Science.gov

Sample records for composition dependent structural

  1. Some Lower Valence Vanadium Fluorides: Their Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and Composition Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Y. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes some contemporary concepts unique to the structure of advanced solids, i.e., their crystal distortions, domain structures, modulated structures, ferrimagnetism, and composition dependence. (Author/CS)

  2. Nepheline structural and chemical dependence on melt composition

    SciTech Connect

    Marcial, José; Crum, Jarrod; Neill, Owen

    Nepheline crystallizes upon slow-cooling in some melts concentrated in Na2O and Al2O3, which can result in a residual glass phase of low chemical durability. Nepheline can incorporate many components often found in high-level waste radioactive borosilicate glass, including glass network ions (e.g., Si, Al, Fe), alkali metals (e.g., Cs, K, Na, and possibly Li), alkaline-earth metals (e.g., Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg), and transition metals (e.g., Mn, and possibly Cr, Zn, Ni). When crystallized from melts of different compositions, nepheline chemistry varies as a function of starting glass composition. Five simulated high level nuclear waste borosilicate glasses shown to crystallize largemore » fractions of nepheline on slow cooling, were selected for study. These melts constituted a range of Al2O3, B2O3, CaO, Na2O, K2O, Fe2O3, and SiO2 compositions. Compositional analyses of nepheline crystals in glass by electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) indicate that boron is unlikely to be present in any significant concentration, if at all, in nepheline. Also, several models are presented for calculating the fraction of vacancies in the nepheline structure.« less

  3. Optical study on the dependence of breast tissue composition and structure on subject anamnesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taroni, Paola; Quarto, Giovanna; Pifferi, Antonio; Abbate, Francesca; Balestreri, Nicola; Menna, Simona; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2015-07-01

    Time domain multi-wavelength (635 to 1060 nm) optical mammography was performed on 200 subjects to estimate their average breast tissue composition in terms of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, water, lipid and collagen, and structural information, as provided by scattering parameters (amplitude and power). Significant (and often marked) dependence of tissue composition and structure on age, menopausal status, body mass index, and use of oral contraceptives was demonstrated.

  4. Temperature and composition dependence of Mg-based amorphous-alloy structure factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    From, M.; Muir, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the x-ray total structure factors for amorphous Mg70Zn30, Ca70Mg30, and Mg85.5Cu14.5 at 9, 150, and 300 K have been made. The composition dependence of the room-temperature structure factors of MgxZn1-x have also been measured for values of x=0.65, 0.70, and 0.75. These compositional changes can be accounted for by the increase in average atomic size as the fraction of the larger Mg atoms increases with x. Also the Perkus-Yevick hard-sphere model is sufficient to calculate the change in structure factor with composition if an experimental structure factor is available from which the sphere diameters and packing fraction can be extracted. The temperature dependence of the structure factors is consistent with the observed thermal expansion and a Debye phonon model with Meisel and Cote's approximation for the multiphonon contribution to the structure factor.

  5. Wood production response to climate change will depend critically on forest composition and structure.

    PubMed

    Coomes, David A; Flores, Olivier; Holdaway, Robert; Jucker, Tommaso; Lines, Emily R; Vanderwel, Mark C

    2014-12-01

    Established forests currently function as a major carbon sink, sequestering as woody biomass about 26% of global fossil fuel emissions. Whether forests continue to act as a global sink will depend on many factors, including the response of aboveground wood production (AWP; MgC ha(-1 ) yr(-1) ) to climate change. Here, we explore how AWP in New Zealand's natural forests is likely to change. We start by statistically modelling the present-day growth of 97 199 individual trees within 1070 permanently marked inventory plots as a function of tree size, competitive neighbourhood and climate. We then use these growth models to identify the factors that most influence present-day AWP and to predict responses to medium-term climate change under different assumptions. We find that if the composition and structure of New Zealand's forests were to remain unchanged over the next 30 years, then AWP would increase by 6-23%, primarily as a result of physiological responses to warmer temperatures (with no appreciable effect of changing rainfall). However, if warmth-requiring trees were able to migrate into currently cooler areas and if denser canopies were able to form, then a different AWP response is likely: forests growing in the cool mountain environments would show a 30% increase in AWP, while those in the lowland would hardly respond (on average, -3% when mean annual temperature exceeds 8.0 °C). We conclude that response of wood production to anthropogenic climate change is not only dependent on the physiological responses of individual trees, but is highly contingent on whether forests adjust in composition and structure. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Composition-dependent structural and transport properties of amorphous transparent conducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Rabi; Buchholz, D. Bruce; Chang, Robert P. H.; Medvedeva, Julia E.

    2015-05-01

    Structural properties of amorphous In-based oxides, In -X -O with X =Zn , Ga, Sn, or Ge, are investigated using ab initio molecular dynamics liquid-quench simulations. The results reveal that indium retains its average coordination of 5.0 upon 20% X fractional substitution for In, whereas X cations satisfy their natural coordination with oxygen atoms. This finding suggests that the carrier generation is primarily governed by In atoms, in accord with the observed carrier concentration in amorphous In-O and In -X -O . At the same time, the presence of X affects the number of six-coordinated In atoms as well as the oxygen sharing between the InO6 polyhedra. Based on the obtained interconnectivity and spatial distribution of the InO6 and XO x polyhedra in amorphous In -X -O , composition-dependent structural models of the amorphous oxides are derived. The results help explain our Hall mobility measurements in In -X -O thin films grown by pulsed-laser deposition and highlight the importance of long-range structural correlations in the formation of amorphous oxides and their transport properties.

  7. Structural state scale-dependent physical characteristics and endurance of cermet composite for cutting metal

    SciTech Connect

    Ovcharenko, V. E., E-mail: ovcharenko.ove45@mail.ru; Ivanov, Yu. F., E-mail: ivanov.yufi55@mail.ru; Mohovikov, A. A., E-mail: mohovikov.maa28@rambler.ru

    A structural-phase state developed on the surface of a TiC/Ni–Cr–Al cermet alloy under superfast heating and cooling produced by pulse electron beam melting has been presented. The effect of the surface’s structural state multimodality on the temperature dependencies of the friction and endurance of the cermet tool in cutting metal has been investigated. The high-energy flux treatment of subsurface layers by electron beam pulses in argon-containing gas discharge plasma serves to improve the endurance of metal cutting tools manifold (by a factor of 6), to reduce the friction via precipitation of secondary 200 nm carbides in binder interlayers. It ismore » possible to improve the cermet tool endurance for cutting metal by a factor of 10–12 by irradiating the cermet in a reactive nitrogen-containing atmosphere with the ensuing precipitation of nanosize 50 nm AlN particles in the binder interlayers.« less

  8. Electro-mechanical analysis of composite and sandwich multilayered structures by shell elements with node-dependent kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera; Valvano; Kulikov

    2018-01-01

    In this work, a new class of finite elements for the analysis of composite and sandwich shells embedding piezoelectric skins and patches is proposed. The main idea of models coupling is developed by presenting the concept of nodal dependent kinematics where the same finite element can present at each node a different approximation of the main unknowns by setting a node-wise through-the-thickness approximation base. In a global/local approach scenario, the computational costs can be reduced drastically by assuming refined theories only in those zones/nodes of the structural domain where the resulting strain and stress states, and their electro-mechanical coupling present a complex distribution. Several numerical investigations are carried out to validate the accuracy and efficiency of the present shell element. An accurate representation of mechanical stresses and electric displacements in localized zones is possible with reduction of the computational costs if an accurate distribution of the higher-order kinematic capabilities is performed. On the contrary, the accuracy of the solution in terms of mechanical displacements and electric potential values depends on the global approximation over the whole structure. The efficacy of the present node-dependent variable kinematic models, thus, depends on the characteristics of the problem under consideration as well as on the required analysis type.

  9. Dose dependence of radiation damage in nano-structured amorphous SiOC/crystalline Fe composite

    DOE PAGES

    Su, Qing; Price, Lloyd; Shao, Lin; ...

    2015-10-29

    Here, through examination of radiation tolerance properties of amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) and crystalline Fe composite to averaged damage levels, from approximately 8 to 30 displacements per atom (dpa), we demonstrated that the Fe/SiOC interface and the Fe/amorphous Fe xSi yO z interface act as efficient defect sinks and promote the recombination of vacancies and interstitials. For thick Fe/SiOC multilayers, a clear Fe/SiOC interface remained and no irradiation-induced mixing was observed even after 32 dpa. For thin Fe/SiOC multilayers, an amorphous Fe xSi yO z intermixed layer was observed to form at 8 dpa, but no further layer growth wasmore » observed for higher dpa levels.« less

  10. Aphid Gel Saliva: Sheath Structure, Protein Composition and Secretory Dependence on Stylet-Tip Milieu

    PubMed Central

    Will, Torsten; Steckbauer, Kathrin; Hardt, Martin; van Bel, Aart J. E.

    2012-01-01

    In order to separate and analyze saliva types secreted during stylet propagation and feeding, aphids were fed on artificial diets. Gel saliva was deposited as chains of droplets onto Parafilm membranes covering the diets into which watery saliva was secreted. Saliva compounds collected from the diet fluid were separated by SDS-PAGE, while non-soluble gel saliva deposits were processed in a novel manner prior to protein separation by SDS-PAGE. Soluble (watery saliva) and non-soluble (gel saliva) protein fractions were significantly different. To test the effect of the stylet milieu on saliva secretion, aphids were fed on various diets. Hardening of gel saliva is strongly oxygen-dependent, probably owing to formation of sulfide bridges by oxidation of sulphydryl groups. Surface texture of gel saliva deposits is less pronounced under low-oxygen conditions and disappears in dithiothreitol containing diet. Using diets mimicking sieve-element sap and cell-wall fluid respectively showed that the soluble protein fraction was almost exclusively secreted in sieve elements while non-soluble fraction was preferentially secreted at cell wall conditions. This indicates that aphids are able to adapt salivary secretion in dependence of the stylet milieu. PMID:23056521

  11. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Various topics relating to composite structural materials for use in aircraft structures are discussed. The mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers, carbon fiber-epoxy interface bonds, composite fractures, residual stress in high modulus and high strength carbon fibers, fatigue in composite materials, and the mechanical properties of polymeric matrix composite laminates are among the topics discussed.

  12. Composite structural materials. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of filamentary composite materials in the design and construction of primary aircraft structures is considered with emphasis on efforts to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, and reliability and life prediction. The redesign of a main spar/rib region on the Boeing 727 elevator near its actuator attachment point is discussed. A composite fabrication and test facility is described as well as the use of minicomputers for computer aided design. Other topics covered include (1) advanced structural analysis methids for composites; (2) ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite structures; (3) optimum combination of hardeners in the cure of epoxy; (4) fatigue in composite materials; (5) resin matrix characterization and properties; (6) postbuckling analysis of curved laminate composite panels; and (7) acoustic emission testing of composite tensile specimens.

  13. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    A multifaceted program is described in which aeronautical, mechanical, and materials engineers interact to develop composite aircraft structures. Topics covered include: (1) the design of an advanced composite elevator and a proposed spar and rib assembly; (2) optimizing fiber orientation in the vicinity of heavily loaded joints; (3) failure mechanisms and delamination; (4) the construction of an ultralight sailplane; (5) computer-aided design; finite element analysis programs, preprocessor development, and array preprocessor for SPAR; (6) advanced analysis methods for composite structures; (7) ultrasonic nondestructive testing; (8) physical properties of epoxy resins and composites; (9) fatigue in composite materials, and (10) transverse thermal expansion of carbon/epoxy composites.

  14. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program has made significant progress in the development of technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Commercial airframe manufacturers have demonstrated technology readiness and cost effectiveness of advanced composites for secondary and medium primary components and have initiated a concerted program to develop the data base required for efficient application to safety-of-flight wing and fuselage structures. Oral presentations were compiled into five papers. Topics addressed include: damage tolerance and failsafe testing of composite vertical stabilizer; optimization of composite multi-row bolted joints; large wing joint demonstation components; and joints and cutouts in fuselage structure.

  15. Composition-dependent photoluminescence and electronic structure of 2-dimensional borocarbonitrides, BC X N (x = 1, 5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Kota; Shirodkar, Sharmila N.; Waghmare, U. V.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2014-04-01

    Layered borocarbonitrides BCN and BC5N with a wide difference in composition have been prepared by the urea route. These 2D materials show a significant difference in the photoluminescence spectra, with BCN and BC5N showing maxima at 340 and 410 nm (3.61 and 3.0 eV), besides exhibiting different electrical resistivities. First-principles calculations show that BCN and BC5N are associated with different band gaps, the gap of the carbon-rich composition being lower. The change in the electronic structure and properties is related to the composition of BC X N i.e. the ordering of the graphene and BN domains.

  16. Composite sandwich lattice structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M. D. (Inventor); Mikulas, M. M., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A lattice type structural panel is described. The panel utilizes the unidirectional character of filamentary epoxy impregnated composites. The panels are stiff lightweight structures for use in constructing space satellites and the like.

  17. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in studies of constituent materials composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology, and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Topics discussed include: mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; fatigue in composite materials; experimental and theoretical studies of moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates and neat resins; numerical investigations of the micromechanics of composite fracture; delamination failures of composite laminates; effect of notch size on composite laminates; improved beam theory for anisotropic materials; variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; numerical analysis composite processing; heat treatment of metal matrix composites, and the RP-1 and RP2 gliders of the sailplane project.

  18. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1987-01-01

    The development and application of composite materials to aerospace vehicle structures which began in the mid 1960's has now progressed to the point where what can be considered entire airframes are being designed and built using composites. Issues related to the fabrication of non-resin matrix composites and the micro, mezzo and macromechanics of thermoplastic and metal matrix composites are emphasized. Several research efforts are presented. They are entitled: (1) The effects of chemical vapor deposition and thermal treatments on the properties of pitch-based carbon fiber; (2) Inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; (3) Analysis of fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; (4) Delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; (5) Numerical investigation of the microhardness of composite fracture; and (6) General beam theory for composite structures.

  19. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The composite aircraft program component (CAPCOMP) is a graduate level project conducted in parallel with a composite structures program. The composite aircraft program glider (CAPGLIDE) is an undergraduate demonstration project which has as its objectives the design, fabrication, and testing of a foot launched ultralight glider using composite structures. The objective of the computer aided design (COMPAD) portion of the composites project is to provide computer tools for the analysis and design of composite structures. The major thrust of COMPAD is in the finite element area with effort directed at implementing finite element analysis capabilities and developing interactive graphics preprocessing and postprocessing capabilities. The criteria for selecting research projects to be conducted under the innovative and supporting research (INSURE) program are described.

  20. Process-Parameter-Dependent Optical and Structural Properties of ZrO2MgO Mixed-Composite Films Evaporated from the solid Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahoo, N. K.; Shapiro, A. P.

    1998-01-01

    The process-parameter-dependent optical and structural properties of ZrO2MgO mixed-composite material have been investigated. Optical properties were derived from spectrophotometric measurements. By use of atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, and energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis, the surface morphology, grain size distributions, crystallographic phases, and process-dependent material composition of films have been investigated. EDX analysis made evident the correlation between the oxygen enrichment in the films prepared at a high level of oxygen pressure and the very low refractive index. Since oxygen pressure can be dynamically varied during a deposition process, coatings constructed of suitable mixed-composite thin films can benefit from continuous modulation of the index of refraction. A step modulation approach is used to develop various multilayer-equivalent thin-film devices.

  1. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    Overall emphasis is on basic long-term research in the following categories: constituent materials, composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology; and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Research in basic composition, characteristics, and processing science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to present and future problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of this comprehensive program are presented.

  2. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    A decade long program to develop critical advanced composite technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concept and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life predictions is reviewed. Specific goals are discussed. The status of the chemical vapor deposition effects on carbon fiber properties; inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; and numerical analysis of composite micromechanical behavior are presented.

  3. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Research in the basic composition, characteristics, and processng science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of his program are presented.

  4. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the RPI composites program is to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability and life prediction. Concommitant goals are to educate engineers to design and use composite materials as normal or conventional materials. A multifaceted program was instituted to achieve these objectives.

  5. Heterogeneous dissipative composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, Victor; Yartsev, Boris; Parshina, Ludmila

    2018-05-01

    The paper suggests mathematical models of decaying vibrations in layered anisotropic plates and orthotropic rods based on Hamilton variation principle, first-order shear deformation laminated plate theory (FSDT), as well as on the viscous-elastic correspondence principle of the linear viscoelasticity theory. In the description of the physical relationships between the materials of the layers forming stiff polymeric composites, the effect of vibration frequency and ambient temperature is assumed as negligible, whereas for the viscous-elastic polymer layer, temperature-frequency relationship of elastic dissipation and stiffness properties is considered by means of the experimentally determined generalized curves. Mitigation of Hamilton functional makes it possible to describe decaying vibration of anisotropic structures by an algebraic problem of complex eigenvalues. The system of algebraic equation is generated through Ritz method using Legendre polynomials as coordinate functions. First, real solutions are found. To find complex natural frequencies of the system, the obtained real natural frequencies are taken as input values, and then, by means of the 3rd order iteration method, complex natural frequencies are calculated. The paper provides convergence estimates for the numerical procedures. Reliability of the obtained results is confirmed by a good correlation between analytical and experimental values of natural frequencies and loss factors in the lower vibration tones for the two series of unsupported orthotropic rods formed by stiff GRP and CRP layers and a viscoelastic polymer layer. Analysis of the numerical test data has shown the dissipation & stiffness properties of heterogeneous composite plates and rods to considerably depend on relative thickness of the viscoelastic polymer layer, orientation of stiff composite layers, vibration frequency and ambient temperature.

  6. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    Topics addressed include: strength and hygrothermal response of L-1011 fin components; wing fuel containment and damage tolerance development; impact dynamics; acoustic transmission; fuselage structure; composite transport wing technology development; spar/assembly concepts.

  7. Precision Composite Space Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-15

    large structures. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Composite materials, dimensional stability, microcracking, thermal expansion , space structures, degradation...Figure 32. Variation of normalized coefficients of thermal expansion α11(n), α22(n), and α33(n) with normalized crack density of an AS4/3501-6...coefficients of thermal expansion α11(n), α22(n), and α33(n) with normalized crack density of an AS4/3501-6 composite lamina with a fiber volume

  8. Composite foam structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E. (Inventor); Brockmeyer, Jerry (Inventor); Tuffias, Robert H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A composite rigid foam structure that has a skin or coating on at least one of its surfaces. The skin is formed in situ by thermal spray techniques. The skin is bonded substantially throughout the surface of the porous substrate to the peripheries of the pores. The skin on the average does not penetrate the surface of the substrate by more than the depth of about 2 to 5 pores. Thus, thermal spraying the skin onto the rigid foam produces a composite that is tightly and uniformly bonded together without unduly increasing the weight of the composite structure. Both thermal conductivity and bonding are excellent.

  9. Composition dependence of structural and optical properties in epitaxial Sr(Sn1-xTix)O3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qinzhuang; Li, Bing; Li, Hong; Dai, Kai; Zhu, Guangping; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yongxing; Gao, Guanyin; Dai, Jianming

    2015-03-01

    Epitaxial Sr(Sn1-xTix)O3 (SSTO, x = 0-1) thin films were grown on MgO substrates by a pulsed laser deposition technique. The effects of composition on the structural and optical properties of SSTO films were investigated. X-ray diffraction studies show that the lattice parameter decreases from 4.041 to 3.919 Å gradually with increasing Ti content from 0 to 1 in SSTO films. Optical spectra analysis reveals that the band gap energy Eg decreases continuously from 4.44 to 3.78 eV over the entire doping range, which is explained by the decreasing degree of octahedral tilting distortion and thus the increasing tolerance factor caused by the increasing small-Ti-ion doping concentration.

  10. Size-confined fixed-composition and composition-dependent engineered band gap alloying induces different internal structures in L-cysteine-capped alloyed quaternary CdZnTeS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-06-01

    The development of alloyed quantum dot (QD) nanocrystals with attractive optical properties for a wide array of chemical and biological applications is a growing research field. In this work, size-tunable engineered band gap composition-dependent alloying and fixed-composition alloying were employed to fabricate new L-cysteine-capped alloyed quaternary CdZnTeS QDs exhibiting different internal structures. Lattice parameters simulated based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) revealed the internal structure of the composition-dependent alloyed CdxZnyTeS QDs to have a gradient nature, whereas the fixed-composition alloyed QDs exhibited a homogenous internal structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis confirmed the size-confined nature and monodispersity of the alloyed nanocrystals. The zeta potential values were within the accepted range of colloidal stability. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis showed that the surface-capped L-cysteine ligand induced electronic and conformational chiroptical changes in the alloyed nanocrystals. The photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) values of the gradient alloyed QDs were 27-61%, whereas for the homogenous alloyed QDs, the PL QY values were spectacularly high (72-93%). Our work demonstrates that engineered fixed alloying produces homogenous QD nanocrystals with higher PL QY than composition-dependent alloying.

  11. [Epiphytic communities of arboreal formations in Southern Vietnam: an analysis of species composition and synusias structure in dependence on the extent of anthropogenic impact].

    PubMed

    Es'kov, A K

    2013-01-01

    Species composition of epiphytic communities within different formations of Phú Quôc Island (Southern Vietnam) is studied. The dependence of species composition and structural complexity of epiphytic communities on formation quality is demonstrated. Representatives of different families differ notably in their sensitivity to disturbances. Most vulnerable are Orchidaceae which represent the dominant group in epiphytic community of rain forest and which drop out almost completely under anthropogenic impacts. In less disturbed forests, epiphyte species diversity increases mainly at the expense of "lower" synusias and directly depends on the formation layering. Diminishing of layering numbers leads to dropping out of species belonging to "lower" synusias. Among epiphytes, the indicators of disturbed communities can be detected, namely species of ruderal strategy (explerents). In primal rain forest, they are absent or barely noticeable. An index is proposed for estimation of epiphytic communitiy complexity.

  12. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of filamentary composite materials, whose development may be considered as entering its second generation, continues to generate intense interest and applications activity. Fiber reinforced composite materials offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been achieved since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. Rather limited applications to primary aircraft structure have been made, however, mainly in a material-substitution mode on military aircraft, except for a few experiments currently underway on large passenger airplanes in commercial operation. To fulfill the promise of composite materials completely requires a strong technology base. NASA and AFOSR recognize the present state of the art to be such that to fully exploit composites in sophisticated aerospace structures, the technology base must be improved. This, in turn, calls for expanding fundamental knowledge and the means by which it can be successfully applied in design and manufacture.

  13. Composite Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    The development and application of filamentary composite materials, is considered. Such interest is based on the possibility of using relatively brittle materials with high modulus, high strength, but low density in composites with good durability and high tolerance to damage. Fiber reinforced composite materials of this kind offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been made since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. There were only limited applied to the primary structure of operational vehicles, mainly as aircrafts.

  14. Structural anomaly and dynamic heterogeneity in cycloether/water binary mixtures: Signatures from composition dependent dynamic fluorescence measurements and computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indra, Sandipa; Guchhait, Biswajit; Biswas, Ranjit

    2016-03-01

    We have performed steady state UV-visible absorption and time-resolved fluorescence measurements and computer simulations to explore the cosolvent mole fraction induced changes in structural and dynamical properties of water/dioxane (Diox) and water/tetrahydrofuran (THF) binary mixtures. Diox is a quadrupolar solvent whereas THF is a dipolar one although both are cyclic molecules and represent cycloethers. The focus here is on whether these cycloethers can induce stiffening and transition of water H-bond network structure and, if they do, whether such structural modification differentiates the chemical nature (dipolar or quadrupolar) of the cosolvent molecules. Composition dependent measured fluorescence lifetimes and rotation times of a dissolved dipolar solute (Coumarin 153, C153) suggest cycloether mole-fraction (XTHF/Diox) induced structural transition for both of these aqueous binary mixtures in the 0.1 ≤ XTHF/Diox ≤ 0.2 regime with no specific dependence on the chemical nature. Interestingly, absorption measurements reveal stiffening of water H-bond structure in the presence of both the cycloethers at a nearly equal mole-fraction, XTHF/Diox ˜ 0.05. Measurements near the critical solution temperature or concentration indicate no role for the solution criticality on the anomalous structural changes. Evidences for cycloether aggregation at very dilute concentrations have been found. Simulated radial distribution functions reflect abrupt changes in respective peak heights at those mixture compositions around which fluorescence measurements revealed structural transition. Simulated water coordination numbers (for a dissolved C153) and number of H-bonds also exhibit minima around these cosolvent concentrations. In addition, several dynamic heterogeneity parameters have been simulated for both the mixtures to explore the effects of structural transition and chemical nature of cosolvent on heterogeneous dynamics of these systems. Simulated four-point dynamic

  15. Composition dependent structural and optical properties of PbF₂-TeO₂-B₂O₃-Eu₂O₃ glasses.

    PubMed

    Wagh, Akshatha; Raviprakash, Y; Upadhyaya, Vyasa; Kamath, Sudha D

    2015-12-05

    Boric oxide based quaternary glasses in the system PbF2-TeO2-B2O3-Eu2O3 have been prepared by melt quenching technique. Density, molar volume, FTIR, UV-Vis techniques were used to probe the structural modifications with incorporation of europium ions in the glass network. An increase in glass density & decrease in molar volume (Vm) values proved the structural changes occurring in coordination of boron atom [conversion of BO3 units to BO4]. This resulted in the increase of the compaction of the prepared glasses with increase in Eu2O3 contents. The amorphous natures of the samples were ascertained by XRD and metallization criterion (M) studies. XPS study showed the values of core-level binding energy [O1s, Eu3d, Eu4d, Te3d, Te4d, Pd4f, Pb5d, O1s, and F1s] of (PbF2-TeO2-B2O3-Eu2O3) the glass matrix. The frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric properties of present glasses were investigated in the frequency range of 1 Hz-10 MHz and temperature range of 313-773K. The study of dielectric measurements proved good insulating and thermal stability of the prepared glasses. At room temperature, dielectric loss [tanδ] values were negligibly small for prepared glasses and increased with increase in temperature. FTIR spectroscopy results were in good agreement with optical band energy gap, density, molar volume and hardness values revealing network modifications caused by europium ions in the glass structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Composite mechanics for engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent research activities and accomplishments at Lewis Research Center on composite mechanics for engine structures are summarized. The activities focused mainly on developing procedures for the computational simulation of composite intrinsic and structural behavior. The computational simulation encompasses all aspects of composite mechanics, advanced three-dimensional finite-element methods, damage tolerance, composite structural and dynamic response, and structural tailoring and optimization.

  17. Composite mechanics for engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1989-01-01

    Recent research activities and accomplishments at Lewis Research Center on composite mechanics for engine structures are summarized. The activities focused mainly on developing procedures for the computational simulation of composite intrinsic and structural behavior. The computational simulation encompasses all aspects of composite mechanics, advanced three-dimensional finite-element methods, damage tolerance, composite structural and dynamic response, and structural tailoring and optimization.

  18. Structural behavior of Tl-exchanged natrolite at high pressure depending on the composition of pressure-transmitting medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seryotkin, Yu. V.; Bakakin, V. V.; Likhacheva, A. Yu.; Dementiev, S. N.; Rashchenko, S. V.

    2017-10-01

    The structural evolution of Tl-exchanged natrolite with idealized formula Tl2[Al2Si3O10]·2H2O, compressed in penetrating (water:ethanol 1:1) and non-penetrating (paraffin) media, was studied up to 4 GPa. The presence of Tl+ with non-bonded electron lone pairs, which can be either stereo-chemically active or passive, determines distinctive features of the high-pressure behavior of the Tl-form. The effective volume of assemblages Tl+(O,H2O) n depends on the E-pairs activity: single-sided coordination correlates with smaller volumes. At ambient conditions, there are two types of Tl positions, only one of them having a nearly single-sided coordination as a characteristic of stereo-activity of the Tl+ E pair. Upon the compression in paraffin, a phase transition occurs: a 5% volume contraction of flexible natrolite framework is accompanied by the conversion of all the Tl+ cations into stereo-chemically active state with a single-sided coordination. This effect requires the reconstruction of all the extra-framework subsystems with the inversion of the cation and H2O positions. The compression in water-containing medium leads to the increase of H2O content up to three molecules pfu through the filling of partly vacant positions. This hinders a single-sided coordination of Tl ions and preserves the configuration of their ion-molecular subsystem. It is likely that the extra-framework subsystem is responsible for the super-structure modulation.

  19. Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufer, Markus; Conger, Robert; Bauer, Thomas; Newman, John

    2013-01-01

    An integrated, generic unibody composite pressurized structure (UCPS) combined with a positive expulsion device (PED), consisting of an elastomeric bladder for monopropellant hydrazine, has been quasi-standardized for spacecraft use. The combination functions as an all-composite, non-metallic, propellant tank with bladder. The integrated UCPS combines several previous innovations - specifically, the linerless, all-composite cryogenic tank technology; all-composite boss; resin formulation; and integrated stringer system. The innovation combines the UCPS with an integrated propellant management device (PMD), the PED or bladder, to create an entirely unique system for in-space use. The UCPS is a pressure vessel that incorporates skirts, stringers, and other structures so that it is both an in-space hydrazine tank, and also a structural support system for a spacecraft in a single, all-composite unit. This innovation builds on the progress in the development of a previous SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) Phase I with Glenn Research Center and an SBIR III with Johnson Space Center that included the fabrication of two 42-in. (˜107-cm) diameter all-composite cryogenic (LOX and liquid methane) UCPS test tanks for a lunar lander. This Phase II provides hydra zine compatibility testing of the elastomeric bladder, a see-through PED to validate the expulsion process and model, and a complete UCPS-based PED with stringers and skirts that will be used to conduct initial qualification and expulsion tests. This extends the UCPS technology to include hydrazine-based, in-space pro - pulsion applications and can also be used for electric propulsion. This innovation creates a system that, in comparison to the traditional approach, is lower in weight, cost, volume, and production time; is stronger; and is capable of much higher pressures. It also has fewer failure modes, and is applicable to both chemical and electric propulsion systems.

  20. Structure and Thermal Stability of High-Strength Cu-18Nb Composite Depending on the Degree of Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deryagina, I. L.; Popova, E. N.; Valova-Zaharevskaya, E. G.; Patrakov, E. I.

    2018-01-01

    The microstructure and thermal stability of multifiber in situ Cu-18Nb composites with a true strain ( e) of 10.2 and 12.5 have been studied by the methods of scanning and transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It has been established that niobium dendrites in the copper matrix acquire the shape of ribbons with thicknesses of less than 100 nm under strong plastic deformation. As the strain grows, the thickness of niobium ribbons decreases, and the degree of axial texture <110>Nb║<111>Cu║DA (drawing axes) and the macrostresses in the crystal lattice of niobium increase. Interplanar distances between adjacent {110}Nb planes are stretched in the longitudinal section of the composites and reduced in their transversal section under the action of macrostresses. It has been shown that, as a result of the annealing of these composites, niobium fibers sustain coagulation, which begins at 300°C, actively develops with increasing temperature, and leads to the appreciable softening of a composite at 700°C. The softening of a composite after the annealing is accompanied by the relaxation of macrostresses in niobium and the recovery of its unit cell parameters to standard values.

  1. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-19

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  2. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  3. Honeycomb-laminate composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A honeycomb-laminate composite structure was comprised of: (1) a cellular core of a polyquinoxaline foam in a honeycomb structure, and (2) a layer of a noncombustible fibrous material impregnated with a polyimide resin laminated on the cellular core. A process for producing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure and articles containing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure is described.

  4. Structural and compositional dependence of the CdTexSe1−x alloy layer photoactivity in CdTe-based solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei; Paudel, Naba; Ng, Amy; More, Karren; Leonard, Donovan; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-01-01

    The published external quantum efficiency data of the world-record CdTe solar cell suggests that the device uses bandgap engineering, most likely with a CdTexSe1−x alloy layer to increase the short-circuit current and overall device efficiency. Here atom probe tomography, transmission electron microscopy and electron beam-induced current are used to clarify the dependence of Se content on the photoactive properties of CdTexSe1−x alloy layers in bandgap-graded CdTe solar cells. Four solar cells were prepared with 50, 100, 200 and 400 nm-thick CdSe layers to reveal the formation, growth, composition, structure and photoactivity of the CdTexSe1−x alloy with respect to the degree of Se diffusion. The results show that the CdTexSe1−x layer photoactivity is highly dependent on the crystalline structure of the alloy (zincblende versus wurtzite), which is also dependent on the Se and Te concentrations. PMID:27460872

  5. Structural and compositional dependence of the CdTexSe 1-x alloy layer photoactivity in CdTe-based solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei; Paudel, Naba; ...

    2016-07-27

    The published external quantum efficiency data of the world-record CdTe solar cell suggests that the device uses bandgap engineering, most likely with a CdTe xSe 1₋x alloy layer to increase the short-circuit current and overall device efficiency. Here atom probe tomography, transmission electron microscopy and electron beam-induced current are used to clarify the dependence of Se content on the photoactive properties of CdTe xSe 1₋x alloy layers in bandgap-graded CdTe solar cells. Four solar cells were prepared with 50, 100, 200 and 400 nm-thick CdSe layers to reveal the formation, growth, composition, structure and photoactivity of the CdTe xSe 1₋xmore » alloy with respect to the degree of Se diffusion. Finally, the results show that the CdTe xSe 1₋x layer photoactivity is highly dependent on the crystalline structure of the alloy (zincblende versus wurtzite), which is also dependent on the Se and Te concentrations.« less

  6. Bonded and Stitched Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalewski, Bart F. (Inventor); Dial, William B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of forming a composite structure can include providing a plurality of composite panels of material, each composite panel having a plurality of holes extending through the panel. An adhesive layer is applied to each composite panel and a adjoining layer is applied over the adhesive layer. The method also includes stitching the composite panels, adhesive layer, and adjoining layer together by passing a length of a flexible connecting element into the plurality of holes in the composite panels of material. At least the adhesive layer is cured to bond the composite panels together and thereby form the composite structure.

  7. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2008-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells and the built-up composite structure global fracture are enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads.

  8. Shell Layer Thickness-Dependent Photocatalytic Activity of Sputtering Synthesized Hexagonally Structured ZnO-ZnS Composite Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuan-Chang; Lo, Ya-Ru; Wang, Chein-Chung; Xu, Nian-Cih

    2018-01-01

    ZnO-ZnS core-shell nanorods are synthesized by combining the hydrothermal method and vacuum sputtering. The core-shell nanorods with variable ZnS shell thickness (7–46 nm) are synthesized by varying ZnS sputtering duration. Structural analyses demonstrated that the as-grown ZnS shell layers are well crystallized with preferring growth direction of ZnS (002). The sputtering-assisted synthesized ZnO-ZnS core-shell nanorods are in a wurtzite structure. Moreover, photoluminance spectral analysis indicated that the introduction of a ZnS shell layer improved the photoexcited electron and hole separation efficiency of the ZnO nanorods. A strong correlation between effective charge separation and the shell thickness aids the photocatalytic behavior of the nanorods and improves their photoresponsive nature. The results of comparative degradation efficiency toward methylene blue showed that the ZnO-ZnS nanorods with the shell thickness of approximately 17 nm have the highest photocatalytic performance than the ZnO-ZnS nanorods with other shell layer thicknesses. The highly reusable catalytic efficiency and superior photocatalytic performance of the ZnO-ZnS nanorods with 17 nm-thick ZnS shell layer supports their potential for environmental applications. PMID:29316671

  9. Structural characterization and compositional dependence of the optical properties of Ge-Ga-La-S chalcohalide glass system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lini; Jiao, Qing; Lin, Changgui; Dai, Shixun; Nie, Qiuhua

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, chalcogenide glasses of 80GeS2sbnd (20sbnd x)Ga2S3sbnd xLa2S3 (x = 0, 1, 3, 5 mol%) were synthesized through the traditional melt-quenching technique. The effects of La2S3 addition on the thermal, optical, and structural properties of Gesbnd Gasbnd S glasses were investigated. Results showed that the synthesized glasses possessed considerably high glass transition temperature, improved glass forming ability, high refractive index, and excellent infrared transmittance. A redshift at the visible absorbing cut-off edge lower than 500 nm was observed with increasing of La2S3 content. Direct and indirect optical band gap values were calculated. SEM result suggested that this glass system owned better glass forming ability and uniformity. Raman spectral analysis indicated that the introduction of La2S3 induced the dissociation of Gesbnd Ge metal bonds and transformed the [S3Gesbnd GeS3] structure to GeS4 tetrahedrons. Consequently, the connectivity between tetrahedrons of the vitreous network was enhanced. This work suggests that La2S3 modified Ge-Gasbnd Lasbnd S glass is a promising material for infrared optical research.

  10. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Transverse properties of fiber constituents in composites, fatigue in composite materials, matrix dominated properties of high performance composites, numerical investigation of moisture effects, numerical investigation of the micromechanics of composite fracture, advanced analysis methods, compact lug design, and the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes projects are discussed.

  11. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinlivan, John T.; Wilson, Robert D.; Smith, Peter J.; Johnson, Ronald W.

    1984-01-01

    Toppics addressed include: advanced composites on Boeing commercial aircraft; composite wing durability; damage tolerance technology development; heavily loaded wing panel design; and pressure containment and damage tolerance in fuselages.

  12. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology utilization of fiber reinforced composite materials is discussed in the areas of physical properties, and life prediction. Programs related to the Composite Aircraft Program are described in detail.

  13. Investigation of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, Michael W.

    2000-01-01

    This final report consists of a compilation of four separate written documents, three dealing with the response and failure of elliptical composite cylinders to an internal pressure load, and the fourth dealing with the influence of manufacturing imperfections in curved composite panels. The three focused on elliptical cylinders consist of the following: 1 - A paper entitled "Progressive Failure Analysis of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cylinders," 2 - A paper entitled "Influence of Geometric Nonlinearities on the Response and Failure of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cylinders," and 3 - A report entitled "Response and Failure of Internally Pressurized Elliptical Composite Cyclinders." The document which deals with the influence of manufacturing imperfections is a paper entitled "Manufacturing Distortions of Curved Composite Panels."

  14. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  15. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Progress and plans are reported for investigations of: (1) the mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; (2) fatigue in composite materials; (3) moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates; (4) the theory of inhomogeneous swelling in epoxy resin; (5) numerical studies of the micromechanics of composite fracture; (6) free edge failures of composite laminates; (7) analysis of unbalanced laminates; (8) compact lug design; (9) quantification of Saint-Venant's principles for a general prismatic member; (10) variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; and (11) the wing fuselage ensemble of the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes.

  16. Fluid-Structure Interaction in Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    polymer composite structures. Some previous experimental observations were confirmed using the results from the computer simulations , which also...computer simulations , which also enhanced understanding the effect of FSI on dynamic responses of composite structures. vi THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY...forces) are applied. A great amount of research has been made using the FEM to study and simulate the cases when the structures are surrounded by

  17. Lessons learned for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Lessons learned for composite structures are presented in three technology areas: materials, manufacturing, and design. In addition, future challenges for composite structures are presented. Composite materials have long gestation periods from the developmental stage to fully matured production status. Many examples exist of unsuccessful attempts to accelerate this gestation period. Experience has shown that technology transition of a new material system to fully matured production status is time consuming, involves risk, is expensive and should not be undertaken lightly. The future challenges for composite materials require an intensification of the science based approach to material development, extension of the vendor/customer interaction process to include all engineering disciplines of the end user, reduced material costs because they are a significant factor in overall part cost, and improved batch-to-batch pre-preg physical property control. Historical manufacturing lessons learned are presented using current in-service production structure as examples. Most producibility problems for these structures can be traced to their sequential engineering design. This caused an excessive emphasis on design-to-weight and schedule at the expense of design-to-cost. This resulted in expensive performance originated designs, which required costly tooling and led to non-producible parts. Historically these problems have been allowed to persist throughout the production run. The current/future approach for the production of affordable composite structures mandates concurrent engineering design where equal emphasis is placed on product and process design. Design for simplified assembly is also emphasized, since assembly costs account for a major portion of total airframe costs. The future challenge for composite manufacturing is, therefore, to utilize concurrent engineering in conjunction with automated manufacturing techniques to build affordable composite structures

  18. Composite desiccant structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, A.V.; Schertz, W.W.

    1984-06-06

    This patent discloses a composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  19. Composite desiccant structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.; Schertz, William W.

    1987-01-01

    A composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  20. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, Michael A [Idaho Falls, ID; Heaps, Ronald J [Idaho Falls, ID; Steffler, Eric D [Idaho Falls, ID; Swank, William D [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-08-30

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  1. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  2. Method of fabricating composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigur, W. A. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method of fabricating structures formed from composite materials by positioning the structure about a high coefficient of thermal expansion material, wrapping a graphite fiber overwrap about the structure, and thereafter heating the assembly to expand the high coefficient of thermal expansion material to forcibly compress the composite structure against the restraint provided by the graphite overwrap. The high coefficient of thermal expansion material is disposed about a mandrel with a release system therebetween, and with a release system between the material having the high coefficient of thermal expansion and the composite material, and between the graphite fibers and the composite structure. The heating may occur by inducing heat into the assembly by a magnetic field created by coils disposed about the assembly through which alternating current flows. The method permits structures to be formed without the use of an autoclave.

  3. Method of fabricating composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigur, Wanda A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method of fabricating structures formed from composite materials by positioning the structure about a high coefficient of thermal expansion material, wrapping a graphite fiber overwrap about the structure, and thereafter heating the assembly to expand the high coefficient of thermal expansion material to forcibly compress the composite structure against the restraint provided by the graphite overwrap. The high coefficient of thermal expansion material is disposed about a mandrel with a release system therebetween, and with a release system between the material having the high coefficient of thermal expansion and the composite material, and between the graphite fibers and the composite structure. The heating may occur by inducing heat into the assembly by a magnetic field created by coils disposed about the assembly through which alternating current flows. The method permits structures to be formed without the use of an autoclave.

  4. Reflexive composites: self-healing composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margraf, Thomas W., Jr.; Barnell, Thomas J.; Havens, Ernie; Hemmelgarn, Christopher D.

    2008-03-01

    Cornerstone Research Group Inc. has developed reflexive composites achieving increased vehicle survivability through integrated structural awareness and responsiveness to damage. Reflexive composites can sense damage through integrated piezoelectric sensing networks and respond to damage by heating discrete locations to activate the healable polymer matrix in areas of damage. The polymer matrix is a modified thermoset shape memory polymer that heals based on phenomena known as reptation. In theory, the reptation healing phenomena should occur in microseconds; however, during experimentation, it has been observed that to maximize healing and restore up to 85 % of mechanical properties a healing cycle of at least three minutes is required. This paper will focus on work conducted to determine the healing mechanisms at work in CRG's reflexive composites, the optimal healing cycles, and an explanation of the difference between the reptation model and actual healing times.

  5. Composite structural materials. [aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The development of composite materials for aircraft applications is addressed with specific consideration of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life prediction. The design and flight testing of composite ultralight gliders is documented. Advances in computer aided design and methods for nondestructive testing are also discussed.

  6. Compositional dependence of lower crustal viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinevar, William J.; Behn, Mark D.; Hirth, Greg

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the viscosity structure of the lower continental crust as a function of its bulk composition using multiphase mixing theory. We use the Gibbs free-energy minimization routine Perple_X to calculate mineral assemblages for different crustal compositions under pressure and temperature conditions appropriate for the lower continental crust. The effective aggregate viscosities are then calculated using a rheologic mixing model and flow laws for the major crust-forming minerals. We investigate the viscosity of two lower crustal compositions: (i) basaltic (53 wt % SiO2) and (ii) andesitic (64 wt % SiO2). The andesitic model predicts aggregate viscosities similar to feldspar and approximately 1 order of magnitude greater than that of wet quartz. The viscosity range calculated for the andesitic crustal composition (particularly when hydrous phases are stable) is most similar to independent estimates of lower crust viscosity in actively deforming regions based on postglacial isostatic rebound, postseismic relaxation, and paleolake shoreline deflection.

  7. Advanced technology composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Walker, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Work performed during the 25th month on NAS1-18889, Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures, is summarized. The main objective of this program is to develop an integrated technology and demonstrate a confidence level that permits the cost- and weight-effective use of advanced composite materials in primary structures of future aircraft with the emphasis on pressurized fuselages. The period from 1-31 May 1991 is covered.

  8. Dependency Structures for Statistical Machine Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bach, Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Dependency structures represent a sentence as a set of dependency relations. Normally the dependency structures from a tree connect all the words in a sentence. One of the most defining characters of dependency structures is the ability to bring long distance dependency between words to local dependency structures. Another the main attraction of…

  9. Multifunctional Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    78  Design of vibrating / oscillating wings for MAV ................................................. 79  6...62  Oscillating structural mechanism ................................................................... 80  Fig. 63  Mode shapes of vibration ...allowing  it  to  perform  important  tasks  including  actuation,  sensing,  energy  storage  and  energy  harvesting   in  addition  to  providing

  10. Structural biological composites: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Marc A.; Lin, Albert Y. M.; Seki, Yasuaki; Chen, Po-Yu; Kad, Bimal K.; Bodde, Sara

    2006-07-01

    Biological materials are complex composites that are hierarchically structured and multifunctional. Their mechanical properties are often outstanding, considering the weak constituents from which they are assembled. They are for the most part composed of brittle (often, mineral) and ductile (organic) components. These complex structures, which have risen from millions of years of evolution, are inspiring materials scientists in the design of novel materials. This paper discusses the overall design principles in biological structural composites and illustrates them for five examples; sea spicules, the abalone shell, the conch shell, the toucan and hornbill beaks, and the sheep crab exoskeleton.

  11. Load Diffusion in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Simmonds, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    This research has been concerned with load diffusion in composite structures. Fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities provides a significant aid towards this process. The results are also amendable to parameter study with a large parameter space and should be useful in structural tailoring studies.

  12. Structural Qualification of Composite Airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedward, Keith T.; McCarty, John E.

    1997-01-01

    The development of fundamental approaches for predicting failure and elongation characteristics of fibrous composites are summarized in this document. The research described includes a statistical formulation for individual fiber breakage and fragmentation and clustered fiber breakage, termed macrodefects wherein the aligned composite may represent a structural component such as a reinforcing bar element, a rebar. Experimental work conducted in support of the future exploitation of aligned composite rebar elements is also described. This work discusses the experimental challenges associated with rebar tensile test evaluation and describes initial numerical analyses performed in support of the experimental program.

  13. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-08-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The ame argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions.

  14. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The ame argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions.

  15. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2001-01-01

    This report includes the results of a research in which the COmposite Durability STRuctural ANalysis (CODSTRAN) computational simulation capabilities were augmented and applied to various structures for demonstration of the new features and verification. The first chapter of this report provides an introduction to the computational simulation or virtual laboratory approach for the assessment of damage and fracture progression characteristics in composite structures. The second chapter outlines the details of the overall methodology used, including the failure criteria and the incremental/iterative loading procedure with the definitions of damage, fracture, and equilibrium states. The subsequent chapters each contain an augmented feature of the code and/or demonstration examples. All but one of the presented examples contains laminated composite structures with various fiber/matrix constituents. For each structure simulated, damage initiation and progression mechanisms are identified and the structural damage tolerance is quantified at various degradation stages. Many chapters contain the simulation of defective and defect free structures to evaluate the effects of existing defects on structural durability.

  16. The composite structure of mixed τ-(Ag, Cu)xV2O5 bronzes—Evidence for T dependant guest-species ordering and mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermes, Wilfred; Dollé, Mickaël; Rozier, Patrick; Lidin, Sven

    2013-03-01

    The complex structural behavior of τ-[AgCu]˜0.92V4O10 has been elucidated by single crystal X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis. The τ-phase region is apparently composed of several distinct phases and this study identifies at least three: τ1rt, τ2rt and τlt. τ1rt and τ2rt have slightly different compositions and crystal habits. Both phases transform to τlt at low temperature. The room temperature modification τ1rt crystallizes in an incommensurately modulated structure with monoclinic symmetry C2(0β1/2) [equivalent to no 5.4, B2(01/2γ) in the Intnl. Tables for Crystallography, Volume C] and the cell parameters a=11.757(4) Å, b=3.6942(5) Å c=9.463(2) Å β=114.62(2)° and the q-vector (0 0.92 1/2), but it is more convenient to transform this to a setting with a non-standard centering X=(1/2 1/2 0 0; 0 0 1/2 1/2; 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2;) and an axial q vector (0 0.92 0). The structure features a vanadate host lattice with Cu and Ag guests forming an incommensurate composite. The structural data indicates perfect Ag/Cu ordering. At low temperature this modification is replaced by a triclinic phase characterized by two independent q-vectors. The τ2rt phase is similar to the low temperature modification τlt but the satellite reflections are generally more diffuse.

  17. Site occupancy, composition and magnetic structure dependencies of martensitic transformation in Mn2Ni1 + x Sn1-x.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Ashis; Ghosh, Subhradip

    2017-11-29

    A delicate balance between various factors such as site occupancy, composition and magnetic ordering seems to affect the stability of the martensitic phase in [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text]. Using first-principles DFT calculations, we explore the impacts of each one of these factors on the martensitic stability of this system. Our results on total energies, magnetic moments and electronic structures upon changes in the composition, the magnetic configurations and the site occupancies show that the occupancies at the 4d sites in the inverse Heusler crystal structure play the most crucial role. The presence of Mn at the 4d sites originally occupied by Sn and its interaction with the Mn atoms at other sites decide the stability of the martensitic phases. This explains the discrepancy between the experiments and earlier DFT calculations regarding phase stability in [Formula: see text]NiSn. Our results qualitatively explain the trends observed experimentally with regard to martensitic phase stability and the magnetisations in Ni-excess, Sn-deficient [Formula: see text]NiSn system.

  18. Compositional Dependence of Optical and Structural Properties of Nanogranular Mixed ZrO2/ZnO/SnO2 Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, S.; Ghodsi, F. E.

    2018-06-01

    A study on the optical properties and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of ternary oxide nanogranular thin films comprising Zr, Zn, and Sn revealed that the change in component ratio could direct the roadmap to improve characteristics of the films. Grazing angle X-ray diffraction analysis showed that incorporation of Sn atoms into the tetragonal structure of Zn/Zr thin film resulted in an amorphous structure. The band gap of film was tunable by precisely controlling the concentration of components. The widening of band gap could correlate to the quantum confinement effect. PL spectra of the composite thin films under excitation at 365 nm showed a sharp red emission with relatively Gaussian line shape, which was intensified in the optimum percentage ratio of 50/30/20. This nearly red emission is attributed to the radiative emission of electrons captured at low-energy traps located near the valence band. An optimum red emission is strongly desirable for use in white LEDs. The comparative study on FTIR spectra of unary, binary, and ternary thin films confirmed successful composition of three different metal oxides in ternary thin films. Detailed investigation on FTIR spectra of ternary compounds revealed that the quenching in PL emission at higher percentage of Sn was originally due to the hydroxyl group.

  19. Textile composite fuselage structures development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Chu, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Phase 2 of the NASA ACT Contract (NAS1-18888), Advanced Composite Structural Concepts and Materials Technology for Transport Aircraft Structures, focuses on textile technology, with resin transfer molding or powder coated tows. The use of textiles has the potential for improving damage tolerance, reducing cost and saving weight. This program investigates resin transfer molding (RTM), as a maturing technology for high fiber volume primary structures and powder coated tows as an emerging technology with a high potential for significant cost savings and superior structural properties. Powder coated tow technology has promise for significantly improving the processibility of high temperature resins such as polyimides.

  20. Composite Crew Module: Primary Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center to design, build, and test a full-scale crew module primary structure, using carbon fiber reinforced epoxy based composite materials. The overall goal of the Composite Crew Module project was to develop a team from the NASA family with hands-on experience in composite design, manufacturing, and testing in anticipation of future space exploration systems being made of composite materials. The CCM project was planned to run concurrently with the Orion project's baseline metallic design within the Constellation Program so that features could be compared and discussed without inducing risk to the overall Program. This report discusses the project management aspects of the project including team organization, decision making, independent technical reviews, and cost and schedule management approach.

  1. Commercial transport aircraft composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    The role that analysis plays in the development, production, and substantiation of aircraft structures is discussed. The types, elements, and applications of failure that are used and needed; the current application of analysis methods to commercial aircraft advanced composite structures, along with a projection of future needs; and some personal thoughts on analysis development goals and the elements of an approach to analysis development are discussed.

  2. Drawing dependent structures, mechanical properties and cyclization behaviors of polyacrylonitrile and polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite fibers prepared by plasticized spinning.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Qin, Aiwen; Zhao, Xinzhen; Liu, Dapeng; Wang, Haiye; He, Chunju

    2015-09-14

    Drawing to change the structural properties and cyclization behaviors of the polyacrylonitrile (PAN) chains in crystalline and amorphous regions is carried out on PAN and PAN/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite fibers. Various characterization methods including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and thermal gravimetric analysis are used to monitor the structural evolution and cyclization behaviors of the fibers. With an increase of the draw ratio during the plasticized spinning process, the structural parameters of the fibers, i.e. crystallinity and planar zigzag conformation, are decreased at first, and then increased, which are associated with the heat exchange rate and the oriented-crystallization rate. A possible mechanism for plasticized spinning is proposed to explain the changing trends of crystallinity and planar zigzag conformation. PAN and PAN/CNT fibers exhibit various cyclization behaviors induced by drawing, e.g., the initiation temperature for the cyclization (Ti) of PAN fibers is increased with increasing draw ratio, while Ti of PAN/CNT fibers is decreased. Drawing also facilitates cyclization and lowers the percentage of β-amino nitrile for PAN/CNT fibers during the stabilization.

  3. Relationships between soil and leaf mineral composition are element-specific, environment-dependent and geographically structured in the emerging model Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ricardo J; Höreth, Stephan; de Melo, J Romário F; Syllwasschy, Lara; Lee, Gwonjin; Garbin, Mário L; Clemens, Stephan; Krämer, Ute

    2017-02-01

    Leaf mineral composition, the leaf ionome, reflects the complex interaction between a plant and its environment including local soil composition, an influential factor that can limit species distribution and plant productivity. Here we addressed within-species variation in plant-soil interactions and edaphic adaptation using Arabidopsis halleri, a well-suited model species as a facultative metallophyte and metal hyperaccumulator. We conducted multi-element analysis of 1972 paired leaf and soil samples from 165 European populations of A. halleri, at individual resolution to accommodate soil heterogeneity. Results were further confirmed under standardized conditions upon cultivation of 105 field-collected genotypes on an artificially metal-contaminated soil in growth chamber experiments. Soil-independent between- and within-population variation set apart leaf accumulation of zinc, cadmium and lead from all other nutrient and nonessential elements, concurring with differential hypothesized ecological roles in either biotic interaction or nutrition. For these metals, soil-leaf relationships were element-specific, differed between metalliferous and nonmetalliferous soils and were geographically structured both in the field and under standardized growth conditions, implicating complex scenarios of recent ecological adaptation. Our study provides an example and a reference for future related work and will serve as a basis for the molecular-genetic dissection and ecological analysis of the observed phenotypic variation. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Reliability analysis of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, Han-Pin

    1992-01-01

    A probabilistic static stress analysis methodology has been developed to estimate the reliability of a composite structure. Closed form stress analysis methods are the primary analytical tools used in this methodology. These structural mechanics methods are used to identify independent variables whose variations significantly affect the performance of the structure. Once these variables are identified, scatter in their values is evaluated and statistically characterized. The scatter in applied loads and the structural parameters are then fitted to appropriate probabilistic distribution functions. Numerical integration techniques are applied to compute the structural reliability. The predicted reliability accounts for scatter due to variability in material strength, applied load, fabrication and assembly processes. The influence of structural geometry and mode of failure are also considerations in the evaluation. Example problems are given to illustrate various levels of analytical complexity.

  5. Defect imaging in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, Paul; Endrizzi, Marco; Olivo, Alessandro

    2018-04-01

    Carbon fiber laminate composites offer advantages including a good strength to weight ratio for aerospace structures. However, manufacturing imperfections and impact during the operation and servicing of the aircraft can lead to barely visible and difficult to detect damage. Incorrect ply lay-up during the manufacturing process can result in fiber misalignment or in-plane and out-of-plane waviness. Impact, such as bird strike, during the service life can lead to delamination and cracking, reducing the load carrying capacity of the structure. Both ultrasonic and X-ray techniques have a good track record for the nondestructive testing of composite structures; for the latter, phase-based approaches provide additional advantages due to their enhanced sensitivity. Bulk and guided ultrasonic waves propagating in the composite panel were employed for defect imaging. Ultrasonic immersion C-scans of a composite panel with barely visible impact damage were taken to characterize the size and shape of damage (delamination). The first antisymmetric A0 Lamb wave mode was excited experimentally using piezoelectric transducers and measured using a laser vibrometer. X-ray phase-contrast and dark field imaging, implemented through the edge-illumination (EI) approach, were used for the detailed visualization of the damages in the composite material. The Edge-illumination approach is multi-modal and provides three representations of the sample: absorption, differential phase and dark-field. The latter is of particular interest to detect cracks and voids of dimensions that are smaller than the actual spatial resolution of the imaging system. Application examples for carbon fiber composite plates with barely visible impact damage are shown.

  6. Functionally Graded Metal-Metal Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, Craig A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Methods and devices are disclosed for creating a multiple alloy composite structure by forming a three-dimensional arrangement of a first alloy composition in which the three-dimensional arrangement has a substantially open and continuous porosity. The three-dimensional arrangement of the first alloy composition is infused with at least a second alloy composition, where the second alloy composition comprises a shape memory alloy. The three-dimensional arrangement is consolidated into a fully dense solid structure, and the original shape of the second alloy composition is set for reversible transformation. Strain is applied to the fully dense solid structure, which is treated with heat so that the shape memory alloy composition becomes memory activated to recover the original shape. An interwoven composite of the first alloy composition and the memory-activated second alloy composition is thereby formed in the multiple alloy composite structure.

  7. Application of Composite Mechanics to Composites Enhanced Concrete Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Gotsis, Pascal K.

    2006-01-01

    A new and effective method is described to design composites to repair damage or enhance the overload strength of concrete infrastructures. The method is based on composite mechanics which is available in computer codes. It is used to simulate structural sections made from reinforced concrete which are typical in infrastructure as well as select reinforced concrete structures. The structural sections are represented by a number of layers through the thickness where different layers are used in concrete, and for the composite. The reinforced concrete structures are represented with finite elements where the element stiffness parameters are from the structural sections which are represented by composite mechanics. The load carrying capability of the structure is determined by progressive structural fracture. Results show up to 40 percent improvements for damage and for overload enhancement with relatively small laminate thickness for the structural sections and up to three times for the composite enhanced select structures (arches and domes).

  8. ACEE Composite Structures Technology: Review of selected NASA research on composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program was designed to develop technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Research on composite materials, aircraft structures, and aircraft design is presented herein. The following parameters of composite materials were addressed: residual strength, damage tolerance, toughness, tensile strength, impact resistance, buckling, and noise transmission within composite materials structures.

  9. Hybrid Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a hybrid structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the hybrid structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high strain to failure at cryogenic

  10. Compositional dependence of phase structure and electrical properties in (K0.42Na0.58)NbO3-LiSbO3 lead-free ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiagang; Xiao, Dingquan; Wang, Yuanyu; Zhu, Jianguo; Yu, Ping; Jiang, Yihang

    2007-12-01

    (1-x)(K0.42Na0.58)NbO3-xLiSbO3 [(1-x)KNN-xLS] lead-free piezoelectric ceramics were prepared by the conventional mixed oxide method. The compositional dependence of the phase structure and the electrical properties of the ceramics were studied. A morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) between the orthorhombic and tetragonal phases was identified in the composition range of 0.04compositional dependence and enhanced piezoelectric properties. The ceramics with 5 mol. % LS exhibit enhanced electrical properties (d33˜270 pC/N, kp˜47.2%, Tc˜364 °C , To-t=35 °C, ɛr˜1412, tan δ ˜2.8%, and Pr˜25.7 μC/cm2; Ec˜11.1 kV/cm) and possess low dielectric loss (<2%) at 10 and 100 kHz at high temperature (250-400 °C). The low dielectric loss at high temperature is very important for high-temperature application of the ceramics. The related mechanism of the enhanced electrical properties of the ceramics was also discussed. These results show that (1-x)KNN-xLS (x =0.05) ceramic is a promising lead-free piezoelectric material.

  11. Composition dependences of crystal structure and electrical properties of epitaxial Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films grown on Si and SrTiO3 substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Shoji; Okamoto, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Shintaro; Akiyama, Kensuke; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    {100}-oriented Pb(Zr x ,Ti1- x )O3 (PZT) thin films of approximately 2 µm thickness and Zr/(Zr + Ti) ratios of 0.39-0.65 were epitaxially grown on (100)cSrRuO3//(100)SrTiO3 (STO) and (100)cSrRuO3//(100)cLaNiO3//(100)CeO2//(100)YSZ//(100)Si (Si) substrates having different thermal expansion coefficients by pulsed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The effects of Zr/(Zr + Ti) ratio and type of substrate on the crystal structure and dielectric, ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of the films were systematically investigated. The X-ray diffraction measurement showed that both films changed from having a tetragonal symmetry to rhombohedral symmetry through the coexisting region with increasing Zr/(Zr + Ti) ratio. This region showed the Zr/(Zr + Ti) ratios of 0.45-0.59 for the films on the STO substrates that were wider than the films on the Si substrates. Saturation polarization values were minimum at approximately Zr/(Zr + Ti) = 0.50 for the films on the STO substrates, and no obvious Zr/(Zr + Ti) ratio dependence was detected in the films on the Si substrates. On the other hand, the maximum field-induced strain values measured by scanning force microscopy at approximately Zr/(Zr + Ti) = 0.50 at 100 kV/cm were about 0.5 and 0.1% in the films on the Si and STO, respectively.

  12. Global Failure Modes in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.; Gonzalez, Luis

    2001-01-01

    . The question of "scaling" is an essential concern in any structural materials investigation. For example, experiments in the past have shown that the "strength" of a composite depends on hole size. As a consequence the validity of traditional fracture mechanics concepts applied to composite materials failure must be questioned. The size of the fibers, the dimensions of the laminae, etc. together with the fact that, because of the layered anisotropy, the stress field is no longer two-dimensional, prevent the otherwise obviously confident use of "similarity concepts". Therefore, the question needs to be raised of whether in composites "size matters or not", i.e., whether the results obtained in a laboratory using small coupons are truly representative of the situation involving a full scale component.

  13. Multiscale Multifunctional Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    2012-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells. Global fracture is enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads. The old reference denotes that nothing has been added to this comprehensive report since then.

  14. Fire resistance of structural composite lumber products

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White

    2006-01-01

    Use of structural composite lumber products is increasing. In applications requiring a fire resistance rating, calculation procedures are used to obtain the fire resistance rating of exposed structural wood products. A critical factor in the calculation procedures is char rate for ASTM E 119 fire exposure. In this study, we tested 14 structural composite lumber...

  15. Rapid Prototyping of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    1998-01-01

    This progress report for the project Rapid Production of Composite Structures covers the period from July 14, 1997 to June 30, 1998. It will present a short overview of the project, followed by the results to date and plans for the future. The goal of this research is to provide a minimum 100x reduction in the time required to produce arbitrary, laminated products without the need for a separate mold or an autoclave. It will accomplish this by developing the science underlying the rapid production of composite structures, specifically those of carbon fiber-epoxy materials. This scientific understanding will be reduced to practice in a demonstration device that will produce a part on the order of 12" by 12" by 6". Work in the past year has focussed on developing an understanding of the materials issues and of the machine design issues. Our initial goal was to use UV cureable resins to accomplish full cure on the machine. Therefore, we have centered our materials work around whether or not UV cureable resins will work. Currently, the answer seems to be that they will not work, because UV light cannot penetrate the carbon fibers, and because no "shadow" curing seems to occur. As a result, non-UV cureable resins are being investigated. This has resulted in a change in the machine design focus. We are now looking into a "dip and place" machine design, whereby a prepreg layer would have one side coated with a curing agent, and then would be placed onto the previous layer. This would lead to cure at the interface, but not to the top of the layer. The formulation of the resins to accomplish this task at room or slightly elevated temperatures is being investigated, as is the machine design needed to apply the curing agent and then cure or partially cure the part. A final, out-of-autoclave, post-cure may be needed with this strategy, as final cure on the machine may not be possible, as it was for the initial UV cure strategy. The remainder of this report details the progress

  16. Effect of stress concentrations in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, C. D.; Waas, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Composite structures have found wide use in many engineering fields and a sound understanding of their response under load is important to their utilization. An experimental program is being carried out to gain a fundamental understanding of the failure mechanics of multilayered composite structures at GALCIT. As a part of this continuing study, the performance of laminated composite plates in the presence of a stress gradient and the failure of composite structures at points of thickness discontinuity is assessed. In particular, the questions of initiation of failure and its subsequent growth to complete failure of the structure are addressed.

  17. Impact analysis of composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, Allan B.; Kushner, Alan S.

    1993-01-01

    The impact analysis of composite aircraft structures is discussed. Topics discussed include: background remarks on aircraft crashworthiness; comments on modeling strategies for crashworthiness simulation; initial study of simulation of progressive failure of an aircraft component constructed of composite material; and research direction in composite characterization for impact analysis.

  18. Composite structures for magnetosphere imager spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin

    1994-01-01

    Results of a trade study addressing the issues and benefits in using carbon fiber reinforced composites for the Magnetosphere Imager (MI) spacecraft are presented. The MI mission is now part of the Sun/Earth Connection Program. To qualify for this category, new technology and innovative methods to reduce the cost and size have to be considered. Topics addressed cover: (1) what is a composite, including advantages and disadvantages of composites and carbon/graphite fibers; and (2) structural design for MI, including composite design configuration, material selection, and analysis of composite structures.

  19. Damage progression in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    1996-01-01

    A computational simulation tool is used to evaluate the various stages of damage progression in composite materials during Iosipescu sheat testing. Unidirectional composite specimens with either the major or minor material axis in the load direction are considered. Damage progression characteristics are described for each specimen using two types of boundary conditions. A procedure is outlined regarding the use of computational simulation in composites testing. Iosipescu shear testing using the V-notched beam specimen is a convenient method to measure both shear strength and shear stiffness simultaneously. The evaluation of composite test response can be made more productive and informative via computational simulation of progressive damage and fracture. Computational simulation performs a complete evaluation of laminated composite fracture via assessment of ply and subply level damage/fracture processes.

  20. Graphic Display of Larger Sentence Dependency Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craven, Timothy C.

    1991-01-01

    Outlines desirable qualities for graphic representation of sentence dependency structures in texts more than a few sentences in length. Several different display formats prototyped in the TEXNET experimental text structure management system are described, illustrated, and compared, and automatic structure manipulations are discussed. (36…

  1. Design considerations for fiber composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of the design methodology for designing structural components from fiber composites is presented. In particular, the need for new conceptual structural designs for the future is discussed and the evolution of conceptual design is illustrated. Sources of design data, analysis and design procedures, and the basic components of structural fiber composites are cited and described. Examples of tradeoff studies and optimum designs are discussed and a simple structure is described in some detail.

  2. Design Optimization of Composite Structures under Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.

    2003-01-01

    Design optimization under uncertainty is computationally expensive and is also challenging in terms of alternative formulation. The work under the grant focused on developing methods for design against uncertainty that are applicable to composite structural design with emphasis on response surface techniques. Applications included design of stiffened composite plates for improved damage tolerance, the use of response surfaces for fitting weights obtained by structural optimization, and simultaneous design of structure and inspection periods for fail-safe structures.

  3. Computational composite mechanics for aerospace propulsion structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Specialty methods are presented for the computational simulation of specific composite behavior. These methods encompass all aspects of composite mechanics, impact, progressive fracture and component specific simulation. Some of these methods are structured to computationally simulate, in parallel, the composite behavior and history from the initial fabrication through several missions and even to fracture. Select methods and typical results obtained from such simulations are described in detail in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of computationally simulating (1) complex composite structural behavior in general and (2) specific aerospace propulsion structural components in particular.

  4. Computational composite mechanics for aerospace propulsion structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1987-01-01

    Specialty methods are presented for the computational simulation of specific composite behavior. These methods encompass all aspects of composite mechanics, impact, progressive fracture and component specific simulation. Some of these methods are structured to computationally simulate, in parallel, the composite behavior and history from the initial frabrication through several missions and even to fracture. Select methods and typical results obtained from such simulations are described in detail in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of computationally simulating: (1) complex composite structural behavior in general, and (2) specific aerospace propulsion structural components in particular.

  5. Composite Dry Structure Cost Improvement Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    This effort demonstrates that by focusing only on properties of relevance, composite interstage and shroud structures can be placed on the Space Launch System vehicle that simultaneously reduces cost, improves reliability, and maximizes performance, thus providing the Advanced Development Group with a new methodology of how to utilize composites to reduce weight for composite structures on launch vehicles. Interstage and shroud structures were chosen since both of these structures are simple in configuration and do not experience extreme environments (such as cryogenic or hot gas temperatures) and should represent a good starting point for flying composites on a 'man-rated' vehicle. They are used as an example only. The project involves using polymer matrix composites for launch vehicle structures, and the logic and rationale behind the proposed new methodology.

  6. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2010-04-27

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  7. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2004-10-19

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  8. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  9. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 deg ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  10. Structural behavior of composites with progressive fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, L.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the study is to unify several computational tools developed for the prediction of progressive damage and fracture with efforts for the prediction of the overall response of damaged composite structures. In particular, a computational finite element model for the damaged structure is developed using a computer program as a byproduct of the analysis of progressive damage and fracture. Thus, a single computational investigation can predict progressive fracture and the resulting variation in structural properties of angleplied composites.

  11. Composition Dependence of the Properties of Noble-metal Nanoalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Seivane, Lucas; Barrón, Héctor; Benson, James; Weissker, Hans-Christian; López-Lozano, Xochitl

    2012-03-01

    Bimetallic nanostructured materials are of greater interest both from the scientific and technological points of view due to their potential to improve the catalytic properties of novel materials. Their applicability as well as the performance depends critically on their size, shape and composition, either as alloy or core-shell. In this work, the structural, electronic, magnetic and optical properties of bimetallic Au-Ag nanoclusters have been investigated through density-functional-theory-based calculations with the Siesta and Octopus codes. Different symmetries -tetrahedral, bipyramidal, decahedral and icosahedral- of bimetallic nanoparticles of 4-, 5-, 7- and 13-atoms, were taken into account including all the possibly different Au:Ag ratio concentrations. In combination with a statistical analysis of the performed calculations and the concepts of the Enthalpy of Mixing and Energy Excess, we have been able to predict the most probable gap and magnetic moment for all the composition stoichiometries. This approach allows us to understand the energy differences due to cluster shape effects, the stoichiometry and segregation. In addition, we can also obtain the bulk energy and surface energy of Au-Ag nanoalloys by looking at fixed number of atoms and fixed morphologies.

  12. Time-dependent response of filamentary composite spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel is modeled as a pseudoisotropic (or transversely isotropic) composite shell, with the effects of the liner and fill tubes omitted. Equations of elasticity, macromechanical and micromechanical formulations, and laminate properties are derived for the application of an internally pressured spherical composite vessel. Viscoelastic properties for the composite matrix are used to characterize time-dependent behavior. Using the maximum strain theory of failure, burst pressure and critical strain equations are formulated, solved in the Laplace domain with an associated elastic solution, and inverted back into the time domain using the method of collocation. Viscoelastic properties of HBFR-55 resin are experimentally determined and a Kevlar/HBFR-55 system is evaluated with a FORTRAN program. The computed reduction in burst pressure with respect to time indicates that the analysis employed may be used to predict the time-dependent response of a filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel.

  13. Structure and properties of hybrid composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, T. A.; Kobeleva, L. I.; Bolotova, L. K.; Katin, I. V.

    2013-03-01

    The structure and interfacial interaction are studied in the hybrid aluminum-matrix composite materials fabricated by reactive casting combined with mechanical mixing of fillers with a metallic melt. The following types of hardening are considered: hardening by ceramic particles and by the phases formed as isolated inclusions or coatings on ceramic particles during in situ reactions. The hardness and tribological properties of the composite materials as functions of their compositions are discussed.

  14. Hydrodynamic Forces on Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    and placed under a vacuum of 10 mmHg overnight. The vacuum set up over the composite sample is shown in Figure 13, the hose in upper left leads to...pulley system, one of which drives the carriage via a braided steel cable. Although the pulley connection between the motor and the drive axle may...slip this system contains a tensioner device. More likely, the braided steel cable is slipping against the drive pulley which has a quarter-inch

  15. Mechanical Model Development for Composite Structural Supercapacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Trenton M.; Lacy, Thomas E., Jr.; Santiago, Diana; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    Novel composite structural supercapacitor concepts have recently been developed as a means both to store electrical charge and to provide modest mechanical load carrying capability. Double-layer composite supercapacitors are often fabricated by impregnating a woven carbon fiber fabric, which serves as the electrodes, with a structural polymer electrolyte. Polypropylene or a glass fabric is often used as the separator material. Recent research has been primarily limited to evaluating these composites experimentally. In this study, mechanical models based on the Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells (MSGMC) were developed and used to calculate the shear and tensile properties and response of two composite structural supercapacitors from the literature. The modeling approach was first validated against traditional composite laminate data. MSGMC models for composite supercapacitors were developed, and accurate elastic shear/tensile properties were obtained. It is envisioned that further development of the models presented in this work will facilitate the design of composite components for aerospace and automotive applications and can be used to screen candidate constituent materials for inclusion in future composite structural supercapacitor concepts.

  16. Effects of defects in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sendeckyj, G. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of defects in composite structures is addressed. Defects in laminates such as wrinkles, foreign particles, scratches and breaks are discussed. Effects of plygap plywaviness and machining defects are also studied.

  17. Probabilistic assessment of smart composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Shiao, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    A composite wing with spars and bulkheads is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of probabilistic assessment of smart composite structures to control uncertainties in distortions and stresses. Results show that a smart composite wing can be controlled to minimize distortions and to have specified stress levels in the presence of defects. Structural responses such as changes in angle of attack, vertical displacements, and stress in the control and controlled plies are probabilistically assessed to quantify their respective uncertainties. Sensitivity factors are evaluated to identify those parameters that have the greatest influence on a specific structural response. Results show that smart composite structures can be configured to control both distortions and ply stresses to satisfy specified design requirements.

  18. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Builtup Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1996-01-01

    The damage progression and fracture of builtup composite structures was evaluated by using computational simulation to examine the behavior and response of a stiffened composite (0 +/- 45/90)(sub s6) laminate panel subjected to a bending load. The damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progression, and propagation to structural collapse were simulated. An integrated computer code (CODSTRAN) was augmented for the simulation of the progressive damage and fracture of builtup composite structures under mechanical loading. Results showed that damage initiation and progression have a significant effect on the structural response. Also investigated was the influence of different types of bending load on the damage initiation, propagation, and final fracture of the builtup composite panel.

  19. Innovative Composite Structure Design for Blast Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    2007-01-0483 Innovative Composite Structure Design for Blast Protection Dongying Jiang, Yuanyuan Liu MKP Structural Design Associates, Inc...protect vehicle and occupants against various explosives. The multi-level and multi-scenario blast simulation and design system integrates three major...numerical simulation of a BTR composite under a blast event. The developed blast simulation and design system will enable the prediction, design, and

  20. Composite Structure with Origami Core

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-19

    spherical linkages using the mechanism theory . Precise motions of origami were identified. In the second case, we identified a link between thick panel...operating reversibly by a coupled tension-to-torsion actuation mechanism . Using theory , we quantitatively explain the complementary effects of an increase in...structures. Our research has paved the way for much broader utilization of such structures in aeronautics and aerospace industries. 15. SUBJECT TERMS

  1. Structural investigation of a new composite process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Philippe; Becker, Eric; Bigot, Régis; Kaïci, Bruno

    2017-10-01

    This work presents a study done on a new patented forming process, created to produce massive composite parts used for structural applications in automotive and aeronautics industries. The study presented in this paper deals with an experimental setup, used to characterize thick composite cylinders. The author presents the characterization of these cylinders and a new analysis method, in order to understand the consolidation steps of the composite in this forming process. The structural health of the part is illustrated by the analysis of the intra-bundle and inter-bundle porosities, by micrographs characterizations.

  2. Service evaluation of aircraft composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, W. A., Jr.; Dow, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    The advantages of the use of composite materials in structural applications have been identified in numerous engineering studies. Technology development programs are underway to correct known deficiencies and to provide needed improvements. However, in the final analysis, flight service programs are necessary to develop broader acceptance of, and confidence in, any new class of materials such as composites. Such flight programs, initiated by NASA Langley Research Center, are reviewed. These programs which include the selectively reinforced metal and the all-composite concepts applied to both secondary and primary aircraft structural components, are described and current status is indicated.

  3. Structural modeling for multicell composite rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Atilgan, Ali R.

    1987-01-01

    Composite material systems are currently good candidates for aerospace structures, primarily for the design flexibility they offer, i.e., it is possible to tailor the material and manufacturing approach to the application. A working definition of elastic or structural tailoring is the use of structural concept, fiber orientation, ply stacking sequence, and a blend of materials to achieve specific performance goals. In the design process, choices of materials and dimensions are made which produce specific response characteristics, and which permit the selected goals to be achieved. Common choices for tailoring goals are preventing instabilities or vibration resonances or enhancing damage tolerance. An essential, enabling factor in the design of tailored composite structures is structural modeling that accurately, but simply, characterizes response. The objective of this paper is to present a new multicell beam model for composite rotor blades and to validate predictions based on the new model by comparison with a finite element simulation in three benchmark static load cases.

  4. Compression Strength of Composite Primary Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.; Starnes, James H., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The focus of research activities under NASA Grant NAG-1-2035 was the response and failure of thin-walled structural components. The research is applicable to the primary load carrying structure of flight vehicles, with particular emphasis on fuselage and wing'structure. Analyses and tests were performed that are applicable to the following structural components an aft pressure bulkhead, or a composite pressure dome, pressure cabin damage containment, and fuselage frames subject to crash-type loads.

  5. Composite blade structural analyzer (COBSTRAN) user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    The installation and use of a computer code, COBSTRAN (COmposite Blade STRuctrual ANalyzer), developed for the design and analysis of composite turbofan and turboprop blades and also for composite wind turbine blades was described. This code combines composite mechanics and laminate theory with an internal data base of fiber and matrix properties. Inputs to the code are constituent fiber and matrix material properties, factors reflecting the fabrication process, composite geometry and blade geometry. COBSTRAN performs the micromechanics, macromechanics and laminate analyses of these fiber composites. COBSTRAN generates a NASTRAN model with equivalent anisotropic homogeneous material properties. Stress output from NASTRAN is used to calculate individual ply stresses, strains, interply stresses, thru-the-thickness stresses and failure margins. Curved panel structures may be modeled providing the curvature of a cross-section is defined by a single value function. COBSTRAN is written in FORTRAN 77.

  6. Structural composite panel performance under long-term load

    Treesearch

    Theodore L. Laufenberg

    1988-01-01

    Information on the performance of wood-based structural composite panels under long-term load is currently needed to permit their use in engineered assemblies and systems. A broad assessment of the time-dependent properties of panels is critical for creating databases and models of the creep-rupture phenomenon that lead to reliability-based design procedures. This...

  7. Development of stitched/RTM composite primary structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kullerd, Susan M.; Dow, Marvin B.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program is to provide the technology required to gain the full benefit of weight savings and performance offered by composite primary structures. Achieving the goal is dependent on developing composite materials and structures which are damage tolerant and economical to manufacture. Researchers at NASA LaRC and Douglas Aircraft Company are investigating stitching reinforcement combined with resin transfer molding (RTM) to create structures meeting the ACT program goals. The Douglas work is being performed under a NASA contract entitled Innovative Composites Aircraft Primary Structures (ICAPS). The research is aimed at materials, processes and structural concepts for application in both transport wings and fuselages. Empirical guidelines are being established for stitching reinforcement in primary structures. New data are presented in this paper for evaluation tests of thick (90-ply) and thin (16-ply) stitched laminates, and from selection tests of RTM composite resins. Tension strength, compression strength and post-impact compression strength data are reported. Elements of a NASA LaRC program to expand the science base for stitched/RTM composites are discussed.

  8. Quantitative NDE of Composite Structures at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Howell, Patricia A.; Johnston, Patrick H.; Burke, Eric R.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Winfree, William P.; Seebo, Jeffery P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of composite materials continues to increase in the aerospace community due to the potential benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and manufacturability. Ongoing work at NASA involves the use of the large-scale composite structures for spacecraft (payload shrouds, cryotanks, crew modules, etc). NASA is also working to enable the use and certification of composites in aircraft structures through the Advanced Composites Project (ACP). The rapid, in situ characterization of a wide range of the composite materials and structures has become a critical concern for the industry. In many applications it is necessary to monitor changes in these materials over a long time. The quantitative characterization of composite defects such as fiber waviness, reduced bond strength, delamination damage, and microcracking are of particular interest. The research approaches of NASA's Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch include investigation of conventional, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods, infrared thermography and x-ray computed tomography techniques. The use of simulation tools for optimizing and developing these methods is also an active area of research. This paper will focus on current research activities related to large area NDE for rapidly characterizing aerospace composites.

  9. Lithographically defined microporous carbon-composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Burckel, David Bruce; Washburn, Cody M.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Finnegan, Patrick Sean; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-12-06

    A microporous carbon scaffold is produced by lithographically patterning a carbon-containing photoresist, followed by pyrolysis of the developed resist structure. Prior to exposure, the photoresist is loaded with a nanoparticulate material. After pyrolysis, the nanonparticulate material is dispersed in, and intimately mixed with, the carbonaceous material of the scaffold, thereby yielding a carbon composite structure.

  10. Mechanics of Bimodular Composite Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    and P. de Meester (1978). The mechanical behaviour of porous austenitic stainless steel fibre structure. J. Matls. Sci., 13, 2650-2658. Gilbert, G.N.J...Investigator Material EClEt Kotlarskii & Karbasova (1968) Fabric/rubber 0.38 Ducheyne et al. (1978) Sintered, porous 0.1 stainless steel Zolotukhina & Lepetov...with aramid cord than when reinforced with polyester cord, This is probably related to the very low compressive strength of the aramid fibers

  11. Energy absorption of composite material and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a joint research program on helicopter crashworthiness conducted by the U.S. Army Aerostructures Directorate and NASA Langley. Through the ongoing research program an in-depth understanding has been developed on the cause/effect relationships between material and architectural variables and the energy-absorption capability of composite material and structure. Composite materials were found to be efficient energy absorbers. Graphite/epoxy subfloor structures were more efficient energy absorbers than comparable structures fabricated from Kevlar or aluminum. An accurate method of predicting the energy-absorption capability of beams was developed.

  12. Infrared thermographic evaluation of marine composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Thomas S.

    1995-06-01

    Glass fiber composite materials have been used for many years in the construction of pleasure, cruising, and racing marine vessels. These vessels have demonstrated excellent performance characteristics and have been reliable in service. Even so, as with all material systems, they are subject to damage from accident, neglect, and abuse. Traditional nondestructive inspection approaches are not always fully effective for examining composite marine structures. Infrared imaging offers a particularly attractive approach for the inspection of composite material structures. Glass fiber composites frequently possess a combination of thermal properties that make them good candidates for infrared thermographic evaluation while other nondestructive evaluation approaches provide limited success. Infrared thermography combines the advantages of being nondestructive with the capability of rapidly inspecting wide surface areas.

  13. Hierarchical Simulation of Hot Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Computational procedures are described to simulate the thermal and mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) Behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via High Temperature Composite Analyzer (HITCAN). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as strength, stress-strain response, and cyclic life in HTMMC's; MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process for optimum performance such as that for in-service load carrying capacity of HT-MMC's; and HITCAN can be used to evaluate static fracture and fatigue life of hot pressurized metal matrix composite rings.

  14. Composite electrode/electrolyte structure

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2004-01-27

    Provided is an electrode fabricated from highly electronically conductive materials such as metals, metal alloys, or electronically conductive ceramics. The electronic conductivity of the electrode substrate is maximized. Onto this electrode in the green state, a green ionic (e.g., electrolyte) film is deposited and the assembly is co-fired at a temperature suitable to fully densify the film while the substrate retains porosity. Subsequently, a catalytic material is added to the electrode structure by infiltration of a metal salt and subsequent low temperature firing. The invention allows for an electrode with high electronic conductivity and sufficient catalytic activity to achieve high power density in ionic (electrochemical) devices such as fuel cells and electrolytic gas separation systems.

  15. Damage Tolerance Characterisitics of Composite Sandwich Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-01

    requirements impose strict test program is devised and carried out, with hundreds of tests at constraints on the design of composite aircraft... design A particular effort was dedicated to the study of delamination methodologies, as well as static and fatigue strength and growth under...partition according to the theoretical tools, the industries are more or less forced, for the fundamental modes. design of primary composite structures

  16. A Design Tool for Robust Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    a a UNIVERSITY OF ^?CAiVI BRIDGE FINAL REPORT A Design Tool for Robust Composite Structures Frank Zok Materials Department University of ...organic fibers, especially Dyneema®. The principal objectives of the present study were to ascertain the fundamental mechanical properties of Dyneema...composites increases by a factor of 2 and the ductility by almost a factor of 3 over the strain rate range 10-3 s-1 to 104 s- 1. One consequence is

  17. Development of constitutive model for composites exhibiting time dependent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupure, L.; Joffe, R.; Varna, J.; Nyström, B.

    2013-12-01

    Regenerated cellulose fibres and their composites exhibit highly nonlinear behaviour. The mechanical response of these materials can be successfully described by the model developed by Schapery for time-dependent materials. However, this model requires input parameters that are experimentally determined via large number of time-consuming tests on the studied composite material. If, for example, the volume fraction of fibres is changed we have a different material and new series of experiments on this new material are required. Therefore the ultimate objective of our studies is to develop model which determines the composite behaviour based on behaviour of constituents of the composite. This paper gives an overview of problems and difficulties, associated with development, implementation and verification of such model.

  18. Global Failure Modes in High Temperature Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.

    1998-01-01

    Composite materials have been considered for many years as the major advance in the construction of energy efficient aerospace structures. Notable advances have been made in understanding the special design considerations that set composites apart from the usual "isotropic" engineering materials such as the metals. As a result, a number of significant engineering designs have been accomplished. However, one shortcoming of the currently favored composites is their relatively unforgiving behavior with respect to failure (brittleness) under seemingly mild impact conditions and large efforts are underway to rectify that situation, much along the lines of introducing thermoplastic matrix materials. Because of their relatively more pronounced (thermo) viscoelastic behavior these materials respond with "toughness" in fracture situations. From the point of view of applications requiring material strength, this property is highly desirable. This feature impacts several important and distinct engineering problems which have been' considered under this grant and cover the 1) effect of impact damage on structural (buckling) stability of composite panels, the 2) effect of time dependence on the progression of buckling instabilities, and the 3) evolution of damage and fracture at generic thickness discontinuities in structures. The latter topic has serious implications for structural stability problems (buckling failure in reinforced shell structures) as well as failure progression in stringer-reinforced shell structures. This grant has dealt with these issues. Polymer "toughness" is usually associated with uncrosslinked or thermo-plastic polymers. But, by comparison with their thermoset counterparts they tend to exhibit more pronounced time dependent material behavior; also, that time dependence can occur at lower temperatures which places restriction in the high temperature use of these "newer and tougher" materials that are not quite so serious with the thermoset matrix

  19. Compression failure mechanisms of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Sohi, M.; Moon, S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study was conducted to delineate the compression failure mechanisms of composite structures. The present report summarizes further results on kink band formation in unidirectional composites. In order to assess the compressive strengths and failure modes of fibers them selves, a fiber bundle was embedded in epoxy casting and tested in compression. A total of six different fibers were used together with two resins of different stiffnesses. The failure of highly anisotropic fibers such as Kevlar 49 and P-75 graphite was due to kinking of fibrils. However, the remaining fibers--T300 and T700 graphite, E-glass, and alumina--failed by localized microbuckling. Compressive strengths of the latter group of fibers were not fully utilized in their respective composite. In addition, acoustic emission monitoring revealed that fiber-matrix debonding did not occur gradually but suddenly at final failure. The kink band formation in unidirectional composites under compression was studied analytically and through microscopy. The material combinations selected include seven graphite/epoxy composites, two graphite/thermoplastic resin composites, one Kevlar 49/epoxy composite and one S-glass/epoxy composite.

  20. Composite Structure Optimization with Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deslandes, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    In the frame of optimization studies in CNES launcher directorate structure, thermic and material department, the need of an optimization tool based on metaheuristic and finite element models for composite structural dimensioning was underlined.Indeed, composite structures need complex optimization methodologies in order to be really compared to metallic structures with regard to mass, static strength and stiffness constraints (metallic structures using optimization methods better known).After some bibliography research, the use of a genetic algorithm coupled with design of experiment to generate the initial population was chosen. Academic functions were used to validate the optimization process and then it was applied to an industrial study aiming to optimize an interstage skirt with regard to its mass, stiffness and stability (global buckling).

  1. Structural Composites With Tuned EM Chirality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-23

    photonic   crystals .   Tammuz  Dubnov  (7/14  –  9/14)  –  Laboratory  Assistant  -­‐  assisted in the testing...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0018 STRUCTURAL COMPOSITES WITH TUNED EM CHIRALITY Siavouche Nemat Nasser UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN DIEGO Final Report 12/23...REPORT Grant/Contract  Title:        STRUCTURAL  COMPOSITES  WITH  TUNED  EM   CHIRALITY     Grant  No.:

  2. Structure of weakly 2-dependent siphons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Daniel Yuh; Chen, Jiun-Ting

    2013-09-01

    Deadlocks arising from insufficiently marked siphons in flexible manufacturing systems can be controlled by adding monitors to each siphon - too many for large systems. Li and Zhou add monitors to elementary siphons only while controlling the rest of (called dependent) siphons by adjusting control depth variables of elementary siphons. Only a linear number of monitors are required. The control of weakly dependent siphons (WDSs) is rather conservative since only positive terms were considered. The structure for strongly dependent siphons (SDSs) has been studied earlier. Based on this structure, the optimal sequence of adding monitors has been discovered earlier. Better controllability has been discovered to achieve faster and more permissive control. The results have been extended earlier to S3PGR2 (systems of simple sequential processes with general resource requirements). This paper explores the structures for WDSs, which, as found in this paper, involve elementary resource circuits interconnecting at more than (for SDSs, exactly) one resource place. This saves the time to compute compound siphons, their complementary sets and T-characteristic vectors. Also it allows us (1) to improve the controllability of WDSs and control siphons and (2) to avoid the time to find independent vectors for elementary siphons. We propose a sufficient and necessary test for adjusting control depth variables in S3PR (systems of simple sequential processes with resources) to avoid the sufficient-only time-consuming linear integer programming test (LIP) (Nondeterministic Polynomial (NP) time complete problem) required previously for some cases.

  3. Composite structures for optical mirror applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Richard A.; Marks, John E.

    1990-10-01

    The employment of composites in RF structures such as antennas, feedhorns, and waveguides is outlined, and focus is placed on the parameters of a composite mirror operating in the 3-5- and 8-12-micron areas. A large beam-steering composite mirror fabricated from ultrahigh-modulus graphite/epoxy is described, including its three subassemblies: the core subassembly and two facesheet subassemblies. Attention is given to an alternative approach in which a gel coat resin is applied to the glass surface and the mirror substrate is pressed to the tool to cover the mirror with the resin. Another method is to seal the composite from the effects of moisture expansion by applying a eutectic coating; voids and crystal-grain growth are the main sources of surface perturbation on such mirror surfaces.

  4. Compositional structure of the asteroid belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradie, J.; Tedesco, E.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of observations, mainly albedos derived from 10 and 20 micron radiometry and eight-filter broadband spectrophotometry, were used to show that the asteroid belt is highly structured in composition. The bias-corrected distribution from 1.8 to 5.2 A.U. of the previously defined compositional types C,S,E,R, and M, plus type D and the newly described types F and P, are reported on. In terms of the relative abundances of the types discussed, the asteroid belt appears to be composed of at least six major compositionally distinct regions. The inferred composition of the asteroids in each semimajor axis region is consistent with the theory that the asteroids accreted from the solar nebula at or near their present location.

  5. Composite structural armor for combat vehicle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskell, William E., III; Alesi, A. L.; Parsons, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Several projects that have demonstrated the advantages of using thick composite armor technology for structural applications in armored combat vehicles are discussed. The first involved composite cargo doors for the Marine Corps LVTP-7 amphibious landing vehicle. Another was a demonstration composite turret that offered a weight reduction of 15.5 percent. The advantages of this composite armor compared to metallic armors used for combat vehicle hull and turret applications are reduced weight at equal ballistic protection; reduced back armor spall; excellent corrosion resistance; reduced production costs by parts consolidation; and inherent thermal and acoustic insulative properties. Based on the encouraging results of these past programs, the Demonstration Composite Hull Program was started in September 1986. To demonstrate this composite armor technology, the Army's newest infantry fighting vehicle, the Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV), was selected as a model. A composite infantry fighting vehicle, designated the CIFV for this program, has been designed and fabricated and is currently undergoing a 6000 mile field endurance test. The CIFV demonstration vehicle uses the BFV engine, transmission, suspension, track and other equipment.

  6. Structural colored liquid membrane without angle dependence.

    PubMed

    Takeoka, Yukikazu; Honda, Masaki; Seki, Takahiro; Ishii, Masahiko; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated for the first time that condensed gel particle suspensions in amorphous-like states display structural color with low angle dependence. This finding is in contrast to the common understanding that a periodic dielectric structure is fundamental to photonic band gap (PBG) production, and it validates the theory that a "tight bonding model" that is applicable to semiconductor systems can also be applied to photonic systems. More practically, this structural colored suspension represents a promising new material for the manufacture of reflective full-color displays with a wide viewing angle and nonfading color materials. This liquid system shows promise as a display material because electronic equipment used for display systems can easily be filled with the liquid in the same way that liquid crystals are currently used.

  7. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  8. Effect of stress concentrations in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, G. D.; Knauss, W. G.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of achieving a better understanding of the failure of complex composite structure is sought. This type of structure requires a thorough understanding of the behavior under load both on a macro and micro scale if failure mechanisms are to be understood. The two problems being studied are the failure at a panel/stiffener interface and a generic problem of failure at a stress concentration.

  9. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  10. Structural Design of Ares V Interstage Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleigh, David W.; Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Kosareo, Daniel N.; Martin, Robert A.; Johnson, Theodore F.

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary and detailed design studies were performed to mature composite structural design concepts for the Ares V Interstage structure as a part of NASA s Advanced Composite Technologies Project. Aluminum honeycomb sandwich and hat-stiffened composite panel structural concepts were considered. The structural design and analysis studies were performed using HyperSizer design sizing software and MSC Nastran finite element analysis software. System-level design trade studies were carried out to predict weight and margins of safety for composite honeycomb-core sandwich and composite hat-stiffened skin design concepts. Details of both preliminary and detailed design studies are presented in the paper. For the range of loads and geometry considered in this work, the hat-stiffened designs were found to be approximately 11-16 percent lighter than the sandwich designs. A down-select process was used to choose the most favorable structural concept based on a set of figures of merit, and the honeycomb sandwich design was selected as the best concept based on advantages in manufacturing cost.

  11. Automated Tape Laying Machine for Composite Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The invention comprises an automated tape laying machine, for laying tape on a composite structure. The tape laying machine has a tape laying head...neatly cut. The automated tape laying device utilizes narrow width tape to increase machine flexibility and reduce wastage.

  12. Timber rivets in structural composite lumber

    Treesearch

    Ronald W. Wolfe; Marshall Begel; Bruce Craig

    2004-01-01

    Timber rivet connections, originally developed for use with glulam construction, may be a viable option for use with structural composite lumber (SCL) products. Tests were conducted on small samples to assess the performance and predictability of timber rivet connections in parallel strand lumber (PSL) and laminated strand lumber (LSL). The test joint configurations...

  13. Structure, composition, and condition of overstory trees

    Treesearch

    Daniel A. Yaussy; Todd F. Hutchinson; Elaine Kennedy Sutherland

    2003-01-01

    The structure, composition, and condition of overstory trees in the four study areas prior to prescribed fire treatments are summarized. Stand initiation dates were similar among the study areas (ca. 1885), and coincided with the decline of the charcoal iron industry in southern Ohio. Tree basal area averaged 26.8m²/ha and was not significantly different among...

  14. Variable Complexity Optimization of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.

    2002-01-01

    The use of several levels of modeling in design has been dubbed variable complexity modeling. The work under the grant focused on developing variable complexity modeling strategies with emphasis on response surface techniques. Applications included design of stiffened composite plates for improved damage tolerance, the use of response surfaces for fitting weights obtained by structural optimization, and design against uncertainty using response surface techniques.

  15. Structure and Composition of the Grain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As a crop with a wide range of genetic diversity, sorghum grain composition and structure can vary widely. Such variability can be of great benefit in supplying a diversity of uses but can also be a negative when viewed from the standpoint of uniformity. Despite sharing similarities to other cereals...

  16. Improved Joining of Metal Components to Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmes, Edmund

    2009-01-01

    Systems requirements for complex spacecraft drive design requirements that lead to structures, components, and/or enclosures of a multi-material and multifunctional design. The varying physical properties of aluminum, tungsten, Invar, or other high-grade aerospace metals when utilized in conjunction with lightweight composites multiply system level solutions. These multi-material designs are largely dependent upon effective joining techAn improved method of joining metal components to matrix/fiber composite material structures has been invented. The method is particularly applicable to equipping such thin-wall polymer-matrix composite (PMC) structures as tanks with flanges, ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liners for high heat engine nozzles, and other metallic-to-composite attachments. The method is oriented toward new architectures and distributing mechanical loads as widely as possible in the vicinities of attachment locations to prevent excessive concentrations of stresses that could give rise to delaminations, debonds, leaks, and other failures. The method in its most basic form can be summarized as follows: A metal component is to be joined to a designated attachment area on a composite-material structure. In preparation for joining, the metal component is fabricated to include multiple studs projecting from the aforementioned face. Also in preparation for joining, holes just wide enough to accept the studs are molded into, drilled, or otherwise formed in the corresponding locations in the designated attachment area of the uncured ("wet') composite structure. The metal component is brought together with the uncured composite structure so that the studs become firmly seated in the holes, thereby causing the composite material to become intertwined with the metal component in the joining area. Alternately, it is proposed to utilize other mechanical attachment schemes whereby the uncured composite and metallic parts are joined with "z-direction" fasteners. The

  17. Density of biogas digestate depending on temperature and composition.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Mandy; Schneider, Nico

    2015-09-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of biogas digestate to ensure an optimal dimensioning and a precise design of biogas plant components like stirring devices, pumps and heat exchangers. In this study the density of biogas digestates with different compositions was measured using pycnometers at ambient pressure in a temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15K. The biogas digestates were taken from semi-continuous experiments, in which the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina, corn silage and a mixture of both were used as feedstocks. The results show an increase of density with increasing total solid content and a decrease with increasing temperature. Three equations to calculate the density of biogas digestate were set up depending on temperature as well as on the total solid content, organic composition and elemental composition, respectively. All correlations show a relative deviation below 1% compared to experimental data. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Compositional dependence of the band gap in Ga(NAsP) quantum well heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Jandieri, K., E-mail: kakhaber.jandieri@physik.uni-marburg.de; Ludewig, P.; Wegele, T.

    We present experimental and theoretical studies of the composition dependence of the direct band gap energy in Ga(NAsP)/GaP quantum well heterostructures grown on either (001) GaP- or Si-substrates. The theoretical description takes into account the band anti-crossing model for the conduction band as well as the modification of the valence subband structure due to the strain resulting from the pseudomorphic epitaxial growth on the respective substrate. The composition dependence of the direct band gap of Ga(NAsP) is obtained for a wide range of nitrogen and phosphorus contents relevant for laser applications on Si-substrate.

  19. Tooling Foam for Structural Composite Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom; Smith, Brett H.; Ely, Kevin; MacArthur, Doug

    1998-01-01

    Tooling technology applications for composite structures fabrication have been expanded at MSFC's Productivity Enhancement Complex (PEC). Engineers from NASA/MSFC and Lockheed Martin Corporation have developed a tooling foam for use in composite materials processing and manufacturing that exhibits superior thermal and mechanical properties in comparison with other tooling foam materials. This tooling foam is also compatible with most preimpregnated composite resins such as epoxy, bismaleimide, phenolic and their associated cure cycles. MARCORE tooling foam has excellent processability for applications requiring either integral or removable tooling. It can also be tailored to meet the requirements for composite processing of parts with unlimited cross sectional area. A shelf life of at least six months is easily maintained when components are stored between 50F - 70F. The MARCORE tooling foam system is a two component urethane-modified polyisocyanurate, high density rigid foam with zero ozone depletion potential. This readily machineable, lightweight tooling foam is ideal for composite structures fabrication and is dimensionally stable at temperatures up to 350F and pressures of 100 psi.

  20. Multidisciplinary tailoring of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described for multidisciplinary analysis and tailoring of layered multi-material hot composite engine structural components subjected to simultaneous multiple discipline-specific thermal, structural, vibration, and acoustic loads. The effect of aggressive environments is also simulated. The simulation is based on a three-dimensional finite element analysis technique in conjunction with structural mechanics codes, thermal/acoustic analysis methods, and tailoring procedures. The integrated multidisciplinary simulation procedure is general-purpose including the coupled effects of nonlinearities in structure geometry, material, loading, and environmental complexities. The composite material behavior is assessed at all composite scales, i.e., laminate/ply/constituents (fiber/matrix), via a nonlinear material characterization hygro-thermo-mechanical model. Sample tailoring cases exhibiting nonlinear material/loading/environmental behavior of aircraft engine fan blades, are presented. The various multidisciplinary loads lead to different tailored designs, even those competing with each other, as in the case of minimum material cost versus minimum structure weight and in the case of minimum vibration frequency versus minimum acoustic noise.

  1. Cost-efficient manufacturing of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, W. Tom; Davis, John G.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) program is seeking research breakthroughs that will allow structures made of graphite epoxy materials to replace metals in the wings and fuselages of future aircrafts. NASA's goals are to reduce acquisition cost by 20 to 25 percent, structural weight for a resized aircraft by 40 to 50 percent, and the number of parts by half compared to current production aluminum aircraft. The innovative structural concepts, materials, and fabrication techniques emerging from the ACT program are described, and the relationship between aerospace developments and industrial, commercial, and sporting goods applications are discussed.

  2. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  3. Fabrication of graphite/polyimide composite structures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varlas, M.

    1972-01-01

    Selection of graphite/polyimide composite as a prime candidate for high-temperature structural applications involving long-duration temperature environments of 400 to 600 F. A variety of complex graphite/polyimide components has been fabricated, using a match-metal die approach developed for making fiber-reinforced resin composites. Parts produced include sections of a missile adapter skin flange, skin frame section, and I-beam and hat-section stringers, as well as unidirectional (0 deg) and plus or minus 45 deg oriented graphite/polyimide tubes in one-, two-, and six-inch diameters.

  4. Analysis of Crushing Response of Composite Crashworthy Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Matthew; Johnson, Alastair F.; Voggenreiter, H.

    2013-10-01

    The paper describes quasi-static and dynamic tests to characterise the energy absorption properties of polymer composite crash energy absorbing segment elements under axial loads. Detailed computer tomography scans of failed specimens are used to identify local compression crush failure mechanisms at the crush front. The varied crushing morphology between the compression strain rates identified in this paper is observed to be due to the differences in the response modes and mechanical properties of the strain dependent epoxy matrix. The importance of understanding the role of strain rate effects in composite crash energy absorbing structures is highlighted in this paper.

  5. Multifunctional structural energy storage composite supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Shirshova, Natasha; Qian, Hui; Houllé, Matthieu; Steinke, Joachim H G; Kucernak, Anthony R J; Fontana, Quentin P V; Greenhalgh, Emile S; Bismarck, Alexander; Shaffer, Milo S P

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the challenge of producing multifunctional composites that can simultaneously carry mechanical loads whilst storing (and delivering) electrical energy. The embodiment is a structural supercapacitor built around laminated structural carbon fibre (CF) fabrics. Each cell consists of two modified structural CF fabric electrodes, separated by a structural glass fibre fabric or polymer membrane, infused with a multifunctional polymeric electrolyte. Rather than using conventional activated carbon fibres, structural carbon fibres were treated to produce a mechanically robust, high surface area material, using a variety of methods, including direct etching, carbon nanotube sizing, and carbon nanotube in situ growth. One of the most promising approaches is to integrate a porous bicontinuous monolithic carbon aerogel (CAG) throughout the matrix. This nanostructured matrix both provides a dramatic increase in active surface area of the electrodes, and has the potential to address mechanical issues associated with matrix-dominated failures. The effect of the initial reaction mixture composition is assessed for both the CAG modified carbon fibre electrodes and resulting devices. A low temperature CAG modification of carbon fibres was evaluated using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) to enhance the electrochemical performance. For the multifunctional structural electrolyte, simple crosslinked gels have been replaced with bicontinuous structural epoxy-ionic liquid hybrids that offer a much better balance between the conflicting demands of rigidity and molecular motion. The formation of both aerogel precursors and the multifunctional electrolyte are described, including the influence of key components, and the defining characteristics of the products. Working structural supercapacitor composite prototypes have been produced and characterised electrochemically. The effect of introducing the necessary multifunctional resin on the mechanical properties has

  6. Damping Analysis of Cylindrical Composite Structures with Enhanced Viscoelastic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliem, Mathias; Høgsberg, Jan; Vanwalleghem, Joachim; Filippatos, Angelos; Hoschützky, Stefan; Fotsing, Edith-Roland; Berggreen, Christian

    2018-04-01

    Constrained layer damping treatments are widely used in mechanical structures to damp acoustic noise and mechanical vibrations. A viscoelastic layer is thereby applied to a structure and covered by a stiff constraining layer. When the structure vibrates in a bending mode, the viscoelastic layer is forced to deform in shear mode. Thus, the vibration energy is dissipated as low grade frictional heat. This paper documents the efficiency of passive constrained layer damping treatments for low frequency vibrations of cylindrical composite specimens made of glass fibre-reinforced plastics. Different cross section geometries with shear webs have been investigated in order to study a beneficial effect on the damping characteristics of the cylinder. The viscoelastic damping layers are placed at different locations within the composite cylinder e.g. circumferential and along the neutral plane to evaluate the location-dependent efficiency of constrained layer damping treatments. The results of the study provide a thorough understanding of constrained layer damping treatments and an improved damping design of the cylindrical composite structure. The highest damping is achieved when placing the damping layer in the neutral plane perpendicular to the bending load. The results are based on free decay tests of the composite structure.

  7. Impact source localisation in aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Mario Emanuele; Ciampa, Francesco; Boccardi, Salvatore; Meo, Michele

    2017-12-01

    The most commonly encountered type of damage in aircraft composite structures is caused by low-velocity impacts due to foreign objects such as hail stones, tool drops and bird strikes. Often these events can cause severe internal material damage that is difficult to detect and may lead to a significant reduction of the structure’s strength and fatigue life. For this reason there is an urgent need to develop structural health monitoring systems able to localise low-velocity impacts in both metallic and composite components as they occur. This article proposes a novel monitoring system for impact localisation in aluminium and composite structures, which is able to determine the impact location in real-time without a-priori knowledge of the mechanical properties of the material. This method relies on an optimal configuration of receiving sensors, which allows linearization of well-known nonlinear systems of equations for the estimation of the impact location. The proposed algorithm is based on the time of arrival identification of the elastic waves generated by the impact source using the Akaike Information Criterion. The proposed approach was demonstrated successfully on both isotropic and orthotropic materials by using a network of closely spaced surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers. The results obtained show the validity of the proposed algorithm, since the impact sources were detected with a high level of accuracy. The proposed impact detection system overcomes current limitations of other methods and can be retrofitted easily on existing aerospace structures allowing timely detection of an impact event.

  8. Hierarchical nonlinear behavior of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Hierarchical computational procedures are described to simulate the multiple scale thermal/mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via METCAN (Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via MMLT (Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via HITCAN (High Temperature Composite Analyzer). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures and accompanying computer codes. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as the entire creep span; MMLT can be used to concurrently tailor the fabrication process and the interphase layer for optimum performance such as minimum residual stresses; and HITCAN can be used to predict the structural behavior such as the deformed shape due to component fabrication. These codes constitute virtual portable desk-top test laboratories for characterizing HT-MMC laminates, tailoring the fabrication process, and qualifying structural components made from them.

  9. Deployable structures using bistable reeled composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daton-Lovett, Andrew J.; Compton-Bishop, Quentin M.; Curry, Richard G.

    2000-06-01

    This paper describes an innovative, patented use of composite materials developed by RolaTube Technology Ltd. to make smart deployable structures. Bi-stable reeled composites (BRCs) can alternate between two stable forms; that of a strong, rigid structure and that of a compact coil of flat-wound material. Bi-stability arises as a result of the manipulation of Poisson's ratio and isotropy in the various layers of the material. BRCs are made of fiber- reinforced composite materials, most often with a thermoplastic matrix. A range of fibers and polymer matrices can be used according to the requirements of the operating environment. Samples of a BRC structure were constructed using layers of unidirectional, fiber-reinforced thermoplastic sheet with the layers at different angles. The whole assembly was then consolidated under conditions of elevated temperature and pressure. The properties of the BRC are described and the result of a series of experiments performed on the sample to determine the tensile strength of the BRC structure are reported. A full analysis using finite element methods is being undertaken in collaboration with the University of Cambridge, England. The first commercial use has been to fabricate boom and drive mechanisms for the remote inspection of industrial plant.

  10. Load Diffusion in Composite and Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Ambur, D. (Technical Monitor); Nemeth, M. P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The research carried out here builds on our previous NASA supported research on the general topic of edge effects and load diffusion in composite structures. Further fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for the multi-functional large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Some specific problems recently considered were those of end effects in smart materials and structures, study of the stress response of pressurized linear piezoelectric cylinders for both static and steady rotating configurations, an analysis of the effect of pre-stressing and pre-polarization on the decay of end effects in piezoelectric solids and investigation of constitutive models for hardening rubber-like materials. Our goal in the study of load diffusion is the development of readily applicable results for the decay lengths in terms of non-dimensional material and geometric parameters. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses.

  11. Self Healing Composite for Aircraft's Structural Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teoh, S. H.; Chia, H. Y.; Lee, M. S.; Nasyitah, A. J. N.; Luqman, H. B. S. M.; Nurhidayah, S.; Tan, Willy. C. K.

    When one cuts himself, it is amazing to watch how quickly the body acts to mend the wound. Immediately, the body works to pull the skin around the cut back together. The concept of repair by bleeding of enclosed functional agents serves as the biomimetic inspiration of synthetic self repair systems. Such synthetic self repair systems are based on advancement in polymeric materials; the process of human thrombosis is the inspiration for the application of self healing fibres within the composite materials. Results based on flexural 3 point bend test on the prepared samples have shown that the doubled layer healed hollow fibre laminate subjected to a healing regime of 3 weeks has a healed strength increase of 27% compared to the damaged baseline laminate. These results gave us confidence that there is a great potential to adopt such self healing mechanism on actual composite parts like in aircraft's composite structures.

  12. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage-Structural Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. H.; Minguet, P. J.; Flynn, B. W.; Carbery, D. J.; Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.

    1997-01-01

    Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC). This report addresses the program activities related to structural performance of the selected concepts, including both the design development and subsequent detailed evaluation. Design criteria were developed to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and typical company objectives. Accurate analysis methods were selected and/or developed where practical, and conservative approaches were used where significant approximations were necessary. Design sizing activities supported subsequent development by providing representative design configurations for structural evaluation and by identifying the critical performance issues. Significant program efforts were directed towards assessing structural performance predictive capability. The structural database collected to perform this assessment was intimately linked to the manufacturing scale-up activities to ensure inclusion of manufacturing-induced performance traits. Mechanical tests were conducted to support the development and critical evaluation of analysis methods addressing internal loads, stability, ultimate strength, attachment and splice strength, and damage tolerance. Unresolved aspects of these performance issues were identified as part of the assessments, providing direction for future development.

  13. Crashworthiness simulation of composite automotive structures

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, M E; Johnson, N L; Simunovic, S

    1998-06-01

    In 1990 the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) began the investigation of crash worthiness simulation methods for composite materials. A contract was given to Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC) to implement a new damage model in LS-DYNA3D TM specifically for composite structures. This model is in LS-DYNA3D TM and is in use by the ACC partners. In 1994 USCAR, a partnership of American auto companies, entered into a partnership called SCAAP (Super Computing Automotive Applications Partnership) for the express purpose of working with the National Labs on computational oriented research. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was signed with Lawrencemore » Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory to work in three distinctly different technical areas, one of which was composites material modeling for crash worthiness. Each Laboratory was assigned a specific modeling task. The ACC was responsible for the technical direction of the composites project and provided all test data for code verification. All new models were to be implemented in DYNA3D and periodically distributed to all partners for testing. Several new models have been developed and implemented. Excellent agreement has been shown between tube crush simulation and experiments.« less

  14. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  15. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2004-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  16. Clay Mineral Crystal Structure Tied to Composition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-13

    This diagram illustrates how the dimensions of clay minerals' crystal structure are affected by which ions are present in the composition of the mineral. Different clay minerals were identified this way at two sites in Mars' Gale Crater: "Murray Buttes" and "Yellowknife Bay." In otherwise identical clay minerals, a composition that includes aluminum and ferric iron ions (red dots) results in slightly smaller crystalline unit cells than one that instead includes magnesium and ferrous iron ions (green dots). Ferric iron is more highly oxidized than ferrous iron. Crystalline cell units are the basic repeating building blocks that define minerals. X-ray diffraction analysis, a capability of the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover, identifies minerals from their crystalline structure. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21148

  17. Thermal Inspection of Composite Honeycomb Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Composite honeycomb structures continue to be widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Pulsed thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Pulsed thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are presented. In addition, limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. Other NDE techniques, such as computed tomography X-ray and ultrasound, are used for comparison to the thermography results.

  18. Automated web service composition supporting conditional branch structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengwei; Ding, Zhijun; Jiang, Changjun; Zhou, Mengchu

    2014-01-01

    The creation of value-added services by automatic composition of existing ones is gaining a significant momentum as the potential silver bullet in service-oriented architecture. However, service composition faces two aspects of difficulties. First, users' needs present such characteristics as diversity, uncertainty and personalisation; second, the existing services run in a real-world environment that is highly complex and dynamically changing. These difficulties may cause the emergence of nondeterministic choices in the process of service composition, which has gone beyond what the existing automated service composition techniques can handle. According to most of the existing methods, the process model of composite service includes sequence constructs only. This article presents a method to introduce conditional branch structures into the process model of composite service when needed, in order to satisfy users' diverse and personalised needs and adapt to the dynamic changes of real-world environment. UML activity diagrams are used to represent dependencies in composite service. Two types of user preferences are considered in this article, which have been ignored by the previous work and a simple programming language style expression is adopted to describe them. Two different algorithms are presented to deal with different situations. A real-life case is provided to illustrate the proposed concepts and methods.

  19. Development of thermoplastic composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renieri, Michael P.; Burpo, Steven J.; Roundy, Lance M.; Todd, Stephanie A.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    Efforts focused on the use of thermoplastic composite materials in the development of structural details associated with an advanced fighter fuselage section with applicability to transport design. In support of these designs, mechanics developments were conducted in two areas. First, a dissipative strain energy approach to material characterization and failure prediction, developed at the Naval Research Laboratory, was evaluated as a design/analysis tool. Second, a finite element formulation for thick composites was developed and incorporated into a lug analysis method which incorporates pin bending effects. Manufacturing concepts were developed for an upper fuel cell cover. A detailed trade study produced two promising concepts: fiber placement and single-step diaphragm forming. Based on the innovative design/manufacturing concepts for the fuselage section primary structure, elements were designed, fabricated, and structurally tested. These elements focused on key issues such as thick composite lugs and low cost forming of fastenerless, stiffener/moldine concepts. Manufacturing techniques included autoclave consolidation, single diaphragm consolidation (SDCC) and roll-forming.

  20. Coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Huang, H.; Hartle, M.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the third years effort of a 5-year program to develop a methodology for coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures. These accomplishments include: (1) structural analysis capability specialized for graded composite structures including large deformation and deformation position eigenanalysis technologies; (2) a thermal analyzer specialized for graded composite structures; (3) absorption of electromagnetic waves by graded composite structures; and (4) coupled structural thermal/electromagnetic analysis of graded composite structures.

  1. Sensor devices comprising field-structured composites

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E.; Hughes, Robert C.; Anderson, Robert A.

    2001-02-27

    A new class of sensor devices comprising field-structured conducting composites comprising a textured distribution of conducting magnetic particles is disclosed. The conducting properties of such field-structured materials can be precisely controlled during fabrication so as to exhibit a large change in electrical conductivity when subject to any environmental influence which changes the relative volume fraction. Influences which can be so detected include stress, strain, shear, temperature change, humidity, magnetic field, electromagnetic radiation, and the presence or absence of certain chemicals. This behavior can be made the basis for a wide variety of sensor devices.

  2. Composition dependence of electric-field-induced structure of Bi{sub 1/2}(Na{sub 1−x}K{sub x}){sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3} lead-free piezoelectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Khansur, Neamul H.; Department of Materials Science, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen 91058; Benton, Rachel

    2016-06-21

    Microscopic origins of the electric-field-induced strain for three compositions of Bi{sub 1/2}(Na{sub 1−x}K{sub x}){sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3} (x = 0.14, 0.18, and 0.22) (BNKT100x) ceramics have been compared using in situ high-energy (87.12 keV) X-ray diffraction. In the as-processed state, average crystallographic structure of BNKT14 and BNKT18 were found to be of rhombohedral symmetry, while BNKT22 was tetragonal. Diffraction data collected under electric field showed that both the BNKT14 and BNKT18 exhibit induced lattice strain and non-180° ferroelectric domain switching without any apparent phase transformation. The BNKT22 composition, in addition to the lattice strain and domain switching, showed an electric-field-induced transformation from a tetragonalmore » to mixed tetragonal-rhombohedral state. Despite the difference in the origin of microscopic strain responses in these compositions, the measured macroscopic poling strains of 0.46% (BNKT14), 0.43% (BNKT18), and 0.44% (BNKT22) are similar. In addition, the application of a second poling field of opposite polarity to the first increased the magnitude of non-180° ferroelectric domain texture. This was suggested to be related to the existence of an asymmetric internal bias field.« less

  3. Advanced composite combustor structural concepts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sattar, M. A.; Lohmann, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to assess the feasibility of and benefits derived from the use of high temperature composite materials in aircraft turbine engine combustor liners. The study included a survey and screening of the properties of three candidate composite materials including tungsten reinforced superalloys, carbon-carbon and silicon carbide (SiC) fibers reinforcing a ceramic matrix of lithium aluminosilicate (LAS). The SiC-LAS material was selected as offering the greatest near term potential primarily on the basis of high temperature capability. A limited experimental investigation was conducted to quantify some of the more critical mechanical properties of the SiC-LAS composite having a multidirection 0/45/-45/90 deg fiber orientation favored for the combustor linear application. Rigorous cyclic thermal tests demonstrated that SiC-LAS was extremely resistant to the thermal fatigue mechanisms that usually limit the life of metallic combustor liners. A thermal design study led to the definition of a composite liner concept that incorporated film cooled SiC-LAS shingles mounted on a Hastelloy X shell. With coolant fluxes consistent with the most advanced metallic liner technology, the calculated hot surface temperatures of the shingles were within the apparent near term capability of the material. Structural analyses indicated that the stresses in the composite panels were low, primarily because of the low coefficient of expansion of the material and it was concluded that the dominant failure mode of the liner would be an as yet unidentified deterioration of the composite from prolonged exposure to high temperature. An economic study, based on a medium thrust size commercial aircraft engine, indicated that the SiC-LAS combustor liner would weigh 22.8N (11.27 lb) less and cost less to manufacture than advanced metallic liner concepts intended for use in the late 1980's.

  4. Long discontinuous fiber composite structure: Forming and structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pipes, R. B.; Santare, M. H.; Otoole, B. J.; Beaussart, A. J.; Deheer, D. C.; Okine, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Cost effective composite structure has motivated the investigation of several new approaches to develop composite structure from innovative material forms. Among the promising new approaches is the conversion of planar sheet to components of complex curvature through sheet forming or stretch forming. In both cases, the potential for material stretch in the fiber direction appears to offer a clear advantage in formability over continuous fiber systems. In the present study, the authors have established a framework which allows the simulation of the anisotropic mechanisms of deformation of long discontinuous fiber laminates wherein the matrix phase is a viscous fluid. The initial study focuses upon the establishment of micromechanics models for prediction of the effective anisotropic viscosities of the oriented fiber assembly in a viscous matrix. Next, the developed constitutive relation is employed through an analogy with incompressible elasticity to exercise the finite element technique for determination of local fiber orientation and laminate thickness after forming. Results are presented for the stretch bending of a curved beam from an arbitrary composite laminate and the bulging of a clamped sheet. Structural analyses are conducted to determine the effect of microstructure on the performance of curved beams manufactured from long discontinuous fiber composites. For the purposes of this study, several curved beams with ideal and non-ideal microstructures are compared for response under pure bending. Material parameters are determined from a separate microstructural analysis.

  5. Site occupancy, composition and magnetic structure dependencies of martensitic transformation in Mn2Ni1+xSn1-x.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Ashis; Ghosh, Subhradip

    2017-11-14

    A delicate balance between various factors such as site occupancy, composition and magnetic ordering seems to affect the stability of the martensitic phase in Mn<sub>2</sub>Ni<sub>1+x</sub>Sn<sub>1-x</sub>. Using first-principles DFT calculations, we explore the impacts of each one of these factors on the martensitic stability of this system. Our results on total energies, magnetic moments and electronic structures upon changes in the composition, the magnetic configurations and the site occupancies show that the occupancies at the 4d sites in the Inverse Heusler crystal structure play the most crucial role. The presence of Mn at the 4d sites originally occupied by Sn and its interaction with the Mn atoms at other sites decide the stability of the martensitic phases. This explains the discrepancy between the experiments and earlier DFT calculations regarding phase stability in Mn<sub>2</sub>NiSn. Our results qualitatively explain the trends observed experimentally with regard to martensitic phase stability and the magnetisations in Ni-excess, Sn-deficient Mn<sub>2</sub>NiSn system. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  6. Hybrid composite rebars for smart concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, R. K.; Belarbi, Abdeldjelil; Chandrashekhara, K.; Watkins, Steve E.

    1997-05-01

    In reinforced concrete structures, steel reinforcing bars (rebars) corrode with time and thus reduce their life span. Composite rebars can be used in lieu of steel rebars to overcome this problem. The conventional composite rebars designed to take tensile force are composed of unidirectional fibers in a resin matrix, and are linearly elastic till failure; thus providing a brittle behavior. The problems of corrosion and brittle behavior can be solved by using a composite rebar which fails gradually under tension. The rebar consists of a hybrid composite system in conjunction with helical fibers. The hybrid system gives the rebar its initial stiffness and enables pseudo-yielding at lower strains. As the strain increase, the load is gradually transferred from the hybrid core to the helical fibers, which enables the rebar to undergo large elongations before failure. Embedded fiber optic sensors in the rebar can be used for health monitoring over a long period of time. The proof of concept and preliminary test results are described in the paper.

  7. Open-Lattice Composite Design Strengthens Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Advanced composite materials and designs could eventually be applied as the framework for spacecraft or extraterrestrial constructions for long-term space habitation. One such structure in which NASA has made an investment is the IsoTruss grid structure, an extension of a two-dimensional "isogrid" concept originally developed at McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, under contract to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in the early 1970s. IsoTruss is a lightweight and efficient alternative to monocoque composite structures, and can be produced in a manner that involves fairly simple techniques. The technology was developed with support from NASA to explore space applications, and is garnering global attention because it is extremely lightweight; as much as 12 times stronger than steel; inexpensive to manufacture, transport, and install; low-maintenance; and is fully recyclable. IsoTruss is expected to see application as utility poles and meteorological towers, for the aforementioned reasons and because its design offers superior wind resistance and is less susceptible to breaking and woodpeckers. Other applications, such as reinforcement for concrete structures, stand-alone towers, sign supports, prostheses, irrigation equipment, and sporting goods are being explored

  8. Thermographic inspection of marine composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Thomas S.; Lindgren, Eric A.

    1994-03-01

    The marine industry is now facing the problems that were faced by the aircraft industry 20 to 25 years ago: glass-fiber-composite structures do not lend themselves to traditional methods of interrogation. Both the material response and the failure modes of composites are different from traditional materials. Infrared thermographic techniques were investigated for application to composite hull structures and found to be very effective in locating and identifying damage to both solid laminate and sandwich panel construction. The thermographic techniques have been applied to cruising as well as racing yachts with good results. Indicated damage has matched well with the damage discovered during repair operations. More recently, the thermographic techniques have been applied to much thicker solid laminate hull construction used in a new U.S. Navy mine hunter, the MHC-51, U.S.S. Osprey. Thermographic investigations were performed on large test panels used to evaluate different material systems for this vessel and on the vessel itself to provide a baseline thermal characterization. Later this year, shock trials will be performed on the U.S.S. Osprey. Additional thermographic studies are planned following the shock trials.

  9. Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Propulsion Structures Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Dickens, Kevin W.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program has successfully demonstrated cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) technology in a scramjet engine test. This demonstration represented the world s largest cooled nonmetallic matrix composite panel fabricated for a scramjet engine and the first cooled nonmetallic composite to be tested in a scramjet facility. Lightweight, high-temperature, actively cooled structures have been identified as a key technology for enabling reliable and low-cost space access. Tradeoff studies have shown this to be the case for a variety of launch platforms, including rockets and hypersonic cruise vehicles. Actively cooled carbon and CMC structures may meet high-performance goals at significantly lower weight, while improving safety by operating with a higher margin between the design temperature and material upper-use temperature. Studies have shown that using actively cooled CMCs can reduce the weight of the cooled flow-path component from 4.5 to 1.6 lb/sq ft and the weight of the propulsion system s cooled surface area by more than 50 percent. This weight savings enables advanced concepts, increased payload, and increased range. The ability of the cooled CMC flow-path components to operate over 1000 F hotter than the state-of-the-art metallic concept adds system design flexibility to space-access vehicle concepts. Other potential system-level benefits include smaller fuel pumps, lower part count, lower cost, and increased operating margin.

  10. Laminar composite structures for high power actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobosyan, M. A.; Martinez, P. M.; Zakhidov, A. A.; Haines, C. S.; Baughman, R. H.; Martirosyan, K. S.

    2017-05-01

    Twisted laminar composite structures for high power and large-stroke actuators based on coiled Multi Wall Carbon Nanotube (MWNT) composite yarns were crafted by integrating high-density Nanoenergetic Gas Generators (NGGs) into carbon nanotube sheets. The linear actuation force, resulting from the pneumatic force caused by expanding gases confined within the pores of laminar structures and twisted carbon nanotube yarns, can be further amplified by increasing NGG loading and yarns twist density, as well as selecting NGG compositions with high energy density and large-volume gas generation. Moreover, the actuation force and power can be tuned by the surrounding environment, such as to increase the actuation by combustion in ambient air. A single 300-μm-diameter integrated MWNT/NGG coiled yarn produced 0.7 MPa stress and a contractile specific work power of up to 4.7 kW/kg, while combustion front propagated along the yarn at a velocity up to 10 m/s. Such powerful yarn actuators can also be operated in a vacuum, enabling their potential use for deploying heavy loads in outer space, such as to unfold solar panels and solar sails.

  11. Prediction and experimental observation of damage dependent damping in laminated composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. H.; Harris, C. E.; Highsmith, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    The equations of motion are developed for laminated composite beams with load-induced matrix cracking. The damage is accounted for by utilizing internal state variables. The net result of these variables on the field equations is the introduction of both enhanced damping, and degraded stiffness. Both quantities are history dependent and spatially variable, thus resulting in nonlinear equations of motion. It is explained briefly how these equations may be quasi-linearized for laminated polymeric composites under certain types of structural loading. The coupled heat conduction equation is developed, and it is shown that an enhanced Zener damping effect is produced by the introduction of microstructural damage. The resulting equations are utilized to demonstrate how damage dependent material properties may be obtained from dynamic experiments. Finaly, experimental results are compared to model predictions for several composite layups.

  12. Modeling the Structure of Composite Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    The dynamical structure of a composite SNR, along with its broadband emission, provides crucial constraints on the ejecta mass and explosion energy, the properties of the pulsar that powers the associated wind nebula, and the ultimate fate of the particles that it injects. Of particular importance is the effect of asymmetries introduced through spatial variations in the ambient medium density and by rapid motion of the pulsar. Here we propose hydrodynamical and semi-analytical modeling of G21.5-0.9 and G292.0+1.8, SNRs for which deep Chandra observations have provided key input parameters for these models. We will derive ambient conditions and pulsar properties that lead to the observed morphology, broadband emission, and shock conditions in these important composite systems.

  13. Time-dependent deformation of titanium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.; Bahei-El-din, Y. A.; Mirdamadi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element program called VISCOPAC was developed and used to conduct a micromechanics analysis of titanium metal matrix composites. The VISCOPAC program uses a modified Eisenberg-Yen thermo-viscoplastic constitutive model to predict matrix behavior under thermomechanical fatigue loading. The analysis incorporated temperature-dependent elastic properties in the fiber and temperature-dependent viscoplastic properties in the matrix. The material model was described and the necessary material constants were determined experimentally. Fiber-matrix interfacial behavior was analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model. The thermal residual stresses due to the fabrication cycle were predicted with a failed interface, The failed interface resulted in lower thermal residual stresses in the matrix and fiber. Stresses due to a uniform transverse load were calculated at two temperatures, room temperature and an elevated temperature of 650 C. At both temperatures, a large stress concentration was calculated when the interface had failed. The results indicate the importance of accuracy accounting for fiber-matrix interface failure and the need for a micromechanics-based analytical technique to understand and predict the behavior of titanium metal matrix composites.

  14. Composition and structure of calcium aluminosilicate microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharonova, O. M.; Oreshkina, N. A.; Zhizhaev, A. M.

    2017-06-01

    The composition was studied of calcium aluminosilicate microspheres of three morphological types in high-calcium fly ash from combustion of brown coal from the Kansk-Achinsk basin in slag-tap boilers at temperatures from 1400 to 1500°C and sampled in the first field of electrostatic precipitators at the Krasnoyarsk Cogeneration Power Station no. 2 (TETs-2). Gross compositions and the composition of local areas were determined using a scanning electron microscopy technique and an energy-dispersive analysis with full mapping of globules. With a high content of basic oxides O ox (68 to 79 wt %) and a low content of acid oxides K ox (21 to 31 wt %), type 1 microspheres are formed. They consist of heterogeneous areas having a porous structure and crystalline components in which the content of CaO, SiO2, or Al2O3 differs by two to three times and the content of MgO differs by seven times. With a lower content of O ox (55 to 63 wt %) and an elevated content of K ox (37 to 45 wt %), type 2 microspheres are formed. They are more homogeneous in the composition and structure and consist of similar crystalline components. Having a close content of O ox (46 to 53 wt %) and K ox (47 to 54 wt %), type 3 microspheres, which are a dense matter consisting of amorphous substance with submicron- and nanostructure of crystalline components, are formed. The basic precursor in formation of high-calcium aluminosilicate microspheres is calcium from the organomineral matter of coals with various contribution of Mg, Fe, S, or Na from the coal organic matter and Al, Fe, S, or Si in the form of single mineral inclusions in a coal particle. On the basis of the available data, the effect was analyzed of the composition of a CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO system on the melting and viscous properties of the matter in microspheres and formation of globules of different morphology. The results of this analysis will help to find a correlation with properties of microspheres in their use as functional

  15. Wood-based composite materials : panel products, glued-laminated timber, structural composite lumber, and wood-nonwood composite materials

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Zhiyong Cai; Charles Carll

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the general types and composition of wood-based composite products and the materials and processes used to manufacture them. It describes conventional wood-based composite panels and structural composite materials intended for general construction, interior use, or both. This chapter also describes wood–nonwood composites. Mechanical...

  16. The Effect of Temperature Dependent Material Nonlinearities on the Response of Piezoelectric Composite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun; Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1997-01-01

    Previously developed analytical formulations for piezoelectric composite plates are extended to account for the nonlinear effects of temperature on material properties. The temperature dependence of the composite and piezoelectric properties are represented at the material level through the thermopiezoelectric constitutive equations. In addition to capturing thermal effects from temperature dependent material properties, this formulation also accounts for thermal effects arising from: (1) coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the various composite and piezoelectric plies and (2) pyroelectric effects on the piezoelectric material. The constitutive equations are incorporated into a layerwise laminate theory to provide a unified representation of the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal behavior of smart structures. Corresponding finite element equations are derived and implemented for a bilinear plate element with the inherent capability to model both the active and sensory response of piezoelectric composite laminates. Numerical studies are conducted on a simply supported composite plate with attached piezoceramic patches under thermal gradients to investigate the nonlinear effects of material property temperature dependence on the displacements, sensory voltages, active voltages required to minimize thermal deflections, and the resultant stress states.

  17. Composition, structure, and chemistry of interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    Different dust components present in the interstellar medium (IM) such as amorphous carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and those IM components which are organic refractory grains and icy grain mantles are discussed as well as their relative importance. The physical properties of grain surface chemistry are discussed with attention given to the surface structure of materials, the adsorption energy and residence time of species on a grain surface, and the sticking probability. Consideration is also given to the contribution of grains to the gas-phase composition of molecular clouds.

  18. The composition and structure of planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of planetary ring systems are summarized herein; emphasis is given to the available evidence on their compositions and to their dynamical attributes. Somewhat contaminated water ice makes up the vast expanse of Saturn's rings. Modified methane ice may comprise Uranus' rings while silicates are the likely material of the Jovian ring. Saturn's rings form an elaborate system whose characteristics are still being documented and whose nature is being unravelled following the Voyager flybys. Uranus' nine narrow bands display an intriguing dynamical structure thought to be caused by unseen shephard satellites. Jupiter's ring system is a mere wisp, probably derived as ejecta off hidden parent bodies.

  19. Load Diffusion in Composite and Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, C. O.

    2003-01-01

    The research carried out here builds on our previous NASA supported research on the general topic of edge effects and load diffusion in composite structures. Further fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for the multi-functional large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Some specific problems recently considered were those of end effects in smart materials and structures, study of the stress response of pressurized linear piezoelectric cylinders for both static and steady rotating configurations, an analysis of the effect of pre-stressing and pre-polarization on the decay of end effects in piezoelectric solids and investigation of constitutive models for hardening rubber-like materials. Our goal in the study of load diffusion is the development of readily applicable results for the decay lengths in terms of non-dimensional material and geometric parameters. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities provides a significant aid towards this process. The analysis is also amenable to parameter study with a large parameter space and should be useful in structural tailoring studies. Special purpose analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and in assessing results from general purpose finite element analyses. For example, a rational basis is needed in choosing where to use three-dimensional to two-dimensional transition finite elements in analyzing stiffened plates and shells. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities furnished by

  20. Shock and Impact Response of Naval Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-09

    elucidating physical mechanisms that control the survivability of composite structures under blast and impact. TECHNICAL APPROACH The Principal...the Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Composite Structures , Kyoto, Japan, July 8-13, 2007. D. ONR Solid Mechanics Program...ONR Solid Mechanics Program Review, Marine Composites and Sandwich Structures , University of Maryland University College, Adelphi, MD, September 21

  1. A Damage-Dependent Finite Element Analysis for Fiber-Reinforced Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy W.; Harris, Charles E.

    1998-01-01

    A progressive damage methodology has been developed to predict damage growth and residual strength of fiber-reinforced composite structure with through penetrations such as a slit. The methodology consists of a damage-dependent constitutive relationship based on continuum damage mechanics. Damage is modeled using volume averaged strain-like quantities known as internal state variables and is represented in the equilibrium equations as damage induced force vectors instead of the usual degradation and modification of the global stiffness matrix.

  2. Dynamic Probabilistic Instability of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    A computationally effective method is described to evaluate the non-deterministic dynamic instability (probabilistic dynamic buckling) of thin composite shells. The method is a judicious combination of available computer codes for finite element, composite mechanics and probabilistic structural analysis. The solution method is incrementally updated Lagrangian. It is illustrated by applying it to thin composite cylindrical shell subjected to dynamic loads. Both deterministic and probabilistic buckling loads are evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. A universal plot is obtained for the specific shell that can be used to approximate buckling loads for different load rates and different probability levels. Results from this plot show that the faster the rate, the higher the buckling load and the shorter the time. The lower the probability, the lower is the buckling load for a specific time. Probabilistic sensitivity results show that the ply thickness, the fiber volume ratio and the fiber longitudinal modulus, dynamic load and loading rate are the dominant uncertainties in that order.

  3. Advanced tow placement of composite fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert L.; Grant, Carroll G.

    1992-01-01

    The Hercules NASA ACT program was established to demonstrate and validate the low cost potential of the automated tow placement process for fabrication of aircraft primary structures. The program is currently being conducted as a cooperative program in collaboration with the Boeing ATCAS Program. The Hercules advanced tow placement process has been in development since 1982 and was developed specifically for composite aircraft structures. The second generation machine, now in operation at Hercules, is a production-ready machine that uses a low cost prepreg tow material form to produce structures with laminate properties equivalent to prepreg tape layup. Current program activities are focused on demonstration of the automated tow placement process for fabrication of subsonic transport aircraft fuselage crown quadrants. We are working with Boeing Commercial Aircraft and Douglas Aircraft during this phase of the program. The Douglas demonstration panels has co-cured skin/stringers, and the Boeing demonstration panel is an intricately bonded part with co-cured skin/stringers and co-bonded frames. Other aircraft structures that were evaluated for the automated tow placement process include engine nacelle components, fuselage pressure bulkheads, and fuselage tail cones. Because of the cylindrical shape of these structures, multiple parts can be fabricated on one two placement tool, thus reducing the cost per pound of the finished part.

  4. Composite foods: from structure to sensory perception.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Elke

    2017-02-22

    An understanding of the effect of structural features of foods in terms of specific sensory attributes is necessary to design foods with specific functionalities, such as reduced fat or increased protein content, and increased feeling of satiety or liking. Although the bulk rheological properties of both liquid and solid foods can be related to textural attributes such as thickness and firmness, they do not always correlate to more complex sensory attributes, such as creamy and smooth. These attributes are often a result of different contributions, including lubrication aspects and interactions between food and components present in the oral cavity. In this review, the different contributions for a variety of composite foods, such as dispersions, emulsions and emulsion-filled gels, are discussed. The rheological properties are discussed in relation to specific structural characteristics of the foods, which are then linked to lubrication aspects and sensory perception.

  5. Carbon composites in space vehicle structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, N. J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent developments in the technology of carbon or graphite filaments now provide the designer with greatly improved materials offering high specific strength and modulus. Besides these advantages are properties which are distinctly useful for space applications and which provide feasibility for missions not obtainable by other means. Current applications include major and secondary structures of communications satellites. A number of R & D projects are exploring carbon-fiber application to rocket engine motor cases, advanced antenna systems, and space shuttle components. Future system studies are being made, based on the successful application of carbon fibers for orbiting space telescope assemblies, orbital transfer vehicles, and very large deployable energy generation systems. Continued technology development is needed in analysis, material standards, and advanced structural concepts to exploit the full potential of carbon filaments in composite materials.

  6. Study of Comets Composition and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, S. Z.; Selman, A. A.; Ali, H. S.

    2008-12-01

    The present paper focuses on the nature of the different interactions between cometary nucleus and tail with solar wind. The dynamics of the comet will impose many features that provide unique behavior of the comet when entering the solar system. These features are reviewed in this paper and few investigations are made. The calculations made in this work represent the analysis and interpretation of the different features of the comet, such as perihelion and eccentricity dependence on the gas production rate, and the dependence of the latter on the composition of the comet nucleus. The dependences of the heliocentric, bow shock, contact surface, and stand-off distances with gas production rate for many types of comets that cover linear and non-linear types are studied in this work. Important results are obtained which indicated the different physical interactions between cometary ions and solar wind. Furthermore, the important relation between mean molecular weight and gas production rate are analyzed and studied in this work and a conclusion is made that, as the gas production rate increases, the mean molecular weight will decrease exponentially. A detailed discussion for this unique relation is given.

  7. Critical joints in large composite aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, W. D.; Bunin, B. L.; Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    A program was conducted at Douglas Aircraft Company to develop the technology for critical structural joints of composite wing structure that meets design requirements for a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The prime objective of the program was to demonstrate the ability to reliably predict the strength of large bolted composite joints. Ancillary testing of 180 specimens generated data on strength and load-deflection characteristics which provided input to the joint analysis. Load-sharing between fasteners in multirow bolted joints was computed by the nonlinear analysis program A4EJ. This program was used to predict strengths of 20 additional large subcomponents representing strips from a wing root chordwise splice. In most cases, the predictions were accurate to within a few percent of the test results. In some cases, the observed mode of failure was different than anticipated. The highlight of the subcomponent testing was the consistent ability to achieve gross-section failure strains close to 0.005. That represents a considerable improvement over the state of the art.

  8. Nonlinear temperature dependent failure analysis of finite width composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagarkar, A. P.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1979-01-01

    A quasi-three dimensional, nonlinear elastic finite element stress analysis of finite width composite laminates including curing stresses is presented. Cross-ply, angle-ply, and two quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy laminates are studied. Curing stresses are calculated using temperature dependent elastic properties that are input as percent retention curves, and stresses due to mechanical loading in the form of an axial strain are calculated using tangent modulii obtained by Ramberg-Osgood parameters. It is shown that curing stresses and stresses due to tensile loading are significant as edge effects in all types of laminate studies. The tensor polynomial failure criterion is used to predict the initiation of failure. The mode of failure is predicted by examining individual stress contributions to the tensor polynomial.

  9. Dimensional and compositional dependent analysis of plasmonic bimetallic nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Amit; Singh Sekhon, Jagmeet; Verma, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    The individual noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) are combined to form alloys with improved optical response, cost effectiveness and better stability. The selection of noble metal alloy NPs for their better use in plasmonic applications is being made on the bases of surface plasmon resonance peak position, its intensity and full width at half maxima (FWHM). Presently, the effect of metal composition (x), aspect ratio (R), size and metal type on the longitudinal plasmon resonance (LPR) of noble metal Ag-Au alloy nanorods (NRs) has been studied by applying modified Gans theory including finite wavelength effects and found that the LPR shifts towards the longer wavelength region with increase in aspect ratio and size of the NR. Moreover, a linear relationship which is in good agreement to the experimental results between the plasmon resonance and aspect ratio has been obtained. The aspect ratio and NR width-dependent absorption efficiency and FWHM have also been calculated. Further, a negligible effect of metal composition and its type is found on the LPR.

  10. Structural Health Monitoring for Impact Damage in Composite Structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis P.; Raymond Bond; Doug Adams

    Composite structures are increasing in prevalence throughout the aerospace, wind, defense, and transportation industries, but the many advantages of these materials come with unique challenges, particularly in inspecting and repairing these structures. Because composites of- ten undergo sub-surface damage mechanisms which compromise the structure without a clear visual indication, inspection of these components is critical to safely deploying composite re- placements to traditionally metallic structures. Impact damage to composites presents one of the most signi fi cant challenges because the area which is vulnerable to impact damage is generally large and sometimes very dif fi cult to access. This workmore » seeks to further evolve iden- ti fi cation technology by developing a system which can detect the impact load location and magnitude in real time, while giving an assessment of the con fi dence in that estimate. Fur- thermore, we identify ways by which impact damage could be more effectively identi fi ed by leveraging impact load identi fi cation information to better characterize damage. The impact load identi fi cation algorithm was applied to a commercial scale wind turbine blade, and results show the capability to detect impact magnitude and location using a single accelerometer, re- gardless of sensor location. A technique for better evaluating the uncertainty of the impact estimates was developed by quantifying how well the impact force estimate meets the assump- tions underlying the force estimation technique. This uncertainty quanti fi cation technique was found to reduce the 95% con fi dence interval by more than a factor of two for impact force estimates showing the least uncertainty, and widening the 95% con fi dence interval by a fac- tor of two for the most uncertain force estimates, avoiding the possibility of understating the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Linear vibration based damage detection tech- niques were investigated in

  11. Electronic structure of cyclodextrin–carbon nanotube composite films

    DOE PAGES

    Jeong, Hae Kyung; Echeverria, Elena; Chakraborti, Priyanka; ...

    2017-02-10

    The electronic structures of two kinds of cyclodextrin–carbon nanotube (αCD–CNT and γCD–CNT) composite films are investigated by using (angular dependent) photoelectron spectroscopy to gain insight as to why the αCD–CNT and γCD–CNT composite films show different performances in biosensor applications. The γCD–CNT composite film is likely to have the CD localized on the surface rather than in the bulk of the film, while αCD–CNT has CD relatively more concentrated within the bulk of selvedge region of the film, rather than the surface. The results indicate that the CD, of the γCD–CNT composite, may be more bioactive, and possibly a bettermore » sensor of biomolecules due to the favorable surface position compared with that of αCD–CNT. The valence band of αCD–CNT and γCD–CNT show little difference from the CNT film except for a density of states, originating from CD, evident at a binding energy near 27 eV below Fermi level, meaning that there are few or no redox interactions between the CD and the CNT. The absence of a redox interaction between the CD and the CNT permits a clear electrochemical response to occur when guest biomolecules are captured on the composites, providing a route to biosensor applications.« less

  12. Delamination Assessment Tool for Spacecraft Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portela, Pedro; Preller, Fabian; Wittke, Henrik; Sinnema, Gerben; Camanho, Pedro; Turon, Albert

    2012-07-01

    Fortunately only few cases are known where failure of spacecraft structures due to undetected damage has resulted in a loss of spacecraft and launcher mission. However, several problems related to damage tolerance and in particular delamination of composite materials have been encountered during structure development of various ESA projects and qualification testing. To avoid such costly failures during development, launch or service of spacecraft, launcher and reusable launch vehicles structures a comprehensive damage tolerance verification approach is needed. In 2009, the European Space Agency (ESA) initiated an activity called “Delamination Assessment Tool” which is led by the Portuguese company HPS Lda and includes academic and industrial partners. The goal of this study is the development of a comprehensive damage tolerance verification approach for launcher and reusable launch vehicles (RLV) structures, addressing analytical and numerical methodologies, material-, subcomponent- and component testing, as well as non-destructive inspection. The study includes a comprehensive review of current industrial damage tolerance practice resulting from ECSS and NASA standards, the development of new Best Practice Guidelines for analysis, test and inspection methods and the validation of these with a real industrial case study. The paper describes the main findings of this activity so far and presents a first iteration of a Damage Tolerance Verification Approach, which includes the introduction of novel analytical and numerical tools at an industrial level. This new approach is being put to the test using real industrial case studies provided by the industrial partners, MT Aerospace, RUAG Space and INVENT GmbH

  13. Compression Strength of Composite Primary Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1998-01-01

    Research conducted under NASA Grant NAG-1-537 focussed on the response and failure of advanced composite material structures for application to aircraft. Both experimental and analytical methods were utilized to study the fundamental mechanics of the response and failure of selected structural components subjected to quasi-static loads. Most of the structural components studied were thin-walled elements subject to compression, such that they exhibited buckling and postbuckling responses prior to catastrophic failure. Consequently, the analyses were geometrically nonlinear. Structural components studied were dropped-ply laminated plates, stiffener crippling, pressure pillowing of orthogonally stiffened cylindrical shells, axisymmetric response of pressure domes, and the static crush of semi-circular frames. Failure of these components motivated analytical studies on an interlaminar stress postprocessor for plate and shell finite element computer codes, and global/local modeling strategies in finite element modeling. These activities are summarized in the following section. References to literature published under the grant are listed on pages 5 to 10 by a letter followed by a number under the categories of journal publications, conference publications, presentations, and reports. These references are indicated in the text by their letter and number as a superscript.

  14. Chemical compositions, methods of making the chemical compositions, and structures made from the chemical compositions

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Lei; Cheng, Zhe; Liu, Ze; Liu, Meilin

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include chemical compositions, structures, anodes, cathodes, electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells, fuel cells, fuel cell membranes, separation membranes, catalytic membranes, sensors, coatings for electrolytes, electrodes, membranes, and catalysts, and the like, are disclosed.

  15. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittenber, David B.

    theory, finite element method, and Castigliano's method in unidirectional tension and compression, but are less accurate for the more bond-dependent flexural and shear properties. With the acknowledged NFRP matrix bonding issues, the over-prediction of these theoretical models indicates that the flexural stiffness of the kenaf composite may be increased by up to 40% if a better bond between the fiber and matrix can be obtained. The sustainability of NFRPs was examined from two perspectives: environmental and socioeconomic. While the kenaf fibers themselves possess excellent sustainability characteristics, costing less while possessing a lesser environmental impact than the glass fibers, the vinyl ester resin used in the composites is environmentally hazardous and inflated the cost and embodied energy of the composite SIPs. Consistent throughout all the designs was a correlation between the respective costs of the raw materials and the respective environmental impacts. The socioeconomic study looked at the sustainability of natural fiber reinforced composite materials as housing materials in developing countries. A literature study on the country of Bangladesh, where the fibers in this study were grown, showed that the jute and kenaf market would benefit from the introduction of a value-added product like natural fiber composites. The high rate of homeless and inadequately housed in Bangladesh, as well as in the US and throughout the rest of the world, could be somewhat alleviated if a new, affordable, and durable material were introduced. While this study found that natural fiber composites possess sufficient mechanical properties to be adopted as primary structural members, the two major remaining hurdles needing to be overcome before natural fiber composites can be adopted as housing materials are the cost and sustainability of the resin system and the moisture resistance/durability of the fibers. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  16. Capacitance-based damage detection sensing for aerospace structural composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, P.; Yamamoto, N.; Chen, Y.; Manohara, H.

    2014-04-01

    Damage detection technology needs improvement for aerospace engineering application because detection within complex composite structures is difficult yet critical to avoid catastrophic failure. Damage detection is challenging in aerospace structures because not all the damage detection technology can cover the various defect types (delamination, fiber fracture, matrix crack etc.), or conditions (visibility, crack length size, etc.). These defect states are expected to become even more complex with future introduction of novel composites including nano-/microparticle reinforcement. Currently, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods with X-ray, ultrasound, or eddy current have good resolutions (< 0.1 mm), but their detection capabilities is limited by defect locations and orientations and require massive inspection devices. System health monitoring (SHM) methods are often paired with NDE technologies to signal out sensed damage, but their data collection and analysis currently requires excessive wiring and complex signal analysis. Here, we present a capacitance sensor-based, structural defect detection technology with improved sensing capability. Thin dielectric polymer layer is integrated as part of the structure; the defect in the structure directly alters the sensing layer's capacitance, allowing full-coverage sensing capability independent of defect size, orientation or location. In this work, capacitance-based sensing capability was experimentally demonstrated with a 2D sensing layer consisting of a dielectric layer sandwiched by electrodes. These sensing layers were applied on substrate surfaces. Surface indentation damage (~1mm diameter) and its location were detected through measured capacitance changes: 1 to 250 % depending on the substrates. The damage detection sensors are light weight, and they can be conformably coated and can be part of the composite structure. Therefore it is suitable for aerospace structures such as cryogenic tanks and rocket

  17. Structural health monitoring in composite materials using frequency response methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Seth S.; Spearing, S. Mark; Atalla, Mauro J.; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Soutis, Constantinos

    2001-08-01

    Cost effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials in structural applications. Non-destructive evaluation techniques (e.g. ultrasound, radiography, infra-red imaging) are available for use during standard repair and maintenance cycles, however by comparison to the techniques used for metals these are relatively expensive and time consuming. This paper presents part of an experimental and analytical survey of candidate methods for the detection of damage in composite materials. The experimental results are presented for the application of modal analysis techniques applied to rectangular laminated graphite/epoxy specimens containing representative damage modes, including delamination, transverse ply cracks and through-holes. Changes in natural frequencies and modes were then found using a scanning laser vibrometer, and 2-D finite element models were created for comparison with the experimental results. The models accurately predicted the response of the specimems at low frequencies, but the local excitation and coalescence of higher frequency modes make mode-dependent damage detection difficult and most likely impractical for structural applications. The frequency response method was found to be reliable for detecting even small amounts of damage in a simple composite structure, however the potentially important information about damage type, size, location and orientation were lost using this method since several combinations of these variables can yield identical response signatures.

  18. Evaluation of metallized paint coatings for composite spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brzuskiewicz, John E.

    1990-01-01

    The extreme temperature excursions of composite spacecraft structures in LEO must be minimized through the use of thermal-control coatings. Attention is presently given to tests of silicone resin coatings which were pigmented with either leafing aluminum or combinations of leafing aluminum with silicate-treated zinc oxide pigment. Atomic oxygen, UV/vacuum, and outgassing screening tests were conducted on several such coating formulations in order to characterize the performance characteristics of this coating concept. Performance was found to depend on pigment volume concentration.

  19. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Peter W R; Soutis, Costas

    2016-07-13

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a 'fracture safe design' is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Polymer sol-gel composite inverse opal structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoran; Blanchard, G J

    2015-03-25

    We report on the formation of composite inverse opal structures where the matrix used to form the inverse opal contains both silica, formed using sol-gel chemistry, and poly(ethylene glycol), PEG. We find that the morphology of the inverse opal structure depends on both the amount of PEG incorporated into the matrix and its molecular weight. The extent of organization in the inverse opal structure, which is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical reflectance data, is mediated by the chemical bonding interactions between the silica and PEG constituents in the hybrid matrix. Both polymer chain terminus Si-O-C bonding and hydrogen bonding between the polymer backbone oxygens and silanol functionalities can contribute, with the polymer mediating the extent to which Si-O-Si bonds can form within the silica regions of the matrix due to hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  1. Probabilistic Assessment of Fracture Progression in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon; Mauget, Bertrand; Huang, Dade; Addi, Frank

    1999-01-01

    This report describes methods and corresponding computer codes that are used to evaluate progressive damage and fracture and to perform probabilistic assessment in built-up composite structures. Structural response is assessed probabilistically, during progressive fracture. The effects of design variable uncertainties on structural fracture progression are quantified. The fast probability integrator (FPI) is used to assess the response scatter in the composite structure at damage initiation. The sensitivity of the damage response to design variables is computed. The methods are general purpose and are applicable to stitched and unstitched composites in all types of structures and fracture processes starting from damage initiation to unstable propagation and to global structure collapse. The methods are demonstrated for a polymer matrix composite stiffened panel subjected to pressure. The results indicated that composite constituent properties, fabrication parameters, and respective uncertainties have a significant effect on structural durability and reliability. Design implications with regard to damage progression, damage tolerance, and reliability of composite structures are examined.

  2. Sonic Fatigue Design Techniques for Advanced Composite Aircraft Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    AFWAL-TR-80.3019 AD A 090553 SONIC FATIGUE DESIGN TECHNIQUES FOR ADVANCED COMPOSITE AIRCRAFT STRUCTURES FINAL REPORT Ian Holehouse Rohr Industries...5 2. General Sonic Fatigue Theory .... ....... 7 3. Composite Laminate Analysis .. ....... ... 10 4. Preliminary Sonic Fatigue...overall sonic fatigue design guides. These existing desiyn methcds have been developed for metal structures. However, recent advanced composite

  3. Fuselage structure using advanced technology fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. K.; Tomlinson, H. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fuselage structure is described in which the skin is comprised of layers of a matrix fiber reinforced composite, with the stringers reinforced with the same composite material. The high strength to weight ratio of the composite, particularly at elevated temperatures, and its high modulus of elasticity, makes it desirable for use in airplane structures.

  4. Nondestructive Evaluation and Health Monitoring of Adhesively Bonded Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, William Walker

    laminate structures is highly dependent on the boundary conditions at the surface and between plies, especially at high frequencies. This work investigates how interfacial defects can alter the propagation of guided waves through bonded fiber reinforced composite materials. As well as how this information can be used to determine the interface properties and correlate the results with fracture parameters. The second approach investigates how structural health monitoring can be used to detect the growth of disbonds from service loads. A mode selection technique is proposed for selecting frequency ranges for electromechanical impedance spectroscopy.

  5. Composite fiber structures for catalysts and electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrion, Christopher J.; Cahela, Donald R.; Ahn, Soonho; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    1993-01-01

    We have recently envisioned a process wherein fibers of various metals in the 0.5 to 15 micron diameter range are slurried in concert with cellulose fibers and various other materials in the form of particulates and/or fibers. The resulting slurry is cast via a wet-lay process into a sheet and dried to produce a free-standing sheet of 'composite paper.' When the 'preform' sheet is sintered in hydrogen, the bulk of the cellulose is removed with the secondary fibers and/or particulates being entrapped by the sinter-locked network provided by the metal fibers. The resulting material is unique, in that it allows the intimate contacting and combination of heretofore mutually exclusive materials and properties. Moreover, due to the ease of paper manufacture and processing, the resulting materials are relatively inexpensive and can be fabricated into a wide range of three-dimensional structures. Also, because cellulose is both a binder and a pore-former, structures combining high levels of active surface area and high void volume (i.e., low pressure drop) can be prepared as freestanding flow through monoliths.

  6. Design for progressive fracture in composite shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1992-01-01

    The load carrying capability and structural behavior of composite shell structures and stiffened curved panels are investigated to provide accurate early design loads. An integrated computer code is utilized for the computational simulation of composite structural degradation under practical loading for realistic design. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to structural fracture are included in the simulation. Progressive fracture investigations providing design insight for several classes of composite shells are presented. Results demonstrate the significance of local defects, interfacial regions, and stress concentrations on the structural durability of composite shells.

  7. Designing for fiber composite structural durability in hygrothermomechanical environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology is described which can be used to design/analyze fiber composite structures subjected to complex hygrothermomechanical environments. This methodology includes composite mechanics and advanced structural analysis methods (finite element). Select examples are described to illustrate the application of the available methodology. The examples include: (1) composite progressive fracture; (2) composite design for high cycle fatigue combined with hot-wet conditions; and (3) general laminate design.

  8. Low-velocity impact tests on fibrous composite sandwich structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, A. V.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of low-velocity projectile impact on the load-carrying ability of the composite sandwich structural components is investigated experimentally, the impact simulating the damage caused by runway debris and the accidental dropping of hand tools during servicing on secondary aircraft structures made with composites. The sandwich-type beam specimens were fabricated with graphite/epoxy face sheets, aluminum honeycomb core, and a steel (back) plate. A four-point beam-loading apparatus was used, and the ultimate strength, ultimate strain, and residual strength of the composites were determined. A faired curve is presented indicating the lower bound of the failure threshold for each of the laminate configurations tested in compression and tension as a function of the projectile impact energy. It is shown that strength degradation due to impact is dependent on the laminate configuration and the fiber/matrix combination. The laminates having more angle plies near the impact surface and unidirectional plies elsewhere seem to show extensive interply and intraply fiber delaminations at failure relative to the laminates with a cross-ply on the impact surface.

  9. Compositional clustering in task structure learning

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    Humans are remarkably adept at generalizing knowledge between experiences in a way that can be difficult for computers. Often, this entails generalizing constituent pieces of experiences that do not fully overlap, but nonetheless share useful similarities with, previously acquired knowledge. However, it is often unclear how knowledge gained in one context should generalize to another. Previous computational models and data suggest that rather than learning about each individual context, humans build latent abstract structures and learn to link these structures to arbitrary contexts, facilitating generalization. In these models, task structures that are more popular across contexts are more likely to be revisited in new contexts. However, these models can only re-use policies as a whole and are unable to transfer knowledge about the transition structure of the environment even if only the goal has changed (or vice-versa). This contrasts with ecological settings, where some aspects of task structure, such as the transition function, will be shared between context separately from other aspects, such as the reward function. Here, we develop a novel non-parametric Bayesian agent that forms independent latent clusters for transition and reward functions, affording separable transfer of their constituent parts across contexts. We show that the relative performance of this agent compared to an agent that jointly clusters reward and transition functions depends environmental task statistics: the mutual information between transition and reward functions and the stochasticity of the observations. We formalize our analysis through an information theoretic account of the priors, and propose a meta learning agent that dynamically arbitrates between strategies across task domains to optimize a statistical tradeoff. PMID:29672581

  10. Conflict Adaptation Depends on Task Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akcay, Caglar; Hazeltine, Eliot

    2008-01-01

    The dependence of the Simon effect on the correspondence of the previous trial can be explained by the conflict-monitoring theory, which holds that a control system adjusts automatic activation from irrelevant stimulus information (conflict adaptation) on the basis of the congruency of the previous trial. The authors report on 4 experiments…

  11. Family Structure and Approval Dependency in College Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Frank H.

    1975-01-01

    Approval dependency in college females was studied as a function of birth order, family size, and sibling sex with control over sib age separation. The results indicated no significant contribution of the family structure variables to approval dependency. (Author)

  12. Lectures on Composite Materials for Aircraft Structures,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    9 Moh), derived composites can be machined only with great difficulty, with diamond-tipped tools. 2.4 Aramid Fibres These fibres are the latest type...between fibrils. Failed specimens often give the appearance of broomsticks due to this failure mode. Machining of Kevlar composites requires careful...Compressive Strength of Kevlar 49/Epoxy Composites , Composites , vol. 6, pp. 217-225, 1975. 13. Anon., A Guide to Cutting and Machining Kevlar Aramid, Du

  13. Braided Composite Technologies for Rotorcraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessie, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    A&P Technology has developed a braided material approach for fabricating lightweight, high-strength hybrid gears for aerospace drive systems. The conventional metallic web was replaced with a composite element made from A&P's quasi-isotropic braid. The 0deg, +/-60deg braid architecture was chosen so that inplane stiffness properties and strength would be nearly equal in all directions. The test results from the Phase I Small Spur Gear program demonstrated satisfactory endurance and strength while providing a 20 percent weight savings. (Greater weight savings is anticipated with structural optimization.) The hybrid gears were subjected to a proof-of-concept test of 1 billion cycles in a gearbox at 10,000 revolutions per minute and 490 in-lb torque with no detectable damage to the gears. After this test the maximum torque capability was also tested, and the static strength capability of the gears was 7x the maximum operating condition. Additional proof-of-concept tests are in progress using a higher oil temperature, and a loss-of-oil test is planned. The success of Phase I led to a Phase II program to develop, fabricate, and optimize full-scale gears, specifically Bull Gears. The design of these Bull Gears will be refined using topology optimization, and the full-scale Bull Gears will be tested in a full-scale gear rig. The testing will quantify benefits of weight savings, as well as noise and vibration reduction. The expectation is that vibration and noise will be reduced through the introduction of composite material in the vibration transmission path between the contacting gear teeth and the shaft-and-bearing system.

  14. Braided Composite Technologies for Rotorcraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessie, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    A&P Technology has developed a braided material approach for fabricating lightweight, high-strength hybrid gears for aerospace drive systems. The conventional metallic web was replaced with a composite element made from A&P's quasi-isotropic braid. The 0deg, plus or minus 60 deg braid architecture was chosen so that inplane stiffness properties and strength would be nearly equal in all directions. The test results from the Phase I Small Spur Gear program demonstrated satisfactory endurance and strength while providing a 20 percent weight savings. (Greater weight savings is anticipated with structural optimization.) The hybrid gears were subjected to a proof-of-concept test of 1 billion cycles in a gearbox at 10,000 revolutions per minute and 490 in-lb torque with no detectable damage to the gears. After this test the maximum torque capability was also tested, and the static strength capability of the gears was 7x the maximum operating condition. Additional proof-of-concept tests are in progress using a higher oil temperature, and a loss-of-oil test is planned. The success of Phase I led to a Phase II program to develop, fabricate, and optimize full-scale gears, specifically Bull Gears. The design of these Bull Gears will be refined using topology optimization, and the full-scale Bull Gears will be tested in a full-scale gear rig. The testing will quantify benefits of weight savings, as well as noise and vibration reduction. The expectation is that vibration and noise will be reduced through the introduction of composite material in the vibration transmission path between the contacting gear teeth and the shaft-and-bearing system.

  15. Optimization of composite wood structural components : processing and design choices

    Treesearch

    Theodore L. Laufenberg

    1985-01-01

    Decreasing size and quality of the world's forest resources are responsible for interest in producing composite wood structural components. Process and design optimization methods are offered in this paper. Processing concepts for wood composite structural products are reviewed to illustrate manufacturing boundaries and areas of high potential. Structural...

  16. Dimensionally stable composite structures and composite mirrors for spaceborne optical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippel, Rudolf; Stute, Thomas; Erdl, Günther

    2018-04-01

    This paper, "Dimensionally stable composite structures and composite mirrors for spaceborne optical instruments," was presented as part of International Conference on Space Optics—ICSO 1997, held in Toulouse, France.

  17. Reliability and life prediction of ceramic composite structures at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1994-01-01

    Methods are highlighted that ascertain the structural reliability of components fabricated of composites with ceramic matrices reinforced with ceramic fibers or whiskers and subject to quasi-static load conditions at elevated temperatures. Each method focuses on a particular composite microstructure: whisker-toughened ceramics, laminated ceramic matrix composites, and fabric reinforced ceramic matrix composites. In addition, since elevated service temperatures usually involve time-dependent effects, a section dealing with reliability degradation as a function of load history has been included. A recurring theme throughout this chapter is that even though component failure is controlled by a sequence of many microfailure events, failure of ceramic composites will be modeled using macrovariables.

  18. Links of gut microbiota composition with alcohol dependence syndrome and alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Dubinkina, Veronika B; Tyakht, Alexander V; Odintsova, Vera Y; Yarygin, Konstantin S; Kovarsky, Boris A; Pavlenko, Alexander V; Ischenko, Dmitry S; Popenko, Anna S; Alexeev, Dmitry G; Taraskina, Anastasiya Y; Nasyrova, Regina F; Krupitsky, Evgeny M; Shalikiani, Nino V; Bakulin, Igor G; Shcherbakov, Petr L; Skorodumova, Lyubov O; Larin, Andrei K; Kostryukova, Elena S; Abdulkhakov, Rustam A; Abdulkhakov, Sayar R; Malanin, Sergey Y; Ismagilova, Ruzilya K; Grigoryeva, Tatiana V; Ilina, Elena N; Govorun, Vadim M

    2017-10-17

    Alcohol abuse has deleterious effects on human health by disrupting the functions of many organs and systems. Gut microbiota has been implicated in the pathogenesis of alcohol-related liver diseases, with its composition manifesting expressed dysbiosis in patients suffering from alcoholic dependence. Due to its inherent plasticity, gut microbiota is an important target for prevention and treatment of these diseases. Identification of the impact of alcohol abuse with associated psychiatric symptoms on the gut community structure is confounded by the liver dysfunction. In order to differentiate the effects of these two factors, we conducted a comparative "shotgun" metagenomic survey of 99 patients with the alcohol dependence syndrome represented by two cohorts-with and without liver cirrhosis. The taxonomic and functional composition of the gut microbiota was subjected to a multifactor analysis including comparison with the external control group. Alcoholic dependence and liver cirrhosis were associated with profound shifts in gut community structures and metabolic potential across the patients. The specific effects on species-level community composition were remarkably different between cohorts with and without liver cirrhosis. In both cases, the commensal microbiota was found to be depleted. Alcoholic dependence was inversely associated with the levels of butyrate-producing species from the Clostridiales order, while the cirrhosis-with multiple members of the Bacteroidales order. The opportunist pathogens linked to alcoholic dependence included pro-inflammatory Enterobacteriaceae, while the hallmarks of cirrhosis included an increase of oral microbes in the gut and more frequent occurrence of abnormal community structures. Interestingly, each of the two factors was associated with the expressed enrichment in many Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus-but the exact set of the species was different between alcoholic dependence and liver cirrhosis. At the level of

  19. Multi-material Preforming of Structural Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Robert E.; Eberle, Cliff C.; Pastore, Christopher M.

    2015-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites offer significant weight reduction potential, with glass fiber composites already widely adopted. Carbon fiber composites deliver the greatest performance benefits, but their high cost has inhibited widespread adoption. This project demonstrates that hybrid carbon-glass solutions can realize most of the benefits of carbon fiber composites at much lower cost. ORNL and Owens Corning Reinforcements along with program participants at the ORISE collaborated to demonstrate methods for produce hybrid composites along with techniques to predict performance and economic tradeoffs. These predictions were then verified in testing coupons and more complex demonstration articles.

  20. Study on voids of epoxy matrix composites sandwich structure parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Simin; Wen, Youyi; Yu, Wenjun; Liu, Hong; Yue, Cheng; Bao, Jing

    2017-03-01

    Void is the most common tiny defect of composite materials. Porosity is closely related to composite structure property. The voids forming behaviour in the composites sandwich structural parts with the carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins was researched by adjusting the manufacturing process parameters. The composites laminate with different porosities were prepared with the different process parameter. The ultrasonic non-destructive measurement method for the porosity was developed and verified through microscopic examination. The analysis results show that compaction pressure during the manufacturing process had influence on the porosity in the laminate area. Increasing the compaction pressure and compaction time will reduce the porosity of the laminates. The bond-line between honeycomb core and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin skins were also analyzed through microscopic examination. The mechanical properties of sandwich structure composites were studied. The optimization process parameters and porosity ultrasonic measurement method for composites sandwich structure have been applied to the production of the composite parts.

  1. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Build-Up Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1997-01-01

    Damage progression and fracture of built-up composite structures is evaluated by using computational simulation. The objective is to examine the behavior and response of a stiffened composite (0/ +/- 45/90)(sub s6) laminate panel by simulating the damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progression and propagation to structural collapse. An integrated computer code, CODSTRAN, was augmented for the simulation of the progressive damage and fracture of built-up composite structures under mechanical loading. Results show that damage initiation and progression have significant effect on the structural response. Influence of the type of loading is investigated on the damage initiation, propagation and final fracture of the build-up composite panel.

  2. Structural Durability of Damaged Metallic Panel Repaired with Composite Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C.

    1997-01-01

    Structural durability/damage tolerance characteristics of an aluminum tension specimen possessing a short crack and repaired by applying a fiber composite surface patch is investigated via computational simulation. The composite patch is made of graphite/epoxy plies with various layups. An integrated computer code that accounts for all possible failure modes is utilized for the simulation of combined fiber-composite/aluminum structural degradation under loading. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to structural fracture are included in the simulation. Results show the structural degradation stages due to tensile loading and illustrate the use of computational simulation for the investigation of a composite patch repaired cracked metallic panel.

  3. Thermal and Compositional Variation of Glassy Metal Structure Factors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    From, Milton

    The x-ray total structure factor of the glassy -metal alloys Mg_{70}Zn_ {30}, Ca_{70}Mg_{30 } and Mg_{85.5}Cu _{14.5} has been measured at three temperatures: 9K, 150K, and 300K. The data have a statistical precision of about.8% and an absolute accuracy of roughly 3%. Percus-Yevick hard sphere structure factors may be fitted quite accurately to the data in the region of the first peak. In addition, the variation of the experimental structure factor with composition is found to be consistent with the Percus-Yevick theory. At low k values, Percus -Yevick and other theoretical model structure factors are in poor agreement with the data. Within experimental error, the temperature dependence of the structure factors is in agreement with the Debye plane wave phonon model of atomic vibrations. The measured structure factors are used to calculate the electrical resistivity from the Faber-Ziman equation. In most cases, the calculations yield both the correct magnitude of resistivity and sign of the temperature coefficient of resistivity.

  4. Composition, structure and chemistry of interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    1986-01-01

    The observational constraints on the composition of the interstellar dust are analyzed. The dust in the diffuse interstellar medium consists of a mixture of stardust (amorphous silicates, amorphous carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and graphite) and interstellar medium dust (organic refractory material). Stardust seems to dominate in the local diffuse interstellar medium. Inside molecular clouds, however, icy grain mantles are also important. The structural differences between crystalline and amorphous materials, which lead to differences in the optical properties, are discussed. The astrophysical consequences are briefly examined. The physical principles of grain surface chemistry are discussed and applied to the formation of molecular hydrogen and icy grain mantles inside dense molecular clouds. Transformation of these icy grain mantles into the organic refractory dust component observed in the diffuse interstellar medium requires ultraviolet sources inside molecular clouds as well as radical diffusion promoted by transient heating of the mantle. The latter process also returns a considerable fraction of the molecules in the grain mantle to the gas phase.

  5. Connectivity and propagule sources composition drive ditch plant metacommunity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favre-Bac, Lisa; Ernoult, Aude; Mony, Cendrine; Rantier, Yann; Nabucet, Jean; Burel, Françoise

    2014-11-01

    The fragmentation of agricultural landscapes has a major impact on biodiversity. In addition to habitat loss, dispersal limitation increasingly appears as a significant driver of biodiversity decline. Landscape linear elements, like ditches, may reduce the negative impacts of fragmentation by enhancing connectivity for many organisms, in addition to providing refuge habitats. To characterize these effects, we investigated the respective roles of propagule source composition and connectivity at the landscape scale on hydrochorous and non-hydrochorous ditch bank plant metacommunities. Twenty-seven square sites (0.5 km2 each) were selected in an agricultural lowland of northern France. At each site, plant communities were sampled on nine ditch banks (totaling 243 ditches). Variables characterizing propagule sources composition and connectivity were calculated for landscape mosaic and ditch network models. The landscape mosaic influenced only non-hydrochorous species, while the ditch network impacted both hydrochorous and non-hydrochorous species. Non-hydrochorous metacommunities were dependent on a large set of land-use elements, either within the landscape mosaic or adjacent to the ditch network, whereas hydrochorous plant metacommunities were only impacted by the presence of ditches adjacent to crops and roads. Ditch network connectivity also influenced both hydrochorous and non-hydrochorous ditch bank plant metacommunity structure, suggesting that beyond favoring hydrochory, ditches may also enhance plant dispersal by acting on other dispersal vectors. Increasing propagule sources heterogeneity and connectivity appeared to decrease within-metacommunity similarity within landscapes. Altogether, our results suggest that the ditch network's composition and configuration impacts plant metacommunity structure by affecting propagule dispersal possibilities, with contrasted consequences depending on species' dispersal vectors.

  6. Unexpected structural and magnetic depth dependence of YIG thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F. K.; Kinane, C. J.; Langridge, S.; Ali, M.; Hickey, B. J.; Niizeki, T.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.; Ambaye, H.; Glavic, A.

    2017-09-01

    We report measurements on yttrium iron garnet (YIG) thin films grown on both gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) and yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) substrates, with and without thin Pt top layers. We provide three principal results: the observation of an interfacial region at the Pt/YIG interface, we place a limit on the induced magnetism of the Pt layer, and confirm the existence of an interfacial layer at the GGG/YIG interface. Polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) was used to give depth dependence of both the structure and magnetism of these structures. We find that a thin film of YIG on GGG is best described by three distinct layers: an interfacial layer near the GGG, around 5 nm thick and nonmagnetic, a magnetic "bulk" phase, and a nonmagnetic and compositionally distinct thin layer near the surface. We theorize that the bottom layer, which is independent of the film thickness, is caused by Gd diffusion. The top layer is likely to be extremely important in inverse spin Hall effect measurements, and is most likely Y2O3 or very similar. Magnetic sensitivity in the PNR to any induced moment in the Pt is increased by the existence of the Y2O3 layer; any moment is found to be less than 0.02 μB/atom .

  7. Compositional structure of the asteroid belt.

    PubMed

    Gradie, J; Tedesco, E

    1982-06-25

    The distribution of compositional types among the asteroids is found to vary systematically with heliocentric distance. Seven distinct peaks in the relative proportion of the compositional types E, R, S, M, F, C, P, and D are found from 1.8 to 5.2 astronomical units. The inferred composition of the asteroids in each semimajor axis region is consistent with the theory that the asteroids accreted from the solar nebula at or near their present locations.

  8. Time Domain Diffraction by Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Giovanni; Frongillo, Marcello

    2017-04-01

    Time domain (TD) diffraction problems are receiving great attention because of the widespread use of ultra wide band (UWB) communication and radar systems. It is commonly accepted that, due to the large bandwidth of the UWB signals, the analysis of the wave propagation mechanisms in the TD framework is preferable to the frequency domain (FD) data processing. Furthermore, the analysis of transient scattering phenomena is also of importance for predicting the effects of electromagnetic pulses on civil structures. Diffraction in the TD framework represents a challenging problem and numerical discretization techniques can be used to support research and industry activities. Unfortunately, these methods become rapidly intractable when considering excitation pulses with high frequency content. This contribution deals with the TD diffraction phenomenon related to composite structures containing a dielectric wedge with arbitrary apex angle when illuminated by a plane wave. The approach is the same used in [1]-[3]. The transient diffracted field originated by an arbitrary function plane wave is evaluated via a convolution integral involving the TD diffraction coefficients, which are determined in closed form starting from the knowledge of the corresponding FD counterparts. In particular, the inverse Laplace transform is applied to the FD Uniform Asymptotic Physical Optics (FD-UAPO) diffraction coefficients available for the internal region of the structure and the surrounding space. For each observation domain, the FD-UAPO expressions are obtained by considering electric and magnetic equivalent PO surface currents located on the interfaces. The surface radiation integrals using these sources is assumed as starting point and manipulated for obtaining integrals able to be solved by means of the Steepest Descent Method and the Multiplicative Method. [1] G. Gennarelli and G. Riccio, "Time domain diffraction by a right-angled penetrable wedge," IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., Vol

  9. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    The linear elastic response is determined for an internally pressurized, long circular cylindrical shell stiffened on the inside by a regular arrangement of identical stringers and identical rings. Periodicity of this configuration permits the analysis of a portion of the shell wall centered over a generic stringer-ring joint; i.e., a unit cell model. The stiffeners are modeled as discrete beams, and the stringer is assumed to have a symmetrical cross section and the ring an asymmetrical section. Asymmetery causes out-of-plane bending and torsion of the ring. Displacements are assumed as truncated double Fourier series plus simple terms in the axial coordinate to account for the closed and pressure vessel effect (a non-periodic effect). The interacting line loads between the stiffeners and the inside shell wall are Lagrange multipliers in the formulation, and they are also assumed as truncated Fourier series. Displacement continuity constraints between the stiffeners and shell along the contact lines are satisfied point-wise. Equilibrium is imposed by the principle of virtual work. A composite material crown panel from the fuselage of a large transport aircraft is the numerical example. The distributions of the interacting line loads, and the out-of-plane bending moment and torque in the ring, are strongly dependent on modeling the deformations due to transverse shear and cross-sectional warping of the ring in torsion. This paper contains the results from the semiannual report on research on 'Pressure Pillowing of an Orthogonally Stiffened Cylindrical Shell'. The results of the new work are illustrated in the included appendix.

  10. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, W.; Santos, João.; Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario.

    2015-05-01

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth.

  11. Advanced Composite Structures At NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Eldred's presentation will discuss several NASA efforts to improve and expand the use of composite structures within aerospace vehicles. Topics will include an overview of NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP), Space Launch System (SLS) applications, and Langley's ISAAC robotic composites research tool.

  12. In-plane orientation and composition dependences of crystal structure and electrical properties of {100}-oriented Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 films grown on (100) Si substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Shoji; Sankara Rama Krishnan, P. S.; Okamoto, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Shintaro; Akiyama, Kensuke; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    In-plane orientation-controlled Pb(Zr x ,Ti1- x )O3 (PZT) films with a thickness of approximately 2 µm and a Zr/(Zr + Ti) ratio of 0.39-0.65 were grown on (100) Si substrates by pulsed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). In-plane-oriented epitaxial PZT films and in-plane random fiber-textured PZT films with {100} out-of-plane orientation were grown on (100)c SrRuO3//(100)c LaNiO3//(100) CeO2//(100) YSZ//(100) Si and (100)c SrRuO3/(100)c LaNiO3/(111) Pt/TiO2/SiO2/(100) Si substrates, respectively. The effects of Zr/(Zr + Ti) ratio and in-plane orientation on the crystal structure, dielectric, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties of the films were systematically investigated. The X-ray diffraction measurement showed that the epitaxial PZT films had a higher volume fraction of (100) orientation than the fiber-textured PZT films in the tetragonal Zr/(Zr + Ti) ratio region. A large difference was not detected between the epitaxial films and the fiber-textured films for Zr/(Zr + Ti) ratio dependence of the dielectric constant, and remanent polarization. However, in the rhombohedral phase region [Zr/(Zr + Ti) = 0.65], coercive field was found to be 1.5-fold different between the epitaxial and fiber-textured PZT films. The maximum field-induced strains measured at 0-100 kV/cm by scanning atomic force microscopy were obtained at approximately Zr/(Zr + Ti) = 0.50 and were about 0.5 and 0.3% for the epitaxial and fiber-textured PZT films, respectively.

  13. Composite isogrid structures for parabolic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, Edward M. (Inventor); Boyd, Jr., William E. (Inventor); Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor); Dyer, Jack E. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to high stiffness parabolic structures utilizing integral reinforced grids. The parabolic structures implement the use of isogrid structures which incorporate unique and efficient orthotropic patterns for efficient stiffness and structural stability.

  14. Analysis of truss, beam, frame, and membrane components. [composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.; Robinson, E. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Truss components are considered, taking into account composite truss structures, truss analysis, column members, and truss joints. Beam components are discussed, giving attention to composite beams, laminated beams, and sandwich beams. Composite frame components and composite membrane components are examined. A description is given of examples of flat membrane components and examples of curved membrane elements. It is pointed out that composite structural design and analysis is a highly interactive, iterative procedure which does not lend itself readily to characterization by design or analysis function only.-

  15. Composite Bus Structure for the SMEX/WIRE Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosanova, Giulio G.

    1998-01-01

    In an effort to reduce the weight and optimize the structural design of the Small Explorer (SMEX) Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) spacecraft, it has become desirable to change the material and construction from mechanically fastened aluminum structure to a fully bonded fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) structure. GSFC has developed the WIRE spacecraft structural bus design concept, including the instrument and launch vehicle requirements. The WIRE Satellite is the fifth of a series of SMEX satellites to be launched once per year. GSFC has chosen Composite Optics Inc. (COI) as the prime contractor for the development and procurement of the WIRE composite structure. The detailed design of the fully bonded FRC structure is based on COI's Short Notice Accelerated Production SATellite ("SNAPSAT") approach. SNAPSAT is a state of the art design and manufacturing technology for advanced composite materials which utilizes flat-stock detail parts bonded together to produce a final structural assembly. The structural design approach adopted for the WIRE structure provides a very viable alternative to both traditional aluminum construction as well as high tech. molded type composite structures. This approach to composite structure design is much less costly than molded or honeycomb sandwich type composite construction, but may cost slightly more than conventional aluminum construction on the subsystem level. However on the overall program level the weight saving achieved is very cost effective, since the primary objective is to allocate more mass for science payloads.

  16. Investigations of plastic composite materials for highway safety structures

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-08-01

    This report presents a basic overview and assessment of different concepts and technologies of using polymer composites in structures generally used for highway safety. The structural systems included a highway barrier guardrail with its posts and bl...

  17. Probabilistic evaluation of fuselage-type composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology is developed to computationally simulate the uncertain behavior of composite structures. The uncertain behavior includes buckling loads, natural frequencies, displacements, stress/strain etc., which are the consequences of the random variation (scatter) of the primitive (independent random) variables in the constituent, ply, laminate and structural levels. This methodology is implemented in the IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures) computer code. A fuselage-type composite structure is analyzed to demonstrate the code's capability. The probability distribution functions of the buckling loads, natural frequency, displacement, strain and stress are computed. The sensitivity of each primitive (independent random) variable to a given structural response is also identified from the analyses.

  18. Structural characterization of high temperature composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, J. F.; Grande, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    Glass, ceramic, and carbon matrix composite materials have emerged in recent years with potential properties and temperature resistance which make them attractive for high temperature applications such as gas turbine engines. At the outset of this study, only flexural tests were available to evaluate brittle matrix composites at temperatures in the 600 to 1000 C range. The results are described of an ongoing effort to develop appropriate tensile, compression, and shear test methods for high temperature use. A tensile test for unidirectional composites was developed and used to evaluate the properties and behavior of ceramic fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites in air at temperatures up to 1000 C. The results indicate generally efficient fiber reinforcement and tolerance to matrix cracking similar to polymer matrix composites. Limiting properties in these materials may be an inherently very low transverse strain to failure, and high temperature embrittlement due to fiber/matrix interface oxidation.

  19. Micromechanical models for textile structural composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrey, Ramesh V.; Sankar, Bhavani V.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is to develop micromechanical models for predicting the stiffness and strength properties of textile composite materials. Two models are presented to predict the homogeneous elastic constants and coefficients of thermal expansion of a textile composite. The first model is based on rigorous finite element analysis of the textile composite unit-cell. Periodic boundary conditions are enforced between opposite faces of the unit-cell to simulate deformations accurately. The second model implements the selective averaging method (SAM), which is based on a judicious combination of stiffness and compliance averaging. For thin textile composites, both models can predict the plate stiffness coefficients and plate thermal coefficients. The finite element procedure is extended to compute the thermal residual microstresses, and to estimate the initial failure envelope for textile composites.

  20. Measuring Moisture Levels in Graphite Epoxy Composite Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark; Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Graphite epoxy composite (GEC) materials are used in the construction of rocket fairings, nose cones, interstage adapters, and heat shields due to their high strength and light weight. However, they absorb moisture depending on the environmental conditions they are exposed to prior to launch. Too much moisture absorption can become a problem when temperature and pressure changes experienced during launch cause the water to vaporize. The rapid state change of the water can result in structural failure of the material. In addition, heat and moisture combine to weaken GEC structures. Diffusion models that predict the total accumulated moisture content based on the environmental conditions are one accepted method of determining if the material strength has been reduced to an unacceptable level. However, there currently doesn t exist any field measurement technique to estimate the actual moisture content of a composite structure. A multi-layer diffusion model was constructed with Mathematica to predict moisture absorption and desorption from the GEC sandwich structure. This model is used in conjunction with relative humidity/temperature sensors both on the inside and outside of the material to determine the moisture levels in the structure. Because the core materials have much higher diffusivity than the face sheets, a single relative humidity measurement will accurately reflect the moisture levels in the core. When combined with an external relative humidity measurement, the model can be used to determine the moisture levels in the face sheets. Since diffusion is temperaturedependent, the temperature measurements are used to determine the diffusivity of the face sheets for the model computations.

  1. Conformation of repaglinide: A solvent dependent structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashmniam, Saeed; Tafazzoli, Mohsen

    2017-09-01

    Experimental and theoretical conformational study of repaglinide in chloroform and dimethyl sulfoxide was investigated. By applying potential energy scanning (PES) at B3LYP/6-311++g** and B3LYP-D3/6-311++g** level of theory on rotatable single bonds, four stable conformers (R1-R4) were identified. Spin-spin coupling constant values were obtained from a set of 2D NMR spectra (Hsbnd H COSY, Hsbnd C HMQC and Hsbnd C HMBC) and compared to its calculated values. Interestingly, from 1HNMR and 2D-NOESY NMR, it has been found that repaglinide structure is folded in CDCl3 and cause all single bonds to rotate at an extremely slow rate. On the other hand, in DMSO-d6, with strong solvent-solute intermolecular interactions, the single bonds rotate freely. Also, energy barrier and thermodynamic parameters for chair to chair interconversion was measured (13.04 kcal mol-1) in CDCl3 solvent by using temperature dynamic NMR.

  2. Chapter 4. Monitoring vegetation composition and structure as habitat attributes

    Treesearch

    Thomas E. DeMeo; Mary M. Manning; Mary M. Rowland; Christina D. Vojta; Kevin S. McKelvey; C. Kenneth Brewer; Rebecca S.H. Kennedy; Paul A. Maus; Bethany Schulz; James A. Westfall; Timothy J. Mersmann

    2013-01-01

    Vegetation composition and structure are key components of wildlife habitat (Mc- Comb et al. 2010, Morrison et al. 2006) and are, therefore, essential components of all wildlife habitat monitoring. The objectives of this chapter are to describe common habitat attributes derived from vegetation composition and structure and to provide guidance for obtaining and using...

  3. Design considerations for composite fuselage structure of commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. W.; Sakata, I. F.

    1981-01-01

    The structural, manufacturing, and service and environmental considerations that could impact the design of composite fuselage structure for commercial transport aircraft application were explored. The severity of these considerations was assessed and the principal design drivers delineated. Technical issues and potential problem areas which must be resolved before sufficient confidence is established to commit to composite materials were defined. The key issues considered are: definition of composite fuselage design specifications, damage tolerance, and crashworthiness.

  4. Analysis of SMA Hybrid Composite Structures using Commercial Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Patel, Hemant D.

    2004-01-01

    A thermomechanical model for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators and SMA hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures has been recently implemented in the commercial finite element codes MSC.Nastran and ABAQUS. The model may be easily implemented in any code that has the capability for analysis of laminated composite structures with temperature dependent material properties. The model is also relatively easy to use and requires input of only fundamental engineering properties. A brief description of the model is presented, followed by discussion of implementation and usage in the commercial codes. Results are presented from static and dynamic analysis of SMAHC beams of two types; a beam clamped at each end and a cantilevered beam. Nonlinear static (post-buckling) and random response analyses are demonstrated for the first specimen. Static deflection (shape) control is demonstrated for the cantilevered beam. Approaches for modeling SMAHC material systems with embedded SMA in ribbon and small round wire product forms are demonstrated and compared. The results from the commercial codes are compared to those from a research code as validation of the commercial implementations; excellent correlation is achieved in all cases.

  5. Progressive fracture of polymer matrix composite structures: A new approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Minnetyan, L.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness parameters has been developed and is described for the computational simulation of progressive fracture of polymer matrix composite structures. The damage stages are quantified based on physics via composite mechanics while the degradation of the structural behavior is quantified via the finite element method. The approach account for all types of composite behavior, structures, load conditions, and fracture processes starting from damage initiation, to unstable propagation and to global structural collapse. Results of structural fracture in composite beams, panels, plates, and shells are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of this new approach. Parameters and guidelines are identified which can be used as criteria for structural fracture, inspection intervals, and retirement for cause. Generalization to structures made of monolithic metallic materials are outlined and lessons learned in undertaking the development of new approaches, in general, are summarized.

  6. Structural Composites Corrosive Management by Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2006-01-01

    A simulation of corrosive management on polymer composites durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured Ph factor and is represented by voids, temperature, and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure, and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply managed degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  7. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, W.; Santos, João; Avérous, L.

    2015-05-22

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size tomore » be used as scaffold for cell growth.« less

  8. Functional geopolymer composites for structural ceramic applications.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-06-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on the behavior of milled and short-fiber : reinforced composite plates are presented in this paper. The target operating temperature for : the plates was 1300C. The principal variables were the type and...

  9. Multifunctional Composite Nanofibers for Smart Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-13

    low cost. It is coated onto the surface of CNF to use as a supercapacitor cathode. The high porosity and surface area of nanofiber composite...SiNP fusion, pulverization, and capacity loss can be minimized during electrochemical cycling. Carbon is also ductile in absorbing the mechanical...b) Figure 2 Core-shell CNF/Si composite with a thin layer of carbon shell coating on SiNP (a) and the capacity of both

  10. Composite Materials and Sandwich Structures - A Primer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    cooling through a temperature range characteristic of the plastic. In the softened stage the plastic can be formed in a desired shape by molding or...which components are placed in a mold , and the composite is built up and worked by hand. Hybrid- A composite laminate comprised of laminae of two or...ply orientation is symmetrical about the laminate mid- plane. Thermoplastic - A plastic that can be repeatedly softened by heating, and hardened by

  11. Flame-Resistant Composite Materials For Structural Members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spears, Richard K.

    1995-01-01

    Matrix-fiber composite materials developed for structural members occasionally exposed to hot, corrosive gases. Integral ceramic fabric surface layer essential for resistance to flames and chemicals. Endures high temperature, impedes flame from penetrating to interior, inhibits diffusion of oxygen to interior where it degrades matrix resin, resists attack by chemicals, helps resist erosion, and provides additional strength. In original intended application, composite members replace steel structural members of rocket-launching structures that deteriorate under combined influences of atmosphere, spilled propellants, and rocket exhaust. Composites also attractive for other applications in which corrosion- and fire-resistant structural members needed.

  12. Analysis of passive damping in thick composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Computational mechanics for the prediction of damping and other dynamic characteristics in composite structures of general thicknesses and laminations are presented. Discrete layer damping mechanics that account for the representation of interlaminar shear effects in the material are summarized. Finite element based structural mechanics for the analysis of damping are described, and a specialty finite element is developed. Applications illustrate the quality of the discrete layer damping mechanics in predicting the damped dynamic characteristics of composite structures with thicker sections and/or laminate configurations that induce interlaminar shear. The results also illustrate and quantify the significance of interlaminar shear damping in such composite structures.

  13. Durability of commercial aircraft and helicopter composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    The development of advanced composite technology during the past decade is discussed. Both secondary and primary components fabricated with boron, graphite, and Kevlar composites are evaluated. Included are spoilers, rudders, and fairings on commercial transports, boron/epoxy reinforced wing structure on C-130 military transports, and doors, fairings, tail rotors, vertical fins, and horizontal stabilizers on commercial helicopters. The development of composite structures resulted in advances in design and manufacturing technology for secondary and primary composite structures for commercial transports. Design concepts and inspection and maintenance results for the components in service are reported. The flight, outdoor ground, and controlled laboratory environmental effects on composites were also determined. Effects of moisture absorption, ultraviolet radiation, aircraft fuels and fluids, and sustained tensile stress are included. Critical parameters affecting the long term durability of composite materials are identified.

  14. Composite Payload Fairing Structural Architecture Assessment and Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivanek, Thomas M.; Yount, Bryan C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the structural architecture assessments conducted and a recommendation for an affordable high performance composite structural concept to use on the next generation heavy-lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch System (SLS). The Structural Concepts Element of the Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) project and its follow on the Lightweight Spacecraft Structures and Materials (LSSM) project was tasked with evaluating a number of composite construction technologies for specific Ares V components: the Payload Shroud, the Interstage, and the Core Stage Intertank. Team studies strived to address the structural challenges, risks and needs for each of these vehicle components. Leveraging off of this work, the subsequent Composites for Exploration (CoEx) effort is focused on providing a composite structural concept to support the Payload Fairing for SLS. This paper documents the evaluation and down selection of composite construction technologies and evolution to the SLS Payload Fairing. Development of the evaluation criteria (also referred to as Figures of Merit or FOMs), their relative importance, and association to vehicle requirements are presented. A summary of the evaluation results, and a recommendation of the composite concept to baseline in the Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project is presented. The recommendation for the SLS Fairing is a Honeycomb Sandwich architecture based primarily on affordability and performance with two promising alternatives, Hat stiffened and Fiber Reinforced Foam (FRF) identified for eventual program block upgrade.

  15. On the vibration properties of composite materials and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. P.; Neilson, H. C.; Roscoe, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a widespread assumption that composite materials and structures offer enhanced vibration and acoustic properties. This assumption has to be evaluated or validated. The objective of this article is to address the subject of vibration characteristics and the related force transmissibility properties of composite structures. For a given composite beam made of Hercules AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy with a layered structure sequence of (0,0,30,-30)(sub 6S), resonance frequencies, structural damping, responses, impedances, and force transmissibility properties are determined, discussed, and compared with those of a steel beam. This article proposes a procedure to evaluate the vibration properties of individual composites. The criterion defined for performance comparison between composite materials and conventional materials is also discussed.

  16. Free vibration of composite re-bars in reinforced structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadioglu, Fethi

    2005-11-01

    The effect of composite rebar's shape in reinforced concrete beam-type structures on the natural frequencies and modes shapes is investigated through finite element analysis in this paper. Steel rebars are being replaced with composite rebars due to their better ability to resist corrosion in reinforced concrete structures for many infrastructure applications. A variety of composite rebar shapes can be obtained through the pultrusion process. It will be interesting to investigate their shape on free vibration characteristics. The results of natural frequencies and mode shapes are presented and compared for the different composite rebar shapes. The effects of various boundary conditions for different rebar shapes are also investigated.

  17. Progress in composite structure and space construction systems technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodle, J. B.; Jenkins, L. M.

    1981-01-01

    The development of deployable and fabricated composite trusses for large space structures by NASA and private industry is reviewed. Composite materials technology is discussed with a view toward fabrication processes and the characteristics of finished truss beams. Advances in roll-forming open section caps from graphite-composite strip material and new ultrasonic welding techniques are outlined. Vacuum- and gravity-effect test results show that the ultrasonic welding of graphite-thermoplastic materials in space is feasible. The structural characteristics of a prototype truss segment are presented. A new deployable graphite-composite truss with high packaging density for broad application to large space platforms is described.

  18. Continuation of tailored composite structures of ordered staple thermoplastic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santare, Michael H.; Pipes, R. Byron

    1992-01-01

    The search for the cost effective composite structure has motivated the investigation of several approaches to develop composite structure from innovative material forms. Among the promising approaches is the conversion of a planar sheet to components of complex curvature through sheet forming or stretch forming. In both cases, the potential for material stretch in the fiber direction appears to offer a clear advantage in formability over continuous fiber systems. A framework was established which allows the simulation of the anisotropic mechanisms of deformation of long discontinuous fiber laminates wherein the matrix phase is a viscous fluid. Predictions for the effective viscosities of a hyper-anisotropic medium consisting of collimated, discontinuous fibers suspended in viscous matrix were extended to capture the characteristics of typical polymers including non-Newtonian behavior and temperature dependence. In addition, the influence of fiber misorientation was also modeled by compliance averaging to determine ensemble properties for a given orientation distribution. A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams such as those used in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during manufacturing processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing radial and tangential gradients in material properties. Two analysis procedures are used to solve the beam problems. The first method uses separate two-dimensional elasticity solutions for the stresses in the flange and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring that forces and displacements match section boundaries. The second method uses an approximate Rayleigh-Ritz technique to find the solutions for more complex beams. Analyses

  19. Design and Processing of Structural Composite Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    The woven fabric, e is 72wt% LiFePO4 , 8wt% acetylene lack, and 20wt% poly(ethylene oxide) 200k as a binder. Acetylene black ensures electrical will...2.1.3 Cathode The composite cathode material utilizes LiFePO4 chemistry. The composition of the cathode material film deposited onto the metal substrat... LiFePO4 chemistry (over a 2.8-4.0V range (8)) including stainless steel and titanium. Stainless steel was evaluated in this udy due to its high

  20. Integrated mechanics for the passive damping of polymer-matrix composites and composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    Some recent developments on integrated damping mechanics for unidirectional composites, laminates, and composite structures are reviewed. Simplified damping micromechanics relate the damping of on-axis and off-axis composites to constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, fiber orientation, temperature, and moisture. Laminate and structural damping mechanics for thin composites are summarized. Discrete layer damping mechanics for thick laminates, including the effects of interlaminar shear damping, are developed and semianalytical predictions of modal damping in thick simply supported specialty composite plates are presented. Applications show the advantages of the unified mechanics, and illustrate the effect of fiber volume ratio, fiber orientation, structural geometry, and temperature on the damping. Additional damping properties for composite plates of various laminations, aspect ratios, fiber content, and temperature illustrate the merits and ranges of applicability of each theory (thin or thick laminates).

  1. New Insights into the Compositional Dependence of Li-Ion Transport in Polymer-Ceramic Composite Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin; Hu, Yan-Yan

    2018-01-31

    Composite electrolytes are widely studied for their potential in realizing improved ionic conductivity and electrochemical stability. Understanding the complex mechanisms of ion transport within composites is critical for effectively designing high-performance solid electrolytes. This study examines the compositional dependence of the three determining factors for ionic conductivity, including ion mobility, ion transport pathways, and active ion concentration. The results show that with increase in the fraction of ceramic Li 7 La 3 Zr 2 O 12 (LLZO) phase in the LLZO-poly(ethylene oxide) composites, ion mobility decreases, ion transport pathways transit from polymer to ceramic routes, and the active ion concentration increases. These changes in ion mobility, transport pathways, and concentration collectively explain the observed trend of ionic conductivity in composite electrolytes. Liquid additives alter ion transport pathways and increase ion mobility, thus enhancing ionic conductivity significantly. It is also found that a higher content of LLZO leads to improved electrochemical stability of composite electrolytes. This study provides insight into the recurring observations of compositional dependence of ionic conductivity in current composite electrolytes and pinpoints the intrinsic limitations of composite electrolytes in achieving fast ion conduction.

  2. Impact damage resistance of composite fuselage structure, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dost, Ernest F.; Finn, Scott R.; Murphy, Daniel P.; Huisken, Amy B.

    1993-01-01

    The strength of laminated composite materials may be significantly reduced by foreign object impact induced damage. An understanding of the damage state is required in order to predict the behavior of structure under operational loads or to optimize the structural configuration. Types of damage typically induced in laminated materials during an impact event include transverse matrix cracking, delamination, and/or fiber breakage. The details of the damage state and its influence on structural behavior depend on the location of the impact. Damage in the skin may act as a soft inclusion or affect panel stability, while damage occurring over a stiffener may include debonding of the stiffener flange from the skin. An experiment to characterize impact damage resistance of fuselage structure as a function of structural configuration and impact threat was performed. A wide range of variables associated with aircraft fuselage structure such as material type and stiffener geometry (termed, intrinsic variables) and variables related to the operating environment such as impactor mass and diameter (termed, extrinsic variables) were studied using a statistically based design-of-experiments technique. The experimental design resulted in thirty-two different 3-stiffener panels. These configured panels were impacted in various locations with a number of impactor configurations, weights, and energies. The results obtained from an examination of impacts in the skin midbay and hail simulation impacts are documented. The current discussion is a continuation of that work with a focus on nondiscrete characterization of the midbay hail simulation impacts and discrete characterization of impact damage for impacts over the stiffener.

  3. Flight service environmental effects on composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson; Baker, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Langley and the U.S. Army have jointly sponsored programs to assess the effects of realistic flight environments and ground-based exposure on advanced composite materials and structures. Composite secondary structural components were initially installed on commercial transport aircraft in 1973; secondary and primary structural components were installed on commercial helicopters in 1979; and primary structural components were installed on commercial aircraft in the mid-to-late 1980's. Service performance, maintenance characteristics, and residual strength of numerous components are reported. In addition to data on flight components, 10 year ground exposure test results on material coupons are reported. Comparison between ground and flight environmental effects for several composite material systems are also presented. Test results indicate excellent in-service performance with the composite components during the 15 year period. Good correlation between ground-based material performance and operational structural performance has been achieved.

  4. Modeling the Dependency Structure of Integrated Intensity Processes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yong-Ki

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies an important issue of dependence structure. To model this structure, the intensities within the Cox processes are driven by dependent shot noise processes, where jumps occur simultaneously and their sizes are correlated. The joint survival probability of the integrated intensities is explicitly obtained from the copula with exponential marginal distributions. Subsequently, this result can provide a very useful guide for credit risk management. PMID:26270638

  5. Advanced organic composite materials for aircraft structures: Future program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Revolutionary advances in structural materials have been responsible for revolutionary changes in all fields of engineering. These advances have had and are still having a significant impact on aircraft design and performance. Composites are engineered materials. Their properties are tailored through the use of a mix or blend of different constituents to maximize selected properties of strength and/or stiffness at reduced weights. More than 20 years have passed since the potentials of filamentary composite materials were identified. During the 1970s much lower cost carbon filaments became a reality and gradually designers turned from boron to carbon composites. Despite progress in this field, filamentary composites still have significant unfulfilled potential for increasing aircraft productivity; the rendering of advanced organic composite materials into production aircraft structures was disappointingly slow. Why this is and research and technology development actions that will assist in accelerating the application of advanced organic composites to production aircraft is discussed.

  6. Behaviour and Analysis of Mechanically Fastened Joints in Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    Safety Factors for Use When Designing bolted Joints In GRP," Composites , April 1979, pp. M376. 93. Dastln, S., "Joining and Machining Techniques... MACHINE SPACER LOCKmm STEEL PLATE FASTENER 203 mm OR DOWEL FiN EXTENSOMETER EXTENSOMETER TGAUGE LENGTH ATTACHMENT COMPOSITE - PLATE 31 mm p NOTE: NOT TO...No.427 Behaviour and Analysis of Mechanically Fastened Joints in Composite Structures DTIC CXVTflUTION STATEME~r £ELECTE Approved fm Vubhc sIlam l JUL

  7. Hydrodynamic Response of a Composite Structure in an Arctic Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    the navy’s first ship constructed entirely of composite materials. The 24-meter long ship is built from carbon fiber reinforced epoxy. The ship is...allowed for repeatable experimentation. Strain gauges were attached to critical locations of the composite plate towed through the tank . Both plate...SUBJECT TERMS Tow Tank , Fluid Structure Interaction, FSI, Composite Material, E-Glass, ANSYS, Hull Shape, CFX, Arctic. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 131

  8. Nano-structured polymer composites and process for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Hillmyer, Marc; Chen, Liang

    2013-04-16

    A process for preparing a polymer composite that includes reacting (a) a multi-functional monomer and (b) a block copolymer comprising (i) a first block and (ii) a second block that includes a functional group capable of reacting with the multi-functional monomer, to form a crosslinked, nano-structured, bi-continuous composite. The composite includes a continuous matrix phase and a second continuous phase comprising the first block of the block copolymer.

  9. Health Monitoring System for Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, S. S.; Riccardella, P. C.; Andrews, R. J.; Grady, J. E.; Mucciaradi, A. N.

    1996-01-01

    An automated system was developed to monitor the health status of composites. It uses the vibration characteristics of composites to identify a component's damage condition. The vibration responses are characterized by a set of signal features defined in the time, frequency and spatial domains. The identification of these changes in the vibration characteristics corresponding to different health conditions was performed using pattern recognition principles. This allows efficient data reduction and interpretation of vast amounts of information. Test components were manufactured from isogrid panels to evaluate performance of the monitoring system. The components were damaged by impact to simulate different health conditions. Free vibration response was induced by a tap test on the test components. The monitoring system was trained using these free vibration responses to identify three different health conditions. They are undamaged vs. damaged, damage location and damage zone size. High reliability in identifying the correct component health condition was achieved by the monitoring system.

  10. Stiff, Strong Splice For A Composite Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmaling, D.

    1991-01-01

    New type of splice for composite sandwich structure reduces peak shear stress in structure. Layers of alternating fiber orientation interposed between thin ears in adhesive joint. Developed for structural joint in spar of helicopter rotor blade, increases precision of control over thickness of adhesive at joint. Joint easy to make, requires no additional pieces, and adds little weight.

  11. Composite Structures Damage Tolerance Analysis Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, James B.; Goyal, Vinay K.; Klug, John C.; Rome, Jacob I.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the results of a literature review as part of the development of composite hardware fracture control guidelines funded by NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) under contract NNL04AA09B. The objectives of the overall development tasks are to provide a broad information and database to the designers, analysts, and testing personnel who are engaged in space flight hardware production.

  12. Composite Repairs of Cracked Metallic Airframe Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    painting of the surface of composites. Therefore, repairs on external surfaces of aircraft should be painted prior to service. 30 2. ANALITICAL AND...tends to decrease the ’apparent’ stress intensity factor. These factors have to be taken into account when comparing the analytical predictions with the...analytical predictions . The fatigue crack growth data for one of the specimens appears in Figure 2-46Zhe ’Inferred’ stress-intensity factor [from the

  13. Active Structural Fibers for Multifunctional Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-06

    capacitors. Lastly, a cathodic electrolytic deposition process has been investigated for the coating of carbon fibers with a PZT shell. The...results have demonstrated the ability to use the process to coat fibers with a thin shell of PZT . The results thus far have demonstrated the feasibility...Journal of Composite Materials, In Review. 2. Zhou, Z., Lin, Y. and Sodano, H.A., Synthesis and Characterization of Textured BaTiO3 Thin Films

  14. Structural Acoustic Physics Based Modeling of Curved Composite Shells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-19

    Results show that the finite element computational models accurately match analytical calculations, and that the composite material studied in this...products. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Finite Element Analysis, Structural Acoustics, Fiber-Reinforced Composites, Physics-Based Modeling 16. SECURITY...2 4 FINITE ELEMENT MODEL DESCRIPTION

  15. Material Distribution Optimization for the Shell Aircraft Composite Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsov, S.; Zhilyaev, I.; Oganesyan, P.; Axenov, V.

    2016-09-01

    One of the main goal in aircraft structures designing isweight decreasing and stiffness increasing. Composite structures recently became popular in aircraft because of their mechanical properties and wide range of optimization possibilities.Weight distribution and lay-up are keys to creating lightweight stiff strictures. In this paperwe discuss optimization of specific structure that undergoes the non-uniform air pressure at the different flight conditions and reduce a level of noise caused by the airflowinduced vibrations at the constrained weight of the part. Initial model was created with CAD tool Siemens NX, finite element analysis and post processing were performed with COMSOL Multiphysicsr and MATLABr. Numerical solutions of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations supplemented by k-w turbulence model provide the spatial distributions of air pressure applied to the shell surface. At the formulation of optimization problem the global strain energy calculated within the optimized shell was assumed as the objective. Wall thickness has been changed using parametric approach by an initiation of auxiliary sphere with varied radius and coordinates of the center, which were the design variables. To avoid a local stress concentration, wall thickness increment was defined as smooth function on the shell surface dependent of auxiliary sphere position and size. Our study consists of multiple steps: CAD/CAE transformation of the model, determining wind pressure for different flow angles, optimizing wall thickness distribution for specific flow angles, designing a lay-up for optimal material distribution. The studied structure was improved in terms of maximum and average strain energy at the constrained expense ofweight growth. Developed methods and tools can be applied to wide range of shell-like structures made of multilayered quasi-isotropic laminates.

  16. Band Structure Characteristics of Nacreous Composite Materials with Various Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    Nacreous composite materials have excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength, high toughness, and wide phononic band gap. In order to research band structure characteristics of nacreous composite materials with various defects, supercell models with the Brick-and-Mortar microstructure are considered. An efficient multi-level substructure algorithm is employed to discuss the band structure. Furthermore, two common systems with point and line defects and varied material parameters are discussed. In addition, band structures concerning straight and deflected crack defects are calculated by changing the shear modulus of the mortar. Finally, the sensitivity of band structures to the random material distribution is presented by considering different volume ratios of the brick. The results reveal that the first band gap of a nacreous composite material is insensitive to defects under certain conditions. It will be of great value to the design and synthesis of new nacreous composite materials for better dynamic properties.

  17. Failure Analysis and Mechanisms of Failure of Fibrous Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K. (Compiler); Shuart, M. J. (Compiler); Starnes, J. H., Jr. (Compiler); Williams, J. G. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art of failure analysis and current design practices, especially as applied to the use of fibrous composite materials in aircraft structures is discussed. Deficiencies in these technologies are identified, as are directions for future research.

  18. USING WATERSHED COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE AS INDICATORS OF ESTUARINE CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many researchers examining relationships between water quality and the surrounding watershed have focused on landscape metrics associated with composition (e.g., % of the whole watershed in agriculture) often excluding measures of landscape structure. In addition, little work ha...

  19. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Build-Up Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, C. C.

    1997-01-01

    Damage progression and fracture of built-up composite structures is evaluated by using computational simulation. The objective is to examine the behavior and response of a stiffened composite (0 +/-45/90)(sub s6) laminate panel by simulating the damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progression and propagation to structural collapse. An integrated computer code CODSTRAN was augmented for the simulation of the progressive damage and fracture of built-up composite structures under mechanical loading. Results show that damage initiation and progression to have significant effect on the structural response. Influence of the type of loading is investigated on the damage initiation, propagation and final fracture of the build-up composite panel.

  20. Structural arrangement trade study. Volume 3: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Addendum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the third of a 3 volume set that addresses the structural trade study plan that will identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The most suitable Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Tank System (GCPS) composite materials for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. Vehicle resizing charts, selection criteria and back-up charts, parametric costing approach and the finite element method analysis are discussed.

  1. Structural arrangement trade study. Volume 3: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Addendum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-03-01

    This volume is the third of a 3 volume set that addresses the structural trade study plan that will identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The most suitable Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Tank System (GCPS) composite materials for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. Vehicle resizing charts, selection criteria and back-up charts, parametric costing approach and the finite element method analysis are discussed.

  2. Composition dependent thermal annealing behaviour of ion tracks in apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadzri, A.; Schauries, D.; Mota-Santiago, P.; Muradoglu, S.; Trautmann, C.; Gleadow, A. J. W.; Hawley, A.; Kluth, P.

    2016-07-01

    Natural apatite samples with different F/Cl content from a variety of geological locations (Durango, Mexico; Mud Tank, Australia; and Snarum, Norway) were irradiated with swift heavy ions to simulate fission tracks. The annealing kinetics of the resulting ion tracks was investigated using synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) combined with ex situ annealing. The activation energies for track recrystallization were extracted and consistent with previous studies using track-etching, tracks in the chlorine-rich Snarum apatite are more resistant to annealing than in the other compositions.

  3. Distributed multifunctional sensor network for composite structural state sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Xinlin P.; Wang, Yishou; Gao, Limin; Kumar, Amrita

    2012-04-01

    Advanced fiber reinforced composite materials are becoming the main structural materials of next generation of aircraft because of their high strength and stiffness to weight ratios, and strong designability. In order to take full advantages of composite materials, there is a need to develop an embeddable multifunctional sensing system to allow a structure to "feel" and "think" its structural state. In this paper, the concept of multifunctional sensor network integrated with a structure, similar to the human nervous system, has been developed. Different types of network sensors are permanently integrated within a composite structure to sense structural strain, temperature, moisture, aerodynamic pressure; monitor external impact on the structure; and detect structural damages. Utilizing this revolutionary concept, future composite structures can be designed and manufactured to provide multiple modes of information, so that the structures have the capabilities for intelligent sensing, environmental adaptation and multi-functionality. The challenges for building such a structural state sensing system and some solutions to address the challenges are also discussed in the paper.

  4. Fluid-Structure Interaction in a Fluid-Filled Composite Structure Subjected to Low Velocity Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    for creating an E-glass composite cubic structure and a pendulum was designed and built to provide a repeatable low velocity impact. The behavior of...structure and a pendulum was designed and built to provide a repeatable low velocity impact. The behavior of the composite structure was studied at various...SET-UP .......................................................31  1.  Impact Pendulum

  5. Investigation of composition dependence of the nanowire samples grown on brass on synthesis conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Himanshu; Khooha, Ajay; Singh, Ajit; Ganguli, Tapas

    2018-04-01

    The study of the growth of nanowires on α-brass (Cu 65%, Zn 35%) substrate was done by annealing the substrates at different temperatures in air and varying flow of moist nitrogen. It was found that the surface composition of oxidized brass depended on the synthesis condition. Angle Dependent X-ray Fluorescence (ADXRF) measurements of the oxidized brass samples were done to study the variation of composition with the synthesis conditions and depth. The results showed that the cause of the compositional dependence on synthesis parameters is due to a process, inherent to the oxidation of brass.

  6. Impact tests on fibrous composite sandwich structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M. D.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of low velocity impact on the strength of laminates fabricated from graphite/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy composite materials was studied. The test laminates were loaded statically either in uniaxial tension or compression when impact occurred to evaluate the effect of loading on the initiation of damage and/or failure. Typical aircraft service conditions such as runway debris encountered during landing were simulated by impacting 1.27-cm-diameter projectiles normal to the plane of the test laminates at velocities between 5.2 and 48.8 m/s.

  7. VARTM Process Modeling of Aerospace Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Xiao-Lan; Grimsley, Brian W.; Hubert, Pascal; Cano, Roberto J.; Loos, Alfred C.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional model was developed to simulate the VARTM composite manufacturing process. The model considers the two important mechanisms that occur during the process: resin flow, and compaction and relaxation of the preform. The model was used to simulate infiltration of a carbon preform with an epoxy resin by the VARTM process. The model predicted flow patterns and preform thickness changes agreed qualitatively with the measured values. However, the predicted total infiltration times were much longer than measured most likely due to the inaccurate preform permeability values used in the simulation.

  8. Quantitative diagnostics of multilayered composite structures with ultrasonic guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunget, Gheorghe; Friedersdorf, Fritz; Na, Jeong K.

    2015-03-01

    The main objective of the current work is to develop a practical nondestructive inspection methodology for a highly sound absorbing composite structural system consisting of polymeric and metallic materials. Due to constraints in geometrical shapes and thicknesses of the composite system used in this work, ultrasonic guided wave approach has been chosen. Since the polymer coatings have high damping properties, less energy is dissipated into the adjacent media in the presence of interface delaminations. Experimental measurements performed on a targeted composite system, whether it has an aluminum, carbon-fiber-composite, or steel outer casing, show promising results.

  9. Validity and factor structure of the bodybuilding dependence scale.

    PubMed

    Smith, D; Hale, B

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the factor structure, validity, and reliability of the bodybuilding dependence scale and to investigate differences in bodybuilding dependence between men and women and competitive and non-competitive bodybuilders. Seventy two male competitive bodybuilders, 63 female competitive bodybuilders, 87 male non-competitive bodybuilders, and 63 non-competitive female bodybuilders completed the bodybuilding dependence scale (BDS), the exercise dependence questionnaire (EDQ), and the muscle dysmorphia inventory (MDI). Confirmatory factor analysis of the BDS supported a three factor model of bodybuilding dependence, consisting of social dependence, training dependence, and mastery dependence (Q = 3.16, CFI = 0.98, SRMR = 0.04). Internal reliability of all three subscales was high (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92, 0.92, and 0.93 respectively). Significant (p<0.001) and moderate correlations were found between all BDS and MDI subscales, and between five of the eight EDQ subscales. A multivariate analysis of covariance, with univariate F tests and Tukey HSD tests, revealed that both male and female competitive bodybuilders scored significantly (p<0.05) higher on all three BDS subscales than the male and female non-competitive bodybuilders. However, there were no significant sex differences on any of the BDS subscales (p>0.05). The three factor BDS appears to be a reliable and valid measure of bodybuilding dependence. Symptoms of bodybuilding dependence are more prevalent in competitive bodybuilders than non-competitive ones, but there are no significant sex differences in bodybuilding dependence.

  10. Validity and factor structure of the bodybuilding dependence scale

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D; Hale, B

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the factor structure, validity, and reliability of the bodybuilding dependence scale and to investigate differences in bodybuilding dependence between men and women and competitive and non-competitive bodybuilders. Methods: Seventy two male competitive bodybuilders, 63 female competitive bodybuilders, 87 male non-competitive bodybuilders, and 63 non-competitive female bodybuilders completed the bodybuilding dependence scale (BDS), the exercise dependence questionnaire (EDQ), and the muscle dysmorphia inventory (MDI). Results: Confirmatory factor analysis of the BDS supported a three factor model of bodybuilding dependence, consisting of social dependence, training dependence, and mastery dependence (Q = 3.16, CFI = 0.98, SRMR = 0.04). Internal reliability of all three subscales was high (Cronbach's α = 0.92, 0.92, and 0.93 respectively). Significant (p<0.001) and moderate correlations were found between all BDS and MDI subscales, and between five of the eight EDQ subscales. A multivariate analysis of covariance, with univariate F tests and Tukey HSD tests, revealed that both male and female competitive bodybuilders scored significantly (p<0.05) higher on all three BDS subscales than the male and female non-competitive bodybuilders. However, there were no significant sex differences on any of the BDS subscales (p>0.05). Conclusion: The three factor BDS appears to be a reliable and valid measure of bodybuilding dependence. Symptoms of bodybuilding dependence are more prevalent in competitive bodybuilders than non-competitive ones, but there are no significant sex differences in bodybuilding dependence. PMID:15039255

  11. NASTRAN as an analytical research tool for composite mechanics and composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Selected examples are described in which NASTRAN is used as an analysis research tool for composite mechanics and for composite structural components. The examples were selected to illustrate the importance of using NASTRAN as an analysis tool in this rapidly advancing field.

  12. High Energy Wide Area Blunt Impact on Composite Aircraft Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeFrancisci, Gabriela K.

    The largest source of damage to commercial aircraft is caused by accidental contact with ground service equipment (GSE). The cylindrical bumper typically found on GSE distributes the impact load over a large contact area, possibly spanning multiple internal structural elements (frame bays) of a stiffened-skin fuselage. This type of impact can lead to damage that is widespread and difficult to detect visually. To address this problem, monolithic composite panels of various size and complexity have been modeled and tested quasi-statically and dynamically. The experimental observations have established that detectability is dependent on the impact location and immediately-adjacent internal structure of the panel, as well as the impactor geometry and total deformation of the panel. A methodology to model and predict damage caused by wide area blunt impact events was established, which was then applied to more general cases that were not tested in order to better understand the nature of this type of impact event and how it relates to the final damage state and visual detectability.

  13. Holistic Processing in the Composite Task Depends on Face Size.

    PubMed

    Ross, David A; Gauthier, Isabel

    Holistic processing is a hallmark of face processing. There is evidence that holistic processing is strongest for faces at identification distance, 2 - 10 meters from the observer. However, this evidence is based on tasks that have been little used in the literature and that are indirect measures of holistic processing. We use the composite task- a well validated and frequently used paradigm - to measure the effect of viewing distance on holistic processing. In line with previous work, we find a congruency x alignment effect that is strongest for faces that are close (2m equivalent distance) than for faces that are further away (24m equivalent distance). In contrast, the alignment effect for same trials, used by several authors to measure holistic processing, produced results that are difficult to interpret. We conclude that our results converge with previous findings providing more direct evidence for an effect of size on holistic processing.

  14. Holistic Processing in the Composite Task Depends on Face Size

    PubMed Central

    Ross, David A.; Gauthier, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Holistic processing is a hallmark of face processing. There is evidence that holistic processing is strongest for faces at identification distance, 2 – 10 meters from the observer. However, this evidence is based on tasks that have been little used in the literature and that are indirect measures of holistic processing. We use the composite task– a well validated and frequently used paradigm – to measure the effect of viewing distance on holistic processing. In line with previous work, we find a congruency x alignment effect that is strongest for faces that are close (2m equivalent distance) than for faces that are further away (24m equivalent distance). In contrast, the alignment effect for same trials, used by several authors to measure holistic processing, produced results that are difficult to interpret. We conclude that our results converge with previous findings providing more direct evidence for an effect of size on holistic processing. PMID:26500423

  15. Time-Dependent Environmental Behavior of Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    for Testing and Materiais, 1979, pp. 263- 281 . 9. F. . Crossman and D. L. Flaggs, "Dirnensional Stability of Composite Laminates during Environmental...191 92 133 2 19.3 3 9193) ( 281 ( :2) ( 40 3 (.h4 _ 372 (210) 1567 228 i ,14 125 6 18 2 3 (16) (2) (03) 4) 1) BASELINE TENSILE DATA MATERIAL T300/5208...JOC0n0K4ýLlC4,NC onocoo o-e (ooo 4 LnjCCNCotn . N.CCOOCCON W)T zwI NNr 1 .0 p m4 r,~UO Nfl -1CN 4-) J IntO f) L) O0 bOul L CO 0l tr T in O1’ 0I, ul fP 0OO-P

  16. Robustness of composite pulse sequences to time-dependent noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabytayev, Chingiz; Green, Todd J.; Khodjasteh, Kaveh; Viola, Lorenza; Biercuk, Michael J.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2014-03-01

    Quantum control protocols can minimize the effect of noise sources that reduce the quality of quantum operations. Originally developed for NMR, composite pulse sequences correct for unknown static control errors . We study these compensating pulses in the general case of time-varying Gaussian control noise using a filter-function approach and detailed numerics. Three different noise models were considered in this work: amplitude noise, detuning noise and simultaneous presence of both noises. Pulse sequences are shown to be robust to noise up to frequencies as high as ~10% of the Rabi frequency. Robustness of pulses designed for amplitude noise is explained using a geometric picture that naturally follows from filter function. We also discuss future directions including new pulses correcting for noise of certain frequency. True J. Merrill and Kenneth R. Brown. arXiv:1203.6392v1. In press Adv. Chem. Phys. (2013)

  17. In-service health monitoring of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, Gino A.; Ventres, C. S.; Ginty, Carol A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    The aerospace industry is witnessing a vast utilization of composites in critical structural applications and anticipates even more use of them in future aircraft. Therefore, a definite need exists for a composite health monitoring expert system to meet today's current needs and tomorrow's future demands. The primary goal for this conceptual health monitoring system is functional reliably for in-service operation in the environments of various composite structures. The underlying philosophy of this system is to utilize proven vibration techniques to assess the structural integrity of a fibrous composite. Statistical methods are used to determine if the variances in the measured data are acceptable for making a reliable decision on the health status of the composite. The flexible system allows for algorithms describing any composite fatigue or damage behavior characteristic to be provided as an input to the system. Alert thresholds and variances can also be provided as an input to this system and may be updated to allow for future changes/refinements in the composite's structural integrity behavior.

  18. Solar flare particles - Energy-dependent composition and relationship to solar composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, H. J.; Price, P. B.; Cartwright, B. G.; Sullivan, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Plastic and glass track detectors on rockets and Apollo spacecraft have been used to determine the composition of particles from He to Ni at energies from 0.1 to 50 MeV per nucleon in several solar flares of widely varying intensities. At low energies the composition of solar particles is enriched in heavy elements by an amount, relative to the asymptotic high-energy composition, that increases with atomic number from Z = 2 up to at least Z = 50, that decreases with energy, and that varies from flare to flare. At high energies (usually beyond an energy of 5 to 20 MeV per nucleon) the composition becomes independent of energy and, though somewhat variable from flare to flare, approximates the composition of the solar atmosphere. A table of abundances of the even-Z elements from He to Ni (plus N) in solar particles is constructed by averaging the asymptotic high-energy abundances in several flares.

  19. Quantification of uncertainties in the performance of smart composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    A composite wing with spars, bulkheads, and built-in control devices is evaluated using a method for the probabilistic assessment of smart composite structures. Structural responses (such as change in angle of attack, vertical displacements, and stresses in regular plies with traditional materials and in control plies with mixed traditional and actuation materials) are probabilistically assessed to quantify their respective scatter. Probabilistic sensitivity factors are computed to identify those parameters that have a significant influence on a specific structural response. Results show that the uncertainties in the responses of smart composite structures can be quantified. Responses such as structural deformation, ply stresses, frequencies, and buckling loads in the presence of defects can be reliably controlled to satisfy specified design requirements.

  20. Versatile Micromechanics Model for Multiscale Analysis of Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Y. W.; Park, M. S.

    2013-08-01

    A general-purpose micromechanics model was developed so that the model could be applied to various composite materials such as reinforced by particles, long fibers and short fibers as well as those containing micro voids. Additionally, the model can be used with hierarchical composite materials. The micromechanics model can be used to compute effective material properties like elastic moduli, shear moduli, Poisson's ratios, and coefficients of thermal expansion for the various composite materials. The model can also calculate the strains and stresses at the constituent material level such as fibers, particles, and whiskers from the composite level stresses and strains. The model was implemented into ABAQUS using the UMAT option for multiscale analysis. An extensive set of examples are presented to demonstrate the reliability and accuracy of the developed micromechanics model for different kinds of composite materials. Another set of examples is provided to study the multiscale analysis of composite structures.

  1. Modeling and characterization of dielectrophoretically structured piezoelectric composites using piezoceramic particle inclusions with high aspect ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Ende, D. A.; Maier, R. A.; van Neer, P. L. M. J.; van der Zwaag, S.; Randall, C. A.; Groen, W. A.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the piezoelectric properties at high electric fields of dielectrophoretically aligned PZT—polymer composites containing high aspect ratio particles (such as short fibers) are presented. Polarization and strain as a function of electric field are evaluated. The properties of the composites are compared to those of PZT-polymer composites with equiaxed particles, continuous PZT fiber-polymer composites, and bulk PZT ceramics. From high-field polarization and strain measurements, the effective field dependent permittivity and piezoelectric charge constant in the poling direction are determined for dielectrophoresis structured PZT-polymer composites, continuous PZT fiber-polymer composites, and bulk PZT ceramics. The changes in dielectric properties of the inclusions and the matrix at high fields influence the dielectric and piezoelectric properties of the composites. It is found that the permittivity and piezoelectric charge constants increase towards a maximum at an applied field of around 2.5-5 kV/mm. The electric field at which the maximum occurs depends on the aspect ratio and degree of alignment of the inclusions. Experimental values of d33 at low and high applied fields are compared to a model describing the composites as a continuous polymer matrix containing PZT particles of various aspect ratios arranged into chains. Thickness mode coupling factors were determined from measured impedance data using fitted equivalent circuit model simulations. The relatively high piezoelectric strain constants, voltage constants, and thickness coupling factors indicate that such aligned short fiber composites could be useful as flexible large area transducers.

  2. Large Composite Structures Processing Technologies for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Vickers, J. H.; McMahon, W. M.; Hulcher, A. B.; Johnston, N. J.; Cano, R. J.; Belvin, H. L.; McIver, K.; Franklin, W.; Sidwell, D.

    2001-01-01

    Significant efforts have been devoted to establishing the technology foundation to enable the progression to large scale composite structures fabrication. We are not capable today of fabricating many of the composite structures envisioned for the second generation reusable launch vehicle (RLV). Conventional 'aerospace' manufacturing and processing methodologies (fiber placement, autoclave, tooling) will require substantial investment and lead time to scale-up. Out-of-autoclave process techniques will require aggressive efforts to mature the selected technologies and to scale up. Focused composite processing technology development and demonstration programs utilizing the building block approach are required to enable envisioned second generation RLV large composite structures applications. Government/industry partnerships have demonstrated success in this area and represent best combination of skills and capabilities to achieve this goal.

  3. Composite S-layer lipid structures

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2010-01-01

    Designing and utilization of biomimetic membrane systems generated by bottom-up processes is a rapidly growing scientific and engineering field. Elucidation of the supramolecular construction principle of archaeal cell envelopes composed of S-layer stabilized lipid membranes led to new strategies for generating highly stable functional lipid membranes at meso- and macroscopic scale. In this review, we provide a state of the art survey how S-layer proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides may be used as basic building blocks for the assembly of S-layer supported lipid membranes. These biomimetic membrane systems are distinguished by a nanopatterned fluidity, enhanced stability and longevity and thus, provide a dedicated reconstitution matrix for membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins. Exciting areas for application of composite S-layer membrane systems concern sensor systems involving specific membrane functions. PMID:19303933

  4. On the Mechanical Behavior of Advanced Composite Material Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinson, Jack

    During the period between 1993 and 2004, the author, as well as some colleagues and graduate students, had the honor to be supported by the Office of Naval Research to conduct research in several aspects of the behavior of structures composed of composite materials. The topics involved in this research program were numerous, but all contributed to increasing the understanding of how various structures that are useful for marine applications behaved. More specifically, the research topics focused on the reaction of structures that were made of fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites when subjected to various loads and environmental conditions. This included the behavior of beam, plate/panel and shell structures. It involved studies that are applicable to fiberglass, graphite/carbon and Kevlar fibers imbedded in epoxy, polyester and other polymeric matrices. Unidirectional, cross-ply, angle ply, and woven composites were involved, both in laminated, monocoque as well as in sandwich constructions. Mid-plane symmetric as well as asymmetric laminates were studied, the latter involving bending-stretching coupling and other couplings that only can be achieved with advanced composite materials. The composite structures studied involved static loads, dynamic loading, shock loading as well as thermal and hygrothermal environments. One major consideration was determining the mechanical properties of composite materials subjected to high strain rates because the mechanical properties vary so significantly as the strain rate increases. A considerable number of references are cited for further reading and study for those interested.

  5. Microstructure Characterization Of Lead-Free Solders Depending On Alloy Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Iuliana; Mueller, Maik; Wolter, Klaus-Juergen

    2010-11-01

    Fatigue and crack nucleation in solder joints is basically associated with changes in the microstructure. Therefore the microstructure evolution of SnAgCu solder joints during solidification and subsequent application is an important subject for reliability investigations and physics of failure analysis. The scope of this study is a systematic overview of the as-cast microstructures in small sized lead-free SnAgCu solder spheres after solidification. A total of 32 alloy compositions have been investigated with varying Ag content from 0 to 5 wt.% and varying Cu content from 0 to 1.2 wt.%. The solder spheres had a diameter of approx. 270 μm and were all manufactured under the similar conditions. Subsequent cross-sectioning was carried out in order to analyze the microstructure by optical and electron microscopy as well as Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy. The results allow a comprehensive overview of the dependence of the as-cast microstructure on the solder composition. It is shown that strong changes in microstructure can be caused by small changes in solder composition. In addition, a solidification phenomenon known as cyclic twinning has been found in the samples. Three different microstructures related to that phenomenon will be presented and detailed characterizations of these structures are given in this study. These microstructures differ in their appearance by solidification morphology, phase distribution as well as grain structure and can be described as follows: 1. large dentritic areas of different grain orientations which are characterized by approx. 60° twin boundaries; 2. areas of small β-Sn cells with approx. 60° twin relation and larger intermetallic precipitates; 3. large grains consisting of a β-Sn matrix with very fine intermetallic precipitates and high angle grain boundaries between adjacent grains.

  6. Failure Analysis of Composite Structure Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-27

    cracking intersected the trailing edge of the skin at a radius for a runout of an overhanging tab. Extensive delamination was evident or each side of...structure with an abrasive cutoff wheel to minimize artifacts. Detailed crack mapping of the delamination surfaces was performed by optical microscopy

  7. The compositional similarity of urban forests among the world's cities is scale dependent

    Treesearch

    Jun Yang; Frank A. La Sorte; Petr Pysek; Pengbo Yan; David Nowak; Joe McBride

    2015-01-01

    Aim We examined species composition of urban forests from local to global scales using occurrence and abundance information to determine how compositional similarity is defined across spatial scales. We predicted that urban forests have become more homogeneous world-wide, which should result in minimal scale dependence that is more pronounced for non-native species,...

  8. Dependence of the structure and electronic state of SrFeO/sub x/ (2. 5 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 3) on composition and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, N.; Okita, T.; Nakayama, N.

    1988-03-01

    The system SrFeO/sub x/, 2.5 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 3, forms a continuous solid solution at temperatures T greater than or equal to T/sub t/(x), but a series of discrete ordered-vacancy phases SrFeO/sub 3-(1/n)/ (n = infinity, 8, 4, 2) below temperatures T/sub t/(n =8) = 523 K, T/sub t/(n = 4) = 598 K, and T/sub t/(n = 2) = 1103 K. The most probable vacancy-ordering schemes for Sr/sub 8/Fe/sub 8/O/sub 23/ (n = 8) and Sr/sub 4/Fe/sub 4/O/sub 11/ (n = 4) are proposed. Formation of fivefold-coordinated iron sites on eithermore » side of an oxygen vacancy is characteristic of both phases, which contrasts with Sr/sub 2/Fe/sub 2/O/sub 5/ (n = 2) where four-coordinated sites coexist with six-coordinated sites. The high-spin Fe/sup 4 +/(t/sub 2//sup 3/sigma*/sup 1/) configuration of SrFeO/sub 3/ (n = infinity) evolves as follows: (a) for x approx. 3, random vacancies trap Fe/sup 3 +/ ions at five-coordinated sites; (b) for n = 8, Fe/sup 4 +/ ions remain high spin, a localized-electron /sup 5/E/sub g/ configuration giving rise to a cooperative Jahn-Teller distortion with c/a less than or equal to 1 and a (220)/sub n8/ unique axis imposed by structural symmetry; fast Fe/sup 3 +/ + Fe/sup 4 +/ = Fe/sup 4 +/ + Fe/sup 3 +/ electron transfer occurs parallel to this axis at room temperature, but Fe/sup 3 +/ ions are ordered at five-coordinated sites at 4 K; (c) for n = 4, the octahedral-site Fe/sup 4 +/ ions have a low-spin t/sub 2//sup 4/ configuration with four near-neighbor Fe/sup 3 +/ ions in five-coordinated sites not making an Fe/sup 3 +/-O-Fe/sup 4 +/-O-Fe/sup 3 +/ linear chain as in n = 8. Oxygen-vacancy hopping times tau/sub h/ greater than or equal to 10/sup -8/ sec persist for 200 K above T/sub t/ in n = 2, and short-range ordering in this temperature interval is inferred. For n = 8 and n = 4, motional narrowing to single Moessbauer peak occurs within tens of degrees above T/sub t/, and this narrowing is assumed to reflect rapid electron

  9. Probabilistic Evaluation of Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the deterministic and probabilistic structural evaluation results of two structures made with advanced ceramic composites (CMC): internally pressurized tube and uniformly loaded flange. The deterministic structural evaluation includes stress, displacement, and buckling analyses. It is carried out using the finite element code MHOST, developed for the 3-D inelastic analysis of structures that are made with advanced materials. The probabilistic evaluation is performed using the integrated probabilistic assessment of composite structures computer code IPACS. The affects of uncertainties in primitive variables related to the material, fabrication process, and loadings on the material property and structural response behavior are quantified. The primitive variables considered are: thermo-mechanical properties of fiber and matrix, fiber and void volume ratios, use temperature, and pressure. The probabilistic structural analysis and probabilistic strength results are used by IPACS to perform reliability and risk evaluation of the two structures. The results will show that the sensitivity information obtained for the two composite structures from the computational simulation can be used to alter the design process to meet desired service requirements. In addition to detailed probabilistic analysis of the two structures, the following were performed specifically on the CMC tube: (1) predicted the failure load and the buckling load, (2) performed coupled non-deterministic multi-disciplinary structural analysis, and (3) demonstrated that probabilistic sensitivities can be used to select a reduced set of design variables for optimization.

  10. Fuzzy Modal Control Applied to Smart Composite Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroishi, E. H.; Faria, A. W.; Lara-Molina, F. A.; Steffen, V., Jr.

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes an active vibration control technique, which is based on Fuzzy Modal Control, as applied to a piezoelectric actuator bonded to a composite structure forming a so-called smart composite structure. Fuzzy Modal Controllers were found to be well adapted for controlling structures with nonlinear behavior, whose characteristics change considerably with respect to time. The smart composite structure was modelled by using a so called mixed theory. This theory uses a single equivalent layer for the discretization of the mechanical displacement field and a layerwise representation of the electrical field. Temperature effects are neglected. Due to numerical reasons it was necessary to reduce the size of the model of the smart composite structure so that the design of the controllers and the estimator could be performed. The role of the Kalman Estimator in the present contribution is to estimate the modal states of the system, which are used by the Fuzzy Modal controllers. Simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed vibration control methodology for composite structures.

  11. Community Composition and Ultrastructure of a Nitrate-Dependent Anaerobic Methane-Oxidizing Enrichment Culture.

    PubMed

    Gambelli, Lavinia; Guerrero-Cruz, Simon; Mesman, Rob J; Cremers, Geert; Jetten, Mike S M; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Kartal, Boran; Lueke, Claudia; van Niftrik, Laura

    2018-02-01

    Methane is a very potent greenhouse gas and can be oxidized aerobically or anaerobically through microbe-mediated processes, thus decreasing methane emissions in the atmosphere. Using a complementary array of methods, including phylogenetic analysis, physiological experiments, and light and electron microscopy techniques (including electron tomography), we investigated the community composition and ultrastructure of a continuous bioreactor enrichment culture, in which anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) was coupled to nitrate reduction. A membrane bioreactor was seeded with AOM biomass and continuously fed with excess methane. After 150 days, the bioreactor reached a daily consumption of 10 mmol nitrate · liter -1 · day -1 The biomass consisted of aggregates that were dominated by nitrate-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing " Candidatus Methanoperedens"-like archaea (40%) and nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing " Candidatus Methylomirabilis"-like bacteria (50%). The " Ca Methanoperedens" spp. were identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunogold localization of the methyl-coenzyme M reductase (Mcr) enzyme, which was located in the cytoplasm. The " Ca Methanoperedens" sp. aggregates consisted of slightly irregular coccoid cells (∼1.5-μm diameter) which produced extruding tubular structures and putative cell-to-cell contacts among each other. " Ca Methylomirabilis" sp. bacteria exhibited the polygonal cell shape typical of this genus. In AOM archaea and bacteria, cytochrome c proteins were localized in the cytoplasm and periplasm, respectively, by cytochrome staining. Our results indicate that AOM bacteria and archaea might work closely together in the process of anaerobic methane oxidation, as the bacteria depend on the archaea for nitrite. Future studies will be aimed at elucidating the function of the cell-to-cell interactions in nitrate-dependent AOM. IMPORTANCE Microorganisms performing nitrate- and nitrite-dependent anaerobic

  12. Nonlinear analysis for high-temperature multilayered fiber composite structures. M.S. Thesis; [turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A unique upward-integrated top-down-structured approach is presented for nonlinear analysis of high-temperature multilayered fiber composite structures. Based on this approach, a special purpose computer code was developed (nonlinear COBSTRAN) which is specifically tailored for the nonlinear analysis of tungsten-fiber-reinforced superalloy (TFRS) composite turbine blade/vane components of gas turbine engines. Special features of this computational capability include accounting of; micro- and macro-heterogeneity, nonlinear (stess-temperature-time dependent) and anisotropic material behavior, and fiber degradation. A demonstration problem is presented to mainfest the utility of the upward-integrated top-down-structured approach, in general, and to illustrate the present capability represented by the nonlinear COBSTRAN code. Preliminary results indicate that nonlinear COBSTRAN provides the means for relating the local nonlinear and anisotropic material behavior of the composite constituents to the global response of the turbine blade/vane structure.

  13. Open-Section Composite Structural Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, T. A.; Smith, C. A.; Raheb, S. J.; Nowitzky, A. M.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes investigation of manufacture and mechanical properties of graphite-fiber/aluminum-matrix open-section structural elements; e.g., channels and angle bars. Conducted with view toward using such elements to build lightweight, thermally stable truss structures in outer space. Other applications transport to, and assembly at, remote or otherwise uninviting locations. Advantages include shapes permitting high packing density during shipment, convenient paths for routing tubes, hoses, and cables; accessibility of both inner and outer surfaces for repair; and ease of attachment of additional hardware. Easier and require less equipment to fabricate, and more amenable to automated fabrication and assembly at remote site. Disadvantages, not as resistant to some kinds of deformation under load.

  14. Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure (UCPS) for In-Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Microcosm, Inc., in conjunction with the Scorpius Space Launch Company, is developing a UCPS (Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure )for in-space propulsion. This innovative approach constitutes a clean break from traditional spacecraft design by combining what were traditionally separate primary and secondary support structures and metal propellant tanks into a single unit.

  15. Thermally Conductive Structural 2D Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-14

    through-thickness thermal conductivity of up to 20 W/m.K. This novel structural prepreg material will be developed through engineering of an optimal fiber...with an EPON 862/Epikure W epoxy resin system to form unidirectional prepreg tapes. Each prepreg was then cut to 6 inch by 6 inch plies and...impregnated with an EPON 862/Epikure W epoxy resin system. The unidirectional prepreg tape was then cut into twelve 6 inch by 6 inch plies and

  16. Metal matrix composite structural panel construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcwithey, R. R.; Royster, D. M. (Inventor); Bales, T. T.

    1983-01-01

    Lightweight capped honeycomb stiffeners for use in fabricating metal or metal/matrix exterior structural panels on aerospace type vehicles and the process for fabricating same are disclosed. The stiffener stringers are formed in sheets, cut to the desired width and length and brazed in spaced relationship to a skin with the honeycomb material serving directly as the required lightweight stiffeners and not requiring separate metal encasement for the exposed honeycomb cells.

  17. Fluid Structure Interaction Effect on Sandwich Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    far back as ancient Egyptian times in the use of straw and bricks, or more recently in the last century with the use of steel rebar in concrete ...construction of sandwich composites; however, this particular material was selected for its uniform pattern and translucent qualities after it is wetted out...excellent fire retardant and corrosion resistant qualities making it a natural selection for shipboard applications. The same translucent qualities

  18. Survivability characteristics of composite compression structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, John G.; Allen, M. R.; Sawdy, D.; Avery, S.

    1990-01-01

    Test and evaluation was performed to determine the compression residual capability of graphite reinforced composite panels following perforation by high-velocity fragments representative of combat threats. Assessments were made of the size of the ballistic damage, the effect of applied compression load at impact, damage growth during cyclic loading and residual static strength. Several fiber/matrix systems were investigated including high-strain fibers, tough epoxies, and APC-2 thermoplastic. Additionally, several laminate configurations were evaluated including hard and soft laminates and the incorporation of buffer strips and stitching for improved damage resistance of tolerance. Both panels (12 x 20-inches) and full scale box-beam components were tested to assure scalability of results. The evaluation generally showed small differences in the responses of the material systems tested. The soft laminate configurations with concentrated reinforcement exhibited the highest residual strength. Ballistic damage did not grow or increase in severity as a result of cyclic loading, and the effects of applied load at impact were not significant under the conditions tested.

  19. Progressive Failure Analysis Methodology for Laminated Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.

    1999-01-01

    A progressive failure analysis method has been developed for predicting the failure of laminated composite structures under geometrically nonlinear deformations. The progressive failure analysis uses C(exp 1) shell elements based on classical lamination theory to calculate the in-plane stresses. Several failure criteria, including the maximum strain criterion, Hashin's criterion, and Christensen's criterion, are used to predict the failure mechanisms and several options are available to degrade the material properties after failures. The progressive failure analysis method is implemented in the COMET finite element analysis code and can predict the damage and response of laminated composite structures from initial loading to final failure. The different failure criteria and material degradation methods are compared and assessed by performing analyses of several laminated composite structures. Results from the progressive failure method indicate good correlation with the existing test data except in structural applications where interlaminar stresses are important which may cause failure mechanisms such as debonding or delaminations.

  20. Ink composition for making a conductive silver structure

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Steven B.; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    An ink composition for making a conductive silver structure comprises a silver salt and a complex of (a) a complexing agent and a short chain carboxylic acid or (b) a complexing agent and a salt of a short chain carboxylic acid, according to one embodiment. A method for making a silver structure entails combining a silver salt and a complexing agent, and then adding a short chain carboxylic acid or a salt of the short chain carboxylic acid to the combined silver salt and a complexing agent to form an ink composition. A concentration of the complexing agent in themore » ink composition is reduced to form a concentrated formulation, and the silver salt is reduced to form a conductive silver structure, where the concentrated formulation and the conductive silver structure are formed at a temperature of about 120.degree. C. or less.« less

  1. Impedance Based Detection of Delamination in Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djemana, M.; Hrairi, M.

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays commercial and military aircrafts are increasingly using composite materials to take advantage of their excellent specific strength and stiffness properties but impacts on composites due to bird-strike, hail-storm cause barely visible impact damage (BVID) that underscores the need for robust structural health monitoring methods. Hence, damage identification in composite materials is a widely researched area that has to deal with problems coming from the anisotropic nature of composites and the fact that much of the damage occurs beneath the top surface of the laminate. This paper focuses on understanding self-sensing piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) to conduct electromechanical impedance (EMI) in glass fibre reinforced polymer composite to perform structural health monitoring. With the aid of a 3D ANSYS finite element model, an analysis of different techniques for the detection of position and size of a delamination in a composite structure using piezoelectric patches had been performed. The real part of the impedance is used because it is known to be more reactive to damage or changes in the structure’s integrity and less sensitive to ambient temperature changes compared to the imaginary part. Comparison with experimental results is presented to validate the FE results. The experimental setup utilizes as its main apparatus an impedance analyser HP4194 that reads the in-situ EMI of PWAS bonded to the monitored composite structure. A good match between experimental and numerical results has been observed for low and high frequencies. The analysis in this paper provides necessary basis for delamination detection in composite structures using EMI technique

  2. In-situ poling and structurization of piezoelectric particulate composites.

    PubMed

    Khanbareh, H; van der Zwaag, S; Groen, W A

    2017-11-01

    Composites of lead zirconate titanate particles in an epoxy matrix are prepared in the form of 0-3 and quasi 1-3 with different ceramic volume contents from 10% to 50%. Two different processing routes are tested. Firstly a conventional dielectrophoretic structuring is used to induce a chain-like particle configuration, followed by curing the matrix and poling at a high temperature and under a high voltage. Secondly a simultaneous combination of dielectrophoresis and poling is applied at room temperature while the polymer is in the liquid state followed by subsequent curing. This new processing route is practiced in an uncured thermoset system while the polymer matrix still possess a relatively high electrical conductivity. Composites with different degrees of alignment are produced by altering the magnitude of the applied electric field. A significant improvement in piezoelectric properties of quasi 1-3 composites can be achieved by a combination of dielectrophoretic alignment of the ceramic particles and poling process. It has been observed that the degree of structuring as well as the functional properties of the in-situ structured and poled composites enhance significantly compared to those of the conventionally manufactured structured composites. Improving the alignment quality enhances the piezoelectric properties of the particulate composites.

  3. Energy Absorption Capacity in Natural Fiber Reinforcement Composites Structures

    PubMed Central

    López-Alba, Elías; Díaz, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    The study of natural fiber reinforcement composite structures has focused the attention of the automobile industry due to the new regulation in relation to the recyclability and the reusability of the materials preserving and/or improving the mechanical characteristics. The influence of different parameters on the material behavior of natural fiber reinforced plastic structures has been investigated, showing the potential for transport application in energy absorbing structures. Two different woven fabrics (twill and hopsack) made of flax fibers as well as a non-woven mat made of a mixture of hemp and kenaf fibers were employed as reinforcing materials. These reinforcing textiles were impregnated with both HD-PE (high-density polyethylen) and PLA (polylactic acid) matrix, using a continuous compression molding press. The impregnated semi-finished laminates (so-called organic sheets) were thermoformed in a second step to half-tubes that were assembled through vibration-welding process to cylindric crash absorbers. The specimens were loaded by compression to determine the specific energy absorption capacity. Quasi-static test results were compared to dynamic test data obtained on a catapult arrangement. The differences on the specific energies absorption (SEA) as a function of different parameters, such as the wall thickness, the weave material type, the reinforced textiles, and the matrix used, depending on the velocity rate application were quantified. In the case of quasi-static analysis it is observed a 20% increment in the SEA value when wove Hopsack fabric reinforcement is employed. No velocity rate influence from the material was observed on the SEA evaluation at higher speeds used to perform the experiments. The influence of the weave configuration (Hopsack) seems to be more stable against buckling effects at low loading rates with 10% higher SEA values. An increase of SEA level of up to 72% for PLA matrix was observed when compared with HD-PE matrix. PMID

  4. Energy Absorption Capacity in Natural Fiber Reinforcement Composites Structures.

    PubMed

    López-Alba, Elías; Schmeer, Sebastian; Díaz, Francisco

    2018-03-13

    The study of natural fiber reinforcement composite structures has focused the attention of the automobile industry due to the new regulation in relation to the recyclability and the reusability of the materials preserving and/or improving the mechanical characteristics. The influence of different parameters on the material behavior of natural fiber reinforced plastic structures has been investigated, showing the potential for transport application in energy absorbing structures. Two different woven fabrics (twill and hopsack) made of flax fibers as well as a non-woven mat made of a mixture of hemp and kenaf fibers were employed as reinforcing materials. These reinforcing textiles were impregnated with both HD-PE (high-density polyethylen) and PLA (polylactic acid) matrix, using a continuous compression molding press. The impregnated semi-finished laminates (so-called organic sheets) were thermoformed in a second step to half-tubes that were assembled through vibration-welding process to cylindric crash absorbers. The specimens were loaded by compression to determine the specific energy absorption capacity. Quasi-static test results were compared to dynamic test data obtained on a catapult arrangement. The differences on the specific energies absorption (SEA) as a function of different parameters, such as the wall thickness, the weave material type, the reinforced textiles, and the matrix used, depending on the velocity rate application were quantified. In the case of quasi-static analysis it is observed a 20% increment in the SEA value when wove Hopsack fabric reinforcement is employed. No velocity rate influence from the material was observed on the SEA evaluation at higher speeds used to perform the experiments. The influence of the weave configuration (Hopsack) seems to be more stable against buckling effects at low loading rates with 10% higher SEA values. An increase of SEA level of up to 72% for PLA matrix was observed when compared with HD-PE matrix.

  5. Transient Dynamic Response and Failure of Composite Structure Under Cyclic Loading with Fluid Structure Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    TERMS fluid structure interaction, composite structures shipbuilding, fatigue loading 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 85 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...under the three point bending test. All the composites exhibit an initial nonlinear and inelastic deformation trend and end with a catastrophic abrupt

  6. Temperature and humidity dependent performance of FBG-strain sensors embedded in carbon/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frövel, Malte; Carrión, Gabriel; Gutiérrez, César; Moravec, Carolina; Pintado, José María

    2009-03-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors, FBGSs, are very promising for Structural Health Monitoring, SHM, of aerospace vehicles due to their capacity to measure strain and temperature, their lightweight harnesses, their multiplexing capacities and their immunity to electromagnetic interferences, within others. They can be embedded in composite materials that are increasingly forming an important part of aerospace structures. The use of embedded FBGSs for SHM purposes is advantageous, but their response under all operative environmental conditions of an aerospace structure must be well understood for the necessary flight certification of these sensors. This paper describes the first steps ahead for a possible in future flight certification of FBGSs embedded in carbon fiber reinforced plastics, CFRP. The investigation work was focused on the validation of the dependence of the FBGS's strain sensitivity in tensile and compression load, in dry and humid condition and in a temperature range from -150°C to 120°C. The test conditions try to simulate the in service temperature and humidity range and static load condition of military aircraft. FBGSs with acrylic and with polyimide coating have been tested. The FBGSs are embedded in both, unidirectional and quasi isotropic carbon/epoxy composite material namely M21/T800 and also MTM-45-1/IM7. Conventional extensometers and strain gages have been used as reference strain sensors. The performed tests show an influence of the testing temperatures, the dry or wet specimen condition, the load direction and the coating material on the sensor strain sensitivity that should be taken into account when using these sensors.

  7. Versatile hydrothermal synthesis of one-dimensional composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yonglan

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we report on a versatile hydrothermal approach developed to fabricate one-dimensional (1D) composite structures. Sulfur and selenium formed liquid and adsorbed onto microrods as droplets and subsequently reacted with metallic ion in solution to produce nanoparticles-decorated composite microrods. 1D composites including ZnO/CdS, ZnO/MnS, ZnO/CuS, ZnO/CdSe, and FeOOH/CdS were successfully made using this hydrothermal strategy and the growth mechanism was also discussed. This hydrothermal strategy is simple and green, and can be extended to the synthesis of various 1D composite structures. Moreover, the interaction between the shell nanoparticles and the one-dimensional nanomaterials were confirmed by photoluminescence investigation of ZnO/CdS.

  8. A procedure for utilization of a damage-dependent constitutive model for laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, David C.; Allen, David H.; Harris, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the procedure for utilizing a damage constitutive model to predict progressive damage growth in laminated composites. In this model, the effects of the internal damage are represented by strain-like second order tensorial damage variables and enter the analysis through damage dependent ply level and laminate level constitutive equations. The growth of matrix cracks due to fatigue loading is predicted by an experimentally based damage evolutionary relationship. This model is incorporated into a computer code called FLAMSTR. This code is capable of predicting the constitutive response and matrix crack damage accumulation in fatigue loaded laminated composites. The structure and usage of FLAMSTR are presented along with sample input and output files to assist the code user. As an example problem, an analysis of crossply laminates subjected to two stage fatigue loading was conducted and the resulting damage accumulation and stress redistribution were examined to determine the effect of variations in fatigue load amplitude applied during the first stage of the load history. It was found that the model predicts a significant loading history effect on damage evolution.

  9. Mechanical strength of multicomponent reinforced composite structures at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumaevskii, A. V.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Kolubae, E. A.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Filippov, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    The paper studies mechanical properties and fractography of composite structure components after tensile testing at 20, +120 and -120°C. Both tensile strength and elasticity modulus of composite samples were shown to be independent of stress concentrators in the form of ribs. On the contrary, the tensile test at high and low temperatures had notable detrimental effect of mechanical characteristics of the samples with ribs as compared to those of the rib-free samples.

  10. Complex refractive index of Martian dust - Wavelength dependence and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, K.; Ajello, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    The size distribution and complex refractive index of Martian dust-cloud particles observed in 1971 with the Mariner 9 UV spectrometer are determined by matching the observed single-scattering albedo and phase function with Mie-scattering calculations for size distributions of spheres. Values of phase function times single-scattering albedo are presented for 12 wavelength intervals in the range from 190 to 350 nm, and best-fit values are obtained for the absorption index. It is found that the absorption index of the dust particles increases with decreasing wavelength from 350 to about 210 nm and then drops off shortward of 210 nm, with a structural shoulder occurring in the absorption spectrum between 240 and 250 nm. A search for a candidate material that can explain the strong UV absorption yields TiO2, whose anatase polymorph has an absorption spectrum matching that of the Martian dust. The TiO2 content of the dust particles is estimated to be a few percent or less.

  11. Structural Arrangement Trade Study. Volume 1: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the first of a three volume set that discusses the structural arrangement trade study plan that will identify the most suitable configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Primary Structures most suitable for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. This executive summary presents the trade study process, the selection process, requirements used, analysis performed and data generated. Conclusions and recommendations are also presented.

  12. Structural Arrangement Trade Study. Volume 1: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-03-01

    This volume is the first of a three volume set that discusses the structural arrangement trade study plan that will identify the most suitable configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Primary Structures most suitable for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. This executive summary presents the trade study process, the selection process, requirements used, analysis performed and data generated. Conclusions and recommendations are also presented.

  13. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-06-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  14. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  15. Ceramics and composites for rocket engines and space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhya, Kamleshwar

    1992-05-01

    The use of ceramic and other nonmetallic composites is considered for engine and structural elements of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), the Space Shuttle, and space stations. Attention is given to the application of refractory composites with protective coatings for oxidation and hydrogen contamination to the NASP to address the high-temperature environments the vehicle is expected to encounter. Existing applications of metal-matrix composite struts and Gr-Ep cargo-bay doors on the Space Shuttle are reviewed, and the need for more data on the service life and failure modes of the materials is identified.

  16. On stress-state optimization in steel-concrete composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauns, J.; Skadins, U.

    2017-10-01

    The plastic resistance of a concrete-filled column commonly is given as a sum of the components and taking into account the effect of confinement. The stress state in a composite column is determined by taking into account the non-linear relationship of modulus of elasticity and Poisson’s ratio on the stress level in the concrete core. The effect of confinement occurs at a high stress level when structural steel acts in tension and concrete in lateral compression. The stress state of a composite beam is determined taking into account non-linear dependence on the position of neutral axis. In order to improve the stress state of a composite element and increase the safety of the construction the appropriate strength of steel and concrete has to be applied. The safety of high-stressed composite structures can be achieved by using high-performance concrete (HPC). In this study stress analysis of the composite column and beam is performed with the purpose of obtaining the maximum load-bearing capacity and enhance the safety of the structure by using components with the appropriate strength and by taking into account the composite action. The effect of HPC on the stress state and load carrying capacity of composite elements is analysed.

  17. Probabilistic and structural reliability analysis of laminated composite structures based on the IPACS code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, Larry; Buttitta, Claudio; Suarez, James

    1993-01-01

    Probabilistic predictions based on the Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures (IPACS) code are presented for the material and structural response of unnotched and notched, 1M6/3501-6 Gr/Ep laminates. Comparisons of predicted and measured modulus and strength distributions are given for unnotched unidirectional, cross-ply, and quasi-isotropic laminates. The predicted modulus distributions were found to correlate well with the test results for all three unnotched laminates. Correlations of strength distributions for the unnotched laminates are judged good for the unidirectional laminate and fair for the cross-ply laminate, whereas the strength correlation for the quasi-isotropic laminate is deficient because IPACS did not yet have a progressive failure capability. The paper also presents probabilistic and structural reliability analysis predictions for the strain concentration factor (SCF) for an open-hole, quasi-isotropic laminate subjected to longitudinal tension. A special procedure was developed to adapt IPACS for the structural reliability analysis. The reliability results show the importance of identifying the most significant random variables upon which the SCF depends, and of having accurate scatter values for these variables.

  18. Self-assembled hierarchically structured organic-inorganic composite systems.

    PubMed

    Tritschler, Ulrich; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-05-13

    Designing bio-inspired, multifunctional organic-inorganic composite materials is one of the most popular current research objectives. Due to the high complexity of biocomposite structures found in nacre and bone, for example, a one-pot scalable and versatile synthesis approach addressing structural key features of biominerals and affording bio-inspired, multifunctional organic-inorganic composites with advanced physical properties is highly challenging. This article reviews recent progress in synthesizing organic-inorganic composite materials via various self-assembly techniques and in this context highlights a recently developed bio-inspired synthesis concept for the fabrication of hierarchically structured, organic-inorganic composite materials. This one-step self-organization concept based on simultaneous liquid crystal formation of anisotropic inorganic nanoparticles and a functional liquid crystalline polymer turned out to be simple, fast, scalable and versatile, leading to various (multi-)functional composite materials, which exhibit hierarchical structuring over several length scales. Consequently, this synthesis approach is relevant for further progress and scientific breakthrough in the research field of bio-inspired and biomimetic materials.

  19. Jovian deep magnetotail composition and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, D. J.; Allegrini, F.; Bagenal, F.; Ebert, R. W.; Elliott, H. A.; Nicolaou, G.; Szalay, J. R.; Valek, P.; Weidner, S.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze plasma ion observations from the Solar Wind Around Pluto instrument on New Horizons as it traveled back through the dusk flank of the Jovian magnetotail from 600 to more than 2500 Jovian radii behind the planet. We find that at all distances, light ions (mostly protons) dominate the heavy ions (S++ and O+) that are far more abundant in the near Jupiter plasma disk and that were expected to be the primary ions filling the Jovian magnetotail. This key new observation might indicate that heavy ions are confined closer to the equator than the spacecraft trajectory or a substantial addition of light ions via reconnection and/or mixing along the magnetopause boundary. However, because we find no evidence for acceleration of the tail plasma with distance, a more likely explanation seems to be that the heavy ions are preferentially released down the dawn flank of the magnetotail. Perhaps, this occurs as a part of the process where flux tubes, after expanding as they rotate across the near-tail region, need to pull back inward in order to fit within the dawnside of the magnetopause. A second major finding of this study is that there are two dominant periods of the plasma structures in the Jovian magnetotail: 3.53 (0.18 full width at half maximum (FWHM)) and 5.35 (0.38 FWHM) days. Remarkably, the first of these is identical within the errors to Europa's orbital period (3.55 days). Both of these results should provide important new fodder for Jovian magnetospheric theories and lead to a better understanding of Jupiter's magnetosphere.

  20. Uniform circular array for structural health monitoring of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz; Engholm, Marcus

    2008-03-01

    Phased array with all-azimuth angle coverage would be extremely useful in structural health monitoring (SHM) of planar structures. One method to achieve the 360° coverage is to use uniform circular arrays (UCAs). In this paper we present the concept of UCA adapted for SHM applications. We start from a brief presentation of UCA beamformers based on the principle of phase mode excitation. UCA performance is illustrated by the results of beamformer simulations performed for the narrowband and wideband ultrasonic signals. Preliminary experimental results obtained with UCA used for the reception of ultrasonic signals propagating in an aluminum plate are also presented.

  1. Nanotechnologies for Composite Structures- From Nanocomposites to Multifunctional Nano-Enabled Fibre Reinforced Composites for Spacecrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, Vassilis; Vavouliotis, Antonios; Baltopoulos, Athanasios; Sotiririadis, George; Masouras, Athanasios; Pambaguian, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    The past decade, extensive efforts have been invested in understanding the nano-scale and revealing the capabilities offered by nanotechnology products to structural materials. Nevertheless, a major issue faced lately more seriously due to the interest of industry is on how to incorporate these nano-species into the final composite structure through existing manufacturing processes and infrastructure. In this work, we present the experience obtained from the latest nanotechnology research activities supported by ESA. The paper focuses on prepreg composite manufacturing technology and addresses:- Approaches for nano-enabling of composites- Up-scaling strategies towards final structures- Latest results on performance of nano-enabledfiber reinforced compositesSeveral approaches for the utilization of nanotechnology products in structural composite structures have been proposed and are reviewed, in short along with respective achieved results. A variety of nano-fillers has been proposed and employed, individually or in combination in hybrid forms, to approach the desired performance. A major part of the work deals with the up-scaling routes of these technologies to reach final products and industrial scales and processes while meeting end-user performance.

  2. Thermal expansion of composites: Methods and results. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, D. E.; Tenney, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    The factors controlling the dimensional stability of various components of large space structures were investigated. Cyclic, thermal and mechanical loading were identified as the primary controlling factors of the dimensional stability of cables. For organic matrix composites, such as graphite-epoxy, it was found that these factors include moisture desorption in the space environment, thermal expansion as the structure moves from the sunlight to shadow in its orbit, mechanical loading, and microyielding of the material caused by microcracking of the matrix material. The major focus was placed on the thermal expansion of composites and in particular the development and testing of a method for its measurement.

  3. High efficiency tantalum-based ceramic composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A. (Inventor); Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); DiFiore, Robert R. (Inventor); Katvala, Victor W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Tantalum-based ceramics are suitable for use in thermal protection systems. These composite structures have high efficiency surfaces (low catalytic efficiency and high emittance), thereby reducing heat flux to a spacecraft during planetary re-entry. These ceramics contain tantalum disilicide, molybdenum disilicide and borosilicate glass. The components are milled, along with a processing aid, then applied to a surface of a porous substrate, such as a fibrous silica or carbon substrate. Following application, the coating is then sintered on the substrate. The composite structure is substantially impervious to hot gas penetration and capable of surviving high heat fluxes at temperatures approaching 3000.degree. F. and above.

  4. Failure mechanisms in energy-absorbing composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Alastair F.; David, Matthew

    2010-11-01

    Quasi-static tests are described for determination of the energy-absorption properties of composite crash energy-absorbing segment elements under axial loads. Detailed computer tomography scans of failed specimens were used to identify local compression crush failure mechanisms at the crush front. These mechanisms are important for selecting composite materials for energy-absorbing structures, such as helicopter and aircraft sub-floors. Finite element models of the failure processes are described that could be the basis for materials selection and future design procedures for crashworthy structures.

  5. Fracture mechanisms and fracture control in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wone-Chul

    Four basic failure modes--delamination, delamination buckling of composite sandwich panels, first-ply failure in cross-ply laminates, and compression failure--are analyzed using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and the J-integral method. Structural failures, including those at the micromechanical level, are investigated with the aid of the models developed, and the critical strains for crack propagation for each mode are obtained. In the structural fracture analyses area, the fracture control schemes for delamination in a composite rib stiffener and delamination buckling in composite sandwich panels subjected to in-plane compression are determined. The critical fracture strains were predicted with the aid of LEFM for delamination and the J-integral method for delamination buckling. The use of toughened matrix systems has been recommended for improved damage tolerant design for delamination crack propagation. An experimental study was conducted to determine the onset of delamination buckling in composite sandwich panel containing flaws. The critical fracture loads computed using the proposed theoretical model and a numerical computational scheme closely followed the experimental measurements made on sandwich panel specimens of graphite/epoxy faceskins and aluminum honeycomb core with varying faceskin thicknesses and core sizes. Micromechanical models of fracture in composites are explored to predict transverse cracking of cross-ply laminates and compression fracture of unidirectional composites. A modified shear lag model which takes into account the important role of interlaminar shear zones between the 0 degree and 90 degree piles in cross-ply laminate is proposed and criteria for transverse cracking have been developed. For compressive failure of unidirectional composites, pre-existing defects play an important role. Using anisotropic elasticity, the stress state around a defect under a remotely applied compressive load is obtained. The experimentally

  6. Development of Textile Reinforced Composites for Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson

    1998-01-01

    NASA has been a leader in development of composite materials for aircraft applications during the past 25 years. In the early 1980's NASA and others conducted research to improve damage tolerance of composite structures through the use of toughened resins but these resins were not cost-effective. The aircraft industry wanted affordable, robust structures that could withstand the rigors of flight service with minimal damage. The cost and damage tolerance barriers of conventional laminated composites led NASA to focus on new concepts in composites which would incorporate the automated manufacturing methods of the textiles industry and which would incorporate through-the-thickness reinforcements. The NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program provided the resources to extensively investigate the application of textile processes to next generation aircraft wing and fuselage structures. This paper discusses advanced textile material forms that have been developed, innovative machine concepts and key technology advancements required for future application of textile reinforced composites in commercial transport aircraft. Multiaxial warp knitting, triaxial braiding and through-the-thickness stitching are the three textile processes that have surfaced as the most promising for further development. Textile reinforced composite structural elements that have been developed in the NASA ACT Program are discussed. Included are braided fuselage frames and window-belt reinforcements, woven/stitched lower fuselage side panels, stitched multiaxial warp knit wing skins, and braided wing stiffeners. In addition, low-cost processing concepts such as resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI), and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are discussed. Process modeling concepts to predict resin flow and cure in textile preforms are also discussed.

  7. Controlling temperature dependence of silicon waveguide using slot structure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Moo; Kim, Duk-Jun; Kim, Gwan-Ha; Kwon, O-Kyun; Kim, Kap-Joong; Kim, Gyungock

    2008-02-04

    We show that the temperature dependence of a silicon waveguide can be controlled well by using a slot waveguide structure filled with a polymer material. Without a slot, the amount of temperature-dependent wavelength shift for TE mode of a silicon waveguide ring resonator is very slightly reduced from 77 pm/ degrees C to 66 pm/ degrees C by using a polymer (WIR30-490) upper cladding instead of air upper cladding. With a slot filled with the same polymer, however, the reduction of the temperature dependence is improved by a pronounced amount and can be controlled down to -2 pm/ degrees C by adjusting several variables of the slot structure, such as the width of the slot between the pair of silicon wires, the width of the silicon wire pair, and the height of the silicon slab in our experiment. This measurement proves that a reduction in temperature dependence can be improved about 8 times more by using the slot structure.

  8. Brain structural connectivity and context-dependent extinction memory.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Andrea; Stark, Rudolf; Blecker, Carlo R; Milad, Mohammed R; Merz, Christian J

    2017-08-01

    Extinction of conditioned fear represents an important mechanism in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Return of fear after successful extinction or exposure therapy in patients with anxiety disorders might be linked to poor temporal or contextual generalization of extinction due to individual differences in brain structural connectivity. The goal of this magnetic resonance imaging study was therefore to investigate the association of context-dependent extinction recall with brain structural connectivity. Diffusion-tensor imaging was used to determine the fractional anisotropy as a measure of white matter structural integrity of fiber tracts connecting central brain regions of the fear and extinction circuit (uncinate fasciculus, cingulum). Forty-five healthy men participated in a two-day fear conditioning experiment with fear acquisition in context A and extinction learning in context B on the first day. Extinction recall in the extinction context as well as renewal in the acquisition context and a novel context C took place one day later. Renewal of conditioned fear (skin conductance responses) in the acquisition context was associated with higher structural integrity of the hippocampal part of the cingulum. Enhanced structural integrity of the cingulum might be related to stronger hippocampal modulation of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, a region important for modulating conditioned fear output by excitatory projections to the amygdala. This finding underpins the crucial role of individual differences in the structural integrity of relevant fiber tracts for context-dependent extinction recall and return of fear after exposure therapy in anxiety disorders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Temporal Dependency and the Structure of Early Looking.

    PubMed

    Messinger, Daniel S; Mattson, Whitney I; Todd, James Torrence; Gangi, Devon N; Myers, Nicholas D; Bahrick, Lorraine E

    2017-01-01

    Although looking time is used to assess infant perceptual and cognitive processing, little is known about the temporal structure of infant looking. To shed light on this temporal structure, 127 three-month-olds were assessed in an infant-controlled habituation procedure and presented with a pre-recorded display of a woman addressing the infant using infant-directed speech. Previous individual look durations positively predicted subsequent look durations over a six look window, suggesting a temporal dependency between successive infant looks. The previous look duration continued to predict the subsequent look duration after accounting for habituation-linked declines in look duration, and when looks were separated by an inter-trial interval in which no stimulus was displayed. Individual differences in temporal dependency, the strength of associations between consecutive look durations, are distinct from individual differences in mean infant look duration. Nevertheless, infants with stronger temporal dependency had briefer mean look durations, a potential index of stimulus processing. Temporal dependency was evident not only between individual infant looks but between the durations of successive habituation trials (total looking within a trial). Finally, temporal dependency was evident in associations between the last look at the habituation stimulus and the first look at a novel test stimulus. Thus temporal dependency was evident across multiple timescales (individual looks and trials comprised of multiple individual looks) and persisted across conditions including brief periods of no stimulus presentation and changes from a familiar to novel stimulus. Associations between consecutive look durations over multiple timescales and stimuli suggest a temporal structure of infant attention that has been largely ignored in previous work on infant looking.

  10. Temporal Dependency and the Structure of Early Looking

    PubMed Central

    Messinger, Daniel S.; Mattson, Whitney I.; Todd, James Torrence; Gangi, Devon N.; Myers, Nicholas D.; Bahrick, Lorraine E.

    2017-01-01

    Although looking time is used to assess infant perceptual and cognitive processing, little is known about the temporal structure of infant looking. To shed light on this temporal structure, 127 three-month-olds were assessed in an infant-controlled habituation procedure and presented with a pre-recorded display of a woman addressing the infant using infant-directed speech. Previous individual look durations positively predicted subsequent look durations over a six look window, suggesting a temporal dependency between successive infant looks. The previous look duration continued to predict the subsequent look duration after accounting for habituation-linked declines in look duration, and when looks were separated by an inter-trial interval in which no stimulus was displayed. Individual differences in temporal dependency, the strength of associations between consecutive look durations, are distinct from individual differences in mean infant look duration. Nevertheless, infants with stronger temporal dependency had briefer mean look durations, a potential index of stimulus processing. Temporal dependency was evident not only between individual infant looks but between the durations of successive habituation trials (total looking within a trial). Finally, temporal dependency was evident in associations between the last look at the habituation stimulus and the first look at a novel test stimulus. Thus temporal dependency was evident across multiple timescales (individual looks and trials comprised of multiple individual looks) and persisted across conditions including brief periods of no stimulus presentation and changes from a familiar to novel stimulus. Associations between consecutive look durations over multiple timescales and stimuli suggest a temporal structure of infant attention that has been largely ignored in previous work on infant looking. PMID:28076362

  11. Composite Structure Modeling and Analysis of Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Sorokach, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project and the Boeing Company are collabrating to advance the unitized damage arresting composite airframe technology with application to the Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft. The testing of a HWB fuselage section with Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) construction is presently being conducted at NASA Langley. Based on lessons learned from previous HWB structural design studies, improved finite-element models (FEM) of the HWB multi-bay and bulkhead assembly are developed to evaluate the performance of the PRSEUS construction. In order to assess the comparative weight reduction benefits of the PRSEUS technology, conventional cylindrical skin-stringer-frame models of a cylindrical and a double-bubble section fuselage concepts are developed. Stress analysis with design cabin-pressure load and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement in each case. Alternate analysis with stitched composite hat-stringers and C-frames are also presented, in addition to the foam-core sandwich frame and pultruded rod-stringer construction. The FEM structural stress, strain and weights are computed and compared for relative weight/strength benefit assessment. The structural analysis and specific weight comparison of these stitched composite advanced aircraft fuselage concepts demonstrated that the pressurized HWB fuselage section assembly can be structurally as efficient as the conventional cylindrical fuselage section with composite stringer-frame and PRSEUS construction, and significantly better than the conventional aluminum construction and the double-bubble section concept.

  12. Synthesis, structure and antimicrobial property of green composites from cellulose, wool, hair and chicken feather.

    PubMed

    Tran, Chieu D; Prosenc, Franja; Franko, Mladen; Benzi, Gerald

    2016-10-20

    Novel composites between cellulose (CEL) and keratin (KER) from three different sources (wool, hair and chicken feather) were successfully synthesized in a simple one-step process in which butylmethylimidazolium chloride (BMIm(+)Cl(-)), an ionic liquid, was used as the sole solvent. The method is green and recyclable because [BMIm(+)Cl(-)] used was recovered for reuse. Spectroscopy (FTIR, XRD) and imaging (SEM) results confirm that CEL and KER remain chemically intact and homogeneously distributed in the composites. KER retains some of its secondary structure in the composites. Interestingly, the minor differences in the structure of KER in wool, hair and feather produced pronounced differences in the conformation of their corresponding composites with wool has the highest α-helix content and feather has the lowest content. These results correlate well with mechanical and antimicrobial properties of the composites. Specifically, adding CEL into KER substantially improves mechanical strength of [CEL+KER] composites made from all three different sources, wool, hair and chicken feathers i.e., [CEL+wool], [CEL+hair] and [CEL+feather]. Since mechanical strength is due to CEL, and CEL has only random structure, [CEL+feather] has, expectedly, the strongest mechanical property because feather has the lowest content of α-helix. Conversely, [CEL+wool] composite has the weakest mechanical strength because wool has the highest α-helix content. All three composites exhibit antibacterial activity against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The antibacterial property is due not to CEL but to the protein and strongly depends on the type of the keratin, namely, the bactericidal effect is strongest for feather and weakest for wool. These results together with our previous finding that [CEL+KER] composites can control release of drug such as ciprofloxacin clearly indicate that these composites can potentially be used as wound dressing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  13. Synthesis, Structure and Antimicrobial Property of Green Composites from Cellulose, Wool, Hair and Chicken Feather

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Chieu D.; Prosenc, Franja; Franko, Mladen; Benzi, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Novel composites between cellulose (CEL) and keratin (KER) from three different sources (wool, hair and chicken feather) were successfully synthesized in a simple one-step process in which butylmethylimidazolium chloride (BMIm+Cl−), an ionic liquid, was used as the sole solvent. The method is green and recyclable because [BMIm+Cl−] used was recovered for reuse. Spectroscopy (FTIR, XRD) and imaging (SEM) results confirm that CEL and KER remain chemically intact and homogeneously distributed in the composites. KER retains some of its secondary structure in the composites. Interestingly, the minor differences in the structure of KER in wool, hair and feather produced pronounced differences in the conformation of their corresponding composites with wool has the highest α-helix content and feather has the lowest content. These results correlate well with mechanical and antimicrobial properties of the composites. Specifically, adding CEL into KER substantially improves mechanical strength of [CEL+KER] composites made from all three different sources, wool, hair and chicken feathers (i.e., [CEL+wool], [CEL+hair] and [CEL+feather]. Since mechanical strength is due to CEL, and CEL has only random structure, [CEL+feather] has, expectedly, the strongest mechanical property because feather has the lowest content of α-helix. Conversely, [CEL+wool] composite has the weakest mechanical strength because wool has the highest α-helix content. All three composites exhibit antibacterial activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The antibacterial property is due not to CEL but to the protein and strongly depends on the type of the keratin, namely, the bactericidal effect is strongest for feather and weakest for wool. These results together with our previous finding that [CEL+KER] composites can control release of drug such as ciprofloxacin clearly indicate that these composites can potentially be used as wound dressing PMID:27474680

  14. Shoulder pain and time dependent structure in wheelchair propulsion variability

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Chandrasekaran; Moon, Yaejin; Sosnoff, Jacob J.

    2016-01-01

    Manual wheelchair propulsion places considerable repetitive mechanical strain on the upper limbs leading to shoulder injury and pain. While recent research indicates that the amount of variability in wheelchair propulsion and shoulder pain may be related. There has been minimal inquiry into the fluctuation over time (i.e. time-dependent structure) in wheelchair propulsion variability. Consequently the purpose of this investigation was to examine if the time-dependent structure in the wheelchair propulsion parameters are related to shoulder pain. 27 experienced wheelchair users manually propelled their own wheelchair fitted with a SMARTWheel on a roller at 1.1 m/s for 3 minutes. Time-dependent structure of cycle-to-cycle fluctuations in contact angle and inter push time interval was quantified using sample entropy (SampEn) and compared between the groups with/without shoulder pain using non-parametric statistics. Overall findings were, (1) variability observed in contact angle fluctuations during manual wheelchair propulsion is structured (Z=3.15;p<0.05), (2) individuals with shoulder pain exhibited higher SampEn magnitude for contact angle during wheelchair propulsion than those without pain (χ2(1)=6.12;p<0.05); and (3) SampEn of contact angle correlated significantly with self-reported shoulder pain (rs (WUSPI) =0.41;rs (VAS)=0.56;p<0.05). It was concluded that the time-dependent structure in wheelchair propulsion may provide novel information for tracking and monitoring shoulder pain. PMID:27134151

  15. Shoulder pain and time dependent structure in wheelchair propulsion variability.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Chandrasekaran; Moon, Yaejin; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2016-07-01

    Manual wheelchair propulsion places considerable repetitive mechanical strain on the upper limbs leading to shoulder injury and pain. While recent research indicates that the amount of variability in wheelchair propulsion and shoulder pain may be related. There has been minimal inquiry into the fluctuation over time (i.e. time-dependent structure) in wheelchair propulsion variability. Consequently the purpose of this investigation was to examine if the time-dependent structure in the wheelchair propulsion parameters are related to shoulder pain. 27 experienced wheelchair users manually propelled their own wheelchair fitted with a SMARTWheel on a roller at 1.1m/s for 3min. Time-dependent structure of cycle-to-cycle fluctuations in contact angle and inter push time interval was quantified using sample entropy (SampEn) and compared between the groups with/without shoulder pain using non-parametric statistics. Overall findings were, (1) variability observed in contact angle fluctuations during manual wheelchair propulsion is structured (Z=3.15;p<0.05), (2) individuals with shoulder pain exhibited higher SampEn magnitude for contact angle during wheelchair propulsion than those without pain (χ(2)(1)=6.12;p<0.05); and (3) SampEn of contact angle correlated significantly with self-reported shoulder pain (rs (WUSPI) =0.41;rs (VAS)=0.56;p<0.05). It was concluded that the time-dependent structure in wheelchair propulsion may provide novel information for tracking and monitoring shoulder pain. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-learning health monitoring algorithm in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; Iannone, Michele; Califano, America; D'Amore, Alberto

    2018-02-01

    The paper describes a system that it is able of monitoring the health state of a composite structure in real time. The hardware of the system consists of a wire of strain sensors connected to a control unit. The software of the system elaborates the strain data and in real time is able to detect the presence of an eventual damage of the structures monitored with the strain sensors. The algorithm requires as input only the strains of the monitored structured measured on real time, i.e. those strains coming from the deformations of the composite structure due to the working loads. The health monitoring system does not require any additional device to interrogate the structure as often used in the literature, instead it is based on a self-learning procedure. The strain data acquired when the structure is healthy are used to set up the correlations between the strain in different positions of structure by means of neural network. Once the correlations between the strains in different position have been set up, these correlations act as a fingerprint of the healthy structure. In case of damage the correlation between the strains in the position of the structure near the damage will change due to the change of the stiffness of the structure caused by the damage. The developed software is able to recognize the change of the transfer function between the strains and consequently is able to detect the damage.

  17. 77 FR 50576 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures; OMB Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... Composite Rotorcraft Structures; OMB Approval of Information Collection AGENCY: Federal Aviation... requirement contained in the FAA's final rule, ``Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite... and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures,'' published in the Federal Register (76 FR...

  18. Low-Cost Composite Materials and Structures for Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deo, Ravi B.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Holzwarth, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of current applications of composite materials and structures in military, transport and General Aviation aircraft is presented to assess the maturity of composites technology, and the payoffs realized. The results of the survey show that performance requirements and the potential to reduce life cycle costs for military aircraft and direct operating costs for transport aircraft are the main reasons for the selection of composite materials for current aircraft applications. Initial acquisition costs of composite airframe components are affected by high material costs and complex certification tests which appear to discourage the widespread use of composite materials for aircraft applications. Material suppliers have performed very well to date in developing resin matrix and fiber systems for improved mechanical, durability and damage tolerance performance. The next challenge for material suppliers is to reduce material costs and to develop materials that are suitable for simplified and inexpensive manufacturing processes. The focus of airframe manufacturers should be on the development of structural designs that reduce assembly costs by the use of large-scale integration of airframe components with unitized structures and manufacturing processes that minimize excessive manual labor.

  19. RNA Dependent RNA Polymerases: Insights from Structure, Function and Evolution.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Sangita; Prasad, Burra V L S; Selvarajan, Ramasamy

    2018-02-10

    RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is one of the most versatile enzymes of RNA viruses that is indispensable for replicating the genome as well as for carrying out transcription. The core structural features of RdRps are conserved, despite the divergence in their sequences. The structure of RdRp resembles that of a cupped right hand and consists of fingers, palm and thumb subdomains. The catalysis involves the participation of conserved aspartates and divalent metal ions. Complexes of RdRps with substrates, inhibitors and metal ions provide a comprehensive view of their functional mechanism and offer valuable insights regarding the development of antivirals. In this article, we provide an overview of the structural aspects of RdRps and their complexes from the Group III, IV and V viruses and their structure-based phylogeny.

  20. RNA Dependent RNA Polymerases: Insights from Structure, Function and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Sangita; Prasad, Burra V L S; Selvarajan, Ramasamy

    2018-01-01

    RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is one of the most versatile enzymes of RNA viruses that is indispensable for replicating the genome as well as for carrying out transcription. The core structural features of RdRps are conserved, despite the divergence in their sequences. The structure of RdRp resembles that of a cupped right hand and consists of fingers, palm and thumb subdomains. The catalysis involves the participation of conserved aspartates and divalent metal ions. Complexes of RdRps with substrates, inhibitors and metal ions provide a comprehensive view of their functional mechanism and offer valuable insights regarding the development of antivirals. In this article, we provide an overview of the structural aspects of RdRps and their complexes from the Group III, IV and V viruses and their structure-based phylogeny. PMID:29439438

  1. Application of the self-diagnosis composite into concrete structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Hideaki; Shin, Soon-Gi; Okuhara, Yoshiki; Nomura, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Hiroaki

    2001-04-01

    The function and performance of the self-diagnosis composites embedded in mortar/concrete blocks and concrete piles were investigated by bending tests and electrical resistance measurements. Carbon powder (CP) and carbon fiber (CF) were introduced in glass fiber reinforced plastics composites to obtain electrical conductivity. The CP composite has commonly good performances in various bending tests of block and pile specimens, comparing to the CF composite. The electrical resistance of the CP composite increases in a small strain to response remarkably micro-crack formation at about 200 (mu) strain and to detect well to smaller deformations before the crack formation. The CP composite possesses a continuous resistance change up to a large strain level near the final fracture of concrete structures reinforced by steel bars. The cyclic bending tests showed that the micro crack closed at unloading state was able to be evaluated from the measurement of residual resistance. It has been concluded that the self- diagnosis composite is fairly useful for the measurement of damage and fracture in concrete blocks and piles.

  2. Effect of processing on Polymer/Composite structure and properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in the vitality and economic health of the field of polymer forecasting are discussed. A consistent and rational point of view which considers processing as a participant in the underlying triad of relationships which comprise materials science and engineering is outlined. This triad includes processing as it influences material structure, and ultimately properties. Methods in processing structure properties, polymer science and engineering, polymer chemistry and synthesis, structure and modification and optimization through processing, and methods of melt flow modeling in processing structure property relations of polymer were developed. Mechanical properties of composites are considered, and biomedical materials research to include polymer processing effects are studied. An analysis of the design technology of advances graphite/epoxy composites is also reported.

  3. Technology of civil usage of composites. [in commercial aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of advanced composites in structural components of commercial aircraft. The need for testing the response of a material system to service environment is discussed along with methods for evaluating design and manufacturing aspects of a built-up structure under environmental conditions and fail-safe (damage-tolerance) evaluation of structures. Crashworthiness aspects, the fire-hazard potential, and electrical damage of composite structures are considered. Practical operational experience with commercial aircraft is reviewed for boron/epoxy foreflaps, Kevlar/epoxy fillets and fairings, graphite/epoxy spoilers, graphite/polysulfone spoilers, graphite/epoxy floor posts, boron/aluminum aft pylon skin panels, graphite/epoxy engine nose cowl outer barrels, and graphite/epoxy upper aft rudder segments.

  4. A critical review of nanotechnologies for composite aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, Vassilis; Masouras, Athanasios; Baltopoulos, Athanasios; Vavouliotis, Antonios; Sotiriadis, George; Pambaguian, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The past decade extensive efforts have been invested in understanding the nano-scale and revealing the capabilities offered by nanotechnology products to structural materials. Integration of nano-particles into fiber composites concludes to multi-scale reinforced composites and has opened a new wide range of multi-functional materials in industry. In this direction, a variety of carbon based nano-fillers has been proposed and employed, individually or in combination in hybrid forms, to approach the desired performance. Nevertheless, a major issue faced lately more seriously due to the interest of industry is on how to incorporate these nano-species into the final composite structure through existing manufacturing processes and infrastructure. This interest originates from several industrial applications needs that request the development of new multi-functional materials which combine enhanced mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. In this work, an attempt is performed to review the most representative processes and related performances reported in literature and the experience obtained on nano-enabling technologies of fiber composite materials. This review focuses on the two main composite manufacturing technologies used by the aerospace industry; Prepreg/Autoclave and Resin Transfer technologies. It addresses several approaches for nano-enabling of composites for these two routes and reports latest achieved results focusing on performance of nano-enabled fiber reinforced composites extracted from literature. Finally, this review work identifies the gap between available nano-technology integration routes and the established industrial composite manufacturing techniques and the challenges to increase the Technology Readiness Level to reach the demands for aerospace industry applications.

  5. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, Roberto J.

    2001-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI) Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  6. Composite Structures and Materials Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Dexter, H. Benson; Johnston, Norman J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Cano, roberto J.

    2003-01-01

    A summary of recent composite structures and materials research at NASA Langley Research Center is presented. Fabrication research to develop low-cost automated robotic fabrication procedures for thermosetting and thermoplastic composite materials, and low-cost liquid molding processes for preformed textile materials is described. Robotic fabrication procedures discussed include ply-by-ply, cure-on-the-fly heated placement head and out-of-autoclave electron-beam cure methods for tow and tape thermosetting and thermoplastic materials. Liquid molding fabrication processes described include Resin Film Infusion (RFI), Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) and Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM). Results for a full-scale composite wing box are summarized to identify the performance of materials and structures fabricated with these low-cost fabrication methods.

  7. Finite element analysis and optimization of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, Jan

    1990-01-01

    Linearly elastic fiber reinforced composite discs and laminates in plane stress with variable local orientation and concentration of one or two fiber fields embedded in the matrix material, are considered. The thicknesses and the domain of the discs or laminates are assumed to be given, together with prescribed boundary conditions and in-plane loading along the edge. The problem under study consists in determining throughout the structural domain the optimum orientations and concentrations of the fiber fields in such a way as to maximize the integral stiffness of the composite disc or laminate under the seven loading. Minimization of the integral stiffness can also be performed. The optimization is performed subject to a prescribed bound on the total cost or weight of the composite that for given unit cost factors or specific weights determines the amounts of fiber and matrix materials in the structure. Examples are presented.

  8. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) for Inspection of Composite Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Composite honeycomb structures are widely used in aerospace applications due to their low weight and high strength advantages. Developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection methods are essential for their safe performance. Flash thermography is a commonly used technique for composite honeycomb structure inspections due to its large area and rapid inspection capability. Flash thermography is shown to be sensitive for detection of face sheet impact damage and face sheet to core disbond. Data processing techniques, using principal component analysis to improve the defect contrast, are discussed. Limitations to the thermal detection of the core are investigated. In addition to flash thermography, X-ray computed tomography is used. The aluminum honeycomb core provides excellent X-ray contrast compared to the composite face sheet. The X-ray CT technique was used to detect impact damage, core crushing, and skin to core disbonds. Additionally, the X-ray CT technique is used to validate the thermography results.

  9. Validation of Material Models For Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures Via Physical And Crash Testing (VMM Composites Project)

    SciTech Connect

    Coppola, Anthony; Faruque, Omar; Truskin, James F

    testing advances in order to assess the correlation of the predicted results to the physical tests. The FBCC was developed to meet a goal of 30-35% mass reduction while aiming for equivalent energy absorption as a steel component for which baseline experimental results were obtained from testing in the same crash modes. The project also evaluated crash performance of thermoplastic composite structures fabricated from commercial prepreg materials and low cost carbon fiber sourced from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The VMM Project determined that no set of predictions from a CAE supplier were found to be universally accurate among all the six crash modes evaluated. In general, crash modes that were most dependent on the properties of the prepreg were more accurate than those that were dependent on the behavior of the joints. The project found that current CAE modeling methods or best practices for carbon fiber composites have not achieved standardization, and accuracy of CAE is highly reliant on the experience of its users. Coupon tests alone are not sufficient to develop an accurate material model, but it is necessary to bridge the gap between the coupon data and performance of the actual structure with a series of subcomponent level tests. Much of the unreliability of the predictions can be attributed to shortcomings in our ability to mathematically link the effects of manufacturing and material variability into the material models. This is a subject of ongoing research in the industry. The final report is organized by key technical tasks to describe how the validation project developed, modeled and compared crash data obtained on the composite FBCC to the multiple sets of CAE predictions. Highlights of the report include a discussion of the quantitative comparison between predictions and experimental data, as well as an in-depth discussion of remaining technological gaps that exist in the industry, which are intended to spur innovations and improvements in CAE

  10. Better Finite-Element Analysis of Composite Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements a finite-element-based method of predicting the deformations of thin aerospace structures made of isotropic materials or anisotropic fiber-reinforced composite materials. The technique and corresponding software are applicable to thin shell structures in general and are particularly useful for analysis of thin beamlike members having open cross-sections (e.g. I-beams and C-channels) in which significant warping can occur.

  11. Structure-Composition-Property Relationships in Polymeric Amorphous Calcium Phosphate-Based Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Justin N.R.; Schumacher, Gary E.; Antonucci, Joseph M.; Skrtic, Drago

    2009-01-01

    Our studies of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)-based materials over the last decade have yielded bioactive polymeric composites capable of protecting teeth from demineralization or even regenerating lost tooth mineral. The anti-cariogenic/re-mineralizing potential of these ACP composites originates from their propensity, when exposed to the oral environment, to release in a sustained manner sufficient levels of mineral-forming calcium and phosphate ions to promote formation of stable apatitic tooth mineral. However, the less than optimal ACP filler/resin matrix cohesion, excessive polymerization shrinkage and water sorption of these experimental materials can adversely affect their physicochemical and mechanical properties, and, ultimately, limit their lifespan. This study demonstrates the effects of chemical structure and composition of the methacrylate monomers used to form the matrix phase of composites on degree of vinyl conversion (DVC) and water sorption of both copolymers and composites and the release of mineral ions from the composites. Modification of ACP surface via introducing cations and/or polymers ab initio during filler synthesis failed to yield mechanically improved composites. However, moderate improvement in composite’s mechanical stability without compromising its remineralization potential was achieved by silanization and/or milling of ACP filler. Using ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate or urethane dimethacrylate as base monomers and adding moderate amounts of hydrophilic 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate or its isomer ethyl-α-hydroxymethacrylate appears to be a promising route to maximize the remineralizing ability of the filler while maintaining high DVC. Exploration of the structure/composition/property relationships of ACP fillers and polymer matrices is complex but essential for achieving a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that govern dissolution/re-precipitation of bioactive ACP fillers, and, ultimately, the

  12. Founder takes all: density-dependent processes structure biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Waters, Jonathan M; Fraser, Ceridwen I; Hewitt, Godfrey M

    2013-02-01

    Density-dependent processes play a key role in the spatial structuring of biodiversity. Specifically, interrelated demographic processes, such as gene surfing, high-density blocking, and competitive exclusion, can generate striking geographic contrasts in the distributions of genes and species. Here, we propose that well-studied evolutionary and ecological biogeographic patterns of postglacial recolonization, progressive island colonization, microbial sectoring, and even the 'Out of Africa' pattern of human expansion, are fundamentally similar, underpinned by a 'founder takes all' density-dependent principle. Additionally, we hypothesize that older historic constraints of density-dependent processes are seen today in the dramatic biogeographic shifts that occur in response to human-mediated extinction events, whereby surviving lineages rapidly expand their ranges to replace extinct sister taxa. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Resin transfer molding for advanced composite primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) has been identified by Douglas Aircraft Company (DAC) and industry to be one of the promising processes being developed today which can break the cost barrier of implementing composite primary structures into a commercial aircraft production environment. The RTM process developments and scale-up plans Douglas Aircrart will be conducting under the NASA ACT contract are discussed.

  14. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  15. The influence of compositional and structural diversity on forest productivity

    Treesearch

    James N. Long; John D. Shaw

    2010-01-01

    Data from ~1500 ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa C. Lawson) stands in the western United States were used to examine the potential influence of compositional and structural diversity on forest productivity. Relative density, height and site quality were combined in a conceptually sound expression of the relationship between growth and growing stock for ponderosa pine-...

  16. ALL NATURAL COMPOSITE SANDWICH BEAMS FOR STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS. (R829576)

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of developing an all natural composite roof for housing application,
    structural panels and unit beams were manufactured out of soybean oil based resin
    and natural fibers (flax, cellulose, pulp, recycled paper, chicken feathers)
    using vacuum assisted resin tran...

  17. Composition, structure, and dynamics of the Illinois Ozark Hills Forest

    Treesearch

    Lisa M. Helmig; James S. Fralish

    2011-01-01

    In the mature oak-hickory ecosystem of the Illinois Ozark Hills, forest community composition, dynamics, and structure were studied to examine the extent of conversion to mesophytic species and eventually predict the broad threshold time of complete conversion. Tree, sapling, and seedling data were collected from 87 plots distributed throughout the region. Data for the...

  18. Damping of composite plate for space structures: Prediction and measurement methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M.; Morganti, F.; Mucciante, L.; Bruno, C.

    Composite materials are extensively used for space structures: the sandwich and laminate panels are now part of the current manufacturing technology for spacecraft and antenna reflectors. Depending on the applications, some mechanical parameters are considered driving in the design, in order to satisfy the required structural performance. Among them, the knowledge of the damping is necessary to evaluate the dynamic behaviour of the structures. That particularly applies to the composite structures for space applications; for which an optimization of their mass versus their stiffness is attempted to take into account both launch and on station environments. The prediction of the damping factors of composites is rather difficult since it depends not only on the nature of the materials, which are in general neither homogeneous nor isotropic, but also on the kind of structures (i.e. size and shape) and on the manufacturing methodology, due to the strong non-linearity in the material behaviour. All the above is also impacted by the tendency of these materials to microcracking under stress. This phenomenon, mainly correlated to the cyclic loads introduced by thermal ageing, produces a variation of damping with time. For these reasons an evaluation of the damping characteristics of this kind of structure has been generally obtained by tests on full scale hardware or specimens with suitable dimension, being any prediction method rather difficult to apply. The purpose of this work is to study the damping behaviour of Gr/Ep, Kevlar/Ep and Glass Fiber/Ep composites which are extensively used in space structures, starting from test results on beam and plate shaped specimens. Experimental evidence will be fitted in an analytical and numerical study, the purpose of which is to correlate the energy dissipated in the composite to the lamination typology. Using a Finite Element Method, the amount of energy dissipated for each mode will be also evaluated, providing the correlations

  19. Implementation of Fiber Substructuring Into Strain Rate Dependent Micromechanics Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2001-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to impact loads. Previously, strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations developed to model the polymer matrix were incorporated into a mechanics of materials based micromechanics method. In the current work, the micromechanics method is revised such that the composite unit cell is divided into a number of slices. Micromechanics equations are then developed for each slice, with laminate theory applied to determine the elastic properties, effective stresses and effective inelastic strains for the unit cell. Verification studies are conducted using two representative polymer matrix composites with a nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation response. The computed results compare well to experimentally obtained values.

  20. Soil type-depending effect of paddy management: composition and distribution of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanski, Livia; Kölbl, Angelika; Lehndorff, Eva; Houtermans, Miriam; Schad, Peter; Zhang, Gang-Lin; Rahayu Utami, Sri; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    Paddy soil management is assumed to promote soil organic matter accumulation and specifically lignin caused by the resistance of the aromatic lignin structure against biodegradation under anaerobic conditions during inundation of paddy fields. The present study investigates the effect of paddy soil management on soil organic matter composition compared to agricultural soils which are not used for rice production (non-paddy soils). A variety of major soil types, were chosen in Indonesia (Java), including Alisol, Andosol and Vertisol sites (humid tropical climate of Java, Indonesia) and in China Alisol sites (humid subtropical climate, Nanjing). This soils are typically used for rice cultivation and represent a large range of soil properties to be expected in Asian paddy fields. All topsoils were analysed for their soil organic matter composition by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and lignin-derived phenols by CuO oxidation method. The soil organic matter composition, revealed by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, was similar for the above named different parent soil types (non-paddy soils) and was also not affected by the specific paddy soil management. The contribution of lignin-related carbon groups to total SOM was similar in the investigated paddy and non-paddy soils. A significant proportion of the total aromatic carbon in some paddy and non-paddy soils was attributed to the application of charcoal as a common management practise. The extraction of lignin-derived phenols revealed low VSC (vanillyl, syringyl, cinnamyl) values for all investigated soils, being typical for agricultural soils. An inherent accumulation of lignin-derived phenols due to paddy management was not found. Lignin-derived phenols seem to be soil type-dependent, shown by different VSC concentrations between the parent soil types. The specific paddy management only affects the lignin-derived phenols in Andosol-derived paddy soils which are characterized by

  1. Structural efficiency study of composite wing rib structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Gary D.; Gurdal, Zafer; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A series of short stiffened panel designs which may be applied to a preliminary design assessment of an aircraft wing rib is presented. The computer program PASCO is used as the primary design and analysis tool to assess the structural efficiency and geometry of a tailored corrugated panel, a corrugated panel with a continuous laminate, a hat stiffened panel, a blade stiffened panel, and an unstiffened flat plate. To correct some of the shortcomings in the PASCO analysis when shear is present, a two step iterative process using the computer program VICON is used. The loadings considered include combinations of axial compression, shear, and lateral pressure. The loading ranges considered are broad enough such that the designs presented may be applied to other stiffened panel applications. An assessment is made of laminate variations, increased spacing, and nonoptimum geometric variations, including a beaded panel, on the design of the panels.

  2. Application of Pi Preform Composite Joints in Fabrication of NASA Composite Crew Module Demonstration Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, John E.; Pelham, Larry

    2008-01-01

    This paper will describe unique and extensive use of pre-woven and impregnated pi cross-sections in fabrication of a carbon composite demonstration structure for the Composite Crew Module (CCM) Program. The program is managed by the NASA Safety and Engineering Center with participants from ten NASA Centers and AFRL. Multiple aerospace contractors are participating in the design development, tooling and fabrication effort as well. The goal of the program is to develop an agency wide design team for composite habitable spacecraft. The specific goals for this development project are: a) To gain hands on experience in design, building and testing a composite crew module. b) To validate key assumptions by resolving composite spacecraft design details through fabrication and testing of hardware. This paper will focus on the design and fabrication issues supporting selection of the Lockheed Martin patented Pi pre-form to provide sound composite joints a numerous locations in the structure. This abstract is based on Preliminary Design data. The final design will continue to evolve through the fall of 2007 with fabrication mostly completed by conference date.

  3. Composition, structure and properties of sediment thermal springs of Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanina, Violetta; Smolyakov, Pavel; Parfenov, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with the physical and mechanical properties sediment thermal fields Mutnovsky, Lower Koshelevo and Bannyh (Kamchatka). This multi-component soils, mineral and chemical composition of which depends on the formation factors (pH, temperature, salinity of water, composition and structure of the host volcanic rocks). Samples Lower Koshelevo sediment thermal sources differ in the following composition: smectite, kaolinite, kaolinite-smectite mixed-mineral. Samples of sediment thermal springs Mutnovsky volcano in accordance with the X-ray analysis has the following composition: volcanic glass, crystalline sulfur, plagioclase, smectite, illite-smectite mixed, illite, chlorite, quartz, cristobalite, pyrite, melanterite, kaolinite. Natural moisture content samples of sediment thermal springs from 45 to 121%, hygroscopic moisture content of 1.3 to 3.7%. A large amount of native sulfur (up to 92%) and the presence of amorphous material gives low values of density of solid particles (up to 2.1 g/cm3) samples Mutnovskii thermal field. The values of the density of solids sediment Koshelevo and Bannyh hot springs close to those of the main components of mineral densities (up to 2.6-3.0 g/cm3). The results of the particle size distribution and microaggregate analysis of sediment thermal springs Lower Koshelevo field shows that the predominance observed of particles with a diameter from 0.05 mm to 0.25 mm, the coefficient of soil heterogeneity heterogeneous. In the bottom sediments of the thermal springs of the volcano Mutnovsky poorly traced predominance of one faction. Most prevalent fraction with particle size 0.01 - 0.05 mm. When analyzing the content in the soil microaggregates their content is shifted towards particles with a diameter of 0.25 mm. The contents of a large number of large (1-10 mm), porous rock fragments, due to the deposition of pyroclastic material from the eruptions of the last century. Present in large amounts rounded crystals of native sulfur

  4. Innovative Structural Materials and Sections with Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Vikram

    The motivation of this work is based on development of new construction products with strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) geared towards sustainable residential applications. The proposed research has three main objectives: automation of existing manufacturing systems for SHCC laminates; multi-level characterization of mechanical properties of fiber, matrix, interface and composites phases using servo-hydraulic and digital image correlation techniques. Structural behavior of these systems were predicted using ductility based design procedures using classical laminate theory and structural mechanics. SHCC sections are made up of thin sections of matrix with Portland cement based binder and fine aggregates impregnating continuous one-dimensional fibers in individual or bundle form or two/three dimensional woven, bonded or knitted textiles. Traditional fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) use random dispersed chopped fibers in the matrix at a low volume fractions, typically 1-2% to avoid to avoid fiber agglomeration and balling. In conventional FRC, fracture localization occurs immediately after the first crack, resulting in only minor improvement in toughness and tensile strength. However in SHCC systems, distribution of cracking throughout the specimen is facilitated by the fiber bridging mechanism. Influence of material properties of yarn, composition, geometry and weave patterns of textile in the behavior of laminated SHCC skin composites were investigated. Contribution of the cementitious matrix in the early age and long-term performance of laminated composites was studied with supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash, silica fume, and wollastonite. A closed form model with classical laminate theory and ply discount method, coupled with a damage evolution model was utilized to simulate the non-linear tensile response of these composite materials. A constitutive material model developed earlier in the group was utilized to characterize and

  5. Free volume dependent fluorescence property of PMMA composite: Positron annihilation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindrachary, V.; Praveena, S. D.; Bhajantri, R. F.; Ismayil, Crasta, Vincent

    2013-02-01

    The free volume related fluorescence properties of chalcone chromophore [1-(4-methylphenyl)-3-(4-N, N, dimethylaminophenyl)-2-propen-1-one doped Poly(methyl methacrylate) have been studied using fluorescence spectroscopy and Positron Annihilation lifetime spectroscopy techniques. The fluorescence spectra show that the fluorescence behavior depends on the free volume dependent polymer microstructure and varies with dopant concentration with in the composite. The origin and variation of fluorescence is understood by twisted internal charge transfer state as well as free volume. The Positron annihilation study shows that the free volume related microstructure of the composite is vary with doping level.

  6. An Efficient Analysis Methodology for Fluted-Core Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremont, Leonard; Schultz, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    The primary loading condition in launch-vehicle barrel sections is axial compression, and it is therefore important to understand the compression behavior of any structures, structural concepts, and materials considered in launch-vehicle designs. This understanding will necessarily come from a combination of test and analysis. However, certain potentially beneficial structures and structural concepts do not lend themselves to commonly used simplified analysis methods, and therefore innovative analysis methodologies must be developed if these structures and structural concepts are to be considered. This paper discusses such an analysis technique for the fluted-core sandwich composite structural concept. The presented technique is based on commercially available finite-element codes, and uses shell elements to capture behavior that would normally require solid elements to capture the detailed mechanical response of the structure. The shell thicknesses and offsets using this analysis technique are parameterized, and the parameters are adjusted through a heuristic procedure until this model matches the mechanical behavior of a more detailed shell-and-solid model. Additionally, the detailed shell-and-solid model can be strategically placed in a larger, global shell-only model to capture important local behavior. Comparisons between shell-only models, experiments, and more detailed shell-and-solid models show excellent agreement. The discussed analysis methodology, though only discussed in the context of fluted-core composites, is widely applicable to other concepts.

  7. Thermo-structural analysis and electrical conductivity behavior of epoxy/metals composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumedienne, N.; Faska, Y.; Maaroufi, A.; Pinto, G.; Vicente, L.; Benavente, R.

    2017-05-01

    This paper reports on the elaboration and characterization of epoxy resin filled with metallic particles powder (aluminum, tin and zinc) composites. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures, density measurements and x-ray diffraction analysis (DRX) showed a homogeneous phase of obtained composites. The differential scanning calorimetry revealed a good adherence at matrix-filler interfaces, confirming the SEM observations. The measured glass transition temperatures depend on composites fillers' nature. Afterwards, the electrical conductivity of composites versus their fillers' contents has been investigated. The obtained results depict a nonlinear behavior, indicating an insulator to conductor phase transition at a conduction threshold; with high contrast of ten decades. Hence, the elaborated materials give a possibility to obtain dielectric or electrically conducting phases, which can to be interesting in the choice of desired applications. Finally, the obtained results have been successfully simulated on the basis of different percolation models approach combined with structural characterization inferences.

  8. A Study of Flexible Composites for Expandable Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Payload volume for launch vehicles is a critical constraint that impacts spacecraft design. Deployment mechanisms, such as those used for solar arrays and antennas, are approaches that have successfully accommodated this constraint, however, providing pressurized volumes that can be packaged compactly at launch and expanded in space is still a challenge. One approach that has been under development for many years is to utilize softgoods - woven fabric for straps, cloth, and with appropriate coatings, bladders - to provide this expandable pressure vessel capability. The mechanics of woven structure is complicated by a response that is nonlinear and often nonrepeatable due to the discrete nature of the woven fiber architecture. This complexity reduces engineering confidence to reliably design and certify these structures, which increases costs due to increased requirements for system testing. The present study explores flexible composite materials systems as an alternative to the heritage softgoods approach. Materials were obtained from vendors who utilize flexible composites for non-aerospace products to determine some initial physical and mechanical properties of the materials. Uniaxial mechanical testing was performed to obtain the stress-strain response of the flexible composites and the failure behavior. A failure criterion was developed from the data, and a space habitat application was used to provide an estimate of the relative performance of flexible composites compared to the heritage softgoods approach. Initial results are promising with a 25% mass savings estimated for the flexible composite solution.

  9. Composite Structural Motifs of Binding Sites for Delineating Biological Functions of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kinjo, Akira R.; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    Most biological processes are described as a series of interactions between proteins and other molecules, and interactions are in turn described in terms of atomic structures. To annotate protein functions as sets of interaction states at atomic resolution, and thereby to better understand the relation between protein interactions and biological functions, we conducted exhaustive all-against-all atomic structure comparisons of all known binding sites for ligands including small molecules, proteins and nucleic acids, and identified recurring elementary motifs. By integrating the elementary motifs associated with each subunit, we defined composite motifs that represent context-dependent combinations of elementary motifs. It is demonstrated that function similarity can be better inferred from composite motif similarity compared to the similarity of protein sequences or of individual binding sites. By integrating the composite motifs associated with each protein function, we define meta-composite motifs each of which is regarded as a time-independent diagrammatic representation of a biological process. It is shown that meta-composite motifs provide richer annotations of biological processes than sequence clusters. The present results serve as a basis for bridging atomic structures to higher-order biological phenomena by classification and integration of binding site structures. PMID:22347478

  10. Health Monitoring of Composite Material Structures using a Vibrometry Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Mark J.

    1997-01-01

    Large composite material structures such as aircraft and Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVS) operate in severe environments comprised of vehicle dynamic loads, aerodynamic loads, engine vibration, foreign object impact, lightning strikes, corrosion, and moisture absorption. These structures are susceptible to damage such as delamination, fiber breaking/pullout, matrix cracking, and hygrothermal strain. To ensure human safety and load-bearing integrity, these structures must be inspected to detect and locate often invisible damage and faults before becoming catastrophic. Moreover, nearly all future structures will need some type of in-service inspection technique to increase their useful life and reduce maintenance and overall costs. Possible techniques for monitoring the health and indicating damage on composite structures include: c-scan, thermography, acoustic emissions using piezoceramic actuators or fiber-optic wires with gratings, laser ultrasound, shearography, holography, x-ray, and others. These techniques have limitations in detecting damage that is beneath the surface of the structure, far away from a sensor location, or during operation of the vehicle. The objective of this project is to develop a more global method for damage detection that is based on structural dynamics principles, and can inspect for damage when the structure is subjected to vibratory loads to expose faults that may not be evident by static inspection. A Transmittance Function Monitoring (TFM) method is being developed in this project for ground-based inspection and operational health monitoring of large composite structures as a RLV. A comparison of the features of existing health monitoring approaches and the proposed TFM method is given.

  11. Significance tests for functional data with complex dependence structure.

    PubMed

    Staicu, Ana-Maria; Lahiri, Soumen N; Carroll, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    We propose an L 2 -norm based global testing procedure for the null hypothesis that multiple group mean functions are equal, for functional data with complex dependence structure. Specifically, we consider the setting of functional data with a multilevel structure of the form groups-clusters or subjects-units, where the unit-level profiles are spatially correlated within the cluster, and the cluster-level data are independent. Orthogonal series expansions are used to approximate the group mean functions and the test statistic is estimated using the basis coefficients. The asymptotic null distribution of the test statistic is developed, under mild regularity conditions. To our knowledge this is the first work that studies hypothesis testing, when data have such complex multilevel functional and spatial structure. Two small-sample alternatives, including a novel block bootstrap for functional data, are proposed, and their performance is examined in simulation studies. The paper concludes with an illustration of a motivating experiment.

  12. Temperature dependent structural and vibrational properties of liquid indium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, A. B.; Bhatt, N. K.

    2018-05-01

    The influence of the temperature effect on both the structure factor and the phonon dispersion relation of liquid indium have been investigated by means of pseudopotential theory. The Percus-Yevick Hard Sphere reference system is applied to describe the structural calculation. The effective electron-ion interaction is explained by using modified empty core potential due to Hasegawa et al. along with a local field correction function due to Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU). The temperature dependence of pair potential needed at higher temperatures was achieved by multiplying the damping factor exp(- π/kBT2k F r ) in the pair potential. Very close agreement of static structure factor, particularly, at elevated temperatures confirms the validity of the local potential. A positive dispersion is found in low-q region and the correct trend of phonon dispersion branches like the experimental; shows all broad features of collective excitations in liquid metals.

  13. End Effects and Load Diffusion in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Ambur, D. (Technical Monitor); Nemeth, M. P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The research carried out here builds on our previous NASA supported research on the general topic of edge effects and load diffusion in composite structures. Further fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Specific problems recently considered were focussed on end effects in sandwich structures and for functionally graded materials. Both linear and nonlinear (geometric and material) problems have been addressed. Our goal is the development of readily applicable design formulas for the decay lengths in terms of non-dimensional material and geometric parameters. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities provides a significant aid towards this process. The analysis is also amenable to parameter study with a large parameter space and should be useful in structural tailoring studies.

  14. Classification of protein quaternary structure by functional domain composition

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaojing; Wang, Chuan; Li, Yixue

    2006-01-01

    Background The number and the arrangement of subunits that form a protein are referred to as quaternary structure. Quaternary structure is an important protein attribute that is closely related to its function. Proteins with quaternary structure are called oligomeric proteins. Oligomeric proteins are involved in various biological processes, such as metabolism, signal transduction, and chromosome replication. Thus, it is highly desirable to develop some computational methods to automatically classify the quaternary structure of proteins from their sequences. Results To explore this problem, we adopted an approach based on the functional domain composition of proteins. Every protein was represented by a vector calculated from the domains in the PFAM database. The nearest neighbor algorithm (NNA) was used for classifying the quaternary structure of proteins from this information. The jackknife cross-validation test was performed on the non-redundant protein dataset in which the sequence identity was less than 25%. The overall success rate obtained is 75.17%. Additionally, to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, we predicted the proteins in an independent dataset and achieved an overall success rate of 84.11% Conclusion Compared with the amino acid composition method and Blast, the results indicate that the domain composition approach may be a more effective and promising high-throughput method in dealing with this complicated problem in bioinformatics. PMID:16584572

  15. A structural model for composite rotor blades and lifting surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Atilgan, Ali R.

    1987-01-01

    Composite material systems are currently candidates for aerospace structures, primarily for the design flexibiity they offer i.e., it is possible to tailor the material and manufacturing approach to the application. Two notable examples are the wing of the Grumman/USAF/DARPA X-29 and rotor blades under development by the U.S.A. Aerostructures Directorate (AVSCOM), Langley Research Center. A working definition of elastic or structural tailoring is the use of structural concept, fiber orientation, ply stacking sequence, and a blend of materials to achieve specific performance goals. In the design process, choices of materials and dimensions are made which produce specific response characteristics which permit the selected goals to be achieved. Common choices for tailoring goals are preventing instabilities or vibration resonances or enhancing damage tolerance. An essential, enabling factor in the design of tailored composite structures is structural modeling that accurately, but simply, characterizes response. The objective of this paper is to improve the single-cell beam model for composite rotor blades or lifting surfaces and to demonstrate its usefullness in applications.

  16. Hybrid Composites for LH2 Fuel Tank Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Loos, Alfred C.; McMahon, William M.

    2001-01-01

    The application of lightweight carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) as structure for cryogenic fuel tanks is critical to the success of the next generation of Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV). The recent failure of the X-33 composite fuel tank occurred in part due to microcracking of the polymer matrix, which allowed cryogen to permeate through the inner skin to the honeycomb core. As part of an approach to solve these problems, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are working to develop and investigate polymer films that will act as a barrier to the permeation of LH2 through the composite laminate. In this study two commercially available films and eleven novel LaRC films were tested in an existing cryogenics laboratory at MSFC to determine the permeance of argon at room temperature. Several of these films were introduced as a layer in the composite to form an interleaved, or hybrid, composite to determine the effects on permeability. In addition, the effects of the interleaved layer thickness, number, and location on the mechanical properties of the composite laminate were investigated. In this initial screening process, several of the films were found to exhibit lower permeability to argon than the composite panels tested.

  17. Lithium concentration dependent structure and mechanics of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitinamaluwa, H. S.; Wang, M. C.; Will, G.; Senadeera, W.; Zhang, S.; Yan, C.

    2016-06-01

    A better understanding of lithium-silicon alloying mechanisms and associated mechanical behavior is essential for the design of Si-based electrodes for Li-ion batteries. Unfortunately, the relationship between the dynamic mechanical response and microstructure evolution during lithiation and delithiation has not been well understood. We use molecular dynamic simulations to investigate lithiated amorphous silicon with a focus to the evolution of its microstructure, phase composition, and stress generation. The results show that the formation of LixSi alloy phase is via different mechanisms, depending on Li concentration. In these alloy phases, the increase in Li concentration results in reduction of modulus of elasticity and fracture strength but increase in ductility in tension. For a LixSi system with uniform Li distribution, volume change induced stress is well below the fracture strength in tension.

  18. Lithium concentration dependent structure and mechanics of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sitinamaluwa, H. S.; Wang, M. C.; Will, G.

    2016-06-28

    A better understanding of lithium-silicon alloying mechanisms and associated mechanical behavior is essential for the design of Si-based electrodes for Li-ion batteries. Unfortunately, the relationship between the dynamic mechanical response and microstructure evolution during lithiation and delithiation has not been well understood. We use molecular dynamic simulations to investigate lithiated amorphous silicon with a focus to the evolution of its microstructure, phase composition, and stress generation. The results show that the formation of Li{sub x}Si alloy phase is via different mechanisms, depending on Li concentration. In these alloy phases, the increase in Li concentration results in reduction of modulus ofmore » elasticity and fracture strength but increase in ductility in tension. For a Li{sub x}Si system with uniform Li distribution, volume change induced stress is well below the fracture strength in tension.« less

  19. Designing for time-dependent material response in spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Oleksuk, Lynda L. S.; Bowles, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    To study the influence on overall deformations of the time-dependent constitutive properties of fiber-reinforced polymeric matrix composite materials being considered for use in orbiting precision segmented reflectors, simple sandwich beam models are developed. The beam models include layers representing the face sheets, the core, and the adhesive bonding of the face sheets to the core. A three-layer model lumps the adhesive layers with the face sheets or core, while a five-layer model considers the adhesive layers explicitly. The deformation response of the three-layer and five-layer sandwich beam models to a midspan point load is studied. This elementary loading leads to a simple analysis, and it is easy to create this loading in the laboratory. Using the correspondence principle of viscoelasticity, the models representing the elastic behavior of the two beams are transformed into time-dependent models. Representative cases of time-dependent material behavior for the facesheet material, the core material, and the adhesive are used to evaluate the influence of these constituents being time-dependent on the deformations of the beam. As an example of the results presented, if it assumed that, as a worst case, the polymer-dominated shear properties of the core behave as a Maxwell fluid such that under constant shear stress the shear strain increases by a factor of 10 in 20 years, then it is shown that the beam deflection increases by a factor of 1.4 during that time. In addition to quantitative conclusions, several assumptions are discussed which simplify the analyses for use with more complicated material models. Finally, it is shown that the simpler three-layer model suffices in many situations.

  20. High temperature resin matrix composites for aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments and the outlook for graphite-polyimide composite structures are briefly outlined. Laminates, skin-stiffened and honeycomb sandwich panels, chopped fiber moldings, and structural components were fabricated with Celion/LARC-160 and Celion/PMR-15 composite materials. Interlaminar shear and flexure strength data obtained on as-fabricated specimens and specimens that were exposed for 125 hours at 589 K indicate that epoxy sized and polyimide sized Celion graphite fibers exhibit essentially the same behavior in a PMR-15 matrix composite. Analyses and tests of graphite-polyimide compression and shear panels indicate that utilization in moderately loaded applications offers the potential for achieving a 30 to 50 percent reduction in structural mass compared to conventional aluminum panels. Data on effects of moisture, temperature, thermal cycling, and shuttle fluids on mechanical properties indicate that both LARC-160 and PMR-15 are suitable matrix materials for a graphite-polyimide aft body flap. No technical road blocks to building a graphite-polyimide composite aft body flap are identified.

  1. Compositional dependent partial molar volume and compressibility of CO2 in rhyolite, phonolite and basalt glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerch, P.; Seifert, R.; Malfait, W. J.; Sanchez-Valle, C.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is the second most abundant volatile in magmatic systems and plays an important role in many magmatic processes, e.g. partial melting, volatile saturation, outgassing. Despite this relevance, the volumetric properties of carbon-bearing silicates at relevant pressure and temperature conditions remain largely unknown because of considerable experimental difficulties associated with in situ measurements. Density and elasticity measurements on quenched glasses can provide an alternative source of information. For dissolved water, such measurements indicate that the partial molar volume is independent of compositions at ambient pressure [1], but the partial molar compressibility is not [2, 3]. Thus the partial molar volume of water may depend on melt composition at elevated pressure. For dissolved CO2, no such data is available. In order to constrain the effect of magma composition on the partial molar volume and compressibility of dissolved carbon, we determined the density and elasticity for three series of carbon-bearing basalt, phonolite and rhyolite glasses, quenched from 3.5 GPa and relaxed at ambient pressure. The CO2 content varies between 0 to 3.90 wt% depending on the glass composition. Glass densities were determined using the sink/float method in a diiodomethane (CH2I2) - acetone mixture. Brillouin measurements were conducted on relaxed and unrelaxed silicate glasses in platelet geometry to determine the compressional (VP) and shear (VS) wave velocities and elastic moduli. The partial molar volume of CO2 in rhyolite, phonolite and basalt glasses is 25.4 ± 0.9, 22.1 ± 0.6 and 26.6 ±1.8 cm3/mol, respectively. Thus, unlike for dissolved water, the partial molar volume of CO2 displays a resolvable compositional effect. Although the composition and CO2/carbonate speciation of the phonolite glasses is intermediate between that of the rhyolite and basalt glasses, the molar volume is not. Similar to dissolved water, the partial molar bulk modulus

  2. Optimization of SMA layers in composite structures to enhance damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghdoust, P.; Cinquemani, S.; Lecis, N.; Bassani, P.

    2016-04-01

    The performance of lightweight structures can be severely affected by vibration. New design concepts leading to lightweight, slender structural components can increase the vulnerability of the components to failure due to excessive vibration. The intelligent approach to address the problem would be the use of materials which are more capable in dissipating the energy due to their high value of loss factor. Among the different materials available to achieve damping, much attention has been attached to the use of shape memory alloys (SMAs) because of their unique microstructure, leading to good damping capacity. This work describes the design and optimization of a hybrid layered composite structure for the passive suppression of flexural vibrations in slender and light structures. Embedding the SMA layers in composite structure allows to combine different properties: the lightness of the base composite (e.g. fiber glass), the mechanical strength of the insert of metallic material and the relevant damping properties of SMA, in the martensitic phase. In particular, we put our attention on embedding the CuZnAl in the form of thin sheet in a layered composite made by glass fiber reinforced epoxy. By appropriately positioning of the SMA sheets so that they are subjected to the maximum curvature, the damping of the hybrid system can be considerably enhanced. Accordingly analytical method for evaluating the energy dissipation of the thin sheets with different shapes and patterns is developed and is followed by a shape optimization based on genetic algorithm. Eventually different configurations of the hybrid beam structure with different patterns of SMA layer are proposed and compared in the term of damping capacity.

  3. Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Wound Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph; Kaul, Raj; Taylor, Scott; Jackson, Kurt; Myers, George; Sharma, A.

    2002-01-01

    The increasing use of advanced composite materials in the wide range of applications including Space Structures is a great impetus to the development of smart materials. Incorporating these FBG sensors for monitoring the integrity of structures during their life cycle will provide valuable information about viability of the usage of such material. The use of these sensors by surface bonding or embedding in this composite will measure internal strain and temperature, and hence the integrity of the assembled engineering structures. This paper focuses on such a structure, called a composite wound pressure vessel. This vessel was fabricated from the composite material: TRH50 (a Mitsubishi carbon fiber with a 710-ksi tensile strength and a 37 Msi modulus) impregnated with an epoxy resin from NEWPORT composites (WDE-3D-1). This epoxy resin in water dispersed system without any solvents and it cures in the 240-310 degrees F range. This is a toughened resin system specifically designed for pressure applications. These materials are a natural fit for fiber sensors since the polyimide outer buffer coating of fiber can be integrated into the polymer matrix of the composite material with negligible residual stress. The tank was wound with two helical patterns and 4 hoop wraps. The order of winding is: two hoops, two helical and two hoops. The wall thickness of the composite should be about 80 mil or less. The tank should burst near 3,000 psi or less. We can measure the actual wall thickness by ultrasonic or we can burst the tank and measure the pieces. Figure 1 shows a cylinder fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composite material. The strain in different directions is measured with a surface bonded fiber Bragg gratings and with embedded fiber Bragg gratings as the cylinder is pressurized to burst pressures. Figure 2 shows the strain as a function of pressure of carbon-epoxy cylinder as it is pressurized with water. Strain is measured in different directions by multiple gratings

  4. Workshop on Scaling Effects in Composite Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    This document contains presentations and abstracts from the Workshop on Scaling Effects in Composite Materials and Structures jointly sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center, Virginia Tech, and the Institute for Mechanics and Materials at the University of California, San Diego, and held at NASA Langley on November 15-16, 1993. Workshop attendees represented NASA, other government research labs, the aircraft/rotorcraft industry, and academia. The workshop objectives were to assess the state-of-technology in scaling effects in composite materials and to provide guidelines for future research.

  5. Nonlinear analyses of composite aerospace structures in sonic fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the semiannual research progress, accomplishments, and future plans performed under the NASA Langley Research Center Grant No. NAG-1-1358. The primary research effort of this project is the development of analytical methods for the prediction of nonlinear random response of composite aerospace structures subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads. The progress, accomplishments, and future plates on four sonic fatigue research topics are described. The sonic fatigue design and passive control of random response of shape memory alloy hybrid composites presented in section 4, which is suited especially for HSCT, is a new initiative.

  6. Dynamic characteristics of specialty composite structures with embedded damping layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    Damping mechanics for simulating the damped dynamic characteristics in specialty composite structures with compliant interlaminar damping layers are presented. Finite-element based mechanics incorporating a discrete layer (or layer-wise) laminate damping theory are utilized to represent general laminate configurations in terms of lay-up and fiber orientation angles, cross-sectional thickness, shape, and boundary conditions. Evaluations of the method with exact solutions and experimental data illustrate the accuracy of the method. Additional applications investigate the potential for significant damping enhancement in angle-ply composite laminates with cocured interlaminar damping layers.

  7. Nonlinear analyses of composite aerospace structures in sonic fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Chuh

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes the semiannual research progress, accomplishments, and future plans performed under the NASA Langley Research Center Grant No. NAG-1-1358. The primary research effort of this project is the development of analytical methods for the prediction of nonlinear random response of composite aerospace structures subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads. The progress, accomplishments, and future plates on four sonic fatigue research topics are described. The sonic fatigue design and passive control of random response of shape memory alloy hybrid composites presented in section 4, which is suited especially for HSCT, is a new initiative.

  8. Task-dependency and structure-dependency in number interference effects in sentence comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Franck, Julie; Colonna, Saveria; Rizzi, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    We report three experiments on French that explore number mismatch effects in intervention configurations in the comprehension of object A’-dependencies, relative clauses and questions. The study capitalizes on the finding of object attraction in sentence production, in which speakers sometimes erroneously produce a verb that agrees in number with a plural object in object relative clauses. Evidence points to the role of three critical constructs from formal syntax: intervention, intermediate traces and c-command (Franck et al., 2010). Experiment 1, using a self-paced reading procedure on these grammatical structures with an agreement error on the verb, shows an enhancing effect of number mismatch in intervention configurations, with faster reading times with plural (mismatching) objects. Experiment 2, using an on-line grammaticality judgment task on the ungrammatical versions of these structures, shows an interference effect in the form of attraction, with slower response times with plural objects. Experiment 3 with a similar grammaticality judgment task shows stronger attraction from c-commanding than from preceding interveners. Overall, the data suggest that syntactic computations in performance refer to the same syntactic representations in production and comprehension, but that different tasks tap into different processes involved in parsing: whereas performance in self-paced reading reflects the intervention of the subject in the process of building an object A’-dependency, performance in grammaticality judgment reflects intervention of the object on the computation of the subject-verb agreement dependency. The latter shows the hallmarks of structure-dependent attraction effects in sentence production, in particular, a sensitivity to specific characteristics of hierarchical representations. PMID:25914652

  9. Damage monitoring of aircraft structures made of composite materials using wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, D.; Safin, A.; Luhyna, N.

    2016-10-01

    The present article is dedicated to the study of the acoustic properties of composite materials and the application of non-destructive testing methods to aircraft components. A mathematical model of a wavelet transformed signal is presented. The main acoustic (vibration) properties of different composite material structures were researched. Multiple vibration parameter dependencies on the noise reduction factor were derived. The main steps of a research procedure and new method algorithm are presented. The data obtained was compared with the data from a three dimensional laser-Doppler scanning vibrometer, to validate the results. The new technique was tested in the laboratory and on civil aircraft at a training airfield.

  10. Multi-objective optimization of composite structures. A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teters, G. A.; Kregers, A. F.

    1996-05-01

    Studies performed on the optimization of composite structures by coworkers of the Institute of Polymers Mechanics of the Latvian Academy of Sciences in recent years are reviewed. The possibility of controlling the geometry and anisotropy of laminar composite structures will make it possible to design articles that best satisfy the requirements established for them. Conflicting requirements such as maximum bearing capacity, minimum weight and/or cost, prescribed thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, etc. usually exist for optimal design. This results in the multi-objective compromise optimization of structures. Numerical methods have been developed for solution of problems of multi-objective optimization of composite structures; parameters of the structure of the reinforcement and the geometry of the design are assigned as controlling parameters. Programs designed to run on personal computers have been compiled for multi-objective optimization of the properties of composite materials, plates, and shells. Solutions are obtained for both linear and nonlinear models. The programs make it possible to establish the Pareto compromise region and special multicriterial solutions. The problem of the multi-objective optimization of the elastic moduli of a spatially reinforced fiberglass with stochastic stiffness parameters has been solved. The region of permissible solutions and the Pareto region have been found for the elastic moduli. The dimensions of the scatter ellipse have been determined for a multidimensional Gaussian probability distribution where correlation between the composite's properties being optimized are accounted for. Two types of problems involving the optimization of a laminar rectangular composite plate are considered: the plate is considered elastic and anisotropic in the first case, and viscoelastic properties are accounted for in the second. The angle of reinforcement and the relative amount of fibers in the longitudinal direction are controlling

  11. Fabricating Composite-Material Structures Containing SMA Ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Cano, Roberto J.; Lach, Cynthia L.

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of designing and fabricating laminated composite-material (matrix/fiber) structures containing embedded shape-memory-alloy (SMA) actuators has been devised. Structures made by this method have repeatable, predictable properties, and fabrication processes can readily be automated. Such structures, denoted as shape-memory-alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures, have been investigated for their potential to satisfy requirements to control the shapes or thermoelastic responses of themselves or of other structures into which they might be incorporated, or to control noise and vibrations. Much of the prior work on SMAHC structures has involved the use SMA wires embedded within matrices or within sleeves through parent structures. The disadvantages of using SMA wires as the embedded actuators include (1) complexity of fabrication procedures because of the relatively large numbers of actuators usually needed; (2) sensitivity to actuator/ matrix interface flaws because voids can be of significant size, relative to wires; (3) relatively high rates of breakage of actuators during curing of matrix materials because of sensitivity to stress concentrations at mechanical restraints; and (4) difficulty of achieving desirable overall volume fractions of SMA wires when trying to optimize the integration of the wires by placing them in selected layers only.

  12. Structure and composition of insulin fibril surfaces probed by TERS

    PubMed Central

    Kurouski, Dmitry; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Deckert, Volker; Lednev, Igor K.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils associated with many neurodegenerative diseases are the most intriguing targets of modern structural biology. Significant knowledge has been accumulated about the morphology and fibril-core structure recently. However, no conventional methods could probe the fibril surface despite its significant role in the biological activity. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) offers a unique opportunity to characterize the surface structure of an individual fibril due to a high depth and lateral spatial resolution of the method in the nanometer range. Here, TERS is utilized for characterizing the secondary structure and amino acid residue composition of the surface of insulin fibrils. It was found that the surface is strongly heterogeneous and consists of clusters with various protein conformations. More than 30% of the fibril surface is dominated by β-sheet secondary structure, further developing Dobson’s model of amyloid fibrils (Jimenez et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2002). The propensity of various amino acids on the fibril surface and specific surface secondary structure elements were evaluated. β-sheet areas are rich in cysteine and aromatic amino acids, such as phenylalanine and tyrosine, whereas proline was found only in α-helical and unordered protein clusters. In addition, we showed that carboxyl, amino and imino groups are nearly equally distributed over β-sheet and α-helix/unordered regions. Overall, this study provides valuable new information about the structure and composition of the insulin fibril surface and demonstrates the power of TERS for fibril characterization. PMID:22813355

  13. Mesoscopic structure of neuronal tracts from time-dependent diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Burcaw, Lauren M.; Fieremans, Els; Novikov, Dmitry S.

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting brain diffusion MRI measurements in terms of neuronal structure at a micrometer level is an exciting unresolved problem. Here we consider diffusion transverse to a bundle of fibers, and show theoretically, as well as using Monte Carlo simulations and measurements in a phantom made of parallel fibers mimicking axons, that the time dependent diffusion coefficient approaches its macroscopic limit slowly, in a (lnt)/t fashion. The logarithmic singularity arises due to short range disorder in the fiber packing. We identify short range disorder in axonal fibers based on histological data from the splenium, and argue that the time dependent contribution to the overall diffusion coefficient from the extra-axonal water dominates that of the intra-axonal water. This dominance may explain the bias in measuring axon diameters in clinical settings. The short range disorder is also reflected in the linear frequency dependence of the diffusion coefficient measured with oscillating gradients, in agreement with recent experiments. Our results relate the measured diffusion to the mesoscopic structure of neuronal tissue, uncovering the sensitivity of diffusion metrics to axonal arrangement within a fiber tract, and providing an alternative interpretation of axonal diameter mapping techniques. PMID:25837598

  14. Mesoscopic structure of neuronal tracts from time-dependent diffusion.

    PubMed

    Burcaw, Lauren M; Fieremans, Els; Novikov, Dmitry S

    2015-07-01

    Interpreting brain diffusion MRI measurements in terms of neuronal structure at a micrometer level is an exciting unresolved problem. Here we consider diffusion transverse to a bundle of fibers, and show theoretically, as well as using Monte Carlo simulations and measurements in a phantom made of parallel fibers mimicking axons, that the time dependent diffusion coefficient approaches its macroscopic limit slowly, in a (ln t)/t fashion. The logarithmic singularity arises due to short range disorder in the fiber packing. We identify short range disorder in axonal fibers based on histological data from the splenium, and argue that the time dependent contribution to the overall diffusion coefficient from the extra-axonal water dominates that of the intra-axonal water. This dominance may explain the bias in measuring axon diameters in clinical settings. The short range disorder is also reflected in the asymptotically linear frequency dependence of the diffusion coefficient measured with oscillating gradients, in agreement with recent experiments. Our results relate the measured diffusion to the mesoscopic structure of neuronal tissue, uncovering the sensitivity of diffusion metrics to axonal arrangement within a fiber tract, and providing an alternative interpretation of axonal diameter mapping techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a Subcell Based Modeling Approach for Modeling the Architecturally Dependent Impact Response of Triaxially Braided Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorini, Chris; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the high velocity impact response of polymer matrix composites with complex architectures is critical to many aerospace applications, including engine fan blade containment systems where the structure must be able to completely contain fan blades in the event of a blade-out. Despite the benefits offered by these materials, the complex nature of textile composites presents a significant challenge for the prediction of deformation and damage under both quasi-static and impact loading conditions. The relatively large mesoscale repeating unit cell (in comparison to the size of structural components) causes the material to behave like a structure rather than a homogeneous material. Impact experiments conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center have shown the damage patterns to be a function of the underlying material architecture. Traditional computational techniques that involve modeling these materials using smeared homogeneous, orthotropic material properties at the macroscale result in simulated damage patterns that are a function of the structural geometry, but not the material architecture. In order to preserve heterogeneity at the highest length scale in a robust yet computationally efficient manner, and capture the architecturally dependent damage patterns, a previously-developed subcell modeling approach where the braided composite unit cell is approximated as a series of four adjacent laminated composites is utilized. This work discusses the implementation of the subcell methodology into the commercial transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corp.). Verification and validation studies are also presented, including simulation of the tensile response of straight-sided and notched quasi-static coupons composed of a T700/PR520 triaxially braided [0deg/60deg/-60deg] composite. Based on the results of the verification and validation studies, advantages and limitations of the methodology as well as plans for future work

  16. Galerkin finite element scheme for magnetostrictive structures and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Kidambi Srinivasan

    The ever increasing-role of magnetostrictives in actuation and sensing applications is an indication of their importance in the emerging field of smart structures technology. As newer, and more complex, applications are developed, there is a growing need for a reliable computational tool that can effectively address the magneto-mechanical interactions and other nonlinearities in these materials and in structures incorporating them. This thesis presents a continuum level quasi-static, three-dimensional finite element computational scheme for modeling the nonlinear behavior of bulk magnetostrictive materials and particulate magnetostrictive composites. Models for magnetostriction must deal with two sources of nonlinearities-nonlinear body forces/moments in equilibrium equations governing magneto-mechanical interactions in deformable and magnetized bodies; and nonlinear coupled magneto-mechanical constitutive models for the material of interest. In the present work, classical differential formulations for nonlinear magneto-mechanical interactions are recast in integral form using the weighted-residual method. A discretized finite element form is obtained by applying the Galerkin technique. The finite element formulation is based upon three dimensional eight-noded (isoparametric) brick element interpolation functions and magnetostatic infinite elements at the boundary. Two alternative possibilities are explored for establishing the nonlinear incremental constitutive model-characterization in terms of magnetic field or in terms of magnetization. The former methodology is the one most commonly used in the literature. In this work, a detailed comparative study of both methodologies is carried out. The computational scheme is validated, qualitatively and quantitatively, against experimental measurements published in the literature on structures incorporating the magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D. The influence of nonlinear body forces and body moments of magnetic origin

  17. The dependency structure of coordinate phrases: a corpus approach.

    PubMed

    Temperley, David

    2005-11-01

    Hudson (1990) proposes that each conjunct in a coordinate phrase forms dependency relations with heads or dependents outside the coordinate phrase (the "multi-head" view). This proposal is tested through corpus analysis of Wall Street Journal text. For right-branching constituents (such as direct-object NPs), a short-long preference for conjunct ordering is observed; this is predicted by the multi-head view, under the assumption that structures resulting in shorter dependencies are preferred. A short-long preference is also observed for left-branching constituents (such as subject NPs), which is less obviously accommodated by the multi-head view but not incompatible with it. The repetition of determiners was also examined (the dog and cat versus the dog and the cat), and a stronger preference was found for repetition with singular count nouns as opposed to mass or plural nouns; this accords well with the multi-head view, under the reasoning that single-determiner constructions require crossing dependencies with count nouns but not with plural or mass nouns.

  18. Three-Axis Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Measurement in 3D Woven Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading. Keywords: fiber optic, distributed strain sensing, Rayleigh scatter, optical frequency domain reflectometry

  19. Concurrent Probabilistic Simulation of High Temperature Composite Structural Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdi, Frank

    1996-01-01

    A computational structural/material analysis and design tool which would meet industry's future demand for expedience and reduced cost is presented. This unique software 'GENOA' is dedicated to parallel and high speed analysis to perform probabilistic evaluation of high temperature composite response of aerospace systems. The development is based on detailed integration and modification of diverse fields of specialized analysis techniques and mathematical models to combine their latest innovative capabilities into a commercially viable software package. The technique is specifically designed to exploit the availability of processors to perform computationally intense probabilistic analysis assessing uncertainties in structural reliability analysis and composite micromechanics. The primary objectives which were achieved in performing the development were: (1) Utilization of the power of parallel processing and static/dynamic load balancing optimization to make the complex simulation of structure, material and processing of high temperature composite affordable; (2) Computational integration and synchronization of probabilistic mathematics, structural/material mechanics and parallel computing; (3) Implementation of an innovative multi-level domain decomposition technique to identify the inherent parallelism, and increasing convergence rates through high- and low-level processor assignment; (4) Creating the framework for Portable Paralleled architecture for the machine independent Multi Instruction Multi Data, (MIMD), Single Instruction Multi Data (SIMD), hybrid and distributed workstation type of computers; and (5) Market evaluation. The results of Phase-2 effort provides a good basis for continuation and warrants Phase-3 government, and industry partnership.

  20. Computational simulation of acoustic fatigue for hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, S. N.; Nagpal, V. K.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents predictive methods/codes for computational simulation of acoustic fatigue resistance of hot composite structures subjected to acoustic excitation emanating from an adjacent vibrating component. Select codes developed over the past two decades at the NASA Lewis Research Center are used. The codes include computation of (1) acoustic noise generated from a vibrating component, (2) degradation in material properties of the composite laminate at use temperature, (3) dynamic response of acoustically excited hot multilayered composite structure, (4) degradation in the first-ply strength of the excited structure due to acoustic loading, and (5) acoustic fatigue resistance of the excited structure, including propulsion environment. Effects of the laminate lay-up and environment on the acoustic fatigue life are evaluated. The results show that, by keeping the angled plies on the outer surface of the laminate, a substantial increase in the acoustic fatigue life is obtained. The effect of environment (temperature and moisure) is to relieve the residual stresses leading to an increase in the acoustic fatigue life of the excited panel.

  1. Computational simulation of acoustic fatigue for hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Sutjahjo, Edhi

    1991-01-01

    Predictive methods/computer codes for the computational simulation of acoustic fatigue resistance of hot composite structures subjected to acoustic excitation emanating from an adjacent vibrating component are discussed. Select codes developed over the past two decades at the NASA Lewis Research Center are used. The codes include computation of acoustic noise generated from a vibrating component, degradation in material properties of a composite laminate at use temperature, dynamic response of acoustically excited hot multilayered composite structure, degradation in the first ply strength of the excited structure due to acoustic loading, and acoustic fatigue resistance of the excited structure, including the propulsion environment. Effects of the laminate lay-up and environment on the acoustic fatigue life are evaluated. The results show that, by keeping the angled plies on the outer surface of the laminate, a substantial increase in the acoustic fatigue life is obtained. The effect of environment (temperature and moisture) is to relieve the residual stresses leading to an increase in the acoustic fatigue life of the excited panel.

  2. Use of microfasteners to produce damage tolerant composite structures

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    The paper concerns the mechanical performance of continuous fibre/thermosetting polymer matrix composites reinforced in the through-thickness direction with fibrous or metallic rods or threads in order to mitigate against low delamination resistance. Specific illustrations of the effects of microfasteners in reducing delamination crack growth are made for Z-pinned and tufted composites. Response to loading in such ‘structured materials’ is subject to multiple parameters defining their in-plane and out-of-plane properties. Single microfastener mechanical tests are well suited to establish the crack bridging laws under a range of loading modes, from simple delamination crack opening to shear, and provide the basis for predicting the corresponding response of microfastener arrays, within a given material environment. The fundamental experiments on microfasteners can be used to derive analytical expressions to describe the crack bridging behaviour in a general sense, to cover all possible loadings. These expressions can be built into cohesive element constitutive laws in a finite-element framework for modelling the effects of microfastener arrays on the out-of-plane mechanical response of reinforced structural elements, including the effects of known manufacturing imperfections. Such predictive behaviour can then be used to assess structural integrity under complex loading, as part of the component design process. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials’. PMID:27242299

  3. Material and structural studies of metal and polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.; Serafini, T. T.; Johns, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The application of fiber composites to aeronautical and space vehicle systems indicates the following: It appears quite probable that resin/fiber composites can be developed for service at 315 C for several thousand hours and at 370 C for a few hundred hours. The retention of resin/fiber strength at these high temperatures can be achieved by modifying the polymer molecular structure or by developing new processing techniques, or both. Carbon monofilament with attractive strength values has been produced and fabrication studies to reinforce aluminum with such monofilaments have been initiated. Refractory wire-superalloy composites have demonstrated sufficiently high strength and impact values to suggest that they have potential for application to turbine blades at temperatures to 1200 C and above.

  4. Effects of thermal cycling on composite materials for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of thermal cycling on the thermal and mechanical properties of composite materials that are candidates for space structures are briefly described. The results from a thermal analysis of the orbiting Space Station Freedom is used to define a typical thermal environment and the parameters that cause changes in the thermal history. The interactions of this environment with composite materials are shown and described. The effects of this interaction on the integrity as well as the properties of GR/thermoset, Gr/thermoplastic, Gr/metal and Gr/glass composite materials are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the interaction that are critical to precision spacecraft. Finally, ground test methodology are briefly discussed.

  5. Structural CNT Composites Part II: Assessment of CNT Yarns as Reinforcement for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one-dimensional nanomaterials with outstanding electrical and thermal conductivities and mechanical properties. This combination of properties offers routes to enable lightweight structural aerospace components. Recent advances in the manufacturing of CNTs have made bulk forms such as yarns, tapes and sheets available in commercial quantities to permit the evaluation of these materials for aerospace use, where the superior tensile properties of CNT composites can be exploited in tension dominated applications such as composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). To investigate their utility in this application, aluminum rings were overwrapped with thermoset/CNT yarn composite and their mechanical properties measured. CNT composite overwrap characteristics such as processing method, CNT/resin ratio, and applied tension during CNT yarn winding were varied to determine their effects on the mechanical performance of the CNT composite overwrapped Al rings (CCOARs). Mechanical properties of the CCOARs were measured under static and cyclic loads at room, elevated, and cryogenic temperatures to evaluate their mechanical performance relative to bare Al rings. At room temperature, the breaking load of CCOARs with a 10.8% additional weight due to the CNT yarn/thermoset overwrap increased by over 200% compared to the bare Al ring. The quality of the wound CNT composites was also investigated using x-ray computed tomography.

  6. Mechanical and time-dependent behavior of wood-plastic composites subjected to tension and compression

    Treesearch

    Scott E. Hamel; John C. Hermanson; Steven M. Cramer

    2012-01-01

    The thermoplastics within wood—plastic composites (WPCs) are known to experience significant time-dependent deformation or creep. In some formulations, creep deformation can be twice as much as the initial quasi-static strain in as little as 4 days. While extensive work has been done on the creep behavior of pure polymers, little information is available on the...

  7. Solution to certain problems in the failure of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodsell, Johnathan

    The present work contains the solution of two problems in composite structures. In the first, an approximate elasticity solution for prediction of the displacement, stress and strain fields within the m-layer, symmetric and balanced angle-ply composite laminate of finite-width subjected anticlastic bending deformation is developed. The solution is shown to recover classical laminated plate theory predictions at interior regions of the laminate and thereby illustrates the boundary layer character of this interlaminar phenomenon. The results exhibit the anticipated response in congruence with the solutions for uniform axial extension and uniform temperature change, where divergence of the interlaminar shearing stress is seen to occur at the intersection of the free-edge and planes between lamina of +theta and -theta orientation. The analytical results show excellent agreement with the finite-element predictions for the same boundary-value problem and thereby provide an efficient and compact solution available for parametric studies of the influence of geometry and material properties. The solution is combined with previously developed solutions for uniform axial extension and uniform temperature change of the identical laminate and the combined solution is exercised to compare the relative magnitudes of free-edge phenomenon arising from the different loading conditions, to study very thick laminates and laminates where the laminate width is less than the laminate thickness. Significantly, it was demonstrated that the solution is valid for arbitrary stacking sequence and the solution was exercised to examine antisymmetric and non-symmetric laminates. Finally, the solution was exercised to determine the dimensions of the boundary layer for very large numbers of layers. It was found that the dimension of the boundary layer width in bending is approximately twice that in uniform axial extension and uniform temperature change. In the second, the intrinsic flaw concept is

  8. Buckling Design and Imperfection Sensitivity of Sandwich Composite Launch-Vehicle Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Sleight, David W.; Myers, David E.; Waters, W. Allen, Jr.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Lovejoy, Andrew W.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    shell. When compared with the current buckling design recommendations, the results suggest that the current recommendations are overly conservative and that the development of new recommendations could reduce the acreage areal mass of many composite sandwich shell designs by between 4% and 19%, depending on the structure.

  9. Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites with Multifunctional and Hybrid Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are leading candidate materials for a number of applications in aeronautics, space, energy, and nuclear industries. Potential composite applications differ in their requirements for thickness. For example, many space applications such as "nozzle ramps" or "heat exchangers" require very thin (< 1 mm) structures whereas turbine blades would require very thick parts (> or = 1 cm). Little is known about the effect of thickness on stress-strain behavior or the elevated temperature tensile properties controlled by oxidation diffusion. In this study, composites consisting of woven Hi-Nicalon (trademark) fibers a carbon interphase and CVI SiC matrix were fabricated with different numbers of plies and thicknesses. The effect of thickness on matrix crack formation, matrix crack growth and diffusion kinetics will be discussed. In another approach, hybrid fiber-lay up concepts have been utilized to "alloy" desirable properties of different fiber types for mechanical properties, thermal stress management, and oxidation resistance. Such an approach has potential for the C(sub I)-SiC and SiC(sub f)-SiC composite systems. CVI SiC matrix composites with different stacking sequences of woven C fiber (T300) layers and woven SiC fiber (Hi-Nicalon (trademark)) layers were fabricated. The results will be compared to standard C fiber reinforced CVI SiC matrix and Hi-Nicalon reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites. In addition, shear properties of these composites at different temperatures will also be presented. Other design and implementation issues will be discussed along with advantages and benefits of using these materials for various components in high temperature applications.

  10. Impact Testing and Simulation of Composite Airframe Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Horta, Lucas G.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Seal, Michael D., II

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center on composite airframe structural components of increasing complexity to evaluate their energy absorption behavior when subjected to impact loading. A second objective was to assess the capabilities of predicting the dynamic response of composite airframe structures, including damage initiation and progression, using a state-of-the-art nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. The test specimens were extracted from a previously tested composite prototype fuselage section developed and manufactured by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation under the US Army's Survivable Affordable Repairable Airframe Program (SARAP). Laminate characterization testing was conducted in tension and compression. In addition, dynamic impact tests were performed on several components, including I-beams, T-sections, and cruciform sections. Finally, tests were conducted on two full-scale components including a subfloor section and a framed fuselage section. These tests included a modal vibration and longitudinal impact test of the subfloor section and a quasi-static, modal vibration, and vertical drop test of the framed fuselage section. Most of the test articles were manufactured of graphite unidirectional tape composite with a thermoplastic resin system. However, the framed fuselage section was constructed primarily of a plain weave graphite fabric material with a thermoset resin system. Test data were collected from instrumentation such as accelerometers and strain gages and from full-field photogrammetry.

  11. Large Area Nondestructive Evaluation of a Fatigue Loaded Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    Large area nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspections are required for fatigue testing of composite structures to track damage initiation and growth. Of particular interest is the progression of damage leading to ultimate failure to validate damage progression models. In this work, passive thermography and acoustic emission NDE were used to track damage growth up to failure of a composite three-stringer panel. Fourteen acoustic emission sensors were placed on the composite panel. The signals from the array were acquired simultaneously and allowed for acoustic emission location. In addition, real time thermal data of the composite structure were acquired during loading. Details are presented on the mapping of the acoustic emission locations directly onto the thermal imagery to confirm areas of damage growth leading to ultimate failure. This required synchronizing the acoustic emission and thermal data with the applied loading. In addition, processing of the thermal imagery which included contrast enhancement, removal of optical barrel distortion and correction of angular rotation before mapping the acoustic event locations are discussed.

  12. Changes in the fatty acid composition in bitter Lupinus species depend on the debittering process.

    PubMed

    Curti, Carolina A; Curti, Ramiro N; Bonini, Norberto; Ramón, Adriana N

    2018-10-15

    The evaluation of changes in the fatty acid composition in Lupinus species after the debittering process is crucial to determine their nutritional implications. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in the fatty acid composition in Lupinus albus and L. mutabilis after the debittering process. Lupinus species showed different fatty acid compositions which changed depending on the debittering process applied. The debittering process changed the monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids in L. albus, whereas in L. mutabilis it changed the w-6/w-3 ratio. However, the total saturated fatty acid content remained stable in both species after the debittering process. The changes in L. albus were associated with the fatty acid desaturation and a conversion into unsaturated fatty acids, whereas in L. mutabilis with the lipid peroxidation by decreasing the linoleic acid content. Nutritional implications of these changes in the fatty acid composition are discussed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Temperature- and composition-dependent hydrogen diffusivity in palladium from statistically-averaged molecular dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Heo, Tae Wook; Wood, Brandon C.; ...

    2018-03-09

    Solid-state hydrogen storage materials undergo complex phase transformations whose kinetics is often limited by hydrogen diffusion. Among metal hydrides, palladium hydride undergoes a diffusional phase transformation upon hydrogen uptake, during which the hydrogen diffusivity varies with hydrogen composition and temperature. Here we perform robust statistically-averaged molecular dynamics simulations to obtain a well-converged analytical expression for hydrogen diffusivity in bulk palladium that is valid throughout all stages of the reaction. Our studies confirm significant dependence of the diffusivity on composition and temperature that elucidate key trends in the available experimental measurements. Whereas at low hydrogen compositions, a single process dominates, atmore » high hydrogen compositions, diffusion is found to exhibit behavior consistent with multiple hopping barriers. Further analysis, supported by nudged elastic band computations, suggests that the multi-barrier diffusion can be interpreted as two distinct mechanisms corresponding to hydrogen-rich and hydrogen-poor local environments.« less

  14. Temperature-dependent charge transport mechanisms in carbon sphere/polyaniline composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, Cesar A.; Martinez, Luis M.; Meléndez, Anamaris; Ortiz, Margarita; Ramos, Idalia; Pinto, Nicholas J.; Zimbovskaya, Natalya

    2017-12-01

    Charge transport in the temperature range 80 K < T < 300 K was studied in a composite of carbon spheres (CS), prepared via hydrothermal carbonization of sucrose, and the conducting polymer polyaniline (PANi). PANi was synthesized via the oxidative polymerization of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate (APS) in acidic media. The CS/PANi composite was prepared by coating the spheres with a thin polyaniline (PANi) film doped with hydrochloric acid (HCl) in situ during the polymerization process. Temperature dependent conductivity measurements show that three dimensional variable range hopping of electrons between polymeric chains in PANi-filled gaps between CS is the predominant transport mechanism through CS/PANi composites. The high conductivity of the CS/PANi composite makes the material attractive for the fabrication of devices and sensors.

  15. Temperature- and composition-dependent hydrogen diffusivity in palladium from statistically-averaged molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Heo, Tae Wook; Wood, Brandon C.

    Solid-state hydrogen storage materials undergo complex phase transformations whose kinetics is often limited by hydrogen diffusion. Among metal hydrides, palladium hydride undergoes a diffusional phase transformation upon hydrogen uptake, during which the hydrogen diffusivity varies with hydrogen composition and temperature. Here we perform robust statistically-averaged molecular dynamics simulations to obtain a well-converged analytical expression for hydrogen diffusivity in bulk palladium that is valid throughout all stages of the reaction. Our studies confirm significant dependence of the diffusivity on composition and temperature that elucidate key trends in the available experimental measurements. Whereas at low hydrogen compositions, a single process dominates, atmore » high hydrogen compositions, diffusion is found to exhibit behavior consistent with multiple hopping barriers. Further analysis, supported by nudged elastic band computations, suggests that the multi-barrier diffusion can be interpreted as two distinct mechanisms corresponding to hydrogen-rich and hydrogen-poor local environments.« less

  16. Physical disturbance to ecological niches created by soil structure alters community composition of methanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Deepak; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Abell, Guy C J; Bodrossy, Levente; Murrell, J Colin

    2011-10-01

    Aggregates of different sizes and stability in soil create a composite of ecological niches differing in terms of physico-chemical and structural characteristics. The aim of this study was to identify, using DNA-SIP and mRNA-based microarray analysis, whether shifts in activity and community composition of methanotrophs occur when ecological niches created by soil structure are physically perturbed. Landfill cover soil was subject to three treatments termed: 'control' (minimal structural disruption), 'sieved' (sieved soil using 2 mm mesh) and 'ground' (grinding using mortar and pestle). 'Sieved' and 'ground' soil treatments exhibited higher methane oxidation potentials compared with the 'control' soil treatment. Analysis of the active community composition revealed an effect of physical disruption on active methanotrophs. Type I methanotrophs were the most active methanotrophs in 'sieved' and 'ground' soil treatments, whereas both Type I and Type II methanotrophs were active in the 'control' soil treatment. The result emphasize that changes to a particular ecological niche may not result in an immediate change to the active bacterial composition and change in composition will depend on the ability of the bacterial communities to respond to the perturbation. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Crystal structure of SAM-dependent methyltransferase from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    PubMed

    Pampa, K J; Madan Kumar, S; Hema, M K; Kumara, Karthik; Naveen, S; Kunishima, Naoki; Lokanath, N K

    2017-12-01

    Methyltransferases (MTs) are enzymes involved in methylation that are needed to perform cellular processes such as biosynthesis, metabolism, gene expression, protein trafficking and signal transduction. The cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) is used for catalysis by SAM-dependent methyltransferases (SAM-MTs). The crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii SAM-MT was determined to a resolution of 2.1 Å using X-ray diffraction. The monomeric structure consists of a Rossmann-like fold (domain I) and a substrate-binding domain (domain II). The cofactor (SAM) molecule binds at the interface between adjacent subunits, presumably near to the active site(s) of the enzyme. The observed dimeric state might be important for the catalytic function of the enzyme.

  18. Design and analysis of composite structures with stress concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbo, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of an analytic procedure which can be used to provide comprehensive stress and strength analysis of composite structures with stress concentrations is given. The methodology provides designer/analysts with a user-oriented procedure which, within acceptable engineering accuracy, accounts for the effects of a wide range of application design variables. The procedure permits the strength of arbitrary laminate constructions under general bearing/bypass load conditions to be predicted with only unnotched unidirectional strength and stiffness input data required. Included is a brief discussion of the relevancy of this analysis to the design of primary aircraft structure; an overview of the analytic procedure with theory/test correlations; and an example of the use and interaction of this strength analysis relative to the design of high-load transfer bolted composite joints.

  19. Intercalated graphite fiber composites as EMI shields in aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The requirements for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding in aerospace structures are complicated over that of ground structures by their weight limitations. As a result, the best EMI shielding materials must blend low density, high strength, and high elastic modulus with high shielding ability. In addition, fabrication considerations including penetrations and joints play a major role. The EMI shielding properties are calculated for shields formed from pristine and intercalated graphite fiber/epoxy composites and compared to preliminary experimental results and to shields made from aluminum. Calculations indicate that EMI shields could be fabricated from intercalated graphite composites which would have less than 12 percent of the mass of conventional aluminum shields, based on mechanical properties and shielding properties alone.

  20. Structure for HTS composite conductors and the manufacture of same

    DOEpatents

    Cotton, J.D.; Riley, G.N. Jr.

    1999-06-01

    A superconducting oxide composite structure including a superconducting oxide member, a metal layer surrounding the superconducting oxide member, and an insulating layer of a complex oxide formed in situ adjacent to the superconducting oxide member and the metal layer is provided together with a method of forming such a superconducting oxide composite structure including encapsulating a superconducting oxide member or precursor within a metal matrix layer from the group of: (1) a reactive metal sheath adjacent to the superconducting oxide member or precursor, the reactive metal sheath surrounded by a second metal layer or (2) an alloy containing a reactive metal; to form an intermediate product, and, heating the intermediate product at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an insulating layer of a complex oxide in situ, the insulating layer to the superconducting oxide member or precursor and the metal matrix layer. 10 figs.

  1. Structure for hts composite conductors and the manufacture of same

    DOEpatents

    Cotton, James D.; Riley, Jr., Gilbert Neal

    1999-01-01

    A superconducting oxide composite structure including a superconducting oxide member, a metal layer surrounding the superconducting oxide member, and an insulating layer of a complex oxide formed in situ adjacent to the superconducting oxide member and the metal layer is provided together with a method of forming such a superconducting oxide composite structure including encapsulating a superconducting oxide member or precursor within a metal matrix layer from the group of: (i) a reactive metal sheath adjacent to the superconducting oxide member or precursor, the reactive metal sheath surrounded by a second metal layer or (ii) an alloy containing a reactive metal; to form an intermediate product, and, heating the intermediate product at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an insulating layer of a complex oxide in situ, the insulating layer to the superconducting oxide member or precursor and the metal matrix layer.

  2. Unambiguous UML Composite Structures: The OMEGA2 Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ober, Iulian; Dragomir, Iulia

    Starting from version 2.0, UML introduced hierarchical composite structures, which are a very expressive way of defining complex software architectures, but which have a very loosely defined semantics in the standard. In this paper we propose a set of consistency rules that ensure UML composite structures are unambiguous and can be given a precise semantics. Our primary application of the static consistency rules defined in this paper is within the OMEGA UML profile [6], but these rules are general and applicable to other hierarchical component models based on the same concepts, such as MARTE GCM or SysML. The rule set has been formalized in OCL and is currently used in the OMEGA UML compiler.

  3. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Structural response and failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorris, William J.; Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Tien; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    Non-linear analysis methods were adapted and incorporated in a finite element based DIAL code. These methods are necessary to evaluate the global response of a stiffened structure under combined in-plane and out-of-plane loading. These methods include the Arc Length method and target point analysis procedure. A new interface material model was implemented that can model elastic-plastic behavior of the bond adhesive. Direct application of this method is in skin/stiffener interface failure assessment. Addition of the AML (angle minus longitudinal or load) failure procedure and Hasin's failure criteria provides added capability in the failure predictions. Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis modules were developed as interactive pre-and post-processors. Each module provides the means of performing self-initiated finite elements based analysis of primary structures such as a flat or curved stiffened panel; a corrugated flat sandwich panel; and a curved geodesic fuselage panel. This module brings finite element analysis into the design of composite structures without the requirement for the user to know much about the techniques and procedures needed to actually perform a finite element analysis from scratch. An interactive finite element code was developed to predict bolted joint strength considering material and geometrical non-linearity. The developed method conducts an ultimate strength failure analysis using a set of material degradation models.

  4. Design of Composite Structures for Reliability and Damage Tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    1999-01-01

    A summary of research conducted during the first year is presented. The research objectives were sought by conducting two tasks: (1) investigation of probabilistic design techniques for reliability-based design of composite sandwich panels, and (2) examination of strain energy density failure criterion in conjunction with response surface methodology for global-local design of damage tolerant helicopter fuselage structures. This report primarily discusses the efforts surrounding the first task and provides a discussion of some preliminary work involving the second task.

  5. Composition, structure, physicochemical properties, and modifications of cassava starch.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan

    2015-05-20

    Cassava is highly tolerant to harsh climatic conditions and has great productivity on marginal lands. The supply of cassava starch, the major component of the root, is thus sustainable and cheap. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the composition, physical and chemical structures, physicochemical properties, nutritional quality, and modifications of cassava starch. Research opportunities to better understand this starch are provided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nanomembrane structures having mixed crystalline orientations and compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lagally, Max G.; Scott, Shelley A.; Savage, Donald E.

    2014-08-12

    The present nanomembrane structures include a multilayer film comprising a single-crystalline layer of semiconductor material disposed between two other single-crystalline layers of semiconductor material. A plurality of holes extending through the nanomembrane are at least partially, and preferably entirely, filled with a filler material which is also a semiconductor, but which differs from the nanomembrane semiconductor materials in composition, crystal orientation, or both.

  7. A life prediction model for laminated composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.

    1990-01-01

    A life prediction methodology for laminated continuous fiber composites subjected to fatigue loading conditions was developed. A summary is presented of research completed. A phenomenological damage evolution law was formulated for matrix cracking which is independent of stacking sequence. Mechanistic and physical support was developed for the phenomenological evolution law proposed above. The damage evolution law proposed above was implemented to a finite element computer program. And preliminary predictions were obtained for a structural component undergoing fatigue loading induced damage.

  8. Na/K-interdiffusion in alkali feldspar: new data on diffusion anisotropy and composition dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Anne-Kathrin; Petrishcheva, Elena; Habler, Gerlinde; Abart, Rainer; Rhede, Dieter

    2013-04-01

    Exchange experiments between gem-quality alkali feldspar with an initial XOr of 0.85 or 0.72 and Na/K-salt melts have been conducted at temperatures between 800° and 1000° C. The crystals were prepared as crystallographically oriented plates, the polished surfaces corresponding to the (010) or (001) plane of the feldspar. The composition of the melts was varied systematically to induce a controlled shift of the feldspar towards more Na-rich or K-rich compositions (XOr 0.5 to 1). A molar excess of cations by a factor of 40 in the melt ensured constant concentration boundary conditions for cation exchange. Different geometries of diffusion profiles can be observed depending on the direction of the composition shift. For a shift towards more K-rich compositions the diffusion profile exhibits two plateaus corresponding to an exchanged rim in equilibrium with the melt and a completely unexchanged core, respectively. Between these plateaus an exchange front develops with an inflection point that progresses into the crystal with t1-2. The width of this diffusion front varies greatly with the extent of chemical shift and crystallographic direction. The narrowest profiles are always found in the direction normal to (010), i.e. b, marking the slowest direction of interdiffusion. A shift towards more Na-rich composition leads to the development of a crack system due to the composition strain associated with the substitution of the larger K+ion with the smaller Na+ion. The exchange front developing in this case lacks the inflection point observed for shifts towards more K-rich compositions. The observed geometry of the diffusion fronts can be explained by a composition dependence of the interdiffusion coefficient. We used the Boltzmann transformation to calculate the interdiffusion coefficient in dependence of composition from our data in a range between XOr 0.5 and 1 for profiles normal to both (010) and (001) and for different temperatures. As indicated by the different

  9. Validation of Design and Analysis Techniques of Tailored Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C. (Technical Monitor); Wijayratne, Dulnath D.

    2004-01-01

    Aeroelasticity is the relationship between the elasticity of an aircraft structure and its aerodynamics. This relationship can cause instabilities such as flutter in a wing. Engineers have long studied aeroelasticity to ensure such instabilities do not become a problem within normal operating conditions. In recent decades structural tailoring has been used to take advantage of aeroelasticity. It is possible to tailor an aircraft structure to respond favorably to multiple different flight regimes such as takeoff, landing, cruise, 2-g pull up, etc. Structures can be designed so that these responses provide an aerodynamic advantage. This research investigates the ability to design and analyze tailored structures made from filamentary composites. Specifically the accuracy of tailored composite analysis must be verified if this design technique is to become feasible. To pursue this idea, a validation experiment has been performed on a small-scale filamentary composite wing box. The box is tailored such that its cover panels induce a global bend-twist coupling under an applied load. Two types of analysis were chosen for the experiment. The first is a closed form analysis based on a theoretical model of a single cell tailored box beam and the second is a finite element analysis. The predicted results are compared with the measured data to validate the analyses. The comparison of results show that the finite element analysis is capable of predicting displacements and strains to within 10% on the small-scale structure. The closed form code is consistently able to predict the wing box bending to 25% of the measured value. This error is expected due to simplifying assumptions in the closed form analysis. Differences between the closed form code representation and the wing box specimen caused large errors in the twist prediction. The closed form analysis prediction of twist has not been validated from this test.

  10. Structure and Composition of the Bacillus anthracis Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Avakyan, A. A.; Katz, L. N.; Levina, K. N.; Pavlova, I. B.

    1965-01-01

    Avakyan, A. A. (Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, USSR), L. N. Katz, K. N. Levina, and I. B. Pavlova. Structure and composition of the Bacillus anthracis capsule. J. Bacteriol. 90:1082–1095. 1965.—Observations by various methods of light microscopy (phase contrast, dark-field, and fluorescence) revealed the complex structure of the Bacillus anthracis capsule, which changes regularly during the growth cycle of the culture. Special cytological methods of staining the capsule made it possible to study its fine structure, which is not revealed by negative staining with India ink. For example, the capsule shows a membranelike outline, fine transverse lines, and interruptions and transverse septa traversing the entire capsule. By using cytochemical methods, it was found that the capsule has a stratified structure and that the various layers of the capsule differ as to the value of the isoelectric point, metachromatic ability, sensitivity to various enzymes, and, consequently, chemical composition. It was thus shown that the membranelike outline of the capsule consists of peptides and neutral mucopolysaccharides. The middle part of the capsule consists of a complex of substances of both polysaccharide and protein nature, and the inner part consists of acid mucopolysaccharides. Observation of the capsular forms of B. anthracis by means of an electron microscope revealed differences in the osmiophilia and submicroscopic structure of the membranelike outline and the middle and inner parts of the capsule. Immunochemical studies conducted by the fluorescent-antibody method revealed localization of antigens in different parts of the capsule, and made it possible to differentiate the capsular antigens according to their serum-staining ability and according of their relations to enzymes, i.e., their chemical composition. This paper concerns the possibility of studying the fine structure of bacterial capsules in fixed preparations, and the differences and similarities of

  11. Propogation loss with frequency of ultrasound guided waves in a composite metal-honeycomb structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Indu F.; Baid, Harsh K.; Guzman, Narciso; Kempen, Lothar U.; Mal, Ajit

    2009-05-01

    Non-destructive testing of critical structural components is time consuming, while necessary for maintaining safe operation. Large aerospace structures, such as the vertical stabilizers of aircraft undergo inspection at regular intervals for damage diagnostics. However, conventional techniques for damage detection and identification before repair can be scheduled are conducted off-line and therefore can take weeks. The use of guided ultrasound waves is being investigated to expedite damage detection in composites. We measure the frequency dependent loss of ultrasonic guided waves for a structure comprising a boron-nitride composite skin sandwiching an aluminum honeycomb. A wide range of ultrasound frequencies propagate as measured using PZTs, with the lowest attenuation observed about 200-250 kHz. These measurements are confirmed using optical fiber Bragg grating arrays used as ultrasound transducers.

  12. Synthesis, Structural, and Adsorption Properties and Thermal Stability of Nanohydroxyapatite/Polysaccharide Composites.

    PubMed

    Skwarek, Ewa; Goncharuk, Olena; Sternik, Dariusz; Janusz, Wladyslaw; Gdula, Karolina; Gun'ko, Vladimir M

    2017-12-01

    A series of composites based on nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) and natural polysaccharides (PS) (nHAp/agar, nHAp/chitosan, nHAp/pectin FB300, nHAp/pectin APA103, nHAp/sodium alginate) was synthesized by liquid-phase two-step method and characterized using nitrogen adsorption-desorption, DSC, TG, FTIR spectroscopy, and SEM. The analysis of nitrogen adsorption-desorption data shows that composites with a nHAp: PS ratio of 4:1 exhibit a sufficiently high specific surface area from 49 to 82 m 2 /g. The incremental pore size distributions indicate mainly mesoporosity. The composites with the component ratio 1:1 preferably form a film-like structure, and the value of S BET varies from 0.3 to 43 m 2 /g depending on the nature of a polysaccharide. Adsorption of Sr(II) on the composites from the aqueous solutions has been studied. The thermal properties of polysaccharides alone and in nHAp/PS show the influence of nHAp, since there is a shift of characteristic DSC and DTG peaks. FTIR spectroscopy data confirm the presence of functional groups typical for nHAp as well as polysaccharides in composites. Structure and morphological characteristics of the composites are strongly dependent on the ratio of components, since nHAp/PS at 4:1 have relatively large S BET values and a good ability to adsorb metal ions. The comparison of the adsorption capacity with respect to Sr(II) of nHAp, polysaccharides, and composites shows that it of the latter is higher than that of nHAp (per 1 m 2 of surface).

  13. On the composition dependence of faceting behaviour of primary phases during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saroch, Mamta; Dubey, K. S.; Ramachandrarao, P.

    1993-02-01

    The entropy of solution of the primary aluminium-rich phase in the aluminium-tin melts has been evaluated as a function of temperature using available thermodynamic and phase equilibria data with a view to understand the faceting behaviour of this phase. It was noticed that the range of compositions in which alloys of aluminium and tin yield a faceted primary phase is correlated with the domain of compositions over which the entropy of solution shows a strong temperature dependence. It is demonstrated that both a high value of the entropy of solution and a strong temperature dependence of it are essential for providing faceting. A strong temperature dependence of the entropy of solution is in turn a consequence of negligible liquidus slope and existence of retrograde solubility. The AgBi and AgPb systems have similar features.

  14. A smart composite patch for the repair of aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakha, Kelah; Samuel, Paul; Pines, Darryll J.

    2005-05-01

    Recent interest in bonded composite patch repair technology for aerospace systems is because this method can be carried out at a reduced cost and time and can easily be applied to complex geometric structures. This paper details the development of a dual stiffness/energy sensor for monitoring the integrity of a composite patch used to repair an aluminum structural component. The smart sensor has the ability to predict the elastic field of a given host structure based on the strain state of two sub-sensors integrated into the structure. The present study shows the possibility of using the sensor to deduce the local instantaneous host stiffness. Damaged structures are characterized by a reduction in their elastic stiffness that evolve from microstructural defects. A local smart sensor can be developed to sense the local average properties on a host. In this paper, sensors are attached to a structure and a modified Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method is used to derive the elastic properties of the host. An analytical derivation and a sensitivity analysis for the quasistatic application is given in a papers by Majed, Dasgupta, Kelah and Pines. A summary of the derivation of the dynamic Eshelby tensor is presented. This is of importance because damage detection in structures undergoing vibratory and other motions present a greater challenge than those in quasistatic motion. An in-situ health monitoring active sensor system for a real structure (an aluminum plate with an attached repair patch) under close-to real lifecycle loading conditions is developed. The detection of the onset of any damage to the structure as well as the repair patch and the subsequent monitoring of the growth of this damage constitute important goals of the system. Both experimental and finite element methods were applied. Experimental results are presented for tests of the aluminum plate with the repair patch under monotonic quasi-static and dynamic loading vibratory conditions. In summary, the

  15. Automated 3D structure composition for large RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Popenda, Mariusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Antczak, Maciej; Purzycka, Katarzyna J.; Lukasiak, Piotr; Bartol, Natalia; Blazewicz, Jacek; Adamiak, Ryszard W.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the numerous functions that RNAs play in living cells depends critically on knowledge of their three-dimensional structure. Due to the difficulties in experimentally assessing structures of large RNAs, there is currently great demand for new high-resolution structure prediction methods. We present the novel method for the fully automated prediction of RNA 3D structures from a user-defined secondary structure. The concept is founded on the machine translation system. The translation engine operates on the RNA FRABASE database tailored to the dictionary relating the RNA secondary structure and tertiary structure elements. The translation algorithm is very fast. Initial 3D structure is composed in a range of seconds on a single processor. The method assures the prediction of large RNA 3D structures of high quality. Our approach needs neither structural templates nor RNA sequence alignment, required for comparative methods. This enables the building of unresolved yet native and artificial RNA structures. The method is implemented in a publicly available, user-friendly server RNAComposer. It works in an interactive mode and a batch mode. The batch mode is designed for large-scale modelling and accepts atomic distance restraints. Presently, the server is set to build RNA structures of up to 500 residues. PMID:22539264

  16. The Candida albicans Biofilm Matrix: Composition, Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Christopher G; Vila, Taissa; Romo, Jesus A; Montelongo-Jauregui, Daniel; Wall, Gina; Ramasubramanian, Anand; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2017-03-01

    A majority of infections caused by Candida albicans -the most frequent fungal pathogen-are associated with biofilm formation. A salient feature of C. albicans biofilms is the presence of the biofilm matrix. This matrix is composed of exopolymeric materials secreted by sessile cells within the biofilm, in which all classes of macromolecules are represented, and provides protection against environmental challenges. In this review, we summarize the knowledge accumulated during the last two decades on the composition, structure, and function of the C. albicans biofilm matrix. Knowledge of the matrix components, its structure, and function will help pave the way to novel strategies to combat C. albicans biofilm infections.

  17. The Candida albicans Biofilm Matrix: Composition, Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Christopher G.; Vila, Taissa; Romo, Jesus A.; Montelongo-Jauregui, Daniel; Wall, Gina; Ramasubramanian, Anand; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.

    2017-01-01

    A majority of infections caused by Candida albicans—the most frequent fungal pathogen—are associated with biofilm formation. A salient feature of C. albicans biofilms is the presence of the biofilm matrix. This matrix is composed of exopolymeric materials secreted by sessile cells within the biofilm, in which all classes of macromolecules are represented, and provides protection against environmental challenges. In this review, we summarize the knowledge accumulated during the last two decades on the composition, structure, and function of the C. albicans biofilm matrix. Knowledge of the matrix components, its structure, and function will help pave the way to novel strategies to combat C. albicans biofilm infections. PMID:28516088

  18. Coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Huang, H.; Hartle, M.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the fourth years effort of a 5-year program to develop a methodology for coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded component structures. These accomplishments include: (1) demonstration of coupled solution capability; (2) alternate CSTEM electromagnetic technology; (3) CSTEM acoustic capability; (4) CSTEM tailoring; (5) CSTEM composite micromechanics using ICAN; and (6) multiple layer elements in CSTEM.

  19. Method for Fabricating Composite Structures Using Continuous Press Forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabricating composite structures at a low-cost. moderate-to-high production rate. A first embodiment of the method includes employing a continuous press forming fabrication process. A second embodiment of the method includes employing a pultrusion process for obtaining composite structures. The methods include coating yarns with matrix material, weaving the yarn into fabric to produce a continuous fabric supply and feeding multiple layers of net-shaped fabrics having optimally oriented fibers into a debulking tool to form an undebulked preform. The continuous press forming fabrication process includes partially debulking the preform, cutting the partially debulked preform and debulking the partially debulked preform to form a net-shape. An electron-beam or similar technique then cures the structure. The pultrusion fabric process includes feeding the undebulked preform into a heated die and gradually debulking the undebulked preform. The undebulked preform in the heated die changes dimension until a desired cross-sectional dimension is achieved. This process further includes obtaining a net-shaped infiltrated uncured preform, cutting the uncured preform to a desired length and electron-beam curing (or similar technique) the uncured preform. These fabrication methods produce superior structures formed at higher production rates. resulting in lower cost and high structural performance.

  20. Method for Fabricating Composite Structures Using Pultrusion Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method for fabricating composite structures at a low-cost, moderate-to-high production rate. A first embodiment of the method includes employing a continuous press forming fabrication process. A second embodiment of the method includes employing a pultrusion process for obtaining composite structures. The methods include coating yarns with matrix material, weaving the yarn into fabric to produce a continuous fabric supply and feeding multiple layers of net-shaped fabrics having optimally oriented fibers into a debulking tool to form an undebulked preform. The continuous press forming fabrication process includes partially debulking the preform, cutting the partially debulked preform and debulking the partially debulked preform to form a net-shape. An electron-beam or similar technique then cures the structure. The pultrusion fabric process includes feeding the undebulked preform into a heated die and gradually debulking the undebulked preform. The undebulked preform in the heated die changes dimension until a desired cross-sectional dimension is achieved. This process further includes obtaining a net-shaped infiltrated uncured preform, cutting the uncured preform to a desired length and electron-beam curing (or similar technique) the uncured preform. These fabrication methods produce superior structures formed at higher production rates, resulting in lower cost and high structural performance.

  1. Method for Fabricating Composite Structures Using Pultrusion Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method for fabricating composite structures at a low-cost, moderate-to-high production rate. A first embodiment of the method includes employing a continuous press forming fabrication process. A second embodiment of the method includes employing a pultrusion process for obtaining composite structures. The methods include coating yarns with matrix material, weaving the yarn into fabric to produce a continuous fabric supply and feeding multiple layers of net-shaped fabrics having optimally oriented fibers into a debulking tool to form an undebulked preform. The continuous press forming fabrication process includes partially debulking the preform, cutting the partially debulked preform and debulking the partially debulked preform to form a netshape. An electron-beam or similar technique then cures the structure. The pultrusion fabric process includes feeding the undebulked preform into a heated die and gradually debulking the undebulked preform. The undebulked preform in the heated die changes dimension until a desired cross-sectional dimension is achieved. This process further includes obtaining a net-shaped infiltrated uncured preform, cutting the uncured preform to a desired length and electronbeam curing (or similar technique) the uncured preform. These fabrication methods produce superior structures formed at higher production rates, resulting in lower cost and high structural performance.

  2. Nonlinear damage detection in composite structures using bispectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Pickering, Simon; Scarselli, Gennaro; Meo, Michele

    2014-03-01

    Literature offers a quantitative number of diagnostic methods that can continuously provide detailed information of the material defects and damages in aerospace and civil engineering applications. Indeed, low velocity impact damages can considerably degrade the integrity of structural components and, if not detected, they can result in catastrophic failure conditions. This paper presents a nonlinear Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) method, based on ultrasonic guided waves (GW), for the detection of the nonlinear signature in a damaged composite structure. The proposed technique, based on a bispectral analysis of ultrasonic input waveforms, allows for the evaluation of the nonlinear response due to the presence of cracks and delaminations. Indeed, such a methodology was used to characterize the nonlinear behaviour of the structure, by exploiting the frequency mixing of the original waveform acquired from a sparse array of sensors. The robustness of bispectral analysis was experimentally demonstrated on a damaged carbon fibre reinforce plastic (CFRP) composite panel, and the nonlinear source was retrieved with a high level of accuracy. Unlike other linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods for damage detection, this methodology does not require any baseline with the undamaged structure for the evaluation of the nonlinear source, nor a priori knowledge of the mechanical properties of the specimen. Moreover, bispectral analysis can be considered as a nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) technique for materials showing either classical or non-classical nonlinear behaviour.

  3. Elastic stability of biaxially loaded longitudinally stiffened composite structures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanathan, A. V.; Tamekuni, M.; Tripp, L. L.

    1973-01-01

    A linear analysis method is presented for the elastic stability of structures of uniform cross section, that may be idealized as an assemblage of laminated plate-strips, flat and curved, and beams. Each plate-strip and beam covers the entire length of the structure and is simply supported on the edges normal to the longitudinal axis. Arbitrary boundary conditions may be specified on any external longitudinal side of plate-strips. The structure or selected plate-strips may be loaded in any desired combination of inplane biaxial loads. The analysis simultaneously considers all modes of instability and is applicable for the buckling of laminated composite structures. Some numerical results are presented to indicate possible applications.

  4. Experimental study on beam for composite CES structural system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Tomoya

    2017-10-01

    Development study on Concrete Encase Steel (CES) composite structure system has been continuously conducted toward the practical use. CES structure is composed of steel and fiber reinforced concrete. In previous study, it was found that CES structure has good seismic performance from experimental study of columns, beam - column joints, shear walls and a two story two span frame. However, as fundamental study on CES beam could be lacking, it is necessary to understand the structural performance of CES beam. In this study, static loading tests of CES beams were conducted with experimental valuable of steel size, the presence or absence of slab and thickness of slab. And restoring characteristics, failure behavior, deformation behavior, and strength evaluation method of CES beam were investigated. As the results, it was found that CES beam showed stable hysteresis behavior. Furthermore it was found that the flexural strength of the CES beam could be evaluated by superposition strength theory.

  5. Passive Cooling Enabled by Polymer Composite Coating: Dependence on Filler, Filler Size and Coating Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yue; Shi, Frank G.

    2017-07-01

    The effective passive radiation cooling that is enabled by silicone-based composites is investigated for its dependence on coating thickness and filler size in the range of nanometers to micrometers. It is established, contrary to prior reports, that the effective passive radiation cooling does not exhibit a filler size dependence, i.e., there is no optimal size at which a maximum cooling would be reached. However, the apparent cooling effect is filler type dependent and among the fillers investigated, Al2O3 exhibits the best apparent cooling effect. In addition, the apparent cooling effect is dependent on coating thickness: the thickness dependence is non-monotonic, and the maximum cooling occurs at an optimal thickness of 70 μm, regardless of filler type. Potential significant implications of the findings are also discussed.

  6. Damage Assessment of Composite Structures Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminero, M. A.; Lopez-Pedrosa, M.; Pinna, C.; Soutis, C.

    2014-02-01

    The steady increase of Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Structures in modern aircraft will reach a new dimension with the entry into service of the Boeing 787 and Airbus 350. Replacement of damaged parts will not be a preferable solution due to the high level of integration and the large size of the components involved. Consequently the need to develop repair techniques and processes for composite components is readily apparent. Bonded patch repair technologies provide an alternative to mechanically fastened repairs with significantly higher performance, especially for relatively thin skins. Carefully designed adhesively bonded patches can lead to cost effective and highly efficient repairs in comparison with conventional riveted patch repairs that cut fibers and introduce highly strained regions. In this work, the assessment of the damage process taking place in notched (open-hole) specimens under uniaxial tensile loading was studied. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Digital Image Correlation (DIC) techniques were employed to obtain full-field surface strain measurements in carbon-fiber/epoxy T700/M21 composite plates with different stacking sequences in the presence of an open circular hole. Penetrant enhanced X-ray radiographs were taken to identify damage location and extent after loading around the hole. DIC strain fields were compared to finite element predictions. In addition, DIC techniques were used to characterise damage and performance of adhesively bonded patch repairs in composite panels under tensile loading. This part of work relates to strength/stiffness restoration of damaged composite aircraft that becomes more important as composites are used more extensively in the construction of modern jet airliners. The behaviour of bonded patches under loading was monitored using DIC full-field strain measurements. Location and extent of damage identified by X-ray radiography correlates well with DIC strain results giving confidence to

  7. Zirconia-hydroxyapatite composite material with micro porous structure.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takuya Junior; An, Sang-Hyun; Ishimoto, Takuya; Nakano, Takayoshi; Matsumoto, Takuya; Imazato, Satoshi

    2011-11-01

    Titanium plates and apatite blocks are commonly used for restoring large osseous defects in dental and orthopedic surgery. However, several cases of allergies against titanium have been recently reported. Also, sintered apatite block does not possess sufficient mechanical strength. In this study, we attempted to fabricate a composite material that has mechanical properties similar to biocortical bone and high bioaffinity by compounding hydroxyapatite (HAp) with the base material zirconia (ZrO(2)), which possesses high mechanical properties and low toxicity toward living organisms. After mixing the raw material powders at several different ZrO(2)/HAp mixing ratios, the material was compressed in a metal mold (8 mm in diameter) at 5 MPa. Subsequently, it was sintered for 5 h at 1500°C to obtain the ZrO(2)/HAp composite. The mechanical property and biocompatibility of materials were investigated. Furthermore, osteoconductivity of materials was investigated by animal studies. A composite material with a minute porous structure was successfully created using ZrO(2)/HAp powders, having different particle sizes, as the starting material. The material also showed high protein adsorption and a favorable cellular affinity. When the mixing ratio was ZrO(2)/HAp=70/30, the strength was equal to cortical bone. Furthermore, in vivo experiments confirmed its high osteoconductivity. The composite material had strength similar to biocortical bones with high cell and tissue affinities by compounding ZrO(2) and HAp. The ZrO(2)/HAp composite material having micro porous structure would be a promising bone restorative material. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nonlinearity and Strain-Rate Dependence in the Deformation Response of Polymer Matrix Composites Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2000-01-01

    There has been no accurate procedure for modeling the high-speed impact of composite materials, but such an analytical capability will be required in designing reliable lightweight engine-containment systems. The majority of the models in use assume a linear elastic material response that does not vary with strain rate. However, for containment systems, polymer matrix composites incorporating ductile polymers are likely to be used. For such a material, the deformation response is likely to be nonlinear and to vary with strain rate. An analytical model has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field that incorporates both of these features. A set of constitutive equations that was originally developed to analyze the viscoplastic deformation of metals (Ramaswamy-Stouffer equations) was modified to simulate the nonlinear, rate-dependent deformation of polymers. Specifically, the effects of hydrostatic stresses on the inelastic response, which can be significant in polymers, were accounted for by a modification of the definition of the effective stress. The constitutive equations were then incorporated into a composite micromechanics model based on the mechanics of materials theory. This theory predicts the deformation response of a composite material from the properties and behavior of the individual constituents. In this manner, the nonlinear, rate-dependent deformation response of a polymer matrix composite can be predicted.

  9. Poling of PVDF matrix composites for integrated structural load sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh; Greminger, Michael A.; Zhao, Ping

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to create and evaluate a smart composite structure that can be used for integrated load sensing and structural health monitoring. In this structure, PVDF films are used as the matrix material instead of epoxy resin or other thermoplastics. The reinforcements are two layers of carbon fiber with one layer of Kevlar separating them. Due to the electrical conductivity properties of carbon fiber and the dielectric effect of Kevlar, the structure acts as a capacitor. Furthermore, the piezoelectric properties of the PVDF matrix can be used to monitor the response of the structure under applied loads. In order to exploit the piezoelectric properties of PVDF, the PVDF material must be polarized to align the dipole moments of its crystalline structure. The optimal condition for poling the structure was found by performing a 23 factorial design of experiment (DoE). The factors that were studied in DoE were temperature, voltage, and duration of poling. Finally, the response of the poled structure was monitored by exposing the samples to an applied load.

  10. Strong composition dependence of adhesive properties of ultraviolet curing adhesives with modified acrylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yefeng; Li, Yandong; Wang, Fupeng; Peng, Cheng; Xu, Zhichao; Hu, Jianbing

    2018-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) curable adhesives have been widely researched in fields of health care and electronic components. UV curing systems with modified acrylic ester prepolymers have been frequently employed. In order to clarify composition dependence of adhesive properties of adhesives containing modified acrylates, in this work, several UV curing adhesives bearing urethane and epoxy acrylates were designed and fabricated. The effects of prepolymer, diluent, feed ratio, initiator and assistant on adhesive performances were investigated. This work might offer a facile route to gain promising high-performance UV curable adhesives with desired adhesive traits through regulating their compositions.

  11. High Temperature Advanced Structural Composites. Volume 2. Ceramic Matrix Composites, Fiber Processing and Properties, and Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-02

    1977) 97. 3 W. Wieswieler, E. Fitzer, G . Nagel, and H. Jager, Thin Solid Film, 148 (1987) 93. 4 T. A. Chernyshova , L. I. Kobelova, J. Mater. Scl., 20...AD-A267 023 I[E[gh ’Temperature kdvanced Structural (Composites Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute , \\ G Troy, N. Y. 12180-3590 - Final Report -- Book 2...thermodynamic data (heats of forma- ,(T p, comp.) °+p, comp.) (1) tion, absolute entropies, heat capacities) of reactants where g ’ is the chemical

  12. Predicting High Explosive Detonation Velocities from Their Composition and Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    for a gamut of ideal explosives. The explosives ranged from nitroaromatics, cyclic and linear nitramines, nitrate esters and nitro-nitrato...structure is postulated for a gamut of explosives. Since detonation velocity, DQ, is density dependent, the linear regression plot. Figure 1, of the

  13. Mechanical and time-dependent behavior of wood-plastic composites subjected to bending

    Treesearch

    S. E. Hamel; John Hermanson; S. M. Cramer

    2015-01-01

    The most popular use of wood–plastic composite (WPC) members in the United States has been as outdoor decking material in residential construction. If the use of these products expands into more structural applications, such as beams and joists, it is imperative that the material’s mechanical behavior be understood. Since most of the potential structural uses of this...

  14. Frequency-dependent learning achieved using semiconducting polymer/electrolyte composite cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W. S.; Zeng, F.; Lu, S. H.; Liu, A.; Li, X. J.; Pan, F.

    2015-10-01

    Frequency-dependent learning has been achieved using semiconducting polymer/electrolyte composite cells. The cells composed of polymer/electrolyte double layers realized the conventional spike-rate-dependent plasticity (SRDP) learning model. These cells responded to depression upon low-frequency stimulation and to potentiation upon high-frequency stimulation and presented long-term memory. The transition threshold θm from depression to potentiation varied depending on the previous stimulations. A nanostructure resembling a bio-synapse in its transport passages was demonstrated and a random channel model was proposed to describe the ionic kinetics at the polymer/electrolyte interface during and after stimulations with various frequencies, accounting for the observed SRDP.Frequency-dependent learning has been achieved using semiconducting polymer/electrolyte composite cells. The cells composed of polymer/electrolyte double layers realized the conventional spike-rate-dependent plasticity (SRDP) learning model. These cells responded to depression upon low-frequency stimulation and to potentiation upon high-frequency stimulation and presented long-term memory. The transition threshold θm from depression to potentiation varied depending on the previous stimulations. A nanostructure resembling a bio-synapse in its transport passages was demonstrated and a random channel model was proposed to describe the ionic kinetics at the polymer/electrolyte interface during and after stimulations with various frequencies, accounting for the observed SRDP. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02891d

  15. Microbial composition during Chinese soy sauce koji-making based on culture dependent and independent methods.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yin-zhuo; Qian, Yu-lin; Ji, Feng-di; Chen, Jing-yu; Han, Bei-zhong

    2013-05-01

    Koji-making is a key process for production of high quality soy sauce. The microbial composition during koji-making was investigated by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods to determine predominant bacterial and fungal populations. The culture-dependent methods used were direct culture and colony morphology observation, and PCR amplification of 16S/26S rDNA fragments followed by sequencing analysis. The culture-independent method was based on the analysis of 16S/26S rDNA clone libraries. There were differences between the results obtained by different methods. However, sufficient overlap existed between the different methods to identify potentially significant microbial groups. 16 and 20 different bacterial species were identified using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods, respectively. 7 species could be identified by both methods. The most predominant bacterial genera were Weissella and Staphylococcus. Both 6 different fungal species were identified using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods, respectively. Only 3 species could be identified by both sets of methods. The most predominant fungi were Aspergillus and Candida species. This work illustrated the importance of a comprehensive polyphasic approach in the analysis of microbial composition during soy sauce koji-making, the knowledge of which will enable further optimization of microbial composition and quality control of koji to upgrade Chinese traditional soy sauce product. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Fluid-Structure Interaction on Dynamic Response of Composite Structures: Experimental and Numerical Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    STRUCTURES: EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL STUDIES by Young W. Kwon August 1, 2013 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Prepared...failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE...AND SUBTITLE Effects of Fluid-Structure Interaction on Dynamic Responses of Composite Structures: Experimental and Numerical Studies 5a. CONTRACT

  17. Coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Chen, P. C.; Dame, L. T.; Huang, H.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the first year effort of a 5-year program to develop a methodology for coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures. These accomplishments include: (1) the results of the selective literature survey; (2) 8-, 16-, and 20-noded isoparametric plate and shell elements; (3) large deformation structural analysis; (4) eigenanalysis; (5) anisotropic heat transfer analysis; and (6) anisotropic electromagnetic analysis.

  18. A Decentralized Compositional Framework for Dependable Decision Process in Self-Managed Cyber Physical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Kun-Mean; Zhang, Zhan

    2017-01-01

    Cyber Physical Systems (CPSs) need to interact with the changeable environment under various interferences. To provide continuous and high quality services, a self-managed CPS should automatically reconstruct itself to adapt to these changes and recover from failures. Such dynamic adaptation behavior introduces systemic challenges for CPS design, advice evaluation and decision process arrangement. In this paper, a formal compositional framework is proposed to systematically improve the dependability of the decision process. To guarantee the consistent observation of event orders for causal reasoning, this work first proposes a relative time-based method to improve the composability and compositionality of the timing property of events. Based on the relative time solution, a formal reference framework is introduced for self-managed CPSs, which includes a compositional FSM-based actor model (subsystems of CPS), actor-based advice and runtime decomposable decisions. To simplify self-management, a self-similar recursive actor interface is proposed for decision (actor) composition. We provide constraints and seven patterns for the composition of reliability and process time requirements. Further, two decentralized decision process strategies are proposed based on our framework, and we compare the reliability with the static strategy and the centralized processing strategy. The simulation results show that the one-order feedback strategy has high reliability, scalability and stability against the complexity of decision and random failure. This paper also shows a way to simplify the evaluation for dynamic system by improving the composability and compositionality of the subsystem. PMID:29120357

  19. A Decentralized Compositional Framework for Dependable Decision Process in Self-Managed Cyber Physical Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Zuo, Decheng; Hou, Kun-Mean; Zhang, Zhan

    2017-11-09

    Cyber Physical Systems (CPSs) need to interact with the changeable environment under various interferences. To provide continuous and high quality services, a self-managed CPS should automatically reconstruct itself to adapt to these changes and recover from failures. Such dynamic adaptation behavior introduces systemic challenges for CPS design, advice evaluation and decision process arrangement. In this paper, a formal compositional framework is proposed to systematically improve the dependability of the decision process. To guarantee the consistent observation of event orders for causal reasoning, this work first proposes a relative time-based method to improve the composability and compositionality of the timing property of events. Based on the relative time solution, a formal reference framework is introduced for self-managed CPSs, which includes a compositional FSM-based actor model (subsystems of CPS), actor-based advice and runtime decomposable decisions. To simplify self-management, a self-similar recursive actor interface is proposed for decision (actor) composition. We provide constraints and seven patterns for the composition of reliability and process time requirements. Further, two decentralized decision process strategies are proposed based on our framework, and we compare the reliability with the static strategy and the centralized processing strategy. The simulation results show that the one-order feedback strategy has high reliability, scalability and stability against the complexity of decision and random failure. This paper also shows a way to simplify the evaluation for dynamic system by improving the composability and compositionality of the subsystem.

  20. Heat resistant composite structure for shuttle applications (Ryton-B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A program was undertaken to characterize Ryton-B resin, develop graphite filament prepregs, undirectional laminates and determine the strength and heat resistance of the composite system. Through the use of a water soluble resin binder, high quality prepreg tape, three inches wide with 4 tows of HM-S were produced. The tape laminated to 0.00175 inch per ply. A wide range of properties in the cured resin and laminate were found using different curing conditions. The thermal stability and strength of molded laminates appears to be very dependent upon the cure cycle used for polymerization.