composites like filament winding, prepreg technique and resin transfer moulding are reported. The advantages and disadvantages of the three different manufacture routes are given and examples are shown.

  2. Microstructure and Tensile Behaviour of B4C Reinforced ZA43 Alloy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adaveesh, B.; Halesh, G. M.; Nagaral, Madeva; Mohan Kumar, T. S.

    2016-09-01

    The work is carried out to investigate and study the mechanical properties of B4C reinforced ZA43 alloy metal matrix composites. In the present work ZA43 alloy is taken as the base matrix and B4C particulates as reinforcement material to prepare metal matrix composites by stir casting method. For metal matrix composites the reinforcement material was varied from 0 to 6 wt.% in steps of 3 wt.%. For each composite, the reinforcement particulates were preheated to a temperature of 300°C and dispersed into a vortex of molten ZA43 alloy. The microstructural characterization was done using scanning electron microscope. Mechanical properties like hardness, ultimate tensile strength and yield strength were evaluated as per ASTM standards. Further, scanning electron microphotographs revealed that there was uniform distribution of B4C particulates in ZA43 alloy matrix. Hardness, ultimate tensile strength and yield strength increased as wt.% of B4C increased in the base matrix.

  3. Failure mode interaction in fiber reinforced laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Pavana

    A novel computational modeling framework to predict the compressive strength of fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite (FRPC) laminates has been presented. The model development has been motivated by a set of experimental results on the compression response of two different FRPCs. The model accounts for failure mode interaction between kink-banding and interface fracture (or delamination), which are observed in the experimental results. To reduce the size of the computational model, those interfaces that are most susceptible to delamination are first determined through a free-edge stress analysis. Furthermore, 0-axis layers, which are passive in the failure process are represented through an equivalent homogenized model, but the microstructural features of the on-axis layers (zero plies) are retained in the computational model. The predictions of the model matched well with the experimental observations, and they were found to accurately account for failure mechanism interactions. Therefore, this model has the potential to replace the need to carry out large numbers of tests to obtain the compressive strength allowable for FRPC laminates, the latter allowable being an essential element in the design of lightweight FRPC aerostructures. Furthermore, the thesis presents a new computational model to predict fiber/matrix splitting failure, a failure mode that is frequently observed in in-plane tensile failure of FRPC's. By considering a single lamina, this failure mechanism was seamlessly modeled through the development of a continuum-decohesive nite element (CDFE). The CDFE was motivated by the variational multiscale cohesive method (VMCM) presented earlier by Rudraraju et al. (2010) at the University of Michigan. In the CDFE, the transition from a continuum to a non-continuum is modeled directly (physically) without resorting to enrichment of the shape functions of the element. Thus, the CDFE is a natural merger between cohesive elements and continuum elements. The

  4. Development of multifunctional fiber reinforced polymer composites through ZnO nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakooti, Mohammad H.; Patterson, Brendan A.; Hwang, Hyun-Sik; Sodano, Henry A.

    2016-04-01

    Piezoelectric nanowires, in particular zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, have been vastly used in the fabrication of electromechanical devices to convert wasted mechanical energy into useful electrical energy. Over recent years, the growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanowires on various structural fibers has led to the development of fiber-based nanostructured energy harvesting devices. However, the development of more realistic energy harvesters that are capable of continuous power generation requires a sufficient mechanical strength to withstand typical structural loading conditions. Yet, a durable, multifunctional material system has not been developed thoroughly enough to generate electrical power without deteriorating the mechanical performance. Here, a hybrid composite energy harvester is fabricated in a hierarchical design that provides both efficient power generating capabilities while enhancing the structural properties of the fiber reinforced polymer composite. Through a simple and low-cost process, a modified aramid fabric with vertically aligned ZnO nanowires grown on the fiber surface is embedded between woven carbon fabrics, which serve as the structural reinforcement as well as the top and the bottom electrodes of the nanowire arrays. The performance of the developed multifunctional composite is characterized through direct vibration excitation and tensile strength examination.

  5. Lamb wave propagation in Z-pin reinforced co-cured composite pi-joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Eric D.; Soni, Som R.; Kapoor, Hitesh

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents an initial study on Lamb wave propagation characteristics in z-pin reinforced, co-cured composite pi-joints for the purposes of structural health monitoring (SHM). Pi-joint test articles were designed and created to replicate a co-cured, all composite skin-spar joint found within a typical aircraft wing structure. Because pi-joints exhibit various complex damage modes, formal studies are required if SHM systems are to be developed to monitor these types of joints for potential damage. Experiments were conducted on a undamaged (healthy) and damaged test articles where Lamb waves were excited using one lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducer. A three-dimensional (3D) scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was used to collect high-density scans of both the in-plane and out-of-plane velocity measurements. In the damaged test article, where delamination, matrix cracking, and fiber breakage can clearly be seen, changes in both the fundamental antisymmetric A0 and symmetric S0 Lamb wave modes are apparent. In both test articles, the effects of narrow geometry, discontinuity due to the attachment of the web, and thickness has detectable effects on Lamb wave propagation. From the comparisons between Lamb waves propagating through the undamaged and damaged test articles, it is clear that damage can be detected using Lamb waves in z-pin reinforced, co-cured composite pi-joints for this case of extensive damage.

  6. Mechanical analysis of three dimensional woven carbon fiber-reinforced composites using fiber-based continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Hyunchul; An, Yongsan; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2016-10-01

    A new numerical method for analyzing the mechanical behavior of three-dimensional (3D) woven carbon fiber-reinforced composites was developed by considering changes in the fiber orientation and calculating the stress increments due to incremental deformations. The model consisted of four steps, starting update of the yarn orientation based on incremental deformation gradient. The stiffness matrix was then computed using the updated yarn orientation. Next, partial damage and propagation were incorporated into the stress calculation using modified ply discount method. The failure conditions were obtained by testing the unidirectional composites and formulated using Puck's criterion. This numerical model was finally implemented into commercial finite element software, ABAQUS, as a user material subroutine. As for experiment, 3D woven composite samples was manufactured using laboratory built-in system and characterized, the results of which were compared with simulated results, demonstrating that the current numerical model can properly predict the mechanical behavior of 3D fiber-reinforced composites.

  7. High strain rate superplasticity of AlN particulate reinforced aluminium alloy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, T. ); L'Esperance, G.; Hong, B.D. )

    1994-08-01

    Ceramic whisker or particulate reinforced aluminium alloy composites have a great potential for automobile engineering components, aerospace structures, semi-conductor packaging and so on, because of the composites ability to exhibit a high specific elastic modulus and specific tensile strength, excellent wear resistance and heat resistance, low thermal expansion and good dimensional stability. A serious problem involving practical application of ceramic whisker or particulate reinforced aluminium alloy composites is due to the low tensile ductility, fracture toughness at room temperature and, also, their hardness qualities that make it difficult to deform by conventional forming processing and machining by ordinary tools. It has been found, however, that aluminium alloy composites reinforced by SiC or Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] whiskers or particulates produce superplasticity at a high strain rate of about 0.1s[sup [minus]1]. Superplastic deformation mechanisms of the ceramic whisker or particulate reinforced aluminium alloy composites are fine grain boundary sliding, interfacial sliding at a liquid phase and dynamic recrystallization. An AlN particulate reinforced aluminium alloy composite exhibits a high elastic modulus and a high thermal conductivity, and their thermal expansion is similar to silicon in that the AlN particulate reinforced aluminum alloy composite is expected to apply to semi-conductor packaging in the aerospace structure. In addition, if the composite could produce superplasticity at high strain rates, the market of aerospace application for superplastic composites could be expanded. The purpose of this study is to make clear if an AlN particulate reinforced aluminium alloy composite can produce superplasticity at high strain rate and the superplastic characteristics.

  8. Characterization of Thermal Behavior of Epoxy Composites Reinforced with Curaua Fibers by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcelos, Mariana A.; Ribeiro, Carolina Gomes D.; Ferreira, Jordana; Vieira, Janaina da S.; Margem, Frederico M.; Monteiro, Sergio N.

    Epoxy composites reinforced with natural lignocellulosic fibers have, in recent times, been gaining attention in engineering areas as lighter and cheaper alternatives for traditional composites such as the "fiberglass". The curaua fiber is the one strongest today being considered as reinforcement of composites for automobile interior parts. In fact, several studies are currently being dedicated to curaua fiber composites since physical and mechanical properties are required for practical uses. In this work, the thermal behavior of epoxy composites reinforced with up to 30 % in volume of curaua fibers was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, DSC. The results showed endothermic and exothermic events associated with water release and possible molecular chain amorphous transformation. Comparison with similar composites permitted to propose mechanism that explains this DSC thermal behavior.

  9. Preparation and characterization of wheat straw fibers for reinforcing application in injection molded thermoplastic composites.

    PubMed

    Panthapulakkal, S; Zereshkian, A; Sain, M

    2006-01-01

    The potential of wheat straw fibers prepared by mechanical and chemical processes as reinforcing additives for thermoplastics was investigated. Fibers prepared by mechanical and chemical processes were characterized with respect to their chemical composition, morphology, and physical, mechanical and thermal properties. Composites of polypropylene filled with 30% wheat straw fibers were prepared and their mechanical properties were also evaluated. The fibers prepared by chemical process exhibited better mechanical, physical and thermal properties. Wheat straw fiber reinforced polypropylene composites exhibited significantly enhanced properties compared to virgin polypropylene. However, the strength properties of the composites were less for chemically prepared fiber filled composites. This was due to the poor dispersion of the fibers under the processing conditions used. These results indicate that wheat straw fibers can be used as potential reinforcing materials for making thermoplastic composites.

  10. Physico-mechanical properties of chemically treated palm and coir fiber reinforced polypropylene composites.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Mominul; Hasan, Mahbub; Islam, Md Saiful; Ali, Md Ershad

    2009-10-01

    In this work, palm and coir fiber reinforced polypropylene bio-composites were manufactured using a single extruder and injection molding machine. Raw palm and coir were chemically treated with benzene diazonium salt to increase their compatibility with the polypropylene matrix. Both raw and treated palm and coir fiber at five level of fiber loading (15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 wt.%) was utilized during composite manufacturing. Microstructural analysis and mechanical tests were conducted. Comparison has been made between the properties of the palm and coir fiber composites. Treated fiber reinforced specimens yielded better mechanical properties compared to the raw composites, while coir fiber composites had better mechanical properties than palm fiber ones. Based on fiber loading, 30% fiber reinforced composites had the optimum set of mechanical properties.

  11. Calculation of the relative uniformity coefficient on the green composites reinforced with cotton and hemp fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baciu, Florin; Hadǎr, Anton; Sava, Mihaela; Marinel, Stǎnescu Marius; Bolcu, Dumitru

    2016-06-01

    In this paper it is studied the influence of discontinuities on elastic and mechanical properties of green composite materials (reinforced with fabric of cotton or hemp). In addition, it is studied the way variations of the volume f the reinforcement influences the elasticity modulus and the tensile strength for the studied composite materials. In order to appreciate the difference in properties between different areas of the composite material, and also the dimensions of the defective areas, we have introduced a relative uniformity coefficient with which the mechanical behavior of the studied composite is compared with a reference composite. To validate the theoretical results we have obtained we made some experiments, using green composites reinforced with fabric, with different imperfection introduced special by cutting the fabric.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of TiB2 Reinforced Aluminium Matrix Composites: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Narendra; Gautam, Gaurav; Gautam, Rakesh Kumar; Mohan, Anita; Mohan, Sunil

    2016-10-01

    Aluminium-matrix composites (AMCs) are developed to meet the demands of light weight high performance materials in aerospace, automotive, marine and other applications. The properties of AMCs can be tailored suitably by combinations of matrix, reinforcement and processing route. AMCs are one of the most attractive alternatives for the manufacturing of light weight and high strength parts due to their low density and high specific strength. There are various techniques for preparing the AMCs with different reinforcement particles. In AMCs, the reinforcements are usually in the form of metal oxides, carbides, borides, nitrides and their combination. Among the various reinforcements titanium di-boride (TiB2) is of much interest due to its excellent stiffness, hardness, and wear resistance. This paper attempts to provide an overview to explore the possibilities of synthesizing titanium di-boride reinforced AMCs with different techniques. The mechanical and tribological properties of these composites have been emphasized to project these as tribo-materials.

  13. Method for Forming Fiber Reinforced Composite Bodies with Graded Composition and Stress Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Smialek, James A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A near-net, complex shaped ceramic fiber reinforced silicon carbide based composite bodies with graded compositions and stress zones is disclosed. To provide the composite a fiber preform is first fabricated and an interphase is applied by chemical vapor infiltration, sol-gel or polymer processes. This first body is further infiltrated with a polymer mixture containing carbon, and/or silicon carbide, and additional oxide, carbide, or nitride phases forming a second body. One side of the second body is spray coated or infiltrated with slurries containing high thermal expansion and oxidation resistant. crack sealant phases and the other side of this second body is coated with low expansion phase materials to form a third body. This third body consisting of porous carbonaceous matrix surrounding the previously applied interphase materials, is then infiltrated with molten silicon or molten silicon-refractory metal alloys to form a fourth body. The resulting fourth body comprises dense composites consisting of fibers with the desired interphase which are surrounded by silicon carbide and other second phases materials at the outer and inner surfaces comprising material of silicon, germanium, refractory metal suicides, borides, carbides, oxides, and combinations thereof The resulting composite fourth body has different compositional patterns from one side to the other.

  14. Compression response of thick layer composite laminates with through-the-thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Smith, Barry T.; Maiden, Janice

    1992-01-01

    Compression and compression-after-impact (CAI) tests were conducted on seven different AS4-3501-6 (0/90) 0.64-cm thick composite laminates. Four of the seven laminates had through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforcement fibers. Two TTT reinforcement methods, stitching and integral weaving, and two reinforcement fibers, Kevlar and carbon, were used. The remaining three laminates were made without TTT reinforcements and were tested to establish a baseline for comparison with the laminates having TTT reinforcement. Six of the seven laminates consisted of nine thick layers whereas the seventh material was composed of 46 thin plies. The use of thick-layer material has the potential for reducing structural part cost because of the reduced part count (layers of material). The compression strengths of the TTT reinforced laminates were approximately one half those of the materials without TTT reinforcements. However, the CAI strengths of the TTT reinforced materials were approximately twice those of materials without TTT reinforcements. The improvement in CAI strength is due to an increase in interlaminar strength produced by the TTT reinforcement. Stitched laminates had slightly higher compression and CAI strengths than the integrally woven laminates.

  15. Optimization of woven jute/glass fibre-reinforced polyester hybrid composite solar parabolic trough collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. S.; Singla, Hitesh

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, structural analysis of 5.77m × 4m woven jute (J)/glass (G) fibre-reinforced polyester hybrid composite solar parabolic trough is carried out based on trough parameters to obtain the minimum RMS local slope deviation, termed as SDx value under gravity loading. The optimization is done by varying parameters viz. direction and size of reinforced conduits, stacking number and sequence of hybrid trough laminate at fibre orientation of Δθ=45° and Δθ=60° amongst the layers at 0° collector angle. The analysis revealed that the configuration in which the conduits are placed in both X and Y directions is preferred over other configurations to scale down the effect of wind loads. Furthermore it has been observed that laminate of the order [0°G/45°G/-45°J/90°J]s undergoes minimum surface deformation amongst all the other configurations at conduit reinforcement in both X and Y directions for a conduit thickness of 0.75 mm and radius of 10 mm and obtains the overall SDx value of 1.3492 mrad. The results shows that proposed trough model is very promising and evolves a cost effective system.

  16. Modelling of the impact response of fibre-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.L.; Harding, J.; Ruiz, C.

    1990-01-01

    The work carried out over the course of a three year period in three different areas is summarized. Experimental techniques for determining the impact mechanical properties of fiber reinforced epoxy laminates are studied. The experimental results obtained from the tensile, compressive and interlaminar shear properties of woven reinforced carbon/epoxy, glass/epoxy, Kevlar/epoxy and hybrid carbon-glass/epoxy laminates are analyzed. Attempts at modeling the experimentally observed behavior are described.

  17. An anisotropic constitutive model with biaxial-tension coupling for woven composite reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Huang, Xiaoshuang; Peng, Xiongqi; Gong, Youkun

    2016-10-01

    Based on fiber reinforced continuum mechanics theory, an anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model with biaxial tension coupling for woven composite reinforcements is developed. Experimental data from literature are used to identify material parameters in the constitutive model for a specific balanced plain woven fabric. The developed model is validated by comparing numerical results with experimental biaxial tension data under different stretch ratios and picture-frame shear data, demonstrating that the developed constitutive model is highly suitable to characterize the highly non-linear and strongly anisotropic mechanical behaviors of woven composite reinforcements under large deformation.

  18. Impact and dynamic mechanical thermal properties of textile silk reinforced epoxy resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, K.; Guan, J.

    2016-07-01

    Silk fabric reinforced epoxy resin composites (SFRPs) were prepared using simple techniques of hand lay-up, hot-press and vacuum treatment, and a series of volume fractions of silk reinforcements were achieved. The impact properties and dynamic mechanical properties of SFRPs were investigated using a pendulum impact testing method and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The results suggest that silk reinforcement could greatly enhance the mechanical performances of SFRPs. The impact strength reached a maximum of 71 kJ/m2 for 60%-silk SFRP, which demonstrated a potential of silk composites for defence and impact- resistant materials.

  19. Strength and deformability of concrete beams reinforced by non-metallic fiber and composite rebar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudyakov, K. L.; Plevkov, V. S.; Nevskii, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Production of durable and high-strength concrete structures with unique properties has always been crucial. Therefore special attention has been paid to non-metallic composite and fiber reinforcement. This article describes the experimental research of strength and deformability of concrete beams with dispersed and core fiber-based reinforcement. As composite reinforcement fiberglass reinforced plastic rods with diameters 6 mm and 10 mm are used. Carbon and basalt fibers are used as dispersed reinforcement. The developed experimental program includes designing and production of flexural structures with different parameters of dispersed fiber and composite rebar reinforcement. The preliminary testing of mechanical properties of these materials has shown their effectiveness. Structures underwent bending testing on a special bench by applying flexural static load up to complete destruction. During the tests vertical displacements were recorded, as well as value of actual load, slippage of rebars in concrete, crack formation. As a result of research were obtained structural failure and crack formation graphs, value of fracture load and maximum displacements of the beams at midspan. Analysis of experimental data showed the effectiveness of using dispersed reinforcement of concrete and the need for prestressing of fiberglass composite rebar.

  20. A study on flammability and moisture absorption behavior of sisal/coir fiber reinforced hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akash; Girisha, K. G.; Venkatesha Gupta, N. S.; Sreenivas Rao, K. V.

    2017-04-01

    Cellulosic fiber reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC’s) are more frequently applied in construction industry and transportation, in which their flammability and water absorption behaviors are important. Fire resistance of cellulosic fiber reinforced composites is important parameter that often limits the application of composites in a given area. This work presents experimental results of a fire retardant behavior and moisture absorption behavior of different weight percentage (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 wt. %) of sisal/coir fiber reinforced epoxy resin hybrid composites. Traditional cold pressing method was used to fabricate hybrid composites. Flammability behavior of the hybrid composite was studied by using vertical and horizontal burning rates as per standard UL-94. Addition of the cellulosic fiber increases the flammability since natural fiber supports fire. It proves as a bad flame retardant due to the generation of a surface layer during pyrolysis of the cellulosic fiber which exhibits poor fire retardant nature. This layer acts as supporter of fire, which spreads the heat from being transferred to the un-pyrolised material. The speed of flame is much faster in vertical burning position compared to horizontal burning position due to preheating of the specimen. Moisture absorption of sisal/coir fiber reinforced epoxy resin hybrid composites are studied according to ISO 62:1999 standard procedure. Absorption of moisture increases with increasing in the reinforcement weight percentage of cellulosic fiber in fabricated hybrid composite.