Science.gov

Sample records for composition distribution life

  1. Assuring Life in Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos c.

    2008-01-01

    A computational simulation method is presented to assure life in composite systems by using dynamic buckling of smart composite shells as an example. The combined use of composite mechanics, finite element computer codes, and probabilistic analysis enable the effective assessment of the dynamic buckling load of smart composite shells. A universal plot is generated to estimate the dynamic buckling load of composite shells at various load rates and probabilities. The shell structure is also evaluated with smart fibers embedded in the plies right below the outer plies. The results show that, on the average, the use of smart fibers improved the shell buckling resistance by about 9% at different probabilities and delayed the buckling occurrence time. The probabilistic sensitivities results indicate that uncertainties in the fiber volume ratio and ply thickness have major effects on the buckling load. The uncertainties in the electric field strength and smart material volume fraction have moderate effects and thereby in the assured life of the shell.

  2. SPECIES COMPOSITION, DISTRIBUTION, LIFE FORMS AND FOLK NOMENCLATURE OF FOREST AND COMMON LAND PLANTS OF WESTERN CHITWAN, NEPAL

    PubMed Central

    Dangol, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper enumerates 349 plant species belonging to 77 families of vascular plants collected in the winter seasons of 1996 and 2000 by the flora teams of the Population and Ecology Research Laboratory, Nepal. Of the total species, 249 species belong to dicotyledons, 87 species to monocotyledons and 13 species to pteridophytes. Among the families, dicotyledons contributed the highest number of families (55 in number) followed by monocotyledons and pteridophytes. In the study areas, species composition varies with the type of habitats in the study plots. Some species are unique in distribution. The highest unique species are contributed by common lands (87 spp.), followed by the Chitwan National Park forest (36 spp.) and Tikauli forest (32 spp.). Ageratum houstonianum Mill., Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers., Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv., Rungia parviflora (Retz.) Nees, Saccharum spontaneum L. and Thelypteris auriculata (J. Sm.) K. Iwats are the most common species across all the research blocks. Of the listed plants, many plants have local names either in Nepalese or other tribal languages. Plants are named in different ways on the basis of habit, habitat, smell, taste, and morphological characters of the plants, which are also the basis of nomenclature in plant taxonomy. PMID:22962539

  3. Effect of Individual Component Life Distribution on Engine Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Soditus, Sherry M.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of individual engine component life distributions on engine life prediction was determined. A Weibull-based life and reliability analysis of the NASA Energy Efficient Engine was conducted. The engine s life at a 95 and 99.9 percent probability of survival was determined based upon the engine manufacturer s original life calculations and assumed values of each of the component s cumulative life distributions as represented by a Weibull slope. The lives of the high-pressure turbine (HPT) disks and blades were also evaluated individually and as a system in a similar manner. Knowing the statistical cumulative distribution of each engine component with reasonable engineering certainty is a condition precedent to predicting the life and reliability of an entire engine. The life of a system at a given reliability will be less than the lowest-lived component in the system at the same reliability (probability of survival). Where Weibull slopes of all the engine components are equal, the Weibull slope had a minimal effect on engine L(sub 0.1) life prediction. However, at a probability of survival of 95 percent (L(sub 5) life), life decreased with increasing Weibull slope.

  4. The compositional distribution of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMeo, F.; Carry, B.; Alexander, C.; Walsh, K.; Chapman, C.

    2014-07-01

    Each compositional class of asteroid is a relic of the temperature and composition conditions in which it formed. The current distribution reveals the history of the Solar System, and each body acts as a marker of any mixing that occurred since formation. The remnant of a primordial temperature gradient, seen as transition from the S class to C class dominating in different regions of the asteroid belt has been a paradigm for three decades [1-4]. Today, we are armed with major advancements from the past decade that have revolutionized the field of asteroids in areas such as discovery, physical characterization, and dynamical models. A new and more detailed compositional map [5,6] created with data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey [7] allows us to re-examine compositional trends in the main asteroid belt and what the physical and dynamical implications might be. This talk is related to recent work from DeMeo & Carry 2013, 2014 [5,6] and an upcoming chapter of the "Asteroids IV" book in 2015.

  5. A distributed program composition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    A graphical technique for creating distributed computer programs is investigated and a prototype implementation is described which serves as a testbed for the concepts. The type of programs under examination is restricted to those comprising relatively heavyweight parts that intercommunicate by passing messages of typed objects. Such programs are often presented visually as a directed graph with computer program parts as the nodes and communication channels as the edges. This class of programs, called parts-based programs, is not well supported by existing computer systems; much manual work is required to describe the program to the system, establish the communication paths, accommodate the heterogeneity of data types, and to locate the parts of the program on the various systems involved. The work described solves most of these problems by providing an interface for describing parts-based programs in this class in a way that closely models the way programmers think about them: using sketches of diagraphs. Program parts, the computational modes of the larger program system are categorized in libraries and are accessed with browsers. The process of programming has the programmer draw the program graph interactively. Heterogeneity is automatically accommodated by the insertion of type translators where necessary between the parts. Many decisions are necessary in the creation of a comprehensive tool for interactive creation of programs in this class. Possibilities are explored and the issues behind such decisions are presented. An approach to program composition is described, not a carefully implemented programming environment. However, a prototype implementation is described that can demonstrate the ideas presented.

  6. Multiscale Fatigue Life Prediction for Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue life prediction capabilities have been incorporated into the HyperSizer Composite Analysis and Structural Sizing Software. The fatigue damage model is introduced at the fiber/matrix constituent scale through HyperSizer s coupling with NASA s MAC/GMC micromechanics software. This enables prediction of the micro scale damage progression throughout stiffened and sandwich panels as a function of cycles leading ultimately to simulated panel failure. The fatigue model implementation uses a cycle jumping technique such that, rather than applying a specified number of additional cycles, a specified local damage increment is specified and the number of additional cycles to reach this damage increment is calculated. In this way, the effect of stress redistribution due to damage-induced stiffness change is captured, but the fatigue simulations remain computationally efficient. The model is compared to experimental fatigue life data for two composite facesheet/foam core sandwich panels, demonstrating very good agreement.

  7. Trends in U.S. life expectancy gradients: the role of changing educational composition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: I examined age patterns and the role of shifting educational distributions in driving trends in educational gradients in life expectancy among non-Hispanic Whites between 1991 and 2005. Methods: Data were from the 1986–2004 National Health Interview Survey with mortality follow-up through 2006. Life expectancies were computed by sex, period and education. Age decompositions of life expectancy gradients and composition-adjusted life expectancies were computed to account for age patterns and shifting educational distributions. Results: Life expectancy at age 25 among White men increased for all education groups, decreased among the least-educated White women and increased among White women with college degrees. Much of the decline in measured life expectancy for White women with less than a high school education comes from the 85+ age group. Educational gradients in life expectancy widened for White men and women. One-third of the gradient is due to ages below 50. Approximately 26% (0.7 years) and 87% (0.8 years) of the widening of the gradient in life expectancy between ages 25 and 85 for White women and men is attributable to shifting education distributions. Over half of the decline in temporary life expectancy among the least-educated White women is due to compositional change. Conclusions: Life expectancy has increased among White men for all education groups and has decreased among White women with less than a high school education, though not to the extent reported in previous studies. The fact that a large proportion of the change in education-specific life expectancy among women is due to the 85+ age group suggests changes in institutionalization may be affecting estimates. Much of the change in education-specific life expectancy and the growth in the educational gradient in life expectancy is due to the shifting distribution of individuals across education categories. PMID:25939662

  8. Fatigue Life Methodology for Bonded Composite Skin/Stringer Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2001-01-01

    A methodology is presented for determining the fatigue life of composite structures based on fatigue characterization data and geometric nonlinear finite element (FE) analyses. To demonstrate the approach, predicted results were compared to fatigue tests performed on specimens which represented a tapered composite flange bonded onto a composite skin. In a first step, tension tests were performed to evaluate the debonding mechanisms between the flange and the skin. In a second step, a 2D FE model was developed to analyze the tests. To predict matrix cracking onset, the relationship between the tension load and the maximum principal stresses transverse to the fiber direction was determined through FE analysis. Transverse tension fatigue life data were used to -enerate an onset fatigue life P-N curve for matrix cracking. The resulting prediction was in good agreement with data from the fatigue tests. In a third step, a fracture mechanics approach based on FE analysis was used to determine the relationship between the tension load and the critical energy release rate. Mixed mode energy release rate fatigue life data were used to create a fatigue life onset G-N curve for delamination. The resulting prediction was in good agreement with data from the fatigue tests. Further, the prediction curve for cumulative life to failure was generated from the previous onset fatigue life curves. The results showed that the methodology offers a significant potential to Predict cumulative fatigue life of composite structures.

  9. Generation of Finite Life Distributional Goodman Diagrams for Reliability Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kececioglu, D.; Guerrieri, W. N.

    1971-01-01

    The methodology of developing finite life distributional Goodman diagrams and surfaces is described for presenting allowable combinations of alternating stress and mean stress to the design engineer. The combined stress condition is that of an alternating bending stress and a constant shear stress. The finite life Goodman diagrams and surfaces are created from strength distributions developed at various ratios of alternating to mean stress at particular cycle life values. The conclusions indicate that the Von Mises-Hencky ellipse, for cycle life values above 1000 cycles, is an adequate model of the finite life Goodman diagram. In addition, suggestions are made which reduce the number of experimental data points required in a fatigue data acquisition program.

  10. Life prediction of short fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, Alessandro

    A procedure is described for estimating the fatigue lives (i.e. the number of cycles to failure) of parts made of short fiber reinforced thermoplastic matrix composites. First, S-N curves were generated at stress ratios of R = 0 and R = -1 for short glass fiber reinforced Copolyamide coupons with 0° (30% or 50% fiber content by weight), 45° (50% fiber content) and 90° (30% or 50% fiber content) fiber orientations. Second, these S-N curves were compared to data reported in the literature for a wide range of short glass and short carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastics materials. On the basis of these comparison, all available data were "collapsed" on two S-N curves, one for R = 0 and one for R = -l. The fatigue lives of short fiber reinforced thermoplastics were modeled by a Generalized Miner's Rule. Tests were conducted measuring the fatigue lives of 150 by 10 by 2 mm short glass fiber reinforced Copolyamide coupons under different types of cyclic loads. The fatigue lives measured in these tests were compared to those provided by the Generalized Miner's Rule, and good agreements were found between the test and model results. The fatigue lives of two different parts (made of short glass fiber reinforced Copolyamide) were then investigated. The first one was a 150 by 10 by 4 mm coupon with a 2 mm hole at the center. The second one was an automotive gear shift link. The fiber orientations and the stresses inside these parts were calculated, respectively, by the commercial softwares C-Mold and by ABAQUS. The fatigue lives under different cyclic loads were measured; they were also calculated by the Generalized Miner's Rule together with the results of C-Mold and ABAQUS and the S-N data generated in this study. Comparisons between the measured and estimated (by the model) fatigue lives are in reasonable agreement, indicating that the procedure employed is a useful tool for estimating the fatigue lives of parts made of short fiber reinforced thermoplastics.

  11. Fatigue Life Methodology for Bonded Composite Skin/Stringer Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    A methodology is presented for determining the fatigue life of bonded composite skin/stringer structures based on delamination fatigue characterization data and geometric nonlinear finite element analyses. Results were compared to fatigue tests on stringer flange/skin specimens to verify the approach.

  12. Durability/life of fiber composites in hygrothermomechanical environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Statistical analysis and multiple regression were used to determine and quantify the significant hygrothermomechanical variables which influence the tensile durability/life (cycle loading, fatigue) of boron-fiber/epoxy-matrix (B/E) and high-modulus-fiber/epoxy-matrix (HMS/E) composites. The use of the multiple regression analysis reduced the variables from fifteen, assumed initially, to six or less with a probability of greater than 0.999. The reduced variables were used to derive predictive models for compression and intralaminar shear durability/life of B/E and HMS/E composites assuming isoparametric fatigue behavior. The predictive models were subsequently generalized to predict the durability/life of graphite/fiber-r generalized model is of simple form, predicts conservative values compared with measured data and should be adequate for use in preliminary designs. Previously announced in STAR as N82-14287

  13. Durability/life of fiber composites in hygrothermomechanical environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Statistical analysis and multiple regression were used to determine and quantify the significant hygrothermomechanical variables which infuence the tensile durability/life (cycle loading, fatigue) of boron-fiber/epoxy-matrix (B/E) and high-modulus-fiber/epoxy-matrix (HMS/E) composites. The use of the multiple regression analysis reduced the variables from fifteen, assumed initially, to six or less with a probability of greater than 0.999. The reduced variables were used to derive predictive models for compression an intralaminar shear durability/life of B/E and HMS/E composites assuming isoparametric fatigue behavior. The predictive models were subsequently generalized to predict the durability/life of graphite-fiber-r generalized model is of simple form, predicts conservative values compared with measured data and should be adequate for use in preliminary designs.

  14. Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) Life Prediction Development - 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Verrilli, Michael J.; Thomas, David J.; Halbig, Michael C.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Ellis, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate life prediction is critical to successful use of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). The tools to accomplish this are immature and not oriented toward the behavior of carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC), the primary system of interest for many reusable and single mission launch vehicle propulsion and airframe applications. This paper describes an approach and progress made to satisfy the need to develop an integrated life prediction system that addresses mechanical durability and environmental degradation of C/SiC.

  15. Fatigue life prediction for carbon-epoxy composite design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, B. D.

    A simple design method for the prediction of fatigue life for long fiber carbon-epoxy composites with multi-angular lay-ups is presented. The approach, based in part on the traditional metallic method of fatigue life prediction, can be applied to fully tensile, fully compressive or part-tensile part-compressive loading of either constant or variable amplitude. Predictions produced by the method are compared with extensive data from fatigue tests on XAS/914C material for both relatively fatigue-sensitive and -insensitive lay-ups.

  16. A life prediction model for laminated composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.

    1990-01-01

    A life prediction methodology for laminated continuous fiber composites subjected to fatigue loading conditions was developed. A summary is presented of research completed. A phenomenological damage evolution law was formulated for matrix cracking which is independent of stacking sequence. Mechanistic and physical support was developed for the phenomenological evolution law proposed above. The damage evolution law proposed above was implemented to a finite element computer program. And preliminary predictions were obtained for a structural component undergoing fatigue loading induced damage.

  17. 12 CFR 2.3 - Distribution of credit life insurance income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Distribution of credit life insurance income. 2... CREDIT LIFE INSURANCE § 2.3 Distribution of credit life insurance income. (a) Distribution of credit life... percent), who is involved in the sale of credit life insurance to loan customers of the national bank,...

  18. Dramatic increase in fatigue life in hierarchical graphene composites.

    PubMed

    Yavari, F; Rafiee, M A; Rafiee, J; Yu, Z-Z; Koratkar, N

    2010-10-01

    We report the synthesis and fatigue characterization of fiberglass/epoxy composites with various weight fractions of graphene platelets infiltrated into the epoxy resin as well as directly spray-coated on to the glass microfibers. Remarkably only ∼0.2% (with respect to the epoxy resin weight and ∼0.02% with respect to the entire laminate weight) of graphene additives enhanced the fatigue life of the composite in the flexural bending mode by up to 1200-fold. By contrast, under uniaxial tensile fatigue conditions, the graphene fillers resulted in ∼3-5-fold increase in fatigue life. The fatigue life increase (in the flexural bending mode) with graphene additives was ∼1-2 orders of magnitude superior to those obtained using carbon nanotubes. In situ ultrasound analysis of the nanocomposite during the cyclic fatigue test suggests that the graphene network toughens the fiberglass/epoxy-matrix interface and prevents the delamination/buckling of the glass microfibers under compressive stress. Such fatigue-resistant hierarchical materials show potential to improve the safety, reliability, and cost effectiveness of fiber-reinforced composites that are increasingly the material of choice in the aerospace, automotive, marine, sports, biomedical, and wind energy industries.

  19. Progressive Failure And Life Prediction of Ceramic and Textile Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, David Y.; Shi, Yucheng; Katikala, Madhu; Johnston, William M., Jr.; Card, Michael F.

    1998-01-01

    An engineering approach to predict the fatigue life and progressive failure of multilayered composite and textile laminates is presented. Analytical models which account for matrix cracking, statistical fiber failures and nonlinear stress-strain behavior have been developed for both composites and textiles. The analysis method is based on a combined micromechanics, fracture mechanics and failure statistics analysis. Experimentally derived empirical coefficients are used to account for the interface of fiber and matrix, fiber strength, and fiber-matrix stiffness reductions. Similar approaches were applied to textiles using Repeating Unit Cells. In composite fatigue analysis, Walker's equation is applied for matrix fatigue cracking and Heywood's formulation is used for fiber strength fatigue degradation. The analysis has been compared with experiment with good agreement. Comparisons were made with Graphite-Epoxy, C/SiC and Nicalon/CAS composite materials. For textile materials, comparisons were made with triaxial braided and plain weave materials under biaxial or uniaxial tension. Fatigue predictions were compared with test data obtained from plain weave C/SiC materials tested at AS&M. Computer codes were developed to perform the analysis. Composite Progressive Failure Analysis for Laminates is contained in the code CPFail. Micromechanics Analysis for Textile Composites is contained in the code MicroTex. Both codes were adapted to run as subroutines for the finite element code ABAQUS and CPFail-ABAQUS and MicroTex-ABAQUS. Graphic user interface (GUI) was developed to connect CPFail and MicroTex with ABAQUS.

  20. Development of a Composite Delamination Fatigue Life Prediction Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, Thomas K.

    2009-01-01

    Delamination is one of the most significant and unique failure modes in composite structures. Because of a lack of understanding of the consequences of delamination and the inability to predict delamination onset and growth, many composite parts are unnecessarily rejected upon inspection, both immediately after manufacture and while in service. NASA Langley is leading the efforts in the U.S. to develop a fatigue life prediction methodology for composite delamination using fracture mechanics. Research being performed to this end will be reviewed. Emphasis will be placed on the development of test standards for delamination characterization, incorporation of approaches for modeling delamination in commercial finite element codes, and efforts to mature the technology for use in design handbooks and certification documents.

  1. Life Cycle Assessment of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sujit

    2011-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites is gaining momentum with the pressure to lightweight vehicles, however energy-intensity and cost remain some of the major barriers before this material could be used in large-scale automotive applications. A representative automotive part, i.e., a 30.8 kg steel floor pan having a 17% weight reduction potential with stringent cash performance requirements has been considered for the life cycle energy and emissions analysis based on the latest developments occurring in the precursor type (conventional textile-based PAN vs. renewable-based lignin), part manufacturing (conventional SMC vs. P4) and fiber recycling technologies. Carbon fiber production is estimated to be about 14 times more energy-intensive than conventional steel production, however life cycle primary energy use is estimated to be quite similar to the conventional part, i.e., 18,500 MJ/part, especially when considering the uncertainty in LCI data that exists from using numerous sources in the literature. Lignin P4 technology offers the most life cycle energy and CO2 emissions benefits compared to a conventional stamped steel technology. With a 20% reduction in energy use in the lignin conversion to carbon fiber and free availability of lignin as a by-product of ethanol and wood production, a 30% reduction in life cycle energy use could be obtained. A similar level of life cycle energy savings could also be obtained with a higher part weight reduction potential of 43%.

  2. Substantial Life Extension and the Fair Distribution of Healthspans.

    PubMed

    Wareham, Christopher S

    2016-10-01

    One of the strongest objections to the development and use of substantially life-extending interventions is that they would exacerbate existing unjust disparities of healthy lifespans between rich and poor members of society. In both popular opinion and ethical theory, this consequence is sometimes thought to justify a ban on life-prolonging technologies. However, the practical and ethical drawbacks of banning receive little attention, and the viability of alternative policies is seldom considered. Moreover, where ethicists do propose alternatives, there is scant effort to consider their merits in light of developing world priorities. In response to these shortcomings, I distinguish four policy options and, on the basis of a plausible intuition about fairness, evaluate their implications for a fair distribution of healthy lifespans. I claim that even in developing nations it would be fairest to favor policies that promote equal access to at least one promising category of substantially life-extending intervention: calorie restriction mimetics. PMID:27465775

  3. Life history, diversity and distribution: A study of Japanese pteridophytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.; Kato, Masako; Ricklefs, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    Many studies address the relationships between diversity or distribution and attributes of the physical environment. However, how these relationships are connected to variation in life history is poorly understood. This is particularly true in the case of pteridophytes. Japanese ferns and their allies comprise one of the best-known pteridophyte floras in the world. We analyzed ca 600 species of Japanese pteridophytes for which there is detailed information on distribution, reproduction, and chromosome number. Species richness was greatest in groups with a single reproductive mode (sexual, followed by apogamous), but distribution was greatest in species groups with multiple reproductive modes: sexual plus either sterile (irregular in meiosis) or apogamous. Geographical ranges varied greatly among species with small chromosome numbers but were uniformly small among species having high chromosome numbers. Seasonally green (mostly summer green) species had significantly larger distribution ranges than evergreen species. Endemic species had higher proportions of apogamy and sterility than non-endemic species. Seasonally green species had significantly larger distributional ranges, and a smaller proportion of species with apogamous reproduction, than evergreen species. There was no clear relationship between distribution and spore size, either among endemic species, non-endemic species, or all species combined. There was no relationship between spore size and chromosome number when all species were combined. However, positive relationships were detected within three of the nine largest genera, suggesting potential phylogenetic effects. We concluded that habitat availability, rather than dispersability, may be the limiting factor for the distribution of pteridophytes in Japan.

  4. Distribution of Articles in Written Composition among Malaysian ESL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahim, Mia Emily Abdul; Rahim, Emma Marini Abdul; Ning, Chia Han

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the distribution patterns of the English grammar articles (a, an, and the) as well as the distributions of their colligation patterns in written compositions of English among Malaysian ESL learners. This paper reports the results of a corpus-based study on articles used by these learners. The method used in this…

  5. Distributed Workflow Service Composition Based on CTR Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhilin; Ye, Yanming

    Recently, WS-BPEL has gradually become the basis of a standard for web service description and composition. However, WS-BPEL cannot efficiently describe distributed workflow services for lacking of special expressive power and formal semantics. This paper presents a novel method for modeling distributed workflow service composition with Concurrent TRansaction logic (CTR). The syntactic structure of WS-BPEL and CTR are analyzed, and new rules of mapping WS-BPEL into CTR are given. A case study is put forward to show that the proposed method is appropriate for modeling workflow business services under distributed environments.

  6. A self-healing polymer composite for extended fatigue life

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E. N.; Jones, A. S.; White, S. R.; Sottos, Nancy R.

    2004-01-01

    A novel approach is explored for improving the fatigue life of thermosetting polymers through the addition of self-healing functionality. Thermosetting polymers are used in a wide variety of applications, but are susceptible to the initiation and propagation of small cracks deep within the structure where detection is difficult and repair is virtually impossible. The material under investigation is an epoxy matrix composite, which utilizes embedded microcapsules to store a healing agent and an embedded catalyst. A propagating crack exposes particles of catalyst and ruptures the microcapsules, which release healing agent into the crack plane. Polymerization of the healing agent is triggered by contact with the catalyst. Fatigue crack retardation and arrest from self-healing functionality result from crack-tip shielding mechanisms, such as hydrodynamic pressure and artificial-crack closure. In situ healing is observed to significantly extended fatigue life or permanently arrested fatigue crack growth over a wide range of loading conditions.

  7. On the fatigue life of 3D woven composite

    SciTech Connect

    Dadkhah, M.S.; Cox, B.N.

    1995-12-31

    Polymer composites with three-dimensional woven graphite fiber reinforcement (3D interlock weaves) have been tested in compression-compression fatigue under load control. As under monotonic loading, the principal mechanism of failure is kink band formation in the primary load bearing twos. Observations of kink bands and microcracking in sectioned specimens suggest that fatigue progresses by the accumulation of damage to the resin within individual tows. If it is assumed that resin damage accumulates at a rate proportional to some power of the local axial shear stress in a misaligned tow, then a simple formula follows for the cycles to kink band formation. Under load control, only a few kink bands are required for specimen failure. Then the formula is also the basis for estimates of fatigue life. Fatigue life data and measured misalignment angles, which determine the local axial shear stress, support the fatigue model.

  8. Landscape structure and diseases profile: associating land use type composition with disease distribution.

    PubMed

    Votsi, Nefta-Eleftheria P; Mazaris, Antonios D; Kallimanis, Athanasios S; Drakou, Evangelia G; Pantis, John D

    2014-04-01

    Human health and well-being presuppose environmental quality. Several studies have documented the indicative role of land use types in environmental quality. However, the exact role of land use composition on disease distribution has remained scientifically vague. We assessed the congruence of diseases' distribution with land use composition, focusing on high environmental quality areas, defined as tranquil areas with view to indicating places offering well-being. Landscape composition is linked to the presence of diseases across 51 prefectures of Greece. Agricultural and natural land use types proved to be the main drivers of disease distribution. Tranquility demonstrated a strong negative correlation with population density, thus could be considered as a quantitative spatial index of life-quality. We concluded that the landscape context affects the dominance of diseases' patterns. Special emphasis should be put on the role of tranquil areas in human health and the relative environmental health policies. PMID:23802561

  9. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(9)-9 - Life expectancy and distribution period tables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Life expectancy and distribution period tables.... § 1.401(a)(9)-9 Life expectancy and distribution period tables. Q-1. What is the life expectancy for... The following table, referred to as the Single Life Table, is used for determining the life...

  10. Distributed dynamic load on composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langella, A.; Lopresto, V.; Caprino, G.

    2016-05-01

    An experimental activity conducted in order to assess the impact behavior at room and low temperature of carbon fibre in vinylester resin laminates used in the shipbuilding industry, was reported. The conditions which reproduce the impact of a hull at low temperature with a solid body suspended in the water was reproduced. A test equipment was designed and realized to reproduce the real material behaviour in water to obtain a load distribution on the entire surface of the specimen. The results were obtained impacting the laminates placed between the cilyndrical steel impactor and a bag containing water. A falling weight machine, equipped with an instrumented steel impactor and a thermal chamber, was adopted for the experimental tests. The impact behaviour in hostile environments was compared to the behaviour at room temperature and the data obtained under distributed load conditions were compared with the results from concentrated loads: a completely different behaviour was observed between the two different loading conditions in terms of load-displacement curve. The effect of the impact on the laminates has been related with the delaminations, evaluated by ultrasonic scanning, and the indentation.

  11. Elucidating the Composition and Distribution of Trace Metals in Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, G.; Webb, S. M.; Apprill, A.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Coral reefs host a plethora of marine life and thereby provide a wealth of aesthetic and economic benefits to coastal countries. Anthropogenic influences, including local coastal water contamination, however threaten the health of these delicate ecosystems. Metal incorporation into carbonate minerals, the backbone of coral reefs, is known to have a large yet variable impact on carbonate structure and solubility. Yet, trace metal influences on the structure, porosity, composition, and solubility of coral skeletons is largely unknown. Here, we coupled synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence (u-XRF) mapping and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy with micro-X-ray diffraction (XRD) to explore the distribution and speciation of trace metals associated with corals and their impact on the carbonate structure of corals obtained from reefs varying in anthropogenic influence - Florida Keys, FL USA and the Federated States of Micronesia. Iron and copper were the most abundant metals in the biological tissue, while in some areas zinc was observed in the tissue, overlapping with the skeleton. Trace metals were not detectable in the aragonite skeletons; in fact, the distributions of Ca and Fe were anti-correlated. XANES spectra show that the iron is primarily Fe(III), likely as the poorly crystalline iron oxide ferrihydrite structure or trapped within ferretin proteins. The same trace metals were observed in corals of different species and from different environments. This in situ investigation corroborates previous studies that corals tend to incorporate iron into the biological components but not into the aragonite skeleton. Given the dominant partitioning of metals within the biological tissue rather than the coral skeleton, the specific carbon molecules responsible for metal attenuation and their fate under changing geochemical conditions and following coral death require exploration.

  12. Proposed framework for thermomechanical life modeling of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saltsman, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The framework of a mechanics of materials model is proposed for thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) life prediction of unidirectional, continuous-fiber metal matrix composites (MMC's). Axially loaded MMC test samples are analyzed as structural components whose fatigue lives are governed by local stress-strain conditions resulting from combined interactions of the matrix, interfacial layer, and fiber constituents. The metallic matrix is identified as the vehicle for tracking fatigue crack initiation and propagation. The proposed framework has three major elements. First, TMF flow and failure characteristics of in situ matrix material are approximated from tests of unreinforced matrix material, and matrix TMF life prediction equations are numerically calibrated. The macrocrack initiation fatigue life of the matrix material is divided into microcrack initiation and microcrack propagation phases. Second, the influencing factors created by the presence of fibers and interfaces are analyzed, characterized, and documented in equation form. Some of the influences act on the microcrack initiation portion of the matrix fatigue life, others on the microcrack propagation life, while some affect both. Influencing factors include coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch strains, residual (mean) stresses, multiaxial stress states, off-axis fibers, internal stress concentrations, multiple initiation sites, nonuniform fiber spacing, fiber debonding, interfacial layers and cracking, fractured fibers, fiber deflections of crack fronts, fiber bridging of matrix cracks, and internal oxidation along internal interfaces. Equations exist for some, but not all, of the currently identified influencing factors. The third element is the inclusion of overriding influences such as maximum tensile strain limits of brittle fibers that could cause local fractures and ensuing catastrophic failure of surrounding matrix material. Some experimental data exist for assessing the plausibility of the proposed

  13. Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels: Mechanics and Stress Rupture Lifing Philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has been conducting an independent technical assessment to address safety concerns related to the known stress rupture failure mode of filament wound pressure vessels in use on Shuttle and the International Space Station. The Shuttle's Kevlar-49 fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar-49 filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of load sharing liners and the complex manufacturing procedures, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. Indeed non-conservative life predictions have been made where stress rupture data and lifing procedures have ignored the contribution of the liner in favor of applied pressure as the controlling load parameter. With the aid of analytical and finite element results, this paper examines the fundamental mechanical response of composite overwrapped pressure vessels including the influence of elastic-plastic liners and degraded/creeping overwrap properties. Graphical methods are presented describing the non-linear relationship of applied pressure to Kevlar-49 fiber stress/strain during manufacturing, operations and burst loadings. These are applied to experimental measurements made on a variety of vessel systems to demonstrate the correct calibration of fiber stress as a function of pressure. Applying this analysis to the actual qualification burst data for Shuttle flight hardware revealed that the nominal fiber stress at burst was in some cases 23% lower than what had previously been used to predict stress rupture life. These results motivate a detailed discussion of the appropriate stress rupture lifing philosophy for COPVs including the correct transference of stress rupture life data between dissimilar vessels and test articles.

  14. Life Modeling and Design Analysis for Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The primary research efforts focused on characterizing and modeling static failure, environmental durability, and creep-rupture behavior of two classes of ceramic matrix composites (CMC), silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) and carbon fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (C/SiC). An engineering life prediction model (Probabilistic Residual Strength model) has been developed specifically for CMCs. The model uses residual strength as the damage metric for evaluating remaining life and is posed probabilistically in order to account for the stochastic nature of the material s response. In support of the modeling effort, extensive testing of C/SiC in partial pressures of oxygen has been performed. This includes creep testing, tensile testing, half life and residual tensile strength testing. C/SiC is proposed for airframe and propulsion applications in advanced reusable launch vehicles. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the models predictive capabilities as well as the manner in which experimental tests are being selected in such a manner as to ensure sufficient data is available to aid in model validation.

  15. Size distribution of microbubbles as a function of shell composition.

    PubMed

    Dicker, Stephen; Mleczko, Michał; Schmitz, Georg; Wrenn, Steven P

    2013-09-01

    The effect of modifying the shell composition of a population of microbubbles on their size demonstrated through experiment. Specifically, these variations include altering both the mole fraction and molecular weight of functionalized polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the microbubble phospholipid monolayer shell (1-15 mol% PEG, and 1000-5000 g/mole, respectively). The size distribution is measured with an unbiased image segmentation program written in MATLAB which identifies and sizes bubbles from micrographs. For a population of microbubbles with a shell composition of 5 mol% PEG2000, the mean diameter is 1.42 μm with a variance of 0.244 μm. For the remainder of the shell compositions studied herein, we find that the size distributions do not show a statistically significant correlation to either PEG molecular weight or mole fraction. All the measured distributions are nearly Gaussian in shape and have a monomodal peak.

  16. The composition of the gut microbiota throughout life, with an emphasis on early life

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Juan Miguel; Murphy, Kiera; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R. Paul; Kober, Olivia I.; Juge, Nathalie; Avershina, Ekaterina; Rudi, Knut; Narbad, Arjan; Jenmalm, Maria C.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Collado, Maria Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota has become a relevant aspect of human health. Microbial colonization runs in parallel with immune system maturation and plays a role in intestinal physiology and regulation. Increasing evidence on early microbial contact suggest that human intestinal microbiota is seeded before birth. Maternal microbiota forms the first microbial inoculum, and from birth, the microbial diversity increases and converges toward an adult-like microbiota by the end of the first 3–5 years of life. Perinatal factors such as mode of delivery, diet, genetics, and intestinal mucin glycosylation all contribute to influence microbial colonization. Once established, the composition of the gut microbiota is relatively stable throughout adult life, but can be altered as a result of bacterial infections, antibiotic treatment, lifestyle, surgical, and a long-term change in diet. Shifts in this complex microbial system have been reported to increase the risk of disease. Therefore, an adequate establishment of microbiota and its maintenance throughout life would reduce the risk of disease in early and late life. This review discusses recent studies on the early colonization and factors influencing this process which impact on health. PMID:25651996

  17. The composition of the gut microbiota throughout life, with an emphasis on early life.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Juan Miguel; Murphy, Kiera; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Kober, Olivia I; Juge, Nathalie; Avershina, Ekaterina; Rudi, Knut; Narbad, Arjan; Jenmalm, Maria C; Marchesi, Julian R; Collado, Maria Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota has become a relevant aspect of human health. Microbial colonization runs in parallel with immune system maturation and plays a role in intestinal physiology and regulation. Increasing evidence on early microbial contact suggest that human intestinal microbiota is seeded before birth. Maternal microbiota forms the first microbial inoculum, and from birth, the microbial diversity increases and converges toward an adult-like microbiota by the end of the first 3-5 years of life. Perinatal factors such as mode of delivery, diet, genetics, and intestinal mucin glycosylation all contribute to influence microbial colonization. Once established, the composition of the gut microbiota is relatively stable throughout adult life, but can be altered as a result of bacterial infections, antibiotic treatment, lifestyle, surgical, and a long-term change in diet. Shifts in this complex microbial system have been reported to increase the risk of disease. Therefore, an adequate establishment of microbiota and its maintenance throughout life would reduce the risk of disease in early and late life. This review discusses recent studies on the early colonization and factors influencing this process which impact on health.

  18. Barium distributions in teeth reveal early-life dietary transitions in primates.

    PubMed

    Austin, Christine; Smith, Tanya M; Bradman, Asa; Hinde, Katie; Joannes-Boyau, Renaud; Bishop, David; Hare, Dominic J; Doble, Philip; Eskenazi, Brenda; Arora, Manish

    2013-06-13

    Early-life dietary transitions reflect fundamental aspects of primate evolution and are important determinants of health in contemporary human populations. Weaning is critical to developmental and reproductive rates; early weaning can have detrimental health effects but enables shorter inter-birth intervals, which influences population growth. Uncovering early-life dietary history in fossils is hampered by the absence of prospectively validated biomarkers that are not modified during fossilization. Here we show that large dietary shifts in early life manifest as compositional variations in dental tissues. Teeth from human children and captive macaques, with prospectively recorded diet histories, demonstrate that barium (Ba) distributions accurately reflect dietary transitions from the introduction of mother's milk through the weaning process. We also document dietary transitions in a Middle Palaeolithic juvenile Neanderthal, which shows a pattern of exclusive breastfeeding for seven months, followed by seven months of supplementation. After this point, Ba levels in enamel returned to baseline prenatal levels, indicating an abrupt cessation of breastfeeding at 1.2 years of age. Integration of Ba spatial distributions and histological mapping of tooth formation enables novel studies of the evolution of human life history, dietary ontogeny in wild primates, and human health investigations through accurate reconstructions of breastfeeding history.

  19. Health monitoring of composite structures throughout the life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilles, James; Croxford, Anthony; Bond, Ian

    2016-04-01

    This study demonstrates the capability of inductively coupled piezoelectric sensors to monitor the state of health throughout the lifetime of composite structures. A single sensor which generated guided elastic waves was embedded into the stacking sequence of a large glass fiber reinforced plastic plate. The progress of cure was monitored by measuring variations in the amplitude and velocity of the waveforms reflected from the plate's edges. Baseline subtraction techniques were then implemented to detect barely visible impact damage (BVID) created by a 10 Joule impact, at a distance of 350 mm from the sensor embedded in the cured plate. To investigate the influence of mechanical loading on sensor performance, a single sensor was embedded within a glass fiber panel and subjected to tensile load. The panel was loaded up to a maximum strain of 1%, in increments of 0.1% strain. Guided wave measurements were recorded by the embedded sensor before testing, when the panel was under load, and after testing. The ultrasonic measurements showed a strong dependence on the applied load. Upon removal of the mechanical load the guided wave measurements returned to their original values recorded before testing. The results in this work show that embedded piezoelectric sensors can be used to monitor the state of health throughout the life-cycle of composite parts, even when subjected to relatively large strains. However the influence of load on guided wave measurements has implications for online monitoring using embedded piezoelectric transducers.

  20. The distribution of all French communes: A composite parametric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderín-Ojeda, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    The distribution of the size of all French settlements (communes) from 1962 to 2012 is examined by means of a three-parameter composite Lognormal-Pareto distribution. This model is based on a Lognormal density up to an unknown threshold value and a Pareto density thereafter. Recent findings have shown that the untruncated settlement size data is in excellent agreement with the Lognormal distribution in the lower and central parts of the empirical distribution, but it follows a power law in the upper tail. For that reason, this probabilistic family, that nests both models, seems appropriate to describe urban agglomeration in France. The outcomes of this paper reveal that for the early periods (1962-1975) the upper quartile of the commune size data adheres closely to a power law distribution, whereas for later periods (2006-2012) most of the city size dynamics is explained by a Lognormal model.

  1. Life history traits to predict biogeographic species distributions in bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, V.; Rinaldi, A.; Sarà, G.

    2015-10-01

    Organismal fecundity ( F) and its relationship with body size (BS) are key factors in predicting species distribution under current and future scenarios of global change. A functional trait-based dynamic energy budget (FT-DEB) is proposed as a mechanistic approach to predict the variation of F and BS as function of environmental correlates using two marine bivalves as model species ( Mytilus galloprovincialis and Brachidontes pharaonis). Validation proof of model skill (i.e., degree of correspondence between model predictions and field observations) and stationarity (i.e., ability of a model generated from data collected at one place/time to predict processes at another place/time) was provided to test model performance in predicting the bivalve distribution throughout the 22 sites in the Central Mediterranean Sea under local conditions of food density and body temperature. Model skill and stationarity were tested through the estimate of commission (i.e., proportion of species' absences predicted present) and omission (i.e., proportion of presences predicted absent) errors of predictions by comparing mechanistic predicted vs. observed F and BS values throughout the study area extrapolated by lab experiments and literature search. The resulting relationship was reliable for both species, and body size and fecundity were highly correlated in M. galloprovincialis compared to B. pharaonis; FT-DEB showed correct predictions of presence in more than 75 % of sites, and the regression between BS predicted vs. observed was highly significant in both species. Whilst recognising the importance of biotic interactions in shaping the distribution of species, our FT-DEB approach provided reliable quantitative estimates of where our species had sufficient F to support local populations or suggesting reproductive failure. Mechanistically, estimating F and BS as key traits of species life history can also be addressed within a broader, scale-dependent context that surpasses the

  2. Life history traits to predict biogeographic species distributions in bivalves.

    PubMed

    Montalto, V; Rinaldi, A; Sarà, G

    2015-10-01

    Organismal fecundity (F) and its relationship with body size (BS) are key factors in predicting species distribution under current and future scenarios of global change. A functional trait-based dynamic energy budget (FT-DEB) is proposed as a mechanistic approach to predict the variation of F and BS as function of environmental correlates using two marine bivalves as model species (Mytilus galloprovincialis and Brachidontes pharaonis). Validation proof of model skill (i.e., degree of correspondence between model predictions and field observations) and stationarity (i.e., ability of a model generated from data collected at one place/time to predict processes at another place/time) was provided to test model performance in predicting the bivalve distribution throughout the 22 sites in the Central Mediterranean Sea under local conditions of food density and body temperature. Model skill and stationarity were tested through the estimate of commission (i.e., proportion of species' absences predicted present) and omission (i.e., proportion of presences predicted absent) errors of predictions by comparing mechanistic predicted vs. observed F and BS values throughout the study area extrapolated by lab experiments and literature search. The resulting relationship was reliable for both species, and body size and fecundity were highly correlated in M. galloprovincialis compared to B. pharaonis; FT-DEB showed correct predictions of presence in more than 75 % of sites, and the regression between BS predicted vs. observed was highly significant in both species. Whilst recognising the importance of biotic interactions in shaping the distribution of species, our FT-DEB approach provided reliable quantitative estimates of where our species had sufficient F to support local populations or suggesting reproductive failure. Mechanistically, estimating F and BS as key traits of species life history can also be addressed within a broader, scale-dependent context that surpasses the

  3. Life history traits to predict biogeographic species distributions in bivalves.

    PubMed

    Montalto, V; Rinaldi, A; Sarà, G

    2015-10-01

    Organismal fecundity (F) and its relationship with body size (BS) are key factors in predicting species distribution under current and future scenarios of global change. A functional trait-based dynamic energy budget (FT-DEB) is proposed as a mechanistic approach to predict the variation of F and BS as function of environmental correlates using two marine bivalves as model species (Mytilus galloprovincialis and Brachidontes pharaonis). Validation proof of model skill (i.e., degree of correspondence between model predictions and field observations) and stationarity (i.e., ability of a model generated from data collected at one place/time to predict processes at another place/time) was provided to test model performance in predicting the bivalve distribution throughout the 22 sites in the Central Mediterranean Sea under local conditions of food density and body temperature. Model skill and stationarity were tested through the estimate of commission (i.e., proportion of species' absences predicted present) and omission (i.e., proportion of presences predicted absent) errors of predictions by comparing mechanistic predicted vs. observed F and BS values throughout the study area extrapolated by lab experiments and literature search. The resulting relationship was reliable for both species, and body size and fecundity were highly correlated in M. galloprovincialis compared to B. pharaonis; FT-DEB showed correct predictions of presence in more than 75 % of sites, and the regression between BS predicted vs. observed was highly significant in both species. Whilst recognising the importance of biotic interactions in shaping the distribution of species, our FT-DEB approach provided reliable quantitative estimates of where our species had sufficient F to support local populations or suggesting reproductive failure. Mechanistically, estimating F and BS as key traits of species life history can also be addressed within a broader, scale-dependent context that surpasses the

  4. Spatial distribution of volatile compounds in graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayson, M. A.; Wolf, C. J.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The distribution of water and other volatile compounds such as acetone and phenol was measured as a function of depth in four graphite resin matrix composites. Precision abrasion mass spectrometry was used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the indigenous volatile compounds in the as received condition and after drying in an environmentally controlled oven. The total amount of water in the composites varied from 0.12 wt% to 1.1 wt% and the times required to dry the samples ranged from less than 96 h to much greater than 555 h.

  5. Fatigue Life Analysis of Tapered Hybrid Composite Flexbeams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.; Schaff, Jeffery R.; Dobyns, Alan L.

    2002-01-01

    Nonlinear-tapered flexbeam laminates from a full-size composite helicopter rotor hub flexbeam were tested under combined constant axial tension and cyclic bending loads. The two different graphite/glass hybrid configurations tested under cyclic loading failed by delamination in the tapered region. A 2-D finite element model was developed which closely approximated the flexbeam geometry, boundary conditions, and loading. The analysis results from two geometrically nonlinear finite element codes, ANSYS and ABAQUS, are presented and compared. Strain energy release rates (G) obtained from the above codes using the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT) at a resin crack location in the flexbeams are presented for both hybrid material types. These results compare well with each other and suggest that the initial delamination growth from the resin crack toward the thick region of the flexbeam is strongly mode II. The peak calculated G values were used with material characterization data to calculate fatigue life curves and compared with test data. A curve relating maximum surface strain to number of loading cycles at delamination onset compared reasonably well with the test results.

  6. Tension fatigue analysis and life prediction for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.; Rigamonti, M.; Zanotti, C.

    1988-01-01

    A tension fatigue life prediction methodology for composite laminates is presented. Tension fatigue tests were conducted on quasi-isotropic and orthotropic glass epoxy, graphite epoxy, and glass/graphite epoxy hybrid laminates. Edge delamination onset data were used to generate plots of strain energy release rate as a function of cycles to delamination onset. These plots were then used along with strain energy release rate analyses of delaminations initiating at matrix cracks to predict local delamination onset. Stiffness loss was measured experimentally to account for the accumulation of matrix cracks and for delamination growth. Fatigue failure was predicted by comparing the increase in global strain resulting from stiffness loss to the decrease in laminate failure strain resulting from delaminations forming at matrix cracks through the laminate thickness. Good agreement between measured and predicted lives indicated that the through-thickness damage accumulation model can accurately describe fatigue failure for laminates where the delamination onset behavior in fatigue is well characterized, and stiffness loss can be monitored in real time to account for damage growth.

  7. Fatigue Life Methodology for Tapered Hybrid Composite Flexbeams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    urri, Gretchen B.; Schaff, Jeffery R.

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear-tapered flexbeam specimens from a full-size composite helicopter rotor hub flexbeam were tested under combined constant axial tension and cyclic bending loads. Two different graphite/glass hybrid configurations tested under cyclic loading failed by delamination in the tapered region. A 2-D finite element model was developed which closely approximated the flexbeam geometry, boundary conditions, and loading. The analysis results from two geometrically nonlinear finite element codes, ANSYS and ABAQUS, are presented and compared. Strain energy release rates (G) associated with simulated delamination growth in the flexbeams are presented from both codes. These results compare well with each other and suggest that the initial delamination growth from the tip of the ply-drop toward the thick region of the flexbeam is strongly mode II. The peak calculated G values were used with material characterization data to calculate fatigue life curves for comparison with test data. A curve relating maximum surface strain to number of loading cycles at delamination onset compared well with the test results.

  8. Optimization of composite structures by estimation of distribution algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosset, Laurent

    The design of high performance composite laminates, such as those used in aerospace structures, leads to complex combinatorial optimization problems that cannot be addressed by conventional methods. These problems are typically solved by stochastic algorithms, such as evolutionary algorithms. This dissertation proposes a new evolutionary algorithm for composite laminate optimization, named Double-Distribution Optimization Algorithm (DDOA). DDOA belongs to the family of estimation of distributions algorithms (EDA) that build a statistical model of promising regions of the design space based on sets of good points, and use it to guide the search. A generic framework for introducing statistical variable dependencies by making use of the physics of the problem is proposed. The algorithm uses two distributions simultaneously: the marginal distributions of the design variables, complemented by the distribution of auxiliary variables. The combination of the two generates complex distributions at a low computational cost. The dissertation demonstrates the efficiency of DDOA for several laminate optimization problems where the design variables are the fiber angles and the auxiliary variables are the lamination parameters. The results show that its reliability in finding the optima is greater than that of a simple EDA and of a standard genetic algorithm, and that its advantage increases with the problem dimension. A continuous version of the algorithm is presented and applied to a constrained quadratic problem. Finally, a modification of the algorithm incorporating probabilistic and directional search mechanisms is proposed. The algorithm exhibits a faster convergence to the optimum and opens the way for a unified framework for stochastic and directional optimization.

  9. Stress Rupture Life Reliability Measures for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Thesken, John C.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are often used for storing pressurant gases onboard spacecraft. Kevlar (DuPont), glass, carbon and other more recent fibers have all been used as overwraps. Due to the fact that overwraps are subjected to sustained loads for an extended period during a mission, stress rupture failure is a major concern. It is therefore important to ascertain the reliability of these vessels by analysis, since the testing of each flight design cannot be completed on a practical time scale. The present paper examines specifically a Weibull statistics based stress rupture model and considers the various uncertainties associated with the model parameters. The paper also examines several reliability estimate measures that would be of use for the purpose of recertification and for qualifying flight worthiness of these vessels. Specifically, deterministic values for a point estimate, mean estimate and 90/95 percent confidence estimates of the reliability are all examined for a typical flight quality vessel under constant stress. The mean and the 90/95 percent confidence estimates are computed using Monte-Carlo simulation techniques by assuming distribution statistics of model parameters based also on simulation and on the available data, especially the sample sizes represented in the data. The data for the stress rupture model are obtained from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) stress rupture testing program, carried out for the past 35 years. Deterministic as well as probabilistic sensitivities are examined.

  10. Fatigue Life Methodology for Tapered Composite Flexbeam Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1997-01-01

    The viability of a method for determining the fatigue life of composite rotor hub flexbeam laminates using delamination fatigue characterization data and a geometric non-linear finite element (FE) analysis was studied. Combined tension and bending loading was applied to non-linear tapered flexbeam laminates with internal ply drops. These laminates, consisting of coupon specimens cut from a full-size S2/E7T1 glass-epoxy flexbeam were tested in a hydraulic load frame under combined axial-tension and transverse cyclic bending. The magnitude of the axial load remained constant and the direction of the load rotated with the specimen as the cyclic bending load was applied. The first delamination damage observed in the specimens occurred at the area around the tip of the outermost ply-drop group. Subsequently, unstable delamination occurred by complete delamination along the length of the specimen. Continued cycling resulted in multiple delaminations. A 2D finite element model of the flexbeam was developed and a geometrically non-linear analysis was performed. The global responses of the model and test specimens agreed very well in terms of the transverse displacement. The FE model was used to calculate strain energy release rates (G) for delaminations initiating at the tip of the outer ply-drop area and growing toward the thick or thin regions of the flexbeam, as was observed in the specimens. The delamination growth toward the thick region was primarily mode 2, whereas delamination growth toward the thin region was almost completely mode 1. Material characterization data from cyclic double-cantilevered beam tests was used with the peak calculated G values to generate a curve predicting fatigue failure by unstable delamination as a function of the number of loading cycles. The calculated fatigue lives compared well with the test data.

  11. Fatigue Life Methodology for Tapered Composite Flexbeam Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.; O''Brien, T. Kevin; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1997-01-01

    The viability of a method for determining the fatigue life of composite rotor hub flexbeam laminates using delamination fatigue characterization data and a geometric non-linear finite element (FE) analysis was studied. Combined tension and bending loading was applied to nonlinear tapered flexbeam laminates with internal ply drops. These laminates, consisting of coupon specimens cut from a full-size S2/E7T1 glass-epoxy flexbeam were tested in a hydraulic load frame under combined axial-tension and transverse cyclic bending loads. The magnitude of the axial load remained constant and the direction of the load rotated with the specimen as the cyclic bending load was applied. The first delamination damage observed in the specimens occurred at the area around the tip of the outermost ply-drop group. Subsequently, unstable delamination occurred by complete delamination along the length of the specimen. Continued cycling resulted in multiple delaminations. A 2D finite element model of the flexbeam was developed and a geometrically non-linear analysis was performed. The global responses of the model and test specimens agreed very well in terms of the transverse flexbeam tip-displacement and flapping angle. The FE model was used to calculate strain energy release rates (G) for delaminations initiating at the tip of the outer ply-drop area and growing toward the thick or thin regions of the flexbeam, as was observed in the specimens. The delamination growth toward the thick region was primarily mode 2, whereas delamination growth toward the thin region was almost completely mode 1. Material characterization data from cyclic double-cantilevered beam tests was used with the peak calculated G values to generate a curve predicting fatigue failure by unstable delamination as a function of the number of loading cycles. The calculated fatigue lives compared well with the test data.

  12. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(9)-9 - Life expectancy and distribution period tables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Life expectancy and distribution period tables. 1... Plans, Etc. § 1.401(a)(9)-9 Life expectancy and distribution period tables. Q-1. What is the life... expectancy of an individual: Single Life Table Age Lifeexpectancy 0 82.4 1 81.6 2 80.6 3 79.7 4 78.7 5 77.7...

  13. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(9)-9 - Life expectancy and distribution period tables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Life expectancy and distribution period tables... Plans, Etc. § 1.401(a)(9)-9 Life expectancy and distribution period tables. Q-1. What is the life... expectancy of an individual: Single Life Table Age Lifeexpectancy 0 82.4 1 81.6 2 80.6 3 79.7 4 78.7 5 77.7...

  14. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(9)-9 - Life expectancy and distribution period tables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Life expectancy and distribution period tables... Plans, Etc. § 1.401(a)(9)-9 Life expectancy and distribution period tables. Q-1. What is the life... expectancy of an individual: Single Life Table Age Lifeexpectancy 0 82.4 1 81.6 2 80.6 3 79.7 4 78.7 5 77.7...

  15. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(9)-9 - Life expectancy and distribution period tables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Life expectancy and distribution period tables... Plans, Etc. § 1.401(a)(9)-9 Life expectancy and distribution period tables. Q-1. What is the life... expectancy of an individual: Single Life Table Age Lifeexpectancy 0 82.4 1 81.6 2 80.6 3 79.7 4 78.7 5 77.7...

  16. The Schiff angular bremsstrahlung distribution from composite media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. L.; Dalton, B.; Franich, R. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Schiff differential for the angular distribution of bremsstrahlung is widely employed, but calculations involving composite materials (i.e. compounds and mixtures) are often undertaken in a somewhat ad hoc fashion. In this work, we suggest an alternative approach to power-law estimates of the effective atomic number utilising Seltzer and Berger's combined approach in order to generate single-valued effective atomic numbers applicable over a large energy range (in the worst case deviation from constancy of about 2% between 10 keV and 1 GeV). Differences with power-law estimates of Z for composites are potentially significant, particularly for low-Z media such as biological or surrogate materials as relevant within the context of medical physics. As an example, soft tissue differs by >70% and cortical bone differs by >85%, while for high-Z composites such as a tungsten-rhenium alloy the difference is of the order of 1%. Use of the normalised Schiff formula for shape only does not exhibit strong Z dependence. Consequently, in such contexts the differences are negligible - the power-law approach overestimates the magnitude by 1.05% in the case of water and underestimates it by <0.1% for the high-Z alloys. The differences in the distribution are most pronounced for small angles and where the bremsstrahlung quanta are low energy.

  17. Freshman Composition "Can" Prepare Students for Real Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Thomas; Tebeaux, Elizabeth

    1988-01-01

    Includes Thomas Dukes' rebuttal to Elizabeth Tebeaux's "The Trouble with Employees' Writing May Be Freshman Composition" (v15 n1) and Tebeaux's response. Dukes argues that inept freshman composition experiences are not the fault of the course itself. Tebeaux contends that freshman composition courses overemphasize expressive discourse. (RAE)

  18. A Component-based Programming Model for Composite, Distributed Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eidson, Thomas M.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The nature of scientific programming is evolving to larger, composite applications that are composed of smaller element applications. These composite applications are more frequently being targeted for distributed, heterogeneous networks of computers. They are most likely programmed by a group of developers. Software component technology and computational frameworks are being proposed and developed to meet the programming requirements of these new applications. Historically, programming systems have had a hard time being accepted by the scientific programming community. In this paper, a programming model is outlined that attempts to organize the software component concepts and fundamental programming entities into programming abstractions that will be better understood by the application developers. The programming model is designed to support computational frameworks that manage many of the tedious programming details, but also that allow sufficient programmer control to design an accurate, high-performance application.

  19. Association of Mid-Life Changes in Body Size, Body Composition and Obesity Status with the Menopausal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Karvonen-Gutierrez, Carrie; Kim, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The mid-life period is a critical window for increases in body weight and changes in body composition. In this review, we summarize the clinical experience of the menopausal transition by obesity status, and examine the evidence regarding the menopausal transition and reproductive hormones effects on body weight, body composition, or fat distribution. Mid-life obesity is associated with a different menopausal experience including associations with menstrual cycle length prior to the final menstrual period (FMP), age at the FMP, and higher prevalence of vasomotor symptoms. The menopausal transition is associated with weight gain and increased central body fat distribution; the majority of evidence suggests that changes in weight are due to chronological aging whereas changes in body composition and fat distribution are primarily due to ovarian aging. Continuous and regular physical activity during mid-life may be an efficacious strategy to counteract the age-related and menopause-related changes in resting energy expenditure and to prevent weight gain and abdominal adiposity deposition. PMID:27417630

  20. Association of Mid-Life Changes in Body Size, Body Composition and Obesity Status with the Menopausal Transition.

    PubMed

    Karvonen-Gutierrez, Carrie; Kim, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The mid-life period is a critical window for increases in body weight and changes in body composition. In this review, we summarize the clinical experience of the menopausal transition by obesity status, and examine the evidence regarding the menopausal transition and reproductive hormones effects on body weight, body composition, or fat distribution. Mid-life obesity is associated with a different menopausal experience including associations with menstrual cycle length prior to the final menstrual period (FMP), age at the FMP, and higher prevalence of vasomotor symptoms. The menopausal transition is associated with weight gain and increased central body fat distribution; the majority of evidence suggests that changes in weight are due to chronological aging whereas changes in body composition and fat distribution are primarily due to ovarian aging. Continuous and regular physical activity during mid-life may be an efficacious strategy to counteract the age-related and menopause-related changes in resting energy expenditure and to prevent weight gain and abdominal adiposity deposition. PMID:27417630

  1. Three-Axis Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Measurement in 3D Woven Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading. Keywords: fiber optic, distributed strain sensing, Rayleigh scatter, optical frequency domain reflectometry

  2. Aerosol size distribution, composition, and CO2 backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Porter, John N.

    1991-03-01

    The aerosol size distribution, composition, and CO2 backscatter at 10.6 microns (beta-CO2) were measured continuosly at the Mauna Loa Observatory (Hawaii) during January-March and November-December, 1988 periods to compare the characteristics of periods associated with appreciable Asian dust transport to that site (January-March) with those of periods characterized by low-dust condition. The aerosol size distribution in the range 0.15 micron to 7.6 microns was measured at temperatures of 40, 150, and 340 C to differentiate between volatile and nonvolatile aerosols. Large ranges of variability was found in measurements of aerosol size distribution during both periods, but the average distributions were similar for both the high-dust and the low-dust periods. However, values for beta-CO2 were more elevated (by about six times) during periods associated with active Asian dust transport to the observatory site than during the low-dust periods.

  3. Prey nutrient composition has different effects on Pardosa wolf spiders with dissimilar life histories.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kim; Mayntz, David; Toft, Søren; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J

    2011-03-01

    The nutritional composition of prey is known to influence predator life histories, but how the life history strategies of predators affect their susceptibility to nutrient imbalance is less investigated. We used two wolf spider species with different life histories as model predators: Pardosa amentata, which have a fixed annual life cycle, and Pardosa prativaga, which reproduce later and can extend development across 2 years. We fed juvenile spiders of the two species ad libitum diets of one of six Drosophila melanogaster fly types varying in lipid:protein composition during three instars, from the start of the second instar until the fifth instar moult. We then tested for interactions between predator species and prey nutrient composition on several life history parameters. P. amentata completed the three instars faster and grew larger carapaces and heavier body masses than P. prativaga, but the two species responded differently to variation in prey lipid:protein ratio. Duration of the instars increased when feeding on protein-poor prey in P. amentata, but was unaffected by diet in P. prativaga. Likewise, the effect of diet on body composition was more pronounced in P. amentata than in P. prativaga. Prey nutrient composition thus affected the two species differently. During macronutrient imbalance P. amentata appear to prioritize high growth rates while experiencing highly variable body compositions, whereas P. prativaga maintain more constant body compositions and have slower growth. These can be seen as different consequences of a fixed annual and a plastic annual-biennial life cycle.

  4. Age distribution curve in psychiatric admissions inversely correlates with Life Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Le Bon, Olivier; Le Bon, Serge-Daniel

    2014-09-30

    A strong inverse correlation was found between the age-distribution curve of psychiatric admissions and the U-bend Life Satisfaction curve. It may indicate that the peak of mental disorders at midlife reflects a less satisfactory period of life or, conversely, that the mental health load burdens of Life Satisfaction.

  5. Unequal geographic distribution of life expectancy in Seoul.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangmi; Yi, Seonju; Kim, Meekyung; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Hwayoung; Jeon, Taekryeon; Cho, Youngtae

    2015-03-01

    This study examined life expectancies in 25 gus, administrative districts of Seoul, the capital of Korea, by gender in 1995, 2002, and 2008 to explore trends in mortality inequality among areas. The authors constructed single-decrement life tables and employed between-group variance, the Theil index, and mean log deviation to measure absolute and relative disparities in life expectancy among areas during the periods 1995-2002 and 2002-2008. It was found that life expectancy gaps between gus have widened in absolute and relative terms in both genders over the decade, and that this pattern was particularly dramatic in females after 2002. This increasing gap could be attributable to the more negative health impact on females since the late 1990s stemming from the economic crisis, eventually reflected in their places of residence. Thus, a social buffer system to narrow the health gap between geographic areas and social classes must be established.

  6. A compositional reservoir simulator on distributed memory parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Rame, M.; Delshad, M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the application of distributed memory parallel computes to field scale reservoir simulations using a parallel version of UTCHEM, The University of Texas Chemical Flooding Simulator. The model is a general purpose highly vectorized chemical compositional simulator that can simulate a wide range of displacement processes at both field and laboratory scales. The original simulator was modified to run on both distributed memory parallel machines (Intel iPSC/960 and Delta, Connection Machine 5, Kendall Square 1 and 2, and CRAY T3D) and a cluster of workstations. A domain decomposition approach has been taken towards parallelization of the code. A portion of the discrete reservoir model is assigned to each processor by a set-up routine that attempts a data layout as even as possible from the load-balance standpoint. Each of these subdomains is extended so that data can be shared between adjacent processors for stencil computation. The added routines that make parallel execution possible are written in a modular fashion that makes the porting to new parallel platforms straight forward. Results of the distributed memory computing performance of Parallel simulator are presented for field scale applications such as tracer flood and polymer flood. A comparison of the wall-clock times for same problems on a vector supercomputer is also presented.

  7. Composition and analysis of a model waste for a CELSS (Controlled Ecological Life Support System)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    A model waste based on a modest vegetarian diet is given, including composition and elemental analysis. Its use is recommended for evaluation of candidate waste treatment processes for a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS).

  8. Material Distribution Optimization for the Shell Aircraft Composite Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsov, S.; Zhilyaev, I.; Oganesyan, P.; Axenov, V.

    2016-09-01

    One of the main goal in aircraft structures designing isweight decreasing and stiffness increasing. Composite structures recently became popular in aircraft because of their mechanical properties and wide range of optimization possibilities.Weight distribution and lay-up are keys to creating lightweight stiff strictures. In this paperwe discuss optimization of specific structure that undergoes the non-uniform air pressure at the different flight conditions and reduce a level of noise caused by the airflowinduced vibrations at the constrained weight of the part. Initial model was created with CAD tool Siemens NX, finite element analysis and post processing were performed with COMSOL Multiphysicsr and MATLABr. Numerical solutions of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations supplemented by k-w turbulence model provide the spatial distributions of air pressure applied to the shell surface. At the formulation of optimization problem the global strain energy calculated within the optimized shell was assumed as the objective. Wall thickness has been changed using parametric approach by an initiation of auxiliary sphere with varied radius and coordinates of the center, which were the design variables. To avoid a local stress concentration, wall thickness increment was defined as smooth function on the shell surface dependent of auxiliary sphere position and size. Our study consists of multiple steps: CAD/CAE transformation of the model, determining wind pressure for different flow angles, optimizing wall thickness distribution for specific flow angles, designing a lay-up for optimal material distribution. The studied structure was improved in terms of maximum and average strain energy at the constrained expense ofweight growth. Developed methods and tools can be applied to wide range of shell-like structures made of multilayered quasi-isotropic laminates.

  9. Carbon nanofiber polymer composites: evaluation of life cycle energy use.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Vikas; Bakshi, Bhavik R

    2009-03-15

    Holistic evaluation of emerging nanotechnologies using systems analysis is pivotal for guiding their safe and sustainable development. While toxicity studies of engineered nanomaterials are essential, understanding of the potential large scale impacts of nanotechnology is also critical for developing sustainable nanoproducts. This work evaluates the life cycle energetic impact associated with the production and use of carbon nanofiber (CNF) reinforced polymer nanocomposites (PNC). Specifically, both simple CNF and carbon nanofiber-glass fiber (CNF-GF) hybrid PNCs are evaluated and compared with steel for equal stiffness design. Life cycle inventory is developed based on published literature and best available engineering information. A cradle-to-gate comparison suggests that for equal stiffness design, CNF reinforced PNCs are 1.6-12 times more energy intensive than steel. It is anticipated that the product use phase may strongly influence whether any net savings in life cycle energy consumption can be realized. A case study involving the use of CNF and CNF-GF reinforced PNCs in the body panels of automobiles highlights that the use of PNCs with lower CNF loading ratios has the potential for net life cycle energy savings relative to steel owing to improved fuel economy benefits. Other factors such as cost, toxicity impact of CNF, and end-of-life issues specific to CNFs need to be considered to evaluate the final economic and environmental performance of CNF reinforced PNC materials.

  10. Grana Padano cheese whey starters: microbial composition and strain distribution.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Lia; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Gatti, Monica; Lazzi, Camilla; Neviani, Erasmo; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2008-09-30

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the species composition and the genotypic strain heterogeneity of dominant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from whey starter cultures used to manufacture Grana Padano cheese. Twenty-four Grana Padano cheese whey starters collected from dairies located over a wide geographic production area in the north of Italy were analyzed. Total thermophilic LAB streptococci and lactobacilli were quantified by agar plate counting. Population structure of the dominant and metabolically active LAB species present in the starters was profiled by reverse transcriptase, length heterogeneity-PCR (RT-LH-PCR), a culture-independent technique successfully applied to study whey starter ecosystems. The dominant bacterial species were Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Lactobacillus fermentum. Diversity in the species composition allowed the whey cultures to be grouped into four main typologies, the one containing L. helveticus, L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis, and S. thermophilus being the most frequent one (45% of the cultures analyzed), followed by that containing only the two lactobacilli (40%). Only a minor fraction of the cultures contained L. helveticus alone (4%) or all the four LAB species (11%). Five hundred and twelve strains were isolated from the 24 cultures and identified by M13-PCR fingerprinting coupled with 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Most of the strains were L. helveticus (190 strains; 37% of the total), L delbrueckii subsp. lactis (90 strains; 18%) and S. thermophilus (215 strains; 42%). This result was in good agreement with the qualitative whey starter composition observed by RT-LH-PCR. M13-PCR fingerprinting indicated a markedly low infra-species diversity, i.e. the same biotypes were often found in more than one culture. The distribution of the biotypes into the different cultures was mainly dairy plant-specific rather than correlated with the different production areas

  11. Particle size distributions of polyaniline-silica colloidal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, M.; Armes, S.P. ); Fairhurst, D. ); Emmett, S.N. ); Idzorek, G.; Pigott, T. )

    1992-09-01

    We have characterized a new polyaniline-silica composite colloid by various particle sizing techniques. Our transmission electron microscopy studies have confirmed for the first time an unusual raspberry morphology, with the small silica particles held together by the polyaniline [open quotes]binder[close quotes]. These particles have average diameters in the size range 150-500 nm. Charge-velocity analysis experiments indicated a number-average particle diameter of 300 [plus minus] 80 nm, but only poor statistics were obtained (172 particles counted). Photon correlation spectroscopy studies suggested an intensity-average particle diameter of 380 nm. Disk centrifuge photosedimentometry (DCP) turned out to be our preferred sizing technique for the polyaniline-silica colloids, since it was both quick and reliable and, more importantly, produced the true particle size distribution (PSD) curve with excellent statistics. The DCP data indicated a weight-average and number-average particle diameter of 330 [plus minus] 70 nm and 280 [plus minus] 70 nm, respectively, and moreover confirmed the PSD to be both broad and unimodal. Finally, these colloidal composites were sized using the Malvern Aerosizer. Using this instrument in conjunction with a nebulizer attachment (which allowed particle sizing of the [open quotes]wet[close quotes] dispersion) rather than in the conventional [open quotes]dry powder[close quotes] mode, we obtained particle size data which were in reasonable agreement with the DCP results. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Waste tire derived carbon-polymer composite paper as pseudocapacitive electrode with long cycle life

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boota, M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Naskar, Amit K.; Gogotsi, Yury; Li, Yunchao; Akato, Kokouvi

    2015-09-25

    Recycling hazardous wastes to produce value-added products is becoming essential for the sustainable progress of our society. Herein, highly porous carbon (1625 m2/g–1) is synthesized using waste tires as the precursor and used as supercapacitor electrode. The narrow pore size distribution (PSD) and high surface area led to a good charge storage capacity, especially when used as a three-dimensional nanoscaffold to polymerize polyaniline (PANI/TC). The composite film was highly flexible, conductive and exhibited a capacitance of 480 F/g–1 at 1 mV/s–1 with excellent capacitance retention up to 98% after 10,000 charge/discharge cycles. The high capacitance and long cycle life weremore » ascribed to the short diffusional paths, uniform PANI coating and tight confinement of the PANI in the inner pores of the tire-derived carbon via - interactions, which minimized the degradation of the PANI upon cycling. Here, we anticipate that the same strategy can be applied to deposit other pseudocapacitive materials with low-cost TC to achieve even higher electrochemical performance and longer cycle life, a key challenge for redox active polymers.« less

  13. Waste tire derived carbon-polymer composite paper as pseudocapacitive electrode with long cycle life

    SciTech Connect

    Boota, M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Naskar, Amit K.; Gogotsi, Yury; Li, Yunchao; Akato, Kokouvi

    2015-09-25

    Recycling hazardous wastes to produce value-added products is becoming essential for the sustainable progress of our society. Herein, highly porous carbon (1625 m2/g–1) is synthesized using waste tires as the precursor and used as supercapacitor electrode. The narrow pore size distribution (PSD) and high surface area led to a good charge storage capacity, especially when used as a three-dimensional nanoscaffold to polymerize polyaniline (PANI/TC). The composite film was highly flexible, conductive and exhibited a capacitance of 480 F/g–1 at 1 mV/s–1 with excellent capacitance retention up to 98% after 10,000 charge/discharge cycles. The high capacitance and long cycle life were ascribed to the short diffusional paths, uniform PANI coating and tight confinement of the PANI in the inner pores of the tire-derived carbon via - interactions, which minimized the degradation of the PANI upon cycling. Here, we anticipate that the same strategy can be applied to deposit other pseudocapacitive materials with low-cost TC to achieve even higher electrochemical performance and longer cycle life, a key challenge for redox active polymers.

  14. Waste Tire Derived Carbon-Polymer Composite Paper as Pseudocapacitive Electrode with Long Cycle Life.

    PubMed

    Boota, M; Paranthaman, M Parans; Naskar, Amit K; Li, Yunchao; Akato, Kokouvi; Gogotsi, Y

    2015-11-01

    Recycling hazardous wastes to produce value-added products is becoming essential for the sustainable progress of our society. Herein, highly porous carbon (1625 m(2)  g(-1)) is synthesized using waste tires as the precursor and used as a supercapacitor electrode material. The narrow pore-size distribution and high surface area led to good charge storage capacity, especially when used as a three-dimensional nanoscaffold to polymerize polyaniline (PANI). The composite paper was highly flexible, conductive, and exhibited a capacitance of 480 F g(-1) at 1 mV s(-1) with excellent capacitance retention of up to 98% after 10,000 charge/discharge cycles. The high capacitance and long cycle life were ascribed to the short diffusional paths, uniform PANI coating, and tight confinement of the PANI in the inner pores of the tire-derived carbon through π-π interactions, which minimized the degradation of the PANI upon cycling. We anticipate that the same strategy can be applied to deposit other pseudocapacitive materials to achieve even higher electrochemical performance and longer cycle life-a key challenge for redox active polymers. PMID:26404735

  15. Waste Tire Derived Carbon-Polymer Composite Paper as Pseudocapacitive Electrode with Long Cycle Life.

    PubMed

    Boota, M; Paranthaman, M Parans; Naskar, Amit K; Li, Yunchao; Akato, Kokouvi; Gogotsi, Y

    2015-11-01

    Recycling hazardous wastes to produce value-added products is becoming essential for the sustainable progress of our society. Herein, highly porous carbon (1625 m(2)  g(-1)) is synthesized using waste tires as the precursor and used as a supercapacitor electrode material. The narrow pore-size distribution and high surface area led to good charge storage capacity, especially when used as a three-dimensional nanoscaffold to polymerize polyaniline (PANI). The composite paper was highly flexible, conductive, and exhibited a capacitance of 480 F g(-1) at 1 mV s(-1) with excellent capacitance retention of up to 98% after 10,000 charge/discharge cycles. The high capacitance and long cycle life were ascribed to the short diffusional paths, uniform PANI coating, and tight confinement of the PANI in the inner pores of the tire-derived carbon through π-π interactions, which minimized the degradation of the PANI upon cycling. We anticipate that the same strategy can be applied to deposit other pseudocapacitive materials to achieve even higher electrochemical performance and longer cycle life-a key challenge for redox active polymers.

  16. Ionic Conduction in Lithium Ion Battery Composite Electrode Governs Cross-sectional Reaction Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Orikasa, Yuki; Gogyo, Yuma; Yamashige, Hisao; Katayama, Misaki; Chen, Kezheng; Mori, Takuya; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Masese, Titus; Inada, Yasuhiro; Ohta, Toshiaki; Siroma, Zyun; Kato, Shiro; Kinoshita, Hajime; Arai, Hajime; Ogumi, Zempachi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Composite electrodes containing active materials, carbon and binder are widely used in lithium-ion batteries. Since the electrode reaction occurs preferentially in regions with lower resistance, reaction distribution can be happened within composite electrodes. We investigate the relationship between the reaction distribution with depth direction and electronic/ionic conductivity in composite electrodes with changing electrode porosities. Two dimensional X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that the reaction distribution is happened in lower porosity electrodes. Our developed 6-probe method can measure electronic/ionic conductivity in composite electrodes. The ionic conductivity is decreased for lower porosity electrodes, which governs the reaction distribution of composite electrodes and their performances. PMID:27193448

  17. Three-axis distributed fiber optic strain measurement in 3D woven composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-03-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading.

  18. Chemical Composition of Fine Particulate Matter and Life Expectancy

    PubMed Central

    Dominici, Francesca; Wang, Yun; Correia, Andrew W.; Ezzati, Majid; Pope, C. Arden; Dockery, Douglas W.

    2016-01-01

    Background In a previous study, we provided evidence that a decline in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution during the period between 2000 and 2007 was associated with increased life expectancy in 545 counties in the United States. In this article, we investigated which chemical constituents of PM2.5 were the main drivers of the observed association. Methods We estimated associations between temporal changes in seven major components of PM2.5 (ammonium, sulfate, nitrate, elemental carbon matter, organic carbon matter, sodium, and silicon) and temporal changes in life expectancy in 95 counties between 2002 and 2007. We included US counties that had adequate chemical components of PM2.5 mass data across all seasons. We fitted single pollutant and multiple pollutant linear models, controlling for available socioeconomic, demographic, and smoking variables and stratifying by urban and nonurban counties. Results In multiple pollutant models, we found that: (1) a reduction in sulfate was associated with an increase in life expectancy; and (2) reductions in ammonium and sodium ion were associated with increases in life expectancy in nonurban counties only. Conclusions Our findings suggest that recent reductions in long-term exposure to sulfate, ammonium, and sodium ion between 2002 and 2007 are associated with improved public health. PMID:25906366

  19. Body composition in infancy: impact on health later in life

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From retrospective studies, there is substantial evidence that birthweight and the rate of weight gain during early infancy are associated with increased risk for adverse health outcomes later in life. Birthweight is the marker of the integrative effects of the prenatal environment, while the rate o...

  20. Asteroid taxonomy and the distribution of the compositional types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, B.

    1979-01-01

    Physical observations of minor planets documented in the TRIAD computer file are used to classify 752 objects into the broad compositional types C, S, M, E, R, and U (unclassifiable) according to the prescriptions adopted by Bowell et al. (1978). Diameters are computed from the photometric magnitude using radiometric and/or polarimetric data where available, or else from albedos characteristic of the indicated type. An analysis of the observational selection effects leads to tabulation of the actual number of asteroids, as a function of type and diameter, in each of 15 orbital element zones. For the whole main belt the population is 75% of type C, 15% of type S, and 10% of other types, with no belt-wide dependence of the mixing ratios on diameter. In some zones the logarithmic diameter-frequency relations are decidedly nonlinear. The relative frequency of S-type objects decreases smoothly outward through the main belt, with exponential scale length 0.5 AU. The rarer types show a more chaotic, but generally flatter, distribution over distance. Characteristic type distributions, contrasting with the background population, are found for the Eos, Koronis, Nysa and Themis families.

  1. The life times of polymer composites in construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Urs

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses examples that prove the long-term reliability of Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) under extreme loading conditions and outdoor weathering. Results of polymer/steel-composite anchorage systems, Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) plates and shells, GFRP box girders, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) post-tensioning tendons and CFRP stays are going to be presented.

  2. Trends in the diversity, distribution and life history strategy of Arctic Hydrozoa (Cnidaria).

    PubMed

    Ronowicz, Marta; Kukliński, Piotr; Mapstone, Gillian M

    2015-01-01

    This is the first attempt to compile a comprehensive and updated species list for Hydrozoa in the Arctic, encompassing both hydroid and medusa stages and including Siphonophorae. We address the hypothesis that the presence of a pelagic stage (holo- or meroplanktonic) was not necessary to successfully recolonize the Arctic by Hydrozoa after the Last Glacial Maximum. Presence-absence data of Hydrozoa in the Arctic were prepared on the basis of historical and present-day literature. The Arctic was divided into ecoregions. Species were grouped into distributional categories according to their worldwide occurrences. Each species was classified according to life history strategy. The similarity of species composition among regions was calculated with the Bray-Curtis index. Average and variation in taxonomic distinctness were used to measure diversity at the taxonomic level. A total of 268 species were recorded. Arctic-boreal species were the most common and dominated each studied region. Nineteen percent of species were restricted to the Arctic. There was a predominance of benthic species over holo- and meroplanktonic species. Arctic, Arctic-Boreal and Boreal species were mostly benthic, while widely distributed species more frequently possessed a pelagic stage. Our results support hypothesis that the presence of a pelagic stage (holo- or meroplanktonic) was not necessary to successfully recolonize the Arctic. The predominance of benthic Hydrozoa suggests that the Arctic could have been colonised after the Last Glacial Maximum by hydroids rafting on floating substrata or recolonising from glacial refugia.

  3. Trends in the Diversity, Distribution and Life History Strategy of Arctic Hydrozoa (Cnidaria)

    PubMed Central

    Ronowicz, Marta; Kukliński, Piotr; Mapstone, Gillian M.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first attempt to compile a comprehensive and updated species list for Hydrozoa in the Arctic, encompassing both hydroid and medusa stages and including Siphonophorae. We address the hypothesis that the presence of a pelagic stage (holo- or meroplanktonic) was not necessary to successfully recolonize the Arctic by Hydrozoa after the Last Glacial Maximum. Presence-absence data of Hydrozoa in the Arctic were prepared on the basis of historical and present-day literature. The Arctic was divided into ecoregions. Species were grouped into distributional categories according to their worldwide occurrences. Each species was classified according to life history strategy. The similarity of species composition among regions was calculated with the Bray-Curtis index. Average and variation in taxonomic distinctness were used to measure diversity at the taxonomic level. A total of 268 species were recorded. Arctic-boreal species were the most common and dominated each studied region. Nineteen percent of species were restricted to the Arctic. There was a predominance of benthic species over holo- and meroplanktonic species. Arctic, Arctic-Boreal and Boreal species were mostly benthic, while widely distributed species more frequently possessed a pelagic stage. Our results support hypothesis that the presence of a pelagic stage (holo- or meroplanktonic) was not necessary to successfully recolonize the Arctic. The predominance of benthic Hydrozoa suggests that the Arctic could have been colonised after the Last Glacial Maximum by hydroids rafting on floating substrata or recolonising from glacial refugia. PMID:25793294

  4. Distribution of protein folds in the three superkingdoms of life.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Y I; Brenner, S E; Bash, P A; Koonin, E V

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive protein-fold recognition procedure was developed on the basis of iterative database search using the PSI-BLAST program. A collection of 1193 position-dependent weight matrices that can be used as fold identifiers was produced. In the completely sequenced genomes, folds could be automatically identified for 20%-30% of the proteins, with 3%-6% more detectable by additional analysis of conserved motifs. The distribution of the most common folds is very similar in bacteria and archaea but distinct in eukaryotes. Within the bacteria, this distribution differs between parasitic and free-living species. In all analyzed genomes, the P-loop NTPases are the most abundant fold. In bacteria and archaea, the next most common folds are ferredoxin-like domains, TIM-barrels, and methyltransferases, whereas in eukaryotes, the second to fourth places belong to protein kinases, beta-propellers and TIM-barrels. The observed diversity of protein folds in different proteomes is approximately twice as high as it would be expected from a simple stochastic model describing a proteome as a finite sample from an infinite pool of proteins with an exponential distribution of the fold fractions. Distribution of the number of domains with different folds in one protein fits the geometric model, which is compatible with the evolution of multidomain proteins by random combination of domains. [Fold predictions for proteins from 14 proteomes are available on the World Wide Web at. The FIDs are available by anonymous ftp at the same location.

  5. Prediction of the fatigue life distribution for aluminum through its mechanical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, S. Z.; Zaid, Adnan I. O.

    2016-08-01

    A novel and reliable theoretical model based on the Birnbaum-Saunders (BISA) distribution is presented from which the fatigue life can be determined. Experimental verification of the model is in progress and will be published in due course.

  6. Fuel Distribution Estimate via Spin Period to Precession Period Ratio for the Advanced Composition Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHart, Russell; Smith, Eric; Lakin, John

    2015-01-01

    The spin period to precession period ratio of a non-axisymmetric spin-stabilized spacecraft, the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), was used to estimate the remaining mass and distribution of fuel within its propulsion system. This analysis was undertaken once telemetry suggested that two of the four fuel tanks had no propellant remaining, contrary to pre-launch expectations of the propulsion system performance. Numerical integration of possible fuel distributions was used to calculate moments of inertia for the spinning spacecraft. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of output from a dynamics simulation was employed to relate calculated moments of inertia to spin and precession periods. The resulting modeled ratios were compared to the actual spin period to precession period ratio derived from the effect of post-maneuver nutation angle on sun sensor measurements. A Monte Carlo search was performed to tune free parameters using the observed spin period to precession period ratio over the life of the mission. This novel analysis of spin and precession periods indicates that at the time of launch, propellant was distributed unevenly between the two pairs of fuel tanks, with one pair having approximately 20% more propellant than the other pair. Furthermore, it indicates the pair of the tanks with less fuel expelled all of its propellant by 2014 and that approximately 46 kg of propellant remains in the other two tanks, an amount that closely matches the operational fuel accounting estimate. Keywords: Fuel Distribution, Moments of Inertia, Precession, Spin, Nutation

  7. The distribution of stars most likely to harbor intelligent life.

    PubMed

    Whitmire, Daniel P; Matese, John J

    2009-09-01

    Simple heuristic models and recent numerical simulations show that the probability of habitable planet formation increases with stellar mass. We combine those results with the distribution of main-sequence stellar masses to obtain the distribution of stars most likely to possess habitable planets as a function of stellar lifetime. We then impose the self-selection condition that intelligent observers can only find themselves around a star with a lifetime greater than the time required for that observer to have evolved, T(i). This allows us to obtain the stellar timescale number distribution for a given value of T(i). Our results show that for habitable planets with a civilization that evolved at time T(i) = 4.5 Gyr the median stellar lifetime is 13 Gyr, corresponding approximately to a stellar type of G5, with two-thirds of the stars having lifetimes between 7 and 30 Gyr, corresponding approximately to spectral types G0-K5. For other values of T(i) the median stellar lifetime changes by less than 50%.

  8. 41 CFR 101-27.209 - Utilization and distribution of shelf-life items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.2-Management of Shelf-Life Materials § 101-27.209 Utilization and... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Utilization and distribution of shelf-life items. 101-27.209 Section 101-27.209 Public Contracts and Property...

  9. Altered potassium channel distribution and composition in myelinated axons suppresses hyperexcitability following injury

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Margarita; Richards, Natalie; Schmid, Annina B; Barroso, Alejandro; Zhu, Lan; Ivulic, Dinka; Zhu, Ning; Anwandter, Philipp; Bhat, Manzoor A; Court, Felipe A; McMahon, Stephen B; Bennett, David LH

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury is associated with hyperexcitability in damaged myelinated sensory axons, which begins to normalise over time. We investigated the composition and distribution of shaker-type-potassium channels (Kv1 channels) within the nodal complex of myelinated axons following injury. At the neuroma that forms after damage, expression of Kv1.1 and 1.2 (normally localised to the juxtaparanode) was markedly decreased. In contrast Kv1.4 and 1.6, which were hardly detectable in the naïve state, showed increased expression within juxtaparanodes and paranodes following injury, both in rats and humans. Within the dorsal root (a site remote from injury) we noted a redistribution of Kv1-channels towards the paranode. Blockade of Kv1 channels with α-DTX after injury reinstated hyperexcitability of A-fibre axons and enhanced mechanosensitivity. Changes in the molecular composition and distribution of axonal Kv1 channels, therefore represents a protective mechanism to suppress the hyperexcitability of myelinated sensory axons that follows nerve injury. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12661.001 PMID:27033551

  10. Life satisfaction in elderly Nigerians: reliability and factor composition of the life satisfaction Index Z.

    PubMed

    Baiyewu, O; Jegede, R O

    1992-07-01

    Life satisfaction Index Z was administered to 945 persons aged 60 years and over in a community survey in rural and urban locations in South-Western Nigeria. Life Satisfaction Index scores correlated significantly with items on self-assessed health, loneliness, sex (women having a higher mean score) and location. Items that measure social contact, such as marital status, proximity of nearest child, and frequency of seeing close friends, did not correlate at a significant level. Factor analysis produced two factors on varimax rotation and an internal consistency value of 0.72 was obtained. These values are similar to some of those reported in other studies outside Africa. PMID:1514454

  11. Characteristics of fatigue life and damage accumulation of short fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yokobori, A.T. Jr.; Takeda, Hidetoshi; Adachi, Takeshi; Ha, J.C.; Yokobori, Takeo

    1996-12-31

    The relation between fatigue life and damage accumulation of fiber-reinforced polymer composite (FRP) is not yet clarified. For practical use of FRP, it is necessary to relate the fatigue life to the mechanism of damage accumulation. Damage formation is controlled by the mechanical behavior of the interface between the matrix and fiber. The authors used short glass fiber-reinforced polycarbonate composite in the experiments. By using an in situ (real time) observational fatigue testing machine, they investigated the relationship between fatigue life and damage accumulation. From these results, the fatigue life of this material was found to be dominated by damage accumulation which results from microfracture at the interface between the matrix and fiber. This microfracture is controlled by a cycle-dependent mechanism.

  12. Energy, ecology and the distribution of microbial life

    PubMed Central

    Macalady, Jennifer L.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Grettenberger, Christen L.; Jones, Daniel S.; Tsao, Leah E.; Burgos, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms that govern the coexistence of multiple biological species have been studied intensively by ecologists since the turn of the nineteenth century. Microbial ecologists in the meantime have faced many fundamental challenges, such as the lack of an ecologically coherent species definition, lack of adequate methods for evaluating population sizes and community composition in nature, and enormous taxonomic and functional diversity. The accessibility of powerful, culture-independent molecular microbiology methods offers an opportunity to close the gap between microbial science and the main stream of ecological theory, with the promise of new insights and tools needed to meet the grand challenges humans face as planetary engineers and galactic explorers. We focus specifically on resources related to energy metabolism because of their direct links to elemental cycling in the Earth's history, engineering applications and astrobiology. To what extent does the availability of energy resources structure microbial communities in nature? Our recent work on sulfur- and iron-oxidizing autotrophs suggests that apparently subtle variations in the concentration ratios of external electron donors and acceptors select for different microbial populations. We show that quantitative knowledge of microbial energy niches (population-specific patterns of energy resource use) can be used to predict variations in the abundance of specific taxa in microbial communities. Furthermore, we propose that resource ratio theory applied to micro-organisms will provide a useful framework for identifying how environmental communities are organized in space and time. PMID:23754819

  13. Reflective, causal, and composite indicators of quality of life: A conceptual or an empirical distinction?

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniel S J

    2015-09-01

    Items (or indicators) that constitute "quality of life" instruments can be classified as either reflective (manifestations of some underlying construct), causal (the construct is an effect of the indicators), or composite (the construct is an exact linear combination of the indicators). Psychometric methods based on inter-item associations are only appropriate for reflective indicators, whereas other statistical and non-statistical validation methods can be used for composite or causal indicators. Thus, the distinction has important practical, as well as theoretical, implications. Attempts have been made to empirically identify which items of the EORTC QLQ-C30, a cancer-specific instrument, are causal and which are reflective. Such attempts, however, first require commitment to a particular definition of quality of life, of which there are many. Whether an indicator forms a composite, is causal or reflective of quality of life will depend on the definition adopted, and therefore, the reflective-composite-causal distinction is, arguably, best established on conceptual rather empirical grounds, guided by the "mental experiments" suggested by Bollen (Structural equations with latent variables, Wiley, New York, 1989). Conceptual models of health status and quality of life, as well as a cognitive-linguistic approach to quality of life assessment, may make some contribution to this practice. Theoretical consideration of indicator content can guide not only instrument development and validation, but also the selection of an appropriate instrument. PMID:25725599

  14. Testing and Life Prediction for Composite Rotor Hub Flexbeams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.

    2004-01-01

    A summary of several studies of delamination in tapered composite laminates with internal ply-drops is presented. Initial studies used 2D FE models to calculate interlaminar stresses at the ply-ending locations in linear tapered laminates under tension loading. Strain energy release rates for delamination in these laminates indicated that delamination would likely start at the juncture of the tapered and thin regions and grow unstably in both directions. Tests of glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy linear tapered laminates under axial tension delaminated as predicted. Nonlinear tapered specimens were cut from a full-size helicopter rotor hub and were tested under combined constant axial tension and cyclic transverse bending loading to simulate the loading experienced by a rotorhub flexbeam in flight. For all the tested specimens, delamination began at the tip of the outermost dropped ply group and grew first toward the tapered region. A 2D FE model was created that duplicated the test flexbeam layup, geometry, and loading. Surface strains calculated by the model agreed very closely with the measured surface strains in the specimens. The delamination patterns observed in the tests were simulated in the model by releasing pairs of MPCs along those interfaces. Strain energy release rates associated with the delamination growth were calculated for several configurations and using two different FE analysis codes. Calculations from the codes agreed very closely. The strain energy release rate results were used with material characterization data to predict fatigue delamination onset lives for nonlinear tapered flexbeams with two different ply-dropping schemes. The predicted curves agreed well with the test data for each case studied.

  15. Describing variability of MSW composition data with the log-logistic distribution.

    PubMed

    Milke, Mark W; Wong, Vincent; McBean, Edward A

    2008-08-01

    Variations in solid waste composition data are necessary as inputs to solid waste planning, yet uncertainty exists regarding which probability distributions might be generally valuable to describe the variability. Twenty-two detailed analyses of solid waste from British Columbia, Canada, were fitted to distributions using the BestFit software. Alternative distributions were ranked based on three goodness-of-fit parameters and twelve waste fractions. The log-logistic distribution was found to be the most able to fit over the wide range of composition types considered. The results were demonstrated to be insensitive to the number of waste components or to the choice of a two- or three-parameter distribution. Although other distributions were able to better match the waste composition for individual waste types, the log-logistic distribution was demonstrated to fit, overall, a wide variety of waste composition types. PMID:18727327

  16. Effect of Internal Clearance on Load Distribution and Life of Radially Loaded Ball and Roller Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of internal clearance on radially loaded deepgroove ball and cylindrical roller bearing load distribution and fatigue life was determined for four clearance groups defined in the bearing standards. The analysis was extended to negative clearance (interference) conditions to produce a curve of life factor versus internal clearance. Rolling-element loads can be optimized and bearing life maximized for a small negative operating clearance. Life declines gradually with positive clearance and rapidly with increasing negative clearance. Relationships were found between bearing life and internal clearance as a function of ball or roller diameter, adjusted for load. Results are presented as life factors for radially loaded bearings independent of bearing size or applied load. In addition, a modified Stribeck Equation is presented that relates the maximum rolling-element load to internal bearing clearance.

  17. Physical Activity, Body Composition, and Perceived Quality of Life of Adults with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, Elizabeth A.; Caputo, Jennifer L.; Perry, Tara L.; Fuller, Dana K.; Morgan, Don W.

    2009-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the health and fitness of adults with visual impairments. This article documents the physical activity levels and body-composition profiles of young and middle-aged adults with visual impairments and addresses the concomitant effects of these factors on perceived quality of life. (Contains 2 tables.)

  18. Strong neutral spatial effects shape tree species distributions across life stages at multiple scales.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue-Hua; Lan, Guo-Yu; Sha, Li-Qing; Cao, Min; Tang, Yong; Li, Yi-De; Xu, Da-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, ecologists use lattice (regional summary) count data to simulate tree species distributions to explore species coexistence. However, no previous study has explicitly compared the difference between using lattice count and basal area data and analyzed species distributions at both individual species and community levels while simultaneously considering the combined scenarios of life stage and scale. In this study, we hypothesized that basal area data are more closely related to environmental variables than are count data because of strong environmental filtering effects. We also address the contribution of niche and the neutral (i.e., solely dependent on distance) factors to species distributions. Specifically, we separately modeled count data and basal area data while considering life stage and scale effects at the two levels with simultaneous autoregressive models and variation partitioning. A principal coordinates of neighbor matrix (PCNM) was used to model neutral spatial effects at the community level. The explained variations of species distribution data did not differ significantly between the two types of data at either the individual species level or the community level, indicating that the two types of data can be used nearly identically to model species distributions. Neutral spatial effects represented by spatial autoregressive parameters and the PCNM eigenfunctions drove species distributions on multiple scales, different life stages and individual species and community levels in this plot. We concluded that strong neutral spatial effects are the principal mechanisms underlying the species distributions and thus shape biodiversity spatial patterns. PMID:22666497

  19. [Distribution and species composition of hyporheic macroinvertebrates in a mountain stream].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue-wei; Yuan, Xing-zhong; Liu, Hong; Ren, Hai-qing; Deng, Wei; Wang, Xiao-feng

    2015-09-01

    Hyporheic macroinvertebrates are an important component of stream ecosystem. The composition and distribution of the hyporheic macroinvertebrates were investigated using artificial substrates in the upper reaches of Heishuitan River in August, December 2013 and April 2014. The results indicated that a total of 27 microinvertbrate species were identified in all three seasons. In summer, 22 species were identified, accounting for 81.8% of aquatic insects. 16 species were identified both in winter and spring, accounting for 75.0% and 62.5% of aquatic insects, respectively. The density of macroinvertebrate assemblage was significantly lower in summer than in winter and spring, and was the highest in spring. The biomass of macroinvertebrate assemblage was significantly higher in winter than in summer and spring, and was the lowest in summer. Species richness, Shannon index and Pielou index all had no significant difference among the three seasons. The density and richness of macroinvertebrates decreased with bed depth, and the maximum invertebrate density was found within the top 20 cm of the stream bed. Collector-filterer and collector-gatherer were the dominant functional feeding group in all three seasons. The community structure and temporal-spatial distribution of macroinvertebrates were determined by interactions and life history strategy of macroinvertebrates, and physical-chemical factors of hyporheic zone. PMID:26785569

  20. [Distribution and species composition of hyporheic macroinvertebrates in a mountain stream].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue-wei; Yuan, Xing-zhong; Liu, Hong; Ren, Hai-qing; Deng, Wei; Wang, Xiao-feng

    2015-09-01

    Hyporheic macroinvertebrates are an important component of stream ecosystem. The composition and distribution of the hyporheic macroinvertebrates were investigated using artificial substrates in the upper reaches of Heishuitan River in August, December 2013 and April 2014. The results indicated that a total of 27 microinvertbrate species were identified in all three seasons. In summer, 22 species were identified, accounting for 81.8% of aquatic insects. 16 species were identified both in winter and spring, accounting for 75.0% and 62.5% of aquatic insects, respectively. The density of macroinvertebrate assemblage was significantly lower in summer than in winter and spring, and was the highest in spring. The biomass of macroinvertebrate assemblage was significantly higher in winter than in summer and spring, and was the lowest in summer. Species richness, Shannon index and Pielou index all had no significant difference among the three seasons. The density and richness of macroinvertebrates decreased with bed depth, and the maximum invertebrate density was found within the top 20 cm of the stream bed. Collector-filterer and collector-gatherer were the dominant functional feeding group in all three seasons. The community structure and temporal-spatial distribution of macroinvertebrates were determined by interactions and life history strategy of macroinvertebrates, and physical-chemical factors of hyporheic zone.

  1. 25 CFR 179.101 - How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the holder of a life estate? 179.101 Section 179.101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LIFE ESTATES AND FUTURE INTERESTS Life Estates Not Created Under AIPRA § 179.101 How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate?...

  2. 25 CFR 179.101 - How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the holder of a life estate? 179.101 Section 179.101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LIFE ESTATES AND FUTURE INTERESTS Life Estates Not Created Under AIPRA § 179.101 How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate?...

  3. 25 CFR 179.101 - How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the holder of a life estate? 179.101 Section 179.101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LIFE ESTATES AND FUTURE INTERESTS Life Estates Not Created Under AIPRA § 179.101 How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate?...

  4. 25 CFR 179.101 - How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the holder of a life estate? 179.101 Section 179.101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LIFE ESTATES AND FUTURE INTERESTS Life Estates Not Created Under AIPRA § 179.101 How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate?...

  5. Primary igneous rocks on Mars: Composition and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Robert B.; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The present knowledge of the crustal composition of Mars is synthesized and implications discussed for in-situ resource utilization. Sources of information include remote sensing observations, Viking XRF chemical measurements, and characteristics of the SNC meteorites (which most researchers now believe originated on Mars). There are a number of lines of evidence that abundant ferrous-iron rich igneous crustal rocks (and derivative soils) are available at or very near the current Martian surface at many locations on the planet. Most of these exposures show spectroscopic evidence for abundant pyroxene, consistent with basaltic compositions. The SNC meteorites, which have basaltic compositions, were also studied extensively. Interpretations of Mars crustal chemistry and mineralogy (petrology) based on these various sources are reviewed, and their consistencies and differences are discussed.

  6. Effect of carbide distribution on rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5749

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1983-01-01

    Endurance tests with ball bearings made of corrosion resistant bearing steel which resulted in fatigue lives much lower than were predicted are discussed. Metallurgical analysis revealed an undesirable carbide distribution in the races. It was shown in accelerated fatigue tests in the RC rig that large, banded carbides can reduce rolling element fatigue life by a factor of approximately four. The early spalling failures on the bearing raceways are attributed to the large carbide size and banded distribution.

  7. Elemental composition and size distribution of particulates in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Neustadter, H. E.; Leibecki, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made of the elemental particle size distribution at five contrasting urban environments with different source-type distributions in Cleveland, Ohio. Air quality conditions ranged from normal to air pollution alert levels. A parallel network of high-volume cascade impactors (5-state) were used for simultaneous sampling on glass fiber surfaces for mass determinations and on Whatman-41 surfaces for elemental analysis by neutron activation for 25 elements. The elemental data are assessed in terms of distribution functions and interrelationships and are compared between locations as a function of resultant wind direction in an attempt to relate the findings to sources.

  8. Influence of machining parameters on cutting tool life while machining aluminum alloy fly ash composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. R. Prakash; chandra, Poorna; Kiran, R.; Asha, P. B.

    2016-09-01

    Metal matrix composites containing fly ash as reinforcement are primarily preferred because these materials possess lower density and higher strength to weight ratio. The metal matrix composites possess hetrogeneous microstructure which is due to the presence of hard ceramic particles. While turning composites, the catastrophic failure of cutting tools is attributed to the presence of hard particles. Selection of optimal cutting conditions for a given machining process and grade of cutting tools are of utmost importance to enhance the tool life during turning operation. Thus the research work was aimed at the experimental investigation of the cutting tool life while machining aluminum alloy composite containing 0-15% fly-ash. The experiments carried out following ISO3685 standards. The carbide inserts of grade K10 and style CGGN120304 were the turning tools. The cutting speed selected was between 200m/min to 500m/min in step of 100m/min, feed of 0.08 & 0.16 mm/revolution and constant depth of cut of 1.0 mm. The experimental results revealed that the performance of K10 grade carbide insert found better while machining composite containing 5% filler, at all cutting speeds and 0.08mm/revolution feed. The failures of carbide tools are mainly due to notch wear followed by built up edge and edge chipping.

  9. Electrical Resistance of Ceramic Matrix Composites for Damage Detection and Life-Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai

    2008-01-01

    The electric resistance of woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites were measured under tensile loading conditions. The results show that the electrical resistance is closely related to damage and that real-time information about the damage state can be obtained through monitoring of the resistance. Such self-sensing capability provides the possibility of on-board/in-situ damage detection or inspection of a component during "down time". The correlation of damage with appropriate failure mechanism can then be applied to accurate life prediction for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites.

  10. The galactic habitable zone and the age distribution of complex life in the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Lineweaver, Charles H; Fenner, Yeshe; Gibson, Brad K

    2004-01-01

    We modeled the evolution of the Milky Way Galaxy to trace the distribution in space and time of four prerequisites for complex life: the presence of a host star, enough heavy elements to form terrestrial planets, sufficient time for biological evolution, and an environment free of life-extinguishing supernovae. We identified the Galactic habitable zone (GHZ) as an annular region between 7 and 9 kiloparsecs from the Galactic center that widens with time and is composed of stars that formed between 8 and 4 billion years ago. This GHZ yields an age distribution for the complex life that may inhabit our Galaxy. We found that 75% of the stars in the GHZ are older than the Sun.

  11. Fatigue life prediction of an intermetallic matrix composite at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    A strain-based fatigue life prediction method is proposed for an intermetallic matrix composite (IMC) under tensile cyclic loadings at elevated temperatures. Styled after the 'Universal Slopes' method, the model utilizes the composite's tensile properties to estimate fatigue life. Factors such as fiber volume ratio (Vf), number of plys and temperature dependence are implicitly incorporated into the model through these properties. The model constants are determined by using unidirectional fatigue data at temperatures of 425 and 815 C. Fatigue lives from two independent sources are used to verify the model at temperatures of 650 and 760 C. Cross-ply lives at 760 C are also predicted. It is demonstrated that the correlation between experimental and predicted lives is within a factor of two.

  12. Fatigue life prediction of an intermetallic matrix composite at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    A strain-based fatigue life prediction method is proposed for an intermetallic matrix composite (IMC) under tensile cyclic loadings at elevated temperatures. Styled after the Universal Slopes method, the model utilizes the composite's tensile properties to estimate fatigue life. Factors such as fiber volume ratio, number of plys and temperature dependence are implicitly incorporated into the model through these properties. The model constants are determined by using unidirectional fatigue data at temperatures of 425 and 815 C. Fatigue lives from two independent sources are used to verify the model at temperatures of 650 and 760 C. Cross-ply lives at 760 C are also predicted. It is demonstrated that the correlation between experimental and predicted lives is within a factor of two.

  13. Identification of Heredity Kernels and Their Influence on the Life Time of Glass/Polyester Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olodo, E. T.; Adjovi, E. C.; Adanhounme, V.

    2014-11-01

    One of the major problems encountered in prediction of hereditary viscoelastic behavior of polymeric composites is the determination of heredity kernels. This issue comes down to identification of the model characterizing the viscoelastic properties of these materials. The purpose of this work is to propose a model for prediction of viscoelastic nonlinear behavior of laminate composite with polyester matrix, through the study and analysis of heredity kernels and their influence on the life time of this material. Identification of this model required experimental determination at room temperature, of viscoelastic parameters of heredity kernels by macroscopic approach. These data provide predictive tools for establishment of the life time and long term stress limit under static complex loading for this type of material.

  14. Temperature effects on gametophyte life-history traits and geographic distribution of two cryptic kelp species.

    PubMed

    Oppliger, L Valeria; Correa, Juan A; Engelen, Aschwin H; Tellier, Florence; Vieira, Vasco; Faugeron, Sylvain; Valero, Myriam; Gomez, Gonzalo; Destombe, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    A major determinant of the geographic distribution of a species is expected to be its physiological response to changing abiotic variables over its range. The range of a species often corresponds to the geographic extent of temperature regimes the organism can physiologically tolerate. Many species have very distinct life history stages that may exhibit different responses to environmental factors. In this study we emphasized the critical role of the haploid microscopic stage (gametophyte) of the life cycle to explain the difference of edge distribution of two related kelp species. Lessonia nigrescens was recently identified as two cryptic species occurring in parapatry along the Chilean coast: one located north and the other south of a biogeographic boundary at latitude 29-30°S. Six life history traits from microscopic stages were identified and estimated under five treatments of temperature in eight locations distributed along the Chilean coast in order to (1) estimate the role of temperature in the present distribution of the two cryptic L. nigrescens species, (2) compare marginal populations to central populations of the two cryptic species. In addition, we created a periodic matrix model to estimate the population growth rate (λ) at the five temperature treatments. Differential tolerance to temperature was demonstrated between the two species, with the gametophytes of the Northern species being more tolerant to higher temperatures than gametophytes from the south. Second, the two species exhibited different life history strategies with a shorter haploid phase in the Northern species contrasted with considerable vegetative growth in the Southern species haploid stage. These results provide strong ecological evidence for the differentiation process of the two cryptic species and show local adaptation of the life cycle at the range limits of the distribution. Ecological and evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. Temperature Effects on Gametophyte Life-History Traits and Geographic Distribution of Two Cryptic Kelp Species

    PubMed Central

    Oppliger, L. Valeria; Correa, Juan A.; Engelen, Aschwin H.; Tellier, Florence; Vieira, Vasco; Faugeron, Sylvain; Valero, Myriam; Gomez, Gonzalo; Destombe, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    A major determinant of the geographic distribution of a species is expected to be its physiological response to changing abiotic variables over its range. The range of a species often corresponds to the geographic extent of temperature regimes the organism can physiologically tolerate. Many species have very distinct life history stages that may exhibit different responses to environmental factors. In this study we emphasized the critical role of the haploid microscopic stage (gametophyte) of the life cycle to explain the difference of edge distribution of two related kelp species. Lessonia nigrescens was recently identified as two cryptic species occurring in parapatry along the Chilean coast: one located north and the other south of a biogeographic boundary at latitude 29–30°S. Six life history traits from microscopic stages were identified and estimated under five treatments of temperature in eight locations distributed along the Chilean coast in order to (1) estimate the role of temperature in the present distribution of the two cryptic L. nigrescens species, (2) compare marginal populations to central populations of the two cryptic species. In addition, we created a periodic matrix model to estimate the population growth rate (λ) at the five temperature treatments. Differential tolerance to temperature was demonstrated between the two species, with the gametophytes of the Northern species being more tolerant to higher temperatures than gametophytes from the south. Second, the two species exhibited different life history strategies with a shorter haploid phase in the Northern species contrasted with considerable vegetative growth in the Southern species haploid stage. These results provide strong ecological evidence for the differentiation process of the two cryptic species and show local adaptation of the life cycle at the range limits of the distribution. Ecological and evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:22723987

  16. Bayesian Analysis of Step-Stress Accelerated Life Test with Exponential Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Pan, R.

    2012-04-01

    In this article, we propose a general Bayesian inference approach to the step-stress accelerated life test with type II censoring. We assume that the failure times at each stress level are exponentially distributed and the test units are tested in an increasing order of stress levels. We formulate the prior distribution of the parameters of life-stress function and integrate the engineering knowledge of product failure rate and acceleration factor into the prior. The posterior distribution and the point estimates for the parameters of interest are provided. Through the Markov chain Monte Carlo technique, we demonstrate a nonconjugate prior case using an industrial example. It is shown that with the Bayesian approach, the statistical precision of parameter estimation is improved and, consequently, the required number of failures could be reduced.

  17. Erosion Coatings Developed to Increase the Life and Durability of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.; Naik, Subhash K.; Bowman, Cheryl L.; Siefker, Robert; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Perusek, Gail P.

    2004-01-01

    Both the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Allison Advanced Development Company (AADC) have worked to develop and demonstrate erosion-resistant coatings that would increase the life and durability of composite materials used in commercial aircraft engines. These composite materials reduce component weight by 20 to 30 percent and result in less fuel burn and emissions and more fuel savings. Previously, however, their use was limited because of poor erosion resistance, which causes concerns about safety and leads to high maintenance costs. The coatings were tested by the University of Cincinnati, and the composites were manufactured by Texas Composites and coated by Engelhard and NASA Glenn. Rolls-Royce Corporation uses composite materials, which are stronger and less dense than steel or titanium, to make bypass vanes for their AE3007 engines. These engines are widely used in regional jet aircraft (Embraer) and unmanned air vehicles such as the Northrop Grumman Global Hawk. Coatings developed by NASA/Rolls-Royce can reduce erosion from abrasive materials and from impurities in the air that pass over these vanes, allowing Rolls-Royce to take advantage of the benefits of composite materials over titanium without the added costs of increased maintenance and/or engine failure. The Higher Operating Temperature Propulsion Components (HOTPC) Project developed cost-effective, durable coatings as part of NASA's goal to increase aviation system capacity growth. These erosion coatings will reduce the number of special inspections or instances of discontinued service due to erosion, allowing aircraft capacity to be maintained without inconveniencing the traveling public. A specific example of extending component life showed that these coatings increased the life of graphite fiber and polymer composite bypass vanes up to 8 times over that of the uncoated vanes. This increased durability allows components to operate to full design life without the fear of wear or failure

  18. Microstructural Influence on Deformation and Fatigue Life of Composites Using the Generalized Method of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Murthy, P.; Bednarcyk, B. A.; Pineda, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    A fully coupled deformation and damage approach to modeling the response of composite materials and composite laminates is presented. It is based on the semi-­-analytical generalized method of cells (GMC) micromechanics model as well as its higher fidelity counterpart, HFGMC, both of which provide closed-form constitutive equations for composite materials as well as the micro scale stress and strain fields in the composite phases. The provided constitutive equations allow GMC and HFGMC to function within a higher scale structural analysis (e.g., finite element analysis or lamination theory) to represent a composite material point, while the availability of the micro fields allow the incorporation of lower scale sub­-models to represent local phenomena in the fiber and matrix. Further, GMC's formulation performs averaging when applying certain governing equations such that some degree of microscale field accuracy is surrendered in favor of extreme computational efficiency, rendering the method quite attractive as the centerpiece in a integrated computational material engineering (ICME) structural analysis; whereas HFGMC retains this microscale field accuracy, but at the price of significantly slower computational speed. Herein, the sensitivity of deformation and the fatigue life of graphite/epoxy PMC composites, with both ordered and disordered microstructures, has been investigated using this coupled deformation and damage micromechanics based approach. The local effects of fiber breakage and fatigue damage are included as sub-models that operate on the microscale for the individual composite phases. For analysis of laminates, classical lamination theory is employed as the global or structural scale model, while GMC/HFGMC is embedded to operate on the microscale to simulate the behavior of the composite material within each laminate layer. A key outcome of this study is the statistical influence of microstructure and micromechanics idealization (GMC or HFGMC) on

  19. Influence of Weight Gain Rate on Early Life Nutritional Status and Body Composition of Children

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Taís Cristina Araújo; Ribeiro, Andréia Queiroz; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro; Sant'Ana, Luciana Ferreira da Rocha

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the influence of the weight gain rate at 4–6 months on nutritional status and body composition in children between 4 and 7 years of age. Methods. Retrospective cohort study, sample of 257 children. Data collection was performed in two stages, with the first relating to retrospective data of weight gain from birth to the first 4–6 months of life in the patient records. Measurements of weight, height, waist circumference, and body composition in children between ages 4 and 7 years were obtained. Nutritional status was assessed by the BMI/age. Control variables, such as pregnancy, breastfeeding, lifestyle, and sociodemographics, were studied. Descriptive analysis and multiple linear regression were performed. Results. In the nutritional status assessment, the prevalence of overweight observed was 24.9%. After adjusting for control variables, it was found that the increase of the WGR at 4–6 months of age explained the occurrence of higher BMI/age, percentage of total body fat, body fat percentage in the android region, and waist circumference in children between 4 and 7 years of age. Conclusion. The increase of the WGR in the first months of life can lead to the occurrence of higher values of parameters of nutritional status and body composition in later life. PMID:25538953

  20. Design of intelligent composites with life-cycle health management capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosania, Colleen L.; Larrosa, Cecilia C.; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2015-03-01

    Use of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) presents challenges because of their complex manufacturing processes and different damage mechanics in relation to legacy metal materials. New monitoring methods for manufacturing, quality verification, damage estimation, and prognosis are needed to use CFRPs safely and efficiently. This work evaluates the development of intelligent composite materials using integrated piezoelectric sensors to monitor the material during cure and throughout service life. These sensors are used to propagate ultrasonic waves through the structure for health monitoring. During manufacturing, data is collected at different stages during the cure cycle, detecting the changing material properties during cure and verifying quality and degree of cure. The same sensors can then be used with previously developed techniques to perform damage detection, such as impact detection and matrix crack density estimation. Real-time damage estimation can be combined with prognostic models to predict future propagation of damage in the material. In this work experimental results will be presented from composite coupons with embedded piezoelectric sensors. Cure monitoring and damage detection results derived from analysis of the ultrasonic sensor signal will be shown. Sensitive signal parameters to the different stimuli in both the time and frequency domains will be explored for this analysis. From these results, use of the same sensor networks from manufacturing throughout the life of the composite material will demonstrate the full life-cycle monitoring capability of these intelligent materials.

  1. Cyclopeptide toxins of lethal amanitas: Compositions, distribution and phylogenetic implication.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shanshan; Zhou, Qian; He, Zhengmi; Luo, Tao; Zhang, Ping; Cai, Qing; Yang, Zhuliang; Chen, Jia; Chen, Zuohong

    2016-09-15

    Lethal amanitas (Amanita sect. Phalloideae) are responsible for 90% of all fatal mushroom poisonings. Since 2000, more than ten new lethal Amanita species have been discovered and some of them had caused severe mushroom poisonings in China. However, the contents and distribution of cyclopeptides in these lethal mushrooms remain poorly known. In this study, the diversity of major cyclopeptide toxins in seven Amanita species from Eastern Asia and three species from Europe and North America were systematically analyzed, and a new approach to inferring phylogenetic relationships using cyclopeptide profile was evaluated for the first time. The results showed that there were diversities of the cyclopeptides among lethal Amanita species, and cyclopeptides from Amanita rimosa and Amanita fuligineoides were reported for the first time. The amounts of amatoxins in East Asian Amanita species were significantly higher than those in European and North American species. The analysis of distribution of amatoxins and phallotoxins in various Amanita species demonstrated that the content of phallotoxins was higher than that of amatoxins in Amanita phalloides and Amanita virosa. In contrast, the content of phallotoxins was significantly lower than that of amatoxins in all East Asian lethal Amanita species tested. However, the distribution of amatoxins and phallotoxins in different tissues showed the same tendency. Eight cyclopeptides and three unknown compounds were identified using cyclopeptide standards and high-resolution MS. Based on the cyclopeptide profiles, phylogenetic relationships of lethal amanitas were inferred through a dendrogram generated by UPGMA method. The results showed high similarity to the phylogeny established previously based on the multi-locus DNA sequences. PMID:27476461

  2. Validation of Framework Code Approach to a Life Prediction System for Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravett, Phillip

    1997-01-01

    The grant was conducted by the MMC Life Prediction Cooperative, an industry/government collaborative team, Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI) acted as the prime contractor on behalf of the Cooperative for this grant effort. See Figure I for the organization and responsibilities of team members. The technical effort was conducted during the period August 7, 1995 to June 30, 1996 in cooperation with Erwin Zaretsky, the LERC Program Monitor. Phil Gravett of Pratt & Whitney was the principal technical investigator. Table I documents all meeting-related coordination memos during this period. The effort under this grant was closely coordinated with an existing USAF sponsored program focused on putting into practice a life prediction system for turbine engine components made of metal matrix composites (MMC). The overall architecture of the NMC life prediction system was defined in the USAF sponsored program (prior to this grant). The efforts of this grant were focussed on implementing and tailoring of the life prediction system, the framework code within it and the damage modules within it to meet the specific requirements of the Cooperative. T'he tailoring of the life prediction system provides the basis for pervasive and continued use of this capability by the industry/government cooperative. The outputs of this grant are: 1. Definition of the framework code to analysis modules interfaces, 2. Definition of the interface between the materials database and the finite element model, and 3. Definition of the integration of the framework code into an FEM design tool.

  3. Kinetics of Formation of Molecular Weight Distribution of Epoxy Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, Lyudmila A.; Kondyurin, Alexey; Svistkov, Alexander L.

    Curing of epoxy matrix prepreg in free space environment is a complex problem. A simulation of the chemical reaction, evaporation and radiation effects in the matrix is a way to understand and predict the curing process. We have developed a mathematical apparatus of the epoxy resin kinetics in term of molecular weight distribution (MWD), which includes the polymerization mechanism of bifunctional epoxy and sixfunctional triethylenetetraamine (TETA) molecules. The mathematical model for a number of molecules with the mass m at time t is based on the following equation $ beta(t,m)=m_{am} / m sum(6}_{i=0) alpha(am) _i (t,m)+ m_{ep} / m sum(2}_{i=0) alpha(ep) _i (t,m), where m_{am} and m_{ep} are the masses of one amine block and one epoxy block, respectively; alpha^{am}_i (t,m) is the MWD near the TETA blocks with the chemical bonds i at time t for the mass values m>0; alpha_i^{ep}(t,m) is the MWD parameters of the epoxy blocks with chemical bonds i at time t for the mass values m>0. For the distribution densities alpha^{am}_i (t,m) and alpha_i^{ep}(t,m), we propose the differential system of equations, which has been solved by applying boundary conditions which are based on the results of chromatography and infrared spectroscopy measurements of the epoxy matrix having different concentration of the hardener. For the initial MWD we accept a Gaussian distribution with parameters alpha^{am}_0 (t,m_1) =146 amu, alpha_0^{ep}(t,m_1) =340 amu and alpha_1^{ep}(t,m_1) =624 amu. Dispersion of the molecular weight for the initial distribution equals to 25 amu. A portion of TETA molecules in the fraction was 25%, and the portion of epoxy molecules with i=0 and i=1 was 67.5% and 7.5%$, respectively. Solutions were obtained at mass step equals to 5 amu and at time step equals to 0.25 min over the interval from 0 to 500 min. The model gives a full kinetic of MWD during the curing reaction. The study is supported by the RFBR (grants N 12-08-00970-a and N 14-08-96011-r-ural-a).

  4. 25 CFR 179.101 - How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the holder of a life estate? 179.101 Section 179.101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... § 179.101 How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate? (a... specify a distribution of proceeds; (2) Where the vested holders of remainder interests and the...

  5. Perchlorate in The Great Lakes: Distribution, Isotopic Composition and Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghosyan, A.; Sturchio, N. C.; Jackson, W. A.; Guan, Y.; Eiler, J. M.; Hatzinger, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Concentrations, stable chlorine and oxygen isotopic compositions, and 36Cl abundances of perchlorate were investigated in the five Laurentian Great Lakes. Samples were collected during monitoring cruises in 2007 and 2008 of the U.S. EPA's RV Lake Guardian and in 2010 at the water supply intake of Marquette, MI on the southern shore of Lake Superior. Concentrations of perchlorate were measured by IC/MS/MS at 24 locations, including one or two depth profiles in each lake. Mean concentrations (μg/L) are: Superior, 0.06 × 0.01; Michigan, 0.10 × 0.01; Huron, 0.11 × 0.01; Erie, 0.08 × 0.01, and Ontario, 0.09 × 0.01. Concentration vs. depth is nearly constant in each lake, indicating well-mixed conditions. Perchlorate was extracted from near-surface water by passing 15,000 to 80,000 L of water through 1-L cartridges containing Purolite A530E bifunctional anion-exchange resin. In the laboratory, perchlorate was eluted from the resin, purified, and precipitated as a >99% pure crystalline phase. Milligram amounts were recovered from each lake. Chlorine and oxygen isotopic analyses were performed at Caltech using the Cameca 7f-GEO SIMS instrument, following validation of the SIMS method with analyses of USGS-37 and USGS-38 isotopic reference materials. Results indicate a relatively narrow range in δ37Cl values (+2.9 to +3.9 ‰) and a wider range in δ18O values (-4.0 to +4.1 ‰), with a general geographic trend of increasing δ18O from west to east. Oxygen-17 was measured at UIC using dual-inlet IRMS of O2 produced by decomposition of KClO4. Great Lakes perchlorate has mass-independent oxygen isotopic variations with positive Δ17O values (+1.6 ‰ to +2.7 ‰) divided into two distinct groups: Lake Superior (+2.7 ‰) and the other four lakes (~ +1.7 ‰). The isotopic data indicate that perchlorate is dominantly of natural origin, having stable isotopic compositions resembling those of perchlorate from pre-industrial groundwaters in the western USA. The 36Cl

  6. Characterization of Cyanobacterial Hydrocarbon Composition and Distribution of Biosynthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Coates, R. Cameron; Podell, Sheila; Korobeynikov, Anton; Lapidus, Alla; Pevzner, Pavel; Sherman, David H.; Allen, Eric E.; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to naturally produce hydrocarbons from fatty acids. Hydrocarbon compositions of thirty-two strains of cyanobacteria were characterized to reveal novel structural features and insights into hydrocarbon biosynthesis in cyanobacteria. This investigation revealed new double bond (2- and 3-heptadecene) and methyl group positions (3-, 4- and 5-methylheptadecane) for a variety of strains. Additionally, results from this study and literature reports indicate that hydrocarbon production is a universal phenomenon in cyanobacteria. All cyanobacteria possess the capacity to produce hydrocarbons from fatty acids yet not all accomplish this through the same metabolic pathway. One pathway comprises a two-step conversion of fatty acids first to fatty aldehydes and then alkanes that involves a fatty acyl ACP reductase (FAAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO). The second involves a polyketide synthase (PKS) pathway that first elongates the acyl chain followed by decarboxylation to produce a terminal alkene (olefin synthase, OLS). Sixty-one strains possessing the FAAR/ADO pathway and twelve strains possessing the OLS pathway were newly identified through bioinformatic analyses. Strains possessing the OLS pathway formed a cohesive phylogenetic clade with the exception of three Moorea strains and Leptolyngbya sp. PCC 6406 which may have acquired the OLS pathway via horizontal gene transfer. Hydrocarbon pathways were identified in one-hundred-forty-two strains of cyanobacteria over a broad phylogenetic range and there were no instances where both the FAAR/ADO and the OLS pathways were found together in the same genome, suggesting an unknown selective pressure maintains one or the other pathway, but not both. PMID:24475038

  7. Distribution of Fullerene Nanoparticles between Water and Solid Supported Lipid Membranes: Thermodynamics and Effects of Membrane Composition on Distribution.

    PubMed

    Ha, Yeonjeong; Katz, Lynn E; Liljestrand, Howard M

    2015-12-15

    The distribution coefficient (Klipw) of fullerene between solid supported lipid membranes (SSLMs) and water was examined using different lipid membrane compositions. Klipw of fullerene was significantly higher with a cationic lipid membrane compared to that with a zwitterionic or anionic lipid membrane, potentially due to the strong interactions between negative fullerene dispersions and positive lipid head groups. The higher Klipw for fullerene distribution to ternary lipid mixture membranes was attributed to an increase in the interfacial surface area of the lipid membrane resulting from phase separation. These results imply that lipid composition can be a critical factor that affects bioconcentration of fullerene. Distribution of fullerene into zwitterionic unsaturated lipid membranes was dominated by the entropy contribution (ΔS) and the process was endothermic (ΔH > 0). This result contrasts the partitioning thermodynamics of highly and moderately hydrophobic chemicals indicating that the lipid-water distribution mechanism of fullerene may be different from that of molecular level chemicals. Potential mechanisms for the distribution of fullerene that may explain these differences include adsorption on the lipid membrane surfaces and partitioning into the center of lipid membranes (i.e., absorption).

  8. Using gamma distribution to determine half-life of rotenone, applied in freshwater.

    PubMed

    Rohan, Maheswaran; Fairweather, Alastair; Grainger, Natasha

    2015-09-15

    Following the use of rotenone to eradicate invasive pest fish, a dynamic first-order kinetic model is usually used to determine the half-life and rate at which rotenone dissipated from the treated waterbody. In this study, we investigate the use of a stochastic gamma model for determining the half-life and rate at which rotenone dissipates from waterbodies. The first-order kinetic and gamma models produced similar values for the half-life (4.45 days and 5.33 days respectively) and days to complete dissipation (51.2 days and 52.48 days respectively). However, the gamma model fitted the data better and was more flexible than the first-order kinetic model, allowing us to use covariates and to predict a possible range for the half-life of rotenone. These benefits are particularly important when examining the influence that different environmental factors have on rotenone dissipation and when trying to predict the rate at which rotenone will dissipate during future operations. We therefore recommend that in future the gamma distribution model is used when calculating the half-life of rotenone in preference to the dynamic first-order kinetics model. PMID:25965037

  9. Composition and molecular weight distribution of carob germ protein fractions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brennan M; Bean, Scott R; Schober, Tilman J; Tilley, Michael; Herald, Thomas J; Aramouni, Fadi

    2010-07-14

    Biochemical properties of carob germ proteins were analyzed using a combination of selective extraction, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled with multiangle laser light scattering (SEC-MALS), and electrophoretic analysis. Using a modified Osborne extraction procedure, carob germ flour proteins were found to contain approximately 32% albumin and globulin and approximately 68% glutelin with no prolamins detected. The albumin and globulin fraction was found to contain low amounts of disulfide-bonded polymers with relatively low M(w) ranging up to 5 x 10(6) Da. The glutelin fraction, however, was found to contain large amounts of high molecular weight disulfide-bonded polymers with M(w) up to 8 x 10(7) Da. When extracted under nonreducing conditions and divided into soluble and insoluble proteins as typically done for wheat gluten, carob germ proteins were found to be almost entirely ( approximately 95%) in the soluble fraction with only ( approximately 5%) in the insoluble fraction. As in wheat, SEC-MALS analysis showed that the insoluble proteins had a greater M(w) than the soluble proteins and ranged up to 8 x 10(7) Da. The lower M(w) distribution of the polymeric proteins of carob germ flour may account for differences in functionality between wheat and carob germ flour.

  10. Behavioural early-life exposures and body composition at age 15 years

    PubMed Central

    Leary, S D; Lawlor, D A; Davey Smith, G; Brion, M J; Ness, A R

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Previous studies have demonstrated associations between some early-life exposures and later obesity, but most have used body mass index in childhood or adulthood as the outcome. The objective of this study was to investigate whether early-life exposures were associated with directly measured fat and lean mass in adolescence. Subjects/Methods: This study used data on 4750 mother–offspring pairs, collected as a part of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, Bristol, UK between 1991 and 1992; associations between behavioural exposures occurring from conception up to 5 years of age (maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy, breastfeeding, age at introduction to solids, dietary patterns and physical inactivity during early childhood) and offspring body composition measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at ~15 years were assessed. Results: After full adjustment for potential confounders, maternal smoking during pregnancy, having a junk food diet and spending more time watching television in early childhood were all associated with higher fat mass at age 15, whereas maternal smoking, having a healthy diet and playing computer games more frequently in early childhood were all associated with a higher lean mass at age 15. Associations with paternal smoking were generally weaker for both fat and lean mass, but as there was no strong statistical evidence for maternal vs paternal differences, confounding by social factors rather than a direct effect of maternal smoking cannot be ruled out. Early feeding was not associated with fat or lean mass at age 15. Conclusions: This study does not provide compelling evidence for associations between most early-life factors and body composition in adolescence. However, possible associations with dietary patterns and physical inactivity in early childhood require further investigation in other cohorts that have direct measurements of adolescent body composition. PMID:25664839

  11. Long-term mechanical life testing of polymeric post insulators for distribution and a comparison to porcelain

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, E.A. )

    1988-07-01

    The paper presents the results and analyses of long-term cantilever strength tests on polymeric line post insulators. The time-to-failure data for static cantilever loads are represented by the Weibull distribution. The life distribution, obtained from the maximum likelihood estimates of the accelerated failure times, fits an exponential model. An extrapolation of the life distribution to normal loads provides an estimate of the strength rating and mechanical equivalence to porcelain line post insulators.

  12. Composition and Manufacturing Effects on Electrical Conductivity of Li/FeS 2 Thermal Battery Cathodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reinholz, Emilee L.; Roberts, Scott A.; Apblett, Christopher A.; Lechman, Jeremy B.; Schunk, P. Randall

    2016-06-11

    The electrical conductivity is key to the performance of thermal battery cathodes. In this work we present the effects of manufacturing and processing conditions on the electrical conductivity of Li/FeS2 thermal battery cathodes. Finite element simulations were used to compute the conductivity of three-dimensional microcomputed tomography cathode microstructures and compare results to experimental impedance spectroscopy measurements. A regression analysis reveals a predictive relationship between composition, processing conditions, and electrical conductivity; a trend which is largely erased after thermally-induced deformation. Moreover, the trend applies to both experimental and simulation results, although is not as apparent in simulations. This research is amore » step toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of processing and composition on thermal battery component microstructure, properties, and performance.« less

  13. Composition of Bacterial Communities Associated with Aurelia aurita Changes with Compartment, Life Stage, and Population

    PubMed Central

    Weiland-Bräuer, Nancy; Neulinger, Sven C.; Pinnow, Nicole; Künzel, Sven; Baines, John F.

    2015-01-01

    The scyphozoan Aurelia aurita is recognized as a key player in marine ecosystems and a driver of ecosystem change. It is thus intensely studied to address ecological questions, although its associations with microorganisms remain so far undescribed. In the present study, the microbiota associated with A. aurita was visualized with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, and community structure was analyzed with respect to different life stages, compartments, and populations of A. aurita by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. We demonstrate that the composition of the A. aurita microbiota is generally highly distinct from the composition of communities present in ambient water. Comparison of microbial communities from different developmental stages reveals evidence for life stage-specific community patterns. Significant restructuring of the microbiota during strobilation from benthic polyp to planktonic life stages is present, arguing for a restructuring during the course of metamorphosis. Furthermore, the microbiota present in different compartments of the adult medusa (exumbrella mucus and gastric cavity) display significant differences, indicating body part-specific colonization. A novel Mycoplasma strain was identified in both compartment-specific microbiota and is most likely present inside the epithelium as indicated by FISH analysis of polyps, indicating potential endosymbiosis. Finally, comparison of polyps of different populations kept under the same controlled laboratory conditions in the same ambient water showed population-specific community patterns, most likely due the genetic background of the host. In conclusion, the presented data indicate that the associated microbiota of A. aurita may play important functional roles, e.g., during the life cycle. PMID:26116680

  14. Modeling and life prediction methodology for Titanium Matrix Composites subjected to mission profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirdamadi, M.; Johnson, W. S.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium matrix composites (TMC) are being evaluated as structural materials for elevated temperature applications in future generation hypersonic vehicles. In such applications, TMC components are subjected to complex thermomechanical loading profiles at various elevated temperatures. Therefore, thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) testing, using a simulated mission profile, is essential for evaluation and development of life prediction methodologies. The objective of the research presented in this paper was to evaluate the TMF response of the (0/90)2s SCS-6/Timetal-21S subjected to a generic hypersonic flight profile and its portions with a temperature ranging from -130 C to 816 C. It was found that the composite modulus, prior to rapid degradation, had consistent values for all the profiles tested. A micromechanics based analysis was used to predict the stress-strain response of the laminate and of the constituents in each ply during thermomechanical loading conditions by using only constituent properties as input. The fiber was modeled as elastic with transverse orthotropic and temperature dependent properties. The matrix was modeled using a thermoviscoplastic constitutive relation. In the analysis, the composite modulus degradation was assumed to result from matrix cracking and was modeled by reducing the matrix modulus. Fatigue lives of the composite subjected to the complex generic hypersonic flight profile were well correlated using the predicted stress in 0 degree fibers.

  15. Analysis of distribution of critical current of bent-damaged Bi2223 composite tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, S.; Okuda, H.; Sugano, M.; Hojo, M.; Osamura, K.; Kuroda, T.; Kumakura, H.; Kitaguchi, H.; Itoh, K.; Wada, H.

    2011-10-01

    Distributions of critical current of damaged Bi2223 tape specimens bent by 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0% were investigated analytically with a modelling approach based on the correlation of damage evolution to distribution of critical current. It was revealed that the distribution of critical current is described by three parameter Weibull distribution function through the distribution of the tensile damage strain of Bi2223 filaments that determines the damage front in bent-composite tape. Also it was shown that the measured distribution of critical current values can be reproduced successfully by a Monte Carlo simulation using the distributions of tensile damage strain of filaments and original critical current.

  16. Simulations of Fiber Distribution Effects in Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bolander, John E.; Lim, Yun Mook

    2008-02-15

    This paper describes a lattice model for coupled moisture transport/stress analyses of fiber-reinforced cement composites (FRCC). Each fiber, and its interface with the matrix material, is explicitly represented within the three-dimensional material volume. This enables the direct study of fiber orientation and distribution effects on composite performance. Realistic, nonuniform fiber distributions can be specified as model input. Basic applications of the model are presented, with emphasis toward simulating the durability mechanics of FRCC exposed to drying environments. The modeling of functionally graded FRCC is an obvious potential extension of this work.

  17. Application of a Fiber Optic Distributed Strain Sensor System to Woven E-Glass Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, Robert F.; Lopatin, Craig

    2001-01-01

    A distributed strain sensing system utilizing a series of identically written Bragg gratings along an optical fiber is examined for potential application to Composite Armored Vehicle health monitoring. A vacuum assisted resin transfer molding process was used to fabricate a woven fabric E-glass/composite panel with an embedded fiber optic strain sensor. Test samples machined from the panel were mechanically tested in 4-point bending. Experimental results are presented that show the mechanical strain from foil strain gages comparing well to optical strain from the embedded sensors. Also, it was found that the distributed strain along the sample length was consistent with the loading configuration.

  18. Spatial distribution of total, ammonia-oxidizing, and denitrifying bacteria in biological wastewater treatment reactors for bioregenerative life support.

    PubMed

    Sakano, Yuko; Pickering, Karen D; Strom, Peter F; Kerkhof, Lee J

    2002-05-01

    Bioregenerative life support systems may be necessary for long-term space missions due to the high cost of lifting supplies and equipment into orbit. In this study, we investigated two biological wastewater treatment reactors designed to recover potable water for a spacefaring crew being tested at Johnson Space Center. The experiment (Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project-Phase III) consisted of four crew members confined in a test chamber for 91 days. In order to recycle all water during the experiment, an immobilized cell bioreactor (ICB) was employed for organic carbon removal and a trickling filter bioreactor (TFB) was utilized for ammonia removal, followed by physical-chemical treatment. In this study, the spatial distribution of various microorganisms within each bioreactor was analyzed by using biofilm samples taken from four locations in the ICB and three locations in the TFB. Three target genes were used for characterization of bacteria: the 16S rRNA gene for the total bacterial community, the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, and the nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) gene for denitrifying bacteria. A combination of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), sequence, and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the microbial community composition in the ICB and the TFB consisted mainly of Proteobacteria, low-G+C gram-positive bacteria, and a Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides group. Fifty-seven novel 16S rRNA genes, 8 novel amoA genes, and 12 new nosZ genes were identified in this study. Temporal shifts in the species composition of total bacteria in both the ICB and the TFB and ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria in the TFB were also detected when the biofilms were compared with the inocula after 91 days. This result suggests that specific microbial populations were either brought in by the crew or enriched in the reactors during the course of operation.

  19. Spatial distribution of total, ammonia-oxidizing, and denitrifying bacteria in biological wastewater treatment reactors for bioregenerative life support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakano, Yuko; Pickering, Karen D.; Strom, Peter F.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Janes, H. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Bioregenerative life support systems may be necessary for long-term space missions due to the high cost of lifting supplies and equipment into orbit. In this study, we investigated two biological wastewater treatment reactors designed to recover potable water for a spacefaring crew being tested at Johnson Space Center. The experiment (Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project-Phase III) consisted of four crew members confined in a test chamber for 91 days. In order to recycle all water during the experiment, an immobilized cell bioreactor (ICB) was employed for organic carbon removal and a trickling filter bioreactor (TFB) was utilized for ammonia removal, followed by physical-chemical treatment. In this study, the spatial distribution of various microorganisms within each bioreactor was analyzed by using biofilm samples taken from four locations in the ICB and three locations in the TFB. Three target genes were used for characterization of bacteria: the 16S rRNA gene for the total bacterial community, the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, and the nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) gene for denitrifying bacteria. A combination of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), sequence, and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the microbial community composition in the ICB and the TFB consisted mainly of Proteobacteria, low-G+C gram-positive bacteria, and a Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides group. Fifty-seven novel 16S rRNA genes, 8 novel amoA genes, and 12 new nosZ genes were identified in this study. Temporal shifts in the species composition of total bacteria in both the ICB and the TFB and ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria in the TFB were also detected when the biofilms were compared with the inocula after 91 days. This result suggests that specific microbial populations were either brought in by the crew or enriched in the reactors during the course of operation.

  20. Constituent-Based Life Models Being Developed for SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Yun, Hee Mann

    2000-01-01

    For the successful utilization of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) as hot-section components in advanced aeropropulsion engines, the CMC constituents will need to be tailored and optimized to meet all the critical property demands of each component. Under the High-Speed Research (HSR) and Advanced High-Temperature Engine Materials Technology (HITEMP) Programs, the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field initiated research to develop mechanistic models for key CMC thermostructural properties. These models would describe the effects of different constituent factors (composition, geometry, and volume fraction) and of potential application conditions (stress, time, temperature, and environment) on these properties. Particular focus was placed on both analytical and numerical modeling of state-of-the-art SiC/SiC composites where the primary load-bearing constituents are stoichiometric SiC fibers in a complex multiphase SiC matrix produced by chemical vapor infiltration and melt infiltration. Recent studies have resulted in computer-based numerical models for the elastic modulus, thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity properties of the SiC/SiC system. Additional studies have generated analytical and empirical models for the time dependence of composite rupture strength at temperatures above 2200 F (1200 C), where CMC's have an important thermostructural advantage over current nickel-based superalloys. These life models utilize thermal activation theory and fiber stress-rupture results measured at Glenn to generate Larson-Miller (L M) plots of fiber rupture strength versus q, a single time- and temperature-dependent parameter. Assuming a worse case in which the SiC matrix is cracked, rupture is then controlled by the time-dependent fracture characteristics of the fiber bundles bridging the matrix cracks. With this as the controlling mechanism, one can then use simple composite theory and the fiber L M plots to predict CMC rupture strength versus the q parameter. The

  1. Determinants of Change in Stroke-Specific Quality of Life After Distributed Constraint-Induced Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan-Hua; Wu, Ching-Yi; Hsieh, Yu-Wei; Snow, Wilaiwan M.; Wang, Tien-Ni

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We identified the predictive factors of change in quality of life (QOL) after a distributed form of constraint-induced therapy (dCIT) among stroke survivors. METHOD. Seventy-four participants were treated with dCIT. We identified eight potential determinants of change: age, gender, side of lesion, time since stroke, cognitive status, motor impairment of the upper extremity, activities of daily living (ADLs), and instrumental ADLs (IADLs). The Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Scale (SS–QOL) was used to assess QOL. RESULTS. Right-sided lesion and onset >17 mo earlier determined greater improvement in the SS–QOL Energy domain. Onset >10 mo earlier, poorer IADL performance, and age >68 yr predicted improvement in the Family Role, Mobility, and Mood domains, respectively. CONCLUSION. Side of lesion, time since stroke, IADL performance, and age were the most important determinants of QOL in patients receiving stroke motor rehabilitation. PMID:23245783

  2. Waste prevention in liquid detergent distribution: a comparison based on life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Nessi, Simone; Rigamonti, Lucia; Grosso, Mario

    2014-11-15

    The distribution of liquid detergents through self-dispensing systems has been adopted in some Italian retail stores over the last few years. By enabling the consumer to refill several times the same container, it is proposed as a less waste-generating and more environmentally friendly alternative to the traditional distribution with single-use plastic containers. For this reason, its implementation is encouraged by the national waste prevention programme recently adopted in Italy. In order to assess such claims, a life cycle assessment was carried out to evaluate whether detergent distribution through self-dispensing systems actually allows to achieve the expected reduction in waste generation and environmental impacts. The focus was on the distribution within the large-scale retail trade and on the categories of laundry detergents, fabric softeners and hand dishwashing detergents. For each of them, a set of baseline single-use scenarios were compared with two alternative waste prevention scenarios, where the detergent is distributed through self-dispensing systems. Beyond waste generation, also the Cumulative Energy Demand and thirteen midpoint-level potential impact indicators were calculated for the comparison. Results showed that a reduction in waste generation up to 98% can be achieved, depending on the category of detergent, on the baseline scenario of comparison and on the number of times the refillable container is used. A progressive reduction in the energy demand and in most of the potential impacts was also observed, starting from a minimum number of uses of the refillable container. PMID:25209251

  3. Waste prevention in liquid detergent distribution: a comparison based on life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Nessi, Simone; Rigamonti, Lucia; Grosso, Mario

    2014-11-15

    The distribution of liquid detergents through self-dispensing systems has been adopted in some Italian retail stores over the last few years. By enabling the consumer to refill several times the same container, it is proposed as a less waste-generating and more environmentally friendly alternative to the traditional distribution with single-use plastic containers. For this reason, its implementation is encouraged by the national waste prevention programme recently adopted in Italy. In order to assess such claims, a life cycle assessment was carried out to evaluate whether detergent distribution through self-dispensing systems actually allows to achieve the expected reduction in waste generation and environmental impacts. The focus was on the distribution within the large-scale retail trade and on the categories of laundry detergents, fabric softeners and hand dishwashing detergents. For each of them, a set of baseline single-use scenarios were compared with two alternative waste prevention scenarios, where the detergent is distributed through self-dispensing systems. Beyond waste generation, also the Cumulative Energy Demand and thirteen midpoint-level potential impact indicators were calculated for the comparison. Results showed that a reduction in waste generation up to 98% can be achieved, depending on the category of detergent, on the baseline scenario of comparison and on the number of times the refillable container is used. A progressive reduction in the energy demand and in most of the potential impacts was also observed, starting from a minimum number of uses of the refillable container.

  4. Nonparametric Fine Tuning of Mixtures: Application to Non-Life Insurance Claims Distribution Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardet, Laure; Patilea, Valentin

    When pricing a specific insurance premium, actuary needs to evaluate the claims cost distribution for the warranty. Traditional actuarial methods use parametric specifications to model claims distribution, like lognormal, Weibull and Pareto laws. Mixtures of such distributions allow to improve the flexibility of the parametric approach and seem to be quite well-adapted to capture the skewness, the long tails as well as the unobserved heterogeneity among the claims. In this paper, instead of looking for a finely tuned mixture with many components, we choose a parsimonious mixture modeling, typically a two or three-component mixture. Next, we use the mixture cumulative distribution function (CDF) to transform data into the unit interval where we apply a beta-kernel smoothing procedure. A bandwidth rule adapted to our methodology is proposed. Finally, the beta-kernel density estimate is back-transformed to recover an estimate of the original claims density. The beta-kernel smoothing provides an automatic fine-tuning of the parsimonious mixture and thus avoids inference in more complex mixture models with many parameters. We investigate the empirical performance of the new method in the estimation of the quantiles with simulated nonnegative data and the quantiles of the individual claims distribution in a non-life insurance application.

  5. Size and composition distribution of fine particulate matter emitted from wood burning, meat charbroiling, and cigarettes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleeman, M.J.; Schauer, J.J.; Cass, G.R.

    1999-10-15

    A dilution source sampling system is augmented to measure the size-distributed chemical composition of fine particle emissions from air pollution sources. Measurements are made using a laser optical particle counter (OPC), a differential mobility analyzer/condensation nucleus counter (DMA/CNC) combination, and a pair of microorifice uniform deposit impactors (MOUDIs). The sources tested with this system include wood smoke (pine, oak, eucalyptus), meat charbroiling, and cigarettes. The particle mass distributions from all wood smoke sources have a single mode that peaks at approximately 0.1--0.2 {micro}m particle diameter. The smoke from meat charbroiling shows a major peak in the particle mass distribution at 0.1--0.2 {micro}m particle diameter, with some material present at larger particle sizes. Particle mass distributions from cigarettes peak between 0.3 and 0.4 {micro}m particle diameter. Chemical composition analysis reveals that particles emitted from the sources tested here are largely composed of organic compounds. Noticeable concentrations of elemental carbon are found in the particles emitted from wood burning. The size distributions of the trace species emissions from these sources also are presented, including data for Na, K, Ti, Fe, Br, Ru, Cl, Al, Zn, Ba, Sr, V, Mn, Sb, La, Ce, as well as sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ion when present in statistically significant amounts. These data are intended for use with air quality models that seek to predict the size distribution of the chemical composition of atmospheric fine particles.

  6. Life-history evolution at the molecular level: adaptive amino acid composition of avian vitellogenins

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Austin L.

    2015-01-01

    Avian genomes typically encode three distinct vitellogenin (VTG) egg yolk proteins (VTG1, VTG2 and VTG3), which arose by gene duplication prior to the most recent common ancestor of birds. Analysis of VTG sequences from 34 avian species in a phylogenetic framework supported the hypothesis that VTG amino acid composition has co-evolved with embryo incubation time. Embryo incubation time was positively correlated with the proportions of dietary essential amino acids (EAAs) in VTG1 and VTG2, and with the proportion of sulfur-containing amino acids in VTG3. These patterns were seen even when only semi-altricial and/or altricial species were considered, suggesting that the duration of embryo incubation is a major selective factor on the amino acid composition of VTGs, rather than developmental mode alone. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the level of EAAs provided to the egg represents an adaptation to the loss of amino acids through breakdown over the course of incubation and imply that life-history phenotypes and VTG amino acid composition have co-evolved throughout the evolutionary history of birds. PMID:26224713

  7. Chemical composition distribution analysis of photoresist copolymers and influence on ArF lithographic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Hikaru; Yasuda, Atsushi; Ueda, Akifumi; Iseki, Takayuki; Ute, Koichi; Nishimura, Takashi; Nakagawa, Ryo; Kitayama, Tatsuki

    2007-03-01

    For getting information about the distribution of chemical composition, several model polymers were prepared under different polymerization conditions and were measured by critical adsorption point-liquid chromatography (CAP-LC). In the copolymer system of 8- and 9- (4-oxatricyclo[5.2.1.0 2,6]decane-3-one) acrylate (OTDA) and 2-ethyl-2-adamantyl methacrylate (EAdMA), the peak shapes of the CAP-LC chromatogram varied according to the polymerization condition although they indicated same molecular weight and averaged chemical composition. The difference of the CAP-LC elution curves was related to the chemical composition distribution of copolymers for CAP-LC measurement combined with proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). The terpolymers consisted of α-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone methacrylate (GBLMA), 2-methyl-2-adamantyl methacrylate (MAdMA) and 1-hydroxy-3-adamantyl methacrylate (HAdMA) were prepared under various polymerization conditions. In the terpolymer system that had same molecular weight and average chemical composition, the solubility parameter (δ) and the dissolution rate were measured. The δ value and the dissolution rate curve were different among these terpolymers. It was suggested that the δ value and the chemical composition distribution of these terpolymers have a significant influence on the lithographic performance.

  8. Bumble bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Bombus spp.) of interior Alaska: Species composition, distribution, seasonal biology, and parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the ecological and agricultural significance of bumble bees in Alaska, very little is known and published about this important group at the regional level. The objectives of this study were to provide baseline data on species composition, distribution, seasonal biology, and parasites of the ...

  9. Investigating low frequency dielectric properties of a composite using the distribution of relaxation times technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of relaxation times approach, a less frequently employed dielectric data analysis technique, is utilized to better understand the relaxation characteristics of composites consisting of metal-coated, hollow glass spheres dispersed in a paraffin wax matrix. The dielectric properties of the composite samples are measured by means of impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range 0.1mHz to 10 MHz. The application of a mixture law is not appropriate for the analysis of the frequency-dependent properties of the considered system on this broad frequency range. However, utilization of the distribution of relaxation times procedure to study the dielectric behaviour shows clear trends in the mixtures' relaxation spectra. Relaxation processes of the paraffin wax and those specific to the composites are found from the extracted distribution of relaxation times spectra. The influence of the filler concentration, q, on the dielectric properties is examined; a relaxation with a narrow distribution at intermediate frequencies becomes broad with the addition of the filler. This relaxation, in the form of the low-frequency-dispersions (also known as constant phase angle) phenomenon, dominates the dielectric properties of the composites with high bead concentration, q > 0:15. The variation in dielectric properties of individual samples whose bead concentrations q are nominally the same is discussed in terms of possible microstructural variations.

  10. Investigating low-frequency dielectric properties of a composite using the distribution of relaxation times technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Bowler, Nicola; Youngs, I. J.; Lymer, K. P.

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of relaxation times approach, a less frequently employed dielectric data analysis technique, is utilized to better understand the relaxation characteristics of composites consisting of metal-coated, hollow glass spheres dispersed in a paraffin wax matrix. The dielectric properties of the composite samples are measured by means of impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range 0.1 mHz to 10 MHz. The application of a mixture law is not appropriate for the analysis of the frequency-dependent properties of the considered system on this broad frequency range. However, utilization of the distribution of relaxation times procedure to study the dielectric behaviour shows clear trends in the mixtures' relaxation spectra. Relaxation processes of the paraffin wax and those specific to the composites are found from the extracted distribution of relaxation times spectra. The influence of the filler concentration, q, on the dielectric properties is examined; a relaxation with a narrow distribution at intermediate frequencies becomes broad with the addition of the filler. This relaxation, in the form of the low-frequency-dispersions (also known as constant phase angle) phenomenon, dominates the dielectric properties of the composites with high bead concentration, q>0.15. The variation in dielectric properties of individual samples whose bead concentrations q are nominally the same is discussed in terms of possible microstructural variations.

  11. Multi-scale mechanism based life prediction of polymer matrix composites for high temperature airframe applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Priyank

    A multi-scale mechanism-based life prediction model is developed for high-temperature polymer matrix composites (HTPMC) for high temperature airframe applications. In the first part of this dissertation the effect of Cloisite 20A (C20A) nano-clay compounding on the thermo-oxidative weight loss and the residual stresses due to thermal oxidation for a thermoset polymer bismaleimide (BMI) are investigated. A three-dimensional (3-D) micro-mechanics based finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to investigate the residual stresses due to thermal oxidation using an in-house FEA code (NOVA-3D). In the second part of this dissertation, a novel numerical-experimental methodology is outlined to determine cohesive stress and damage evolution parameters for pristine as well as isothermally aged (in air) polymer matrix composites. A rate-dependent viscoelastic cohesive layer model was implemented in an in-house FEA code to simulate the delamination initiation and propagation in unidirectional polymer composites before and after aging. Double cantilever beam (DCB) experiments were conducted (at UT-Dallas) on both pristine and isothermally aged IM-7/BMI composite specimens to determine the model parameters. The J-Integral based approach was adapted to extract cohesive stresses near the crack tip. Once the damage parameters had been characterized, the test-bed FEA code employed a micromechanics based viscoelastic cohesive layer model to numerically simulate the DCB experiment. FEA simulation accurately captures the macro-scale behavior (load-displacement history) simultaneously with the micro-scale behavior (crack-growth history).

  12. The effects of distributed life cycles on the dynamics of viral infections.

    PubMed

    Campos, Daniel; Méndez, Vicenç; Fedotov, Sergei

    2008-09-21

    We explore the role of cellular life cycles for viruses and host cells in an infection process. For this purpose, we derive a generalized version of the basic model of virus dynamics (Nowak, M.A., Bangham, C.R.M., 1996. Population dynamics of immune responses to persistent viruses. Science 272, 74-79) from a mesoscopic description. In its final form the model can be written as a set of Volterra integrodifferential equations. We consider the role of distributed lifespans and a intracellular (eclipse) phase. These processes are implemented by means of probability distribution functions. The basic reproductive ratio R(0) of the infection is properly defined in terms of such distributions by using an analysis of the equilibrium states and their stability. It is concluded that the introduction of distributed delays can strongly modify both the value of R(0) and the predictions for the virus loads, so the effects on the infection dynamics are of major importance. We also show how the model presented here can be applied to some simple situations where direct comparison with experiments is possible. Specifically, phage-bacteria interactions are analyzed. The dynamics of the eclipse phase for phages is characterized analytically, which allows us to compare the performance of three different fittings proposed before for the one-step growth curve. PMID:18573261

  13. Battery cycle life balancing in a microgrid through flexible distribution of energy and storage resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasawneh, Hussam J.; Illindala, Mahesh S.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a microgrid consisting of four fuel cell-battery hybrid Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) is devised for an industrial crusher-conveyor load. Each fuel cell was accompanied by a Li-ion battery to provide energy storage support under islanded condition of the microgrid since the fuel cells typically have poor transient response characteristics. After carrying out extensive modeling and analysis in MATLAB®, the battery utilization was found to vary significantly based on the DER's 'electrical' placement within the microgrid. This paper presents, under such conditions, a variety of battery life balancing solutions through the use of the new framework of Flexible Distribution of EneRgy and Storage Resources (FDERS). It is based on an in-situ reconfiguration approach through 'virtual' reactances that help in changing the 'electrical' position of each DER without physically displacing any component in the system. Several possible approaches toward balancing the battery utilization are compared in this paper taking advantage of the flexibility that FDERS offers. It was observed that the estimated battery life is dependent on factors such as cycling sequence, pattern, and occurrence.

  14. Viral distribution and life strategies in the Bach Dang Estuary, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bettarel, Yvan; Bouvier, Thierry; Agis, Martin; Bouvier, Corinne; Chu, Thuoc Van; Combe, Marine; Mari, Xavier; Nghiem, Minh Ngoc; Nguyen, Thuy Thanh; Pham, Thu The; Pringault, Olivier; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Torréton, Jean-Pascal; Tran, Huy Quang

    2011-07-01

    Although the structure and dynamics of planktonic viruses in freshwater and seawater environments are relatively well documented, little is known about the occurrence and activity of these viruses in estuaries, especially in the tropics. Viral abundance, life strategies, and morphotype distribution were examined in the Bach Dang Estuary (Vietnam) during the dry season in 2009. The abundance of both viruses and their prokaryotic hosts decreased significantly from upstream to downstream, probably as the result of nutrient dilution and osmotic stress faced by the freshwater communities. The antibiotic mitomycin-C revealed that the fraction of lysogenic cells was substantially higher in the lower seawater part of the estuary (max 27.1%) than in the upper freshwater area where no inducible lysogens were observed. The question of whether there is a massive, continuous induction of marine lysogens caused by the mixing with freshwater is considered. Conversely, the production of lytic viruses declined as salinity increased, indicating a spatial succession of viral life strategies in this tropical estuary. Icosahedral tailless viruses with capsids smaller than 60 nm dominated the viral assemblage throughout the estuary (63.0% to 72.1% of the total viral counts), and their distribution was positively correlated with that of viral lytic production. Interestingly, the gamma-proteobacteria explained a significant portion of the variance in the <60 nm and 60 to 90 nm tailless viruses (92% and 80%, respectively), and in the Myoviridae (73%). Also, 60% of the variance of the tailless larger viruses (>90 nm) was explained by the beta-proteobacteria. Overall, these results support the view that the environment, through selection mechanisms, probably shapes the structure of the prokaryotic community. This might be in turn a source of selection for the virioplankton community via specific affiliation favoring particular morphotypes and life strategies. PMID:21390531

  15. Distribution and Life Strategies of Two Bacterial Populations in a Eutrophic Lake

    PubMed Central

    Weinbauer, Markus G.; Höfle, Manfred G.

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and epifluorescence microscopy were used to determine the depth distribution of two indigenous bacterial populations in the stratified Lake Plußsee and characterize their life strategies. Populations of Comamonas acidovorans PX54 showed a depth distribution with maximum abundances in the oxic epilimnion, whereas Aeromonas hydrophila PU7718 showed a depth distribution with maximum abundances in the anoxic thermocline layer (metalimnion), i.e., in the water layer with the highest microbial activity. Resistance of PX54 to protist grazing and high metabolic versatility and growth rate of PU7718 were the most important life strategy traits for explaining the depth distribution of the two bacterial populations. Maximum abundance of PX54 was 16,000 cells per ml, and maximum abundance of PU7718 was 20,000 cells per ml. Determination of bacterial productivity in dilution cultures with different-size fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from lake water indicates that low-molecular-weight (LMW) DOM is less bioreactive than total DOM (TDOM). The abundance and growth rate of PU7718 were highest in the TDOM fractions, whereas those of PX54 were highest in the LMW DOM fraction, demonstrating that PX54 can grow well on the less bioreactive DOM fraction. We estimated that 13 to 24% of the entire bacterial community and 14% of PU7718 were removed by viral lysis, whereas no significant effect of viral lysis on PX54 could be detected. Growth rates of PX54 (0.11 to 0.13 h−1) were higher than those of the entire bacterial community (0.04 to 0.08 h−1) but lower than those of PU7718 (0.26 to 0.31 h−1). In undiluted cultures, the growth rates were significantly lower, pointing to density effects such as resource limitation or antibiosis, and the effects were stronger for PU7718 and the entire bacterial community than for PX54. Life strategy characterizations based on data from literature and this study revealed that the fast-growing and metabolically

  16. Thermal history, chemical composition and relationship of comets to the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Leschine, S. B.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1980-01-01

    The role of thermal processes in determining the chemical composition of comets is considered, and implications of possible cometary constituents for the origin and evolution of life on earth are discussed. It is shown that the inclusion of short-lived Al-26 from a nearby supernova explosion into cometary nuclei could lead to comets with surfaces cool enough to retain H2O and interiors warm enough for thermal processing to occur, with the production of complex organic molecules such as amino acids and nucleic acid bases. It is thus suggested that comets may have played a part in seeding the primitive earth with biological polymers capable of self-replication or of evolving towards that capability, and may even be responsible for the subsequent introduction of organic material capable of infecting already existing cells.

  17. Frequency Distributions of Geochemical Data, Scaling Laws, and Properties of Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccianti, Antonella

    2015-07-01

    Many random processes occur in geochemistry. Accurate predictions of the manner in which elements or chemical species interact with each other are needed to construct models able to treat the presence of random components. Although modelling of frequency distributions with some probabilistic models (for example Gaussian, log-normal, Pareto) has been well discussed in several fields of application, little attention has been devoted to the features of compositional data and, in particular, to their multivariate nature. In this contribution an approach coherent with the properties of compositional information is proposed and used to investigate the shape of the frequency distribution of geochemical indices obtained by robust multivariate analysis. The purpose is to understand data-generation processes from the perspective of compositional theory. The approach is based on use of transformations of the log-ratio family, each with peculiar theoretical and practical advantages, depending on the statistical methods adopted. Accordingly, because, in compositional data, all the relevant information about one term ( x i ) of a D-part composition is contained in the ratios to each of the remaining parts x 2,…, x D , analysis of single variables is abandoned. The proposed methodology directs attention to modelling of the frequency distribution of more complex indices, linking all the terms of the composition to better represent the dynamics of geochemical processes. An example of its application is presented and discussed on the basis of consideration of the chemistry of 616 ocean floor basaltic (OFB) glasses from the abyssal volcanic glass data file (AVGDF) of the Smithsonian Institution.

  18. Composition and cycle life of multicomponent AB{sub 5} hydride electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Adzic, G.D.; Johnson, J.R.; Reilly, J.J.; McBreen, J.; Mukerjee, S.; Kumar, M.P.S.; Zhang, W.; Srinivasan, S.

    1994-11-01

    Multicomponent AB{sub 5} hydrides are attractive replacements for the cadmium electrode in nickel -- cadmium batteries. The archetype compound of the AB{sub 5} alloy class is LaNi{sub 5}, but in a typical battery electrode mischmetal is substituted for La and Ni is substituted in part by variety of metals. While the effects of Ni substitution have been widely studied, relatively little effort has focused on the effect of La substitution. This paper deals with the effect on cycle life due to the increasing presence of Ce in the alloy series La{sub 1-x}Ce{sub x}Ni{sub 3.55}Co{sub .75}Mn{sub .4}Al{sub .3}. Alloys were characterized by the determination of pressure-composition relationships, molar volume of H and electrode cycle life. The effects due to lattice expansion are taken into account. It was concluded that the rate of loss of electrochemical capacity per charge/discharge cycle was significantly decreased due to the presence of Ce.

  19. Changes in chemical composition and antioxidative properties of rye ginger cakes during their shelf-life.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Henryk; del Castillo, Maria Dolores; Przygodzka, Małgorzata; Ciesarova, Zuzana; Kukurova, Kristina; Zielińska, Danuta

    2012-12-15

    Changes in chemical composition and antioxidative properties of rye ginger cakes during their shelf-life were investigated in this study. In particular, the changes in antioxidants content, antioxidative and reducing capacity, and Maillard reaction development in rye ginger cakes after long-term storage were addressed. Ginger cakes produced according to the traditional and current recipe were stored for 5 years at room temperature in a dark place. The total phenolic compounds (TPC), inositol hexaphosphate (IP6), reduced (GSH) and oxidised glutathione (GSSG) contents, antioxidant and reducing capacity and Maillard reaction products (MRPs) were determined in ginger cakes after storage and then compared to those measured after baking. After long-term storage a decrease in TPC and IP6 contents in cakes was noted. In contrast, an increase in antioxidative and reducing capacity of stored cakes was observed. Long-term storage induced formation of furosine, advanced and final Maillard reaction products and caused changes in both reduced and oxidised forms of glutathione. After long-term storage the modest changes in furosine, FAST index and browning in ginger cake formulated with dark rye flour may suggest that this product is the healthiest among others. Therefore, traditional rye ginger cakes can be considered as an example of a healthy food that is also relatively stable during long term storage as noted by the small chemical changes observed in its composition.

  20. Evaluating distributed fibre optic sensors integrated into thermoplastic composites for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilder, Constanze; Schukar, Marcus; Steffen, Milan; Krebber, Katerina

    2014-05-01

    Strain sensors used for structural health monitoring (SHM) must provide reliable measurement data during their entire service lifetime. To achieve this for fibre optic sensors integrated into composites, the integration of the sensor has to be adapted according to the process conditions. This paper describes the fabrication of thermoplastic composite samples with integrated distributed fibre optic sensors (DFOS) based on copper-nickel and polyimide coated silica optical fibres. The performance of these DFOS as SHM sensors is evaluated in terms of reliability by measurements derived from comparative measurements with resistance strain gauges and from fatigue tests with 10 million load cycles.

  1. Fatigue-life behavior and matrix fatigue crack spacing in unnotched SCS-6/Timetal 21S metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, G. T.; Herrmann, D. J.; Hillberry, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    Fatigue tests of the SCS-6/Timetal 21S composite system were performed to characterize the fatigue behavior for unnotched conditions. The stress-life behavior of the unnotched (9/90)2s laminates was investigated for stress ratios of R = 0.1 and R = 0.3. The occurrence of matrix cracking was also examined in these specimens. This revealed multiple matrix crack initiation sites throughout the composite, as well as evenly spaced surface cracks along the length of the specimens. No difference in fatigue lives were observed for stress ratios of R = 0.1 and R = 0.3 when compared on a stress range basis. The unnotched SCS-6/Timetal 21S composites had shorter fatigue lives than the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites, however the neat Timetal 21S matrix material had a longer fatigue life than the neat Ti-15-3.

  2. Recycling and reuse of waste from electricity distribution networks as reinforcement agents in polymeric composites.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Matheus V G; Zattera, Ademir J

    2013-07-01

    Of the waste generated from electricity distribution networks, wooden posts treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) and ceramic insulators make up the majority of the materials for which no effective recycling scheme has been developed. This study aims to recycle and reuse this waste as reinforcement elements in polymer composites and hybrid composites, promoting an ecologically and economically viable alternative for the disposal of this waste. The CCA wooden posts were cut, crushed and recycled via acid leaching using 0.2 and 0.4N H2SO4 in triplicate at 70°C and then washed and dried. The ceramic insulators were fragmented in a hydraulic press and separated by particle size using a vibrating sieve. The composites were mixed in a twin-screw extruder and injected into the test specimens, which were subjected to physical, mechanical, thermal and morphological characterization. The results indicate that the acid treatment most effective for removing heavy metals in the wood utilizes 0.4NH2SO4. However, the composites made from wood treated with 0.2NH2SO4 exhibited the highest mechanical properties of the composites, whereas the use of a ceramic insulator produces composites with better thermal stability and impact strength. This study is part of the research and development project of ANEEL (Agência Nacional de Energia Elétrica) and funded by CPFL (Companhia Paulista de Força e Luz).

  3. Recycling and reuse of waste from electricity distribution networks as reinforcement agents in polymeric composites.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Matheus V G; Zattera, Ademir J

    2013-07-01

    Of the waste generated from electricity distribution networks, wooden posts treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) and ceramic insulators make up the majority of the materials for which no effective recycling scheme has been developed. This study aims to recycle and reuse this waste as reinforcement elements in polymer composites and hybrid composites, promoting an ecologically and economically viable alternative for the disposal of this waste. The CCA wooden posts were cut, crushed and recycled via acid leaching using 0.2 and 0.4N H2SO4 in triplicate at 70°C and then washed and dried. The ceramic insulators were fragmented in a hydraulic press and separated by particle size using a vibrating sieve. The composites were mixed in a twin-screw extruder and injected into the test specimens, which were subjected to physical, mechanical, thermal and morphological characterization. The results indicate that the acid treatment most effective for removing heavy metals in the wood utilizes 0.4NH2SO4. However, the composites made from wood treated with 0.2NH2SO4 exhibited the highest mechanical properties of the composites, whereas the use of a ceramic insulator produces composites with better thermal stability and impact strength. This study is part of the research and development project of ANEEL (Agência Nacional de Energia Elétrica) and funded by CPFL (Companhia Paulista de Força e Luz). PMID:23663959

  4. Determing Lamprey Species Composition, Larval Distribution, and Adult Abundance in the Deschutes River, Oregon, Subbasin; 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Jennifer C.; Brun, Christopher V.

    2006-05-01

    Information about lamprey species composition, distribution, life history, abundance, habitat requirements, and exploitation in the lower Deschutes River Subbasin is extremely limited. During 2002, we began a multi-year study to assess the status of lamprey in the Deschutes River subbasin. The objectives of this project are to determine ammocoete (larval lamprey) distribution and associated habitats; Lampretra species composition; numbers of emigrants; adult escapement and harvest rates at Sherars Falls. This report describes the preliminary results of data collected during 2005. We continued documenting ammocoete (larval) habitat selection by surveying four perennial eastside tributaries to the Deschutes River (Warm Springs River, Badger, Beaver and Shitike creeks) within the known ammocoete distribution. The results of 2003-2005 sampling indicate that positive relationships exist between: presence of wood (P = < 0.001), depositional area (P = < 0.001), flow (P = < 0.001), and fine substrate (P = < 0.001). Out-migrants numbers were not estimated during 2005 due to our inability to recapture marked larvae. In Shitike Creek, ammocoete and microphthalmia out-migration peaked during November 2005. In the Warm Spring River, out-migration peaked for ammocoetes in April 2006 and December 2005 for microphthalmia. Samples of ammocoetes from each stream were retained in a permanent collection of future analysis. An escapement estimate was generated for adult Pacific lamprey in the lower Deschutes River using a two event mark-recapture experiment during run year 2005. A modified Peterson model was used to estimate the adult population of Pacific lamprey at 3,895 with an estimated escapement of 2,881 during 2005 (95% CI= 2,847; M = 143; C = 1,027 R = 37). A tribal creel was also conducted from mid-June through August. We estimated tribal harvest to be approximately 1,015 adult lamprey during 2005 (95% CI= +/- 74).

  5. Inference of stratospheric aerosol composition and size distribution from SAGE II satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Fuller, W. H.; Yue, G. K.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    A method for inferring stratospheric aerosol composition and size distribution from the water vapor concentration and aerosol extinction measurements obtained in the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II and the associated temperature from the NMC. The aerosols are assumed to be sulfuric acid-water droplets. A modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to determine model size distribution parameters based on the SAGE II multiwavelength aerosol extinctions. It is found that the best aerosol size information is contained in the aerosol radius range between about 0.25 and 0.80 micron.

  6. Effect of hydrodynamic interaction on the free volume distribution of SGFR-PBT composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munirathnamma, L. M.; Ningaraju, S.; Kumar, K. V. Aneesh; Ravikumar, H. B.

    2016-05-01

    In order to explore the effect of short glass fiber (SGF) reinforcement on the mechanical properties of Polybutylene terephthalate (PBT), short glass fibers of different proportion (10 - 40 wt %) are reinforced into PBT matrix. The free volume distribution of SGFR-PBT composites derived from CONTIN-PALS2 program exhibits the narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM). This is attributed to the improved adhesion resulted by the hydrodynamic interaction between the polymeric chains of PBT matrix and SGF. The hydrodynamic interaction parameter (h) decreases as a function of SGF wt% and becomes more negative for 40 wt% SGFR-PBT composites suggest the generation of excess friction at the interface. This improves the adhesion between the polymeric chains of PBT matrix and SGF and hence the mechanical strength of the SGFR-PBT composites.

  7. Size and Life Time Distributions of Bright Points in the Quiet Sun Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramenko, V.; Yurchyshyn, V.; Goode, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    We present results of two-hour uninterrupted observations of solar granulation obtained at excellent seeing conditions on August 3, 2010 with the largest ground-based new solar telescope (NST) operating at Big Bear Solar observatory. Adaptive optics corrected data were acquired with a broad-band TiO filter (centered at a wavelength of 705.7 nm). The time cadence was 10s and the pixel size was 0.0375 arcsec. Photospheric bright points (BPs) were automatically detected and traced. We find that NST TiO BPs are co-spatial with those visible in Hinode/SOT G-band images. In cases where Hinode/SOT detects one large BP, NST shows several fully resolved BPs. Extended filigree features running along intergranular lanes appear in NST images clearly fragmented into separate BPs. The distribution function of the NST BPs size is exponential and extends to the diffraction limit of NST (77 km) without any saturation. The life time distribution function follows a power law with an index of -1.9. About 98.6% of all detected BPs live shorter than 120 s, and the most persistent BP lasted for 44 minutes. The size and the maximum intensity of BPs were found to be proportional to the life time. Results are discussed in framework of coronal heating and turbulent dynamo. Left - Hinode G-band image obtained on 2010 August 3 at 12:22:11 UT (pixel size 0.109"). Right - NST TiO image obtained on 2010 August 3 at 12:22:10 UT. Both images cover the same area of 18.8" x 18.8" on the Sun. PDFs of the BPs diameter calculated from NST TiO images (black) and from Hinode/SOT G-band images (by Utz et al. 2009, blue).

  8. [Species composition and distribution of foraminifers in the Deryugin Basin (Sea of Okhotsk)].

    PubMed

    Khusid, T A; Domanov, M M; Svinininnikov, A M

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of the composition and quantitative distribution of foraminifers in bathyal sediments collected at 14 stations in the Deryugin Basin and at 11 stations in other regions of the Sea of Okhotsk, Sea of Japan, and North Pacific demonstrated specific foraminifer complex in the basin at depths from 1650 to 1800 m associated with cold barite/methane seeps. Oligomixed biocenosis with prevailing agglutinated foraminifers and Saccorhiza ramosa as the dominant was shown to develop in these zones. PMID:16634440

  9. Fatigue Life Prediction of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures. Part II: Experimental Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    This paper follows on from the earlier study (Part I) which investigated the fatigue behavior of unidirectional, cross-ply and 2.5D C/SiC composites at room and elevated temperatures. In this paper, a micromechanics approach to predict the fatigue life S-N curves of fiber-reinforced CMCs has been developed considering the fatigue damage mechanism of interface wear or interface oxidation. Upon first loading to fatigue peak stress, matrix multicracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding occur. The two-parameter Weibull model is used to describe fibers strength distribution. The stress carried by broken and intact fibres on the matrix crack plane under fatigue loading is determined based on the Global Load Sharing (GLS) criterion. The fibres failure probabilities under fatigue loading considering the degradation of interface shear stress and fibres strength have been obtained. When the broken fibres fraction approaches critical value, the composite would fatigue fail. The fatigue life S-N curves of unidirectional, cross-ply and 2.5D C/SiC composites at room and elevated temperatures have been predicted. The predicted results agreed with experimental data.

  10. A creep cavity growth model for creep-fatigue life prediction of a unidirectional W/Cu composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Young-Suk; Verrilli, Michael J.; Halford, Gary R.

    1992-01-01

    A microstructural model was developed to predict creep-fatigue life in a (0)(sub 4), 9 volume percent tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite at the temperature of 833 K. The mechanism of failure of the composite is assumed to be governed by the growth of quasi-equilibrium cavities in the copper matrix of the composite, based on the microscopically observed failure mechanisms. The methodology uses a cavity growth model developed for prediction of creep fracture. Instantaneous values of strain rate and stress in the copper matrix during fatigue cycles were calculated and incorporated in the model to predict cyclic life. The stress in the copper matrix was determined by use of a simple two-bar model for the fiber and matrix during cyclic loading. The model successfully predicted the composite creep-fatigue life under tension-tension cyclic loading through the use of this instantaneous matrix stress level. Inclusion of additional mechanisms such as cavity nucleation, grain boundary sliding, and the effect of fibers on matrix-stress level would result in more generalized predictions of creep-fatigue life.

  11. Nutrient composition and respiration characteristics of silkworms in the Bioregenerative Life Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ling; Yu, Xiaohui; Liu, Hong

    As the appropriate space animal candidate, silkworm(Bombyx Mori L.) can supply animal food for taikonauts and consume inedible parts of plants in Bioregenerative Life Support Sys-tem(BLSS). Due to the features of BLSS, the silkworm breeding method in the system differ-ent from the conventional one is feeding the silkworm in the first three developing stages with mulberry leaves and with lettuce leaves in the latter two developing stages. Therefore, it is nec-essary to investigate the biochemical components and respiration characteristics of silkworms raised with this method to supply data bases for the inclusion of silkworms in the system to conduct system experiments. The nutrient compositions of silkworm powder (SP) which are the grinded and freeze-dried silkworm on the 3rd day in the fifth developing stage containing protein, fat, vitamins, minerals and fatty acids were determined with international standard analyzing methods in this study. The results showed that SP was rich in protein and amino acids. There were twelve kinds of essential vitamins, nine kinds of minerals and twelve kinds of fatty acids in SP. In contrast, SP had much better nutrient components than snail, fish, chicken, beef and pork as animal food for crew members. Moreover, 359 kCal can be generated per 100g of SP (dry weight). The respirations of silkworm during its whole growing process under two main physiological statuses which were eating and non-eating leaves were studied. According to the results measured by the animal respiration measuring system, there were much difference among the respirations of silkworms under the two main physiological statuses. The amounts of O2 inhaled and CO2 exhaled by the silkworms when they were eating leaves were more than those under the non-eating status. Even under the same status, the respiration characteristics of silkworms in five different developing stages were also different from one an-other. The respiratory quotients of silkworms under two

  12. Magnitude and distribution of stresses in composite resin and sound dentine interface with mechanical retentions

    PubMed Central

    Borie, Eduardo; Orsi, Iara-Augusta; Del Sol, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Background Adhesive systems are constantly subjected to mechanical and chemical stresses that negatively impact the integrity and durability of the dentine-adhesive interface. Despite the lack of evidence to support or reject the clinical indication for mechanical retention, the potential further contribution of these preparations to the behavior of the composite resin-sound dentine bond has been rarely addressed. The authors evaluated by finite element analysis the effect of mechanical retention on the magnitude and distribution of stresses in a composite resin-sound dentin bonding interface when subjected to tensile and shear forces. Material and Methods A three-dimensional model was created based on three cylindrical volumes representing the sound dentin, adhesive system, and composite resin. From this main model, two models were designed to simulate dentine bonding: 1) a model with no mechanical retention, which considered flat adhesion; and 2) a model with retention, which considered four hemispherical holes on the dentine surface. Both groups were subjected to linear static analysis under tensile and shear loading of 200N. Results At the model with retentions’ bonding interface under tensile and shear loading, a concentration of Von Mises equivalent stress was observed within the retentions, with a reduction of those stresses on the bonding boundary surface. Conclusions Additional mechanical retention increases the tensile strength of the sound dentin-composite resin bonding interface, promoting a decrease in the magnitude of the stresses and their redistribution under tensile and shear loading. Key words:Adhesion, composite resins, dentine, finite element analysis. PMID:26155338

  13. Undernutrition in early life and body composition of adolescent males from a birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gigante, Denise P; Victora, Cesar G; Horta, Bernardo L; Lima, Rosângela C

    2007-05-01

    The evidence for an association between poor nutrition in early life and subsequent obesity is inconclusive. In the present study, we investigated the associations between stunting, wasting and underweight at 2 and 4 years of age, and body composition in adolescence in male subjects studied since birth. The 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study included all children born in maternity hospitals and living in the urban area of the city of Pelotas, Southern Brazil. All males born in 1982 were legally required to enlist in the army between January and April 2000. We were thus able to track 2250 subjects in 2000 (78.9% of the original cohort). Anthropometric measurements were collected in 1984 and 1986, and body composition was assessed in 2000. In the present analysis, we used as predictors the nutritional indices height-for-age, weight-for-height and weight-for-age presented in six categories. Outcomes included fat, lean and body mass indices and fat:lean mass ratio, derived from anthropometric and bioimpedance measurements. ANOVA and linear regression were used in the analyses to adjust for confounding. All predictors were positively associated with fat and body mass indices. Height-for-age Z score at age 2 or 4 years was not associated with lean mass index, but all other predictors were associated. Fat:lean mass ratio was associated only with weight-for-height Z score. Our results suggest that undernutrition is not a risk factor for overweight and obesity in our population and may partially protect against fatness in adolescence.

  14. Determing Lamprey Species Composition, Larval Distribution, and Adult Abundance in the Deschutes River, Oregon, Subbasin; 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Jennifer C.; Brun, Christopher V.

    2003-05-01

    Information about lamprey species composition, distribution, life history, abundance, habitat requirements and exploitation in lower Deschutes River tributaries is extremely limited. To assess the status of lampreys in the Deschutes River subbasin, baseline information is needed. We operated to rotary screw traps in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek to gain an understanding of species composition, migration time and production. We identified Pacific lampreys in two life stages, ammocoete and macropthalmia. It appears that Pacific lamprey macropthalmia out-migrate during winter in the Warm Springs River. We saw peak movements by ammocoetes in the spring in Shitike Creek and winter in the Warm Springs River. We found no relationship between stream discharge and the number of lamprey collected. Very few macropthalmia were collected in Shitike Creek. Ammocoete size in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek were different. The ammocoetes in the Shitike Creek trap were close in size to the macropthalmia collected in the Warm Springs River trap. We also completed planning and preparation for larval and associated habitat data collection. This preparation included purchasing necessary field equipment, selecting and marking sampling areas and attending training with US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Confederated Tribes of Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). Because lamprey identification is difficult we met with US Geological Survey (USGS) to assist us with larval lamprey identification techniques. We have also been working in coordination with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) to prepare and implement creel surveys and a mark-recapture study at Sherar's Falls to estimate adult lamprey escapement.

  15. Aerobic training during hemodialysis improves body composition, muscle function, physical performance, and quality of life in chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Lee, Suk Min; Jo, Jong Il

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We assessed the influences of individualized aerobic training on body composition, knee joint muscle function, physical performance, and quality of life in chronic kidney disease patients. [Subjects] Ten chronic kidney disease patients undergoing dialysis. [Methods] Overall physical function and quality of life before and after 12 weeks of aerobic training were evaluated by body composition, the six-minute walk test, cardiopulmonary exercise tests, and Short Form 36-item questionnaire. [Results] The six-minute walk test distance increased significantly after 12 weeks aerobic training. Resting metabolic rate, lactate threshold, maximum oxygen uptake, and quality of life tended to increase after training. Post-training weight, muscle mass, body fat mass, fat percentage, body mass index, and peak torque of right and left knee extension and flexion did not change significantly. [Conclusion] Intra-dialytic training can a safe approach to maintain or improve physical performance and quality of life of chronic kidney disease patients undergoing hemodialysis without adverse events or negative cardiovascular responses. Aerobic training may prevent a decline in body composition and knee joint muscle function due to inactivity in chronic kidney disease patients. Clinically, aerobic training may initially be adapted to maintain overall physical function or improve quality of life in chronic kidney disease patients undergoing hemodialysis. PMID:26157237

  16. Software for analysis of chemical mixtures--composition, occurrence, distribution, and possible toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Jonathon C.; Skach, Kenneth A.; Toccalino, Patricia L.

    2013-01-01

    The composition, occurrence, distribution, and possible toxicity of chemical mixtures in the environment are research concerns of the U.S. Geological Survey and others. The presence of specific chemical mixtures may serve as indicators of natural phenomena or human-caused events. Chemical mixtures may also have ecological, industrial, geochemical, or toxicological effects. Chemical-mixture occurrences vary by analyte composition and concentration. Four related computer programs have been developed by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey for research of chemical-mixture compositions, occurrences, distributions, and possible toxicities. The compositions and occurrences are identified for the user-supplied data, and therefore the resultant counts are constrained by the user’s choices for the selection of chemicals, reporting limits for the analytical methods, spatial coverage, and time span for the data supplied. The distribution of chemical mixtures may be spatial, temporal, and (or) related to some other variable, such as chemical usage. Possible toxicities optionally are estimated from user-supplied benchmark data. The software for the analysis of chemical mixtures described in this report is designed to work with chemical-analysis data files retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System but can also be used with appropriately formatted data from other sources. Installation and usage of the mixture software are documented. This mixture software was designed to function with minimal changes on a variety of computer-operating systems. To obtain the software described herein and other U.S. Geological Survey software, visit http://water.usgs.gov/software/.

  17. Composition and distribution of elements and ultrastructural topography of a human cardiac calculus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Li; Chang, Hsiao-Huang; Huang, Pei-Jung; Chu, Yu-Ting; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2013-04-01

    Trace elements (TEs) may contribute to the formation of calculi or stones or be involved in the aetiopathogenesis of stone diseases. The compositions and spatial distribution of elements from the inner nucleus to outer crust of the cardiac calculus were investigated by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer. The surface topograph, distribution map of elements, elemental and chemical compositions were also determined by environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM)-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Twenty-five elements were identifiable from 18 positions on the cardiac calculus by EDXRF spectrometer, in which the highest concentrations of toxic TEs (Ni, Pt, Hg, Sn, Pb, W, Au, Al, Si) and higher levels of essential TEs (Ca, Sr, Cr, P) were detected. A moderate positive Pearson's correlation between TEs concentrations of Mg, Ca or P and location differences from centre to periphery in the cardiac calculus was observed. A positive correlation was also found for Ca/Zn and Ca/Cu, indicating the gradual increase of calcium concentration from inner nucleus to outer crust of cardiac calculus. The drop-like nodules/crystals on the surface of petrous part of cardiac calculus were observed from ESEM analysis. ESEM-EDX analysis determined the calculus to be predominantly composed of calcium hydroxyapatite and cholesterol, as indicated by the petrous surface and drop-like nodules/crystals, respectively. This composition was confirmed using a portable Raman analyser. The spatial distribution analysis indicated a gradual increase in Mg, P and Ca concentrations from the inner nucleus to the outer crust of the cardiac calculus. The major chemical compositions of calcium hydroxyapatite and cholesterol were detected on this cardiac calculus. PMID:23404458

  18. A Comparison of Various Stress Rupture Life Models for Orbiter Composite Pressure Vessels and Confidence Intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Murthy, Pappu, L. N.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Glaser, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    In conjunction with a recent NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) investigation of flight worthiness of Kevlar Ovenvrapped Composite Pressure Vessels (COPVs) on board the Orbiter, two stress rupture life prediction models were proposed independently by Phoenix and by Glaser. In this paper, the use of these models to determine the system reliability of 24 COPVs currently in service on board the Orbiter is discussed. The models are briefly described, compared to each other, and model parameters and parameter error are also reviewed to understand confidence in reliability estimation as well as the sensitivities of these parameters in influencing overall predicted reliability levels. Differences and similarities in the various models will be compared via stress rupture reliability curves (stress ratio vs. lifetime plots). Also outlined will be the differences in the underlying model premises, and predictive outcomes. Sources of error and sensitivities in the models will be examined and discussed based on sensitivity analysis and confidence interval determination. Confidence interval results and their implications will be discussed for the models by Phoenix and Glaser.

  19. Loading Analysis of Composite Wind Turbine Blade for Fatigue Life Prediction of Adhesively Bonded Root Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi-Majd, Davood; Azimzadeh, Vahid; Mohammadi, Bijan

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays wind energy is widely used as a non-polluting cost-effective renewable energy resource. During the lifetime of a composite wind turbine which is about 20 years, the rotor blades are subjected to different cyclic loads such as aerodynamics, centrifugal and gravitational forces. These loading conditions, cause to fatigue failure of the blade at the adhesively bonded root joint, where the highest bending moments will occur and consequently, is the most critical zone of the blade. So it is important to estimate the fatigue life of the root joint. The cohesive zone model is one of the best methods for prediction of initiation and propagation of debonding at the root joint. The advantage of this method is the possibility of modeling the debonding without any requirement to the remeshing. However in order to use this approach, it is necessary to analyze the cyclic loading condition at the root joint. For this purpose after implementing a cohesive interface element in the Ansys finite element software, one blade of a horizontal axis wind turbine with 46 m rotor diameter was modelled in full scale. Then after applying loads on the blade under different condition of the blade in a full rotation, the critical condition of the blade is obtained based on the delamination index and also the load ratio on the root joint in fatigue cycles is calculated. These data are the inputs for fatigue damage growth analysis of the root joint by using CZM approach that will be investigated in future work.

  20. A Comparison of Various Stress Rupture Life Models for Orbiter Composite Pressure Vessels and Confidence Intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Glaser, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    In conjunction with a recent NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) investigation of flight worthiness of Kevlar Overwrapped Composite Pressure Vessels (COPVs) on board the Orbiter, two stress rupture life prediction models were proposed independently by Phoenix and by Glaser. In this paper, the use of these models to determine the system reliability of 24 COPVs currently in service on board the Orbiter is discussed. The models are briefly described, compared to each other, and model parameters and parameter uncertainties are also reviewed to understand confidence in reliability estimation as well as the sensitivities of these parameters in influencing overall predicted reliability levels. Differences and similarities in the various models will be compared via stress rupture reliability curves (stress ratio vs. lifetime plots). Also outlined will be the differences in the underlying model premises, and predictive outcomes. Sources of error and sensitivities in the models will be examined and discussed based on sensitivity analysis and confidence interval determination. Confidence interval results and their implications will be discussed for the models by Phoenix and Glaser.

  1. Life Limiting Behavior in Interlaminar Shear of Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Verrilli, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Interlaminar shear strength of four different fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites was determined with doublenotch shear test specimens as a function of test rate at elevated temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1316 C in air. Life limiting behavior, represented as interlaminar shear strength degradation with decreasing test rate, was significant for 2-D crossplied SiC/MAS-5 and 2-D plain-woven C/SiC composites, but insignificant for 2-D plain-woven SiC/SiC and 2-D woven Sylramic (Dow Corning, Midland, Michigan) SiC/SiC composites. A phenomenological, power-law delayed failure model was proposed to account for and to quantify the rate dependency of interlaminar shear strength of the composites. Additional stress rupture testing in interlaminar shear was conducted at elevated temperatures to validate the proposed model. The model was in good agreement with SiC/MAS-5 and C/SiC composites, but in poor to reasonable agreement with Sylramic SiC/SiC. Constant shear stress-rate testing was proposed as a possible means of life prediction testing methodology for ceramic matrix composites subjected to interlaminar shear at elevated temperatures when short lifetimes are expected.

  2. Acoustic characterization of void distributions across carbon-fiber composite layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayong, Rostand B.; Smith, Robert A.; Pinfield, Valerie J.

    2016-02-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composites are often used as aircraft structural components, mostly due to their superior mechanical properties. In order to improve the efficiency of these structures, it is important to detect and characterize any defects occurring during the manufacturing process, removing the need to mitigate the risk of defects through increased thicknesses of structure. Such defects include porosity, which is well-known to reduce the mechanical performance of composite structures, particularly the inter-laminar shear strength. Previous work by the authors has considered the determination of porosity distributions in a fiber-metal laminate structure [1]. This paper investigates the use of wave-propagation modeling to invert the ultrasonic response and characterize the void distribution within the plies of a CFRP structure. Finite Element (FE) simulations are used to simulate the ultrasonic response of a porous composite laminate to a typical transducer signal. This simulated response is then applied as input data to an inversion method to calculate the distribution of porosity across the layers. The inversion method is a multi-dimensional optimization utilizing an analytical model based on a normal-incidence plane-wave recursive method and appropriate mixture rules to estimate the acoustical properties of the structure, including the effects of plies and porosity. The effect of porosity is defined through an effective wave-number obtained from a scattering model description. Although a single-scattering approach is applied in this initial study, the limitations of the method in terms of the considered porous layer, percentage porosity and void radius are discussed in relation to single- and multiple-scattering methods. A comparison between the properties of the modeled structure and the void distribution obtained from the inversion is discussed. This work supports the general study of the use of ultrasound methods with inversion to

  3. Habitat and distribution of post-recruit life stages of the squid Loligo forbesii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jennifer M.; Macleod, Colin D.; Valavanis, Vasilis; Hastie, Lee; Valinassab, Tooraj; Bailey, Nick; Santos, M. Begoña; Pierce, Graham J.

    2013-10-01

    This study models habitat preferences of the squid Loligo forbesii through its post-recruitment life cycle in waters around Scotland (UK). Trawl survey and market sample data from 1985 to 2004 are used to model seasonal habitats of immature, maturing and mature squid (maturity being inferred from size and season). Squid presence-absence and catch rate in areas of presence were analysed using generalised additive models, relating spatiotemporal patterns of distribution and abundance to ecogeographic variables. For all maturity classes, higher abundance in winter and spring (i.e., quarters 1 and 2) was associated with deeper water while higher abundance in summer and autumn (quarters 3 and 4) was associated with shallower water, consistent with seasonal onshore-offshore migrations but suggesting that most spawning may take place in deeper waters. The preferred SST range was generally 8-8.75 °C while preferred salinity values were below 35‰ in winter and summer and above 35‰ in spring and autumn. Squid were positively associated with gravel substrate and negatively associated with mud. Seasonal changes in habitat use were more clearly evident than changes related to inferred maturity, although the two effects cannot be fully separated due to the annual life cycle. Habitat selection for this species can be satisfactorily modelled on a seasonal basis; predictions based on such models could be useful for fishers to target the species more effectively, and could assist managers wishing to protect spawning grounds. The extent to which this approach may be useful for other cephalopods is discussed.

  4. A study of the charged ice grains in the Enceladus plume with a composite size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Y.; Hill, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    We study the negatively charged ice grains in the Enceladus plume ranging from nanometer to micrometer in size based on Cassini's multiple instrument observations. We have constructed a composite size distribution by combining the CAPS nanograin size distributions (Hill et al., 2012 JGR) and the CDA dust power-law size distribution (Kempf et al., 2008 Icarus). We also study the charging of the ice grains using RPWS-LP data (Morooka et al., 2011 JGR). E3 and E5 CDA data are not available, but RPWS detected impacts of micron sized dust grains with the same power law size distribution (Ye et al., 2012 AGU meeting). Our size distribution formula is fitted with E3 and E5 CAPS and RPWS data, and constrained with the total dust charge density inferred from the RPWS-LP cold plasma data. The fitting with E17 and E18 CAPS nanograin data (Tokar et al., 2012 AGU meeting) and RPWS dust data (Ye et al., 2013 MAPS workshop) will also be discussed. Based on the charge per grain and the size distribution, the densities, source rate, motion, and currents of the ice grains can be calculated. Our size distribution implies that the grains ~2-20 nm dominate in both charge density and number density. But the mass density is very sensitive to the larger grains. We discuss the mass densities and source rates with different size distribution parameters, and compare with the water vapor plume. We study the trajectories of the charged ice grains in both Enceladus and Saturn frames, and calculate the dust currents from their motion. We find that the total dust pickup current at Enceladus is ≥10^5 A. We will also discuss the ion and dust current systems and resulting magnetic perturbations near the moon.

  5. Floristic composition, environmental variation and species distribution patterns in burned grassland in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Overbeck, G E; Müller, S C; Pillar, V D; Pfadenhauer, J

    2006-11-01

    In regularly burned grassland on Morro Santana, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, we investigated differences in the floristic composition and their relation to soil properties, aspect and distance from the forest border. In 48 plots of 0.75 m2, we identified a total of 201 species from a local species pool of approximately 450 to 500 species. Most species occurred in low frequencies, showing clumpy distribution patterns in the studied area. Multivariate analysis showed that plots close to the forest edge clearly differed from plots in the open grassland concerning composition and structure. Plots exposed to the north differed from plots on the top of the hill both in the composition of species as well as in soil variables, mainly due to shallower soil in the former. No strong relation between soil properties and variation in vegetation composition could be detected at a finer scale. The studied grassland, as all grassland vegetation in southern Brazil, is very rich in species compared to other grassland formations worldwide. However, this high biodiversity and conservational value of Campos vegetation in general has so far not been recognized properly. Disturbance is essential to maintain this open vegetation type and its species richness. Fire should be considered as a management option in the absence of grazing. PMID:17299944

  6. Characterization of reinforcement distribution in cast Al-alloy/SiC{sub p} composites

    SciTech Connect

    Karnezis, P.A.; Durrant, G.; Cantor, B.

    1998-02-01

    The distribution of reinforcement in 10% SiC and 20% SiC{sub p} reinforced A356 alloy processed by gravity casting, squeeze casting, and roll casting is studied by using the mean free path, nearest neighbor distance, radial distribution function, and quadrat methods. The study is performed by using computer image analysis methods in an automated procedure to prevent operator errors, improve sample size, and minimize analysis time. From the methods used to characterize the SiC{sub p} distributions, the quadrat method and radial distribution function are found to be more effective in detecting pronounced changes in the metal-matrix composite (MMC) microstructure through appropriate parameters, whereas the mean free path is characteristic of the particular MMC system rather than process specific. Furthermore, the nearest neighbor distance is of little use in studying cast MMCs, because it is affected by local clusters of a few SiC particles commonly found in cast MMCs, thus failing to characterize the macroscopic arrangement of reinforcement. Quantitative methods present themselves as a useful tool for quality control in MMC fabrication and can be used to correlate particle distribution and properties of MMC systems.

  7. The Chemical Composition and Nitrogen Distribution of Chinese Yak (Maiwa) Milk

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haimei; Ma, Ying; Li, Qiming; Wang, Jiaqi; Cheng, Jinju; Xue, Jun; Shi, John

    2011-01-01

    The paper surveyed the chemical composition and nitrogen distribution of Maiwa yak milk, and compared the results with reference composition of cow milk. Compared to cow milk, yak milk was richer in protein (especially whey protein), essential amino acids, fat, lactose and minerals (except phosphorus). The contents of some nutrients (total protein, lactose, essential amino acids and casein) were higher in the warm season than in the cold season. Higher ratios of total essential amino acids/total amino acids (TEAA/TAA) and total essential amino acids/total non essential amino acids (TEAA/TNEAA) were found in the yak milk from the warm season. However its annual average ratio of EAA/TAA and that of EAA/NEAA were similar to those of cow milk. Yak milk was rich in calcium and iron (p < 0.05), and thus may serve as a nutritional ingredient with a potential application in industrial processing. PMID:21954332

  8. General models for resource use or other compositional count data using the Dirichlet-multinomial distribution.

    PubMed

    De Valpine, Perry; Harmon-Threatt, Alexandra N

    2013-12-01

    Many ecological studies investigate how organisms use resources, such as habitats or foods, in relation to availability or other variables. Related statistical problems include analysis of proportions of species or genotypes in a community or population. These require statistical modeling of compositional count data: data on relative proportions of each category collected as counts. Common methods for analyzing compositional count data lack one or more important considerations. Some methods lack explicit accommodation of count data, dealing instead with proportions. Others do not handle between-sample heterogeneity for overdispersed data. Yet others do not allow general types of relationships between explanatory variables and resource use. All three components have been combined in a Bayesian framework, but for frequentist hypothesis tests and AIC model selection, maximum-likelihood estimation is needed. Here we propose the Dirichlet-multinomial distribution to accommodate overdispersed compositional count data. This approach can be used flexibly in combination with explanatory models, but the only correlations among compositional proportions that it can accommodate are the negative correlations due to the fact that proportions must sum to 1. Many existing models can be generalized to use the Dirichlet-multinomial distribution for residual variation, and the flexibility of the approach allows new hypotheses that have often not been considered in resource preference analysis, including that availability has no relation to use. We also highlight a new design for resource use studies, with multiple individual-use data sets from each of multiple sites, with different explanatory data for each site. We illustrate the approach with three examples. For two previously published habitat use data sets, we support the original conclusions and show that use is not unrelated to availability. For a data set of pollen collected by multiple bees from each of two sites, pollen use

  9. Free-standing carbon nanotube composite sensing skin for distributed strain sensing in structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Andrew R.; Minegishi, Kaede; Kurata, Masahiro; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2014-04-01

    The technical challenges of managing the health of critical infrastructure systems necessitate greater structural sensing capabilities. Among these needs is the ability for quantitative, spatial damage detection on critical structural components. Advances in material science have now opened the door for novel and cost-effective spatial sensing solutions specially tailored for damage detection in structures. However, challenges remain before spatial damage detection can be realized. Some of the technical challenges include sensor installations and extensive signal processing requirements. This work addresses these challenges by developing a patterned carbon nanotube composite thin film sensor whose pattern has been optimized for measuring the spatial distribution of strain. The carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposite sensing material is fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate using a layer-by-layer deposition process. The thin film sensors are then patterned into sensing elements using optical lithography processes common to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. The sensor array is designed as a series of sensing elements with varying width to provide insight on the limitations of such patterning and implications of pattern geometry on sensing signals. Once fabrication is complete, the substrate and attached sensor are epoxy bonded to a poly vinyl composite (PVC) bar that is then tested with a uniaxial, cyclic load pattern and mechanical response is characterized. The fabrication processes are then utilized on a larger-scale to develop and instrument a component-specific sensing skin in order to observe the strain distribution on the web of a steel beam. The instrumented beam is part of a larger steel beam-column connection with a concrete slab in composite action. The beam-column subassembly is laterally loaded and strain trends in the web are observed using the carbon nanotube composite sensing skin. The results are discussed in the context of

  10. Cyanobacterial composition and spatial distribution based on pyrosequencing data in the Gurbantunggut Desert, Northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingchang; Li, Renhui; Xiao, Peng; Su, Yangui; Zhang, Yuanming

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria are the primary colonizers and form a dominant component of soil photosynthetic communities in biological soil crusts. They are crucial in improving soil environments, namely accumulating soil carbon and nitrogen. Many classical studies have examined cyanobacterial diversity in desert crusts, but relatively few comprehensive molecular surveys have been conducted. We used 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA to investigate cyanobacterial composition and distribution on regional scales in the Gurbantunggut Desert. The relationship between cyanobacterial distribution and environmental factors was also explored. A total of 24,973 cyanobacteria partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained, and 507OTUs were selected, as most OTUs had very few reads. Among these, 347 OTU sequences were of cyanobacteria origin, belonging to Oscillatoriales, Nostocales, Chroococcales, and uncultured cyanobacterium clone, respectively. Microcoleus vaginatus, Chroococcidiopsis spp. and M. steenstrupii were the dominant species in most areas of the Gurbantunggut Desert. Compared with other desert, the Gurbantunggut Desert differed in the prominence of Chroococcidiopsis spp. and lack of Pseudanabaenales. Species composition and abundance of cyanobacteria also showed distinct variations. Soil texture, precipitation, and nutrients and salt levels affected cyanobacterial distribution. Increased precipitation was helpful in improving cyanobacterial diversity. A higher content of coarse sand promoted the colonization and growth of Oscillatoriales and some phylotypes of Chroococcales. The fine-textured soil with higher nutrients and salts supported more varied populations of cyanobacteria, namely some heterocystous cyanobacteria. The results suggested that the Gurbantunggut Desert was rich in cyanobacteria and that precipitation was a primary regulating factor for cyanobacterial composition on a regional scale.

  11. Perinatal bisphenol A exposure promotes hyperactivity, lean body composition, and hormonal responses across the murine life course

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Olivia S.; Peterson, Karen E.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Mancuso, Peter; Dolinoy, Dana C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of adult-onset diseases is influenced by perinatal exposure to altered environmental conditions. One such exposure, bisphenol A (BPA), has been associated with obesity and diabetes, and consequently labeled an obesogen. Using an isogenic murine model, we examined the effects of perinatal exposure through maternal diet to 50 ng (n=20), 50 μg (n=21), or 50 mg (n=18) BPA/kg diet, as well as controls (n=20) on offspring energy expenditure, spontaneous activity, and body composition at 3, 6, and 9 mo of age, and hormone levels at 9 and 10 mo of age. Overall, exposed females and males exhibited increased energy expenditure (P<0.001 and 0.001, respectively) throughout the life course. In females, horizontal and vertical activity increased (P=0.07 and 0.06, respectively) throughout the life course. Generally, body composition measures were not different throughout the life course in exposed females or males (all P>0.44), although body fat and weight decreased in exposed females at particular ages (all P<0.08). Milligram-exposed females had improved glucose, insulin, adiponectin, and leptin profiles (all P<0.10). Thus, life-course analysis illustrates that BPA is associated with hyperactive and lean phenotypes. Variability across studies may be attributable to differential exposure duration and timing, dietary fat and phytoestrogen content, or lack of sophisticated phenotyping across the life course.—Anderson, O.S., Peterson, K.E., Sanchez, B.N., Zhang, Z., Mancuso, P., Dolinoy, D.C. Perinatal bisphenol A exposure promotes hyperactivity, lean body composition, and hormonal responses across the murine life course. PMID:23345456

  12. Perinatal bisphenol A exposure promotes hyperactivity, lean body composition, and hormonal responses across the murine life course.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Olivia S; Peterson, Karen E; Sanchez, Brisa N; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Mancuso, Peter; Dolinoy, Dana C

    2013-04-01

    The development of adult-onset diseases is influenced by perinatal exposure to altered environmental conditions. One such exposure, bisphenol A (BPA), has been associated with obesity and diabetes, and consequently labeled an obesogen. Using an isogenic murine model, we examined the effects of perinatal exposure through maternal diet to 50 ng (n=20), 50 μg (n=21), or 50 mg (n=18) BPA/kg diet, as well as controls (n=20) on offspring energy expenditure, spontaneous activity, and body composition at 3, 6, and 9 mo of age, and hormone levels at 9 and 10 mo of age. Overall, exposed females and males exhibited increased energy expenditure (P<0.001 and 0.001, respectively) throughout the life course. In females, horizontal and vertical activity increased (P=0.07 and 0.06, respectively) throughout the life course. Generally, body composition measures were not different throughout the life course in exposed females or males (all P>0.44), although body fat and weight decreased in exposed females at particular ages (all P<0.08). Milligram-exposed females had improved glucose, insulin, adiponectin, and leptin profiles (all P<0.10). Thus, life-course analysis illustrates that BPA is associated with hyperactive and lean phenotypes. Variability across studies may be attributable to differential exposure duration and timing, dietary fat and phytoestrogen content, or lack of sophisticated phenotyping across the life course. PMID:23345456

  13. On the Relationship Between Site Geology and the Distribution of Surface Regolith Compositions at the Apollo Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, Randy L.

    2000-01-01

    Some considerations are discussed on how information on site geology can be obtained from the distribution of data points on 2-element plots of composition of lunar regolith samples collected along a traverse.

  14. Direct Determination of 3D Distribution of Elemental Composition in Single Semiconductor Nanoislands by Scanning Auger Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomaryov, Semyon S.; Yukhymchuk, Volodymyr O.; Lytvyn, Peter M.; Valakh, Mykhailo Ya

    2016-02-01

    An application of scanning Auger microscopy with ion etching technique and effective compensation of thermal drift of the surface analyzed area is proposed for direct local study of composition distribution in the bulk of single nanoislands. For GexSi1 - x-nanoislands obtained by MBE of Ge on Si-substrate gigantic interdiffusion mixing takes place both in the open and capped nanostructures. Lateral distributions of the elemental composition as well as concentration-depth profiles were recorded. 3D distribution of the elemental composition in the d-cluster bulk was obtained using the interpolation approach by lateral composition distributions in its several cross sections and concentration-depth profile. It was shown that there is a germanium core in the nanoislands of both nanostructure types, which even penetrates the substrate. In studied nanostructures maximal Ge content in the nanoislands may reach about 40 at.%.

  15. Astrobiology: The Study of the Origin, Evolution, and Distribution of the Life in the Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalice, Daniella; Wilmoth, Krisstina

    2004-01-01

    Life as known here on Earth exchanges energy and materials with the environment. Life forms grow, develop, produce waste products, and reproduce, storing genetic information in DNA and RNA and passing it from one generation to the next. Life evolves, adapting to changes in the environment and changing the environment in return. The basic unit of…

  16. Astrobiology: The Study of the Origin, Evolution, and Distribution of Life in the Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalice, Daniella; Wilmoth, Krisstina

    2004-01-01

    Life as people know it here on Earth exchanges energy and materials with the environment. Life forms grow, develop, produce waste products, and reproduce, storing genetic information in DNA and RNA and passing it from one generation to the next. Life evolves, adapting to changes in the environment and changing the environment in return. The basic…

  17. Evaluation of flawed composite structural components under static and cyclic loading. [fatigue life of graphite-epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of initial defects on the fatigue and fracture response of graphite-epoxy composite laminates are presented. The structural laminates investigated were a typical angle ply laminate, a polar/hoop wound pressure vessel laminate, and a typical engine fan blade laminate. Defects investigated were full and half penetration circular holes, full and half penetration slits, and countersink holes. The effects of the defect size and type on the static fracture strength, fatigue performance, and residual static strength are shown as well as the results of loadings on damage propagation in composite laminates. The data obtained were used to define proof test levels as a qualification procedure in composite structure subjected to cyclic loading.

  18. Detangling the Effects of Environmental Filtering and Dispersal Limitation on Aggregated Distributions of Tree and Shrub Species: Life Stage Matters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing-Song; Shen, Guo-Chun; Liu, He-Ming; Wang, Zhang-Hua; Ma, Zun-Ping; Fang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The pervasive pattern of aggregated tree distributions in natural communities is commonly explained by the joint effect of two clustering processes: environmental filtering and dispersal limitation, yet little consensus remains on the relative importance of the two clustering processes on tree aggregations. Different life stages of examined species were thought to be one possible explanation of this disagreement, because the effect of environmental filtering and dispersal limitation are expected to increase and decrease with tree life stages, respectively. However, few studies have explicitly tested these expectations. In this study, we evaluated these expectations by three different methods (species-habitat association test based on Poisson Clustering model and spatial point pattern analyses based on Heterogeneous Poisson model and the jointly modeling approach) using 36 species in a 20-ha subtropical forest plot. Our results showed that the percentage of species with significant habitat association increased with life stages, and there were fewer species affected by dispersal limitation in later life stages compared with those in earlier stages. Percentage of variance explained by the environmental filtering and dispersal limitation also increases and decreases with life stages. These results provided a promising alternative explanation on the existing mixed results about the relative importance of the two clustering processes. These findings also highlighted the importance of plant life stages for fully understanding species distributions and species coexistence. PMID:27227538

  19. Detangling the Effects of Environmental Filtering and Dispersal Limitation on Aggregated Distributions of Tree and Shrub Species: Life Stage Matters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He-Ming; Wang, Zhang-Hua; Ma, Zun-Ping; Fang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The pervasive pattern of aggregated tree distributions in natural communities is commonly explained by the joint effect of two clustering processes: environmental filtering and dispersal limitation, yet little consensus remains on the relative importance of the two clustering processes on tree aggregations. Different life stages of examined species were thought to be one possible explanation of this disagreement, because the effect of environmental filtering and dispersal limitation are expected to increase and decrease with tree life stages, respectively. However, few studies have explicitly tested these expectations. In this study, we evaluated these expectations by three different methods (species-habitat association test based on Poisson Clustering model and spatial point pattern analyses based on Heterogeneous Poisson model and the jointly modeling approach) using 36 species in a 20-ha subtropical forest plot. Our results showed that the percentage of species with significant habitat association increased with life stages, and there were fewer species affected by dispersal limitation in later life stages compared with those in earlier stages. Percentage of variance explained by the environmental filtering and dispersal limitation also increases and decreases with life stages. These results provided a promising alternative explanation on the existing mixed results about the relative importance of the two clustering processes. These findings also highlighted the importance of plant life stages for fully understanding species distributions and species coexistence. PMID:27227538

  20. Detangling the Effects of Environmental Filtering and Dispersal Limitation on Aggregated Distributions of Tree and Shrub Species: Life Stage Matters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing-Song; Shen, Guo-Chun; Liu, He-Ming; Wang, Zhang-Hua; Ma, Zun-Ping; Fang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The pervasive pattern of aggregated tree distributions in natural communities is commonly explained by the joint effect of two clustering processes: environmental filtering and dispersal limitation, yet little consensus remains on the relative importance of the two clustering processes on tree aggregations. Different life stages of examined species were thought to be one possible explanation of this disagreement, because the effect of environmental filtering and dispersal limitation are expected to increase and decrease with tree life stages, respectively. However, few studies have explicitly tested these expectations. In this study, we evaluated these expectations by three different methods (species-habitat association test based on Poisson Clustering model and spatial point pattern analyses based on Heterogeneous Poisson model and the jointly modeling approach) using 36 species in a 20-ha subtropical forest plot. Our results showed that the percentage of species with significant habitat association increased with life stages, and there were fewer species affected by dispersal limitation in later life stages compared with those in earlier stages. Percentage of variance explained by the environmental filtering and dispersal limitation also increases and decreases with life stages. These results provided a promising alternative explanation on the existing mixed results about the relative importance of the two clustering processes. These findings also highlighted the importance of plant life stages for fully understanding species distributions and species coexistence.

  1. Distributed sensing of Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessels using Fiber-Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The increasing use of advanced composite materials in the wide range of applications including Space Structures is a great impetus to the development of smart materials. These materials offer a wide range of possibilities within the space program. But before they can be reliably incorporated into space flight applications, additional understanding is required in the area of damage tolerance of these materials. Efforts to enhance our understanding of failure modes, mechanical properties, long and short term environmental effects, cyclic damage accumulation and residual strength are needed. Thus we have employed the use of fiber optical sensors which offers an excellent opportunity exploit these materials through monitoring and characterizing their mechanical properties and thus the integrity of structures made from such materials during their life cycle. Use of these optical innovations provides an insight into structures that have not been available in the past, as well as the technology available to provide real time health monitoring throughout its life cycle. The embedded fiber optical sensor shows a clearly detectable sensitivity to changes in the near strain and stress fields of the host structure promoted by mechanical or thermal loading or, in certain conditions, structural damage. The last ten years have seen a large increase in the use of FBG based monitoring systems in a broad range of applications. Fiber Bragg gratings are use to monitor the structural properties of composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in composite structures. The fiber Bragg sensors are both embedded within the composite laminates and bonded to the surface of the vessel with varying orientations with respect to the carbon fiber in the epoxy matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around

  2. Orderly packed anodes for high-power lithium-ion batteries with super-long cycle life: rational design of MnCO3/large-area graphene composites.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yiren; Yang, Mei; Zhou, Xianlong; Luo, Yuting; Wei, Jinping; Zhou, Zhen

    2015-02-01

    MnCO3 particles uniformly distributed on large-area graphene form 2D composites whose large-area character enables them to self-assemble face-to-face into orderly packed electrodes. Such regular structures form continuous and efficient transport networks, leading to outstanding lithium storage with high capacity, ultralong cycle life, and excellent rate capability--all characteristics that are required for high-power lithium-ion batteries.

  3. Reliability and life prediction of ceramic composite structures at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1994-01-01

    Methods are highlighted that ascertain the structural reliability of components fabricated of composites with ceramic matrices reinforced with ceramic fibers or whiskers and subject to quasi-static load conditions at elevated temperatures. Each method focuses on a particular composite microstructure: whisker-toughened ceramics, laminated ceramic matrix composites, and fabric reinforced ceramic matrix composites. In addition, since elevated service temperatures usually involve time-dependent effects, a section dealing with reliability degradation as a function of load history has been included. A recurring theme throughout this chapter is that even though component failure is controlled by a sequence of many microfailure events, failure of ceramic composites will be modeled using macrovariables.

  4. Deuterium NMR of Raft Model Membranes Reveals Domain-Specific Order Profiles and Compositional Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Tomokazu; Tsuchikawa, Hiroshi; Murata, Michio; Matsumori, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we applied site-specifically deuterated N-stearoylsphingomyelins (SSMs) to raft-exhibiting ternary mixtures containing SSM, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), and cholesterol (Chol) and successfully acquired deuterium quadrupole coupling profiles of SSM from liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) domains. To our knowledge, this is the first report that shows detailed lipid chain dynamics separately and simultaneously obtained from coexisting Lo and Ld domains. We also found that the quadrupole profile of the Lo phase in the ternary system was almost identical to that in the SSM-Chol binary mixture, suggesting that the order profile of the binary system is essentially applicable to more complicated membrane systems in terms of the acyl chain order. We also demonstrated that 2H NMR spectroscopy, in combination with organic synthesis of deuterated components, could be used to reveal the accurate mole fractions of each component distributed in the Lo and Ld domains. As compared with the reported tie-line analysis of phase diagrams, the merit of our 2H NMR analysis is that the domain-specific compositional fractions are directly attainable without experimental complexity and ambiguity. The accurate compositional distributions as well as lipid order profiles in ternary mixtures are relevant to understanding the molecular mechanism of lipid raft formation. PMID:25992728

  5. Stress distribution in roots restored with different types of post systems with composite resin.

    PubMed

    Okada, Daizo; Miura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Chikako; Komada, Wataru; Shin, Chiharu; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Masuoka, David

    2008-07-01

    Although composite resin core is used with various types of prefabricated posts, it remains unclear which kind of material is most suitable for the post. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of prefabricated posts on the stress distribution within the root by finite element analysis. Posts and cores were built up with composite resin and four types of prefabricated posts: two types of glass fiber posts (GFP1, GFP2) with low and high Young's moduli, a titanium post (TIP), and a stainless steel post (SSP). In all models, stress distribution during function was calculated. There were differences in stress concentration at the root around the end of posts. The magnitudes of stress for GFP1, GFP2, TIP, and STP were 8.7, 9.3, 11.7, and 13.9 MPa respectively. Given the results obtained, GFP1 was the most suitable material for post fabrication since this model showed a lower stress value. It would therefore mean a lower possibility of root fracture.

  6. Nanofibre distribution in composites manufactured with epoxy reinforced with nanofibrillated cellulose: model prediction and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitomäki, Yvonne; Westin, Mikael; Korpimäki, Jani; Oksman, Kristiina

    2016-07-01

    In this study a model based on simple scattering is developed and used to predict the distribution of nanofibrillated cellulose in composites manufactured by resin transfer moulding (RTM) where the resin contains nanofibres. The model is a Monte Carlo based simulation where nanofibres are randomly chosen from probability density functions for length, diameter and orientation. Their movements are then tracked as they advance through a random arrangement of fibres in defined fibre bundles. The results of the model show that the fabric filters the nanofibres within the first 20 µm unless clear inter-bundle channels are available. The volume fraction of the fabric fibres, flow velocity and size of nanofibre influence this to some extent. To verify the model, an epoxy with 0.5 wt.% Kraft Birch nanofibres was made through a solvent exchange route and stained with a colouring agent. This was infused into a glass fibre fabric using an RTM process. The experimental results confirmed the filtering of the nanofibres by the fibre bundles and their penetration in the fabric via the inter-bundle channels. Hence, the model is a useful tool for visualising the distribution of the nanofibres in composites in this manufacturing process.

  7. RETRACTED: On the composition of the distributions x[lambda]+ and x[mu]+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Brian; Tas, Kenan

    2006-06-01

    This article has been retracted at the request of the Editors-in-Chief and Author. Reason: Following publication of this paper, it was brought to our attention that a virtually identical paper had been published earlier: B. Fisher and K. Tas. On the composition of the distributions x-r+ and x[mu]+, Indian Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics 36 (2005) 11-22. Furthermore, the following similar paper has also appeared: B. Fisher and K. Tas. On the composition of the distributions x-1 ln x and xr+. Integral Transforms and Special Functions 16 (2005) 533-543. When the JMAA paper was being submitted, the JMAA Editors were unaware that an almost identical version was under consideration elsewhere, and indeed, in the submission procedures, authors are asked to declare explicitly that this is not the case. Had this notification been given accordingly, the paper would not have been accepted. The Editors deplore the practice of simultaneous multiple submission of papers to different journals, and offer their sincere and unreserved apologies to readers of the journal for not having spotted this. Professors Steven G. Krantz, Richard M. Aron, Goong Chen; Editors-in-Chief

  8. Altered potassium channel distribution and composition in myelinated axons suppresses hyperexcitability following injury.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Margarita; Richards, Natalie; Schmid, Annina B; Barroso, Alejandro; Zhu, Lan; Ivulic, Dinka; Zhu, Ning; Anwandter, Philipp; Bhat, Manzoor A; Court, Felipe A; McMahon, Stephen B; Bennett, David L H

    2016-04-19

    Neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury is associated with hyperexcitability in damaged myelinated sensory axons, which begins to normalise over time. We investigated the composition and distribution of shaker-type-potassium channels (Kv1 channels) within the nodal complex of myelinated axons following injury. At the neuroma that forms after damage, expression of Kv1.1 and 1.2 (normally localised to the juxtaparanode) was markedly decreased. In contrast Kv1.4 and 1.6, which were hardly detectable in the naïve state, showed increased expression within juxtaparanodes and paranodes following injury, both in rats and humans. Within the dorsal root (a site remote from injury) we noted a redistribution of Kv1-channels towards the paranode. Blockade of Kv1 channels with α-DTX after injury reinstated hyperexcitability of A-fibre axons and enhanced mechanosensitivity. Changes in the molecular composition and distribution of axonal Kv1 channels, therefore represents a protective mechanism to suppress the hyperexcitability of myelinated sensory axons that follows nerve injury.

  9. Altered potassium channel distribution and composition in myelinated axons suppresses hyperexcitability following injury.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Margarita; Richards, Natalie; Schmid, Annina B; Barroso, Alejandro; Zhu, Lan; Ivulic, Dinka; Zhu, Ning; Anwandter, Philipp; Bhat, Manzoor A; Court, Felipe A; McMahon, Stephen B; Bennett, David L H

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury is associated with hyperexcitability in damaged myelinated sensory axons, which begins to normalise over time. We investigated the composition and distribution of shaker-type-potassium channels (Kv1 channels) within the nodal complex of myelinated axons following injury. At the neuroma that forms after damage, expression of Kv1.1 and 1.2 (normally localised to the juxtaparanode) was markedly decreased. In contrast Kv1.4 and 1.6, which were hardly detectable in the naïve state, showed increased expression within juxtaparanodes and paranodes following injury, both in rats and humans. Within the dorsal root (a site remote from injury) we noted a redistribution of Kv1-channels towards the paranode. Blockade of Kv1 channels with α-DTX after injury reinstated hyperexcitability of A-fibre axons and enhanced mechanosensitivity. Changes in the molecular composition and distribution of axonal Kv1 channels, therefore represents a protective mechanism to suppress the hyperexcitability of myelinated sensory axons that follows nerve injury. PMID:27033551

  10. [Species composition and geographical distribution of threatened fishes in Yunnan Province of Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Zhong, Jin-Xin

    2013-05-01

    Based on the related published papers, and by using Geographic Information System (ArcGIS 9.3), this paper analyzed the species composition and geographical distribution of threatened fishes in Yunnan Province of Southwest China. There were 83 threatened species living in the Province, belonging to 5 orders, 13 families, and 47 genera. Cypriniformes was absolutely dominant, with 64 species, followed by Siluriformes, with 16 species. Cyprinidae fishes had 51 species, accounting for 79.7% of Cypriniformes. The most species of Cyprinid fishes were of Barbinae (14 species), Cyprininae (10 species), and Cultrinae (10 species). The threatened fishes could be divided into two zoogeographical regions, i. e., Tibetan Plateau region and Oriental region, and their species composition and geographical distribution were resulted from the historical evolution adapted to the related environments. Whatever in rivers and in lakes, the Cyprinid fishes were both absolutely dominant, occupying 36.1% and 31.3% of the total, respectively. The Cyprinid fishes in rivers were mostly of endangered species, while those in lakes were mostly of vulnerable species. The factors affecting the threatened fishes in the Province were discussed from the two aspects of geodynamic evolution and present situation.

  11. The distribution of compositional classes in the asteroid belt: A cosmochemical fingerprint?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradie, J.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of the physical properties of the asteroids show a nonrandom distribution of types across the belt for asteroid classes E, S, M, F, C, P, and D. The general trend is for asteroids in the inner belt to have higher albedos and stronger mafic silicate absorption features than those asteroids located further out in the belt. One interpretation of this trend is that the asteroids, which occupy the region between the silicate rich terrestrial planets and the volatile rich outer planets, have preserved in their heliocentric compositional distribution a cosmochemical fingerprint of the thermodynamic conditions present in the solar nebula at the time of their formation. This hypothesis predicts that the differences in the spectral properties among the low albedo classes (C, P, F, P, and D) are due to temperature controlled processes which formed carbonaceous opaques. If this is true then the exact composition of the opaque components could, in principle, be used to determine the thermodynamic conditions between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter during the formation of the asteroids.

  12. Real-Time Impact Visualization Inspection of Aerospace Composite Structures with Distributed Sensors.

    PubMed

    Si, Liang; Baier, Horst

    2015-07-08

    For the future design of smart aerospace structures, the development and application of a reliable, real-time and automatic monitoring and diagnostic technique is essential. Thus, with distributed sensor networks, a real-time automatic structural health monitoring (SHM) technique is designed and investigated to monitor and predict the locations and force magnitudes of unforeseen foreign impacts on composite structures and to estimate in real time mode the structural state when impacts occur. The proposed smart impact visualization inspection (IVI) technique mainly consists of five functional modules, which are the signal data preprocessing (SDP), the forward model generator (FMG), the impact positioning calculator (IPC), the inverse model operator (IMO) and structural state estimator (SSE). With regard to the verification of the practicality of the proposed IVI technique, various structure configurations are considered, which are a normal CFRP panel and another CFRP panel with "orange peel" surfaces and a cutout hole. Additionally, since robustness against several background disturbances is also an essential criterion for practical engineering demands, investigations and experimental tests are carried out under random vibration interfering noise (RVIN) conditions. The accuracy of the predictions for unknown impact events on composite structures using the IVI technique is validated under various structure configurations and under changing environmental conditions. The evaluated errors all fall well within a satisfactory limit range. Furthermore, it is concluded that the IVI technique is applicable for impact monitoring, diagnosis and assessment of aerospace composite structures in complex practical engineering environments.

  13. Modified oleic cottonseeds show altered content, composition and tissue-specific distribution of triacylglycerol molecular species.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick J; Sturtevant, Drew; Chapman, Kent D

    2014-01-01

    Targeted increases in monounsaturated (oleic acid) fatty acid content of refined cottonseed oil could support improved human nutrition and cardiovascular health. Genetic modifications of cottonseed fatty acid composition have been accomplished using several different molecular strategies. Modification of oleic acid content in cottonseed embryos using a dominant-negative protein approach, while successful in effecting change in the desired fatty acid composition, resulted in reduced oil content and seed viability. Here these changes in fatty acid composition were associated with changes in dominant molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAGs) and their spatial distributions within embryo tissues. A combination of mass spectrometry (MS)-based lipidomics approaches, including MS imaging of seed cryo-sections, revealed that cotton embryos expressing a non-functional allele of a Brassica napus delta-12 desaturase showed altered accumulation of TAG species, especially within cotyledonary tissues. While lipid analysis of seed extracts could demonstrate detailed quantitative changes in TAG species in transgenics, the spatial contribution of metabolite compartmentation could only be visualized by MS imaging. Our results suggest tissue-specific differences in TAG biosynthetic pathways within cotton embryos, and indicate the importance of considering the location of metabolites in tissues in addition to their identification and quantification when developing a detailed view of cellular metabolism.

  14. Central Appalachian basin natural gas database: distribution, composition, and origin of natural gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Román Colón, Yomayra A.; Ruppert, Leslie F.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled a database consisting of three worksheets of central Appalachian basin natural gas analyses and isotopic compositions from published and unpublished sources of 1,282 gas samples from Kentucky, Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. The database includes field and reservoir names, well and State identification number, selected geologic reservoir properties, and the composition of natural gases (methane; ethane; propane; butane, iso-butane [i-butane]; normal butane [n-butane]; iso-pentane [i-pentane]; normal pentane [n-pentane]; cyclohexane, and hexanes). In the first worksheet, location and American Petroleum Institute (API) numbers from public or published sources are provided for 1,231 of the 1,282 gas samples. A second worksheet of 186 gas samples was compiled from published sources and augmented with public location information and contains carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotopic measurements of natural gas. The third worksheet is a key for all abbreviations in the database. The database can be used to better constrain the stratigraphic distribution, composition, and origin of natural gas in the central Appalachian basin.

  15. Real-Time Impact Visualization Inspection of Aerospace Composite Structures with Distributed Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Si, Liang; Baier, Horst

    2015-01-01

    For the future design of smart aerospace structures, the development and application of a reliable, real-time and automatic monitoring and diagnostic technique is essential. Thus, with distributed sensor networks, a real-time automatic structural health monitoring (SHM) technique is designed and investigated to monitor and predict the locations and force magnitudes of unforeseen foreign impacts on composite structures and to estimate in real time mode the structural state when impacts occur. The proposed smart impact visualization inspection (IVI) technique mainly consists of five functional modules, which are the signal data preprocessing (SDP), the forward model generator (FMG), the impact positioning calculator (IPC), the inverse model operator (IMO) and structural state estimator (SSE). With regard to the verification of the practicality of the proposed IVI technique, various structure configurations are considered, which are a normal CFRP panel and another CFRP panel with “orange peel” surfaces and a cutout hole. Additionally, since robustness against several background disturbances is also an essential criterion for practical engineering demands, investigations and experimental tests are carried out under random vibration interfering noise (RVIN) conditions. The accuracy of the predictions for unknown impact events on composite structures using the IVI technique is validated under various structure configurations and under changing environmental conditions. The evaluated errors all fall well within a satisfactory limit range. Furthermore, it is concluded that the IVI technique is applicable for impact monitoring, diagnosis and assessment of aerospace composite structures in complex practical engineering environments. PMID:26184196

  16. A Model to Predict Shelf-Life Loss Ofhorticultural Produce During Distribution Withfluctuated Temperature and Vehicle Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Weiwei; Li, Daoliang; Liu, Xue; Yue, Jun; Fu, Zetian

    Fresh fruits and vegetables has become a public concern from the food security aspect. And the prediction of shelf-life loss under the fluctuated temperature becomes one of the key problems in food supply chain operation. So this paper identifies the impact aspects of produce decaying during distribution. For the key temperature factor, the process is divided into three phases: sorting, traveling and door-opening. Based on time-temperature function, a model of shelf-life loss of horticultural produce during distribution is developed by evaluating respiration rate of vegetables and fruits considering both the environment fluctuated temperature and vehicle vibration during traveling. Taking eggplant as an example, the numerical experiment result demonstrates that the average cost for ambient distribution is 2.8 times of the insulation way.

  17. Receptor modelling of both particle composition and size distribution from a background site in London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddows, D. C. S.; Harrison, R. M.; Green, D. C.; Fuller, G. W.

    2015-09-01

    Positive matrix factorisation (PMF) analysis was applied to PM10 chemical composition and particle number size distribution (NSD) data measured at an urban background site (North Kensington) in London, UK, for the whole of 2011 and 2012. The PMF analyses for these 2 years revealed six and four factors respectively which described seven sources or aerosol types. These included nucleation, traffic, urban background, secondary, fuel oil, marine and non-exhaust/crustal sources. Urban background, secondary and traffic sources were identified by both the chemical composition and particle NSD analysis, but a nucleation source was identified only from the particle NSD data set. Analysis of the PM10 chemical composition data set revealed fuel oil, marine, non-exhaust traffic/crustal sources which were not identified from the NSD data. The two methods appear to be complementary, as the analysis of the PM10 chemical composition data is able to distinguish components contributing largely to particle mass, whereas the number particle size distribution data set - although limited to detecting sources of particles below the diameter upper limit of the SMPS (604 nm) - is more effective for identifying components making an appreciable contribution to particle number. Analysis was also conducted on the combined chemical composition and NSD data set, revealing five factors representing urban background, nucleation, secondary, aged marine and traffic sources. However, the combined analysis appears not to offer any additional power to discriminate sources above that of the aggregate of the two separate PMF analyses. Day-of-the-week and month-of-the-year associations of the factors proved consistent with their assignment to source categories, and bivariate polar plots which examined the wind directional and wind speed association of the different factors also proved highly consistent with their inferred sources. Source attribution according to the air mass back trajectory showed, as

  18. Temporal Variations in the Abundance and Composition of Biofilm Communities Colonizing Drinking Water Distribution Pipes

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John J.; Minalt, Nicole; Culotti, Alessandro; Pryor, Marsha; Packman, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Pipes that transport drinking water through municipal drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) are challenging habitats for microorganisms. Distribution networks are dark, oligotrophic and contain disinfectants; yet microbes frequently form biofilms attached to interior surfaces of DWDS pipes. Relatively little is known about the species composition and ecology of these biofilms due to challenges associated with sample acquisition from actual DWDS. We report the analysis of biofilms from five pipe samples collected from the same region of a DWDS in Florida, USA, over an 18 month period between February 2011 and August 2012. The bacterial abundance and composition of biofilm communities within the pipes were analyzed by heterotrophic plate counts and tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, respectively. Bacterial numbers varied significantly based on sampling date and were positively correlated with water temperature and the concentration of nitrate. However, there was no significant relationship between the concentration of disinfectant in the drinking water (monochloramine) and the abundance of bacteria within the biofilms. Pyrosequencing analysis identified a total of 677 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (3% distance) within the biofilms but indicated that community diversity was low and varied between sampling dates. Biofilms were dominated by a few taxa, specifically Methylomonas, Acinetobacter, Mycobacterium, and Xanthomonadaceae, and the dominant taxa within the biofilms varied dramatically between sampling times. The drinking water characteristics most strongly correlated with bacterial community composition were concentrations of nitrate, ammonium, total chlorine and monochloramine, as well as alkalinity and hardness. Biofilms from the sampling date with the highest nitrate concentration were the most abundant and diverse and were dominated by Acinetobacter. PMID:24858562

  19. Temporal variations in the abundance and composition of biofilm communities colonizing drinking water distribution pipes.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J; Minalt, Nicole; Culotti, Alessandro; Pryor, Marsha; Packman, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Pipes that transport drinking water through municipal drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) are challenging habitats for microorganisms. Distribution networks are dark, oligotrophic and contain disinfectants; yet microbes frequently form biofilms attached to interior surfaces of DWDS pipes. Relatively little is known about the species composition and ecology of these biofilms due to challenges associated with sample acquisition from actual DWDS. We report the analysis of biofilms from five pipe samples collected from the same region of a DWDS in Florida, USA, over an 18 month period between February 2011 and August 2012. The bacterial abundance and composition of biofilm communities within the pipes were analyzed by heterotrophic plate counts and tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, respectively. Bacterial numbers varied significantly based on sampling date and were positively correlated with water temperature and the concentration of nitrate. However, there was no significant relationship between the concentration of disinfectant in the drinking water (monochloramine) and the abundance of bacteria within the biofilms. Pyrosequencing analysis identified a total of 677 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (3% distance) within the biofilms but indicated that community diversity was low and varied between sampling dates. Biofilms were dominated by a few taxa, specifically Methylomonas, Acinetobacter, Mycobacterium, and Xanthomonadaceae, and the dominant taxa within the biofilms varied dramatically between sampling times. The drinking water characteristics most strongly correlated with bacterial community composition were concentrations of nitrate, ammonium, total chlorine and monochloramine, as well as alkalinity and hardness. Biofilms from the sampling date with the highest nitrate concentration were the most abundant and diverse and were dominated by Acinetobacter.

  20. A detailed investigation of ambient aerosol composition and size distribution in an urban atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, S Levent; Saral, Arslan; Demir, Selami; Summak, Gülsüm; Demir, Göksel

    2013-04-01

    This research was executed between March 2009 and March 2010 to monitor particulate matter size distribution and its composition in Istanbul. Particulate matter composition was determined using ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The sampling point is adjacent to a crowded road and the Bosporus Strait. Two prevailing particulate modes are found throughout PM10 by sampling with a nine-stage low-volume cascade impactor. First mode in the fine mode is found to be between 0.43 and 0.65 μm, whereas the other peak was observed between 3.3 and 4.7 μm, referring to the coarse mode. The mean PM10 concentration was determined as 41.2 μg/m(3), with a standard deviation of 16.92 μg/m(3). PM0.43 had the highest mean concentration value of 10.67 μg/m(3), making up nearly one fourth of the total PM10 mass. For determining the effect of traffic on particulate matter (PM) composition and distribution, four different sampling cycles were applied: entire day, nighttime, rush hour, and rush hour at weekdays. SO4(-2) and organic carbon/elemental carbon proportions are found to be lower in night samples, representing a decrease in traffic. The long-range transports of dust storms were observed during the sampling periods. Their effects were determined analytically and their route models were run by the HYSPLIT model and validated through satellite photographs taken by the NASA Earth Observatory.

  1. Opisthorchis viverrini: life cycle, intermediate hosts, transmission to man and geographical distribution in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Harinasuta, C; Harinasuta, T

    1984-01-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini has been found to be the only species of liver fluke in Thailand. The morphology is similar to that of O. felineus, but it has more deeply lobated testes, situated near the ovary. The appearance and distribution of the vitellaria with few granular clumps and the shorter and wider egg closely resemble that of C. sinensis. The adult worms live in the biliary system. Eggs pass out in faeces. On reaching water the eggs are eaten by snails, the first intermediate host. In the snail the miracidia hatch and develop further through the stages of sporocysts, rediae and cercariae in six to eight weeks. The cercariae then leave the snail, penetrate into susceptible fresh water fish, encyst in the muscle and develop into metacercariae, and infective stage, in six weeks. When ingested by man or animal the metacercariae excyst in the duodenum or jejunum and then migrate to the bile duct. They become mature within four weeks and begin to produce eggs. The life span of the fluke is over 10 years. The snail intermediate hosts are Bithynia goniomphalus, B. funiculata and B. siamensis. Many species of cyprinoid fish serve as second intermediate host; Cyclocheilichthys siaja is the most important. Cats, dogs and many fish eating mammals are definitive hosts. Man and animals acquire infection by eating raw fish containing metacercariae cysts. In Northeast Thailand "Koi-Pla" is the most popular raw fish dish. In 1980-1981 the prevalence in the north, northeast, centre and south of Thailand was 5.59, 34.60, 6.34, and 0.01%, respectively, with an overall prevalence of 14% or 7 million people. PMID:6542383

  2. Elemental Sulfur and Molybdenum Disulfide Composites for Li-S Batteries with Long Cycle Life and High-Rate Capability.

    PubMed

    Dirlam, Philip T; Park, Jungjin; Simmonds, Adam G; Domanik, Kenneth; Arrington, Clay B; Schaefer, Jennifer L; Oleshko, Vladimir P; Kleine, Tristan S; Char, Kookheon; Glass, Richard S; Soles, Christopher L; Kim, Chunjoong; Pinna, Nicola; Sung, Yung-Eun; Pyun, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    The practical implementation of Li-S technology has been hindered by short cycle life and poor rate capability owing to deleterious effects resulting from the varied solubilities of different Li polysulfide redox products. Here, we report the preparation and utilization of composites with a sulfur-rich matrix and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) particulate inclusions as Li-S cathode materials with the capability to mitigate the dissolution of the Li polysulfide redox products via the MoS2 inclusions acting as "polysulfide anchors". In situ composite formation was completed via a facile, one-pot method with commercially available starting materials. The composites were afforded by first dispersing MoS2 directly in liquid elemental sulfur (S8) with sequential polymerization of the sulfur phase via thermal ring opening polymerization or copolymerization via inverse vulcanization. For the practical utility of this system to be highlighted, it was demonstrated that the composite formation methodology was amenable to larger scale processes with composites easily prepared in 100 g batches. Cathodes fabricated with the high sulfur content composites as the active material afforded Li-S cells that exhibited extended cycle lifetimes of up to 1000 cycles with low capacity decay (0.07% per cycle) and demonstrated exceptional rate capability with the delivery of reversible capacity up to 500 mAh/g at 5 C. PMID:27171646

  3. Elemental Sulfur and Molybdenum Disulfide Composites for Li-S Batteries with Long Cycle Life and High-Rate Capability.

    PubMed

    Dirlam, Philip T; Park, Jungjin; Simmonds, Adam G; Domanik, Kenneth; Arrington, Clay B; Schaefer, Jennifer L; Oleshko, Vladimir P; Kleine, Tristan S; Char, Kookheon; Glass, Richard S; Soles, Christopher L; Kim, Chunjoong; Pinna, Nicola; Sung, Yung-Eun; Pyun, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    The practical implementation of Li-S technology has been hindered by short cycle life and poor rate capability owing to deleterious effects resulting from the varied solubilities of different Li polysulfide redox products. Here, we report the preparation and utilization of composites with a sulfur-rich matrix and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) particulate inclusions as Li-S cathode materials with the capability to mitigate the dissolution of the Li polysulfide redox products via the MoS2 inclusions acting as "polysulfide anchors". In situ composite formation was completed via a facile, one-pot method with commercially available starting materials. The composites were afforded by first dispersing MoS2 directly in liquid elemental sulfur (S8) with sequential polymerization of the sulfur phase via thermal ring opening polymerization or copolymerization via inverse vulcanization. For the practical utility of this system to be highlighted, it was demonstrated that the composite formation methodology was amenable to larger scale processes with composites easily prepared in 100 g batches. Cathodes fabricated with the high sulfur content composites as the active material afforded Li-S cells that exhibited extended cycle lifetimes of up to 1000 cycles with low capacity decay (0.07% per cycle) and demonstrated exceptional rate capability with the delivery of reversible capacity up to 500 mAh/g at 5 C.

  4. Impact of filler size and distribution on roughness and wear of composite resin after simulated toothbrushing

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, Gabriela Ulian; MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; CHARANTOLA RODRIGUES, Marcela; FRANCO, Eduardo Batista; ISHIKIRIAMA, Sérgio Kiyoshi; WANG, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Nanofilled composite resins are claimed to provide superior mechanical properties compared with microhybrid resins. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare nanofilled with microhybrid composite resins. The null hypothesis was that the size and the distribution of fillers do not influence the mechanical properties of surface roughness and wear after simulated toothbrushing test. Material and methods Ten rectangular specimens (15 mm x 5 mm x 4 mm) of Filtek Z250 (FZ2), Admira (A), TPH3 (T),Esthet-X (EX), Estelite Sigma (ES), Concept Advanced (C), Grandio (G) and Filtek Z350 (F) were prepared according to manufacturer's instructions. Half of each top surface was protected with nail polish as control surface (not brushed) while the other half was assessed with five random readings using a roughness tester (Ra). Following, the specimens were abraded by simulated toothbrushing with soft toothbrushes and slurry comprised of 2:1 water and dentifrice (w/w). 100,000 strokes were performed and the brushed surfaces were re-analyzed. Nail polish layers were removed from the specimens so that the roughness (Ra) and the wear could be assessed with three random readings (µm). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's multiple-comparison test (α=0.05). Results Overall outcomes indicated that composite resins showed a significant increase in roughness after simulated toothbrushing, except for Grandio, which presented a smoother surface. Generally, wear of nanofilled resins was significantly lower compared with microhybrid resins. Conclusions As restorative materials suffer alterations under mechanical challenges, such as toothbrushing, the use of nanofilled materials seem to be more resistant than microhybrid composite resins, being less prone to be rougher and worn. PMID:23138735

  5. Species composition and bathymetric distribution of gorgonians (Anthozoa: Octocorallia) on the Southern Mexican Pacific coast.

    PubMed

    Abeytia, Rosalinda; Guzmán, Hector M; Breedy, Odalisca

    2013-09-01

    Gorgonians are important components of coastal ecosystems, as they provide niches, natural compounds with medical applications and are used as bioindicators. Species composition and assemblage structure of gorgonians (Anthozoa: Octocorallia) were studied along a bathymetric profile in the Southern Mexican Pacific coast. Species composition was based on specimens collected within a depth range of 0-70 m in 15 sites. The relative abundance of species was determined in six sites at four depths (5, 10, 20 and 25 m) using three 10 m2 transects at each depth level. Twenty-seven species of gorgonians belonging to six genera and three families were registered. The species composition varied with depth: 11 species were distributed between 0-25m depth, while 17 species were found between 40-70 m depth interval. The shallow zone is characterized by a relatively large abundance of gorgonians, dominated by colonies of Leptogorgia cuspidata and L. ena. In contrast, the deepest zone was characterized by relatively low abundance of gorgonians, dominated by L. alba, the only species observed in both depth intervals. The similarity analysis showed differences in the composition and abundance of species by depth and site, suggesting that the main factor in determining the assemblage structure is depth. Results of this study suggest that the highest richness of gorgonian species in the study area may be located at depths of 40-70 m, whereas the highest abundances are found between 5 and 10 m depth. This study represents a contribution to the poorly known eastern Pacific gorgonian biota.

  6. Astrobiology: exploring the origins, evolution, and distribution of life in the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Walter, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    The search for the origins of life and its presence beyond Earth is strengthened by new technology and by evidence that life tolerates extreme conditions and that planets are widespread. Astrobiologists learn how planets develop and maintain habitable conditions. They combine biological and information sciences to decipher the origins of life. They examine how biota, particularly microorganisms, evolve, at scales from the molecular to the biosphere level, including interactions with long-term planetary changes. Astrobiologists learn how to recognize the morphological, chemical, and spectroscopic signatures of life in order to explore both extraterrestrial samples and electromagnetic spectra reflected from extrasolar planets.

  7. Astrobiology: exploring the origins, evolution, and distribution of life in the Universe.

    PubMed

    Des Marais, D J; Walter, M R

    1999-01-01

    The search for the origins of life and its presence beyond Earth is strengthened by new technology and by evidence that life tolerates extreme conditions and that planets are widespread. Astrobiologists learn how planets develop and maintain habitable conditions. They combine biological and information sciences to decipher the origins of life. They examine how biota, particularly microorganisms, evolve, at scales from the molecular to the biosphere level, including interactions with long-term planetary changes. Astrobiologists learn how to recognize the morphological, chemical, and spectroscopic signatures of life in order to explore both extraterrestrial samples and electromagnetic spectra reflected from extrasolar planets.

  8. Culicoides species composition and environmental factors influencing African horse sickness distribution at three sites in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, Danica; Piketh, Stuart; Labuschagne, Karien; Venter, Gert; Greyling, Telane; Mienie, Charlotte; de Waal, Tania; van Hamburg, Huib

    2016-11-01

    African horse sickness (AHS) is one of the most lethal infectious, non-contagious, vector-borne disease of equids. The causative agent, African horse sickness virus (AHSV) is transmitted via Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). AHS is endemic to Namibia but detailed studies of Culicoides communities and influencing environmental parameters are limited. This study aims to determine the Culicoides species composition at three different sites and to assess environmental parameters influencing the geographical distribution of AHS in Namibia. Weekly collections of Culicoides were made during the AHS peak season from January to May for 2013 and 2014 using the Onderstepoort 220V UV-light trap. Out of 397 collections made, 124 collections (3287 Culicoides) were analysed for AHSV presence with RT-qPCR. A total of 295 collections were analysed for total Culicoides (all collected Culicoides individuals) and in 75% of these collections the Culicoides were identified to species level. C. imicola was the dominant species with proportional representation of 29.9%. C. subschultzei, C. exspectator and C. ravus each contribute more than 10% to the species composition. The lowest number of Culicoides was collected at Aus 9980, a total of 21819 at Windhoek and the highest number at Okahandja 47343. AHSV was present at all three sites during 2013 but only in Windhoek and Okahandja during 2014. Multivariate analyses of data from the two year survey indicate the environmental parameters in order of importance for the distribution of AHS in Namibia as precipitation>temperature>clay>relative humidity>NDVI. The implication of these findings is that any precipitation event increases Culicoides numbers significantly. Together with these results the high number of species found of which little is known regarding their vector competence, add to the complexity of the distribution of AHS in Namibia. PMID:27491343

  9. Effect of hydrocolloids and emulsifiers on the shelf-life of composite cassava-maize-wheat bread after storage.

    PubMed

    Eduardo, Maria; Svanberg, Ulf; Ahrné, Lilia

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydrocolloids and/or emulsifiers on the shelf-life of composite cassava-maize-wheat (ratio 40:10:50) reference bread during storage. Added hydrocolloids were carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and high methoxyl pectin (HM pectin) at a 3% level (w/w) and/or the emulsifiers diacetyl tartaric acid esters of monoglycerides (DATEM), lecithin (LC), and monoglycerides (MG) at a 0.3% level (w/w). After 4 days of storage, composite breads with MG had comparatively lower crumb moisture while crumb density was similar in all breads. The reference bread crumb firmness was 33.4 N, which was reduced with an addition of DATEM (23.0 N), MG (29.8 N), CMC (24.6 N) or HM pectin (22.4 N). However, the CMC/DATEM, CMC/LC, and HM pectin/DATEM combinations further reduced crumb firmness to <20.0 N. The melting peak temperature was increased from 52 C to between 53.0 C and 57.0 C with added hydrocolloids and/or emulsifiers. The melting enthalpy of the retrograded amylopectin was lower in composite bread with hydrocolloids and emulsifiers, 6.7-11.0 J/g compared to 20.0 J/g for the reference bread. These results show that emulsifiers in combination with hydrocolloids can improve the quality and extend the shelf-life of composite cassava-maize-wheat breads.

  10. On the limit theorem for life time distribution connected with some reliability systems and their validation by means of the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghe, Munteanu Bogdan; Alexei, Leahu; Sergiu, Cataranciuc

    2013-09-01

    We prove the limit theorem for life time distribution connected with reliability systems when their life time is a Pascal Convolution of independent and identically distributed random variables. We show that, in some conditions, such distributions may be approximated by means of Erlang distributions. As a consequnce, survival functions for such systems may be, respectively, approximated by Erlang survival functions. By using Monte Carlo method we experimantally confirm the theoretical results of our theorem.

  11. Somatic Maintenance Resources in the Honeybee Worker Fat Body Are Distributed to Withstand the Most Life-Threatening Challenges at Each Life Stage

    PubMed Central

    Seehuus, Siri-Christine; Taylor, Simon; Petersen, Kjell; Aamodt, Randi M.

    2013-01-01

    In a global transcriptome analysis of three natural and three manipulated honeybee worker phenotypes at different ages, we have investigated the distribution of investment in somatic maintenance of the fat body. Gene expression is modulated so that the bees are able to resist the most life-threatening challenges at the actual life stage. Different modes of maintenance and repair are regulated, apparently to meet the environmental challenges most detrimental to survival and reproductive potential for the hive. We observed a broad down-regulation of genomic and cellular maintenance in the short-lived foragers and nurse bees compared to the long-lived winter bees. Our results show that survival and reproduction of the entire hive is given priority over the individual bees, hence supporting the idea of the honeybee society as a superorganism. Our results also fit the disposable soma theory of aging. PMID:23940531

  12. Electrical Resistance of SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for Damage Detection and Life-Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory; Xia, Zhenhai

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are suitable for high temperature structural applications such as turbine airfoils and hypersonic thermal protection systems due to their low density high thermal conductivity. The employment of these materials in such applications is limited by the ability to accurately monitor and predict damage evolution. Current nondestructive methods such as ultrasound, x-ray, and thermal imaging are limited in their ability to quantify small scale, transverse, in-plane, matrix cracks developed over long-time creep and fatigue conditions. CMC is a multifunctional material in which the damage is coupled with the material s electrical resistance, providing the possibility of real-time information about the damage state through monitoring of resistance. Here, resistance measurement of SiC/SiC composites under mechanical load at both room temperature monotonic and high temperature creep conditions, coupled with a modal acoustic emission technique, can relate the effects of temperature, strain, matrix cracks, fiber breaks, and oxidation to the change in electrical resistance. A multiscale model can in turn be developed for life prediction of in-service composites, based on electrical resistance methods. Results of tensile mechanical testing of SiC/SiC composites at room and high temperatures will be discussed. Data relating electrical resistivity to composite constituent content, fiber architecture, temperature, matrix crack formation, and oxidation will be explained, along with progress in modeling such properties.

  13. [Population, distribution and food composition of wolves (Canis lupus) at Saihanwula Nature Reserve, Inner Mongolia].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiu-Yi; Zhang, Li-Jia; Wang, An-Meng; Bater; Nasendelger; Yuan, Li; Bao, Wei-Dong

    2011-04-01

    To provide initial value for population restoration and management of wolves (Canis lupus) in the wild, line transect survey and fecal analysis method were used to study the population ecology of wolf at Saihanwula National Nature Reserve, Inner Mongolia. The results revealed that the population number was at least seven within the reserve and population density was 4.18+/-2.88 individual per 100 km2. The wolf population was mainly distributed in Shengshan and Qinyunshan core areas; active sites appeared mostly along mountain ridges, roads and valleys at Shengshan and mountain ridges at Qinyunshan. Hare (Lepus capensis) and plants occurred frequently in the food composition of wolf scats. Food types varied between years but not seasons (Winter-Spring and Summer-Autumn).

  14. Interfacial shear stress distribution in model composites. I - A Kevlar 49 fibre in an epoxy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Jahankhani, H.; Galiotis, C. )

    1991-05-01

    The technique of Laser Raman Spectroscopy has been applied in the study of aramid fibers, such as Kevlar 49, and aramid/epoxy interfaces. A linear relationship has been found between Raman frequencies and strain upon loading a single Kevlar 49 filament in air. Model composites of single Kevlar 49 fibers embedded in epoxy resins have been fabricated and subjected to various degrees of mechanical deformation. The transfer lengths for reinforcement have been measured at various levels of applied tensile load and the dependence of transfer length upon applied matrix strain has been established. Finally, by balancing the tensile and the shear forces acting along the interface, the interfacial shear stress (ISS) distribution along the embedded fiber was obtained. 52 refs.

  15. Investigation on stress distribution of multilayered composite structure (MCS) using infrared thermographic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junyan; Gong, Jinlong; Liu, Liqiang; Qin, Lei; Wang, Yang

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) on a multilayered composite structure (MCS) was investigated by means of lock-in thermographic image technique (LITI). The application of thermoelastic stress analysis on MCS becomes particularly complicated due to consisting of different material components, which determines the different thermoelastic coupling response depended on material thermal-physical property. The thermoelastic coupling constants (TCC) of GFRP, medium-carbon steel and foam were obtained through thermomechanical calibration experiments, respectively. An artificial neural network was proposed to determine the component of MCS. Comparisons between finite element analysis (FEA) and LITI measurement are reported. It is found that the stress distribution of MCS can be evaluated with good accuracies using LITI measurement.

  16. 25 CFR 179.201 - How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate without...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the holder of a life estate without regard to waste? 179.201 Section 179.201 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LIFE ESTATES AND FUTURE INTERESTS Life Estates Created Under AIPRA § 179.201 How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a...

  17. 25 CFR 179.201 - How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate without...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the holder of a life estate without regard to waste? 179.201 Section 179.201 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LIFE ESTATES AND FUTURE INTERESTS Life Estates Created Under AIPRA § 179.201 How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a...

  18. 25 CFR 179.201 - How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate without...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the holder of a life estate without regard to waste? 179.201 Section 179.201 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LIFE ESTATES AND FUTURE INTERESTS Life Estates Created Under AIPRA § 179.201 How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a...

  19. 25 CFR 179.201 - How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate without...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the holder of a life estate without regard to waste? 179.201 Section 179.201 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LIFE ESTATES AND FUTURE INTERESTS Life Estates Created Under AIPRA § 179.201 How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a...

  20. 25 CFR 179.201 - How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a life estate without...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the holder of a life estate without regard to waste? 179.201 Section 179.201 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LIFE ESTATES AND FUTURE INTERESTS Life Estates Created Under AIPRA § 179.201 How does the Secretary distribute principal and income to the holder of a...

  1. The bacteriological composition of biomass recovered by flushing an operational drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Douterelo, I; Husband, S; Boxall, J B

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the influence of pipe characteristics on the bacteriological composition of material mobilised from a drinking water distribution system (DWDS) and the impact of biofilm removal on water quality. Hydrants in a single UK Distribution Management Area (DMA) with both polyethylene and cast iron pipe sections were subjected to incremental increases in flow to mobilise material from the pipe walls. Turbidity was monitored during these operations and water samples were collected for physico-chemical and bacteriological analysis. DNA was extracted from the material mobilised into the bulk water before and during flushing. Bacterial tag-encoded 454 pyrosequencing was then used to characterize the bacterial communities present in this material. Turbidity values were high in the samples from cast iron pipes. Iron, aluminium, manganese and phosphate concentrations were found to correlate to observed turbidity. The bacterial community composition of the material mobilised from the pipes was significantly different between plastic and cast iron pipe sections (p < 0.5). High relative abundances of Alphaproteobacteria (23.3%), Clostridia (10.3%) and Actinobacteria (10.3%) were detected in the material removed from plastic pipes. Sequences related to Alphaproteobacteria (22.8%), Bacilli (16.6%), and Gammaproteobacteria (1.4%) were predominant in the samples obtained from cast iron pipes. The highest species richness and diversity were found in the samples from material mobilised from plastic pipes. Spirochaeta spp., Methylobacterium spp. Clostridium spp. and Desulfobacterium spp., were the most represented genera in the material obtained prior to and during the flushing of the plastic pipes. In cast iron pipes a high relative abundance of bacteria able to utilise different iron and manganese compounds were found such as Lysinibacillus spp., Geobacillus spp. and Magnetobacterium spp.

  2. Where did the Trojan asteroids form? Constraints from composition and size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, Joshua; Bell, Jim; Trilling, David; Patience, Jennifer; Brown, Mike

    2014-08-01

    We propose to make near-infrared (0.8 - 2.5 μm) spectral observations of 15 small to medium sized (<100 km) Jovian Trojan asteroids. These objects are part of a substantial population of primitive bodies trapped in Jupiter's stable Lagrange regions. Because they may have become trapped in these orbits at the end of the initial phase of planetary formation and subsequent migration, the physical properties of Trojans provide unique perspectives on chemical and dynamical processes that shaped the Solar System. Indeed, in recognition of their importance, the Trojans are one of only five allowable target destinations for NASA's next New Frontiers mission. Previous observations have identified two spectral classes, suggesting that the Trojans are comprised of two distinct compositional groups, perhaps representing distinct outer Solar System reservoirs for their formation. These new proposed observations will: (a) Enable a search for minor absorptions due to ices, organics, and/or silicates in the smallest Trojans yet observed, near and below the size regime thought to represent the largest collisional fragments from impacts within the Trojan clouds; and (b) Test whether the two spectral groups previously identified have different cumulative size distributions, which would suggest different internal strengths and support the hypothesis of distinct compositions and origins.

  3. Processing and Characterization of a Novel Distributed Strain Sensor Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Nonwoven Composites.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hongbo; Thostenson, Erik T; Schumacher, Thomas

    2015-07-21

    This paper describes the development of an innovative carbon nanotube-based non-woven composite sensor that can be tailored for strain sensing properties and potentially offers a reliable and cost-effective sensing option for structural health monitoring (SHM). This novel strain sensor is fabricated using a readily scalable process of coating Carbon nanotubes (CNT) onto a nonwoven carrier fabric to form an electrically-isotropic conductive network. Epoxy is then infused into the CNT-modified fabric to form a free-standing nanocomposite strain sensor. By measuring the changes in the electrical properties of the sensing composite the deformation can be measured in real-time. The sensors are repeatable and linear up to 0.4% strain. Highest elastic strain gage factors of 1.9 and 4.0 have been achieved in the longitudinal and transverse direction, respectively. Although the longitudinal gage factor of the newly formed nanocomposite sensor is close to some metallic foil strain gages, the proposed sensing methodology offers spatial coverage, manufacturing customizability, distributed sensing capability as well as transverse sensitivity.

  4. Processing and Characterization of a Novel Distributed Strain Sensor Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Nonwoven Composites.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hongbo; Thostenson, Erik T; Schumacher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an innovative carbon nanotube-based non-woven composite sensor that can be tailored for strain sensing properties and potentially offers a reliable and cost-effective sensing option for structural health monitoring (SHM). This novel strain sensor is fabricated using a readily scalable process of coating Carbon nanotubes (CNT) onto a nonwoven carrier fabric to form an electrically-isotropic conductive network. Epoxy is then infused into the CNT-modified fabric to form a free-standing nanocomposite strain sensor. By measuring the changes in the electrical properties of the sensing composite the deformation can be measured in real-time. The sensors are repeatable and linear up to 0.4% strain. Highest elastic strain gage factors of 1.9 and 4.0 have been achieved in the longitudinal and transverse direction, respectively. Although the longitudinal gage factor of the newly formed nanocomposite sensor is close to some metallic foil strain gages, the proposed sensing methodology offers spatial coverage, manufacturing customizability, distributed sensing capability as well as transverse sensitivity. PMID:26197323

  5. Decompression vs. Decomposition: Distribution, Amount, and Gas Composition of Bubbles in Stranded Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Diaz, Oscar; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Fernández, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Gas embolic lesions linked to military sonar have been described in stranded cetaceans including beaked whales. These descriptions suggest that gas bubbles in marine mammal tissues may be more common than previously thought. In this study we have analyzed gas amount (by gas score) and gas composition within different decomposition codes using a standardized methodology. This broad study has allowed us to explore species-specific variability in bubble prevalence, amount, distribution, and composition, as well as masking of bubble content by putrefaction gases. Bubbles detected within the cardiovascular system and other tissues related to both pre- and port-mortem processes are a common finding on necropsy of stranded cetaceans. To minimize masking by putrefaction gases, necropsy, and gas sampling must be performed as soon as possible. Before 24 h post mortem is recommended but preferably within 12 h post mortem. At necropsy, amount of bubbles (gas score) in decomposition code 2 in stranded cetaceans was found to be more important than merely presence vs. absence of bubbles from a pathological point of view. Deep divers presented higher abundance of gas bubbles, mainly composed of 70% nitrogen and 30% CO2, suggesting a higher predisposition of these species to suffer from decompression-related gas embolism. PMID:22675306

  6. Processing and Characterization of a Novel Distributed Strain Sensor Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Nonwoven Composites

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hongbo; Thostenson, Erik T.; Schumacher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an innovative carbon nanotube-based non-woven composite sensor that can be tailored for strain sensing properties and potentially offers a reliable and cost-effective sensing option for structural health monitoring (SHM). This novel strain sensor is fabricated using a readily scalable process of coating Carbon nanotubes (CNT) onto a nonwoven carrier fabric to form an electrically-isotropic conductive network. Epoxy is then infused into the CNT-modified fabric to form a free-standing nanocomposite strain sensor. By measuring the changes in the electrical properties of the sensing composite the deformation can be measured in real-time. The sensors are repeatable and linear up to 0.4% strain. Highest elastic strain gage factors of 1.9 and 4.0 have been achieved in the longitudinal and transverse direction, respectively. Although the longitudinal gage factor of the newly formed nanocomposite sensor is close to some metallic foil strain gages, the proposed sensing methodology offers spatial coverage, manufacturing customizability, distributed sensing capability as well as transverse sensitivity. PMID:26197323

  7. nirS-Encoding denitrifier community composition, distribution, and abundance along the coastal wetlands of China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Juan; Hou, Lijun; Zheng, Yanling; Liu, Min; Yin, Guoyu; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong; Jiang, Xiaofen; Sun, Xiuru

    2016-10-01

    For the past few decades, human activities have intensively increased the reactive nitrogen enrichment in China's coastal wetlands. Although denitrification is a critical pathway of nitrogen removal, the understanding of denitrifier community dynamics driving denitrification remains limited in the coastal wetlands. In this study, the diversity, abundance, and community composition of nirS-encoding denitrifiers were analyzed to reveal their variations in China's coastal wetlands. Diverse nirS sequences were obtained and more than 98 % of them shared considerable phylogenetic similarity with sequences obtained from aquatic systems (marine/estuarine/coastal sediments and hypoxia sea water). Clone library analysis revealed that the distribution and composition of nirS-harboring denitrifiers had a significant latitudinal differentiation, but without a seasonal shift. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that the community structure of nirS-encoding denitrifiers was significantly related to temperature and ammonium concentration. The nirS gene abundance ranged from 4.3 × 10(5) to 3.7 × 10(7) copies g(-1) dry sediment, with a significant spatial heterogeneity. Among all detected environmental factors, temperature was a key factor affecting not only the nirS gene abundance but also the community structure of nirS-type denitrifiers. Overall, this study significantly enhances our understanding of the structure and dynamics of denitrifying communities in the coastal wetlands of China. PMID:27311565

  8. Decompression vs. Decomposition: Distribution, Amount, and Gas Composition of Bubbles in Stranded Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Diaz, Oscar; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Fernández, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Gas embolic lesions linked to military sonar have been described in stranded cetaceans including beaked whales. These descriptions suggest that gas bubbles in marine mammal tissues may be more common than previously thought. In this study we have analyzed gas amount (by gas score) and gas composition within different decomposition codes using a standardized methodology. This broad study has allowed us to explore species-specific variability in bubble prevalence, amount, distribution, and composition, as well as masking of bubble content by putrefaction gases. Bubbles detected within the cardiovascular system and other tissues related to both pre- and port-mortem processes are a common finding on necropsy of stranded cetaceans. To minimize masking by putrefaction gases, necropsy, and gas sampling must be performed as soon as possible. Before 24 h post mortem is recommended but preferably within 12 h post mortem. At necropsy, amount of bubbles (gas score) in decomposition code 2 in stranded cetaceans was found to be more important than merely presence vs. absence of bubbles from a pathological point of view. Deep divers presented higher abundance of gas bubbles, mainly composed of 70% nitrogen and 30% CO(2), suggesting a higher predisposition of these species to suffer from decompression-related gas embolism.

  9. Tracing subsoil organic matter compositional changes by radiocarbon and plant leaf wax distributional changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Stephan; Angst, Gerrit; Mueller, Carsten W.; Heinze, Stefanie; Marschner, Bernd; Rethemeyer, Janet

    2014-05-01

    The carbon pool in subsoils is thought to be considerably larger than in the upper 30 cm. However, factors like turnover, stabilization and distribution of organic matter (OM) are less well understood than in topsoils. The investigation of changes in OM composition with depth enables a better understanding of the peculiarity of subsoil OM in contrast to the already extensively studied topsoil OM. Analysis of long chained n-alkanes and n-fatty acids in soil profiles sampled in high resolution, combined with radiocarbon data of bulk soil, is a tool to demonstrate spatial distribution and the degradation of plant leaf wax-derived material as a defined source of soil organic. We analysed the OM in 3.15 m long soil transects under an even aged European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest in Northern Germany (Grinderwald, Lower Saxony) for lipid and radiocarbon analysis. Samples were taken from a grid raster with eight sampling points increasing in distance to the main tree (45cm grid dimension) and from five depths (10, 35, 60, 85, 110 cm) resulting 40 samples per transect. Organic carbon contents in the podzolic Cambisol decrease from 1.69 % in the A-horizon to 0.02 % in the C-horizon at 110 cm depth. The distribution of organic carbon contents shows no significant trend with increasing distance to the beeches in all transects. We compare the distribution of long-chain n-alkanes (C27, C29 and C31) and n-fatty acids (>C20), known as components mainly derived from leaf waxes of higher plants, in the different transect/depth intervals. Distributional and quantitative changes in the transects, combined with bulk soil 14C-analyses, reflecting apparent mean residence time of OM, are used to identify how fast OM is degraded from surface to subsoil horizons. Furthermore, spatial OM heterogeneity in the transects is investigated. We expect a more significant heterogeneity in the lipid distribution and nearly similar decreasing contents for n-alkanes as well as n-fatty acids

  10. CCN frequency distributions and aerosol chemical composition from long-term observations at European ACTRIS supersites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, Stefano; Rinaldi, Matteo; Schmale, Julia Yvonne; Gysel, Martin; Fröhlich, Roman; Poulain, Laurent; Henning, Silvia; Stratmann, Frank; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Cloud droplet number concentration is regulated by the availability of aerosol acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Predicting the air concentrations of CCN involves knowledge of all physical and chemical processes that contribute to shape the particle size distribution and determine aerosol hygroscopicity. The relevance of specific atmospheric processes (e.g., nucleation, coagulation, condensation of secondary organic and inorganic aerosol, etc.) is time- and site-dependent, therefore the availability of long-term, time-resolved aerosol observations at locations representative of diverse environments is strategic for the validation of state-of-the-art chemical transport models suited to predict CCN concentrations. We focused on long-term (year-long) datasets of CCN and of aerosol composition data including black carbon, and inorganic as well as organic compounds from the Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at selected ACTRIS supersites (http://www.actris.eu/). We discuss here the joint frequency distribution of CCN levels and of aerosol chemical components concentrations for two stations: an alpine site (Jungfraujoch, CH) and a central European rural site (Melpitz, DE). The CCN frequency distributions at Jungfraujoch are broad and generally correlated with the distributions of the concentrations of aerosol chemical components (e.g., high CCN concentrations are most frequently found for high organic matter or black carbon concentrations, and vice versa), which can be explained as an effect of the strong seasonality in the aerosol characteristics at the mountain site. The CCN frequency distributions in Melpitz show a much weaker overlap with the distributions of BC concentrations or other chemical compounds. However, especially at high CCN concentration levels, a statistical correlation with organic matter (OM) concentration can be observed. For instance, the number of CCN (with particle diameter between 20 and 250 nm) at a supersaturation of 0.7% is

  11. Life Prediction Issues in Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coatings in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Brewer, David N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2001-01-01

    Issues and design requirements for the environmental barrier coating (EBC)/thermal barrier coating (TBC) life that are general and those specific to the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) development program have been described. The current state and trend of the research, methods in vogue related to the failure analysis, and long-term behavior and life prediction of EBCITBC systems are reported. Also, the perceived failure mechanisms, variables, and related uncertainties governing the EBCITBC system life are summarized. A combined heat transfer and structural analysis approach based on the oxidation kinetics using the Arrhenius theory is proposed to develop a life prediction model for the EBC/TBC systems. Stochastic process-based reliability approach that includes the physical variables such as gas pressure, temperature, velocity, moisture content, crack density, oxygen content, etc., is suggested. Benefits of the reliability-based approach are also discussed in the report.

  12. Effects of Temperature, Oxidation and Fiber Preforms on Fatigue Life of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effects of temperature, oxidation and fiber preforms on the fatigue life of carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide ceramic-matrix composites (C/SiC CMCs) have been investigated. An effective coefficient of the fiber volume fraction along the loading direction (ECFL) was introduced to describe the fiber architecture of preforms. Under cyclic fatigue loading, the fibers broken fraction was determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at room temperature, and interface/fibers oxidation model, interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at elevated temperatures in the oxidative environments. When the broken fibers fraction approaches to the critical value, the composites fatigue fracture. The fatigue life S-N curves and fatigue limits of unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D, 2.5D and 3D C/SiC composites at room temperature, 800 °C in air, 1100, 1300 and 1500 °C in vacuum conditions have been predicted.

  13. The characterisation of diesel exhaust particles - composition, size distribution and partitioning.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammed S; Zeraati-Rezaei, Soheil; Stark, Christopher P; Liang, Zhirong; Xu, Hongming; Harrison, Roy M

    2016-07-18

    A number of major research questions remain concerning the sources and properties of road traffic generated particulate matter. A full understanding of the composition of primary vehicle exhaust aerosol and its contribution to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation still remains elusive, and many uncertainties exist relating to the semi-volatile component of the particles. Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds (SVOCs) are compounds which partition directly between the gas and aerosol phases under ambient conditions. The SVOCs in engine exhaust are typically hydrocarbons in the C15-C35 range, and are largely uncharacterised because they are unresolved by traditional gas chromatography, forming a large hump in the chromatogram referred to as Unresolved Complex Mixture (UCM). In this study, thermal desorption coupled to comprehensive Two Dimensional Gas-Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass-Spectrometry (TD-GC × GC-ToF-MS) was exploited to characterise and quantify the composition of SVOCs from the exhaust emission. Samples were collected from the exhaust of a diesel engine, sampling before and after a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), while testing at steady state conditions. Engine exhaust was diluted with air and collected using both filter and impaction (nano-MOUDI), to resolve total mass and size resolved mass respectively. Adsorption tubes were utilised to collect SVOCs in the gas phase and they were then analysed using thermal desorption, while particle size distribution was evaluated by sampling with a DMS500. The SVOCs were observed to contain predominantly n-alkanes, branched alkanes, alkyl-cycloalkanes, alkyl-benzenes, PAHs and various cyclic aromatics. Particle phase compounds identified were similar to those observed in engine lubricants, while vapour phase constituents were similar to those measured in fuels. Preliminary results are presented illustrating differences in the particle size distribution and SVOCs composition when collecting samples with and

  14. The characterisation of diesel exhaust particles - composition, size distribution and partitioning.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammed S; Zeraati-Rezaei, Soheil; Stark, Christopher P; Liang, Zhirong; Xu, Hongming; Harrison, Roy M

    2016-07-18

    A number of major research questions remain concerning the sources and properties of road traffic generated particulate matter. A full understanding of the composition of primary vehicle exhaust aerosol and its contribution to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation still remains elusive, and many uncertainties exist relating to the semi-volatile component of the particles. Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds (SVOCs) are compounds which partition directly between the gas and aerosol phases under ambient conditions. The SVOCs in engine exhaust are typically hydrocarbons in the C15-C35 range, and are largely uncharacterised because they are unresolved by traditional gas chromatography, forming a large hump in the chromatogram referred to as Unresolved Complex Mixture (UCM). In this study, thermal desorption coupled to comprehensive Two Dimensional Gas-Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass-Spectrometry (TD-GC × GC-ToF-MS) was exploited to characterise and quantify the composition of SVOCs from the exhaust emission. Samples were collected from the exhaust of a diesel engine, sampling before and after a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), while testing at steady state conditions. Engine exhaust was diluted with air and collected using both filter and impaction (nano-MOUDI), to resolve total mass and size resolved mass respectively. Adsorption tubes were utilised to collect SVOCs in the gas phase and they were then analysed using thermal desorption, while particle size distribution was evaluated by sampling with a DMS500. The SVOCs were observed to contain predominantly n-alkanes, branched alkanes, alkyl-cycloalkanes, alkyl-benzenes, PAHs and various cyclic aromatics. Particle phase compounds identified were similar to those observed in engine lubricants, while vapour phase constituents were similar to those measured in fuels. Preliminary results are presented illustrating differences in the particle size distribution and SVOCs composition when collecting samples with and

  15. Bumble Bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Bombus spp.) of Interior Alaska: Species Composition, Distribution, Seasonal Biology, and Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Pampell, Rehanon; Pantoja, Alberto; Holloway, Patricia; Knight, Charles; Ranft, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite the ecological and agricultural significance of bumble bees in Alaska, very little is known and published about this important group at the regional level. The objectives of this study were to provide baseline data on species composition, distribution, seasonal biology, and parasites of the genus Bombus at three major agricultural locations within Alaska: Fairbanks, Delta Junction, and Palmer, to lay the groundwork for future research on bumble bee pollination in Alaska. New information A total of 8,250 bumble bees representing 18 species was collected from agricultural settings near Delta Junction, Fairbanks, and Palmer, Alaska in 2009 and 2010. Of the 8,250 specimens, 51% were queens, 32.7% were workers, and 16.2% were males. The species composition and relative abundances varied among sites and years. Delta Junction had the highest relative abundance of bumble bees, representing 51.6% of the specimens collected; the other two locations, Fairbanks and Palmer represented 26.5% and 21.8% of the overall catch respectively. The species collected were: Bombus bohemicus Seidl 1837 (= B. ashtoni (Cresson 1864)), B. balteatus Dahlbom 1832, B. bifarius Cresson 1878, B. centralis Cresson 1864, B. cryptarum (Fabricius 1775) (=B. moderatus Cresson 1863), B. distinguendus Morawitz 1869, B. flavidus Eversmann 1852 (=B. fernaldae Franklin 1911), B. flavifrons Cresson 1863, B. frigidus Smith 1854, B. insularis (Smith 1861), B. jonellus (Kirby 1802), B. melanopygus Nylander 1848, B. mixtus Cresson 1878, B. neoboreus Sladen 1919, B. occidentalis Greene 1858, B. perplexus Cresson 1863, B. rufocinctus Cresson 1863, and B. sylvicola Kirby 1837. Overall, the most common bumble bees near agricultural lands were B. centralis, B. frigidus, B. jonellus, B. melanopygus, B. mixtus, and B. occidentalis. Species' relative population densities and local diversity were highly variable from year to year. Bombus occidentalis, believed to be in decline in the Pacific

  16. Molecular Structures of Polymer/Sulfur Composites for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with Long Cycle Life

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Lifen; Cao, Yuliang; Xiao, Jie; Schwenzer, Birgit; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Nie, Zimin; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Liu, Jun

    2013-04-26

    Vulcanizedpolyaniline/sulfur (SPANI/S) nanostructures were investigated for Li-S battery applications, but the detailed molecular structures of such composites have not been fully illustrated. In this paper, we synthesize SPANI/S composites with different S content in a nanorod configuration. FTIR, Raman, XPS, XRD, SEM and elemental analysis methods are used to characterize the molecular structure of the materials. We provide clear evidence that a portion of S was grafted on PANI during heating and connected the PANI chains with disulfide bonds to form a crosslinked network and the rest of S was encapsulated within it.. Polysulfides and elementary sulfur nanoparticles are physically trapped inside the polymer network and are not chemically bound to the polymer. The performance of the composites is further improved by reducing the particle size. Even after 500 cycles a capacity retention rate of 68.8% is observed in the SPANI/S composite with 55% S content.

  17. Method for uniformly distributing carbon flakes in a positive electrode, the electrode made thereby and compositions

    DOEpatents

    Mrazek, Franklin C.; Smaga, John A.; Battles, James E.

    1983-01-01

    A positive electrode for a secondary electrochemical cell wherein an electrically conductive current collector is in electrical contact with a particulate mixture of gray cast iron and an alkali metal sulfide and an electrolyte including alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides. Also present may be a transition metal sulfide and graphite flakes from the conversion of gray cast iron to iron sulfide. Also disclosed is a method of distributing carbon flakes in a cell wherein there is formed an electrochemical cell of a positive electrode structure of the type described and a suitable electrolyte and a second electrode containing a material capable of alloying with alkali metal ions. The cell is connected to a source of electrical potential to electrochemically convert gray cast iron to an iron sulfide and uniformly to distribute carbon flakes formerly in the gray cast iron throughout the positive electrode while forming an alkali metal alloy in the negative electrode. Also disclosed are compositions useful in preparing positive electrodes.

  18. Research on the Composition and Distribution of Organic Sulfur in Coal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanjun; Li, Zenghua; Yang, Yongliang; Zhou, Yinbo; Li, Jinhu; Si, Leilei; Kong, Biao

    2016-05-13

    The structure and distribution of organic sulfur in coals of different rank and different sulfur content were studied by combining mild organic solvent extraction with XPS technology. The XPS results have shown that the distribution of organic sulfur in coal is related to the degree of metamorphism of coal. Namely, thiophenic sulfur content is reduced with decreasing metamorphic degree; sulfonic acid content rises with decreasing metamorphic degree; the contents of sulfate sulfur, sulfoxide and sulfone are rarely related with metamorphic degree. The solvent extraction and GC/MS test results have also shown that the composition and structure of free and soluble organic sulfur small molecules in coal is closely related to the metamorphic degree of coal. The free organic sulfur small molecules in coal of low metamorphic degree are mainly composed of aliphatic sulfides, while those in coal of medium and high metamorphic degree are mainly composed of thiophenes. Besides, the degree of aromatization of organic sulfur small molecules rises with increasing degree of coalification.

  19. Effects of Hypoxia on the Phylogenetic Composition and Species Distribution of Protists in a Subtropical Harbor.

    PubMed

    Rocke, Emma; Jing, Hongmei; Xia, Xiaomin; Liu, Hongbin

    2016-07-01

    Tolo Harbor, a subtropical semi-enclosed coastal water body, is surrounded by an expanding urban community, which contributes to large concentrations of nutrient runoff, leading to algal blooms and localized hypoxic episodes. Present knowledge of protist distributions in subtropical waters during hypoxic conditions is very limited. In this study, therefore, we combined parallel 454 pyrosequencing technology and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprint analyses to reveal the protist community shifts before, during, and after a 2-week hypoxic episode during the summer of 2011. Hierarchical clustering for DGGE demonstrated similar grouping of hypoxic samples separately from oxic samples. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and dissolved inorganic nitrogen:phosphate (DIN:PO4) concentrations significantly affected OTU distribution in 454 sequenced samples, and a shift toward a ciliate and marine alveolate clade II (MALV II) species composition occurred as waters shifted from oxic to hypoxic. These results suggest that protist community shifts toward heterotrophic and parasitic tendencies as well as decreased diversity and richness in response to hypoxic outbreaks. PMID:26979838

  20. Effects of Hypoxia on the Phylogenetic Composition and Species Distribution of Protists in a Subtropical Harbor.

    PubMed

    Rocke, Emma; Jing, Hongmei; Xia, Xiaomin; Liu, Hongbin

    2016-07-01

    Tolo Harbor, a subtropical semi-enclosed coastal water body, is surrounded by an expanding urban community, which contributes to large concentrations of nutrient runoff, leading to algal blooms and localized hypoxic episodes. Present knowledge of protist distributions in subtropical waters during hypoxic conditions is very limited. In this study, therefore, we combined parallel 454 pyrosequencing technology and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprint analyses to reveal the protist community shifts before, during, and after a 2-week hypoxic episode during the summer of 2011. Hierarchical clustering for DGGE demonstrated similar grouping of hypoxic samples separately from oxic samples. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and dissolved inorganic nitrogen:phosphate (DIN:PO4) concentrations significantly affected OTU distribution in 454 sequenced samples, and a shift toward a ciliate and marine alveolate clade II (MALV II) species composition occurred as waters shifted from oxic to hypoxic. These results suggest that protist community shifts toward heterotrophic and parasitic tendencies as well as decreased diversity and richness in response to hypoxic outbreaks.

  1. Research on the Composition and Distribution of Organic Sulfur in Coal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanjun; Li, Zenghua; Yang, Yongliang; Zhou, Yinbo; Li, Jinhu; Si, Leilei; Kong, Biao

    2016-01-01

    The structure and distribution of organic sulfur in coals of different rank and different sulfur content were studied by combining mild organic solvent extraction with XPS technology. The XPS results have shown that the distribution of organic sulfur in coal is related to the degree of metamorphism of coal. Namely, thiophenic sulfur content is reduced with decreasing metamorphic degree; sulfonic acid content rises with decreasing metamorphic degree; the contents of sulfate sulfur, sulfoxide and sulfone are rarely related with metamorphic degree. The solvent extraction and GC/MS test results have also shown that the composition and structure of free and soluble organic sulfur small molecules in coal is closely related to the metamorphic degree of coal. The free organic sulfur small molecules in coal of low metamorphic degree are mainly composed of aliphatic sulfides, while those in coal of medium and high metamorphic degree are mainly composed of thiophenes. Besides, the degree of aromatization of organic sulfur small molecules rises with increasing degree of coalification. PMID:27187339

  2. Design and optimization of a material property distribution in a composite flywheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielman, Scott Craig

    The material properties of a fiber reinforced plastic laminate can be tailored for a given structure and loading by continuously varying the direction of the fiber through-out the plies. Here, it is shown that adding such a material property distribution to a thick-radius, composite flywheel can improve performance. A flywheel made from alternating plies of purely circumferential and purely radial reinforcement is designed as the performance benchmark. A second flywheel, substituting plies with a continuous fiber angle variation for the purely radial plies, is investigated. It is shown that the design of the fiber angle distribution can be formulated as an optimal control problem incorporating Classical Lamination Theory to describe the constitutive behavior and the Tsai-Wu failure criteria to predict failure of the flywheel laminate. The effects of the matrix properties on performance are also investigated. Numerical simulation indicates a 13% increase in energy density for the optimized flywheel over the benchmark flywheel. To demonstrate the feasibility of manufacture, automated ply layup machines are developed that are capable of producing the necessary carbon fiber plies. Experimentally determined material properties are used to re-run the optimization routine then prototype benchmark and optimized flywheel are constructed. Tangential strain measurements confirm that the separate flywheels have different material properties suggestive of those found in the analysis.

  3. Vegetation in Bangalore's Slums: Composition, Species Distribution, Density, Diversity, and History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Divya; Nagendra, Harini; Manthey, Michael

    2015-06-01

    There is widespread acknowledgement of the need for biodiversity and greening to be part of urban sustainability efforts. Yet we know little about greenery in the context of urban poverty, particularly in slums, which constitute a significant challenge for inclusive development in many rapidly growing cities. We assessed the composition, density, diversity, and species distribution of vegetation in 44 slums of Bangalore, India, comparing these to published studies on vegetation diversity in other land-use categories. Most trees were native to the region, as compared to other land-use categories such as parks and streets which are dominated by introduced species. Of the most frequently encountered tree species, Moringa oleifera and Cocos nucifera are important for food, while Ficus religiosa plays a critical cultural and religious role. Tree density and diversity were much lower in slums compared to richer residential neighborhoods. There are also differences in species preferences, with most plant (herb, shrub and vines) species in slums having economic, food, medicinal, or cultural use, while the species planted in richer residential areas are largely ornamental. Historic development has had an impact on species distribution, with older slums having larger sized tree species, while recent slums were dominated by smaller sized tree species with greater economic and food use. Extensive focus on planting trees and plant species with utility value is required in these congested neighborhoods, to provide livelihood support.

  4. Relating belowground microbial composition to the taxonomic, phylogenetic, and functional trait distributions of trees in a tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Barberán, Albert; McGuire, Krista L; Wolf, Jeffrey A; Jones, F Andrew; Wright, Stuart Joseph; Turner, Benjamin L; Essene, Adam; Hubbell, Stephen P; Faircloth, Brant C; Fierer, Noah

    2015-12-01

    The complexities of the relationships between plant and soil microbial communities remain unresolved. We determined the associations between plant aboveground and belowground (root) distributions and the communities of soil fungi and bacteria found across a diverse tropical forest plot. Soil microbial community composition was correlated with the taxonomic and phylogenetic structure of the aboveground plant assemblages even after controlling for differences in soil characteristics, but these relationships were stronger for fungi than for bacteria. In contrast to expectations, the species composition of roots in our soil core samples was a poor predictor of microbial community composition perhaps due to the patchy, ephemeral, and highly overlapping nature of fine root distributions. Our ability to predict soil microbial composition was not improved by incorporating information on plant functional traits suggesting that the most commonly measured plant traits are not particularly useful for predicting the plot-level variability in belowground microbial communities. PMID:26472095

  5. Relating belowground microbial composition to the taxonomic, phylogenetic, and functional trait distributions of trees in a tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Barberán, Albert; McGuire, Krista L; Wolf, Jeffrey A; Jones, F Andrew; Wright, Stuart Joseph; Turner, Benjamin L; Essene, Adam; Hubbell, Stephen P; Faircloth, Brant C; Fierer, Noah

    2015-12-01

    The complexities of the relationships between plant and soil microbial communities remain unresolved. We determined the associations between plant aboveground and belowground (root) distributions and the communities of soil fungi and bacteria found across a diverse tropical forest plot. Soil microbial community composition was correlated with the taxonomic and phylogenetic structure of the aboveground plant assemblages even after controlling for differences in soil characteristics, but these relationships were stronger for fungi than for bacteria. In contrast to expectations, the species composition of roots in our soil core samples was a poor predictor of microbial community composition perhaps due to the patchy, ephemeral, and highly overlapping nature of fine root distributions. Our ability to predict soil microbial composition was not improved by incorporating information on plant functional traits suggesting that the most commonly measured plant traits are not particularly useful for predicting the plot-level variability in belowground microbial communities.

  6. MinSORTING: an Excel macro for modelling sediment composition and grain-size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resentini, Alberto; Malusà, Marco G.; Garzanti, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    Detrital mineral analyses are gaining increasing attention in the geosciences as new single-grain analytical techniques are constantly improving their resolution, and consequently widening their range of application, including sedimentary petrology, tectonic geomorphology and archaeology (Mange and Wright, 2007; von Eynatten and Dunkl, 2012). We present here MinSORTING, a new tool to quickly predict the size distribution of various minerals and rock fragments in detrital sediments, based on the physical laws that control sedimentation by tractive wind or water currents (Garzanti et al., 2008). The input values requested by the software are the sediment mean size, sorting, fluid type (seawater, freshwater, air) and standard sediment composition chosen from a given array including nine diverse tectonic settings. MinSORTING calculates the bulk sediment density and the settling velocity. The mean size of each single detrital component, assumed as lognormally-distributed, is calculated from its characteristic size-shift with respect to bulk sediment mean size, dependent in turn on its density and shape. The final output of MinSORTING is the distribution of each single detrital mineral in each size classes (at the chosen 0.25, 0.5 or 1 phi intervals). This allows geochronolgists to select the most suitable grain size of sediment to be sampled in the field, as well as the most representative size-window for analysis. Also, MinSORTING provides an estimate of the volume/weight of the fractions not considered in both sizes finer and coarser than the selected size-window. A beta version of the software is available upon request from: alberto.resentini@unimib.it Mange, M., and Wright, D. (eds), 2007. Heavy minerals in use. Developments in Sedimentology Series, 58. Elsevier, Amsterdam. Garzanti, E., Andò, S., Vezzoli, G., 2008. Settling-equivalence of detrital minerals and grain-size dependence of sediment composition. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 273, 138-151. von

  7. Recent advances in ionic polymer conductor composite materials as distributed nanosensors, nanoactuators, and artificial muscles (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2005-05-01

    Recent advances in ionic polymer conductor composites (IPCC) and ionic polymer metal composites (IPMC) as biomimetic distributed nanosensors, nanoactuators, nanotransducers and artificial muscles are briefly discussed in this paper. These advances include brief reproduction of some of these advances that appeared in a new book and a recent set of 4 review articles published in the International Journal of Smart Materials and Structures, advances in manufacturing, force optimization, modeling and simulation and new products developed by Environmental Robots Incorporated, as well as numerous potential applications using Ionic Polymer-Metal Composites (IPMC's) as distributed nanosensors, nanotransducers, nanoactuators and artificial muscles. It is certainly clear that the extent of applications of IPCC's and IPMC's go beyond the scope of this paper or the space allocated to this paper. However, this paper will present the breadth and the depth of all such applications of IPCC's and IPMC's as biomimetic robotic distributed nanosensors, nanoactuators, nanotransducers and artificial/synthetic muscles.

  8. Vertical distribution and composition of phytoplankton under the influence of an upper mixed layer.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, Alexei B; Rudolf, Lars; Blasius, Bernd

    2010-03-01

    The vertical distribution of phytoplankton is of fundamental importance for the dynamics and structure of aquatic communities. Here, using an advection-reaction-diffusion model, we investigate the distribution and competition of phytoplankton species in a water column, in which inverse resource gradients of light and a nutrient can limit growth of the biomass. This problem poses a challenge for ecologists, as the location of a production layer is not fixed, but rather depends on many internal parameters and environmental factors. In particular, we study the influence of an upper mixed layer (UML) in this system and show that it leads to a variety of dynamic effects: (i) Our model predicts alternative density profiles with a maximum of biomass either within or below the UML, thereby the system may be bistable or the relaxation from an unstable state may require a long-lasting transition. (ii) Reduced mixing in the deep layer can induce oscillations of the biomass; we show that a UML can sustain these oscillations even if the diffusivity is less than the critical mixing for a sinking phytoplankton population. (iii) A UML can strongly modify the outcome of competition between different phytoplankton species, yielding bistability both in the spatial distribution and in the species composition. (iv) A light limited species can obtain a competitive advantage if the diffusivity in the deep layers is reduced below a critical value. This yields a subtle competitive exclusion effect, where the oscillatory states in the deep layers are displaced by steady solutions in the UML. Finally, we present a novel graphical approach for deducing the competition outcome and for the analysis of the role of a UML in aquatic systems.

  9. Energy Analysis of Aluminosilicate Zeolites with Comprehensive Ranges of Framework Topologies, Chemical Compositions, and Aluminum Distributions.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Koki; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Okubo, Tatsuya

    2016-05-18

    The contents and locations of Al in the zeolite frameworks are one of the key factors determining the physicochemical properties of zeolites. Systematic evaluation of the characteristics of zeolites with a wide variety of framework topologies, a wide range of Si/Al ratios, and various locations of Al is of great significance, but very challenging due to the limitation of the realizable ranges of Al contents in zeolites as well as the limited information on the Al locations obtained from the current analytical techniques. Here, we report the systematic analysis of the energetics of aluminosilicate zeolites with 209 existing framework topologies at different Si/Al ratios using molecular mechanics. More than 43 000 initial structures were generated to give comprehensive views of the energetics of zeolites. The results coincide well with the structural knowledge obtained experimentally. It was revealed that the relation between the relative framework energies versus the Al contents varies in accordance with the topologies, suggesting that the relative stability of zeolites depends not only on the topologies, but also on the substituting contents of Al. For particular topologies with the same Al contents, in addition, comparisons between random and specific distributions of Al showed that zeolite with Al at a particular T site is energetically more stable than those with random distributions, suggesting the inherent influences of the Al locations. The contents and locations of Al in zeolites likely have a certain preference that may reflect the range of chemical compositions, the Al distributions, and consequently the physicochemical properties of realizable aluminosilicate zeolites. PMID:27097121

  10. Investigation of chloride induced corrosion of bridge pier and life-cycle repair cost analysis using fiber reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Dinesh

    Bridges are the long term investment of the highway agencies. To maintain the required service level throughout the life of a bridge, a series of maintenance, repair, and rehabilitation (MRℝ) works can be performed. To investigate the corrosion deterioration and maintenance and repair practices in the bridge pier columns constructed in chloride-laden environment, a questionnaire survey was conducted within the 50 state Departments of Transportation (DOTs). Based on the survey data, two corrosion deterioration phases were identified. They were corrosion crack initiation phase and corrosion propagation phase. The data showed that the mean corrosion crack initiation phase for bridge pier column having cover of 50 mm, 75 mm, and 100 mm was 18.9 years, 20.3 years, and 22.5 years, respectively. The corrosion propagation phase starts after the corrosion crack initiation. The corrosion propagation is defined in a single term, corrosion damage rate, measured as percentage of area damaged due to corrosion cracking, spalling, and delamination. From the survey, the corrosion damage rate was found 2.23% and 2.10% in the bridge pier columns exposed to deicing salt water and exposed to tidal splash/spray, respectively. For this study, two different corrosion damage rates were proposed before and after the repair criteria for minor damage repair as practiced by DOTs. This study also presents the collected data regarding the corrosion effectiveness of using sealers and coatings, cathodic protection, corrosion inhibitors, carbon fiber/epoxy composites, and glass fiber/epoxy composites as maintenance and repair technique. In this study, the cost-effectiveness of wrapping carbon fiber/epoxy composites and glass fiber/epoxy composites in bridge pier columns constructed in a chloride-laden environment was investigated by conducting life-cycle cost analysis. As a repair work, externally bonded two layer of carbon fiber/epoxy and glass fiber/epoxy composites were installed by wet

  11. Application of Distribution Transformer Thermal Life Models to Electrified Vehicle Charging Loads Using Monte-Carlo Method: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kuss, M.; Markel, T.; Kramer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrated purchasing patterns of plug-in vehicles may result in localized distribution transformer overload scenarios. Prolonged periods of transformer overloading causes service life decrements, and in worst-case scenarios, results in tripped thermal relays and residential service outages. This analysis will review distribution transformer load models developed in the IEC 60076 standard, and apply the model to a neighborhood with plug-in hybrids. Residential distribution transformers are sized such that night-time cooling provides thermal recovery from heavy load conditions during the daytime utility peak. It is expected that PHEVs will primarily be charged at night in a residential setting. If not managed properly, some distribution transformers could become overloaded, leading to a reduction in transformer life expectancy, thus increasing costs to utilities and consumers. A Monte-Carlo scheme simulated each day of the year, evaluating 100 load scenarios as it swept through the following variables: number of vehicle per transformer, transformer size, and charging rate. A general method for determining expected transformer aging rate will be developed, based on the energy needs of plug-in vehicles loading a residential transformer.

  12. Development of a fatigue-life methodology for composite structures subjected to out-of-plane load components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumich, Mark; Kedward, Keith T.

    1991-01-01

    The efforts to identify and implement a fatigue life methodology applicable to demonstrate delamination failures for use in certifying composite rotor blades are presented. The RSRA/X-Wing vehicle was a proof-of-concept stopped rotor aircraft configuration which used rotor blades primarily constructed of laminated carbon fiber. Delamination of the main spar during ground testing demonstrated that significant interlaminar stresses were produced. Analysis confirmed the presence of out-of-plane load components. The wear out (residual strength) methodology and the requirements for its implementation are discussed.

  13. Using and Distributing Spaceflight Data: The Johnson Space Center Life Sciences Data Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, J. A.; Buckey, J. C.; Turner, J. N.; White, T. S.; Havelka,J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Life sciences data collected before, during and after spaceflight are valuable and often irreplaceable. The Johnson Space Center Life is hard to find, and much of the data (e.g. Sciences Data Archive has been designed to provide researchers, engineers, managers and educators interactive access to information about and data from human spaceflight experiments. The archive system consists of a Data Acquisition System, Database Management System, CD-ROM Mastering System and Catalog Information System (CIS). The catalog information system is the heart of the archive. The CIS provides detailed experiment descriptions (both written and as QuickTime movies), hardware descriptions, hardware images, documents, and data. An initial evaluation of the archive at a scientific meeting showed that 88% of those who evaluated the catalog want to use the system when completed. The majority of the evaluators found the archive flexible, satisfying and easy to use. We conclude that the data archive effectively provides key life sciences data to interested users.

  14. Dependence of the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional graphite nanoplatelet-based composites on the nanoparticle size distribution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaobo; Ramesh, Palanisamy; Itkis, Mikhail E; Bekyarova, Elena; Haddon, Robert C

    2010-08-25

    We report the thermal conductivities of graphite nanoplatelet-epoxy composites prepared by exfoliation of natural graphite flakes of varying lateral sizes. We found that utilization of natural graphite flakes of the optimum lateral dimensions (∼200-400 µm) as a starting material for exfoliation significantly enhanced the thermal conductivity of the composite. In order to understand this enhancement we developed a procedure for evaluation of the particle size distribution of graphite nanoplatelets and correlated the measured distributions with the resulting thermal conductivities. In order to expand the scope of our study we applied our statistical and thermal analysis to commercially available graphite nanoplatelet materials.

  15. Comparative life cycle studies on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)-based composites as potential replacement for conventional petrochemical plastics.

    PubMed

    Pietrini, Matteo; Roes, Lex; Patel, Martin K; Chiellini, Emo

    2007-07-01

    A cradle-to-grave environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) of a few poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) based composites has been performed and was compared to commodity petrochemical polymers. The end products studied are a cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor housing (conventionally produced from high-impact polystyrene, HIPS) and the internal panels of an average car (conventionally produced from glass-fibers-filled polypropylene, PP-GF). The environmental impact is evaluated on the basis of nonrenewable energy use (NREU) and global warming potential over a 100 years time horizon (GWP100). Sugar cane bagasse (SCB) and nanoscaled organophilic montmorillonite (OMMT) are used as PHB fillers. The results obtained show that, despite the unsatisfying mechanical properties of PHB composites, depending on the type of filler and on the product, it is possible to reach lower environmental impacts than by use of conventional petrochemical polymers. These savings are mainly related to the PHB production process, while there are no improvements related to composites preparation. SCB-based composites seem to be environmentally superior to clay-based ones.

  16. Effect of hydrocolloids and emulsifiers on the shelf-life of composite cassava-maize-wheat bread after storage.

    PubMed

    Eduardo, Maria; Svanberg, Ulf; Ahrné, Lilia

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydrocolloids and/or emulsifiers on the shelf-life of composite cassava-maize-wheat (ratio 40:10:50) reference bread during storage. Added hydrocolloids were carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and high methoxyl pectin (HM pectin) at a 3% level (w/w) and/or the emulsifiers diacetyl tartaric acid esters of monoglycerides (DATEM), lecithin (LC), and monoglycerides (MG) at a 0.3% level (w/w). After 4 days of storage, composite breads with MG had comparatively lower crumb moisture while crumb density was similar in all breads. The reference bread crumb firmness was 33.4 N, which was reduced with an addition of DATEM (23.0 N), MG (29.8 N), CMC (24.6 N) or HM pectin (22.4 N). However, the CMC/DATEM, CMC/LC, and HM pectin/DATEM combinations further reduced crumb firmness to <20.0 N. The melting peak temperature was increased from 52 C to between 53.0 C and 57.0 C with added hydrocolloids and/or emulsifiers. The melting enthalpy of the retrograded amylopectin was lower in composite bread with hydrocolloids and emulsifiers, 6.7-11.0 J/g compared to 20.0 J/g for the reference bread. These results show that emulsifiers in combination with hydrocolloids can improve the quality and extend the shelf-life of composite cassava-maize-wheat breads. PMID:27386112

  17. A study of stiffness, residual strength and fatigue life relationships for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, J. T.; Crossman, F. W.

    1983-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative exploration of the relationship between stiffness, strength, fatigue life, residual strength, and damage of unnotched, graphite/epoxy laminates subjected to tension loading. Clarification of the mechanics of the tension loading is intended to explain previous contradictory observations and hypotheses; to develop a simple procedure to anticipate strength, fatigue life, and stiffness changes; and to provide reasons for the study of more complex cases of compression, notches, and spectrum fatigue loading. Mathematical models are developed based upon analysis of the damage states. Mathematical models were based on laminate analysis, free body type modeling or a strain energy release rate. Enough understanding of the tension loaded case is developed to allow development of a proposed, simple procedure for calculating strain to failure, stiffness, strength, data scatter, and shape of the stress-life curve for unnotched laminates subjected to tension load.

  18. Investigating the Composition and Conductance Distributions on Highly GeSi Mixed Quantum Dots and Inside Oxidation Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, F. F.; Ma, Y. J.; Lv, Y.; Jiang, Z. M.; Yang, X. J.

    2015-12-01

    With the help of a nanoscale trench, the composition and conductance distributions of single GeSi quantum dots (QDs) are obtained by conductive atomic force microscopy combined with selective chemical etching. However, the obtained composition and current distributions are unwonted and inconsistent on the QDs grown at 680 °C. With a series of confirmatory experiments, it is suggested that a thick oxide layer is formed and remains on the QDs' surface after etching. Though this selective chemical etching has already been widely applied to investigate the composition distribution of GeSi nanostructures, the oxidation problem has not been concerned yet. Our results indicate that the oxidation problem could not be ignored on highly GeSi mixed QDs. After removing the oxide layer, the composition and conductance distributions as well as their correlation are obtained. The results suggest that QDs' current distribution is mainly determined by the topographic shape, while the absolute current values are influenced by the Ge/Si contents.

  19. Application of composite flow laws to grain size distributions derived from polar ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Tobias; de Bresser, Hans; Jansen, Daniela; Weikusat, Ilka; Garbe, Christoph; Kipfstuhl, Sepp

    2014-05-01

    Apart from evaluating the crystallographic orientation, focus of microstructural analysis of natural ice during the last decades has been to create depth-profiles of mean grain size. Several ice flow models incorporated mean grain size as a variable. Although such a mean value may coincide well with the size of a large proportion of the grains, smaller/larger grains are effectively ignored. These smaller/larger grains, however, may affect the ice flow modeling. Variability in grain size is observed on centimeter, meter and kilometer scale along deep polar ice cores. Composite flow laws allow considering the effect of this variability on rheology, by weighing the contribution of grain-size-sensitive (GSS, diffusion/grain boundary sliding) and grain-size-insensitive (GSI, dislocation) creep mechanisms taking the full grain size distribution into account [1]. Extraction of hundreds of grain size distributions for different depths along an ice core has become relatively easy by automatic image processing techniques [2]. The shallow ice approximation is widely adopted in ice sheet modeling and approaches the full-Stokes solution for small ratios of vertical to horizontal characteristic dimensions. In this approximation shear stress in the vertical plain dominates the strain. This assumption is not applicable at ice divides or dome structures, where most deep ice core drilling sites are located. Within the upper two thirds of the ice column longitudinal stresses are not negligible and ice deformation is dominated by vertical strain. The Dansgaard-Johnsen model [3] predicts a dominating, constant vertical strain rate for the upper two thirds of the ice sheet, whereas in the lower ice column vertical shear becomes the main driver for ice deformation. We derived vertical strain rates from the upper NEEM ice core (North-West Greenland) and compared them to classical estimates of strain rates at the NEEM site. Assuming intervals of constant accumulation rates, we found a

  20. The plankton community in Norwegian coastal waters—abundance, composition, spatial distribution and diel variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratbak, Gunnar; Jacquet, Stéphan; Larsen, Aud; Pettersson, Lasse H.; Sazhin, Andrey F.; Thyrhaug, Runar

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the composition and variation of the pico-, nano- and micro-plankton communities in Norwegian coastal waters and Skagerrak, and the co-occurrence of bacteria and viruses. Samples were collected along three cruise transects from Jæren, Lista and Oksøy on the south coast of Norway and into the North Sea and Skagerrak. We also followed a drifting buoy for 55 h in Skagerrak in order to observe diel variations. Satellite ocean color images (SeaWiFS) of the chlorophyll a (chl a) distribution compared favorably to in situ measurements in open waters, while closer to the shore remote sensing chl a data was overestimated compared to the in situ data. Using light microscopy, we identified 49 micro- and 15 nanoplankton sized phototrophic forms as well as 40 micro- and 12 nanoplankton sized heterotrophic forms. The only picoeukaryote (0.2-2.0 μm) we identified was Resultor micron (Pedinophyceae ). Along the transects a significant variation in the distribution and abundance of different plankton forms were observed, with Synechococcus spp and autotrophic picoeukaryotes as the most notable examples. There was no correlation between viruses and chl a, but between viruses and bacteria, and between viruses and some of the phytoplankton groups, especially the picoeukaryotes. Moreover, there was a negative correlation between nutrients and small viruses (Low Fluorescent Viruses) but a positive correlation between nutrients and large viruses (High Fluorescent Viruses). The abundance of autotrophic picoplankton, bacteria and viruses showed a diel variation in surface waters with higher values around noon and late at night and lower values in the evening. Synechococcus spp were found at 20 m depth 25-45 nautical miles from shore apparently forming a bloom that stretched out for more than 100 nautical miles from Skagerrak and up the south west coast of Norway. The different methods used for assessing abundance, distribution and

  1. Early life history and spatiotemporal changes in distribution of the rediscovered Suwannee moccasinshell Medionidus walkeri (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Nathan A.; Mcleod, John; Holcomb, Jordan; Rowe, Matthew T.; Williams, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate distribution data are critical to the development of conservation and management strategies for imperiled species, particularly for narrow endemics with life history traits that make them vulnerable to extinction. Medionidus walkeri is a rare freshwater mussel endemic to the Suwannee River Basin in southeastern North America. This species was rediscovered in 2012 after a 16-year hiatus between collections and is currently proposed for listing under the Endangered Species Act. Our study fills knowledge gaps regarding changes in distribution and early life history requirements of M. walkeri. Spatiotemporal changes in M. walkeri distribution were displayed using a conservation status assessment map incorporating metadata from 98 historical (1916–1999) and 401 recent (2000–2015) site surveys from museums and field notes representing records for 312 specimens. Recent surveys detected M. walkeri only in the middle Suwannee subbasin (n = 86, 22 locations) and lower Santa Fe subbasin (n = 2, 2 locations), and it appears the species may be extirpated from 67% of historically occupied 10-digit HUCs. In our laboratory experiments, M. walkeri successfully metamorphosed onPercina nigrofasciata (56.2% ± 8.9) and Etheostoma edwini (16.1% ± 7.9) but not on Trinectes maculatus, Lepomis marginatus, Notropis texanus, Noturus leptacanthus, Etheostoma fusiforme, orGambusia holbrooki. We characterize M. walkeri as a lure-displaying host fish specialist and a long-term brooder (bradytictic), gravid from fall to early summer of the following year. The early life history and distribution data presented here provide the baseline framework for listing decisions and future efforts to conserve and recover the species.

  2. Assessing Historical Fish Community Composition Using Surveys, Historical Collection Data, and Species Distribution Models

    PubMed Central

    Labay, Ben; Cohen, Adam E.; Sissel, Blake; Hendrickson, Dean A.; Martin, F. Douglas; Sarkar, Sahotra

    2011-01-01

    Accurate establishment of baseline conditions is critical to successful management and habitat restoration. We demonstrate the ability to robustly estimate historical fish community composition and assess the current status of the urbanized Barton Creek watershed in central Texas, U.S.A. Fish species were surveyed in 2008 and the resulting data compared to three sources of fish occurrence information: (i) historical records from a museum specimen database and literature searches; (ii) a nearly identical survey conducted 15 years earlier; and (iii) a modeled historical community constructed with species distribution models (SDMs). This holistic approach, and especially the application of SDMs, allowed us to discover that the fish community in Barton Creek was more diverse than the historical data and survey methods alone indicated. Sixteen native species with high modeled probability of occurrence within the watershed were not found in the 2008 survey, seven of these were not found in either survey or in any of the historical collection records. Our approach allowed us to more rigorously establish the true baseline for the pre-development fish fauna and then to more accurately assess trends and develop hypotheses regarding factors driving current fish community composition to better inform management decisions and future restoration efforts. Smaller, urbanized freshwater systems, like Barton Creek, typically have a relatively poor historical biodiversity inventory coupled with long histories of alteration, and thus there is a propensity for land managers and researchers to apply inaccurate baseline standards. Our methods provide a way around that limitation by using SDMs derived from larger and richer biodiversity databases of a broader geographic scope. Broadly applied, we propose that this technique has potential to overcome limitations of popular bioassessment metrics (e.g., IBI) to become a versatile and robust management tool for determining status of

  3. [Composition, abundance and distribution of populations of commercially important gastropods in La Guajira, Colombian Caribbean].

    PubMed

    Nieto-Bernal, Ramón; Luis, Chasqui; Rodriguez, Angélica María; Castro, Erick; Gil-Agudelo, Diego L

    2013-06-01

    In the continental Colombian Caribbean the conch resource exploitation and the status of snails populations has been poorly studied, which are reflected in the lack of fisheries management. This study assesses composition, population density and distribution of the gastropods species that make conch resource in La Guajira region. Underwater visual censuses for snails were performed between September-November 2009 in 145100x4m (400m2) transects, spanning a total area of 56920m2 between Riohacha and Cabo de la Vela. The study was complemented with the evaluation of composition, abundance and size of gastropods conch found in the discarded-by-fishermen shell mounds in 13 beaches. In October 2010 another 40 transects were evaluated (16 000 m2) from the Southern of Riohacha to the Camarones village (La Guajira). We found a total of 9911 snails belonging to 12 species, the most abundant being Strombus pugilis with 8 912 individuals and an average density of 1 538.4 +/- 3 662.6 ind./ha, followed by Vasum muricatum with 374 individuals and an average density of 51.8 +/- 91.2 ind./ha. Calculating the importance value index (IVI) for both living organisms as the empty shells on beaches, shows that Turbinella angulata is the most used species by artisanal fishermen in the region. Cassis madagascariensis and Cassis tuberosa are also important snail resources in the region (as suggested by the number of empty shells found in beaches), but its densities were low. Strombus gigas, with only three living organisms found in the area, presented the lowest abundance ever found in the Colombian Caribbean (0.52 +/- 3.6 ind./ha), showing that queen conch population in La Guajira cannot support commercial exploitation. The abundance of discarded S. gigas shells on beaches suggests resource exploitation in the recent past. Results remarks the urgency of implementing management plans for snail fisheries in the region.

  4. Composition and distribution of sublittoral zoobenthos in Kemskaya Bay of the White Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisenko, N. V.

    2009-12-01

    Data on the distribution of the zoobenthos in Kemskaya Bay (the Kem’ River estuary and the White Sea), which is subject to the strong influence of the river discharge, are presented. The number of species at the sampling stations varied from 4 to 65. The density of the communities and the zoobenthos biomass ranged from 342 ± 68 to 4293 ± 96 ind./m2 and from 0.418 ± 0.081 to 1975.22 ± 494.36 g/m2, respectively. The Shannon index values varied between 1.19 to 4.7 bit/ind. At the upper part of the estuary, detritivores dominated, while, in the central part and at outlets, sestonophages prevailed. The changes in the quantitative indices of the zoobenthos along the gradient of the water salinity were traced, and the relations of these indices with seven more environmental factors were revealed. It was found that the species composition, the biodiversity, and the trophic structure of the zoobenthos significantly correlate with some of the above mentioned parameters. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess the combined effect of the factors, and it revealed which of them play a determining role in Kemskaya Bay: for the species composition, these are the depth, the water color, and the content of total suspended matter; for the number, these are the contents of pelite and Corg in the bottom sediments. The biomass depends on the water salinity, the water chromaticity, and the Corg contents in the sediments and suspended matter. The Shannon index value is determined by the water color, the Corg contents in the sediments, and the pelite content. The calculations of the ecological stress values revealed two zones with an unstable state of the zoobenthos.

  5. [Composition, abundance and distribution of populations of commercially important gastropods in La Guajira, Colombian Caribbean].

    PubMed

    Nieto-Bernal, Ramón; Luis, Chasqui; Rodriguez, Angélica María; Castro, Erick; Gil-Agudelo, Diego L

    2013-06-01

    In the continental Colombian Caribbean the conch resource exploitation and the status of snails populations has been poorly studied, which are reflected in the lack of fisheries management. This study assesses composition, population density and distribution of the gastropods species that make conch resource in La Guajira region. Underwater visual censuses for snails were performed between September-November 2009 in 145100x4m (400m2) transects, spanning a total area of 56920m2 between Riohacha and Cabo de la Vela. The study was complemented with the evaluation of composition, abundance and size of gastropods conch found in the discarded-by-fishermen shell mounds in 13 beaches. In October 2010 another 40 transects were evaluated (16 000 m2) from the Southern of Riohacha to the Camarones village (La Guajira). We found a total of 9911 snails belonging to 12 species, the most abundant being Strombus pugilis with 8 912 individuals and an average density of 1 538.4 +/- 3 662.6 ind./ha, followed by Vasum muricatum with 374 individuals and an average density of 51.8 +/- 91.2 ind./ha. Calculating the importance value index (IVI) for both living organisms as the empty shells on beaches, shows that Turbinella angulata is the most used species by artisanal fishermen in the region. Cassis madagascariensis and Cassis tuberosa are also important snail resources in the region (as suggested by the number of empty shells found in beaches), but its densities were low. Strombus gigas, with only three living organisms found in the area, presented the lowest abundance ever found in the Colombian Caribbean (0.52 +/- 3.6 ind./ha), showing that queen conch population in La Guajira cannot support commercial exploitation. The abundance of discarded S. gigas shells on beaches suggests resource exploitation in the recent past. Results remarks the urgency of implementing management plans for snail fisheries in the region. PMID:23885583

  6. Life-history- and ecosystem-driven variation in composition and residence pattern of seabream species (Perciformes: Sparidae) in two Mediterranean coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    Species composition and length-frequency distributions of six sparid fish species were investigated in two central Mediterranean coastal lagoons off the western coast of Italy: Fogliano and Caprolace. In the former, the sparid fauna was dominated by the gilt-head seabream (Sparus aurata), whereas in Caprolace, species composition was more homogeneous across all six species. Size structure varied considerably among species: S. aurata, Diplodus puntazzo and Diplodus vulgaris had a single-cohort structure in both lagoons, whereas in Diplodus annularis and Diplodus sargus at least two cohorts were identified. In Lithognathus mormyrus inter-lagoon variation was detected, with a single-cohort structure in Fogliano and a two-cohort structure in Caprolace. While inter-specific differences can be explained by variation in life-history strategies among species, intra-specific variation in L. mormyrus is likely to be determined by the known differences between the two habitats: Fogliano being a more confined lagoon, and Caprolace more extensively influenced by the sea. PMID:16266729

  7. Supporting Distributed Team Working in 3D Virtual Worlds: A Case Study in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minocha, Shailey; Morse, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study into how a three-dimensional (3D) virtual world (Second Life) can facilitate socialisation and team working among students working on a team project at a distance. This models the situation in many commercial sectors where work is increasingly being conducted across time zones and between…

  8. Transverse Tension Fatigue Life Characterization Through Flexure Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The transverse tension fatigue life of S2/8552 glass-epoxy and IM7/8552 carbon-epoxy was characterized using flexure tests of 90-degree laminates loaded in 3-point and 4-point bending. The influence of specimen polishing and specimen configuration on transverse tension fatigue life was examined using the glass-epoxy laminates. Results showed that 90-degree bend specimens with polished machined edges and polished tension-side surfaces, where bending failures where observed, had lower fatigue lives than unpolished specimens when cyclically loaded at equal stress levels. The influence of specimen thickness and the utility of a Weibull scaling law was examined using the carbon-epoxy laminates. The influence of test frequency on fatigue results was also documented for the 4-point bending configuration. A Weibull scaling law was used to predict the 4-point bending fatigue lives from the 3-point bending curve fit and vice-versa. Scaling was performed based on maximum cyclic stress level as well as fatigue life. The scaling laws based on stress level shifted the curve fit S-N characterizations in the desired direction, however, the magnitude of the shift was not adequate to accurately predict the fatigue lives. Furthermore, the scaling law based on fatigue life shifted the curve fit S-N characterizations in the opposite direction from measured values. Therefore, these scaling laws were not adequate for obtaining accurate predictions of the transverse tension fatigue lives.

  9. Metabolic bacterial genes and the construction of high-level composite lineages of life.

    PubMed

    Méheust, Raphaël; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Understanding how major organismal lineages originated is fundamental for understanding processes by which life evolved. Major evolutionary transitions, like eukaryogenesis, merging genetic material from distantly related organisms, are rare events, hence difficult ones to explain causally. If most archaeal lineages emerged after massive acquisitions of bacterial genes, a rule however arises: metabolic bacterial genes contributed to all major evolutionary transitions.

  10. Experimental Investigation of the Shuttle Transportation System Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels for Stress Rupture Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Nathanael; Saulsberry, Regor; Yoder, Tommy; Forsyth, Brad; Carillo, Marlene; Thesken, John

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing stress rupture testing on Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) is shown. The topics include: 1) Purpose for Testing; 2) NASA WSTF COPV Test Program; 3) NASA WSTF Test Facilities; 4) COPV Impact Study; 5) Fluids Compatibility Testing; 6) Stress Rupture Testing; and 7) COPV Lifting.

  11. Nanostructured Carbon/Antimony Composites as Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries with Long Life.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yong; Yi, Zheng; Wang, Chunli; Wang, Lidong; Wu, Yaoming; Wang, Limin

    2016-08-01

    A series of nanostructured carbon/antimony composites have been successfully synthesized by a simple sol-gel, high-temperature carbon thermal reduction process. In the carbon/antimony composites, antimony nanoparticles are homogeneously dispersed in the pyrolyzed nanoporous carbon matrix. As an anode material for lithium-ion batteries, the C/Sb10 composite displays a high initial discharge capacity of 1214.6 mAh g(-1) and a reversible charge capacity of 595.5 mAh g(-1) with a corresponding coulombic efficiency of 49 % in the first cycle. In addition, it exhibits a high reversible discharge capacity of 466.2 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1) after 200 cycles and a high rate discharge capacity of 354.4 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 1000 mA g(-1) . The excellent cycling stability and rate discharge performance of the C/Sb10 composite could be due to the uniform dispersion of antimony nanoparticles in the porous carbon matrix, which can buffer the volume expansion and maintain the integrity of the electrode during the charge-discharge cycles. PMID:27310879

  12. Life on the boundary: Environmental factors as drivers of habitat distribution in the littoral zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cefalì, Maria Elena; Cebrian, Emma; Chappuis, Eglantine; Pinedo, Susana; Terradas, Marc; Mariani, Simone; Ballesteros, Enric

    2016-04-01

    The boundary between land and sea, i.e. the littoral zone, is home to a large number of habitats whose distribution is primarily driven by the distance to the sea level but also by other environmental factors such as littoral's geomorphological features, wave exposure, water temperature or orientation. Here we explore the relative importance of those major environmental factors that drive the presence of littoral rocky habitats along 1100 Km of Catalonia's shoreline (Spain, NW Mediterranean) by using Geographic Information Systems and Generalized Linear Models. The distribution of mediolittoral and upper infralittoral habitats responded to different environmental factors. Mediolittoral habitats showed regional differences drawn by sea-water temperature and substrate type. Wave exposure (hydrodynamism), slope and geological features were only relevant to those mediolittoral habitats with specific environmental needs. We did not find any regional pattern of distribution in upper infralittoral habitats, and selected factors only played a moderate role in habitat distribution at the local scale. This study shows for the first time that environmental factors determining habitat distribution differ within the mediolittoral and the upper infralittoral zones and provides the basis for further development of models oriented at predicting the distribution of littoral marine habitats.

  13. The inner magnetosphere ion composition and local time distribution over a solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, C. G.

    2016-03-01

    Using the Cluster/Composition and Distribution Function (CODIF) analyzer data set from 2001 to 2013, a full solar cycle, we determine the ion distributions for H+, He+, and O+ in the inner magnetosphere (L < 12) over the energy range 40 eV to 40 keV as a function magnetic local time, solar EUV (F10.7), and geomagnetic activity (Kp). Concentrating on L = 6-7 for comparison with previous studies at geosynchronous orbit, we determine both the average flux at 90° pitch angle and the pitch angle anisotropy as a function of energy and magnetic local time. We clearly see the minimum in the H+ spectrum that results from the competition between eastward and westward drifts. The feature is weaker in O+ and He+, leading to higher O+/H+ and He+/H+ ratios in the affected region, and also to a higher pitch angle anisotropy, both features expected from the long-term effects of charge exchange. We also determine how the nightside L = 6-7 densities and temperatures vary with geomagnetic activity (Kp) and solar EUV (F10.7). Consistent with other studies, we find that the O+ density and relative abundance increase significantly with both Kp and F10.7. He+ density increases with F10.7, but not significantly with Kp. The temperatures of all species decrease with increasing F10.7. The O+ and He+ densities increase from L = 12 to L ~ 3-4, both absolutely and relative to H+, and then drop off sharply. The results give a comprehensive view of the inner magnetosphere using a contiguous long-term data set that supports much of the earlier work from GEOS, ISEE, Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers, and Polar from previous solar cycles.

  14. Particle number concentration, size distribution and chemical composition during haze and photochemical smog episodes in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Chen, Jianmin; Cheng, Tiantao; Zhang, Renyi; Wang, Xinming

    2014-09-01

    The aerosol number concentration and size distribution as well as size-resolved particle chemical composition were measured during haze and photochemical smog episodes in Shanghai in 2009. The number of haze days accounted for 43%, of which 30% was severe (visibility<2km) and moderate (2km≤visibility<3km) haze, mainly distributed in winter and spring. The mean particle number concentration was about 17,000/cm(3) in haze, more than 2 times that in clean days. The greatest increase of particle number concentration was in 0.5-1μm and 1-10μm size fractions during haze events, about 17.78 times and 8.78 times those of clean days. The largest increase of particle number concentration was within 50-100nm and 100-200nm fractions during photochemical smog episodes, about 5.89 times and 4.29 times those of clean days. The particle volume concentration and surface concentration in haze, photochemical smog and clean days were 102, 49, 15μm(3)/cm(3) and 949, 649, 206μm(2)/cm(3), respectively. As haze events got more severe, the number concentration of particles smaller than 50nm decreased, but the particles of 50-200nm and 0.5-1μm increased. The diurnal variation of particle number concentration showed a bimodal pattern in haze days. All soluble ions were increased during haze events, of which NH4(+), SO4(2-) and NO3(-) increased greatly, followed by Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Cl(-). These ions were very different in size-resolved particles during haze and photochemical smog episodes.

  15. The microscopic state of the solar wind: Links between composition, velocity distributions, waves and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsch, E.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of the microscopic state of the solar wind with emphasis on recent Ulysses high-latitude observations and previous Helios in-ecliptic observations. The possible links between composition, ionization state. velocity distribution functions of electrons, protons and heavy ions. kinetic plasma waves and MHD-scale turbulence are elaborated. Emphasis is placed on a connection of interplanetary kinetic-scale phenomena with their generating microscopic processes in the corona. The fast streams seem to consist of mesoscale pressure-balanced plasma filaments and magnetic flux tubes, reminiscent of the supergranular-size structures building the open corona, from which copious Alfven waves emanate. The wind from the magnetically structured and active corona shows developed compressive turbulence and considerable abundance and ionization state variations. Some modelling attempts to explain the observed element fractionation are briefly reviewed. The causes of the nonthermal particle features. such as proton-ion differential streaming, ion beams. temperature anisotropies, and skewed distributions associated with collisionless heat conduction, are ultimately to be searched in the fact, that the corona is never quiescent but fundamentally variable in space and time. Consequently, the radial evolution of the internal state of the wind resembles at all latitudes a complicated relaxation process, in the course of which the free (in comparison with LTE conditions) particle kinetic energy is converted into plasma waves and MHD turbulence on a wide range of scales. This leads to intermittent wave-particle interactions and unsteady anomalous transport, mixed with the weak effects of the rare Coulomb collisions. Spherical expansion and large-scale inhomogeneity forces the wind to attain microscopically a complex internal state of dynamic statistical equilibrium.

  16. Distribution and species composition of juvenile and adult scombropids (Teleostei, Scombropidae) in Japanese coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Itoi, S; Odaka, J; Yuasa, K; Akeno, S; Nakajima, A; Suenaga, A; Noda, T; Akimoto, S; Myojin, T; Ikeda, Y; Masuda, Y; Takai, N; Yoshihara, K; Sugita, H

    2010-02-01

    Two scombropid fishes, Scombrops boops and Scombrops gilberti, are closely related and commercially important species in Japan. These species are often confused in commercial markets because of their morphological similarity. In this study, scombropid specimens collected from various Japanese coastal waters were subjected to polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene in mitochondrial DNA. These analyses showed that all the scombropid specimens collected from localities in the Sea of Japan were identified as S. boops, whereas those from the Pacific Ocean included two species, S. boops and S. gilberti. Almost all juvenile (<200 mm standard body length, S(L)) S. gilberti originated from the Pacific coastal waters of the northern Japan, whereas adults (>400 mm S(L)) were found only in deep water off the Izu Peninsula to the Izu Islands. This suggests that S. gilberti might migrate extensively during its life cycle. In addition, differences in the number of specimens and the distribution between the two species suggest that S. gilberti is less abundant than S. boops in Japanese waters.

  17. Unequally distributed psychological assets: are there social disparities in optimism, life satisfaction, and positive affect?

    PubMed

    Boehm, Julia K; Chen, Ying; Williams, David R; Ryff, Carol; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomic status is associated with health disparities, but underlying psychosocial mechanisms have not been fully identified. Dispositional optimism may be a psychosocial process linking socioeconomic status with health. We hypothesized that lower optimism would be associated with greater social disadvantage and poorer social mobility. We also investigated whether life satisfaction and positive affect showed similar patterns. Participants from the Midlife in the United States study self-reported their optimism, satisfaction, positive affect, and socioeconomic status (gender, race/ethnicity, education, occupational class and prestige, income). Social disparities in optimism were evident. Optimistic individuals tended to be white and highly educated, had an educated parent, belonged to higher occupational classes with more prestige, and had higher incomes. Findings were generally similar for satisfaction, but not positive affect. Greater optimism and satisfaction were also associated with educational achievement across generations. Optimism and life satisfaction are consistently linked with socioeconomic advantage and may be one conduit by which social disparities influence health.

  18. Effect of sulfate on the transformation of corrosion scale composition and bacterial community in cast iron water distribution pipes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The stability of iron corrosion products and the bacterial composition of biofilm in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) could have great impact on the water safety at the consumer ends. In this work, pipe loops were setup to investigate the transformation characteristics ...

  19. Composition and distribution of bacteria in an operating rainwater harvesting tank.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mikyeong; Han, Mooyoung

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the phylogenetic distribution of the bacteria present in an operating rainwater tank by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and compared the bacterial composition in rainwater and biofilm from the inlet and outlet of the tank. Seventeen species were identified, the DGGE profiles of which showed a clear difference between the planktonic bacterial community and the community in the biofilm. Most of the bacteria were closely related to fresh water, soil, and biofilm bacteria found in natural environments. The high proportion of Proteobacteria indicates the generally clean oligotrophic nature of the tank water. Biofilm formation is an advantage for bacteria that exist in oligotrophic environments. The groups identified in the biofilm, such as Sphingomonas, Bacillus, and Sphingophyxis, have been demonstrated to degrade certain contaminants and to act as bio-control agents. Thus, biofilm formation in rainwater tanks not only represents a survival strategy for bacteria, but also serves as a natural filter by removing contaminants and bacteria from rainwater.

  20. New Method for Determining the Elemental Composition and Distribution in Semiconductor Core-Shell Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Zorn, Gilad; Dave, Shivang R.; Gao, Xiaohu; Castner, David G.

    2011-01-01

    In the biological sciences the use of core-shell quantum dots (QDs) has gained wide usage, but analytical challenges still exist for characterizing the QD structure. The application of energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to bulk materials is relatively straightforward, however, for meaningful applications of surface science techniques to multilayer nanoparticles requires novel modifications and analysis methods. To experimentally characterize the elemental composition and distribution in CdSe/CdS/ZnS QDs, we first develop a XPS signal subtraction technique capable of separating the overlapped selenium 3s (core) and sulfur 2s (shell) peaks (both peaks have binding energies near 230eV) with higher precision than is typically reported in the nanoparticle literature. This method is valid for any nanoparticle containing selenium and sulfur. Then we apply a correction formula to the XPS data and determine that the 2 nm stoichiometric CdSe core is surrounded by 2 CdS layers and a stoichimetric ZnS monolayer. These findings and the multi-approach methodology represent a significant advancement in the detailed surface science study of multi-layer nanoparticles. In agreement with recent surprising findings, the time-of-flight secondary mass spectrometry measurements suggest that the surface sites of the QDs used in this study are primarily covered with a mixture of octadecylphosphonic acid and trioctylphophine oxide. PMID:21226467

  1. Distribution and size composition of the arctic lamprey Lethenteron camtschaticum in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. M.; Baitalyuk, A. A.; Pelenev, D. V.

    2014-03-01

    Results of the long-term study of the spatial and vertical distribution of the parasitic anadromous Arctic lamprey Lethenteron camtschaticum (Tilesius, 1811) (Petromyzontidae) in the North Pacific and data on its size composition are given. This species is most frequent in the northwestern Sea of Japan and the western Bering Sea. The maximum concentrations are noted in waters of southern Primorye, southwestern Sakhalin, the northwestern part of the Sea of Okhotsk, and the northern part of the Bering Sea, which is probably explained by the increased number of its victims, Pacific salmon. Near the bottom, Pacific lampreys are extremely few and are primarily encountered at depths less that 400 m, and in the Pelagic zone, in the 100-m layer. The catches have contained Arctic lampreys having a total length of 15-79 cm. The lampreys of several size groups in the catches may indicate that L. camtschaticum spends not less than four years in the sea. No relationship has been found between the body length and the capture depth. Analyzed are the relationships between the body length and weight and the body length and the condition factor. The seasonal dynamics of these indices are considered.

  2. Cosmopolitan distribution of the large composite microbial mat spirochete, Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Navarrete, A.; Sole, M.

    1998-01-01

    Inocula from organic-rich black muds immediately underlying intertidal laminated microbial mats dominated by Microcoleus chthonoplastes yielded large, variable diameter spirochetes. These unusual spirochetes, previously reported only from the Alfacs Peninsula at the delta of the Ebro river in northeast Spain, contain striking arrays of cytoplasmic granules packed into their protoplasmic cylinders. On several occasions, both in summer and winter, the huge spirochetes were recognized in samples from mats growing in the Sippewissett salt marsh at Woods Hole Massachusetts. They were also seen in similar samples from microbial mats at North Pond, Laguna Figueroa, Baja California Norte, Mexico. The identity of these spirochetes was confirmed by electron microscopy: number and disposition of flagella, composite structure, measurements of their distinctive cytoplasmic granules. The granules, larger, more conspicuous and present in addition to ribosomes, are hypothesized to contain ATPases. As culture conditions worsen, these spirochetes retract into membrane-bounded round bodies in which they form refractile inclusions. From morphology and behavior we conclude the North American spirochetes from both Atlantic and Pacific intertidal microbial mats are indistinguishable from those at the delta of the Ebro river. We conclude a cosmopolitan distribution for Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi.

  3. Species Composition and Distribution of Adult Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae) in Panama

    PubMed Central

    LOAIZA, J. R.; BERMINGHAM, E.; SCOTT, M. E.; ROVIRA, J. R.; CONN, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae) species composition and distribution were studied using human landing catch data over a 35-yr period in Panama. Mosquitoes were collected from 77 sites during 228 field trips carried out by members of the National Malaria Eradication Service. Fourteen Anopheles species were identified. The highest average human biting rates were recorded from Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) albimanus (Wiedemann) (9.8 bites/person/night) and Anopheles (Anopheles) punctimacula (Dyar and Knab) (6.2 bites/person/night). These two species were also the most common, present in 99.1 and 74.9%, respectively, of the sites. Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) aquasalis (Curry) was encountered mostly in the indigenous Kuna Yala Comarca along the eastern Atlantic coast, where malaria case history and average human biting rate (9.3 bites/person/night) suggest a local role in malaria transmission. An. albimanus, An. punctimacula, and Anopheles (Anopheles) vestitipennis (Dyar and Knab) were more abundant during the rainy season (May–December), whereas An. aquasalis was more abundant in the dry season (January–April). Other vector species collected in this study were Anopheles (Kerteszia) neivai (Howard, Dyar, and Knab) and Anopheles (Anopheles) pseudopunctipennis s.l. (Theobald). High diversity of Anopheles species and six confirmed malaria vectors in endemic areas of Panama emphasize the need for more detailed studies to better understand malaria transmission dynamics. PMID:18826025

  4. Composition and distribution of bacteria in an operating rainwater harvesting tank.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mikyeong; Han, Mooyoung

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the phylogenetic distribution of the bacteria present in an operating rainwater tank by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and compared the bacterial composition in rainwater and biofilm from the inlet and outlet of the tank. Seventeen species were identified, the DGGE profiles of which showed a clear difference between the planktonic bacterial community and the community in the biofilm. Most of the bacteria were closely related to fresh water, soil, and biofilm bacteria found in natural environments. The high proportion of Proteobacteria indicates the generally clean oligotrophic nature of the tank water. Biofilm formation is an advantage for bacteria that exist in oligotrophic environments. The groups identified in the biofilm, such as Sphingomonas, Bacillus, and Sphingophyxis, have been demonstrated to degrade certain contaminants and to act as bio-control agents. Thus, biofilm formation in rainwater tanks not only represents a survival strategy for bacteria, but also serves as a natural filter by removing contaminants and bacteria from rainwater. PMID:21508560

  5. Bacterial composition in a metropolitan drinking water distribution system utilizing different source waters.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Humrighouse, Ben W; Revetta, Randy P; Santo Domingo, Jorge W

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the bacterial composition of water samples from two service areas within a drinking water distribution system (DWDS), each associated with a different primary source of water (groundwater, GW; surface water, SW) and different treatment process. Community analysis based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicated that Actinobacteria (Mycobacterium spp.) and α-Proteobacteria represented nearly 43 and 38% of the total sequences, respectively. Sequences closely related to Legionella, Pseudomonas, and Vibrio spp. were also identified. In spite of the high number of sequences (71%) shared in both areas, multivariable analysis revealed significant differences between the GW and SW areas. While the dominant phylotypes where not significantly contributing in the ordination of samples, the populations associated with the core of phylotypes (1-10% in each sample) significantly contributed to the differences between both service areas. Diversity indices indicate that the microbial community inhabiting the SW area is more diverse and contains more distantly related species coexisting with local assemblages as compared with the GW area. The bacterial community structure of SW and GW service areas were dissimilar, suggesting that their respective source water and/or water quality parameters shaped by the treatment processes may contribute to the differences in community structure observed.

  6. Affixation in semantic space: Modeling morpheme meanings with compositional distributional semantics.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Marco; Baroni, Marco

    2015-07-01

    The present work proposes a computational model of morpheme combination at the meaning level. The model moves from the tenets of distributional semantics, and assumes that word meanings can be effectively represented by vectors recording their co-occurrence with other words in a large text corpus. Given this assumption, affixes are modeled as functions (matrices) mapping stems onto derived forms. Derived-form meanings can be thought of as the result of a combinatorial procedure that transforms the stem vector on the basis of the affix matrix (e.g., the meaning of nameless is obtained by multiplying the vector of name with the matrix of -less). We show that this architecture accounts for the remarkable human capacity of generating new words that denote novel meanings, correctly predicting semantic intuitions about novel derived forms. Moreover, the proposed compositional approach, once paired with a whole-word route, provides a new interpretative framework for semantic transparency, which is here partially explained in terms of ease of the combinatorial procedure and strength of the transformation brought about by the affix. Model-based predictions are in line with the modulation of semantic transparency on explicit intuitions about existing words, response times in lexical decision, and morphological priming. In conclusion, we introduce a computational model to account for morpheme combination at the meaning level. The model is data-driven, theoretically sound, and empirically supported, and it makes predictions that open new research avenues in the domain of semantic processing. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26120909

  7. Simple Sequence Repeats in Escherichia coli: Abundance, Distribution, Composition, and Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Gur-Arie, Riva; Cohen, Cyril J.; Eitan, Yuval; Shelef, Leora; Hallerman, Eric M.; Kashi, Yechezkel

    2000-01-01

    Computer-based genome-wide screening of the DNA sequence of Escherichia coli strain K12 revealed tens of thousands of tandem simple sequence repeat (SSR) tracts, with motifs ranging from 1 to 6 nucleotides. SSRs were well distributed throughout the genome. Mononucleotide SSRs were over-represented in noncoding regions and under-represented in open reading frames (ORFs). Nucleotide composition of mono- and dinucleotide SSRs, both in ORFs and in noncoding regions, differed from that of the genomic region in which they occurred, with 93% of all mononucleotide SSRs proving to be of A or T. Computer-based analysis of the fine position of every SSR locus in the noncoding portion of the genome relative to downstream ORFs showed SSRs located in areas that could affect gene regulation. DNA sequences at 14 arbitrarily chosen SSR tracts were compared among E. coli strains. Polymorphisms of SSR copy number were observed at four of seven mononucleotide SSR tracts screened, with all polymorphisms occurring in noncoding regions. SSR polymorphism could prove important as a genome-wide source of variation, both for practical applications (including rapid detection, strain identification, and detection of loci affecting key phenotypes) and for evolutionary adaptation of microbes.[The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession numbers AF209020–209030 and AF209508–209518.] PMID:10645951

  8. [Differential physical growth during the first years of life. III. Body composition].

    PubMed

    Rosales-López, A; Martínez-Meza, A; Sánchez-Aguilar, G; Chávez-Rojas, G; Guízar-Vázquez, J

    1992-12-01

    The present article report the results of longitudinally research, on growth children, of both sex and ages from 0 to 1 year of extrauterine life. We obtained measures that appraisal the muscular and fat tissues: upper arm and leg circumferences; muscle and fat of upper arm areas; triceps, subscapular and supra-iliac skinfolds. Moreover, we report relationship dates between weight and stature, which is a good indicator for morphological body equilibrium.

  9. Fatigue, fracture, and life prediction criteria for composite materials in magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, F.M.G.

    1990-06-01

    An explosively-bonded copper/Inconel 718/copper laminate conductor was proposed to withstand the severe face compression stresses in the central core of the Alcator C-MOD tokamak toroidal field (TF) magnet. Due to the severe duty of the TF magnet, it is critical that an accurate estimate of useful life be determined. As part of the effort to formulate an appropriate life prediction, fatigue crack growth experiments were performed on the laminate as well as its components. Metallographic evaluation of the laminate interface revealed many shear bands in the Inconel 718. Shear bands and shear band cracks were produced in the Inconel 718 as a result of the explosion bonding process. These shear bands were shown to have a detrimental effect on the crack growth behavior of the laminate, by significantly reducing the load carrying capability of the reinforcement layer and providing for easy crack propagation paths. Fatigue crack growth rate was found not only to be dependent on temperature but also on orientation. Fatigue cracks grew faster in directions which contained shear bands in the plane of the propagating crack. Fractography showed crack advancement by fatigue cracking in the Inconel 718 and ductile tearing of the copper at the interface. However, further away from the interfaces, the copper exhibited fatigue striations indicating that cracks were now propagating by fatigue. Laminate life prediction results showed a strong dependence on shear band orientation, and exhibited little variation between room temperature and 77{degree}K. Predicted life of this laminate was lower when the crack propagation was along a shear band than when crack propagation was across the shear bands. Shear bands appear to have a dominating effect on crack growth behavior.

  10. Grain size distribution and composition of modern dune and beach sediments, Malindi Bay coast, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuodha, J. O. Z.

    2003-02-01

    Grain size distribution and heavy mineral content of beach and dune sediments from the Malindi Bay coast, Kenya were determined. Grain sizes were determined by dry sieving sediments; samples represent the upper 5 mm of surficial sediment, collected from the four main geomorphological units (beach, berm zone, foredune and dunefield), during three observation periods, covering the southeast and northeast monsoon seasons. Sediment samples were grouped according to whether they were collected from the northern or southern sector of the Sabaki river. The heavy mineral content of several samples collected from the beach, berm zone and sand dunes was obtained by using separating funnels and tetrabromomethane to gain insight into the mineral distribution, the mineralogy and comment on the economic potential of prospecting for the heavy minerals. The petrographic parameters determined include the heavy mineral weight percentages and the mineral composition of the heavy fractions obtained using a petrographic microscope. The Malindi Bay shore is dominated by terrigenous deposits brought in by the Sabaki river which consist mainly of fine- to medium-grained quartz sand. The sediments also contain heavy minerals averaging about 15%, with highest concentration being 67% by weight for the samples analyzed. The heavy mineral suite here is dominated by opaque iron-titanium minerals as well as some red garnet and zircon. The results demonstrate a good relationship between the heavy mineral concentrations and the corresponding geomorphological elements. There are some differences between the various geomorphological units, with a subtle trend from the beach to the dunes. During all three observation periods grain size decreases slightly from the beach to the foredune. The sediment size fraction 0.625∅, present on the beach, was absent in the immediate aeolian environments, except for the steep slopes of sand sheets and interdune valleys. The berm zone rarely has sediments coarser

  11. Characteristics of aerosol size distributions and chemical compositions during wintertime pollution episodes in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zirui; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Junke; Yu, Yangchun; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-02-01

    To characterize the features of particle pollution, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions were performed at an urban site in Beijing in January 2013. The particle number and volume concentration from 14 nm to 1000 nm were (37.4 ± 15.3) × 103 cm- 3 and (85.2 ± 65.6) μm3 cm- 3, respectively. N-Ait (Aitken mode) particles dominated the number concentration, whereas N-Acc (accumulation mode) particles dominated the volume concentration. Submicron particles were generally characterized by a high content of organics and SO42 -, and a low level of NO3- and Cl-. Two types of pollution episodes were observed, characterized by the "explosive growth" (EXP) and "sustained growth" (SUS) of PM2.5. Fine particles greater than 100 nm dominated the volume concentration during the ends of these pollution episodes, shifting the maximum of the number size distribution from 60 nm to greater than 100 nm in a few hours (EXP) or a few days (SUS). Secondary transformation is the main reason for the pollution episodes; SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+ (SNA) accounted for approximately 42% (EXP) and greater than 60% (SUS) of the N-Acc particle mass increase. The size distributions of particulate organics and SNA varied on timescales of hours to days, the characteristics of which changed from bimodal to unimodal during the evolution of haze episodes. The accumulation mode (peaking at approximately 500-700 nm) was dominated by organics that appeared to be internally mixed with nitrate or sulfate. The sulfate was most likely formed via heterogeneous reactions, because the SOR was constant under dry conditions (RH < 50%) and began to increase when RH > 50%, suggesting an important contribution from heterogeneous reactions with abundant aerosol water under wet conditions. Finally, the correlations between [NO3-]/[SO42 -] and [NH4+]/[SO42 -] suggest that the homogenous reaction between HNO3 and NH3 dominated the formation of nitrate under conditions of

  12. A requirement for reduced pressure and modified atmosphere composition in lunar and martian biological life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Mike; Stasiak, Michael; Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Lawson, Jamie

    The Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility at the PlaceTypeUniversity of Place- NameGuelph (country-regionplaceCanada) represents an extensive collection of variable pressure plant growth chambers devoted to the study of biological systems including plants and microbes, in life support roles for space exploration. To simplify engineering requirements for plant growth structures on the Moon or Mars, lower pressures are required in order to reduce mass and decrease atmospheric leakage. Few facilities exist that can provide low pressure plant growth capabilities coupled with complete control over temperature, vapour pressure deficit (humidity), gas composition, nutrient delivery, and pressure. The Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility maintains five canopy-scale hypobaric plant growth chambers with capabilities ideally suited for low pressure advanced life support research. System performance evaluations during low pressure experiments on radish (Raphanus sativa L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) have demonstrated temperature control of +/- 0.5 ° C, vapour pressure deficit control of +/- 0.5 mb, CO2 injection control of +/- 20 ` ımol mol-1 , and leakage rates of less than 1% per day. Keywords: hypobaric, plant growth chamber, advanced life support, controlled environment, low pressure, atmospheric control

  13. Out-Life Characteristics of IM7/977-3 Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Sutter, James K.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Martin, Richard E.; Maryanski, Michael; Schlea, Michelle; Gardner, John M.; Schiferl, Zack R.

    2010-01-01

    The capability to manufacture large structures leads to weight savings and reduced risk relative to joining smaller components. However, manufacture of increasingly large composite components is pushing the out-time limits of epoxy/ carbon fiber prepreg. IM7/977-3 is an autoclave processable prepreg material, commonly used in aerospace structures. The out-time limit is reported as 30 days by the manufacturer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the material processability and composite properties of 977-3 resin and IM7/977-3 prepreg that had been aged at room temperature for up to 60 days. The effects of room temperature aging on the thermal and visco-elastic properties of the materials were investigated. Neat resin was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry to characterize thermal properties and change in activation energy of cure. Neat resin was also evaluated by rheometry to characterize its processability in composite fabrication. IM7/977-3 prepreg was evaluated by dynamic mechanical analysis to characterize the curing behavior. Prepreg tack was also evaluated over 60 days. The overall test results suggested that IM7/977-3 was a robust material that offered quality laminates throughout this aging process when processed by autoclave.

  14. Chamber-confined silicon-carbon nanofiber composites for prolonged cycling life of Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Kun; Lu, Yao; Dirican, Mahmut; Chen, Chen; Yanilmaz, Meltem; Shi, Quan; Bradford, Philip D.; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2014-06-01

    Silicon is a promising high capacity (4200 mA h g-1) anode material for lithium ion batteries but the significant volume change (over 300%) of silicon during lithiation/delithiation remains a challenge in terms of silicon pulverization and solid-electrolyte-interphase (SEI) accumulation in the silicon composite electrode. To alleviate the volumetric change of silicon, we built a flexible and self-supporting carbon-enhanced carbon nanofiber (CNF) structure with vacant chamber to encapsulate Si nanoparticles (vacant Si@CNF@C). This composite was tested directly without any polymer and current collector. The confined vacant chamber allowed the increasing volume of silicon and SEI accumulates to be well retained for a long cycle life. This chamber-confined silicon-carbon nanofiber composite exhibited an improved performance in terms of good cycling performance (620 mA h g-1), high coulombic efficiency (99%), and good capacity retention (80%) after 200 cycles. This self-supported silicon-carbon nanofiber structure showed high flexibility and good electrochemical performance for the potential as flexible electrode for lithium-ion batteries.

  15. Chamber-confined silicon-carbon nanofiber composites for prolonged cycling life of Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun; Lu, Yao; Dirican, Mahmut; Chen, Chen; Yanilmaz, Meltem; Shi, Quan; Bradford, Philip D; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2014-07-01

    Silicon is a promising high capacity (4200 mA h g(-1)) anode material for lithium ion batteries but the significant volume change (over 300%) of silicon during lithiation/delithiation remains a challenge in terms of silicon pulverization and solid-electrolyte-interphase (SEI) accumulation in the silicon composite electrode. To alleviate the volumetric change of silicon, we built a flexible and self-supporting carbon-enhanced carbon nanofiber (CNF) structure with vacant chamber to encapsulate Si nanoparticles (vacant Si@CNF@C). This composite was tested directly without any polymer and current collector. The confined vacant chamber allowed the increasing volume of silicon and SEI accumulates to be well retained for a long cycle life. This chamber-confined silicon-carbon nanofiber composite exhibited an improved performance in terms of good cycling performance (620 mA h g(-1)), high coulombic efficiency (99%), and good capacity retention (80%) after 200 cycles. This self-supported silicon-carbon nanofiber structure showed high flexibility and good electrochemical performance for the potential as flexible electrode for lithium-ion batteries.

  16. Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Materials Using Distributed Fiber Bragg Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph; Kual, Raj; Taylor, Scott; Jackson, Kurt V.; Myers, George; Wang, Y.; Sharma, A.; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Health monitoring of polymer matrix composite materials using fiber optic Bragg grating (FBG) sensors is accomplished using a tunable IR (infrared) laser via transmission mode. Results are presented from experiments of composite structures with FBG's embedded at various orientations, and surface measurements of various cryogenic composite vessels.

  17. Efficient estimation of the distribution of time to composite endpoint when some endpoints are only partially observed.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Rhian M; Tsiatis, Anastasios A

    2013-10-01

    Two common features of clinical trials, and other longitudinal studies, are (1) a primary interest in composite endpoints, and (2) the problem of subjects withdrawing prematurely from the study. In some settings, withdrawal may only affect observation of some components of the composite endpoint, for example when another component is death, information on which may be available from a national registry. In this paper, we use the theory of augmented inverse probability weighted estimating equations to show how such partial information on the composite endpoint for subjects who withdraw from the study can be incorporated in a principled way into the estimation of the distribution of time to composite endpoint, typically leading to increased efficiency without relying on additional assumptions above those that would be made by standard approaches. We describe our proposed approach theoretically, and demonstrate its properties in a simulation study. PMID:23722304

  18. Efficient estimation of the distribution of time to composite endpoint when some endpoints are only partially observed

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Rhian M.; Tsiatis, Anastasios A.

    2014-01-01

    Two common features of clinical trials, and other longitudinal studies, are (1) a primary interest in composite endpoints, and (2) the problem of subjects withdrawing prematurely from the study. In some settings, withdrawal may only affect observation of some components of the composite endpoint, for example when another component is death, information on which may be available from a national registry. In this paper, we use the theory of augmented inverse probability weighted estimating equations to show how such partial information on the composite endpoint for subjects who withdraw from the study can be incorporated in a principled way into the estimation of the distribution of time to composite endpoint, typically leading to increased efficiency without relying on additional assumptions above those that would be made by standard approaches. We describe our proposed approach theoretically, and demonstrate its properties in a simulation study. PMID:23722304

  19. Rate of Return to Education: A Distributional Analysis Using the LifePaths Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boothby, Daniel; Rowe, Geoff

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports estimates of the distribution of individual private rates of return to undergraduate and community college education by field of study for Canada. It is important to know the dispersion of the private rate of return to post-secondary education, as well as its average level. There are very different implications for…

  20. "A Bit More Life in the Leadership": Co-Principalship as Distributed Leadership Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gronn, Peter; Hamilton, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Most commentators think of leadership as individually focused, a preference which reflects historical understandings and usage. With the example of a co-principalship, this article shows how focused leadership is at odds with the reality of distributed work practice. The article reports research at College A, a Catholic all-girls' secondary school…

  1. Crustacea in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice: distribution, diet and life history strategies.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Carolin E; Swadling, Kerrie M

    2006-01-01

    This review concerns crustaceans that associate with sea ice. Particular emphasis is placed on comparing and contrasting the Arctic and Antarctic sea ice habitats, and the subsequent influence of these environments on the life history strategies of the crustacean fauna. Sea ice is the dominant feature of both polar marine ecosystems, playing a central role in physical processes and providing an essential habitat for organisms ranging in size from viruses to whales. Similarities between the Arctic and Antarctic marine ecosystems include variable cover of sea ice over an annual cycle, a light regimen that can extend from months of total darkness to months of continuous light and a pronounced seasonality in primary production. Although there are many similarities, there are also major differences between the two regions: The Antarctic experiences greater seasonal change in its sea ice extent, much of the ice is over very deep water and more than 80% breaks out each year. In contrast, Arctic sea ice often covers comparatively shallow water, doubles in its extent on an annual cycle and the ice may persist for several decades. Crustaceans, particularly copepods and amphipods, are abundant in the sea ice zone at both poles, either living within the brine channel system of the ice-crystal matrix or inhabiting the ice-water interface. Many species associate with ice for only a part of their life cycle, while others appear entirely dependent upon it for reproduction and development. Although similarities exist between the two faunas, many differences are emerging. Most notable are the much higher abundance and biomass of Antarctic copepods, the dominance of the Antarctic sea ice copepod fauna by calanoids, the high euphausiid biomass in Southern Ocean waters and the lack of any species that appear fully dependent on the ice. In the Arctic, the ice-associated fauna is dominated by amphipods. Calanoid copepods are not tightly associated with the ice, while harpacticoids and

  2. Progressive failure methodologies for predicting residual strength and life of laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Allen, David H.; Obrien, T. Kevin

    1991-01-01

    Two progressive failure methodologies currently under development by the Mechanics of Materials Branch at NASA Langley Research Center are discussed. The damage tolerance/fail safety methodology developed by O'Brien is an engineering approach to ensuring adequate durability and damage tolerance by treating only delamination onset and the subsequent delamination accumulation through the laminate thickness. The continuum damage model developed by Allen and Harris employs continuum damage laws to predict laminate strength and life. The philosophy, mechanics framework, and current implementation status of each methodology are presented.

  3. Design, fabrication, and properties of 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution

    PubMed Central

    Dongyu, Xu; Xin, Cheng; Banerjee, Sourav; Shifeng, Huang

    2014-01-01

    The laminated 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution were fabricated by employing Lead Zirconium Titanate ceramic as active phase, and mixture of cement powder, epoxy resin, and hardener as matrix phase with a mass proportion of 4:4:1. The dielectric, piezoelectric, and electromechanical coupling properties of the composites were studied. The composites with large total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric strain constant and relative permittivity, and the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites are independent of the dimensional variations of the piezoelectric ceramic layer. The composites with small total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric voltage constant, but also large dielectric loss. The composite with gradually increased dimension of piezoelectric ceramic layer has the smallest dielectric loss, and that with the gradually increased dimension of matrix layer has the largest piezoelectric voltage constant. The novel piezoelectric composites show potential applications in fabricating ultrasonic transducers with varied surface vibration amplitude of the transducer. PMID:25565725

  4. Design, fabrication, and properties of 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Dongyu, Xu; Xin, Cheng; Shifeng, Huang; Banerjee, Sourav

    2014-12-28

    The laminated 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution were fabricated by employing Lead Zirconium Titanate ceramic as active phase, and mixture of cement powder, epoxy resin, and hardener as matrix phase with a mass proportion of 4:4:1. The dielectric, piezoelectric, and electromechanical coupling properties of the composites were studied. The composites with large total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric strain constant and relative permittivity, and the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites are independent of the dimensional variations of the piezoelectric ceramic layer. The composites with small total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric voltage constant, but also large dielectric loss. The composite with gradually increased dimension of piezoelectric ceramic layer has the smallest dielectric loss, and that with the gradually increased dimension of matrix layer has the largest piezoelectric voltage constant. The novel piezoelectric composites show potential applications in fabricating ultrasonic transducers with varied surface vibration amplitude of the transducer.

  5. Physical and biological control of protistan community composition, distribution and abundance in the seasonal ice zone of the Southern Ocean between 30 and 80°E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Andrew T.; Scott, Fiona J.; Nash, Geraldine V.; Wright, Simon W.; Raymond, Ben

    2010-05-01

    Protists are critical components of the Antarctic marine ecosystem as they comprise most of the living carbon and are the base of the Antarctic food web. They are also key determinants of vertical carbon flux and mediate draw-down of atmospheric CO 2 by the ocean. The community composition, abundance and distribution of marine protists (phytoplankton and protozoa) was studied during the Baseline Research on Oceanography, Krill and the Environment-West (BROKE-West) survey, in the seasonal ice zone during the 2005-2006 austral summer between 30°E and 80°E. Light and electron microscopy were used to determine the protistan composition and abundance in samples obtained at 30 sites from surface waters and at 26 sites from the depth of the maximum in situ chlorophyll fluorescence (Chl max). Cluster analysis was used to identify 5 groups of sample sites at the surface and 5 at the Chl max that were of similar protist composition and abundance. The physical characteristics, taxonomic composition, indicator taxa, and taxonomic diversity were determined for each group. In the southwest, a bloom of colonial Phaeocystis antarctica dominated the protistan community composition and biomass amongst the receding ice, but this was replaced by the flagellate life stage/s of this haptophyte in waters to the north. In the southeast, a diatom bloom had the highest diversity of protist taxa observed during the survey and centric diatoms dominated the biomass. Outside these blooms, grazing by krill probably reduced the composition and abundance of large diatoms and autotrophic dinoflagellates in coastal to mid-inshore waters. Only in offshore waters did large diatoms and dinoflagellates increase in abundance and diversity, despite low concentrations of iron and silicate at many of these sites. This increase was probably due to reduced top-down control by krill and other large zooplankton. Large diatoms dominated in offshore waters, despite other coincident studies showing that the

  6. USE OF MULTI-PHOTON LASER-SCANNING MICROSCOPY TO DESCRIBE THE DISTRIBUTION OF XENOBIOTIC CHEMICALS IN FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand the mechanisms by which persistent bioaccumulative toxicants (PBTs) produce toxicity during fish early life stages (ELS), dose response relationships need to be determined in relation to the dynamic distribution of chemicals in sensitive tissues. In this stud...

  7. Biochemical composition of deep-sea decapod crustaceans with two different benthic life strategies off the Portuguese south coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, R.; Nunes, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to characterize the benthic life strategies of Aristeus antennatus (Crustacea: Penaeidea), Parapenaeus longirostris (Crustacea: Penaeidea) and Nephrops norvegicus (Crustacea: Astacidea) on the basis of biochemical composition (proximate chemical composition, total lipids, glycogen and cholesterol contents), and its response to biological and environmental factors (sex, maturation, reproduction, food availability and depth) into account. The specimens were collected at depths between 200 and 600 m off the Portuguese south coast (Algarve). The nektobenthic species ( A. antennatus and P. longirostris) showed higher protein, lipid, cholesterol and glycogen contents, and lower moisture content in the muscle than the benthic-endobenthic species ( N. norvegicus). Consequently, the energy content of the nektobenthic species was also higher. Principal component analyses were used to assess the relationship between the different biochemical contents and to relate them to the biotic and abiotic factors. Depth seems to have the most important role in the observed trends of the biochemical composition. The increase of the ovarian lipid levels occurs as a result of the maturation process. The highest values were obtained in mature N. norvegicus females. The differences can be due to maternal investment (lipid metabolism of the female is geared to the provision of egg lipid), since N. norvegicus produce large lecithotrophic eggs. The biochemical differences observed in the three species did not seem to be due to distinct trophic strategies, but instead were a consequence of depth, which may have a significant interspecific effect on food intake. It was also evident that reproductive cycle has profound effects upon the biochemistry of the three species. Gonadal maturation has large associated energy costs due to the increase in biosynthetic work. Moreover, the biochemical composition would be influenced by or synchronized with seasonal

  8. Accelerated cable life testing of EPR-insulated medium voltage distribution cables

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, M.D. ); Bernstein, B.S. ); Smith, J.T. III ); Thue, W.A. , Stuart, FL ); Groeger, J.H. )

    1994-07-01

    This paper presents results aimed at developing a reliable accelerated aging tank test for EPR-insulated cables. Aging was performed at 2 to 4 times rated voltage on load cycling to temperatures of 45 C, 60 C, 75 C, and 90 C at the conductor with water in the conductor strands and outside the cable. Results show that cable failure is more rapid at the highest electrical stress and lowest conductor load cycle temperature. Cables aged at higher temperatures and various levels of electrical stress rarely failed and retained in excess of 40% of their original breakdown strength after 1,500+ days of aging. Aging performed at 90 C load cycle temperature and 4 times rated voltage with air on the outside and water at the conductor of the cable showed more rapid loss of life than with water outside. Results indicate the optimum aging conditions for EPR-insulated cables in the accelerated cable life test (ACLT) differ significantly from those previously observed for XLPE-insulated cables, and that the appropriate test methodology for EPR-insulated cables requires additional study.

  9. Method of improving fatigue life of cast nickel based superalloys and composition

    DOEpatents

    Denzine, Allen F.; Kolakowski, Thomas A.; Wallace, John F.

    1978-03-14

    The invention consists of a method of producing a fine equiaxed grain structure (ASTM 2-4) in cast nickel-base superalloys which increases low cycle fatigue lives without detrimental effects on stress rupture properties to temperatures as high as 1800.degree. F. These superalloys are variations of the basic nickel-chromium matrix, hardened by gamma prime [Ni.sub.3 (Al, Ti)] but with optional additions of cobalt, tungsten, molybdenum, vanadium, columbium, tantalum, boron, zirconium, carbon and hafnium. The invention grain refines these alloys to ASTM 2 to 4 increasing low cycle fatigue life by a factor of 2 to 5 (i.e. life of 700 hours would be increased to 1400 to 3500 hours for a given stress) as a result of the addition of 0.01% to 0.2% of a member of the group consisting of boron, zirconium and mixtures thereof to aid heterogeneous nucleation. The alloy is vacuum melted and heated to 250.degree.-400.degree. F. above the melting temperature, cooled to partial solidification, thus resulting in said heterogeneous nucleation and fine grains, then reheated and cast at about 50.degree.-100.degree. F. of superheat. Additions of 0.1% boron and 0.1% zirconium (optional) are the preferred nucleating agents.

  10. The composition and size distribution of the dust in the coma of Comet Hale Bopp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, M.; Hovenier, J. W.; de Koter, A.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Dominik, C.

    2005-12-01

    We discuss the composition and size distribution of the dust in the coma of Comet Hale-Bopp. We do this using a model fit for the infrared emission measured by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the measured degree of linear polarization of scattered light at various phase angles and wavelengths. The effects of particle shape on the modeled optical properties of the dust grains are taken into account. Both the short wavelength (7-44 μm) and the long wavelength (44-120 μm) infrared spectrum are fitted using the same dust parameters, as well as the degree of linear polarization at twelve different wavelengths in the optical to near-infrared domains. We constrain our fit by forcing the abundances of the major rock forming chemical elements to be equal to those observed in meteorites. The infrared spectrum at long wavelengths reveals that large grains are needed in order to fit the spectral slope. The size and shape distribution we employ allows us to estimate the sizes of the crystalline silicates. The ratios of the strength of various forsterite features show that the crystalline silicate grains in Hale-Bopp must be submicrometer-sized. On the basis of our analysis the presence of large crystalline silicate grains in the coma can be excluded. Because of this lack of large crystalline grains combined with the fact that we do need large amorphous grains to fit the emission spectrum at long wavelengths, we need only approximately 4% of crystalline silicates by mass (forsterite and enstatite) to reproduce the observed spectral features. After correcting for possible hidden crystalline material included in large amorphous grains, our best estimate of the total mass fraction of crystalline material is ˜7.5%, which is significantly lower than deduced in previous studies in which the typical derived crystallinity is ˜20-30%. The implications of this low abundance of crystalline material on the possible origin and evolution of the comet are discussed. We conclude

  11. Chemical Composition and Size Distributions of Coastal Aerosols Observed on the U.S. East Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Song, F.; Jusino-Atresino, R.; Thuman, C.; Gao, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol input is an important source of certain limiting nutrients, such as iron, for phytoplankton growth in several large oceanic regions. As the efficiency of biological uptake of nutrients may depend on the aerosol properties, a better knowledge of aerosol properties is critically important. Characterizing aerosols over the coastal ocean needs special attention, because the properties of aerosols could be altered by many anthropogenic processes in this land-ocean transition zone before they are transported over the remote ocean. The goal of this experiment was to examine aerosol properties, in particular chemical composition, particle-size distributions and iron solubility, over the US Eastern Seaboard, an important boundary for the transport of continental substances from North America to the North Atlantic Ocean. Our field sampling site was located at Tuckerton (39°N, 74°W) on the southern New Jersey coast. Fourteen sets of High-Volume aerosol samples and three sets of size segregated aerosol samples by a 10-stage MOUDI impactor were collected during 2007 and 2008. The ICP-MS methodology was used to analyze aerosol samples for the concentrations of thirteen trace elements: Al, Fe, Mn, Sc, Cd, Pb, Sb, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Zn and V. The IC procedures were applied to determine five cations (sodium, ammonium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and eleven anions (fluoride, acetate, propionate, formate, MSA, chloride, nitrate, succinate, malonate, sulfate and oxalate). The UV spectrometry was employed for the determination of iron solubility. Preliminary results suggest three major sources of aerosols: anthropogenic, crustal and marine. At this location, the concentrations of iron (II) ranged from 2.8 to 29ng m-3, accounting for ~20% of the total iron. The iron concentrations at this coastal site were substantially lower than those observed in Newark, an urban site in northern NJ. High concentrations of iron (II) were associated with both fine and coarse aerosol

  12. Tracing organic matter composition and distribution and its role on arsenic release in shallow Cambodian groundwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Michael; Polya, David A.; Boyce, Adrian J.; Bryant, Charlotte; Ballentine, Christopher J.

    2016-04-01

    aquifer sediments, arsenic release also occurs in deeper aquifer sediments and as such remains an important process in controlling the spatial distribution of arsenic in the groundwaters of SE Asia. Our findings suggest that any anthropogenic activities that alter the source of groundwater recharge or the timescales over which recharge takes place may also drive changes in the natural composition of dissolved organic carbon in these groundwaters. Such changes have the potential to influence both the spatial and temporal evolution of the current groundwater arsenic hazard in this region.

  13. Chemical composition and size distribution of airborne particulate matters in Beijing during the 2008 Olympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingru; Wang, Lili; Wang, Yuesi; Wen, Tianxue; Yang, Yongjie; Zhao, Yanan; Wang, Yingfeng

    2012-04-01

    Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected daily in Beijing from 1 Jun. to 20 Sep. during the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008 to investigate aerosol concentrations, particle size distributions, and sources as well as the effects of pollution control measures on the chemical compositions (including Water-soluble ions, trace elements, elemental carbon (EC), and organic carbon (OC)) in aerosols of different sizes. Water-soluble ions, EC, OC, and trace elements accounted for 45.0%, 1.6%, 14.7%, and 11.4% of the total particle mass (PM), respectively. Approximately 56%, 56%, 30%, 71% and 55% of the PM, water-soluble ions, trace elements, EC and OC, respectively, were associated with particles smaller than 2.1 μm. Sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium were the dominant ions, which together accounted for approximately 77% of total water-soluble ions. The crustal elements accounted for the majority of the trace elements present. Different sources showed different mass size distributions. Anthropogenic source compounds, such as sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, OC, EC, and toxic elements, were mainly present in fine mode aerosols, whereas crustal elements, such as Al, Fe, Ca, Mg and Ba, primarily occurred in the coarse mode. SO42- and NH4+ concentrations were strongly correlated (r2 = 0.90, slope = 1.63) in the fine mode, thereby indicating that SO42- was mainly present as (NH4)2SO4; in contrast, a weak correlation between SO42- and NH4+ (r2 = 0.18, slope = 0.54) was observed in the coarse mode, indicating that SO42- was associated with other ions. Similarly, SO42- and NO3- exhibited a stronger correlation in the fine mode than in the coarse mode, indicating that SO42- and NO3- were formed via the same in-cloud processes in fine particles. The OC/EC ratio and the correlations between EC and OC concentrations showed that the sources of carbonaceous species were secondary organic carbon from fine particles and the long-range transport of coarse carbonaceous particles from biomass

  14. The Distribution of the Magnetic Field in the Spine Depends on the Composition of Bone Marrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, F.

    1995-07-01

    Although the composition of bone marrow with hemopoietic cells, fat cells, and extracellular fluid can be roughly assessed by standard MR-imaging techniques and especially water and lipid-selective chemical-shift-imaging methods, a new approach to the characterization of the magnetic properties of marrow was performed by special field-mapping techniques. The distribution of the magnetic field inside and outside vertebral bodies containing paramagnetic substances was systematically studied for phantoms and by measurements in vivo. Nineteen healthy volunteers and 26 patients with alterations of the bone marrow due to hematologic diseases were examined. The amount of paramagnetic substances in the marrow was estimated by measuring steps of Larmor frequency of the water resonances at the transition between vertebral bodies and adjacent intervertebral disks. These frequency steps were exhibited by MAGSUS imaging on a 1.5 Tesla whole-body imager. Additional volume-localized H-1 spectroscopy allowed a more quantitative assessment of the spectral components. The measured frequency steps of the water resonances ranged between 0 and 26 Hz for the healthy volunteers examined. In contrast, patients with pathologically altered marrow and high amount of paramagnetic substances revealed frequency steps of up to 85 Hz. The frequency steps in 8 patients after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with slow reconstitution (mean 48.9 Hz, standard deviation (s.d.) 21.7 Hz) were significantly (p < 0.001) higher than in normal volunteers. Seven BMT patients with good reconstitution (frequency steps: mean 16.7 Hz, s.d. 13.9 Hz) were not clearly different from the healthy subjects. Six patients with acute leukemia showed significantly (p < 0.01) increasing frequency steps during initial cytotoxic treatment: The frequency steps increased from a mean of 4.7 Hz (s.d, 2.7 Hz) before treatment to a mean of 30.2 Hz (s.d. 14.6 Hz) after a few months of therapy.

  15. Monitoring of Pb Contamination in Loire Estuary: Trends, Distribution and Isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brach-Papa, Christophe; Chiffoleau, Jean-François; Knoery, Joel; Chouvelon, Tiphaine; Auger, Dominique; Bretaudeau, Jane; Crochet, Sylvette; Rozuel, Emmanuelle; Thomas, Batien; Vasileva, Emilia; Oriani, Anna Maria

    2014-05-01

    The Loire River is one of the largest river systems in Western Europe and constitutes a major continental input to marine environment in the Bay of Biscay. Its catchment area flows through agricultural, industrial areas and through a more and more urbanized estuary. Even if Loire River is not considered as a highly polluted system, some studies identified a Pb contamination of its estuary due to industrial inputs and combustion of leaded gasoline up to the mid 90's. A retrospective study, based on the analysis (Pb contents and isotopic composition) of Mytilus edulis samples collected by the French mussel watch program (RNO/ROCCH) has highlighted this contamination and its trend between 1985-2005 (Couture et al., 2010). This poster will first complete the work initiated by Couture et al. Pb contents and isotopic signatures in mussel samples collected by RNO/ROCCH over the last 10 years will be presented and discussed. Results will be compared to measurements performed on various environmental samples (sediment, biota…) collected in the frame of the environmental monitoring project RS2E started in 2012 by the "Observatoire des Sciences de l'Univers Nantes-Atlantique" (OSUNA). This new data will contribute to a better characterisation of Pb contents and distribution along the Loire Estuary. Moreover, some key samples will be submitted to HR-ICP-MS for Pb isotopic analysis. Discrimination of anthropic Pb sources requires both precise and accurate isotope ratio determination and also high versatility due to the complex matrix, which is typical for marine and estuarine samples. These measurements will contribute to a more accurate definition and characterisation of main actual anthropic Pb sources (urban, agricultural, industrial or atmospheric deposition). Couture R.- M., Chiffoleau J.-F., Auger D., Claisse D., Gobeil C. and Cossa D. (2010) Seasonal and decadal variation in lead sources to eastern north Atlantic mussels. Environ. Sci. Technol. 44, 1211-1216.

  16. Vertical distribution of triple oxygen isotopic composition of dissolved oxygen in the northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Osamu; Honda, Makio; Saino, Toshiro

    2013-04-01

    Oxygen-17 excess of dissolved oxygen calculated from δ18O and δ17O is not affected by oxygen consumption process but controlled only by processes of primary production and air-water gas transfer. Evaluating gross primary productivity using the 17O-excess in ocean surface water are one of the most advanced geochemical researches for last 10 years. Oxygen-17 excess below ocean mixed/photic layer has not been much investigated because it might be out of focus for estimating present primary productivity, except for the purpose to correct diapycnal mixing effect on surface water. In principle, water mass which has not been affected both by photosynthesis and gas transfer after its separation from ocean surface could preserve 17O-excess value where the water mass was at the surface. The purpose of this study is to determine the vertical distribution of 17O-excess from the surface to the bottom of northwestern Pacific to know whether 17O-excess could really preserve its "original" value after the long and dark travel. Near stations K2 and KNOT, water mass which has a density of 26.8 ?? is observed at depth between 100 and 300 m. This water mass is mainly originated from bottom water in the Okhotsk Sea and spreading widely to entire northwestern Pacific, which is called North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW). NPIW is found at depth of 700 m at station S1. Samplings were conducted by two R/V Mirai cruises (MR10-06, Oct-Nov 2010; MR11-02, Feb-Mar 2011). Dissolved oxygen gas was purified by the method of Sarma et al. (2003) and its isotopic composition was determined by dual-inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometer (Thermo Scientific Delta Plus). Gross primary productivities at mixed layer estimated by 17O-excess were well consistent with those by conventional light and dark bottle incubations for stations K2 and S1.

  17. Controls on the Composition and Distribution of Holocene Sediment in Lake Junín, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidhaas, N.; Woods, A.; Abbott, M. B.; Rodbell, D. T.; Hatfield, R. G.; Larsen, D. J.; Brady, K.; Delgado, G.; Hillman, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Junín is a high-­elevation intermontane lake in the inner-­tropics of the South American Andes (11° S, 76.1° W) that is highly sensitive to changes in temperature and precipitation, and contains sediments that are well­-suited for multiproxy analysis and can be reliably dated. It is one of the few lakes in the tropical Andes that can provide a continuous record throughout the last glacial cycle and it is ideally situated to record long­-term variations in the South American Summer Monsoon. Lake Junín was drilled in 2015 to recover sediment cores which will provide the longest independently­-dated record of tropical water balance, glacier variability, vegetation history, and paleomagnetic secular variation for the region. We collected six cores across a NE­-SW transect to characterize the controls on sediment composition and distribution prior to drilling. The cores range from 2 to 9 m in length and each contains a complete Holocene section and glacial transition. Interglacial sediments are composed primarily of authigenic carbonates, whereas minerogenic material sourced from nearby glacial outwash fans dominates the late glacial sediment record. All cores exhibit a similar two-­component stratigraphy: an upper section of primarily whitish pink marl with intermittent light brown mud and a lower section of characteristic light gray glacial flour. Magnetic susceptibility data show that the carbonate/clastic contact deepens from NE to SW, and the thickness of the upper carbonate section displays a significant positive correlation with distance from the NE shore. Quantification of Holocene carbonate sediment dynamics in Lake Junín will facilitate more accurate interpretation of their stratigraphic significance in the longer sediment record.

  18. Bayesian statistical approaches to compositional analyses of transgenic crops 2. Application and validation of informative prior distributions.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jay M; Breeze, Matthew L; Berman, Kristina H; Harrigan, George G

    2013-03-01

    Bayesian approaches to evaluation of crop composition data allow simpler interpretations than traditional statistical significance tests. An important advantage of Bayesian approaches is that they allow formal incorporation of previously generated data through prior distributions in the analysis steps. This manuscript describes key steps to ensure meaningful and transparent selection and application of informative prior distributions. These include (i) review of previous data in the scientific literature to form the prior distributions, (ii) proper statistical model specification and documentation, (iii) graphical analyses to evaluate the fit of the statistical model to new study data, and (iv) sensitivity analyses to evaluate the robustness of results to the choice of prior distribution. The validity of the prior distribution for any crop component is critical to acceptance of Bayesian approaches to compositional analyses and would be essential for studies conducted in a regulatory setting. Selection and validation of prior distributions for three soybean isoflavones (daidzein, genistein, and glycitein) and two oligosaccharides (raffinose and stachyose) are illustrated in a comparative assessment of data obtained on GM and non-GM soybean seed harvested from replicated field sites at multiple locations in the US during the 2009 growing season. PMID:23261475

  19. Bayesian statistical approaches to compositional analyses of transgenic crops 2. Application and validation of informative prior distributions.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jay M; Breeze, Matthew L; Berman, Kristina H; Harrigan, George G

    2013-03-01

    Bayesian approaches to evaluation of crop composition data allow simpler interpretations than traditional statistical significance tests. An important advantage of Bayesian approaches is that they allow formal incorporation of previously generated data through prior distributions in the analysis steps. This manuscript describes key steps to ensure meaningful and transparent selection and application of informative prior distributions. These include (i) review of previous data in the scientific literature to form the prior distributions, (ii) proper statistical model specification and documentation, (iii) graphical analyses to evaluate the fit of the statistical model to new study data, and (iv) sensitivity analyses to evaluate the robustness of results to the choice of prior distribution. The validity of the prior distribution for any crop component is critical to acceptance of Bayesian approaches to compositional analyses and would be essential for studies conducted in a regulatory setting. Selection and validation of prior distributions for three soybean isoflavones (daidzein, genistein, and glycitein) and two oligosaccharides (raffinose and stachyose) are illustrated in a comparative assessment of data obtained on GM and non-GM soybean seed harvested from replicated field sites at multiple locations in the US during the 2009 growing season.

  20. Effect of ceramic thickness and composite bases on stress distribution of inlays--a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Durand, Letícia Brandão; Guimarães, Jackeline Coutinho; Monteiro Junior, Sylvio; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cavity depth, ceramic thickness, and resin bases with different elastic modulus on von Mises stress patterns of ceramic inlays. Tridimensional geometric models were developed with SolidWorks image software. The differences between the models were: depth of pulpal wall, ceramic thickness, and presence of composite bases with different thickness and elastic modulus. The geometric models were constrained at the proximal surfaces and base of maxillary bone. A load of 100 N was applied. The stress distribution pattern was analyzed with von Mises stress diagrams. The maximum von Mises stress values ranged from 176 MPa to 263 MPa and varied among the 3D-models. The highest von Mises stress value was found on models with 1-mm-thick composite resin base and 1-mm-thick ceramic inlay. Intermediate values (249-250 MPa) occurred on models with 2-mm-thick composite resin base and 1-mm-thick ceramic inlay and 1-mm-thick composite resin base and 2-mm-thick ceramic inlay. The lowest values were observed on models restored exclusively with ceramic inlay (176 MPa to 182 MPa). It was found that thicker inlays distribute stress more favorably and bases with low elastic modulus increase stress concentrations on the internal surface of the ceramic inlay. The increase of ceramic thickness tends to present more favorable stress distribution, especially when bonded directly onto the cavity without the use of supporting materials. When the use of a composite base is required, composite resin with high elastic modulus and reduced thickness should be preferred. PMID:25831105

  1. Effect of ceramic thickness and composite bases on stress distribution of inlays--a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Durand, Letícia Brandão; Guimarães, Jackeline Coutinho; Monteiro Junior, Sylvio; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cavity depth, ceramic thickness, and resin bases with different elastic modulus on von Mises stress patterns of ceramic inlays. Tridimensional geometric models were developed with SolidWorks image software. The differences between the models were: depth of pulpal wall, ceramic thickness, and presence of composite bases with different thickness and elastic modulus. The geometric models were constrained at the proximal surfaces and base of maxillary bone. A load of 100 N was applied. The stress distribution pattern was analyzed with von Mises stress diagrams. The maximum von Mises stress values ranged from 176 MPa to 263 MPa and varied among the 3D-models. The highest von Mises stress value was found on models with 1-mm-thick composite resin base and 1-mm-thick ceramic inlay. Intermediate values (249-250 MPa) occurred on models with 2-mm-thick composite resin base and 1-mm-thick ceramic inlay and 1-mm-thick composite resin base and 2-mm-thick ceramic inlay. The lowest values were observed on models restored exclusively with ceramic inlay (176 MPa to 182 MPa). It was found that thicker inlays distribute stress more favorably and bases with low elastic modulus increase stress concentrations on the internal surface of the ceramic inlay. The increase of ceramic thickness tends to present more favorable stress distribution, especially when bonded directly onto the cavity without the use of supporting materials. When the use of a composite base is required, composite resin with high elastic modulus and reduced thickness should be preferred.

  2. The LifeWatch approach to the exploration of distributed species information

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Daniel; Fiore, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This paper introduces a new method of automatically extracting, integrating and presenting information regarding species from the most relevant online taxonomic resources. First, the information is extracted and joined using data wrappers and integration solutions. Then, an analytical tool is used to provide a visual representation of the data. The information is then integrated into a user friendly content management system. The proposal has been implemented using data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), the Catalogue of Life (CoL), the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS), the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS) and the Global Names Index (GNI). The approach improves data quality, avoiding taxonomic and nomenclature errors whilst increasing the availability and accessibility of the information. PMID:25589865

  3. Biology, Systematics, Life Cycle, and Distribution of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the Cause of Rat Lungworm Disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a metastrongyloid nematode in the family Angiostrongylidae. It is the cause of angiostrongyliasis (rat lungworm disease), which manifests as eosinophilic meningitis. First described in 1935 from rats in China, A. cantonensis was placed in the genus Parastrongylus in 1986, but most workers have not adopted this treatment. The taxonomy of A. cantonensis and related worms is largely based on adult morphology, notably of the male bursa. However, identification of infective third stage larvae is more difficult. The natural life cycle involves rats as the definitive host and snails or slugs as the intermediate host. Human infection, as accidental hosts, results in worms maturing in the brain, but dying there instead of moving back into the bloodstream, as in rats, thereby leading to eosinophilic meningitis. The disease is an emerging infectious disease; Angiostrongylus cantonensis continues to be reported in new regions beyond its native range. PMID:23901372

  4. Organic Composition and Morphology of Sea Spray Aerosols as a Function of Biological Life during IMPACTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, D.; Moffet, R.; Fraund, M. W.; O'Brien, R.; Laskina, O.; Prather, K. A.; Grassian, V. H.; Beall, C.; Wang, X.; Forestieri, S.; Cappa, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols influence climate by directly reflecting or absorbing sunlight, or indirectly by affecting clouds. A major source of aerosols is from oceanic wave breaking. Due to their complexity, the effects of marine aerosol on climate are uncertain. To provide more detailed measurements of the chemical composition of marine aerosols, Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy coupled with Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (SXTM-NEXAFS) was used to give spatially resolved molecular information for carbon and oxygen. Application of STXM/NEXAFS to particles collected during a mesocosm study using a unique wave channel facility to generate aerosols shows that the organic volume fraction of aerosols at the aerodynamic diameter size range of 0.18-0.32 μm are a direct function of the biological activity in the sea water. Aerosol organic volume fraction increased from 0.32 for particles generated from seawater containing low biolife to 0.49 and 0.40 for particles produced during phytoplankton blooms. However, the organic volume fraction of aerosols at the aerodynamic diameter size range of 0.56-1 μm did not change with biological activity. Measurements also show that different types of organics can concentrate into aerosols depending on the enzyme activity expressed at the time. Enhanced spectral signatures for aliphatic hydrocarbons were observed during the first phytoplankton bloom compared to a second phytoplankton bloom occurring directly thereafter. The decreased signature of aliphatic organics in the second phytoplankton bloom was correlated with increased lipase activity from heterobacteria. Organic aggregates having similar morphology also differ in composition from their carbon spectra from the two blooms. For July 17, organic aggregates were much richer in hydrocarbons, which showed a remarkably intense C-H absorbance and a broad C-C absorbance. Organic aggregates observed for July 26-27, did not have the C-H and C-C signatures, but contained more polar

  5. Distributed feedback lasing from a composite poly(phenylene vinylene)-nanoparticle one-dimensional photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Puzzo, Daniel P; Scotognella, Francesco; Zavelani-Rossi, Margherita; Sebastian, Maria; Lough, Alan J; Manners, Ian; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Tubino, Riccardo; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2009-12-01

    Nanoparticle one-dimensional photonic crystals exhibit intense, broadband reflectivity coupled with a unique mesoporosity. The latter property allows for infiltration of the one-dimensional photonic crystal with functional materials, such as emitting polymers, which in turn can lead to the fabrication of composites whereby the emitter's emission can be modulated by the photon density of states of the photonic crystal. We exploit this interaction in order to produce efficient distributed feedback lasing from a composite poly(phenylene vinylene)-infiltrated nanoparticle one-dimensional photonic crystal.

  6. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Saz, J; Herrera, M; Delgado, F J; Duguay, S; Philippe, T; Gonzalez, M; Abell, J; Walters, R J; Molina, S I

    2016-07-29

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs.

  7. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Saz, J.; Herrera, M.; Delgado, F. J.; Duguay, S.; Philippe, T.; Gonzalez, M.; Abell, J.; Walters, R. J.; Molina, S. I.

    2016-07-01

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs.

  8. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Saz, J; Herrera, M; Delgado, F J; Duguay, S; Philippe, T; Gonzalez, M; Abell, J; Walters, R J; Molina, S I

    2016-07-29

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs. PMID:27306098

  9. Antarctic Marine Biodiversity – What Do We Know About the Distribution of Life in the Southern Ocean?

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Huw J.

    2010-01-01

    The remote and hostile Southern Ocean is home to a diverse and rich community of life that thrives in an environment dominated by glaciations and strong currents. Marine biological studies in the region date back to the nineteenth century, but despite this long history of research, relatively little is known about the complex interactions between the highly seasonal physical environment and the species that inhabit the Southern Ocean. Oceanographically, the Southern Ocean is a major driver of global ocean circulation and plays a vital role in interacting with the deep water circulation in each of the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans. The Census of Antarctic Marine Life and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research Marine Biodiversity Information Network (SCAR-MarBIN) have strived to coordinate and unify the available scientific expertise and biodiversity data to improve our understanding of Southern Ocean biodiversity. Taxonomic lists for all marine species have been compiled to form the Register of Antarctic Marine Species, which currently includes over 8,200 species. SCAR-MarBIN has brought together over 1 million distribution records for Southern Ocean species, forming a baseline against which future change can be judged. The sample locations and numbers of known species from different regions were mapped and the depth distributions of benthic samples plotted. Our knowledge of the biodiversity of the Southern Ocean is largely determined by the relative inaccessibility of the region. Benthic sampling is largely restricted to the shelf; little is known about the fauna of the deep sea. The location of scientific bases heavily influences the distribution pattern of sample and observation data, and the logistical supply routes are the focus of much of the at-sea and pelagic work. Taxa such as mollusks and echinoderms are well represented within existing datasets with high numbers of georeferenced records. Other taxa, including the species-rich nematodes, are

  10. Integrated quantum key distribution sender unit for daily-life implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mélen, Gwenaelle; Vogl, Tobias; Rau, Markus; Corrielli, Giacomo; Crespi, Andrea; Osellame, Roberto; Weinfurter, Harald

    2016-03-01

    Unlike currently implemented encryption schemes, Quantum Key Distribution provides a secure way of generating and distributing a key among two parties. Although a multitude of research platforms has been developed, the integration of QKD units within classical communication systems remains a tremendous challenge. The recently achieved maturity of integrated photonic technologies could be exploited to create miniature QKD add-ons that could extend the primary function of various existing systems such as mobile devices or optical stations. In this work we report on an integrated optics module enabling secure short-distance communication for, e.g., quantum access schemes. Using BB84-like protocols, Alice's mobile low-cost device can exchange secure key and information everywhere within a trusted node network. The new optics platform (35×20×8mm) compatible with current smartphone's technology generates NIR faint polarised laser pulses with 100MHz repetition rate. Fully automated beam tracking and live basis-alignment on Bob's side ensure user-friendly operation with a quantum link efficiency as high as 50% stable over a few seconds.

  11. Computed-tomography scan-based finite element analysis of stress distribution in premolars restored with composite resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantardžić, I.; Vasiljević, D.; Blažić, L.; Puškar, T.; Tasić, M.

    2012-05-01

    Mechanical properties of restorative material have an effect on stress distribution in the tooth structure and the restorative material during mastication. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of restorative materials with different moduli of elasticity on stress distribution in the three-dimensional (3D) solid tooth model. Computed tomography scan data of human maxillary second premolars were used for 3D solid model generation. Four composite resins with a modulus of elasticity of 6700, 9500, 14 100 and 21 000 MPa were considered to simulate four different clinical direct restoration types. Each model was subjected to a resulting force of 200 N directed to the occlusal surface, and stress distribution and maximal von Mises stresses were calculated using finite-element analysis. We found that the von Mises stress values and stress distribution in tooth structures did not vary considerably with changing the modulus of elasticity of restorative material.

  12. Effects of Composition and Compositional Distribution on the Electronic Structure of ZnSe(1-x)Te(x) Ternary Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Sumeet C.; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    We report results of first-principles density functional theory(DFT) calculations for the electronic structure of ZnSe1- x Te x ternary quantum dots (TQDs) and the effects of composition and compositional distribution on the electron density distribution, electronic density of states, and band gap. We analyze the electronic structure of five types of nanocrystal configurations, namely, pristine ZnSe and ZnTe quantum dots, as well as ZnSe/ZnTe core/shell, ZnTe/ZnSe reverse core/shell, and randomly alloyed ZnSe1- x Te x TQDs. We find that the band gaps for ZnSe/ZnTe core/shell TQDs are nonlinearly dependent on the number of Te atoms in the shell, whereas presence of Te in the core of alloyed ZnSe1- x Te x TQDs modifies the electronic energy levels abruptly and significantly in the limits of x → 0 and x → 1. Our results imply that distribution of Te atoms in the TQD in the form of a ZnSe/ZnTe core/shell configuration allows for optimum tunability of the band gap and wave function confinement in TQDs.

  13. [Interphase distribution of divalent metal ions in aqueous casein-containing systems with variable mineral composition].

    PubMed

    Genkina, N K; Koltysheva, G I; Manakov, M N

    2000-01-01

    The influence of the salt composition of casein-water-Cd(NO3)2 and defatted milk-Cd(NO3)2 systems on the partition of Cd2+ during acidic precipitation of casein was studied. The conditions that minimize the content of the toxicant ion in the isolated protein (pH and salt composition) are determined. PMID:10994194

  14. Thermoelectric figure of merit for bulk nanostructured composites with distributed parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Snarskii, A. A.; Sarychev, A. K.; Bezsudnov, I. V.; Lagarkov, A. N.

    2012-05-15

    The effective properties of composites whose structure includes nanocontacts between bulk-phase macrocrystallites are considered. A model for such a nanostructured composite is constructed. Effective values of the thermoelectric power, thermal and electrical conductivities, and thermoelectric figure of merit are calculated in the mean-field approximation.

  15. Distribution of protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation systems across all domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Perina, Dragutin; Mikoč, Andreja; Ahel, Josip; Ćetković, Helena; Žaja, Roko; Ahel, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of proteins involved in regulation of many cellular pathways. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) consists of chains of repeating ADP-ribose nucleotide units and is synthesized by the family of enzymes called poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). This modification can be removed by the hydrolytic action of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) and ADP-ribosylhydrolase 3 (ARH3). Hydrolytic activity of macrodomain proteins (MacroD1, MacroD2 and TARG1) is responsible for the removal of terminal ADP-ribose unit and for complete reversion of protein ADP-ribosylation. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is widely utilized in eukaryotes and PARPs are present in representatives from all six major eukaryotic supergroups, with only a small number of eukaryotic species that do not possess PARP genes. The last common ancestor of all eukaryotes possessed at least five types of PARP proteins that include both mono and poly(ADP-ribosyl) transferases. Distribution of PARGs strictly follows the distribution of PARP proteins in eukaryotic species. At least one of the macrodomain proteins that hydrolyse terminal ADP-ribose is also always present. Therefore, we can presume that the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes possessed a fully functional and reversible PAR metabolism and that PAR signalling provided the conditions essential for survival of the ancestral eukaryote in its ancient environment. PARP proteins are far less prevalent in bacteria and were probably gained through horizontal gene transfer. Only eleven bacterial species possess all proteins essential for a functional PAR metabolism, although it is not known whether PAR metabolism is truly functional in bacteria. Several dsDNA viruses also possess PARP homologues, while no PARP proteins have been identified in any archaeal genome. Our analysis of the distribution of enzymes involved in PAR metabolism provides insight into the evolution of these important signalling systems, as well as

  16. Microbial Biomass Distribution and Compositional Changes Associated with a Warmer Climate in Boreal Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, L.; Jérôme, J.; Billings, S. A.; Edwards, K.; Morrill, P. L.; Ziegler, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Predicting the physiological and structural changes of the microbial community in warming soils is essential for a functional understanding of climate feedback mechanisms. Laboratory and field experiments have often found that warming increases soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization and decreases microbial biomass, but remain more inconclusive regarding microbial community structure. These experiments, however, have been limited to responses on a time scale of months to years, while soil properties change over decades to centuries. Studies along climate gradients may prove helpful in elucidating how climate history affects soil properties, including microbial community structure. We present the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) based community characterization of the organic (L, F, H) and mineral (B; top 10cm) horizons of podzols from two mesic boreal forest sites similar in most aspects (e.g. stand type, class and age) but differing in mean annual temperature (MAT) by almost 6°C. This temperature difference is similar to the warming predicted for this region by 2100. Results are compared to respiration rates in laboratory incubations. We observed consistent PLFA derived biomass per unit SOC throughout the profile, independent of depth or site. The organic horizons contained similar amounts of SOC and PLFA as the top 10 cm of the mineral horizon (2.5-3.4 kg C m-2; 10.3-12.6 mmol PLFA m-2). Within the organic horizon, the greatest proportion of SOC and PLFA were found in the F horizon. The overall distribution of PLFA among the soil horizons was largely unaffected by climate regime, except that biomass was shifted from F to L horizons at the warmer site (from 12% to 29% of total organic horizon PLFA located in L) indicating that biomass was located closer to the surface in warmer sites. A similar shift was found in respiration (26 vs. 42% of organic horizon CO2 from L). As expected, community structure changed with depth. The abundance of fungal and protozoan PLFA

  17. Feeding into old age: long-term effects of dietary fatty acid supplementation on tissue composition and life span in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ruf, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Smaller mammals, such as mice, possess tissues containing more polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) than larger mammals, while at the same time live shorter lives. These relationships have been combined in the ‘membrane pacemaker hypothesis of aging’. It suggests that membrane PUFA content might determine an animal’s life span. PUFAs in general and certain long-chain PUFAs in particular, are highly prone to lipid peroxidation which brings about a high rate of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We hypothesized that dietary supplementation of either n-3 or n-6 PUFAs might affect (1) membrane phospholipid composition of heart and liver tissues and (2) life span of the animals due to the altered membrane composition, and subsequent effects on lipid peroxidation. Therefore, we kept female laboratory mice from the C57BL/6 strain on three diets (n-3 PUFA rich, n-6 PUFA rich, control) and assessed body weights, life span, heart, and liver phospholipid composition after the animals had died. We found that while membrane phospholipid composition clearly differed between feeding groups, life span was not directly affected. However, we were able to observe a positive correlation between monounsaturated fatty acids in cardiac muscle and life span. PMID:20981551

  18. Life span and tissue distribution of 111indium-labeled blood platelets in hypomagnesemic lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.D.; Miller, J.K.; White, P.K.; Ramsey, N.

    1983-05-01

    Circulating platelets may be activated by exposed triple-helical collagen in atherosclerotic lesions in Mg-deficient ruminants. Autologous platelets, labeled in vitro with 111In and determined to be active, were injected into 5 hypomagnesemic and 3 control lambs fed semipurified diets with 100 or 2,000 mg of Mg/kg of feed for 3 months. During the first 68 hours, 111In concentrations were 11 times higher in packed cells than in plasma. Packed-cell 111In increased 60% during the first 2 hours, probably due to initial tissue sequestration and later release of labeled platelets. Thereafter, platelet half-life span averaged 60 and 63 hours for hypomagnesemic and control lambs. After 68 hours, lambs were injected with native vascular collagen fibrils at 500 micrograms/kg of body weight to initiate reversible platelet aggregation. Within 1 minute, 83% of packed-cell 111In disappeared from circulation. Thirty minutes later, the lambs were euthanatized and necropsied and in the lungs, liver, and spleen, 111In averaged 24%, 19%, and 9%, respectively, of 111In injected 68 hours earlier. Organ deposits were not affected by Mg intake, but 111In in the lungs was somewhat lower in 2 lambs injected with inactivated collagen. Pathologic changes induced by reversible platelet aggregation were compatible with right ventricular failure complicated by pulmonary edema, similar to changes in hypomagnesemic lambs that died spontaneously. Platelets in blood exposed to vascular lesions in hypomagnesemic ruminants could be a major mortality risk factor in grass tetany disease.

  19. Within-twig leaf distribution patterns differ among plant life-forms in a subtropical Chinese forest.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fengqun; Cao, Rui; Yang, Dongmei; Niklas, Karl J; Sun, Shucun

    2013-07-01

    Amax) had more even leaf distribution patterns than evergreen species (which had low LCP, LSP and Amax); shade-adapted evergreen species had more even leaf distribution patterns than sun-adapted evergreen species. We propose that the leaf distribution pattern (i.e., 'evenness' CV, which is an easily measured functional trait) can be used to distinguish among life-forms in communities similar to the one examined in this study.

  20. The Role of Distribution Infrastructure and Equipment in the Life-cycle Air Emissions of Liquid Transportation Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strogen, Bret Michael

    Production of fuel ethanol in the United States has increased ten-fold since 1993, largely as a result of government programs motivated by goals to improve domestic energy security, economic development, and environmental impacts. Over the next decade, the growth of and eventually the total production of second generation cellulosic biofuels is projected to exceed first generation (e.g., corn-based) biofuels, which will require continued expansion of infrastructure for producing and distributing ethanol and perhaps other biofuels. In addition to identifying potential differences in tailpipe emissions from vehicles operating with ethanol-blended or ethanol-free gasoline, environmental comparison of ethanol to petroleum fuels requires a comprehensive accounting of life-cycle environmental effects. Hundreds of published studies evaluate the life-cycle emissions from biofuels and petroleum, but the operation and maintenance of storage, handling, and distribution infrastructure and equipment for fuels and fuel feedstocks had not been adequately addressed. Little attention has been paid to estimating and minimizing emissions from these complex systems, presumably because they are believed to contribute a small fraction of total emissions for petroleum and first generation biofuels. This research aims to quantify the environmental impacts associated with the major components of fuel distribution infrastructure, and the impacts that will be introduced by expanding the parallel infrastructure needed to accommodate more biofuels in our existing systems. First, the components used in handling, storing, and transporting feedstocks and fuels are physically characterized by typical operating throughput, utilization, and lifespan. US-specific life-cycle GHG emission and water withdrawal factors are developed for each major distribution chain activity by applying a hybrid life-cycle assessment methodology to the manufacturing, construction, maintenance and operation of each

  1. Deformation and Life Analysis of Composite Flywheel Disk and Multi-disk Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Saleeb, A. F.; AlZoubi, N. R.

    2001-01-01

    In this study an attempt is made to put into perspective the problem of a rotating disk, be it a single disk or a number of concentric disks forming a unit. An analytical model capable of performing an elastic stress analysis for single/multiple, annular/solid, anisotropic/isotropic disk systems, subjected to both pressure surface tractions, body forces (in the form of temperature-changes and rotation fields) and interfacial misfits is derived and discussed. Results of an extensive parametric study are presented to clearly define the key design variables and their associated influence. In general the important parameters were identified as misfit, mean radius, thickness, material property and/or load gradation, and speed; all of which must be simultaneously optimized to achieve the "best" and most reliable design. Also, the important issue of defining proper performance/merit indices (based on the specific stored energy), in the presence of multiaxiality and material anisotropy is addressed. These merit indices are then utilized to discuss the difference between flywheels made from PMC and TMC materials with either an annular or solid geometry. Finally two major aspects of failure analysis, that is the static and cyclic limit (burst) speeds are addressed. In the case of static limit loads, upper, lower, and out-of-plane bounds for disks with constant thickness are presented for both the case of internal pressure loading (as one would see in a hydroburst test) and pure rotation (as in the case of a free spinning disk). The results (interaction diagrams) are displayed graphically in designer friendly format. For the case of fatigue, a representative fatigue/life master curve is illustrated in which the normalized limit speed versus number of applied cycles is given for a cladded TMC disk application.

  2. Glass Composition Constraint Recommendations for Use in Life-Cycle Mission Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.

    2010-05-03

    The component concentration limits that most influence the predicted Hanford life-cycle HLW glass volume by HTWOS were re-evaluated. It was assumed that additional research and development work in glass formulation and melter testing would be performed to improve the understanding of component effects on the processability and product quality of these HLW glasses. Recommendations were made to better estimate the potential component concentration limits that could be applied today while technology development is underway to best estimate the volume of HLW glass that will eventually be produced at Hanford. The limits for concentrations of P2O5, Bi2O3, and SO3 were evaluated along with the constraint used to avoid nepheline formation in glass. Recommended concentration limits were made based on the current HLW glass property models being used by HTWOS (Vienna et al. 2009). These revised limits are: 1) The current ND should be augmented by the OB limit of OB ≤ 0.575 so that either the normalized silica (NSi) is less that the 62% limit or the OB is below the 0.575 limit. 2) The mass fraction of P2O5 limit should be revised to allow for up to 4.5 wt%, depending on CaO concentrations. 3) A Bi2O3 concentration limit of 7 wt% should be used. 4) The salt accumulation limit of 0.5 wt% SO3 may be increased to 0.6 wt%. Again, these revised limits do not obviate the need for further testing, but make it possible to more accurately predict the impact of that testing on ultimate HLW glass volumes.

  3. Europa's Crust and Ocean: Origin, Composition, and the Prospects for Life

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kargel, J.S.; Kaye, J.Z.; Head, J. W.; Marion, G.M.; Sassen, R.; Crowley, J.K.; Ballesteros, O.P.; Grant, S.A.; Hogenboom, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    We have considered a wide array of scenarios for Europa's chemical evolution in an attempt to explain the presence of ice and hydrated materials on its surface and to understand the physical and chemical nature of any ocean that may lie below. We postulate that, following formation of the jovian system, the europan evolutionary sequence has as its major links: (a) initial carbonaceous chondrite rock, (b) global primordial aqueous differentiation and formation of an impure primordial hydrous crust, (c) brine evolution and intracrustal differentiation, (d) degassing of Europa's mantle and gas venting, (e) hydrothermal processes, and (f) chemical surface alteration. Our models were developed in the context of constraints provided by Galileo imaging, near infrared reflectance spectroscopy, and gravity and magnetometer data. Low-temperature aqueous differentiation from a carbonaceous CI or CM chondrite precursor, without further chemical processing, would result in a crust/ocean enriched in magnesium sulfate and sodium sulfate, consistent with Galileo spectroscopy. Within the bounds of this simple model, a wide range of possible layered structures may result; the final state depends on the details of intracrustal differentiation. Devolatilization of the rocky mantle and hydrothermal brine reactions could have produced very different ocean/crust compositions, e.g., an ocean/crust of sodium carbonate or sulfuric acid, or a crust containing abundant clathrate hydrates. Realistic chemical-physical evolution scenarios differ greatly in detailed predictions, but they generally call for a highly impure and chemically layered crust. Some of these models could lead also to lateral chemical heterogeneities by diapiric upwellings and/or cryovolcanism. We describe some plausible geological consequences of the physical-chemical structures predicted from these scenarios. These predicted consequences and observed aspects of Europa's geology may serve as a basis for further analys is

  4. Influence of Ply Waviness on Fatigue Life of Tapered Composite Flexbeam Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.

    1999-01-01

    Nonlinear tapered flexbeam laminates, with significant ply waviness, were cut from a full-size composite rotor hub flexbeam. The specimens were tested under combined axial tension and cyclic bending loads. All of the specimens had wavy plies through the center and near the surfaces (termed marcelled areas), although for some of the specimens the surface marcels were very obvious, and for others they were much smaller. The specimens failed by first developing cracks through the marcels at the surfaces, and then delaminations grew from those cracks, in both directions. Delamination failure occurred in these specimens at significantly shorter fatigue lives than similar specimens without waviness, tested in ref. 2. A 2D finite element model was developed which closely approximated the flexbeam geometry, boundary conditions, and loading. In addition, the FE model duplicated the waviness observed in one of the test specimens. The model was analyzed using a geometrically nonlinear FE code. Modifications were made to the original model to reduce the amplitude of the marcels near the surfaces. The analysis was repeated for each modification. Comparisons of the interlaminar normal stresses, sigma(sub n), in the various models showed that under combined axial-tension and cyclic-bending loading, for marcels of the same aspect ratio, sigma(sub n) stresses increased as the distance along the taper, from thick to thin end, increased. For marcels of the same aspect ratio and at the same X-location along the taper, sigma(sub n) stresses decreased as the distance from the surface into the flexbeam interior increased. A technique was presented for determining the smallest acceptable marcel aspect ratio at various locations in the flexbeam.

  5. Sulfide isotopic compositions in shergottites and ALH84001, and possible implications for life on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, J.P.; McSween, H.Y. Jr.; Riciputi, L.R.

    1997-10-01

    The shergottite and ALH84001 meteorites hold keys for understanding geologic and possibly biologic processes on Mars. Recently, it has been proposed that carbonates in ALH84001, and the Fe-sulfides they contain, are products of extraterrestrial biogenic activity. Here we report ion microprobe analyses of sulfides in shergottites and ALH84001. The sulfur isotope ratios of igneous pyrrhotites in shergottites (mean {delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT}: Shergotty = -0.4{per_thousand}, Zagami = +2.7{per_thousand}, EETA79001A = 1.9{per_thousand}, EETA79001B = -1.7{per_thousand}, LEW88516 = -1.9{per_thousand}, QUE94201 = +0.8{per_thousand}) are similar to those of terrestrial ocean-floor basalts, suggesting that the sulfur isotopic composition of the Martian mantle may be similar to that of the mantle of the Earth. The sulfur isotopic systematics of ALH84001 sulfides are distinct from the shergottites. Measured sulfur isotope ratios of eight pyrite grains ({delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} = +2.0 to +7.3{per_thousand}) in crushed zones confirm previously reported analyses of isotopically heavy sulfides and are indistinguishable from an Fe-sulfide zone within a carbonate globule ({delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} = +6.0{per_thousand}). Analyses of synthesized, fine-grained mixtures of sulfide, carbonate, and magnetite indicate than the measured sulfur isotope ratio is independent of the presence of carbonate and magnetite in the sputtered volume, confirming the accuracy of the analysis of the fine-grained sulfide in the carbonate globule. Terrestrial biogenic sulfate reduction typically results in light isotopic enrichments. The similarity of {delta}{sup 34}S values of the sulfides in ALH84001 imply that the Fe-sulfide zones within ALH84001 carbonates are probably not the result of bacterial reduction of sulfate. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Strain distribution in the proximal femur with flexible composite and metallic femoral components under axial and torsional loads.

    PubMed

    Otani, T; Whiteside, L A; White, S E

    1993-05-01

    This study investigated strain distribution changes in the proximal femur after implantation of a flexible composite femoral component (carbon composite material, modulus of elasticity = 18.6 GPa), a titanium alloy implant (E = 100 GPa), and a stainless steel implant (E = 200 GPa). Transverse as well as longitudinal strain was measured using bipolar strain gauges at eight locations on the proximal femur under both physiologic axial (1000 N and 2000 N) and physiologic torsional (10 N-m and 20 N-m) loads. Under axial load, longitudinal compressive strain at the calcar region was significantly greater in intact femurs and the carbon composite stem specimens than in the two metal stem specimens. The difference between intact femurs and the carbon composite stem specimens was not significant. Stress shielding in the proximal lateral region of the femur, however, was still apparent even in the carbon composite stem specimens. Without seating of the stem collar on the femoral neck, longitudinal compressive strain was not generated at the calcar region, and transverse tensile strain at this region was increased. With conventional implant design, the stem collar was still necessary even in the flexible composite stem to provide near normal longitudinal compressive strain in the calcar region. Under torsional load, proximal strain in intact femurs was small and the proximal strain levels observed after either carbon composite or titanium alloy stem implantation were greater than strain levels before implantation. It seemed unlikely that torsional stress relief played a significant role in proximal bone loss after total hip arthroplasty. Both longitudinal and transverse strains at the calcar region under torsional load were significantly greater in the carbon composite stem specimens than in both intact femurs and the titanium alloy stem specimens, suggesting that these abnormally high proximal stresses may cause high proximal micromotion of the implant, and even bone

  7. The role of microstructure and phase distribution in the failure mechanisms and life prediction model for PSZ coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisson, R. D., Jr.; Sone, Ichiro; Biederman, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Partially Stabilized Zirconia (PSZ) may become widely used for Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC). Failure of these coatings can occur due to thermal fatigue in oxidizing atmospheres. The failure is due to the strains that develop due to thermal gradients, differences in thermal expansion coefficients, and oxidation of the bond coating. The role of microstructure and the cubic, tetragonal, and monoclinic phase distribution in the strain development and subsequent failure will be discussed. An X-ray diffraction technique for accurate determination of the fraction of each phase in PSZ will be applied to understanding the phase transformations and strain development. These results will be discussed in terms of developing a model for life prediction in PSZ coatings during thermal cycling.

  8. Life cycle analysis of distributed concentrating solar combined heat and power: economics, global warming potential and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, Zack; Kammen, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    We report on life cycle assessment (LCA) of the economics, global warming potential and water (both for desalination and water use in operation) for a distributed concentrating solar combined heat and power (DCS-CHP) system. Detailed simulation of system performance across 1020 sites in the US combined with a sensible cost allocation scheme informs this LCA. We forecast a levelized cost of 0.25 kWh-1 electricity and 0.03 kWh-1 thermal, for a system with a life cycle global warming potential of ˜80 gCO2eq kWh-1 of electricity and ˜10 gCO2eq kWh-1 thermal, sited in Oakland, California. On the basis of the economics shown for air cooling, and the fact that any combined heat and power system reduces the need for cooling while at the same time boosting the overall solar efficiency of the system, DCS-CHP compares favorably to other electric power generation systems in terms of minimization of water use in the maintenance and operation of the plant. The outlook for water desalination coupled with distributed concentrating solar combined heat and power is less favorable. At a projected cost of 1.40 m-3, water desalination with DCS-CHP would be economical and practical only in areas where water is very scarce or moderately expensive, primarily available through the informal sector, and where contaminated or salt water is easily available as feed-water. It is also interesting to note that 0.40-1.90 m-3 is the range of water prices in the developed world, so DCS-CHP desalination systems could also be an economical solution there under some conditions.

  9. Composition and conductance distributions of single GeSi quantum rings studied by conductive atomic force microscopy combined with selective chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Y.; Cui, J.; Jiang, Z. M.; Yang, X. J.

    2013-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy imaging combined with selective chemical etching is employed to quantitatively investigate three-dimensional (3D) composition distributions of single GeSi quantum rings (QRs). In addition, the 3D quantitative composition distributions and the corresponding conductance distributions are simultaneously obtained on the same single GeSi QRs by conductive atomic force microscopy combined with selective chemical etching, allowing us to investigate the correlations between the conductance and composition distributions of single QRs. The results show that the QRs’ central holes have higher Ge content, but exhibit lower conductance, indicating that the QRs’ conductance distribution is not consistent with their composition distribution. By comparing the topography, composition and conductance profiles of the same single QRs before and after different etching processes, it is found that the conductance distributions of GeSi QRs do not vary with the change of composition distribution. Instead, the QRs’ conductance distributions are found to be consistent with their topographic shapes, which can be supposed to be due to the shape determined electronic structures.

  10. Composition and conductance distributions of single GeSi quantum rings studied by conductive atomic force microscopy combined with selective chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Lv, Y; Cui, J; Jiang, Z M; Yang, X J

    2013-02-15

    Atomic force microscopy imaging combined with selective chemical etching is employed to quantitatively investigate three-dimensional (3D) composition distributions of single GeSi quantum rings (QRs). In addition, the 3D quantitative composition distributions and the corresponding conductance distributions are simultaneously obtained on the same single GeSi QRs by conductive atomic force microscopy combined with selective chemical etching, allowing us to investigate the correlations between the conductance and composition distributions of single QRs. The results show that the QRs' central holes have higher Ge content, but exhibit lower conductance, indicating that the QRs' conductance distribution is not consistent with their composition distribution. By comparing the topography, composition and conductance profiles of the same single QRs before and after different etching processes, it is found that the conductance distributions of GeSi QRs do not vary with the change of composition distribution. Instead, the QRs' conductance distributions are found to be consistent with their topographic shapes, which can be supposed to be due to the shape determined electronic structures.

  11. Decapod crustacean larval communities in the Balearic Sea (western Mediterranean): Seasonal composition, horizontal and vertical distribution patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Asvin P.; Dos Santos, Antonina; Balbín, Rosa; Alemany, Francisco; Massutí, Enric; Reglero, Patricia

    2014-10-01

    Decapod crustaceans are the main target species of deep water bottom trawl fisheries in the Balearic Sea but little is known about their larval stages. This work focuses on the species composition of the decapod larval community, describing the main spatio-temporal assemblages and assessing their vertical distribution. Mesozooplankton sampling was carried out using depth-stratified sampling devices at two stations located over the shelf break and the mid slope, in the north-western and southern Mallorca in late autumn 2009 and summer 2010. Differences among decapod larvae communities, in terms of composition, adult's habitat such as pelagic or benthic, and distribution patterns were observed between seasons, areas and station. Results showed that for both seasons most species and developmental stages aggregated within the upper water column (above 75 m depth) and showed higher biodiversity in summer compared to late autumn. Most abundant species were pelagic prawns (e.g., Sergestidae) occurring in both seasons and areas. The larval assemblages' distributions were different between seasonal hydrographic scenarios and during situations of stratified and non-stratified water column. The vertical distribution patterns of different larval developmental stages in respect to the adult's habitat were analyzed in relation to environmental variables. Fluorescence had the highest explanatory power. Four clearly different vertical patterns were identified: two corresponding to late autumn, which were common for all the main larval groups and other two in summer, one corresponding to larvae of coastal benthic and the second to pelagic species larvae.

  12. Species composition, richness, and distribution of marine bivalve molluscs in Bahía de Mazatlán, México

    PubMed Central

    Esqueda-González, María del Carmen; Ríos-Jara, Eduardo; Galván-Villa, Cristian Moises; Rodríguez-Zaragoza, Fabian Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We describe the composition and distribution of bivalve molluscs from the sandy and rocky intertidal and the shallow subtidal environments of Bahía de Mazatlán, México. The bivalve fauna of the bay is represented by 89 living species in 28 families, including 37 new records and four range extensions: Lithophaga hastasia, Adula soleniformis, Mactrellona subalata, and Strigilla ervilia. The number of species increases from the upper (44) and lower intertidal (53) to the shallow subtidal (76), but only 11 (17%) have a wide distribution in the bay (i.e., found in all sampling sites and environments). The bivalve assemblages are composed of four main life forms: 27 epifaunal species, 26 infaunal, 16 semi-infaunal, and 20 endolithic. A taxonomic distinctness analysis identified the sampling sites and environments that contribute the most to the taxonomic diversity (species to suborder categories) of the bay. The present work increased significantly (31%) to 132 species previous inventories of bivalves of Bahía de Mazatlán. These species represent 34% of the bivalve diversity of the southern Golfo de California and approximately 15% of the Eastern Tropical Pacific region. PMID:24843252

  13. Enzymatic Activity, Bacterial Distribution, and Organic Matter Composition in Sediments of the Ross Sea (Antarctica)

    PubMed Central

    Fabiano, Mauro; Danovaro, Roberto

    1998-01-01

    Enzymatic activities of aminopeptidase and β-glucosidase were investigated in Antarctic Ross Sea sediments at two sites (sites B and C, 567 and 439 m deep, respectively). The sites differed in trophic conditions related to organic matter (OM) composition and bacterial distribution. Carbohydrate concentrations at site B were about double those at site C, while protein and lipid levels were 10 times higher. Proteins were mainly found in a soluble fraction (>90%). Chloropigment content was generally low and phaeopigments were almost absent, indicating the presence of reduced inputs of primary organic matter. ATP concentrations (as a measure of the living microbial biomass) were significantly higher at site B. By contrast, benthic bacterial densities at site C were about double those at site B. Bacterial parameters do not appear to be “bottom-up controlled” by the amount of available food but rather “top-down controlled” by meiofauna predatory pressure, which was significantly higher at site B. Aminopeptidase and β-glucosidase extracellular enzyme activities (EEA) in Antarctic sediments appear to be high and comparable to those reported for temperate or Arctic sediments and characterized by low aminopeptidase/β-glucosidase ratios (about 10). Activity profiles showed decreasing patterns with increasing sediment depth, indicating vertical shifts in both availability and nutritional quality of degradable OM. Vertical profiles of aminopeptidase activity were related to a decrease in protein concentration and/or to an increase in the insoluble refractory proteinaceous fraction. The highest aminopeptidase activity rates were observed at site C, characterized by much lower protein concentrations. Differences in EEA between sites do not seem to be explained by differences in the in situ temperature (−1.6 and −0.8°C at sites B and C, respectively). Aminopeptidase activity profiles are consistent with the bacterial biomass and frequency of dividing cells. Enzyme

  14. CHANGES IN BACTERIAL COMPOSITION OF BIOFILM IN A METROPOLITAN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined the development of bacterial biofilms within a metropolitan distribution system. The distribution system is fed with different source water (i.e., groundwater, GW and surface water, SW) and undergoes different treatment processes in separate facilities. The b...

  15. Creating Composite Age Groups to Smooth Percentile Rank Distributions of Small Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Francesca; Olson, Amy; Bansal, Naveen

    2011-01-01

    Individually administered tests are often normed on small samples, a process that may result in irregularities within and across various age or grade distributions. Test users often smooth distributions guided by Thurstone assumptions (normality and linearity) to result in norms that adhere to assumptions made about how the data should look. Test…

  16. Deep-sea surface-dwelling enteropneusts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Their ecology, distribution and mode of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Daniel O. B.; Alt, Claudia H. S.; Priede, Imants G.; Reid, William D. K.; Wigham, Benjamin D.; Billett, David S. M.; Gebruk, Andrey V.; Rogacheva, Antonina; Gooday, Andrew J.

    2013-12-01

    The ecology, distribution and mode of life of three species of surface-dwelling enteropneusts is described, based on ROV observations and samples on the flanks of the Northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at comparative stations north and south of the Sub-Polar Front. Tergivelum cinnabarinum was most abundant in the north (mean=4.56 ind. 1000 m-2±3.50 s.d.) and occurred at low densities in the south (mean=1.19±1.68 s.d.). Yoda purpurata was dominant in the south (mean=17.00 ind. 1000 m-2±12.32 s.d.) but only one individual was found in the north. The within-station distribution of all enteropneust species encountered was generally random. T. cinnabarinum was larger (mean total length 142 mm) than Y. purpurata (mean total length 70 mm). Size distributions suggested smaller individuals of both species on the western side of the MAR. Size and density of enteropneusts were generally higher in areas with higher carbon flux to the seafloor. A single individual of Allapasus isidis was observed drifting and settling to the seafloor at the SW site. Traces on the seafloor made by T. cinnabarinum covered a much higher percentage of the total seabed area surveyed (mean=0.323%±0.155 s.d.) than those of Y. purpurata (mean=0.034%±0.037 s.d.). Stable isotope values for T. cinnabarinum suggested that it was a typical surficial deposit feeder. Enteropneusts appear to be abundant and an important bioturbator on the sedimented seafloor of the MAR at around 2500 m depth.

  17. Evaluation of two fiber optic-based solar collection and distribution systems for advanced space life support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, D. A.; Nakamura, T.; Sadler, P.; Cuello, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Growing plants in an enclosed controlled environment is crucial in developing bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS) for space applications. The major challenge currently facing a BLSS is the extensive use of highly energy-intensive electric light sources, which leads to substantial energy wastes through heat dissipations by these lamps. An alternative lighting strategy is the use of a solar irradiance collection, transmission, and distribution system (SICTDS). Two types of fiber optic-based SICTDS, a Fresnel-lens Himawari and a parabolic-mirror optical waveguide (OW) lighting system, were evaluated. The overall efficiency for the OW SICTDS of 40.5% exceeded by 75% that for the Himawari of 23.2%. The spectral distributions of the light delivered by the Himawari and the OW SICTDS were almost identical and had practically no difference from that of terrestrial solar radiation. The ratios of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) to total emitted radiation (k) of 0.39 +/- 0.02 for the Himawari and 0.41 +/- 0.04 for the OW SICTDS were statistically indistinguishable, were not significantly different from that of 0.042 +/- 0.01 for terrestrial solar radiation, and were comparable to that of 0.35 for a high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamp. The coefficients of variation (CV) of 0.34 and 0.39 for PPF distributions, both at 50 mm X 50 mm square grid arrays, corresponding to the Himawari and the OW SICTDS, respectively, were comparable with each other but were both significantly greater than the CV of 0.08 corresponding to the HPS lamp. The average fresh weight or dry weight of lettuce grown in the solar chamber with either the Himawari or the OW SICTDS showed no statistical difference from the average fresh weight or dry weight of lettuce grown in the reference chamber with the HPS lamp. The results of this study suggest that an SICTDS could help reduce the electric power demand in a BLSS.

  18. Quantitative assessment on the orientation and distribution of carbon fibers in a conductive polymer composite using high-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hsun; Huang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Shyh-Hau

    2012-05-01

    Conductive polymer composites, typically fabricated from a mix of conductive fillers and a polymer substrate, are commonly applied as bipolar plates in a fuel cell stack. Electrical conductivity is a crucial property that greatly depends on the distribution and orientation of the fillers. In this study, a 50-MHz ultrasound imaging system and analysis techniques capable of nondestructively assessing the properties of carbon fibers (CFs) in conductive polymer composites were developed. Composite materials containing a mix of polycarbonate substrates and 0 to 0.3 wt% of CFs were prepared using an injection molding technique. Ultrasonic A-line signals and C-scan images were acquired from each composite sample in regions at a depth of 0.15 mm beneath the sample surface (region A) and those at a depth of 0.3 mm (region B). The integrated backscatter (IB) and the Nakagami statistical parameter were calculated to quantitatively assess the samples. The area ratio, defined as the percentage of areas composed of CF images normalized by that of the whole C-scan image, was applied to further quantify the orientation of CFs perpendicular to the sample surface. Corresponding to the increase in CF concentrations from 0.1 to 0.3 wt%, the average IB and Nakagami parameter (m) of the composite samples increased from -78.10 ± 2.20 (mean ± standard deviation) to -72.66 ± 1.40 dB and from 0.024 ± 0.012 to 0.048 ± 0.011, respectively. The corresponding area ratios were respectively estimated to be 0.78 ± 0.35%, 2.33 ± 0.66%, and 2.20 ± 0.60% in region A of the samples; those of CFs with a perpendicular orientation were 0.04 ± 0.03%, 0.08 ± 0.02%, and 0.12 ± 0.05%. The area ratios in region B of the samples were calculated to be 1.19 ± 0.54%, 2.81 ± 0.42%, and 2.64 ± 0.76%, and those of CFs with a perpendicular orientation were 0.07 ± 0.04%, 0.12 ± 0.04%, and 0.14 ± 0.03%. According to the results of the orientations and ultrasonic images, CFs tended to distribute more

  19. Nitrate distribution and isotopic composition in vadose-zone sediments underlying large dairy operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, B. K.; Singleton, M. J.; Moran, J. E.; Roberts, S. K.; Barton, C. G.; Watanabe, N.; Harter, T.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the transport and cycling of nitrate in the vadose zone is essential to 1) linking agronomic models of nitrate flux out of the root zone to groundwater models of nitrate loading at the water table, 2) quantifying the impact of vadose-zone biogeochemical processes on nitrate isotopic composition for the purpose of source attribution, and 3) constraining transport time scales through the vadose zone in order to assess the impact of changes in agricultural nutrient management on underlying groundwater quality. In this study, we have investigated the isotopic composition of water-leachable nitrate extracted from sediment cores underlying three dairy operations in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California. One of the dairy operations is new (less than ten years old) and is sited on former range land; the other two operations are older (with one having been continuously operated for over a century). All use dairy wastewater for irrigation, and have vadose zones of 25-60 meters thickness developed in sedimentary sequences dominated by alluvial fan deposits. Sediment core samples from a UC-Davis monitor well drilling program were extracted with an equal amount of ultrapure water, and analyzed for nitrate isotopic composition using the denitrifying bacteria method at LLNL. The range in nitrate isotopic composition (δ15N,air = 4.8 to 26.6 permil, δ18O,VSMOW = -0.3 to 16.2 permil) is large, comparable to isotopic compositions observed in dairy wastewater-impacted groundwaters (Singleton et al., 2007, ES&T 41:759-765), and varies from site to site. The range is the largest on the oldest operation (δ15N = 5.2 to 26.6), and most tightly clustered on the youngest operation (δ15N = 4.8 to 7.8). Leachable nitrate-δ18O correlates with nitrate-δ15N along a characteristic denitrification trend for individual cores. Leachable nitrate-δ15N is not simply correlated with leachable nitrate concentration (which is generally high in shallow sediments and decreases

  20. Composition, spatial distribution, and diversity of the bacterial communities in the rumen of cows fed different forages.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yunhong; Teather, Ronald; Forster, Robert

    2010-12-01

    The species composition, distribution, and biodiversity of the bacterial communities in the rumen of cows fed alfalfa or triticale were investigated using 16S rRNA gene clone library analyses. The rumen bacterial community was fractionated and analyzed as three separate fractions: populations in the planktonic, loosely attached to rumen digesta particles, and tightly attached to rumen digesta particles. Six hundred and thirteen operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to 32 genera, 19 families, and nine phyla of the domain Bacteria were identified from 1014 sequenced clones. Four hundred and fifty one of the 613 OTUs were identified as new species. These bacterial sequences were distributed differently among the three fractions in the rumen digesta of cows fed alfalfa or triticale. Chao 1 estimation revealed that, in both communities, the populations tightly attached to particulates were more diverse than the planktonic and those loosely attached to particulates. S-Libshuff detected significant differences in the composition between any two fractions in the rumen of cows with the same diet and between the communities fed alfalfa and triticale diets. The species richness estimated for the communities fed alfalfa and triticale is 1027 and 662, respectively. The diversity of the rumen bacterial community examined in this study is greater than previous studies have demonstrated and the differences in the community composition between two high-fiber diets have implications for sample selection for downstream metagenomics applications.

  1. Fatigue Life Prediction of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures. Part I: Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental analysis on the fatigue behavior in C/SiC ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) with different fiber preforms, i.e., unidirectional, cross-ply and 2.5D woven, at room and elevated temperatures in air atmosphere. The experimental fatigue life S - N curves of C/SiC composites corresponding to different stress levels and test conditions have been obtained. The damage evolution processes under fatigue loading have been analyzed using fatigue hysteresis modulus and fatigue hysteresis loss energy. By comparing the experimental fatigue hysteresis loss energy with theoretical computational values, the interface shear stress corresponding to different peak stress, fiber preforms and test conditions have been estimated. It was found that the degradation of interface shear stress and fibres strength caused by oxidation markedly decreases the fatigue life of C/SiC composites at elevated temperature.

  2. Calf foetal and early life nutrition on grazing conditions: metabolic and endocrine profiles and body composition during the growing phase.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, V; Espasandin, A C; Astessiano, A L; Casal, A; López-Mazz, C; Carriquiry, M

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of nutrition during foetal and lactation periods on calf growth and body composition, and their association with changes in metabolic and endocrine profiles during the calf first year of life on purebred (Hereford and Angus) and cross-bred (F1) dam offspring. Forty cross-bred calves and their dams (purebred--PU: Hereford and Angus, and cross-bred--CR: F1) were used in a randomized block design with a factorial arrangement of herbage allowance of native pastures (high: Hi-HA and low: Lo-HA), 4 vs. 2.5 kg dry matter/kg body weight (BW) and dam genotype (PU vs. CR). Calf BW and blood samples were collected monthly from birth to 380±15 days of age, and body composition was estimated by the urea dilution technique at weaning (142±15 days) and 380 days. Calf birthweight did not differ among groups but from birth to 380 days, and BW was reduced (p=0.046) in Lo-PU offspring. Although Lo-CR calves achieved similar BW than Hi-PU and Hi-CR offspring, they showed an increased fat in detriment of lean tissue deposition. At birth, plasma total protein was less (p=0.04), while plasma glucose, insulin or IGF-I tended or were greater (p<0.072) in Hi-HA than Lo-HA calves. Greater (p<0.03) plasma total protein and/or glucose concentrations during the first months of lactation were observed in CR offspring associated with the greater dam milk production. Although glucose concentrations did not differ among calf groups after weaning, plasma insulin was greater (p=0.004) in Hi-PU than other groups at 380 days. Consistent with the reduced BW, Lo-PU offspring presented the lowest (p=0.026) plasma IGF-I from birth to 380 days. Herbage allowance of native grasslands during calf foetal and lactation periods interacted with maternal heterosis to affect, in the short and/or long term, calf BW or body composition, and metabolic and endocrine profiles. PMID:22712599

  3. Effect of re-melting on particle distribution and interface formation in SiC reinforced 2124Al matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Durbadal; Viswanathan, Srinath

    2013-12-15

    The interface between metal matrix and ceramic reinforcement particles plays an important role in improving properties of the metal matrix composites. Hence, it is important to find out the interface structure of composite after re-melting. In the present investigation, the 2124Al matrix with 10 wt.% SiC particle reinforced composite was re-melted at 800 °C and 900 °C for 10 min followed by pouring into a permanent mould. The microstructures reveal that the SiC particles are distributed throughout the Al-matrix. The volume fraction of SiC particles varies from top to bottom of the composite plate and the difference increases with the decrease of re-melting temperature. The interfacial structure of re-melted 2124Al–10 wt.%SiC composite was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, an electron probe micro-analyzer, a scanning transmission electron detector fitted with scanning electron microscopy and an X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer. It is found that a thick layer of reaction product is formed at the interface of composite after re-melting. The experimental results show that the reaction products at the interface are associated with high concentration of Cu, Mg, Si and C. At re-melting temperature, liquid Al reacts with SiC to form Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} and Al–Si eutectic phase or elemental Si at the interface. High concentration of Si at the interface indicates that SiC is dissociated during re-melting. The X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer analyses confirm that Mg- and Cu-enrich phases are formed at the interface region. The Mg is segregated at the interface region and formed MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} in the presence of oxygen. The several elements identified at the interface region indicate that different types of interfaces are formed in between Al matrix and SiC particles. The Al–Si eutectic phase is formed around SiC particles during re-melting which restricts the SiC dissolution. - Highlights: • Re-melted composite shows homogeneous particle

  4. Depth distribution and composition of seed banks under different tree layers in a managed temperate forest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godefroid, Sandrine; Phartyal, Shyam S.; Koedam, Nico

    2006-05-01

    In the present work we examined the composition and distribution across three soil layers of the buried soil seed bank under three different overstory types ( Fagus sylvatica, Quercus robur, Pinus sylvestris) and in logging areas in a 4383-ha forest in central Belgium. The objectives were: (1) to investigate whether species composition and species richness of soil seed banks are affected by different forest stands; (2) to examine how abundant are habitat-specific forest species in seed banks under different planted tree layers. The study was carried out in stands which are replicated, managed in the same way (even-aged high forest), and growing on the same soil type with the same land-use history. In the investigated area, the seed bank did show significant differences under oak, beech, pine and in logging areas, respectively in terms of size, composition and depth occurrence. All species and layers taken together, the seed bank size ranked as follows: oakwood > beechwood > logging area > pinewood. The same pattern was found for forest species. Seed numbers of Betula pendula, Calluna vulgaris, Dryopteris dilatata and Rubus fruticosus were significantly higher under the beech canopy. Carex remota, Impatiens parviflora and Lotus sp. showed a significantly denser seed bank in logging areas, while Digitalis purpurea seeds were significantly more abundant in soils under the oak canopy. The fact that the seed bank of an originally homogeneous forest varies under different planted stands highlights that a long period of canopy conversion can affect the composition and depth of buried seeds.

  5. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of stress distribution in composite resin cores with fiber posts of varying diameters.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kazuhiko; Ino, Teruno; Iwase, Naoki; Shimizu, Eitaroh; Suzuki, Megumi; Satoh, Goh; Ohkawa, Shuji; Fujisawa, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    Using three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA), stress distributions in the remaining radicular tooth structure were investigated under the condition of varying diameters of fiber post for fiber post-reinforced composite resin cores (fiber post and core) in maxillary central incisors. Four 3D-FEA models were constructed: (1) fiber post (ø1.2, ø1.4, and ø1.6 mm) and composite resin core; and (2) gold-cast post and core. Maximum stresses in the tooth structure for fiber post and core were higher than that for gold-cast post and core. In the former models, stresses in the tooth structure as well as in the composite resin were slightly reduced with increase in fiber post diameter. These results thus suggested that to reduce stress in the remaining radicular tooth with a large coronal defect, it is recommended to accompany a composite resin core with a fiber post of a large diameter. PMID:18309611

  6. Damage detection tomography based on guided waves in composite structures using a distributed sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memmolo, Vittorio; Maio, Leandro; Boffa, Natalino Daniele; Monaco, Ernesto; Ricci, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on guided waves allows assessing the health of a structure due to the sensitivity to the occurrence of delamination. However, wave propagation presents several complexities for effective damage identification in composite structures. An efficient implementation of a guided wave-based SHM system requires an accurate analysis of collected data to obtain a useful detection. This paper is concerned with the identification of small emerging delaminations in composite structural components using a sparse array of surface ultrasonic transducers. An ultrasonic-guided wave tomography technique focused on impact damage detection in composite plate-like structures is presented. A statistical damage index approach is adopted to interpret the recorded signals, and a subsequent graphic interpolation is implemented to reconstruct the damage appearance. Experimental tests carried out on a typical composite structure demonstrated the effectiveness of the developed technique with the aim to investigate the presence and location of damage using simple imaging reports and a limited number of measurements. A traditional ultrasonic inspection (C-scan) is used to assess the methodology.

  7. Monte Carlo Simulation of Thermal Conductivity in Randomly Distributed Nanowire Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.; Yang, R.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we investigated the thermal conductivity of composites made of two types of randomly stacked nanowires with high contrast ratio of bulk thermal conductivity. Thermal conductivity predictions based on solving the phonon Boltzmann transport equation by using the Monte Carlo method are presented for different contrast ratios of thermal conductivity, sizes of nanowires and the volumetric fractions in the composites. For composites made of nanowires with high contrast ratio thermal conductivity, the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites increase dramatically when the volumetric fraction of high thermal conductivity nanowire is higher than the geometry percolation threshold, although existing correlations in percolation theory do not fit the results due to the phonon interface scattering. On the other hand, when the the size of nanowires is small and the volumetric fraction of high thermal conductivity nanowire is less than percolation threshold, the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites decreases with increasing the volumetric fraction of the high thermal conductivity nanowires. The results of this study may help the development of nanoscale thermoelectric materials in which the figure of merit is optimized by choosing appropriate nanowire size, property contrast and composition. RY acknowledges the funding support for this work by DoD/AFOSR MURI grant FA9550-06-1-0326. The simulation was conducted on a 24-node cluster supported by Intel Corporation and managed by Prof. Gang Chen and Mr. Lu Hu at MIT.

  8. Aerosol Size Distribution, Composition, and Hygroscopicity Measurements During CSTRIPE Using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Dual Differential Mobility Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahreini, R.; Varutbangkul, V.; Conant, W. C.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Buzorius, G.; Jonsson, H. H.

    2003-12-01

    During July 2003, the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft was deployed in the CSTRIPE (Coastal STRatocumulus Imposed Perturbation Experiment) field experiment in order to quantify the effects of aerosols on the microphysics and dynamics of marine stratocumulus clouds. In order to characterize the effects of different aerosol types on stratocumulus clouds, various air masses were sampled, including local fire plumes, pollution over the San Joaquin valley, unperturbed marine stratocumulus clouds, and stratocumulus clouds perturbed by seeding flares. Some research flights were also dedicated to characterize the seeding flares in the clear sky. Measurements of aerosol mass distribution and composition, using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), and size distribution and hygroscopic behavior, using a Dual Differential Mobility Analyzer (Dual DMA) with one column at dry conditions and another at a relative humidity of approximately 70 percent, will be presented here. During a number of in-cloud sampling periods, the Counter-flow Virtual Impactor (CVI) was used to select and dry cloud droplets, which were then analyzed by the AMS and the Dual DMA. The AMS composition measurements showed that sulfate and organics comprised most of the mass of the non-refractory components of the aerosol. The DMA showed a mixture of unimodal and bimodal size distributions in most types of air masses. The air mass over the San Joaquin valley, however, showed strong evidence of freshly nucleated particles, with aerosol number concentrations often above 80,000 cm-3.

  9. Influence of post and resin cement on stress distribution of maxillary central incisors restored with direct resin composite.

    PubMed

    Spazzin, A O; Galafassi, D; de Meira-Júnior, A D; Braz, R; Garbin, C A

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated the influence of two endodontic post systems and the elastic modulus and film thickness of resin cement on stress distribution in a maxillary central incisor (MCI) restored with direct resin composite using finite element analysis (FEA). A three-dimensional model of an MCI with a coronary fracture and supporting structures was performed. A static chewing pressure of 2.16 N/mm2 was applied to two areas on the palatal surface of the composite restoration. Zirconia ceramic (ZC) and glass fiber (GF) posts were considered. The stress distribution was analyzed in the post, dentin and cement layer when ZC and GF posts were fixed to the root canals using resin cements of different elastic moduli (7.0 and 18.6 GPa) and different layer thicknesses (70 and 200 microm). The different post materials presented a significant influence on stress distribution with lesser stress concentration when using the GF post. The higher elastic modulus cement created higher stress levels within itself. The cement thicknesses did not present significant changes. PMID:19363979

  10. Pyrolysis as a way to close a CFRC life cycle: Carbon fibers recovery and their use as feedstock for a new composite production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgini, Loris; Benelli, Tiziana; Mazzocchetti, Laura; Leonardi, Chiara; Zattini, Giorgio; Minak, Giangiacomo; Dolcini, Enrico; Tosi, Cristian; Montanari, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Pyrolysis is shown to be an efficient method for recycling carbon fiber composites in the form of both uncured prepregs scraps or as cured end-of-life objects. The pyrolytic process leads to different products in three physical states of matter. The gaseous fraction, called syngas, can be used as energy feedstock in the process itself. The oil fraction can be used as fuel or chemical feedstock. The solid residue contains substantially unharmed carbon fibers that can be isolated and recovered for the production of new composite materials, thus closing the life cycle of the composite in a "cradle to cradle" approach. All the pyrolysis outputs were thoroughly analyzed and characterized in terms of composition for oil and gas fraction and surface characteristics of the fibers. In particular, it is of paramount importance to correlate the aspect and properties of the fibers obtained with different composite feedstock and operational conditions, that can be significantly different, with the reinforcing performance in the newly produced Recycled Carbon Fibers Reinforced Polymers. Present results have been obtained on a pyrolysis pilot plant that offers the possibility of treating up to 70kg of materials, thus leading to a significant amount of products to be tested in the further composites production, focused mainly on chopped carbon fiber reinforcement.

  11. [Species composition and main populations spatial distribution pattern in Korean pine broadleaved forest in Xiaoxing' An Mountains of Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Hou, Hong-Ya; Wang, Li-Hai

    2013-11-01

    Taking the Korean pine broadleaved forest in Liangshui Nature Reserve of Heilongjiang Province, Northeast China as test object, this paper studied the species composition and diameter class structure, and by using point pattern analysis, analyzed the spatial distribution pattern and spatial association of the main populations. In the Reserve, there were a total of 16 species with diameter greater than 1 cm in tree layer, and great differences were observed in the densities of main populations. Coniferous trees such as Pinus koraiensis and Abies nephrolepis were dominant. The diameter class structure of the populations presented as an inverse "J" curve, indicating a good regeneration across the community. The main populations were mostly in aggregated distribution pattern, except that the P. koraiensis populations at the scales of 19-21 m and 44 m as well as the Acer tegmentosum populations close to the largest research scale were in random distribution. The P. koraiensis populations at all research scales were approximately in random distribution, and had the minimum aggregation. A. nephrolepis, Tilia amurensis, and A. tegmentosum populations all presented a random distribution trend. Except that the P. koraiensis and A. nephrolepis at 2-3 m scale and the A. nephrolepis and A. tegmentosum populations at 37-81 m scale had significant positive association, no significant associations were observed between other populations. All the tree species presented an overall non-significant positive association. PMID:24564130

  12. Comparison of Fatigue Life Between C/SiC and SiC/SiC Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the comparison of fatigue life between C/SiC and SiC/SiC ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) at room and elevated temperatures has been investigated. An effective coefficient of the fiber volume fraction along the loading direction (ECFL) was introduced to describe the fiber architecture of preforms. Under cyclic fatigue loading, the fibers broken fraction was determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at room temperature, and interface/fibers oxidation model, interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at elevated temperatures in the oxidative environments. When the broken fibers fraction approaches to the critical value, the composites fatigue fracture. The fatigue life S-N curves and fatigue limits of cross-ply, 2D and 3D C/SiC and SiC/SiC composites at room temperature, 550 °C in air, 750 °C in dry and humid condition, 800 °C in air, 1000 °C in argon and air, 1100 °C, 1300 °C and 1500 °C in vacuum, have been predicted. At room temperature, the fatigue limit of 2D C/SiC composite with ECFL of 20 % lies between 0.78 and 0.8 tensile strength; and the fatigue limit of 2D SiC/SiC composite with ECFL of 20 % lies between 0.75 and 0.85 tensile strength. The fatigue limit of 2D C/SiC composite increases to 0.83 tensile strength with ECFL increasing from 20 to 22.5 %, and the fatigue limit of 3D C/SiC composite is 0.85 tensile strength with ECFL of 37 %. The fatigue performance of 2D SiC/SiC composite is better than that of 2D C/SiC composite at elevated temperatures in oxidative environment.

  13. Comparison of Fatigue Life Between C/SiC and SiC/SiC Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the comparison of fatigue life between C/SiC and SiC/SiC ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) at room and elevated temperatures has been investigated. An effective coefficient of the fiber volume fraction along the loading direction (ECFL) was introduced to describe the fiber architecture of preforms. Under cyclic fatigue loading, the fibers broken fraction was determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at room temperature, and interface/fibers oxidation model, interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at elevated temperatures in the oxidative environments. When the broken fibers fraction approaches to the critical value, the composites fatigue fracture. The fatigue life S-N curves and fatigue limits of cross-ply, 2D and 3D C/SiC and SiC/SiC composites at room temperature, 550 °C in air, 750 °C in dry and humid condition, 800 °C in air, 1000 °C in argon and air, 1100 °C, 1300 °C and 1500 °C in vacuum, have been predicted. At room temperature, the fatigue limit of 2D C/SiC composite with ECFL of 20 % lies between 0.78 and 0.8 tensile strength; and the fatigue limit of 2D SiC/SiC composite with ECFL of 20 % lies between 0.75 and 0.85 tensile strength. The fatigue limit of 2D C/SiC composite increases to 0.83 tensile strength with ECFL increasing from 20 to 22.5 %, and the fatigue limit of 3D C/SiC composite is 0.85 tensile strength with ECFL of 37 %. The fatigue performance of 2D SiC/SiC composite is better than that of 2D C/SiC composite at elevated temperatures in oxidative environment.

  14. Silicon Isotopic Composition of Isua BIF and Other Early Archean Supracrustal Rocks: a Tracer for Early Life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, L.; Cardinal, D.; Alleman, L. Y.; Moorbath, S.

    2004-12-01

    High temperature vapor condensations and stardust forming stellar outflows strongly differentiate Si-isotopes (-650\\permil<\\delta29Si<+200\\permil). In contrast, on Earth, the major cause of slight Si isotope fractionation (-1.8\\permil <\\delta29Si <+1.5\\permil) is related to preferential biological uptake of 28Si by diatoms, radiolarian, sponges and plants in building their opaline frustules, spicules and phytoliths. As a consequence, modern waters, clays, soils and sediments are also fractionated: -0.9\\permil<\\delta29Si<+1.7\\permil, while Phanerozoic magmatic and metamorphic processes leave terrestrial crystalline rocks almost unfractionated: -0.4\\permil <\\delta29Si <+0.2\\permil. Spectacular claims for discovery of oldest evidence for terrestrial life in early Archean (ca 3.7-3.8 Ga) metamorphosed rocks from southern West Greenland have been challenged in a series of studies, and there is need for some independent tracer to gain new insights into the quest for primitive life. In order to unravel potentialities of silicon isotopes, we determined the Si-isotope composition of four groups of rocks from the Isua Greenstone Belt: magnetite-quartz "Banded Iron Formations" (BIF); mica-feldspar-quartz-(garnet) schists of potential pelitic origin; a series of tonalitic gneisses, metabasalt pillows, volcanogenic sediments and hydrothermal quartz veins and vesicles. Specimens were powdered using diamond-coated microdrills. Si was purified by TEA molybdate co-precipitation and measured on a Nu Plasma MC-ICP-MS using Mg external doping in dry plasma mode following Cardinal et al's (2003) methodology. Measured 29Si/28Si are expressed with the \\delta29Si notation relative to the NBS28 quartz standard. Overall reproducibility assessed on 5 BIF duplicates is better than 0.08\\permil. Merck Quartz aliquots processed in the same way as the Isua specimens are unfractionated, showing that our chemical procedure does not produce any isotopic artefacts. Metasediments yield

  15. Abundance, composition, and distribution of crustacean zooplankton in relation to hypolimnetic oxygen depletion in west-central Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heberger, Roy F.; Reynolds, James B.

    1977-01-01

    Samples of crustacean zooplankton were collected monthly in west-central Lake Erie in April and June to October 1968, and in July and August 1970, before and during periods of hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen (DO) depletion. The water column at offshore stations was thermally stratified from June through September 1968, and the hypolimnion contained no DO in mid-August of 1968 or 1970. Composition, abundance, and vertical distribution of crustacean zooplankton changed coincidentally with oxygen depletion. From July to early August, zooplankton abundance dropped 79% in 1968 and 50% in 1970. The declines were attributed largely to a sharp decrease in abundance of planktonic Cyclops bicuspidatus thomasi. Zooplankton composition shifted from mainly cyclopoid copepods in July to mainly cladocerans and copepod nauplii in middle to late August. We believe that mortality of adults and dormancy of copepodites in response to anoxia was the probable reason for the late summer decline in planktonic C. b. thomasi.

  16. Failure models for textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    1995-01-01

    The goals of this investigation were to: (1) identify mechanisms of failure and determine how the architecture of reinforcing fibers in 3D woven composites controlled stiffness, strength, strain to failure, work of fracture, notch sensitivity, and fatigue life; and (2) to model composite stiffness, strength, and fatigue life. A total of 11 different angle and orthogonal interlock woven composites were examined. Composite properties depended on the weave architecture, the tow size, and the spatial distributions and strength of geometrical flaws. Simple models were developed for elastic properties, strength, and fatigue life. A more complicated stochastic model, called the 'Binary Model,' was developed for damage tolerance and ultimate failure. These 3D woven composites possessed an extraordinary combination of strength, damage tolerance, and notch insensitivity.

  17. Failure models for textile composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.

    1995-08-01

    The goals of this investigation were to: (1) identify mechanisms of failure and determine how the architecture of reinforcing fibers in 3D woven composites controlled stiffness, strength, strain to failure, work of fracture, notch sensitivity, and fatigue life; and (2) to model composite stiffness, strength, and fatigue life. A total of 11 different angle and orthogonal interlock woven composites were examined. Composite properties depended on the weave architecture, the tow size, and the spatial distributions and strength of geometrical flaws. Simple models were developed for elastic properties, strength, and fatigue life. A more complicated stochastic model, called the `Binary Model,` was developed for damage tolerance and ultimate failure. These 3D woven composites possessed an extraordinary combination of strength, damage tolerance, and notch insensitivity.

  18. Distribution of ether lipids and composition of the archaeal community in terrestrial geothermal springs: impact of environmental variables.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Wang, Jinxiang; Chen, Yufei; Zhu, Yuanqing; de la Torre, José R; Dong, Hailiang; Hartnett, Hilairy E; Hedlund, Brian P; Klotz, Martin G

    2015-05-01

    Archaea can respond to changes in the environment by altering the composition of their membrane lipids, for example, by modification of the abundance and composition of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs). Here, we investigated the abundance and proportions of polar GDGTs (P-GDGTs) and core GDGTs (C-GDGTs) sampled in different seasons from Tengchong hot springs (Yunnan, China), which encompassed a pH range of 2.5-10.1 and a temperature range of 43.7-93.6°C. The phylogenetic composition of the archaeal community (reanalysed from published work) divided the Archaea in spring sediment samples into three major groups that corresponded with spring pH: acidic, circumneutral and alkaline. Cluster analysis showed correlation between spring pH and the composition of P- and C-GDGTs and archaeal 16S rRNA genes, indicating an intimate link between resident Archaea and the distribution of P- and C-GDGTs in Tengchong hot springs. The distribution of GDGTs in Tengchong springs was also significantly affected by temperature; however, the relationship was weaker than with pH. Analysis of published datasets including samples from Tibet, Yellowstone and the US Great Basin hot springs revealed a similar relationship between pH and GDGT content. Specifically, low pH springs had higher concentrations of GDGTs with high numbers of cyclopentyl rings than neutral and alkaline springs, which is consistent with the predominance of high cyclopentyl ring-characterized Sulfolobales and Thermoplasmatales present in some of the low pH springs. Our study suggests that the resident Archaea in these hot springs are acclimated if not adapted to low pH by their genetic capacity to effect the packing density of their membranes by increasing cyclopentyl rings in GDGTs at the rank of community.

  19. Martian Surface Composition From Multiple Datasets, Part II: Chemical Analysis of Global Mineral Distributions from MGS-TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, V. E.; Rogers, D.

    2010-12-01

    Koeppen and Hamilton [2008, JGR-Planets] produced global mineral maps of Mars from Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data using a library of mineral and amorphous phase spectra and a linear least squares fitting algorithm. Here we will use known or estimated bulk chemistries of the phases in the Koeppen and Hamilton [2008] spectral library, along with each phase's modeled abundance in the TES data from that work, to calculate effective bulk chemistry for Martian dark regions at a spatial resolution of ~3x6 km. By doing this, we are able to analyze global bulk chemical variation as well as enable direct comparisons between TES data and chemical/elemental abundance maps (e.g., wt.% SiO2) produced using data collected by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer. A second chemical analysis also makes use of the Koeppen and Hamilton [2008] global mineral maps and focuses on the spatial variations in solid solution chemistry among feldspars, pyroxenes, high silica phases (e.g., silica, phyllosilicates, zeolites), and sulfates. Koeppen and Hamilton [2008] demonstrated that there is a range of Mg-Fe olivine compositions on Mars and that there are distinct geographic distributions of those phases, pointing to spatial variations in geologic processes. We use the same methodology to search for correlations between geography (e.g., geologic unit, latitude), elevation, and chemical (solid solution) composition. Preliminary analyses of pyroxene chemical variation reveal that globally, low-Ca pyroxenes are dominated by the clinopyroxene pigeonite and that among orthopyroxenes, Mg-rich phases (enstatite) are virtually never identified and phases with greater proportions of Fe (bronzite and hypersthene) are identified in distinct geographic and/or geologic terrains. Only the distribution of hypersthene (the composition of pyroxene in the Martian meteorite ALH 84001) correlates with the OMEGA-mapped distribution of low-Ca pyroxene suggesting that OMEGA-based maps of high-Ca pyroxene may include

  20. Estimation of Thickness and Cadmium Composition Distributions in HgCdTe Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzali, S.; Lefebvre, S.; Rommeluère, S.; Ferrec, Y.; Primot, J.

    2016-09-01

    Mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) is one of the most commonly used material systems for infrared detection. The performance of infrared focal-plane arrays (IRFPAs) based on this material is limited by several noise sources. In this paper, we focus on the fixed pattern noise, which is related to disparities between the spectral responses of pixels. In our previous work, we showed that spectral nonuniformities in a HgCdTe IRFPA were caused by inhomogeneities of thickness and cadmium composition in the HgCdTe layer, using an optical description of the pixel structure. We propose to use this bidimensional dependence combined with experimental spectral responses to estimate disparities of thickness and cadmium composition in a specific HgCdTe-based IRFPA. The estimation methods and the resulting maps are presented, highlighting the accuracy of this nondestructive method.

  1. Synthesis of supported bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size and composition distributions for active site elucidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim, Sikander H.; Sener, Canan; Alba Rubio, Ana C.; Gostanian, Thomas M.; O'neill, Brandon J; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Dumesic, James A

    2015-08-01

    Elucidation of active sites in supported bimetallic catalysts is complicated by the high level of dispersity in the nanoparticle size and composition that is inherent in conventional methods of catalyst preparation. We present a synthesis strategy that leads to highly dispersed, bimetallic nanoparticles with uniform particle size and composition by means of controlled surface reactions. We demonstrate the synthesis of three systems, RhMo, PtMo, and RhRe, consisting of a highly reducible metal with an oxophilic promoter. These catalysts are characterized by FTIR, CO chemisorption, STEM/EDS, TPR, and XAS analysis. The catalytic properties of these bimetallic nanoparticles were probed for the selective CO hydrogenolysis of (hydroxymethyl)tetrahydropyran to produce 1,6 hexanediol. Based on the characterization results and reactivity trends, the active sites in the hydrogenolysis reaction are identified to be small ensembles of the more noble metal (Rh, Pt) adjacent to highly reduced moieties of the more oxophilic metal (Mo, Re).

  2. Distribution and enantiomeric composition of amino acids in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, M. H.; Nagy, B.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the amino acid contents and enantiomeric compositions of a single stone from the Murchison meteorite are reported. Water-extracted and 6M HCl-extracted samples from the meteorite interior of meteorite fragments were analyzed by gas chromatography and combined gas chromatography-chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Examination of the D/L ratios of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, proline, leucine and alanine reveals those amino acids extractable by water to be partially racemized, whereas the acid-extracted amino acids were less racemized. The amino acid composition of the stone is similar to those previously reported, including the absence of serine, threonine, tyrosine phenylalanine and methionine and the presence of unusual amino acids including such as isovaline, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid and pseudoleucine. It is concluded that the most likely mechanism accounting for the occurrence of nonracemic amino acid mixtures in the Murchison meteorite is by extraterrestrial stereoselective synthesis or decomposition reactions.

  3. Spectroscopic study of the Moses Lake dune field, Washington: Determination of compositional distributions and source lithologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandfield, Joshua L.; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2002-11-01

    Source lithologies and transport histories of materials within the Ephrata Fan are investigated. Data were collected using a variety of remote-sensing, laboratory spectroscopic, and field observations and techniques. Laboratory thermal emission spectra were collected of bedrock within the Grand Coulee, dune samples, and clast deposits. Factor analysis, target transformation, and end-member recovery techniques were applied to the set of dune samples as well as a set of grain size fractions. The dune sample spectra are composed of three components that represent basalt, granodiorite, and clay compositions. The basalt and granodiorite components are similar to spectra of clast and bedrock samples from the Grand Coulee and the Ephrata Fan. The clay component is similar to weathering surfaces located within the dune field. The same components were recovered from the set of grain size fractions from a single dune sample demonstrating a relatively higher basalt concentration with grain sizes greater than ~250 μm. Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data display significant intradune compositional variation and no discernable interdune compositional variation, indicating that the basalt and granodiorite components were likely deposited simultaneously and subsequently separated by wind based on grain size. Basalt and granodiorite bedrock units within the Channeled Scablands are source materials for the deposits within the Ephrata Fan and Moses Lake dune field. The Columbia River, located 20 km west of the dune field, is not a likely source of material.

  4. [Effects of heavy metals pollution on paddy soil aggregates composition and heavy metals distribution].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang-Yun; Li, Lian-Qing; Pan, Gen-Xing; Cui, Li-Qiang; Li, Hong-Lei; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Shao, Jie-Qi

    2009-11-01

    Topsoil samples were collected from a polluted and an adjacent non-polluted paddy field in the Taihu Lake region of China. Different particle size fractions of soil aggregates were separated by low-energy dispersion procedure, and their mass composition and Pb, Cd, Hg, and As concentrations were determined. Under heavy metals pollution, the mass composition of sand-sized fractions reduced, while that of clay-sized fractions increased. The concentrations of test metals in different particle size fractions differed, with the highest in < 0.002 mm fraction, followed by in 2-0.2 mm fraction. In 0.02-0.002 mm and 0.2-0.02 mm fractions, all the test metals were relatively deficient, with an enrichment index of 0.56-0.96. The present study showed that the aggregation of fine particles could be depressed by heavy metals pollution, which in turn, led to a relative increase in the mass composition of fine particles and the associated allocation of heavy metals in weakly aggregated silt particles, and further, increased the risks of heavy metals translocation from polluted farmland into water and atmosphere. Further studies should be made on the impacts of heavy metals pollution on soil biophysical and biochemical processes and related mechanisms.

  5. Search for quark compositeness in dijet angular distributions from pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-05-01

    A search for quark compositeness using dijet angular distributions from pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is presented. The search has been carried out using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 inverse femtobarns, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Normalized dijet angular distributions have been measured for dijet invariant masses from 0.4 TeV to above 3 TeV and compared with a variety of contact interaction models, including those which take into account the effects of next-to-leading-order QCD corrections. The data are found to be in agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD, and lower limits are obtained on the contact interaction scale, ranging from 7.5 up to 14.5 TeV at 95% confidence level.

  6. Particles in the lower troposphere over the High Plains of the United States. I - Size distributions, elemental compositions and morphologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, P. V.; Radke, W. F.; Bowdle, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Airborne measurements of particle size distributions obtained during the spring and summer of 1975-1976 at various locations in the high plains of the U.S. are presented. The instrumentation and techniques used to collect the data are described. Particle number, surface area, and volume distribution are measured; differences in particle concentrations are investigated. Variables in particle size are related to changes in strength of ground sources of Aitken nuclei, age of the particle population, and presence or absence of rain. An accumulation mode between particles diameters of 0.1-1 micron, a coarse particle mode between particle diameters between 10-20 microns, and a nucleation mode at particle diameters less than 0.1 micron are detected. The control of the accommodation and coarse particle modes and their influence on particle concentration are studied. The elemental composition of the particles is analyzed and the morphologies are examined with an electron scanner microscope.

  7. A Monte Carlo simulation on critical current distribution of bent-damaged multifilamentary Bi2223 composite tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, S.; Okuda, H.; Fujimoto, M.; Shin, J. K.; Oh, S. S.; Ha, D. W.

    2011-11-01

    It was attempted to reproduce the measured critical current ( I c) distributions of the Bi2223 composite tape bent by 0-0.833% by simulation. Simulation was carried out with a Monte Carlo method in combination with a model that correlates the critical current to damage evolution. Two variables that differ from specimen to specimen were input in the simulation. One was the damage strain parameter, with which the difference in extent of damage among specimens was expressed. Another was the original critical current ( I c0) values at zero bending strain. With the present simulation approach, the measured distributions of critical current at various bending strains, and the measured variations of average and coefficient of variation of critical current values with increasing bending strain were reproduced well.

  8. Effects of mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distribution in fiber-reinforced composite adhesive fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Daiichiro; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Using finite element analysis (FEA), this study investigated the effects of the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements on stress distributions in fiber-reinforced resin composite (FRC) adhesive fixed partial dentures (AFPDs). Two adhesive resin cements were compared: Super-Bond C&B and Panavia Fluoro Cement. The AFPD consisted of a pontic to replace a maxillary right lateral incisor and retainers on a maxillary central incisor and canine. FRC framework was made of isotropic, continuous, unidirectional E-glass fibers. Maximum principal stresses were calculated using finite element method (FEM). Test results revealed that differences in the mechanical properties of adhesive resin cements led to different stress distributions at the cement interfaces between AFPD and abutment teeth. Clinical implication of these findings suggested that the safety and longevity of an AFPD depended on choosing an adhesive resin cement with the appropriate mechanical properties. PMID:22447051

  9. Distribution and elemental composition of suspended matter in Alaskan coastal waters

    SciTech Connect

    Feely, R.A.; Massoth, G.J.; Paulson, A.J.; Lamb, M.F.

    1980-09-01

    The distribution of suspended matter in the northeastern Gulf of Alaska is affected by a number of parameters which combine to form a unique distribution pattern. East of Kayak Island the surface particulate matter distributions are dominated by the discharge of sedimentary material from the coastal streams which drain the Beering, Guyot and Malaspina Glaciers. The major source of sedimentary material to the Gulf of Alaska is the Copper River. In general, concentrations of suspended matter in the northeast Gulf of Alaska are high at the surface with an average concentration of approximately 1.0 mg/l. Recent studies of oil spills in coastal waters containing high suspended loads have indicated rapid dispersal and removal of the oil by sorption onto particles along frontal zones.

  10. Switching field distribution of exchange coupled ferri-/ferromagnetic composite bit patterned media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oezelt, Harald; Kovacs, Alexander; Fischbacher, Johann; Matthes, Patrick; Kirk, Eugenie; Wohlhüter, Phillip; Heyderman, Laura Jane; Albrecht, Manfred; Schrefl, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the switching field distribution and the resulting bit error rate of exchange coupled ferri-/ferromagnetic bilayer island arrays by micromagnetic simulations. Using islands with varying microstructure and anisotropic properties, the intrinsic switching field distribution is computed. The dipolar contribution to the switching field distribution is obtained separately by using a model of a triangular patterned island array resembling 1.4 Tb/in2 bit patterned media. Both contributions are computed for different thicknesses of the soft exchange coupled ferrimagnet and also for ferromagnetic single phase FePt islands. A bit patterned media with a bilayer structure of FeGd( 5 nm )/FePt( 5 nm ) shows a bit error rate of 10-4 with a write field of 1.16 T .

  11. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John G.

    The Composites market is arguably the most challenging and profitable market for phenolic resins aside from electronics. The variety of products and processes encountered creates the challenges, and the demand for high performance in critical operations brings value. Phenolic composite materials are rendered into a wide range of components to supply a diverse and fragmented commercial base that includes customers in aerospace (Space Shuttle), aircraft (interiors and brakes), mass transit (interiors), defense (blast protection), marine, mine ducting, off-shore (ducts and grating) and infrastructure (architectural) to name a few. For example, phenolic resin is a critical adhesive in the manufacture of honeycomb sandwich panels. Various solvent and water based resins are described along with resin characteristics and the role of metal ions for enhanced thermal stability of the resin used to coat the honeycomb. Featured new developments include pultrusion of phenolic grating, success in RTM/VARTM fabricated parts, new ballistic developments for military vehicles and high char yield carbon-carbon composites along with many others. Additionally, global regional market resin volumes and sales are presented and compared with other thermosetting resin systems.

  12. A feasibility study of altered spatial distribution of losses induced by eddy currents in body composition analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tomographic imaging has revealed that the body mass index does not give a reliable state of overall fitness. However, high measurement costs make the tomographic imaging unsuitable for large scale studies or repeated individual use. This paper reports an experimental investigation of a new electromagnetic method and its feasibility for assessing body composition. The method is called body electrical loss analysis (BELA). Methods The BELA method uses a high-Q parallel resonant circuit to produce a time-varying magnetic field. The Q of the resonator changes when the sample is placed in its coil. This is caused by induced eddy currents in the sample. The new idea in the BELA method is the altered spatial distribution of the electrical losses generated by these currents. The distribution of losses is varied using different excitation frequencies. The feasibility of the method was tested using simplified phantoms. Two of these phantoms were rough estimations of human torso. One had fat in the middle of its volume and saline solution in the outer shell volume. The other had reversed conductivity distributions. The phantoms were placed in the resonator and the change in the losses was measured. Five different excitation frequencies from 100 kHz to 200 kHz were used. Results The rate of loss as a function of frequency was observed to be approximately three times larger for a phantom with fat in the middle of its volume than for one with fat in its outer shell volume. Conclusions At higher frequencies the major signal contribution can be shifted toward outer shell volume. This enables probing the conductivity distribution of the subject by weighting outer structural components. The authors expect that the loss changing rate over frequency can be a potential index for body composition analysis. PMID:21047441

  13. The distribution and life cycle of the dinoflagellate Spatulodinium pseudonoctiluca (Dinophyceae, Noctilucales) in the northeastern English Channel.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Fernando; Souissi, Sami

    2007-03-01

    The distribution of Spatulodinium (= Gymnodinium) pseudonoctiluca (Pouchet) J. Cachon & M. Cachon has been investigated for eight years (1998-2005) in the northeastern English Channel, type locality of the species and its immature stages. The species can be found after the spring diatom bloom from late May to October. The highest abundance was found in June 2004 after the Phaeocystis bloom. Exceptionally, the Phaeocystis bloom was absent in 2005 and only several specimens of S. pseudonoctiluca were observed. The immature and mature stages of Spatulodinium nearly always co-occurred. No other kofoidiniaceans such as Kofoidinium or Pomatodinium were observed. The first stages of the development of Spatulodinium can easily confuse with gymnodiniaceans. The transformation of the stage 'D', which has been described as Gymnodinium lebouriae (= G. fulgens) or Gymnodinium conicum (= G. viridis), into the mature stage, is illustrated. The stage 'D' originates from a cluster of pairs of smaller cells joined by an elongate episome. In the boreal Atlantic Ocean, Spatulodinium pseudonoctiluca, a single species whose life stages are often reported as separate species, is especially adapted to a strongly fluctuant environment.

  14. Size distribution and composition of phosphorus in the East Tiao River, China: the significant role of colloids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Liang, Xinqiang; Yang, Jianjun; Ye, Yushi; Su, Miaomiao; Nie, Zeyu; Chen, Yingxu

    2011-10-01

    The environmental risk of aquatic phosphorus (P) critically depends on its mobility and bioavailability, both of which are greatly affected by the size distribution and composition of P. The size distribution (particulate, colloidal and truly dissolved phase) of P, composed of molybdate reactive P (MRP) and molybdate unreactive P (MUP), was determined at twenty-three typical sections of the East Tiao River, China in the plum rain season. Results indicated particulate P was dominant followed by the truly dissolved P, while colloidal P was quantitatively the lowest in the whole river. From upstream to downstream, particulate P sharply increased, along with a slight decrease of truly dissolved P. However, colloidal P remained at a relatively stable level in the whole river, ranging from below detection limit to 0.025 mg L(-1), 0 to 13.4% of total P (TP). Furthermore, colloidal MRP exhibited a rising trend downriver as compared to upriver, with the notable transfer of MRP from the truly dissolved phase to particulate and colloidal phases. Particle concentration effect for colloids, observed in the study of MRP distribution, further corroborated the role of colloids in MRP solid/liquid partitioning. These observations, in this large-scale field investigation, fitted the "colloidal pumping" hypothesis. It may be concluded that colloids act as the intermediate and buffer in the dynamically balanced transfer of P from truly dissolved phase to large particulate phase, having a significant role in size distribution of P.

  15. Bacterial Composition of Biofilms Collected From Two Service Areas in a Metropolitan Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development and succession of bacteria were examined by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries generated from various biofilms within a metropolitan water distribution system. Biofilms were obtained from off-line devices using polycarbonate coupons from annular reactors incubated for ...

  16. Bacterial Composition in a Metropolitan Drinking Water Distribution System Utilizing Different Source Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial community structure was investigated from bulk phase water samples of multiple collection sites from two service areas within the Cincinnati drinking water distribution system (DWDS). Each area is associated with a different primary source of water (i.e., groundwat...

  17. Microbial life in variably saturated soil aggregates - upscaling gaseous fluxes across distributed aggregate sizes in a soil profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Ebrahimi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies revealed highly dynamic and rich behavior of microbial communities inhabiting soil aggregates. Modeling of these processes in three dimensional (unsaturated) pore networks provided insights into the unique conditions essential for coexistence of oxic and anoxic microsites that shape (and respond to) aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities. Soil hydration dynamics continuously alter the spatial extent of anoxic niches (hotspots) that flicker in time (hot moments) and support anaerobic microbial activity even in unsaturated and oxic soil profiles. We extend a model for individual-based microbial community growth in 3-D angular pore networks mimicking soil aggregates of different sizes placed in different ambient boundary conditions reflecting profiles of water, carbon, and oxygen in soil. An upscaling scheme was developed to account for aerobic and anaerobic activity within each aggregate class size and soil depth integrated over the aggregate size distribution in the soil for a range of hydration conditions. Results show that dynamic adjustments in microbial community composition affect CO2 and N2O production rates in good agreement with experimental data. The modeling approach addresses a long-standing challenge of linking hydration conditions to dynamic adjustments of microbial communities within "hotspots" with the emergence of "hot moments" reflecting high rates of denitrification and organic matter decomposition.

  18. Soil type-depending effect of paddy management: composition and distribution of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanski, Livia; Kölbl, Angelika; Lehndorff, Eva; Houtermans, Miriam; Schad, Peter; Zhang, Gang-Lin; Rahayu Utami, Sri; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    Paddy soil management is assumed to promote soil organic matter accumulation and specifically lignin caused by the resistance of the aromatic lignin structure against biodegradation under anaerobic conditions during inundation of paddy fields. The present study investigates the effect of paddy soil management on soil organic matter composition compared to agricultural soils which are not used for rice production (non-paddy soils). A variety of major soil types, were chosen in Indonesia (Java), including Alisol, Andosol and Vertisol sites (humid tropical climate of Java, Indonesia) and in China Alisol sites (humid subtropical climate, Nanjing). This soils are typically used for rice cultivation and represent a large range of soil properties to be expected in Asian paddy fields. All topsoils were analysed for their soil organic matter composition by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and lignin-derived phenols by CuO oxidation method. The soil organic matter composition, revealed by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, was similar for the above named different parent soil types (non-paddy soils) and was also not affected by the specific paddy soil management. The contribution of lignin-related carbon groups to total SOM was similar in the investigated paddy and non-paddy soils. A significant proportion of the total aromatic carbon in some paddy and non-paddy soils was attributed to the application of charcoal as a common management practise. The extraction of lignin-derived phenols revealed low VSC (vanillyl, syringyl, cinnamyl) values for all investigated soils, being typical for agricultural soils. An inherent accumulation of lignin-derived phenols due to paddy management was not found. Lignin-derived phenols seem to be soil type-dependent, shown by different VSC concentrations between the parent soil types. The specific paddy management only affects the lignin-derived phenols in Andosol-derived paddy soils which are characterized by

  19. Distribution of stable isotopes in arid storms . I. Relation between the distribution of isotopic composition in rainfall and in the consequent runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adar, E. M.; Dody, A.; Geyh, M. A.; Yair, A.; Yakirevich, A.; Issar, A. S.

    Temporal distributions of the isotopic composition in arid rain storms and in the associated runoff were investigated in a small arid rocky basin in Israel. Customized rain and runoff samplers provided sequential water samples hermetically sealed in high-density PVC bags. In several storms where the runoff was isotopically depleted, compared with the rainfall, the difference could not be explained by fractionation effects occurring during overland flow. A water-balance study relating the runoff discharge to rainfall over a rocky watershed showed that the entire discharge is produced by a very small segment (1-2mm) of the rain storm. The major objective, therefore, was to provide quantitative relations between segments of rainfall (rain showers and rain spells) and runoff. The time distribution of the composition of stable isotopes (oxygen and hydrogen) was used to quantify the correlation between the rain spell's amount and the consequent runoff. The aim of this work was to (a) utilize the dynamic variations in the isotopic composition in rainfall and runoff and model the magnitude of surface-storage capacity associated with runoff processes of overland flow, and (b) characterize the isotopic composition of the percolating water with respect to the isotopic distribution in rainfall and runoff events. The conceptual model postulates an isotopic mixing of overland flow with water within the depression storage. A transport model was then formulated in order to estimate the physical watershed parameters that control the development of overland flow from a certain rainfall period. Part I (this paper) presents the results and the assessment of the relative depression storage obtained from oxygen-18 and deuterium analyses that lead to the physical and mathematical formulation of a double-component model of kinematic-wave flow and transport, which is presented in Part II (accompanying paper). Résumé Les variations temporelles, en zone aride, de la composition isotopique

  20. The Impact of Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions and Detailed Exhaust Chemical Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Stetter, J; Forster, N; Ghandhi, J; Foster, D

    2003-08-24

    Detailed exhaust emission data have been taken from a Cummins N-14 single cylinder research engine in which the oil consumption was varied by different engine modifications. Low sulfur fuel was used, and oil consumption was varied by modifying the intake valve stem seals, the exhaust valve stem seals, the oil control ring and combinations of these modifications. Detailed measurements of exhaust gas particle size distributions and chemical composition were made for the various oil consumption configurations for a range of engine loads and speeds. The particulate mass was measured with TEOM and traditional gravimetric filter methods. Filter data for EC/OC, sulfates and trace metals have been taken and analyzed. The trace metals in the particulate mass serve as the basis for assessing oil consumption at the different operating conditions. The data indicate that the oil consumption for the steady state testing done here was approximately an order of magnitude below oil consumption values cited in the literature. We did measure changes in the details of the chemical composition of the particulate for the different engine operating conditions, but it did not correlate with changes in the oil consumption. Furthermore, the data indicate that the particle size distribution is not strongly impacted by low level oil consumption variations observed in this work.

  1. Simplified Shear Solution for Determination of the Shear Stress Distribution in a Composite Panel from the Applied Shear Resultant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Collier, Craig S.

    2008-01-01

    The simplified shear solution method is presented for approximating the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate or panel based on laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem; rather it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants (as determined, for instance, by finite element analysis) at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply by ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. Comparisons to existing theories are made for a variety of laminates, and design examples are provided illustrating the use of the method for determining through-thickness shear stress margins in several types of composite panels and in the context of a finite element structural analysis.

  2. Probing the Structure, Composition, and Spatial Distribution of Ligands on Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Hore, Michael J A; Ye, Xingchen; Ford, Jamie; Gao, Yuzhi; Fei, Jiayang; Wu, Qiong; Rowan, Stuart J; Composto, Russell J; Murray, Christopher B; Hammouda, Boualem

    2015-09-01

    The structure and size of ligands attached to the surfaces of gold nanorods, such as adsorbed surfactants or grafted polymers, are important considerations that facilitate the use of such nanoparticles in the human body, in advanced materials for energy harvesting, or in devices for single molecule detection. Here, we report small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from surfactant or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coated gold nanorods in solution, which quantitatively determine the location, structure, and composition of these surface layers. In addition, by synthesizing gold nanorods using seed crystals which are coated with deuterated cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (dCTAB), we are able to exploit the isotopic sensitivity of SANS to study, for the first time, the retention of surfactant from the seed crystals to the final gold nanorod product, finding that very little exchange of the deuterated with hydrogenated surfactant occurs. Finally, we demonstrate that, when Au NRs are PEGylated using standard techniques, the surfactant bilayer remains intact, and while mass spectrometry detects the presence of both surfactant and PEG, the composition as measured from SANS is predominantly that of the surfactant. These measurements not only provide new insight into the synthesis and functionalization of gold nanorods but provide a quantitative picture of the structure of grafted polymer and surfactant layers on gold nanorod surfaces which has implications for the fabrication of plasmonic and biomedical materials.

  3. Lifelong maintenance of composition, function and cellular/subcellular distribution of proteasomes in human liver.

    PubMed

    Bellavista, Elena; Martucci, Morena; Vasuri, Francesco; Santoro, Aurelia; Mishto, Michele; Kloss, Alexander; Capizzi, Elisa; Degiovanni, Alessio; Lanzarini, Catia; Remondini, Daniel; Dazzi, Alessandro; Pellegrini, Sara; Cescon, Matteo; Capri, Miriam; Salvioli, Stefano; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Dahlmann, Burkhardt; Grazi, Gian Luca; Franceschi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Owing to organ shortage, livers from old donors are increasingly used for transplantation. The function and duration of such transplanted livers are apparently comparable to those from young donors, suggesting that, despite some morphological and structural age-related changes, no major functional changes do occur in liver with age. We tested this hypothesis by performing a comprehensive study on proteasomes, major cell organelles responsible for proteostasis, in liver biopsies from heart-beating donors. Oxidized and poly-ubiquitin conjugated proteins did not accumulate with age and the three major proteasome proteolytic activities were similar in livers from young and old donors. Analysis of proteasomes composition showed an age-related increased of β5i/α4 ratio, suggesting a shift toward proteasomes containing inducible subunits and a decreased content of PA28α subunit, mainly in the cytosol of hepatocytes. Thus our data suggest that, proteasomes activity is well preserved in livers from aged donors, concomitantly with subtle changes in proteasome subunit composition which might reflect the occurrence of a functional remodelling to maintain an efficient proteostasis. Gender differences are emerging and they deserve further investigations owing to the different aging trajectories between men and women. Finally, our data support the safe use of livers from old donors for transplantation.

  4. Salp distribution and size composition in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, S.; Siegel, V.; Litvinov, F.; Loeb, V.; Watkins, J.

    2004-06-01

    Salp abundance and length frequency were measured during the large-scale CCAMLR 2000 Survey conducted in the Atlantic Sector of the Southern Ocean in the 1999/2000 season. Results from regional surveys around Elephant Island in 1994/95 and 1996/97 seasons also were examined. During the CCAMLR 2000 Survey, salp abundance was higher in the Antarctic Peninsula and South Sandwich Island areas than in the central Scotia Sea. The probable reason for this pattern is a negative relationship with phytoplankton abundance; the central Scotia Sea having greater phytoplankton concentrations than required for optimal salp filter-feeding performance. Cluster analysis of salp size composition resulted in three cluster groups for each of the three surveys. Clusters comprising large salps occurred in warmer waters in all three surveys. The size composition of the salp populations suggests that the timing of intense asexual reproductive budding was earlier in warmer waters. As surface water temperatures generally decrease from north to south, and increase from spring to summer, the general spatio-temporal pattern of asexual reproduction by budding is likely to proceed from north to south as the summer season progresses.

  5. Alkane distribution and carbon isotope composition in fossil leaves: An interpretation of plant physiology in the geologic past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, H. V.; Freeman, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The relative chain-length distribution and carbon-isotope composition of n-alkanes extracted from sedimentary rocks are important geochemical tools for investigating past terrestrial ecosystems. Alkanes preserved in ancient sediments are assumed to be contemporaneous, derived from the same ecosystem, and integrated from the biomass present on the landscape at the time of deposition. Further, there is an underlying assumption that ancient plants exhibited the same metabolic and physiological responses to climate conditions that are observed for modern plants. Interpretations of alkane abundances and isotopic signatures are complicated by the strong influence of phylogenetic affiliation and ecological factors, such as canopy structure. A better understanding of how ecosystem and taxa influence alkane properties, including homologue abundance patterns and leaf-lipid carbon isotope fractionation would help strengthen paleoecological interpretations based on these widely employed plant biomarkers. In this study, we analyze the alkane chain-length distribution and carbon-isotope composition of phytoleim and alkanes (d13Cleaf and d13Clipid) extracted from a selection of Cretaceous and Paleocene fossil leaves from the Guaduas and Cerrejon Formations of Colombia. These data were compared with data for the same families in a modern analogue biome. Photosynthetic and biosynthetic fractionation (∆leaf and elipid) values determined from the fossil material indicate carbon metabolism patterns were similar to modern plants. Fossil data were incorporated in a biomass-weighted mixing model to represent the expected lipid complement of sediment arising from this ecosystem and compared with alkane measurements from the rock matrix. Modeled and observed isotopic and abundance patterns match well for alkane homologs most abundant in plants (i.e., n-C27 to n-C33). The model illustrates the importance of understanding biases in litter flux and taphonomic pressures inherent in the

  6. Vertical distribution and isotopic composition of living planktonic foraminifera in the western North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbanks, R.G.; Wiebe, P.H.; Be, A.W.H.

    1980-01-04

    Thirteen species of planktonic foraminifera collected with vertically stratified zooplankton tows in the slope water, Gulf Stream cold core ring, and northern Sargasso Sea show significant differences in their vertical distributions in the upper 200 meters of these different hydrographic regimes. Gulf Stream cold core rings may be responsible for a southern displacement of the faunal boundary associated with the Gulf Stream when reconstructed from the deep-sea sediment record. Oxygen isotope analyses of seven species reveal that nonspinose species (algal symbiont-barren) apparently calcify in oxygen isotope equilibrium, whereas spinose species usually calcify out of oxygen isotope equilibrium by approximately -0.3 to -0.4 per mil in delta/sup 18/O values. The isotope data indicate that foraminifera shells calcify in depth zones that are significantly narrower than the overall vertical distribution of a species would imply.

  7. Carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in lunar fines 15012 and 15013 - Abundances, distributions and isotopic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Lawless, J.; Romiez, M.; Kaplan, I. R.; Petrowski, C.; Sakai, H.; Smith, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lunar fines 15012,16 and 15013,3 were analyzed by stepwise pyrolysis and acid hydrolysis as well as complete combustion in oxygen to determine carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. In addition, hydrogen was analysed during pyrolysis as well as during hydrolysis. By comparison of the distribution frequencies of C, N, S, H2 and Fe with He-4, considered to have arisen from solar wind contribution, it is concluded that nitrogen and hydrogen have largely a solar origin. Carbon has a significant solar contribution, and metallic iron may have resulted from solar wind interaction with ferrous minerals on the lunar surface. Sulfur probably has a predominantly lunar origin. There is no direct evidence for meteorotic contribution to these samples. Solar wind interaction also has a marked effect on the stable isotope distribution of C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, and S-34/S-32. In all cases, the heavy isotope was most enriched in the smallest grain-size fraction.

  8. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, M.; Nosewicz, S.; Pietrzak, K.; Rojek, J.; Strojny-Nędza, A.; Mackiewicz, S.; Dutkiewicz, J.

    2014-11-01

    It is commonly known that the properties of sintered materials are strongly related to technological conditions of the densification process. This paper shows the sintering behavior of a NiAl-Al2O3 composite, and its individual components sintered separately. Each kind of material was processed via the powder metallurgy route (hot pressing). The progress of sintering at different stages of the process was tested. Changes in the microstructure were examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Metal-ceramics interface was clean and no additional phases were detected. Correlation between the microstructure, density, and mechanical properties of the sintered materials was analyzed. The values of elastic constants of NiAl/Al2O3 were close to intermetallic ones due to the volume content of the NiAl phase particularly at low densities, where small alumina particles had no impact on the composite's stiffness. The influence of the external pressure of 30 MPa seemed crucial for obtaining satisfactory stiffness for three kinds of the studied materials which were characterized by a high dense microstructure with a low number of isolated spherical pores.

  9. Composite coating of alginate-olive oil enriched with antioxidants enhances postharvest quality and shelf life of Ber fruit (Ziziphus mauritiana Lamk. Var. Gola).

    PubMed

    Ramana Rao, T V; Baraiya, Nilanjana S; Vyas, Pinal B; Patel, Dhara M

    2016-01-01

    The present study has been carried out to evaluate the effect of a composite edible coating of 2 % Sodium alginate and 0.2 % Olive oil with combination of 1 % ascorbic acid and 1 % citric acid on the post harvest nutritional quality and shelf life of Ber fruit stored at 25 ± 2 °C and 65 % R.H. The coatings reduced the decay occurrence, weight loss, accumulation of total soluble solids (TSS) and total sugars in Ber fruit and enhanced the level of antioxidants. The delayed activity of polygalacturonase (PG), Pectate lyase (PL) and Pectin methyl esterase (PME) was noticed in coated fruits than that of the control fruit indicating the reduced softening and ripening process. These findings suggest that the composite edible coating tested under the current study has the potential to control decaying incidence of Ber fruit, extends its storage life and also improves its valuable nutritional characteristics.

  10. Distribution, composition and seasonality of aquatic birds in the Nhecolândia sub-region of South Pantanal, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Donatelli, R J; Posso, S R; Toledo, M C B

    2014-11-01

    Despite remarkable significance of Pantanal for the conservation of aquatic birds, the status of their populations, the spatiotemporal patterns of distribution and habitat use and structure of communities are little known. Thus, we studied three aquatic environments (Negro river, bays and salines) from 2007 to 2009 in the Nhecolândia Pantanal to verify the distribution and composition of aquatic birds and also if there is significant seasonal influence on these aspects. We adopted the transect method (288 hours of sampling) and recorded 135 species (7.834 individuals). The Negro river showed the highest diversity, while the salines the lowest. The similarity of aquatic bird communities was higher between bays and salines, followed by Negro river and bays and lower between salines and Negro river. The equidistribution is more variable in the salines and more stable in the Negro river. The environments strongly differ from each other in aquatic bird composition in space (habitat use and distribution) and time (seasonal water fluctuations). The diversity of bird community in the dry season varies significantly in the salines, followed by the bays and more stable in the Negro river. The Negro river, regardless of large annual amplitude of flow, is more seasonally stable since its riparian vegetation is continuous (not isolated) and constant. These aspects provide better conditions to stay all year, contributing to decrease the seasonal nomadic tendencies of aquatic birds. Finally, all these data provide strong arguments to the preservation of all phytophysiognomies in the Nhecolândia sub- region of Pantanal, but with special attention to the salines widely used by many flocks of aquatic birds (mainly in the dry season) and migrant and/or rare species restricted to this habitat.

  11. Distribution of aquatic macrophytes in contrasting river systems: a critique of compositional-based assessment of water quality.

    PubMed

    Demars, Benoît O L; Edwards, Anthony C

    2009-01-01

    A brief summary of the historical developments relating to plant distribution and aquatic macrophyte-nutrient indices provided a means of assessing the general context and validity of previous assumptions. This has particular current relevance because of the prominent use of bioindicators for defining nutrient enrichment. A survey of 161 sites distributed across two broadly contrasting groups of rivers (circum-neutral versus alkaline) recorded 110 species of aquatic macrophytes and these have been statistically analyzed to (i) rank and separate the individual effects of local environmental conditions and spatial isolation on species distribution in the two contrasting groups of sites; (ii) calculate a macrophyte index based on plant cover and species indicator values (Mean Trophic Rank, MTR); and finally (iii) investigate the implications for biomonitoring. Chemical, physical and hydrological site attributes together with spatial isolation, each explained a significant and at least partially independent influence over plant species distribution. It was extremely difficult, however, to separate the single effects of different site attributes on plant distribution. While some plant species are more restricted to certain environmental conditions, many appeared indifferent to the range of those being tested. The role played by nutrients (nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)) were either mostly indistinguishable from other site attributes (e.g., nitrate from conductivity) or subordinate (e.g., soluble reactive phosphorus, ammonium). It is therefore very unlikely that macrophyte species composition could provide a reliable bioindicator of the surrounding nutrient (N, P) status. The calculation of the plant index illustrated this unreliability by showing that strong correlations existed with many environmental variables, not just inorganic N and P. PMID:18977514

  12. Distribution of aquatic macrophytes in contrasting river systems: a critique of compositional-based assessment of water quality.

    PubMed

    Demars, Benoît O L; Edwards, Anthony C

    2009-01-01

    A brief summary of the historical developments relating to plant distribution and aquatic macrophyte-nutrient indices provided a means of assessing the general context and validity of previous assumptions. This has particular current relevance because of the prominent use of bioindicators for defining nutrient enrichment. A survey of 161 sites distributed across two broadly contrasting groups of rivers (circum-neutral versus alkaline) recorded 110 species of aquatic macrophytes and these have been statistically analyzed to (i) rank and separate the individual effects of local environmental conditions and spatial isolation on species distribution in the two contrasting groups of sites; (ii) calculate a macrophyte index based on plant cover and species indicator values (Mean Trophic Rank, MTR); and finally (iii) investigate the implications for biomonitoring. Chemical, physical and hydrological site attributes together with spatial isolation, each explained a significant and at least partially independent influence over plant species distribution. It was extremely difficult, however, to separate the single effects of different site attributes on plant distribution. While some plant species are more restricted to certain environmental conditions, many appeared indifferent to the range of those being tested. The role played by nutrients (nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)) were either mostly indistinguishable from other site attributes (e.g., nitrate from conductivity) or subordinate (e.g., soluble reactive phosphorus, ammonium). It is therefore very unlikely that macrophyte species composition could provide a reliable bioindicator of the surrounding nutrient (N, P) status. The calculation of the plant index illustrated this unreliability by showing that strong correlations existed with many environmental variables, not just inorganic N and P.

  13. Ecological composition and distribution of the diatoms from the Laguna Superior, Oaxaca, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ruiz, José Luis; Tapia-Garcia, Margarito; Licea, Sergio; Figueroa-Torres, María Guadalupe; Esquivel, Alfonso; Herrera-Galindo, Jorge Eduardo; González-Fernández, José Manuel; González-Macias, Maria Del Carmen

    2011-07-01

    A taxonomic study of diatoms was carried out in a tropical coastal lagoon. Material for this study consists of water samples obtained from February-March 1992 to November-December 2000. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed the presence of 373 taxa of which the families Bacillariaceae (67 species) and Chaetocerotaceae (37 species) were the most abundant groups. The species Skeletonema costatum, Chaetoceros curvisetus, Coscinodiscus radiatus var. radiatus, Ditylum brightwellii, Thalassiosira eccentrica and Entomoneis alata were found associated with moderate water quality and forming blooms. In addition, a regional comparison between Mexico and South America of the identified species is given. For practical handling, indicative values obtained from their ecological composition are incorporated as well as a code of the floristic list. Achecklist of the species and their occurrence are given. PMID:22315822

  14. Eggshell composition of squamate reptiles: relationship between eggshell permeability and amino acid distribution.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Owen J; Bramble, Judith E; Heisler, I Lorraine; Phillips, Christopher A; Cox, David L

    2005-10-01

    Most snakes and lizards produce eggs with flexible shells that interact with the environment to maintain water balance. Geckos produce rigid eggshells that are independent of an external source of water and can be oviposited in more open, dryer locations. In this study, we analyzed and compared the amino acid composition of 24 lizard species, six snake species, and four outgroups (including avian and reptilian elastin and chicken eggshell). Rigid Gecko eggshells had significantly lower levels of seven of the 17 amino acids evaluated. Multivariate analysis showed that proline was the most important amino acid in distinguishing between these two groups of eggshells, occurring at significantly higher levels in flexible eggshells. High levels of proline have also been observed in the eggshells of other species. Proline and other amino acids are associated with the alleviation of water and salt stress in plants. PMID:16195850

  15. Biophysical transport model suggests climate variability determines distribution of Walleye Pollock early life stages in the eastern Bering Sea through effects on spawning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrik, Colleen M.; Duffy-Anderson, Janet T.; Mueter, Franz; Hedstrom, Katherine; Curchitser, Enrique N.

    2015-11-01

    The eastern Bering Sea recently experienced an anomalously warm period followed by an anomalously cold period. These periods varied with respect to sea ice extent, water temperature, wind patterns, and ocean circulation. The distributions of Walleye Pollock early life stages also differed between periods, with larval stages found further eastward on the shelf in warm years. Statistical analyses indicated that these spatial distributions were more closely related to temperature than to other covariates, though a mechanism has not been identified. The objective of this study was to determine if variable transport could be driving the observed differences in pollock distributions. An individual-based model of pollock early life stages was developed by coupling a hydrodynamic model to a particle-tracking model with biology and behavior. Simulation experiments were performed with the model to investigate the effects of wind on transport, ice presence on time of spawning, and water temperature on location of spawning. This modeling approach benefited from the ability to individually test mechanisms to quantitatively assess the impact of each on the distribution of pollock. Neither interannual variability in advection nor advances or delays in spawning time could adequately represent the observed differences in distribution between warm and cold years. Changes to spawning areas, particularly spatial contractions of spawning areas in cold years, resulted in modeled distributions that were most similar to observations. The location of spawning pollock in reference to cross-shelf circulation patterns is important in determining the distribution of eggs and larvae, warranting further study on the relationship between spawning adults and the physical environment. The different distributions of pollock early life stages between warm and cold years may ultimately affect recruitment by influencing the spatial overlap of pollock juveniles with prey and predators.

  16. Composition, distribution, and characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil in Linfen, China

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, S.; Cheng, H.X.; Liu, Y.H.; Xia, X.J.; Xu, X.B.

    2009-02-15

    A total of 10 surface soil samples representing the entire area of Linfen City were collected and analyzed for the presence of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentration ranged from 1.1 to 63.7 {mu} g g{sup -1}. Analysis of the sources of contamination revealed that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the soil were derived from combustion sources. Specifically, the primary source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was coal combustion, but the samples were also effected to varying degrees by traffic emissions. Furthermore, increased levels of contamination were observed in northeast Linfen due to the distribution of industrial plants.

  17. Fatigue behavior and life prediction of a SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb composite under isothermal conditions. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) and Intermetallic Matrix Composites (IMC) were identified as potential material candidates for advanced aerospace applications. They are especially attractive for high temperature applications which require a low density material that maintains its structural integrity at elevated temperatures. High temperature fatigue resistance plays an important role in determining the structural integrity of the material. This study attempts to examine the relevance of test techniques, failure criterion, and life prediction as they pertain to an IMC material, specifically, unidirectional SiC fiber reinforced titanium aluminide. A series of strain and load controlled fatigue tests were conducted on unidirectional SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb composite at 425 and 815 C. Several damage mechanism regimes were identified by using a strain-based representation of the data, Talreja's fatigue life diagram concept. Results of these tests were then used to address issues of test control modes, definition of failure, and testing techniques. Finally, a strain-based life prediction method was proposed for an IMC under tensile cyclic loadings at elevated temperatures.

  18. Effect of particle size and distribution of the sizing agent on the carbon fibers surface and interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of its composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. L.; Liu, Y.; Huang, Y. D.; Liu, L.

    2013-12-01

    Effect of particle size and distribution of the sizing agent on the performance of carbon fiber and carbon fiber composites has been investigated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize carbon fiber surface topographies. At the same time, the single fiber strength and Weibull distribution were also studied in order to investigate the effect of coatings on the fibers. The interfacial shear strength and hygrothermal aging of the carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites were also measured. The results indicated that the particle size and distribution is important for improving the surface of carbon fibers and its composites performance. Different particle size and distribution of sizing agent has different contribution to the wetting performance of carbon fibers. The fibers sized with P-2 had higher value of IFSS and better hygrothermal aging resistant properties.

  19. Airborne brake wear debris: size distributions, composition, and a comparison of dynamometer and vehicle tests.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Paul G; Xu, Ning; Dalka, Tom M; Maricq, M Matti

    2003-09-15

    Particle size distributions of light-duty vehicle brake wear debris are reported with careful attention paid to avoid sampling biases. Electrical low-pressure impactor and micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor measurements yield consistent size distributions, and the net particulate matter mass from each method is in good agreement with gravimetric filter measurements. The mass mean diameter of wear debris from braking events representative of urban driving is 6 microm, and the number-weighted mean is 1-2 microm for three currently used classes of lining materials: low metallic, semimetallic, and non-asbestos organic (NAO). In contrast, the wear rates are very material dependent, both in number and mass of particles, with 3-4 times higher emissions observed from the low metallic linings as compared to the semimetallic and NAO linings. Wind tunnel and test track measurements demonstrate the appearance of micron size particles that correlate with braking events, with approximately 50% of the wear debris being airborne for the test vehicle in this study. Elemental analysis of the wear debris reveals a consistent presence of the elements Fe, Cu, and Ba in both dynamometer and test track samples. PMID:14524436

  20. Mass size distributions and size resolved chemical composition of fine particulate matter at the Pittsburgh supersite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabada, Juan C.; Rees, Sarah; Takahama, Satoshi; Khlystov, Andrey; Pandis, Spyros N.; Davidson, Cliff I.; Robinson, Allen L.

    Size-resolved aerosol mass and chemical composition were measured during the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study. Daily samples were collected for 12 months from July 2001 to June 2002. Micro-orifice uniform deposit impactors (MOUDIs) were used to collect aerosol samples of fine particulate matter smaller than 10 μm. Measurements of PM 0.056, PM 0.10, PM 0.18, PM 0.32, PM 0.56, PM 1.0, PM 1.8 and PM 2.5 with the MOUDI are available for the full study period. Seasonal variations in the concentrations are observed for all size cuts. Higher concentrations are observed during the summer and lower during the winter. Comparison between the PM 2.5 measurements by the MOUDI and other integrated PM samplers reveals good agreement. Good correlation is observed for PM 10 between the MOUDI and an integrated sampler but the MOUDI underestimates PM 10 by 20%. Bouncing of particles from higher stages of the MOUDI (>PM 2.5) is not a major problem because of the low concentrations of coarse particles in the area. The main cause of coarse particle losses appears to be losses to the wall of the MOUDI. Samples were collected on aluminum foils for analysis of carbonaceous material and on Teflon filters for analysis of particle mass and inorganic anions and cations. Daily samples were analyzed during the summer (July 2001) and the winter intensives (January 2002). During the summer around 50% of the organic material is lost from the aluminum foils as compared to a filter-based sampler. These losses are due to volatilization and bounce-off from the MOUDI stages. High nitrate losses from the MOUDI are also observed during the summer (above 70%). Good agreement between the gravimetrically determined mass and the sum of the masses of the individual compounds is obtained, if the lost mass from organics and the aerosol water content are included for the summer. For the winter no significant losses of material are detected and there exists reasonable agreement between the gravimetrical mass and the

  1. Size and composition distributions of particulate matter emissions: part 2--heavy-duty diesel vehicles.

    PubMed

    Robert, Michael A; Kleeman, Michael J; Jakober, Christopher A

    2007-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions from heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) were collected using a chassis dynamometer/dilution sampling system that employed filter-based samplers, cascade impactors, and scanning mobility particle size (SMPS) measurements. Four diesel vehicles with different engine and emission control technologies were tested using the California Air Resources Board Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) 5 mode driving cycle. Vehicles were tested using a simulated inertial weight of either 56,000 or 66,000 lb. Exhaust particles were then analyzed for total carbon, elemental carbon (EC), organic matter (OM), and water-soluble ions. HDDV fine (< or =1.8 microm aerodynamic diameter; PM1.8) and ultrafine (0.056-0.1 microm aerodynamic diameter; PM0.1) PM emission rates ranged from 181-581 mg/km and 25-72 mg/km, respectively, with the highest emission rates in both size fractions associated with the oldest vehicle tested. Older diesel vehicles produced fine and ultrafine exhaust particles with higher EC/OM ratios than newer vehicles. Transient modes produced very high EC/OM ratios whereas idle and creep modes produced very low EC/OM ratios. Calcium was the most abundant water-soluble ion with smaller amounts of magnesium, sodium, ammonium ion, and sulfate also detected. Particle mass distributions emitted during the full 5-mode HDDV tests peaked between 100-180 nm and their shapes were not a function of vehicle age. In contrast, particle mass distributions emitted during the idle and creep driving modes from the newest diesel vehicle had a peak diameter of approximately 70 nm, whereas mass distributions emitted from older vehicles had a peak diameter larger than 100 nm for both the idle and creep modes. Increasing inertial loads reduced the OM emissions, causing the residual EC emissions to shift to smaller sizes. The same HDDV tested at 56,000 and 66,000 lb had higher PM0.1 EC emissions (+22%) and lower PM0.1 OM emissions (-38%) at the higher load

  2. Sources of aerosol as determined from elemental composition and size distributions in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjie; Zhuang, Guoshun; Guo, Jinghua; Xu, Dongqun; Wang, Wei; Baumgardner, Darrel; Wu, Zhiyuan; Yang, Wen

    2010-02-01

    Samples of PM 2.5, PM 10, and TSP from 2001 to 2003 have been collected in Beijing during spring (low-dust), spring (high dust), summer and winter. The concentration of TSP, PM 10, and PM 2.5 was most abundant in spring with high dust followed by winter, spring with little dust and summer. The average mass ratios of PM > 10 , PM 2.5-10 and PM 2.5 to TSP show that the large coarse fraction (PM > 10 ) and the fine fraction (PM 2.5) contribute most in spring with high dust while PM 2.5, PM 2.5-10, and PM > 10 contributed similar fractions to TSP in summer and PM 2.5 in winter. Sixteen cascade impaction samples were collected for elemental analysis in 2000 and 2001 and 16 major components were analyzed by PIXE. Based on the characteristics of the size distribution, three different patterns are observed: coarse mode, fine mode and bimodal mode. Different groups showed different characteristics. Crustal elements showed stable size shapes between different seasons, however, pollution elements showed complex and more variations, and the size distribution showed tendency to vary between unimodal fine modes and bimodal modes. Additionally, the concentration of aerosols and the temporal variation of the elements varied significantly according to different meteorological conditions especially on haze-fog weather conditions. Different elements showed different size distributions on haze-fog weather, i.e. crustal elements of Al, Si, Ca showed similar variation with those average days, pollution elements of S, As, Zn showed significantly higher level than those average values but mixed elements of K, Mn, Cu, Pb showed not so higher than those pollution elements. The high S in haze-fog weather was most from water soluble sulfate parts, the bimodal modes of elements showed unimodal variation and the peak of accumulation modes showed tendency variation to the larger sizes in haze-fog weather. However, most crustal elements showed not much increase during haze-fog condition, which is

  3. Electrical properties of polypropylene-based composites controlled by multilayered distribution of conductive particles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wanli; Zheng, Yu; Shen, Jiabin; Guo, Shaoyun

    2015-01-28

    Materials consisting of alternating layers of pure polypropylene (PP) and carbon black filled polypropylene (PPCB) were fabricated in this work. The electrical behaviors of the multilayered composites were investigated from two directions: (1) Parallel to interfaces. The confined layer space allowed for a more compact connection between CB particles, while the conductive pathways tended to be broken up with increasing number of layers leading to a distinct enhancement of the electrical resistivity due to the separation of insulated PP layers. (2) Vertical to interfaces. The alternating assemblies of insulated and conductive layers like a parallel-plate capacitor made the electrical conductivity become frequency dependent. Following the layer multiplication process, the dielectric permittivity was significantly enhanced due to the accumulation of electrical charges at interfaces. Thus, as a microwave was incident on the dielectric medium, the interfacial polarization made the main contribution to inherent dissipation of microwave energy, so that the absorbing peak became strengthened when the material had more layers. Furthermore, the layer interfaces in the multilayered system were also effective to inhibit the propagation of cracks in the stretching process, leading to a larger elongation at the break than that of the PP/CB conventional system, which provided a potential route to fabricate electrical materials with optimal mechanical properties. PMID:25549245

  4. Electrical properties of polypropylene-based composites controlled by multilayered distribution of conductive particles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wanli; Zheng, Yu; Shen, Jiabin; Guo, Shaoyun

    2015-01-28

    Materials consisting of alternating layers of pure polypropylene (PP) and carbon black filled polypropylene (PPCB) were fabricated in this work. The electrical behaviors of the multilayered composites were investigated from two directions: (1) Parallel to interfaces. The confined layer space allowed for a more compact connection between CB particles, while the conductive pathways tended to be broken up with increasing number of layers leading to a distinct enhancement of the electrical resistivity due to the separation of insulated PP layers. (2) Vertical to interfaces. The alternating assemblies of insulated and conductive layers like a parallel-plate capacitor made the electrical conductivity become frequency dependent. Following the layer multiplication process, the dielectric permittivity was significantly enhanced due to the accumulation of electrical charges at interfaces. Thus, as a microwave was incident on the dielectric medium, the interfacial polarization made the main contribution to inherent dissipation of microwave energy, so that the absorbing peak became strengthened when the material had more layers. Furthermore, the layer interfaces in the multilayered system were also effective to inhibit the propagation of cracks in the stretching process, leading to a larger elongation at the break than that of the PP/CB conventional system, which provided a potential route to fabricate electrical materials with optimal mechanical properties.

  5. Distribution, species composition and relative abundances of sandflies in North Waziristan Agency, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Ullah, A; Wahid, S; Khisroon, M; Rasheed, S B

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the diversity of sandflies (Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) and the incidence of leishmaniasis in three villages of North Waziristan Agency, Pakistan. Sandflies were sampled monthly during 2012, at dusk and dawn, in selected indoor habitats including both bedrooms and animal sheds using a knock-down spray catch method. A total of 3687 sandflies were collected, including 1444 individuals in Drezanda, 1193 in Damdil and 1050 in Dattakhel. This study revealed 14 species of two genera, Phlebotomus (Phlebotomus sergenti, Phlebotomus papatasi, Phlebotomus caucasicus, Phlebotomus kazeruni, Phlebotomus alexandri and Phlebotomus salehi) and Sergentomyia (Sergentomyia dentate, Sergentomyia baghdadis, Sergentomyia babu, Sergentomyia theodori, Sergentomyia sumbarica, Sergentomyia dreyfussitur kestanica, Sergentomyia hogsoni pawlowskyi and Sergentomyia fallax afghanica) (both: Diptera: Psychodidae). Phlebotomus sergenti was the most abundant species (42.1%), followed by S. dentata (17.7%) and S. baghdadis (17.4%). The number of males collected represented about twice that of female flies, and the maximum number was collected in July, followed by August. The determination of the species composition of sandfly populations, seasonal variations, relative abundances and estimations of infection in the vector population may provide information about the dynamics of leishmaniasis transmission that is useful in planning vector control activities.

  6. [Polypore species diversity, floral composition, and distribution characteristics in Changbai Mountains, Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-lian

    2011-10-01

    Polypore is an important group of wood-rotting fungi, which can decompose wood cellulose, semi-cellulose, and lignin into nutrients to be utilized by itself and other organisms, and accordingly, can promote the material cycling in forest ecosystem. Based on more than 10 years investigation and collection, it was found that the polypore in Changbai Mountains was rich in species diversity, with the Shannon diversity index being 5.06. In the Mountains, a total of 246 polypore species were recorded, occupying 40.7% of the total in China. The polypore species recorded belonged to 80 genera, 11 families, and 6 orders, among which, Polyporaceae was the dominant family. The most important bio-geographical elements of the polypore in Changbai Mountains were north temperate element and cosmopolitan element, other elements also included, showing a distinct north temperate character in floral composition. Pinus was the main host of polypore, supporting 41.5% of the polypore in Changbai Mountains. Most of the polypore was saprophytic, and its quantity had a significant correlation with the decaying degree of substrates, implying its important role in the material cycling in forest ecosystem in Changbai Mountains. There were 18 threatened polypore species in the Mountains, accounting for 37.5% of total in China. Besides their important ecological functions, many of the polypore also had higher economic value. On the premise of complete protection on them, these fungal resources should be exploited reasonably.

  7. A formalism for scattering of complex composite structures. II. Distributed reference points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Pedersen, Jan Skov

    2012-04-01

    Recently, we developed a formalism for the scattering from linear and acyclic branched structures build of mutually non-interacting sub-units. [C. Svaneborg and J. S. Pedersen, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 104105 (2012)], 10.1063/1.3682778 We assumed each sub-unit has reference points associated with it. These are well-defined positions where sub-units can be linked together. In the present paper, we generalize the formalism to the case where each reference point can represent a distribution of potential link positions. We also present a generalized diagrammatic representation of the formalism. Scattering expressions required to model rods, polymers, loops, flat circular disks, rigid spheres, and cylinders are derived, and we use them to illustrate the formalism by deriving the generic scattering expression for micelles and bottle-brush structures and show how the scattering is affected by different choices of potential link positions and sub-unit choices.

  8. Composition, enantiomeric distribution, and antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Achillea ligustica All. from Corsica.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Jean-Jacques; Lanfranchi, Don-Antoine; Prado, Soizic; Baldovini, Nicolas; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2006-08-23

    The essential oil of Achillea ligustica from Corsica was investigated by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 82 compounds representing 94.0% of the oil were tentatively identified. The main constituents were the camphane derivatives, representing >30% (camphor, 21.3%; borneol, 6.2%; bornyl acetate, 3.5%) of the whole oil, and santolina alcohol (19.3%). The enantiomeric distribution of 8 chiral constituents was determined by GC-MS using two enantioselective stationary phases (DIME-beta-CD and Lipodex-E). Racemic santolina alcohol, required for optimization of the enantioselective GC conditions, was prepared by an original two-step synthesis from 2,5-dimethylhexa-2,4-diene. The whole essential oil was tested for its antibacterial activity against a wide range of bacteria using a paper disk method. The results show a promising activity against Streptomyces species. PMID:16910724

  9. Embedded particle size distribution and its effect on detonation in composite explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberthal, Brandon; Stewart, D. Scott

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses the effects of stochastically varying inert particle parameters on the long-term behaviour of detonation front propagation. The simulation model involves a series of cylindrical high explosive unit cells, each embedded with an inert spherical particle. Detonation shock dynamics theory postulates that the velocity of the shock front in the explosive fluid is related to its curvature. In our previous work, we derived a series of partial differential equations that govern the propagation of the shock front passing over the inert particles and developed a computationally efficient simulation environment to study the model over extremely long timescales. We expand upon that project by randomising several properties of the inert particles to represent experimental designs better. First, we randomise the particle diameters according to the Weibull distribution. Then we discuss stochastic particle spacing methods and their effects on the predictability of the shock wave speed. Finally, we discuss mixtures of plastic and metal particles and material inconsistency among the particles.

  10. Improved electrochemical properties of LiFe0.5Mn0.5PO4/C composite materials via a surface coating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Chen; Hung, Yen-Wei; Lue, Shingjiang Jessie

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a LiFe0.5Mn0.5PO4/C (LFMP/C) material was prepared by a simple solid-state ball-mill method by using LiH2PO4, γ-MnO2, and hollow α-Fe2O3 nano-sized materials. Both γ-MnO2 and hollow α-Fe2O3 were synthesized by a hydrothermal process. LFMP/C composites coated with different amounts (1-3wt%) of Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) were synthesized by a sol-gel method. Their typical properties are studied using X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, the AC impedance method, and the galvanostatic charge-discharge method. The results revealed that a 1 wt%-LTO-coated LFMP/C composite shows the highest performance among all LFMP/C composite samples. The long-term cycling performance of the LFMP/C composite improves considerably when the LTO ionic conductor is applied on it. Moreover, the 1 wt%-LTO-coated LFMP/C composite, which has the lowest fading rate, maintains high cycling stability at 1 C (141 mAh g-1) and 10 C (133 mAh g-1) at 55 °C after 100 cycles; by contrast, a bare LFMP/C sample, which demonstrates the highest fading rate, exhibits an unfavorable life cycle, and its discharge capacity decreases rapidly. The ionic conductor coating thus improves the high-temperature performance of LFMP/C composites. A LFMP/C-KS6/SiO2 full cell is assembled and tested.

  11. Distribution and Geochemical Composition of Living Planktonic Foraminifera in the Caribbean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzen, A.; Schönfeld, J.; Nuernberg, D.

    2014-12-01

    Planktonic foraminifera are widely used for paleoceanographic reconstructions of different water mass dynamics. For accurate reconstruction, it is crucial to understand the habitat, ecology and shell chemistry of single species. In this study, living planktonic foraminifera were collected with a multi closing net in the Caribbean Sea during R/V Meteor cruises M78/1 in 2009, and M94, M95 in 2013 respectively. The population structure in surface to subsurface waters was assessed and related to salinity, temperature and chlorophyll concentrations. Stable isotopes and trace elements of shell calcite are measured to improve the proxy calibration. At all stations, the highest standing stock was observed in the near-surface layer and the highest population densities in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Markedly low abundances of foraminifera were recognized in Gulf of Paria and close to the Orinoco River plume. The most frequent species in the Caribbean were Globigerinoides sacculifer, Globigerinita glutinata, Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinella calida, and Neogloboquadrina dutertrei. Abundance maxima of G. sacculifer and G. ruber were always recorded in the surface water. The preferred habitat of N. dutertrei was the near-surface mixed layer, even though the species has been commonly referred to calcify in the thermocline. As expected, the deep dweller Globorotalia truncatulinoides (dextral) was mainly observed in upper intermediate waters, although juvenile specimens were found at shallower depths. Plankton tow data showed that shallow-living species adjusted their habitat to surface water masses, which deepened in the southern Caribbean Sea from East to West. Furthermore, intermediate to deep dwellers appear to prevail in surface or subsurface waters during the early stage of their life cycle.

  12. Marine litter in the upper São Vicente submarine canyon (SW Portugal): Abundance, distribution, composition and fauna interactions.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Frederico; Monteiro, Pedro; Bentes, Luis; Henriques, Nuno Sales; Aguilar, Ricardo; Gonçalves, Jorge M S

    2015-08-15

    Marine litter has become a worldwide environmental problem, tainting all ocean habitats. The abundance, distribution and composition of litter and its interactions with fauna were evaluated in the upper S. Vicente canyon using video images from 3 remote operated vehicle exploratory dives. Litter was present in all dives and the abundance was as high as 3.31 items100m(-1). Mean abundance of litter over rock bottom was higher than on soft substrate. Mean litter abundance was slightly higher than reported for other canyons on the Portuguese margin, but lower in comparison to more urbanized coastal areas of the world. Lost fishing gear was the prevalent type of litter, indicating that the majority of litter originates from maritime sources, mainly fishing activity. Physical contact with sessile fauna and entanglement of specimens were the major impacts of lost fishing gear. Based on the importance of this region for the local fishermen, litter abundance is expected to increase. PMID:26051154

  13. Distribution, abundance and carbon isotopic composition of gaseous hydrocarbons in Big Soda Lake, Nevada - An alkaline, meromictic lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The study of the distribution and isotopic composition of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases at the Big Soda Lake, Nevada, has shown that while neither ethylene nor propylene were found in the lake, ethane, propane, isobutane and n-butane concentrations all increased with water column depth. It is concluded that methane has a biogenic origin in both the sediments and the anoxic water column, and that C2-C4 alkanes have biogenic origins in the monimolimnion water and shallow sediments. The changes observed in delta C-13/CH4/ and CH4/(C2H6 + C3H8) with depth in the water column and sedimeents are probably due to bacterial processes, which may include anaerobic methane oxidation and different rates of methanogenesis, and C2-to-C4 alkane production by microorganisms.

  14. [Distribution characteristics of soil organic carbon and its composition in Suaeda salsa wetland in the Yellow River delta].

    PubMed

    Dong, Hong-Fang; Yu, Jun-Bao; Guan, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Applying the method of physical fractionation, distribution characteristics of soil organic carbon and its composition in Suaeda salsa wetland in the Yellow River delta were studied. The results showed that the heavy fraction organic carbon was the dominant component of soil organic carbon in the studied region. There was a significantly positive relationship between the content of heavy fraction organic carbon, particulate organic carbon and total soil organic carbon. The ranges of soil light fraction organic carbon ratio and content were 0.008% - 0.15% and 0.10-0.40 g x kg(-1), respectively, and the range of particulate organic carbon ratio was 8.83% - 30.58%, indicating that the non-protection component of soil organic carbon was low and the carbon pool was relatively stable in Suaeda salsa wetland of the Yellow River delta.

  15. Characteristic features of first and second moments of fission-fragment energy distribution as functions of nucleon composition

    SciTech Connect

    Gruzintsev, E.N.; Itkis, M.G.; Mul'gin, S.I.; Okolovich, V.N.; Rusanov, A.Y.; Serdyuk, O.I.; Smirenkin, G.N.; Subbotin, M.I.

    1988-08-01

    We discuss the totality of experimental data obtained at the Alma-Ata isochronous cyclotron for the mean kinetic energy /similar to/(E/sub k/) and energy dispersion sigma/sub E//sup 2/ for nuclei with Z = 68--85, A = 165--213. The dependences of these first two moments of the E/sub k/ distribution as functions of the nucleon composition of the fissioning nucleus are found to have a new feature: a ''break'' in the curve in the vicinity of (Z/sup 2//A/sup 1//sup ///sup 3/)/sub 0/approx. =1000. This effect is due to the fact that the descent-to-scission stage is absent for fissioning nuclei with Z/sup 2//A/sup 1//sup ///sup 3/<(Z/sup 2//A/sup 1//sup ///sup 3/)/sub 0/.

  16. Marine litter in the upper São Vicente submarine canyon (SW Portugal): Abundance, distribution, composition and fauna interactions.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Frederico; Monteiro, Pedro; Bentes, Luis; Henriques, Nuno Sales; Aguilar, Ricardo; Gonçalves, Jorge M S

    2015-08-15

    Marine litter has become a worldwide environmental problem, tainting all ocean habitats. The abundance, distribution and composition of litter and its interactions with fauna were evaluated in the upper S. Vicente canyon using video images from 3 remote operated vehicle exploratory dives. Litter was present in all dives and the abundance was as high as 3.31 items100m(-1). Mean abundance of litter over rock bottom was higher than on soft substrate. Mean litter abundance was slightly higher than reported for other canyons on the Portuguese margin, but lower in comparison to more urbanized coastal areas of the world. Lost fishing gear was the prevalent type of litter, indicating that the majority of litter originates from maritime sources, mainly fishing activity. Physical contact with sessile fauna and entanglement of specimens were the major impacts of lost fishing gear. Based on the importance of this region for the local fishermen, litter abundance is expected to increase.

  17. Effect of tissue composition on dose distribution in brachytherapy with various photon emitting sources

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Salahshour, Fateme; Haghparast, Abbas; Knaup, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to compare the dose in various soft tissues in brachytherapy with photon emitting sources. Material and methods 103Pd, 125I, 169Yb, 192Ir brachytherapy sources were simulated with MCNPX Monte Carlo code, and their dose rate constant and radial dose function were compared with the published data. A spherical phantom with 50 cm radius was simulated and the dose at various radial distances in adipose tissue, breast tissue, 4-component soft tissue, brain (grey/white matter), muscle (skeletal), lung tissue, blood (whole), 9-component soft tissue, and water were calculated. The absolute dose and relative dose difference with respect to 9-component soft tissue was obtained for various materials, sources, and distances. Results There was good agreement between the dosimetric parameters of the sources and the published data. Adipose tissue, breast tissue, 4-component soft tissue, and water showed the greatest difference in dose relative to the dose to the 9-component soft tissue. The other soft tissues showed lower dose differences. The dose difference was also higher for 103Pd source than for 125I, 169Yb, and 192Ir sources. Furthermore, greater distances from the source had higher relative dose differences and the effect can be justified due to the change in photon spectrum (softening or hardening) as photons traverse the phantom material. Conclusions The ignorance of soft tissue characteristics (density, composition, etc.) by treatment planning systems incorporates a significant error in dose delivery to the patient in brachytherapy with photon sources. The error depends on the type of soft tissue, brachytherapy source, as well as the distance from the source. PMID:24790623

  18. Relationship between fasting heat production, body composition and tissue distribution, in mature ewes from seven breeds.

    PubMed

    Olthoff, J C; Dickerson, G E

    1989-10-01

    To evaluate the relationship between measures of maintenance and body composition, data were collected on 12 mature, nonpregnant, nonlactating ewes from each of seven breeds following 6 wk of ad libitum (AL) or maintenance (MN) feeding (six per breed-level). After fasting 56 h, fasting heat production (FHP) was measured for each of 42 pairs of ewes over a 16-h period. Ewes then were slaughtered and the empty body divided into visceral organs and blood (ORB); gastrointestinal tract and internal fat (GIF); head, hooves and pelt (HHP); and carcass (CAR). Each fraction was chemically analyzed for water, fat, ash and (by difference) fat-free dry organic matter (FFDOM or protein). Correlations with FHP/d were highest (.86 to .87) for weights of empty body and body water or lean (FFDOM + water) and were lower (.77) for weight of empty body fat. Best nonlinear LWT predictors of FHP/d were LWT.63 and water.71 or lean.71 (R2 = .76). Correlations of metabolic FHP (kcal/kg.75) with percentage lean and fat, respectively, were .53 and -.55 for the empty body and .60 and -.60 for the GIF fraction. For AL ewes, the better predictors of FHP/d were weights of lean in GIF + ORB (R2 = .88, ESD = 106), live weight (LWT) plus fat and lean in GIF fraction (R2 .88, ESD = 112) or LWT plus fat in HHP and GIF fractions (R2 = .90, ESD = 103). For MN ewes, LWT alone was as accurate (R2 = .80, ESD = 123) as any combination of components. Breed mean daily FHP was predicted very accurately (R2 = .94) from total weight of empty body lean plus the proportion of total body lean located in the GIF fractions.

  19. Measuring Changes in the Distribution, Mass, and Composition of Dust in the Eruptive LBV Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Patrick

    The luminous, massive binary system eta Carinae is both one of the nearest and most unstable objects in a class of evolved massive stars, near the end of its lifetime before expected destruction in a supernova. It experienced a major outburst in 1843, producing the well-known Homunculus nebula, containing some 15 to 40 Msun in warm ( 170 K) and cool (90-110 K) dust and gas, according to mid-infrared ISO spectroscopy. The location of these thermal components has been uncertain due to large apertures. In Cycle 3 we were approved for 10 hours to use the FORCAST imager with long wavelength filters to better locate and estimate the mass in thermal components of this material that may be resolved, constraining it to the interior regions or bipolar lobes of the Homunculus nebula, or in outer ejecta that would support the hypothesis of a major event prior to the 1843 eruption. About 40% of the program is planned for completion in Cycle 4. We are proposing in Cycle 5 to carry out spectroscopy of the dusty Homunculus nebula at two positions and one reference sky position, using the FORCAST grism with all four filters, in order to characterize changes in mass, composition, and grain properties of especially the cool dust containing >80% of the dust mass, and comparing the results to our spatially integrated ISO spectra taken in 1996/1997, and to 8-13.5 micron data of the warm dust obtained with VLTI/MIDI in 2002/2003 by Chesneau et al. (2005) . These changes may result from the ongoing production of dust in the colliding winds of the 5.5 year period eccentric binary system, particularly during periastron which has occurred three times since 1997. The proposed spectroscopy of especially the cool dust cannot be accomplished from the ground.

  20. Diversity, composition, and geographical distribution of microbial communities in California salt marsh sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cordova-Kreylos, A. L.; Cao, Y.; Green, P.G.; Hwang, H.-M.; Kuivila, K.M.; LaMontagne, M.G.; Van De Werfhorst, L. C.; Holden, P.A.; Scow, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Pacific Estuarine Ecosystem Indicators Research Consortium seeks to develop bioindicators of toxicant-induced stress and bioavailability for wetland biota. Within this framework, the effects of environmental and pollutant variables on microbial communities were studied at different spatial scales over a 2-year period. Six salt marshes along the California coastline were characterized using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis. Additionally, 27 metals, six currently used pesticides, total polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, chlordanes, nonachlors, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane, and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene were analyzed. Sampling was performed over large (between salt marshes), medium (stations within a marsh), and small (different channel depths) spatial scales. Regression and ordination analysis suggested that the spatial variation in microbial communities exceeded the variation attributable to pollutants. PLFA analysis and TRFLP canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) explained 74 and 43% of the variation, respectively, and both methods attributed 34% of the variation to tidal cycles, marsh, year, and latitude. After accounting for spatial variation using partial CCA, we found that metals had a greater effect on microbial community composition than organic pollutants had. Organic carbon and nitrogen contents were positively correlated with PLFA biomass, whereas total metal concentrations were positively correlated with biomass and diversity. Higher concentrations of heavy metals were negatively correlated with branched PLFAs and positively correlated with methyl- and cyclo-substituted PLFAs. The strong relationships observed between pollutant concentrations and some of the microbial indicators indicated the potential for using microbial community analyses in assessments of the ecosystem health of salt marshes. Copyright ?? 2006, American Society for

  1. Chemical Composition, Seasonal Variation and Size distribution of Atmospheric Aerosols at an Alpine Site in Guanzhong Plain, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    PM10 and size-segregated aerosol samples were collected at Mt. Hua (2065 a.s.m) in central China, and determined for carbonaceous fraction, ions and organic composition. The concentration of most chemical compositions in summer are lower than those in winter, due to decreased emissions of biomass and coal burning for house heating. High temperature and relative humidity (RH) conditions are favorable for secondary aerosol formation, resulting in higher concentrations of SO42- and NH4+ in summer. Non-dehydrated sugars are increased in summer because of the enhanced metabolism. Carbon preference index results indicate that n-alkanes at Mt. Hua are derived mostly by plant wax. Low Benzo(a)pyrene/Benzo(a)pyrene ratios indicate that mountain aerosols are more aged. Concentrations of biogenic (BSOA, the isoprene/pinene/caryophyllene oxidation products) and anthropogenic (ASOA, mainly aromatic acids) SOA positively correlated with temperature . However, a decreasing trend of BSOA concentration with an increase in RH was observed during the sampling period, although a clear trend between ASOA and RH was not found. Based on the AIM Model calculation, we found that during the sampling period an increase in RH resulted in a decrease in the aerosol acidity and thus reduced the effect of acid-catalysis on BSOA formation. Size distributions of K+ and NH4+ present as an accumulation mode, in contrast to Ca2+ and Mg2+, which are mainly existed in coarse particles. SO42- and NO3- show a bimodal pattern. Dehydrated sugars, fossil fuel derived n-alkanes and PAHs presented unimode size distribution, whereas non-dehydrated sugars and plant wax derived n-alkanes showed bimodal pattern. Most of the determined BSOA are formed in the aerosol phase and enriched in the fine mode except for cis-pinonic acid, which is formed in the gas phase and subsequently partitioned into aerosol phase and thus presents a bimodal pattern with a major peak in the coarse mode.

  2. Assessing land ownership as a driver of change in the distribution, structure, and composition of California's forests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easterday, K.; Kelly, M.; McIntyre, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is forecasted to have considerable influence on the distribution, structure, and function of California's forests. However, human interactions with forested landscapes (e.g. fire suppression, resource extraction and etc.) have complicated scientific understanding of the relative contributions of climate change and anthropogenic land management practices as drivers of change. Observed changes in forest structure towards smaller, denser forests across California have been attributed to both climate change (e.g. increased temperatures and declining water availability) and management practices (e.g. fire suppression and logging). Disentangling how these drivers of change act both together and apart is important to developing sustainable policy and land management practices as well as enhancing knowledge of human and natural system interactions. To that end, a comprehensive historical dataset - the Vegetation Type Mapping project (VTM) - and a modern forest inventory dataset (FIA) are used to analyze how spatial variations in vegetation composition and structure over a ~100 year period can be explained by land ownership.Climate change is forecasted to have considerable influence on the distribution, structure, and function of California's forests. However, human interactions with forested landscapes (e.g. fire suppression, resource extraction and etc.) have complicated scientific understanding of the relative contributions of climate change and anthropogenic land management practices as drivers of change. Observed changes in forest structure towards smaller, denser forests across California have been attributed to both climate change (e.g. increased temperatures and declining water availability) and management practices (e.g. fire suppression and logging). Disentangling how these drivers of change act both together and apart is important to developing sustainable policy and land management practices as well as enhancing knowledge of human and natural

  3. The Influence of the Extreme Ultraviolet Spectral Energy Distribution on the Structure and Composition of the Upper Atmosphere of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. H.; Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi

    2016-02-01

    By varying the profiles of stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we tested the influences of stellar EUV SEDs on the physical and chemical properties of an escaping atmosphere. We apply our model to study four exoplanets: HD 189733b, HD 209458b, GJ 436b, and Kepler-11b. We find that the total mass loss rates of an exoplanet, which are determined mainly by the integrated fluxes, are moderately affected by the profiles of the EUV SED, but the composition and species distributions in the atmosphere can be dramatically modified by the different profiles of the EUV SED. For exoplanets with a high hydrodynamic escape parameter (λ), the amount of atomic hydrogen produced by photoionization at different altitudes can vary by one to two orders of magnitude with the variation of stellar EUV SEDs. The effect of photoionization of H is prominent when the EUV SED is dominated by the low-energy spectral region (400–900 Å), which pushes the transition of H/H+ to low altitudes. In contrast, the transition of H/H+ moves to higher altitudes when most photons are concentrated in the high-energy spectral region (50–400 Å). For exoplanets with a low λ, the lower temperatures of the atmosphere make many chemical reactions so important that photoionization alone can no longer determine the composition of the escaping atmosphere. For HD 189733b, it is possible to explain the time variability of Lyα between 2010 and 2011 by a change in the EUV SED of the host K-type star, yet invoking only thermal H i in the atmosphere.

  4. Influence of hydraulic regimes on bacterial community structure and composition in an experimental drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Douterelo, I; Sharpe, R L; Boxall, J B

    2013-02-01

    Microbial biofilms formed on the inner-pipe surfaces of drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) can alter drinking water quality, particularly if they are mechanically detached from the pipe wall to the bulk water, such as due to changes in hydraulic conditions. Results are presented here from applying 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene to investigate the influence of different hydrological regimes on bacterial community structure and to study the potential mobilisation of material from the pipe walls to the network using a full scale, temperature-controlled experimental pipeline facility accurately representative of live DWDS. Analysis of pyrosequencing and water physico-chemical data showed that habitat type (water vs. biofilm) and hydraulic conditions influenced bacterial community structure and composition in our experimental DWDS. Bacterial community composition clearly differed between biofilms and bulk water samples. Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were the most abundant phyla in biofilms while Alphaproteobacteria was predominant in bulk water samples. This suggests that bacteria inhabiting biofilms, predominantly species belonging to genera Pseudomonas, Zooglea and Janthinobacterium, have an enhanced ability to express extracellular polymeric substances to adhere to surfaces and to favour co-aggregation between cells than those found in the bulk water. Highest species richness and diversity were detected in 28 days old biofilms with this being accentuated at highly varied flow conditions. Flushing altered the pipe-wall bacterial community structure but did not completely remove bacteria from the pipe walls, particularly under highly varied flow conditions, suggesting that under these conditions more compact biofilms were generated. This research brings new knowledge regarding the influence of different hydraulic regimes on the composition and structure of bacterial communities within DWDS and the implication that this

  5. Properties of wine polymeric pigments formed from anthocyanin and tannins differing in size distribution and subunit composition.

    PubMed

    Bindon, Keren; Kassara, Stella; Hayasaka, Yoji; Schulkin, Alex; Smith, Paul

    2014-11-26

    To explore the effect of tannin composition on pigment formation, model ferments of purified 3-O-monoglucoside anthocyanins (ACN) were conducted either alone or in the presence of two different tannins. Tannins were isolated from grape seeds (Sd) or skins (Sk) following exhaustive extraction in 70% v/v acetone. The Sd and Sk tannin fractions had a mean degree of polymerization of 5.2 and 25.6, respectively. The Sd fraction was highly galloylated, at 22%, but galloylation was <2% in the Sk fraction. The Sk fraction was distinguished by a high proportion of prodelphinidin, at 58%. After a 6 month aging period, polymeric pigments were quantified and their color properties determined following isolation by solid-phase extraction. Wine color and polymeric pigment were highest in the treatment containing ACN+Sd and similar in the ACN+Sk and ACN treatments. The same trend between treatments was observed for total and polymeric nonbleachable pigments. Only minor changes in tannin subunit composition were found following ACN incorporation, but the size distribution of polymeric pigments determined by gel permeation chromatography decreased, in particular for the ACN+Sk treatment. Color incorporation in the higher molecular mass range was lower for ACN+Sk wines than for ACN+Sd wines. Compositional differences between the two tannin fractions may therefore limit the incorporation of ACNs in the colored form. The results suggest that in the ACN+Sk and ACN treatments, the formation of lower molecular mass oligomeric pigments was favored. In polymeric pigments derived from ACNs, the presence of ethyl- and vinyl-linked ACNs to the level of trimers was identified using mass spectrometry.

  6. Influence of hydraulic regimes on bacterial community structure and composition in an experimental drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Douterelo, I; Sharpe, R L; Boxall, J B

    2013-02-01

    Microbial biofilms formed on the inner-pipe surfaces of drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) can alter drinking water quality, particularly if they are mechanically detached from the pipe wall to the bulk water, such as due to changes in hydraulic conditions. Results are presented here from applying 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene to investigate the influence of different hydrological regimes on bacterial community structure and to study the potential mobilisation of material from the pipe walls to the network using a full scale, temperature-controlled experimental pipeline facility accurately representative of live DWDS. Analysis of pyrosequencing and water physico-chemical data showed that habitat type (water vs. biofilm) and hydraulic conditions influenced bacterial community structure and composition in our experimental DWDS. Bacterial community composition clearly differed between biofilms and bulk water samples. Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were the most abundant phyla in biofilms while Alphaproteobacteria was predominant in bulk water samples. This suggests that bacteria inhabiting biofilms, predominantly species belonging to genera Pseudomonas, Zooglea and Janthinobacterium, have an enhanced ability to express extracellular polymeric substances to adhere to surfaces and to favour co-aggregation between cells than those found in the bulk water. Highest species richness and diversity were detected in 28 days old biofilms with this being accentuated at highly varied flow conditions. Flushing altered the pipe-wall bacterial community structure but did not completely remove bacteria from the pipe walls, particularly under highly varied flow conditions, suggesting that under these conditions more compact biofilms were generated. This research brings new knowledge regarding the influence of different hydraulic regimes on the composition and structure of bacterial communities within DWDS and the implication that this

  7. Amino acid composition, molecular weight distribution and gel electrophoresis of walnut (Juglans regia L.) proteins and protein fractionations.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoying; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Guogang

    2014-01-27

    As a by-product of oil production, walnut proteins are considered as an additional source of plant protein for human food. To make full use of the protein resource, a comprehensive understanding of composition and characteristics of walnut proteins are required. Walnut proteins have been fractionated and characterized in this study. Amino acid composition, molecular weight distribution and gel electrophoresis of walnut proteins and protein fractionations were analyzed. The proteins were sequentially separated into four fractions according to their solubility. Glutelin was the main component of the protein extract. The content of glutelin, albumin, globulin and prolamin was about 72.06%, 7.54%, 15.67% and 4.73% respectively. Glutelin, albumin and globulin have a balanced content of essential amino acids, except for methionine, with respect to the FAO pattern recommended for adults. SDS-PAGE patterns of albumin, globulin and glutelin showed several polypeptides with molecular weights 14.4 to 66.2 kDa. The pattern of walnut proteins in two-dimension electrophoresis (2-DE) showed that the isoelectric point was mainly in the range of 4.8-6.8. The results of size exclusion chromatogram indicated molecular weight of the major components of walnut proteins were between 3.54 and 81.76 kDa.

  8. Epoxy Composites with Added Aluminum with Binary Particle Size Distribution for Enhanced Dielectric Properties and Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Xuezhen; Zhou, Wenying; Dong, Lina; Wang, Zijun; Wu, Peng; Zuo, Jing; Cai, Huiwu; Liu, Xiangrong

    2016-08-01

    Three kinds of hybrid aluminum (Al) particles with binary particle size distribution, i.e., [2 μm/50 μm], [2 μm/18 μm] and [18 μm/50 μm], were added in epoxy (EP) to prepare hybrid Al/EP composites with enhanced dielectric properties and thermal conductivity for embedded capacitor applications. The dielectric permittivity, dissipation factor, and thermal conductivity of three types of hybrid Al/EP composites were investigated as a function of relative volume fraction of smaller-size Al of hybrid Al particles (V s) at a total filler content of 60 wt.%, respectively. The results indicate that dielectric permittivity and thermal conductivity of the hybrid Al/EP mainly depend on two factors, such as the type of hybrid filler and the V s. The maximum dielectric permittivity of 48 appears at V s = V 18μm/V (18μm+50μm) = 35%. While, the above two factors have a negligible influence on the dissipation factor, which is as low as 0.022. The highest thermal conductivity of 1.28 W/m K is obtained at V s = V 18μm/V (18μm+50μm) = 50%. The maximum thermal conductivity for three hybrid systems shifts towards lower V s with decreasing the size ratio of a larger Al to a smaller one.

  9. Influence of Cow Bone Particle Size Distribution on the Mechanical Properties of Cow Bone-Reinforced Polyester Composites

    PubMed Central

    Oladele, Isiaka Oluwole; Adewole, Temitope Akinyemi

    2013-01-01

    This work was carried out to investigate the influence of cow bone particle size distribution on the mechanical properties of polyester matrix composites in order to consider the suitability of the materials as biomaterials. Cow bone was procured from an abattoir, washed with water, and sun-dried for 4 weeks after which it was crushed with a sledge hammer and was further pulverized with laboratory ball mill. Sieve size analysis was carried out on the pulverized bone where it was sieved into three different sizes of 75, 106, and 300 μm sieve sizes. Composite materials were developed by casting them into tensile and flexural tests moulds using predetermined proportions of 2, 4, 6, and 8%. The samples after curing were striped from the moulds and were allowed to be further cured at room temperature for 3 weeks before tensile and flexural tests were performed on them. Both tensile and flexural strength were highly enhanced by 8 wt% from 75 μm while toughness was highly enhanced by 6 and 8 wt% from 300 μm. This shows that fine particles lead to improved strength while coarse particles lead to improved toughness. The results show that these materials are structurally compatible and are being developed from animal fibre based particle; it is expected to also aid the compatibility with the surface conditions as biomaterials. PMID:24324892

  10. Epoxy Composites with Added Aluminum with Binary Particle Size Distribution for Enhanced Dielectric Properties and Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Xuezhen; Zhou, Wenying; Dong, Lina; Wang, Zijun; Wu, Peng; Zuo, Jing; Cai, Huiwu; Liu, Xiangrong

    2016-11-01

    Three kinds of hybrid aluminum (Al) particles with binary particle size distribution, i.e., [2 μm/50 μm], [2 μm/18 μm] and [18 μm/50 μm], were added in epoxy (EP) to prepare hybrid Al/EP composites with enhanced dielectric properties and thermal conductivity for embedded capacitor applications. The dielectric permittivity, dissipation factor, and thermal conductivity of three types of hybrid Al/EP composites were investigated as a function of relative volume fraction of smaller-size Al of hybrid Al particles ( V s) at a total filler content of 60 wt.%, respectively. The results indicate that dielectric permittivity and thermal conductivity of the hybrid Al/EP mainly depend on two factors, such as the type of hybrid filler and the V s. The maximum dielectric permittivity of 48 appears at V s = V 18 μm/ V (18 μm+50 μm) = 35%. While, the above two factors have a negligible influence on the dissipation factor, which is as low as 0.022. The highest thermal conductivity of 1.28 W/m K is obtained at V s = V 18 μm/ V (18 μm+50 μm) = 50%. The maximum thermal conductivity for three hybrid systems shifts towards lower V s with decreasing the size ratio of a larger Al to a smaller one.

  11. Evaluation of the body composition and fat distribution in long-term users of hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Perrone, G; Liu, Y; Capri, O; Critelli, C; Barillaro, F; Galoppi, P; Zichella, L

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the body composition and fat distribution in long-term users of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT). 18 healthy menopausal women, long-term users of HRT (transdermal estradiol 50 microg continuously administered and 10 mg/day of medroxyprogesterone acetate for 12 days/month) and 18 healthy menopausal women, who had never used HRT were included in the study. Age, menopausal age, parity, weight and height (body mass index, weight/height2), and lifestyle habits were similar. Waist and hip circumference, body composition and waist/hip ratio were measured and the results were analyzed. No significant difference was demonstrated in fat and water percentage, and waist/hip ratio. Nevertheless, the waist circumference of long-term HRT users was significantly lower than that of non-users. In conclusion, abdominal fat in long-term HRT users is lower than that of non-users of similar age, menopausal age and body mass index.

  12. Amino Acid Composition, Molecular Weight Distribution and Gel Electrophoresis of Walnut (Juglans regia L.) Proteins and Protein Fractionations

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiaoying; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Guogang

    2014-01-01

    As a by-product of oil production, walnut proteins are considered as an additional source of plant protein for human food. To make full use of the protein resource, a comprehensive understanding of composition and characteristics of walnut proteins are required. Walnut proteins have been fractionated and characterized in this study. Amino acid composition, molecular weight distribution and gel electrophoresis of walnut proteins and protein fractionations were analyzed. The proteins were sequentially separated into four fractions according to their solubility. Glutelin was the main component of the protein extract. The content of glutelin, albumin, globulin and prolamin was about 72.06%, 7.54%, 15.67% and 4.73% respectively. Glutelin, albumin and globulin have a balanced content of essential amino acids, except for methionine, with respect to the FAO pattern recommended for adults. SDS-PAGE patterns of albumin, globulin and glutelin showed several polypeptides with molecular weights 14.4 to 66.2 kDa. The pattern of walnut proteins in two-dimension electrophoresis (2-DE) showed that the isoelectric point was mainly in the range of 4.8–6.8. The results of size exclusion chromatogram indicated molecular weight of the major components of walnut proteins were between 3.54 and 81.76 kDa. PMID:24473146

  13. Particle size distribution and chemical composition of total mixed rations for dairy cattle: water addition and feed sampling effects.

    PubMed

    Arzola-Alvarez, C; Bocanegra-Viezca, J A; Murphy, M R; Salinas-Chavira, J; Corral-Luna, A; Romanos, A; Ruíz-Barrera, O; Rodríguez-Muela, C

    2010-09-01

    Four dairy farms were used to determine the effects of water addition to diets and sample collection location on the particle size distribution and chemical composition of total mixed rations (TMR). Samples were collected weekly from the mixing wagon and from 3 locations in the feed bunk (top, middle, and bottom) for 5 mo (April, May, July, August, and October). Samples were partially dried to determine the effect of moisture on particle size distribution. Particle size distribution was measured using the Penn State Particle Size Separator. Crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber contents were also analyzed. Particle fractions 19 to 8, 8 to 1.18, and <1.18 mm were judged adequate in all TMR for rumen function and milk yield; however, the percentage of material>19 mm was greater than recommended for TMR, according to the guidelines of Cooperative Extension of Pennsylvania State University. The particle size distribution in April differed from that in October, but intermediate months (May, July, and August) had similar particle size distributions. Samples from the bottom of the feed bunk had the highest percentage of particles retained on the 19-mm sieve. Samples from the top and middle of the feed bunk were similar to that from the mixing wagon. Higher percentages of particles were retained on >19, 19 to 8, and 8 to 1.18 mm sieves for wet than dried samples. The reverse was found for particles passing the 1.18-mm sieve. Mean particle size was higher for wet than dried samples. The crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber contents of TMR varied with month of sampling (18-21, 40-57, and 21-34%, respectively) but were within recommended ranges for high-yielding dairy cows. Analyses of TMR particle size distributions are useful for proper feed bunk management and formulation of diets that maintain rumen function and maximize milk production and quality. Water addition may help reduce dust associated with feeding TMR. PMID

  14. Species Composition and Seasonal Distribution of Mosquito Larvae (Diptera: Culicidae) in Southern New Jersey, Burlington County.

    PubMed

    Verna, Thomas N

    2015-09-01

    A total of 36,495 larvae consisting of 45 species from 11 genera were collected from 7,189 sites from southern New Jersey, Burlington County between the months of March and October, 2001-2014. Density and seasonal distribution were determined among natural and artificial habitat. The most dominant species collected from natural habitat was Aedes vexans (Meigen) followed by Ochlerotatus canadensis canadensis (Theobald), Culex restuans Theobald, Culex pipiens L., and Culex territans Walker. The most dominant species collected from artificial habitat was Aedes albopictus (Skuse) followed by Ochlerotatus japonicus japonicus (Theobald), Cx. restuans, Cx. pipiens, and Ochlerotatus triseriatus (Say). Cx. restuans and Cx. pipiens were the only species categorized as dominant among both natural and artificial habitat and comprised greater than half the total density. Sympatry was common among dominant species from artificial habitat where a significant percentage of the total collection contained multiple species. The most common types of natural habitats were forested depressions and stream flood plains whereas rimless vehicle tires and various plastic containers were the most common artificial habitats. The pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea L. was the only habitat exclusive to one species.

  15. Macrobenthos composition, distribution and abundance within Sungai Pulai estuary, Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guan Wan; Min, Lee Di; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd; Ali, Masni Md; Cob, Zaidi Che

    2014-09-01

    Macrobenthos are very useful organisms for monitoring marine environmental and widely use in marine ecology research. They are able to monitor the difference phase in the recovery stage of disturbed sites by appear different species macrobenthos after the cessation of the impact. Univariate and multivariate methods were use to study the macrobenthos community within Sungai Pulai estuary, Johor, Malaysia. Five sub-samples were taken at each sampling sites by using 10 cm diameter corer. Crustaceans were the most abundant at Tanjung Adang (St. 1) and the station of non-seagrass area (St. 2) while polychaetes were the most abundant at Merambong Shoal (St. 3). Higher density of macrobenthos was found at St.3 followed by St. 1 and St. 2. The commonly used population indices such as diversity, richness, evenness and dominance were employed to determine the differences in diversity and abundance of macrobenthos. The diversity, richness and evenness index values showed slight increment from Station 1 to Station 3, while the dominance index decreasing trend from Station 1 to Station 3. A total 21 polychaete families were collected in Sungai Pulai estuary, which was dominated by the Spionidae, Capitellidae and Glyceridae. Cluster (Bray-Curtis similarities) analyses revealed that the Tanjung Adang and Merambong Shoal population were clearly separated from the station non-seagrass. For the time being factors that influence the pattern of distribution of the macrobenthos cannot be determined and subjected to further studies.

  16. Snow-borne nanosized particles: Abundance, distribution, composition, and significance in ice nucleation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel-Alvarado, Rodrigo Benjamin; Nazarenko, Yevgen; Ariya, Parisa A.

    2015-11-01

    Physicochemical processes of nucleation constitute a major uncertainty in understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. To improve the knowledge of the ice nucleation process, we characterized physical, chemical, and biological properties of fresh snow using a suite of state-of-the-art techniques based on mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, chromatography, and optical particle sizing. Samples were collected at two North American Arctic sites, as part of international campaigns (2006 and 2009), and in the city of Montreal, Canada, over the last decade. Particle size distribution analyses, in the range of 3 nm to 10 µm, showed that nanosized particles are the most numerous (38-71%) in fresh snow, with a significant portion (11 to 19%) less than 100 nm in size. Particles with diameters less than 200 nm consistently exhibited relatively high ice-nucleating properties (on average ranged from -19.6 ± 2.4 to -8.1 ± 2.6°C). Chemical analysis of the nanosized fraction suggests that they contain bioorganic materials, such as amino acids, as well as inorganic compounds with similar characteristics to mineral dust. The implication of nanoparticle ubiquity and abundance in diverse snow ecosystems are discussed in the context of their importance in understanding atmospheric nucleation processes.

  17. Amphiura filiformis (Ophiuroidea: Echinodermata) in the North Sea. Distribution, present and former abundance and size composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duineveld, G. C. A.; Künitzer, A.; Heyman, R. P.

    During the North Sea Benthos Survey undertaken by the ICES Benthos Ecology Working Group in spring 1986, a synoptic inventory was made of the benthos in the southern, central and part of the northern North Sea. The present paper deals with the status of the population of the infaunal ophiuroid Amphiura filiformis on the basis of measurements from 150 stations. A. filiformis was found at all the offshore muddy stations, but densities were generally highest in the shallow area south of the Dogger Bank. Stations with more than 1000 ind·m -2 were mainly situated near the frontiers between turbid and summer-stratified water masses, viz. along the southern border of the Oyster Ground, the southern slope of the Dogger Bank and in the northern part of the Pleistocene Elbe river valley. The size-distributions of A. filiformis show that juveniles were generally scarce at stations with high numbers of adults, whereas highest numbers of juveniles occur at stations with few adults. An unequivocal relation between adults and juveniles was, however, absent. This stresses the importance of other factors involved in recruitment. Comparison between the present and former (1938 and 1950) density of A. filiformis suggests that density has increased in the shallower parts but has remained stable in the deeper northern North Sea. An increase of A. filiformis shallow part of the North Sea could point to an enhanced food supply for the benthos, which may have some relation to the eutrophication in nearshore areas.

  18. Hydrothermal processing of duckweed: effect of reaction conditions on product distribution and composition.

    PubMed

    Duan, Peigao; Chang, Zhoufan; Xu, Yuping; Bai, Xiujun; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Lei

    2013-05-01

    Influences of operating conditions such as temperature (270-380 °C), time (10-120 min), reactor loading (0.5-5.5 g), and K2CO3 loading (0-50 wt.%) on the product (e.g. crude bio-oil, water soluble, gas and solid residue) distribution from the hydrothermal processing of duckweed were determined. Of the four variables, temperature and K2CO3 loading were always the most influential factors to the relative amount of each component. The presence of K2CO3 is unfavorable for the production of bio-oil and gas. Hydrothermal processing duckweed produces a bio-oil that is enriched in carbon and hydrogen and has reduced levels of O compared with the original duckweed feedstock. The higher heating values of the bio-oil were estimated within the range of 32-36 MJ/kg. Major bio-oil constituents include ketones and their alkylated derivatives, alcohols, heterocyclic nitrogen-containing compounds, saturated fatty acids and hydrocarbons. The gaseous products were mainly CO2 and H2, with lesser amounts of CH4 and CO.

  19. Pore Distribution and Water Uptake in a Cenosphere-Cement Paste Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronins, J.; Setina, J.; Sahmenko, G.; Lagzdina, S.; Shishkin, A.

    2015-11-01

    Alumina silicate cenospheres (CS) is a significant waste material from power plants that use a coal. Use CS as Portland cement replacement material gives opportunity to control physical and mechanical properties and makes a product lighter and more cost-effective. In the frame of this study, Portland cement paste samples were produced by adding CS in the concentration range from 0 to 40 volume %. Water uptake of hardened samples was checked and pore size distribution by using the mercury porosimetry was determined. In a cold climate where the temperature often falls below 0 °C, it is important to avoid the amount of micrometer sized pores in the final structure and to decrease water absorption capacity of material. In winter conditions, water fills such pores and causes additional stresses to their walls by expansion while freezing. It was found that generally water uptake capacity for cement paste samples decreased up to 20% by increasing the concentration of CS up to 40 volume %, at the same time, the volume of micrometer sized opened pores increases.

  20. Abundance, distribution, and isotopic composition of particulate black carbon in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weifeng; Guo, Laodong

    2014-11-01

    There exists increasing evidence supporting the important role of black carbon in global carbon cycles. Particulate black carbon (PBC) is allochthonous and has distinct reactivities compared to the bulk particulate organic carbon (tot-POC) in marine environments. However, the abundance, geochemical behavior of PBC and its importance in oceanic carbon budget remain poorly understood. Here we report the abundance, distribution, and stable isotopic signatures of BC derived from the chemo-thermal oxidation (CTO-375) method (BCCTO) in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results show that BCCTO abundance decreased from shelf to basin, and more than a half of riverine BCCTO could be removed over the shelf. Moreover, BCCTO is much more refractory compared to the tot-POC and has δ13C values lower than those of BC-excluded POC. These results highlight the significance of PBC in marine carbon cycles and potentially suggest the need for a new end-member term in quantifying POC sources in the ocean.

  1. Automated Measurements of Ambient Aerosol Chemical Composition and its Dry and Wet Size Distributions at Pittsburgh Supersite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A. Y.; Stanier, C.; Chun, W.; Vayenas, D.; Mandiro, M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2001-12-01

    Ambient aerosol particles change size with changes in ambient relative humidity. The magnitude of the size change depends on the hygroscopic properties of the particles, which is determined by their chemical composition. Hygroscopic properties of particles influence many environmentally important aerosol qualities, such as light scattering and partitioning between the gas and particle phases of semivolitile compounds. Studying the hygroscopic growth of ambient particles is thus of paramount importance. The highroscopic growth of ambient particles and their chemical composition are measured continuously within the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study (EPA supersite program). The hygroscopic size changes are measured using an automated system built for this study. The system consists of two Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers (SMPS, TSI Inc.) and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS, TSI Inc.). The three instruments measure aerosol size distribution between 5 nanometers and 10 micrometers in diameter. The inlets of the instruments and the sheath air lines of the SMPS systems are equipped with computer controlled valves that direct air through Nafion dryers (PermaPure Inc.) or bypass them. The Nafion dryers are drying the air stream below 40% RH at which point ambient particles are expected to lose most or all water and thus be virtually dry. To avoid changes in relative humidity and evaporation of volatile particles due to temperature differences the system is kept at ambient temperature. The system measures alternatively dry (below 40% RH) and wet (actual ambient RH) aerosol size distributions every 6 minutes. The hygroscopic growth observed with the size-spectrometer system is compared with theoretic predictions based on the chemical composition of aerosol particles. A modified semi-continuous Steam-Jet Aerosol Collector provides the total available budget (particles and gas) of water-soluble species, which is used as an input to the thermodynamic model. The model calculates

  2. Raman Microscopy for Non-Invasive Imaging of Pharmaceutical Nanocarriers: Intracellular Distribution of Cationic Liposomes of Different Composition

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, R. R.; Miljkovic, M.; Quintero, L.; Diem, M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology is playing an increasing role in targeted drug delivery into pathological tissues. Drug-loaded pharmaceutical nanocarriers can be delivered into diseased sites by passive targeting (spontaneous accumulation of nanocarriers in the areas with affected vasculature) or by active targeting (via site-specific ligands attached to the surface of drug-loaded nanocarriers). Subsequent level of targeting requires cellular internalization of nanocarriers and their specific association with certain individual cell organelles. The control over intracellular distribution of pharmaceutical nanocarriers requires effective and non-invasive methods of their visualization inside cells. In an attempt to enhance cellular internalization of pharmaceutical nanocarriers and their association with mitochondria specifically, we have prepared three types of cationic liposomes and investigated their intracellular distribution. The analysis was performed using Raman microspectroscopy in combination with optical microscopy, in order to provide morphological information as well as biochemical signatures of the sample. It was demonstrated that the Raman microscopy allows to evaluate the extent of mitochondrial association depending on the liposome composition. PMID:22376068

  3. Method for uniformly distributing carbon flakes in a positive electrode, the electrode made thereby and compositions. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Mrazek, F.C.; Smaga, J.A.; Battles, J.E.

    1981-01-19

    A positive electrode for a secondary electrochemical cell is described wherein an electrically conductive current collector is in electrical contact with a particulate mixture of gray cast iron and an alkali metal sulfide and an electrolyte including alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides. Also present may be a transition metal sulfide and graphite flakes from the conversion of gray cast iron to iron sulfide. Also disclosed is a method of distributing carbon flakes in a cell wherein there is formed an electrochemical cell of a positive electrode structure of the type described and a suitable electrolyte and a second electrode containing a material capable of alloying with alkali metal ions. The cell is connected to a source of electrical potential to electrochemically convert gray cast iron to an iron sulfide and uniformly to distribute carbon flakes formerly in the gray cast iron throughout the positive electrode while forming an alkali metal alloy in the negative electrode. Also disclosed are compositions useful in preparing positive electrodes.

  4. Equilibrium Compositional Distribution in Freestanding Ternary Semiconductor Quantum Dots: The Case of In(x)Ga(1-x)As

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Sumeet C.; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    We report the findings of a systematic computational study that addresses the effects of surface segregation on the atomic distribution at equilibrium of constituent group-III atoms in freestanding ternary semiconductor InxGa1-xAs nanocrystals. Our analysis is based on density functional theory calculations in conjunction with Monte Carlo simulations of the freestanding nanocrystals using a DFT-re-parameterized valence force field description of interatomic interactions. We have determined the equilibrium concentration profiles as a function of nanocrystal size (d), composition (x), and temperature (T). The ranges of d, x, and T are explored and demonstrate surface segregation and phase separation that leads to different extents of alloying in the nanocrystal core and in the near-surface regions. We find that formation of core/shell-like quantum dots characterized by an In-deficient core and an In-rich shell with a diffuse interface is favored at equilibrium. The analysis elucidates the relationship between the constituent species distribution in the nanocrystal and the parameters that can be tuned experimentally to design synthesis routes for tailoring the properties of ternary quantum dots.

  5. Composition-dependent trap distributions in CdSe and InP quantum dots probed using photoluminescence blinking dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Heejae; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Koh, Weon-Kyu; Kim, Dongho; Kim, Jiwon

    2016-07-01

    Although Group II-VI quantum dots (QDs) have attracted much attention due to their wide range of applications in QD-based devices, the presence of toxic ions in II-VI QDs raises environmental concerns. To fulfill the demands of nontoxic QDs, synthetic routes for III-V QDs have been developed. However, only a few comparative analyses on optical properties of III-V QDs have been performed. In this study, the composition-related energetic trap distributions have been explored by using three different types of core/multishell QDs: CdSe-CdS (CdSe/CdS/ZnS), InP-ZnSe (InP/ZnSe/ZnS), and InP-GaP (InP/GaP/ZnS). It was shown that CdSe-CdS QDs have much larger trap densities than InP-shell QDs at higher energy states (at least 1Eg (band gap energy) above the lowest conduction band edge) based on probability density plots and Auger ionization efficiencies which are determined by analyses of photoluminescence blinking dynamics. This result suggests that the composition of encapsulated QDs is closely associated with the charge trapping processes, and also provides an insight into the development of more environmentally friendly QD-based devices.Although Group II-VI quantum dots (QDs) have attracted much attention due to their wide range of applications in QD-based devices, the presence of toxic ions in II-VI QDs raises environmental concerns. To fulfill the demands of nontoxic QDs, synthetic routes for III-V QDs have been developed. However, only a few comparative analyses on optical properties of III-V QDs have been performed. In this study, the composition-related energetic trap distributions have been explored by using three different types of core/multishell QDs: CdSe-CdS (CdSe/CdS/ZnS), InP-ZnSe (InP/ZnSe/ZnS), and InP-GaP (InP/GaP/ZnS). It was shown that CdSe-CdS QDs have much larger trap densities than InP-shell QDs at higher energy states (at least 1Eg (band gap energy) above the lowest conduction band edge) based on probability density plots and Auger ionization

  6. Composition and depth distribution of hydrocarbons in Barataria Bay marsh sediments after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Dincer Kırman, Zeynep; Sericano, José L; Wade, Terry L; Bianchi, Thomas S; Marcantonio, Franco; Kolker, Alexander S

    2016-07-01

    In 2010, an estimate 4.1 million barrels of oil were accidentally released into the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) Oil Spill. One and a half years after this incident, a set of subtidal and intertidal marsh sediment cores were collected from five stations in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, USA, and analyzed to determine the spatial and vertical distributions and source of hydrocarbon residues based on their chemical composition. An archived core, collected before the DWH oil spill from the same area, was also analyzed to assess the pre-spill hydrocarbon distribution in the area. Analyses of aliphatic hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and stable carbon isotope showed that the distribution of petroleum hydrocarbons in Barataria Bay was patchy and limited in areal extent. Significant TPH and ΣPAH concentrations (77,399 μg/g and 219,065 ng/g, respectively) were detected in the surface sediments of one core (i.e., core A) to a depth of 9 cm. Based on a sedimentation rate of 0.39 cm yr(-1), determined using (137)Cs, the presence of anthropogenic hydrocarbons in these sediment core deposited ca. 50 to 60 years ago. The historical background hydrocarbon concentrations increased significantly at the sediment surface and can be attributed to recent inputs. Although the oil present in the bay's sediments has undergone moderate weathering, biomarker analyses performed on core A samples likely indicated the presence of hydrocarbons from the DWH oil spill. The effects of oiling events on Barataria Bay and other marsh ecosystems in this region remain uncertain, as oil undergoes weathering changes over time. PMID:27064616

  7. Composition and depth distribution of hydrocarbons in Barataria Bay marsh sediments after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Dincer Kırman, Zeynep; Sericano, José L; Wade, Terry L; Bianchi, Thomas S; Marcantonio, Franco; Kolker, Alexander S

    2016-07-01

    In 2010, an estimate 4.1 million barrels of oil were accidentally released into the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) Oil Spill. One and a half years after this incident, a set of subtidal and intertidal marsh sediment cores were collected from five stations in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, USA, and analyzed to determine the spatial and vertical distributions and source of hydrocarbon residues based on their chemical composition. An archived core, collected before the DWH oil spill from the same area, was also analyzed to assess the pre-spill hydrocarbon distribution in the area. Analyses of aliphatic hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and stable carbon isotope showed that the distribution of petroleum hydrocarbons in Barataria Bay was patchy and limited in areal extent. Significant TPH and ΣPAH concentrations (77,399 μg/g and 219,065 ng/g, respectively) were detected in the surface sediments of one core (i.e., core A) to a depth of 9 cm. Based on a sedimentation rate of 0.39 cm yr(-1), determined using (137)Cs, the presence of anthropogenic hydrocarbons in these sediment core deposited ca. 50 to 60 years ago. The historical background hydrocarbon concentrations increased significantly at the sediment surface and can be attributed to recent inputs. Although the oil present in the bay's sediments has undergone moderate weathering, biomarker analyses performed on core A samples likely indicated the presence of hydrocarbons from the DWH oil spill. The effects of oiling events on Barataria Bay and other marsh ecosystems in this region remain uncertain, as oil undergoes weathering changes over time.

  8. The evolution and distribution of life in the Precambrian eon-global perspective and the Indian record.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M; Shukla, Y

    2009-11-01

    The discovery of Precambrian microfossils in 1954 opened a new vista of investigations in the field of evolution of life. Although the Precambrian encompasses 87% of the earth's history, the pace of organismal evolution was quite slow. The life forms as categorised today in the three principal domains viz. the Bacteria, the Archaea and the Eucarya evolved during this period. In this paper, we review the advancements made in the Precambrian palaeontology and its contribution in understanding the evolution of life forms on earth. These studies have enriched the data base on the Precambrian life. Most of the direct evidence includes fossil prokaryotes, protists, advanced algal fossils, acritarchs, and the indirect evidence is represented by the stromatolites, trace fossils and geochemical fossils signatures. The Precambrian fossils are preserved in the form of compressions, impressions, and permineralized and biomineralized remains.

  9. The evolution and distribution of life in the Precambrian eon-global perspective and the Indian record.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M; Shukla, Y

    2009-11-01

    The discovery of Precambrian microfossils in 1954 opened a new vista of investigations in the field of evolution of life. Although the Precambrian encompasses 87% of the earth's history, the pace of organismal evolution was quite slow. The life forms as categorised today in the three principal domains viz. the Bacteria, the Archaea and the Eucarya evolved during this period. In this paper, we review the advancements made in the Precambrian palaeontology and its contribution in understanding the evolution of life forms on earth. These studies have enriched the data base on the Precambrian life. Most of the direct evidence includes fossil prokaryotes, protists, advanced algal fossils, acritarchs, and the indirect evidence is represented by the stromatolites, trace fossils and geochemical fossils signatures. The Precambrian fossils are preserved in the form of compressions, impressions, and permineralized and biomineralized remains. PMID:20009270

  10. Effect of