Science.gov

Sample records for compositional streamline simulation

  1. Industrial Compositional Streamline Simulation for Efficient and Accurate Prediction of Gas Injection and WAG Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Margot Gerritsen

    2008-10-31

    Gas-injection processes are widely and increasingly used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In the United States, for example, EOR production by gas injection accounts for approximately 45% of total EOR production and has tripled since 1986. The understanding of the multiphase, multicomponent flow taking place in any displacement process is essential for successful design of gas-injection projects. Due to complex reservoir geometry, reservoir fluid properties and phase behavior, the design of accurate and efficient numerical simulations for the multiphase, multicomponent flow governing these processes is nontrivial. In this work, we developed, implemented and tested a streamline based solver for gas injection processes that is computationally very attractive: as compared to traditional Eulerian solvers in use by industry it computes solutions with a computational speed orders of magnitude higher and a comparable accuracy provided that cross-flow effects do not dominate. We contributed to the development of compositional streamline solvers in three significant ways: improvement of the overall framework allowing improved streamline coverage and partial streamline tracing, amongst others; parallelization of the streamline code, which significantly improves wall clock time; and development of new compositional solvers that can be implemented along streamlines as well as in existing Eulerian codes used by industry. We designed several novel ideas in the streamline framework. First, we developed an adaptive streamline coverage algorithm. Adding streamlines locally can reduce computational costs by concentrating computational efforts where needed, and reduce mapping errors. Adapting streamline coverage effectively controls mass balance errors that mostly result from the mapping from streamlines to pressure grid. We also introduced the concept of partial streamlines: streamlines that do not necessarily start and/or end at wells. This allows more efficient coverage and avoids

  2. Development and application of a streamline micellar/polymer simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Lake, L.W.; Pope, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    A large-scale, two-dimensional, multicomponent, multiphase, compositional simulator for micellar/polymer flooding has been developed and applied. It can be used to calculate the areal sweep with any well pattern and any irregular reservoir boundary. The model involves both streamline and finite-difference techniques. In order to demonstrate that this model is capable of handling large field problems, a large-scale simulation of the north lease of the Kansas' El Dorado micellar/polymer pilot test was made. The simulated final oil recovery and the production histories of each producer are illustrated. 28 refs.

  3. Improved streamlines and time-of-flight for streamline simulation on irregular grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hægland, H.; Dahle, H. K.; Eigestad, G. T.; Lie, K.-A.; Aavatsmark, I.

    2007-04-01

    Streamline methods have shown to be effective for reservoir simulation. For a regular grid, it is common to use the semi-analytical Pollock's method to obtain streamlines and time-of-flight coordinates (TOF). The usual way of handling irregular grids is by trilinear transformation of each grid cell to a unit cube together with a linear flux interpolation scaled by the Jacobian. The flux interpolation allows for fast integration of streamlines, but is inaccurate even for uniform flow. To improve the tracing accuracy, we introduce a new interpolation method, which we call corner-velocity interpolation. Instead of interpolating the velocity field based on discrete fluxes at cell edges, the new method interpolates directly from reconstructed point velocities given at the corner points in the grid. This allows for reproduction of uniform flow, and eliminates the influence of cell geometries on the velocity field. Using several numerical examples, we demonstrate that the new method is more accurate than the standard tracing methods.

  4. Exploring Solute Transport and Streamline Connectivity Using Two-point and Multipoint Simulation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klise, K. A.; McKenna, S. A.; Tidwell, V. C.; Lane, J. W.; Weissmann, G. S.; Wawrzyniec, T. F.; Nichols, E. M.

    2008-12-01

    Sequential indicator simulation is widely used to create lithofacies models based on the two-point correlation of the desired heterogeneous field. However, two-point correlation (i.e. the variogram) is not capable of preserving complex patterns such as connected curvilinear structures often noted in realistic geologic media. As an alternative, several multipoint simulation methods have been suggested to replicate structural patterns based on a training image. To understand the implications that two-point and multipoint methods have on predicting solute transport, rigorous tests are needed that use realistic aquifer analogs. For this study, we use high-resolution terrestrial lidar scans to identify sand and gravel lithofacies at the outcrop (meter) scale. The lithofacies map serves as the aquifer analog and is used as a training image. The use of two-point (sisim) and multipoint (filtersim and snesim) stochastic simulation methods are then compared based on the ability of the resulting simulations to replicate solute transport characteristics using the aquifer analog. Detailed particle tracking simulations are used to explore the streamline-based connectivity that is preserved using each method. Based on the three simulation methods tested here, filtersim, a multipoint method that replicates structural patterns seen in the aquifer analog, best predicts non- Fickian solute transport characteristics by matching the connectivity of facies along streamlines. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000.

  5. Streamline-based Simulation of Geological CO2 Storage: Otway Case-Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaro Vallejo, Lorena; Dance, Tess; Cinar, Yildiray; Laforce, Tara

    2010-05-01

    Three of the most important challenges for the near future: maximizing oil extraction, securing fresh water supplies and mitigating climate change through Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS), require a better understanding of flow in porous media. It has been shown by Qi et al [1] that an optimum injection strategy for CO2 storage can result in up to 90% of the injected CO2 being trapped in the pore network of the rock during the injection phase of a CO2 storage project. When the non-wetting phase saturation increases and then decreases in the pore space, part of the non-wetting phase is trapped in pores as a residual saturation. Injection of CO2 and water in alternating cycles can be used to engineer this trapping. With time, CO2 will dissolve in the brine surrounding it and finally precipitate as carbonate. The Otway Project, taking place in the south-east of Australia and lead by the Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC), is the world's largest research and geosequestration demonstration project [2]. CO2CRC has proposed testing the concept of using residual trapping to improve storage security by using Huff and Push injections. In this case, CO2 is injected in a depleted gas reservoir together with methane. The Huff and Push injection mechanism consists of a single well which alternates injection and production. Initially, brine is injected followed by a mixture of CO2/CH4/other gases (77/20/3 mole%) followed by a shut-in period. Then, when production starts the water front should move faster towards the production well and immobilise CO2 in the micro pores of the rock. Very little production of CO2 should be observed, confirming that it has been immobilized within the formation. Traditional grid-based reservoir simulations are used to predict fluid behaviour and to design injection strategies that maximize both oil extraction and trapping of carbon dioxide in the rock formation. Unlike conventional grid-based simulations, streamline

  6. Anomalous transport in heterogeneous media demonstrated by streamline-based simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Donato, Ginevra; Obi, Eguono-Oghene; Blunt, Martin J.

    2003-06-01

    We use fine-grid streamline simulation to demonstrate that anomalous (non-Gaussian) transport arises from purely advective movement through heterogeneous systems.The simulation model represents a channeled sandstone North Sea oil field and contains over one million grid blocks. We find the average location and spreading of the plume and the breakthrough curves. These features are consistent with anomalous transport described by an exponent β that characterizes the long-time tail of the transit time distribution. β depends on the degree of heterogeneity and whether the tracer was injected or originally uniformly distributed across the domain. Incorporating dispersion to account for sub-grid-block heterogeneity does not affect the results.

  7. Streamlined Island

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-15

    This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows a streamlined island in a broad channel in Chryse Planitia. The channel is part of the outflow region of Lobo Vallis, a northern branch of Kasei Valles.

  8. Streamlined Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-514, 15 October 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows a streamlined island in Marte Vallis, a large outflow channel system that crosses the 180oW meridian between the Elysium and Amazonis regions of Mars. The flow patterns on the floor of Marte Vallis might be the remains of lava flows or mud flows. Marte is the Spanish word for Mars. Most of the largest valleys on the red planet are named for 'Mars' in various languages. This island is located near 21.8oN, 175.3oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  9. A streamline splitting pore-network approach for computationally inexpensive and accurate simulation of transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Mehmani, Yashar; Oostrom, Martinus; Balhoff, Matthew

    2014-03-20

    Several approaches have been developed in the literature for solving flow and transport at the pore-scale. Some authors use a direct modeling approach where the fundamental flow and transport equations are solved on the actual pore-space geometry. Such direct modeling, while very accurate, comes at a great computational cost. Network models are computationally more efficient because the pore-space morphology is approximated. Typically, a mixed cell method (MCM) is employed for solving the flow and transport system which assumes pore-level perfect mixing. This assumption is invalid at moderate to high Peclet regimes. In this work, a novel Eulerian perspective on modeling flow and transport at the pore-scale is developed. The new streamline splitting method (SSM) allows for circumventing the pore-level perfect mixing assumption, while maintaining the computational efficiency of pore-network models. SSM was verified with direct simulations and excellent matches were obtained against micromodel experiments across a wide range of pore-structure and fluid-flow parameters. The increase in the computational cost from MCM to SSM is shown to be minimal, while the accuracy of SSM is much higher than that of MCM and comparable to direct modeling approaches. Therefore, SSM can be regarded as an appropriate balance between incorporating detailed physics and controlling computational cost. The truly predictive capability of the model allows for the study of pore-level interactions of fluid flow and transport in different porous materials. In this paper, we apply SSM and MCM to study the effects of pore-level mixing on transverse dispersion in 3D disordered granular media.

  10. Streamlined one-pass modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.H.; Harne, R.L.; Firth, K.J.; Meyer, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    Streamlined one-pass models provide an alternative to the standard type of one-pass models for departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) studies, which require a large number of computer simulations. The standard one-pass models simulate the limiting subchannel (subchannel in which minimum DNBR occurs), a ring of subchannels around the limiting subchannel, the remainder of the limiting bundle, and the remainder of the core. Typically, these standard models use from 8 to 12 channels and approx.20 cross-flow gaps. Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) has developed streamlined one-pass models that require approximately one-half the number of channels and approx.20% of the computer resources as the standard one-pass models. These streamlined models are applicable in one-pass analysis codes such as the B and W code LYNXT and the Electric Power Research Institute VIPRE code. Streamlined one-pass models are particularly suited to extensive studies wherein computer cost and turnaround are critical, without sacrificing DNBR accuracy. Examples of such studies are reactor protection operating limit determination, limiting transient selection, and scoping studies. Moreover, streamlined one-pass models make it possible to perform DNBR studies on personal computers (PCs) using PC-adapted codes such as COBRAPC.

  11. Curvature of wave streamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.

    2013-10-01

    Wave streamlines are integral curves of the local wavevector (phase gradient). An exact formula is derived, giving the curvature of streamlines as the component transverse to the local wavevector of the gradient of the logarithm of the local wavenumber. The formula is applied to quantum particles moving in a potential and classical light in the presence of a refractive-index gradient. Three limiting regimes are encompassed. The first is geometrical, in which the bending of streamlines arises solely from the classical force or optical index gradient. The second and third limits concern singularities in the pattern of wave streamlines, of two types: optical vortices, near which the streamlines are asymptotically circular, and phase saddles, near which the streamlines are asymptotically hyperbolic.

  12. Composite Erosion by Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2006-01-01

    Composite degradation is evaluated by computational simulation when the erosion degradation occurs on a ply-by-ply basis and the degrading medium (device) is normal to the ply. The computational simulation is performed by a multi factor interaction model and by a multi scale and multi physics available computer code. The erosion process degrades both the fiber and the matrix simultaneously in the same slice (ply). Both the fiber volume ratio and the matrix volume ratio approach zero while the void volume ratio increases as the ply degrades. The multi factor interaction model simulates the erosion degradation, provided that the exponents and factor ratios are selected judiciously. Results obtained by the computational composite mechanics show that most composite characterization properties degrade monotonically and approach "zero" as the ply degrades completely.

  13. Harmonization of experimental approach and data collection to streamline analysis of biomass composition from algae in an inter-laboratory setting

    DOE PAGES

    Laurens, Lieve M. L.; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Pienkos, Philip T.; ...

    2017-04-26

    In order to establish and design long-term algae cultivation experiments, inter-laboratory projects need to harmonize the requirements of techno-economic and life-cycle analysis models, with standardized data inputs. In order to provide a consistent foundation and allow for integration and analysis of the results in computational technical and resource analysis models, we implemented closely coordinated, harmonized and objective analytical protocols along with a common language for measuring growth and productivity for the major algal components. We describe here the process by which we developed a harmonization framework for analysis across five geographically diverse testbed sites. Our goal was to align analyticalmore » procedures to ensure consistent reporting on biomass and lipid content, quality and yields to eliminate measurement variability as a source of uncertainty in production data. Developing standards for analysis that streamline reporting on composition and expected fuel yields from biomass is one of the major outcomes of this work and this provides a starting place for further advanced characterization of algae to support the techno-economical process analyses and account for the mass balance accounting of algal biomass. In conclusion, initial analysis of data obtained from field studies shows trends in compositional shifts of lipid and protein content of the biomass that are in support of the physiological experiments demonstrated in the first geographically distributed unified outdoor cultivation trials.« less

  14. Numerical simulation of unsteady vortex structures in near wake of poorly streamlined bodies on multiprocessor computer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babakov, A. V.; Novikov, P. A.

    2011-02-01

    On the basis of the conservative difference method, spatially unsteady flows near complexly shaped objects are studied. The mathematical model is based on the inviscid gas model. For subsonic, transonic, and supersonic regimes, the nonstationary aerodynamics of various aerospace objects is examined. The three-dimensional structure of the unsteady vortex near wake and its influence on the basic aerodynamic characteristics of aerial vehicles are visualized. The numerical simulation is performed using parallel algorithms on supercomputers of cluster architecture.

  15. Streamlining the EIS Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Julian

    1977-01-01

    A new publication service abstracts, indexes, and prepares microfiche of environmental impact statements (EIS). This new service is designed to streamline the EIS process by reducing the cost and time of preparation, by eliminating redundancy of similar statements, and by working with the government to standardize the preparation process. (MA)

  16. Kasei Vallis Streamlined Island

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-13

    Except for the loss of its ring of ejecta, the crater at the leading edge of this streamlined island in Kasei Vallis, imaged here by NASA Mars Odyssey, shows no hint of the catastrophic floods that passed by it. Kasei Vallis is one of several major outflow channel systems that were active over 3 billion years ago. The intense floods scoured the landscape, eroding craters and producing streamlined islands. But in a close-up view, the evidence for these floods is not apparent. This true of the most similar terrestrial example, the channeled scablands of eastern Washington which also were formed by a catastrophic flood. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04022

  17. Simulations of carbon fiber composite delamination tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, G

    2007-10-25

    Simulations of mode I interlaminar fracture toughness tests of a carbon-reinforced composite material (BMS 8-212) were conducted with LSDYNA. The fracture toughness tests were performed by U.C. Berkeley. The simulations were performed to investigate the validity and practicality of employing decohesive elements to represent interlaminar bond failures that are prevalent in carbon-fiber composite structure penetration events. The simulations employed a decohesive element formulation that was verified on a simple two element model before being employed to perform the full model simulations. Care was required during the simulations to ensure that the explicit time integration of LSDYNA duplicate the near steady-state testing conditions. In general, this study validated the use of employing decohesive elements to represent the interlaminar bond failures seen in carbon-fiber composite structures, but the practicality of employing the elements to represent the bond failures seen in carbon-fiber composite structures during penetration events was not established.

  18. Streamlined Livestock Trailer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-01-01

    Bull Nose livestock trailer, manufactured by American Trailer, Inc. is one of a line of highway transport vehicles manufactured by American Trailers, Inc. The slant side front end is a streamlining feature based on a NASA Research Program which investigated the aerodynamic characteristics of trailer/tractor combinations and suggested ways of reducing air resistance. Application of NASA's aerodynamic research technology to the bull nose design resulted in a 10 percent reduction in air drag, which translates into annual fuel savings of several hundred dollars.

  19. Streamlined acquisition handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA has always placed great emphasis on the acquisition process, recognizing it as among its most important activities. This handbook is intended to facilitate the application of streamlined acquisition procedures. The development of these procedures reflects the efforts of an action group composed of NASA Headquarters and center acquisition professionals. It is the intent to accomplish the real change in the acquisition process as a result of this effort. An important part of streamlining the acquisition process is a commitment by the people involved in the process to accomplishing acquisition activities quickly and with high quality. Too often we continue to accomplish work in 'the same old way' without considering available alternatives which would require no changes to regulations, approvals from Headquarters, or waivers of required practice. Similarly, we must be sensitive to schedule opportunities throughout the acquisition cycle, not just once the purchase request arrives at the procurement office. Techniques that have been identified as ways of reducing acquisition lead time while maintaining high quality in our acquisition process are presented.

  20. Structural Composites Corrosive Management by Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2006-01-01

    A simulation of corrosive management on polymer composites durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured Ph factor and is represented by voids, temperature, and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure, and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply managed degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  1. Polymer Composites Corrosive Degradation: A Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2007-01-01

    A computational simulation of polymer composites corrosive durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured pH factor and is represented by voids, temperature and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  2. Simulation design for the composition of zirconia composite ceramic tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuanzhen, Huang; Jing, Sun; Hanlian, Liu; Bin, Zou; Xing, Ai; Wang, Jun

    2004-04-01

    The relationship between the fracture toughness increment (ΔK IC) resulting from toughening mechanisms, such as phase transition, residual stress, geometry effect, and grain bridging, and the volume fraction of zirconia was established to simulate and design the composition of a zirconia-matrix composite tool, thereby avoiding “trial-and-error” experiments. The composition of the ZrO2/Al2O3 ceramic tool was simulated in accordance with the requirement for fracture toughness. It was shown that the simulated result was in agreement with experiment and that the established simulation model was to some extent valid in predicting the composition of the zirconia-matrix composite ceramic tool with dispersed α-Al2O3. Thus, a new type of ceramic tool material, a ZrO2/Al2O3 composite, was developed by adding α-Al2O3 to ZrO2 on the basis of the results of the computer simulation.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Thermographic Responses in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Cramer, K. Elliot; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Howell, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations of thermographic responses in composite materials have been a useful for evaluating and optimizing thermographic analysis techniques. Numerical solutions are particularly beneficial for thermographic techniques, since the fabrication of specimens with realistic flaws is difficult. Simulations are presented with different ply layups that incorporated the anisotropic thermal properties that exist in each ply. The results are compared to analytical series solutions and thermal measurements on composites with flat bottom holes and delaminations.

  4. Scalable Computation of Streamlines on Very Large Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Pugmire, David; Childs, Hank; Garth, Christoph; Ahern, Sean; Weber, Gunther H.

    2009-09-01

    Understanding vector fields resulting from large scientific simulations is an important and often difficult task. Streamlines, curves that are tangential to a vector field at each point, are a powerful visualization method in this context. Application of streamline-based visualization to very large vector field data represents a significant challenge due to the non-local and data-dependent nature of streamline computation, and requires careful balancing of computational demands placed on I/O, memory, communication, and processors. In this paper we review two parallelization approaches based on established parallelization paradigms (static decomposition and on-demand loading) and present a novel hybrid algorithm for computing streamlines. Our algorithm is aimed at good scalability and performance across the widely varying computational characteristics of streamline-based problems. We perform performance and scalability studies of all three algorithms on a number of prototypical application problems and demonstrate that our hybrid scheme is able to perform well in different settings.

  5. Terrestrial planet composition: simulation and observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter-Bond, J.; Bolmont, E.; Raymond, S.

    2014-03-01

    As direct detection and examination of terrestrial exoplanets is not yet possible, we must persue alternative methods to constarin the types of planets likely to be found within extrasolar planetary systems and thus guide future missions. Such studies cannot be undertaken by transit surveys. Instead, secondary sources must be utilized. In addition to simultions of terrestrial planet formation, based on spectroscopic observations of known stars, observations of polluted white dwarfs (e.g. Jura, M., & Xu, S. (2012); Gaensicke et al., (2013)) and simulations of the pollution of migrating gas giants may be utilized to determine the composition of solid bodies withn extrasolar planetary systems. Observations of polluted white dwarfs (e.g. Jura, M., & Xu, S. (2012); Gaensicke et al., (2013)) will be compared to simulations of the bulk composition of terrestrial planets (Carter-Bond et al. (2012)). Combining dynamical simulations of Carter-Bond et al. (2012) and Raymond et al. (2006) with spectrally-derived abundances for 15 planet-forming elements (H, C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe and Ni), bulk compositions for simulated terrestrial planets have been obtained. This is the first time that compositional simulations can be compared with observations (albeit of a proxy for solid composition) and will be crucial for placing constraints on both the true diversity of planetary compositions expected to exist in extrasolar planetary systems and the simulations currently utilized. Simulations of the change in composition resulting from pollution of a gas giant as it migrates through a planetary system will also be presented. These simulations represent an as-yet untested approach to determining the solid composition within a planetary system. By simulating the amount and composition of material accreted by the gas giant (following Carter-Bond et al. (2012)), we will be able to determine what effect, if any, the accretion of solid material during migration has on

  6. Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Carl

    2006-07-11

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) engaged in numerous projects outlined under the scope of work discussed in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) grant number DE-FC26-04NT15456 awarded to the IOGCC. Numerous projects were completed that were extremely valuable to state oil and gas agencies as a result of work performed utilizing resources provided by the grant. There are numerous areas in which state agencies still need assistance. This additional assistance will need to be addressed under future scopes of work submitted annually to DOE's Project Officer for this grant. This report discusses the progress of the projects outlined under the grant scope of work for the 2005-2006 areas of interest, which are as follows: Area of Interest No. 1--Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement: This area of interest continues to support IOGCC's regulatory streamlining efforts that include the identification and elimination of unnecessary duplications of efforts between and among state and federal programs dealing with exploration and production on public lands. Area of Interest No. 2--Technology: This area of interest seeks to improve efficiency in states through the identification of technologies that can reduce costs. Area of Interest No. 3--Training and Education: This area of interest is vital to upgrading the skills of regulators and industry alike. Within the National Energy Policy, there are many appropriate training and education opportunities. Education was strongly endorsed by the President's National Energy Policy Development group. Acting through the governors offices, states are very effective conduits for the dissemination of energy education information. While the IOGCC favors the development of a comprehensive, long-term energy education plan, states are also supportive of immediate action on important concerns, such as energy prices, availability and conservation. Area of Interest No. 4--Resource Assessment and Development: This area

  7. Hierarchical Simulation of Hot Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Computational procedures are described to simulate the thermal and mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) Behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via High Temperature Composite Analyzer (HITCAN). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as strength, stress-strain response, and cyclic life in HTMMC's; MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process for optimum performance such as that for in-service load carrying capacity of HT-MMC's; and HITCAN can be used to evaluate static fracture and fatigue life of hot pressurized metal matrix composite rings.

  8. Simulated Data for High Temperature Composite Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes an effective formal method that can be used to simulate design properties for composites that is inclusive of all the effects that influence those properties. This effective simulation method is integrated computer codes that include composite micromechanics, composite macromechanics, laminate theory, structural analysis, and multi-factor interaction model. Demonstration of the method includes sample examples for static, thermal, and fracture reliability for a unidirectional metal matrix composite as well as rupture strength and fatigue strength for a high temperature super alloy. Typical results obtained for a unidirectional composite show that the thermal properties are more sensitive to internal local damage, the longitudinal properties degrade slowly with temperature, the transverse and shear properties degrade rapidly with temperature as do rupture strength and fatigue strength for super alloys.

  9. Acquisition streamlining: A cultural change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Jesse

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: the defense systems management college, educational philosophy, the defense acquisition environment, streamlining initiatives, organizational streamlining types, defense law review, law review purpose, law review objectives, the Public Law Pilot Program, and cultural change.

  10. Acquisition streamlining: A cultural change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Jesse

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: the defense systems management college, educational philosophy, the defense acquisition environment, streamlining initiatives, organizational streamlining types, defense law review, law review purpose, law review objectives, the Public Law Pilot Program, and cultural change.

  11. Athabasca Vallis Streamlined 'Islands'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-322, 12 December 2002

    Tremendous floods carved these tear drop-shaped landforms in Athabasca Vallis in the Cerberus region, south of the Elysium volcanoes. The orientation of the streamlined forms indicate that the fluid flowed from the right/upper right toward the left/lower left (from the northeast to the southwest). Similar features occur in central and eastern Washington in the northwestern United States. The examples in Washington formed when massive amounts of water rushed across the landscape, scouring a 'channeled scabland' during the last Ice Age, roughly 12,000-13,000 years ago. The features on Mars are much older; while the absolute age cannot be determined, the small impact craters with rayed ejecta patterns on the flood surfaces indicate it must be much, much older than the flood landscape in Washington. This is a mosaic of six Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images acquired in 1999 through 2002. Illumination is from the left. The mosaic covers an area 11.9 km (7.4 mi) by 13.0 km (8.1 mi). The full-size mosaic has a resolution of 4 meters (13 ft) per pixel.

  12. Compositional reservoir simulation in parallel supercomputing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Briens, F.J.L. ); Wu, C.H. ); Gazdag, J.; Wang, H.H. )

    1991-09-01

    A large-scale compositional reservoir simulation ({gt}1,000 cells) is not often run on a conventional mainframe computer owing to excessive turnaround times. This paper presents programming and computational techniques that fully exploit the capabilities of parallel supercomputers for a large-scale compositional simulation. A novel algorithm called sequential staging of tasks (SST) that can take full advantage of parallel-vector processing to speed up the solution of a large linear system is introduced. The effectiveness of SST is illustrated with results from computer experiments conducted on an IBM 3090-600E.

  13. Ultrasonic NDE Simulation for Composite Manufacturing Defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    The increased use of composites in aerospace components is expected to continue into the future. The large scale use of composites in aerospace necessitates the development of composite-appropriate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods to quantitatively characterize defects in as-manufactured parts and damage incurred during or post manufacturing. Ultrasonic techniques are one of the most common approaches for defect/damage detection in composite materials. One key technical challenge area included in NASA's Advanced Composite's Project is to develop optimized rapid inspection methods for composite materials. Common manufacturing defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites include fiber waviness (in-plane and out-of-plane), porosity, and disbonds; among others. This paper is an overview of ongoing work to develop ultrasonic wavefield based methods for characterizing manufacturing waviness defects. The paper describes the development and implementation of a custom ultrasound simulation tool that is used to model ultrasonic wave interaction with in-plane fiber waviness (also known as marcelling). Wavefield data processing methods are applied to the simulation data to explore possible routes for quantitative defect characterization.

  14. Metal matrix composites microfracture: Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Caruso, John J.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    Fiber/matrix fracture and fiber-matrix interface debonding in a metal matrix composite (MMC) are computationally simulated. These simulations are part of a research activity to develop computational methods for microfracture, microfracture propagation and fracture toughness of the metal matrix composites. The three-dimensional finite element model used in the simulation consists of a group of nine unidirectional fibers in three by three unit cell array of SiC/Ti15 metal matrix composite with a fiber volume ration of 0.35. This computational procedure is used to predict the fracture process and establish the hierarchy of fracture modes based on strain energy release rate. It is also used to predict stress redistribution to surrounding matrix-fibers due to initial and progressive fracture of fiber/matrix and due to debonding of fiber-matrix interface. Microfracture results for various loading cases such as longitudinal, transverse, shear and bending are presented and discussed. Step-by-step procedures are outlined to evaluate composite microfracture for a given composite system.

  15. Metal matrix composites microfracture - Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, S. K.; Caruso, J. J.; Chamis, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Fiber/matrix fracture and fiber-matrix interface debonding in a metal matrix composite (MMC) are computationally simulated. These simulations are part of a research activity to develop computational methods for microfracture, microfracture propagation and fracture toughness of the metal matrix composites. The three-dimensional finite element model used in the simulation consists of a group of nine unidirectional fibers in three by three unit cell array of SiC/Ti15 metal matrix composite with a fiber volume ration of 0.35. This computational procedure is used to predict the fracture process and establish the hierarchy of fracture modes based on strain energy release rate. It is also used to predict stress redistribution to surrounding matrix-fibers due to initial and progressive fracture of fiber/matrix and due to debonding of fiber-matrix interface. Microfracture results for various loading cases such as longitudinal, transverse, shear and bending are presented and discussed. Step-by-step procedures are outlined to evaluate composite microfracture for a given composite system.

  16. Conductivity simulations of field-grading composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Fritjof; Unge, Mikael

    2016-08-01

    The electrical conductivity and the percolation threshold of field grading polymer composites intended for high voltage applications were examined with representative elementary volume simulation methods based on percolation threshold modeling (PTM) and electrical network modeling (ENM). Comparisons were made with experimental conductivity data for SiC-EPDM composites with spherical and angular particles, using different filler fractions and electrical field strengths. With a known conductivity of the filler particles (powder), the simulations could predict the percolation threshold and the composite conductivity as functions of the electrical field for a wide range of SiC-filler fractions. The effects of morphology, dispersion and filler shape were examined and the simulations were able to explain the experimental difficulty of reaching sufficient reproducibility when designing composites with filler fractions close to a percolation threshold. PTM of composites containing hard-core/soft-shell spheres revealed a y  =  (a  +  bx)(-1/c) relationship (R 2  =  0.9997) between filler fraction and relative soft-shell thickness.

  17. NDE and SHM Simulation for CFRP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-based nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is a common technique for damage detection in composite materials. There is a need for advanced NDE that goes beyond damage detection to damage quantification and characterization in order to enable data driven prognostics. The damage types that exist in carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites include microcracking and delaminations, and can be initiated and grown via impact forces (due to ground vehicles, tool drops, bird strikes, etc), fatigue, and extreme environmental changes. X-ray microfocus computed tomography data, among other methods, have shown that these damage types often result in voids/discontinuities of a complex volumetric shape. The specific damage geometry and location within ply layers affect damage growth. Realistic threedimensional NDE and structural health monitoring (SHM) simulations can aid in the development and optimization of damage quantification and characterization techniques. This paper is an overview of ongoing work towards realistic NDE and SHM simulation tools for composites, and also discusses NASA's need for such simulation tools in aeronautics and spaceflight. The paper describes the development and implementation of a custom ultrasound simulation tool that is used to model ultrasonic wave interaction with realistic 3-dimensional damage in CFRP composites. The custom code uses elastodynamic finite integration technique and is parallelized to run efficiently on computing cluster or multicore machines.

  18. Simulating Clinical Carious Lesions in Composition Teeth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, E. R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A step-by-step technique to alter stock composition teeth and create simulated carious conditions that are ideal or otherwise is presented. The procedures provide the student with life-like lesions, suitable in texture and location and similar to conditions found in the oral cavity. (MLW)

  19. Streamline coal slurry letdown valve

    DOEpatents

    Platt, R.J.; Shadbolt, E.A.

    1983-11-08

    A streamlined coal slurry letdown valve is featured which has a two-piece throat comprised of a seat and seat retainer. The two-piece design allows for easy assembly and disassembly of the valve. A novel cage holds the two-piece throat together during the high pressure letdown. The coal slurry letdown valve has long operating life as a result of its streamlined and erosion-resistance surfaces. 5 figs.

  20. Streamline coal slurry letdown valve

    DOEpatents

    Platt, Robert J.; Shadbolt, Edward A.

    1983-01-01

    A streamlined coal slurry letdown valve is featured which has a two-piece throat comprised of a seat and seat retainer. The two-piece design allows for easy assembly and disassembly of the valve. A novel cage holds the two-piece throat together during the high pressure letdown. The coal slurry letdown valve has long operating life as a result of its streamlined and erosion-resistance surfaces.

  1. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2004-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  2. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  3. Streamlining Payload Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lufkin, Susan N.

    2010-01-01

    Payload integration onto space transport vehicles and the International Space Station (ISS) is a complex process. Yet, cargo transport is the sole reason for any space mission, be it for ferrying humans, science, or hardware. As the largest such effort in history, the ISS offers a wide variety of payload experience. However, for any payload to reach the Space Station under the current process, Payload Developers face a list of daunting tasks that go well beyond just designing the payload to the constraints of the transport vehicle and its stowage topology. Payload customers are required to prove their payload s functionality, structural integrity, and safe integration - including under less than nominal situations. They must also plan for or provide training, procedures, hardware labeling, ground support, and communications. In addition, they must deal with negotiating shared consumables, integrating software, obtaining video, and coordinating the return of data and hardware. All the while, they must meet export laws, launch schedules, budget limits, and the consensus of more than 12 panel and board reviews. Despite the cost and infrastructure overhead, payload proposals have increased. Just in the span from FY08 to FY09, the NASA Payload Space Station Support Office budget rose from $78M to $96M in attempt to manage the growing manifest, but the potential number of payloads still exceeds available Payload Integration Management manpower. The growth has also increased management difficulties due to the fact that payloads are more frequently added to a flight schedule late in the flow. The current standard ISS template for payload integration from concept to payload turn-over is 36 months, or 18 months if the payload already has a preliminary design. Customers are increasingly requiring a turn-around of 3 to 6-months to meet market needs. The following paper suggests options for streamlining the current payload integration process in order to meet customer schedule

  4. Streamlining Payload Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lufkin, Susan N.

    2010-01-01

    Payload integration onto space transport vehicles and the International Space Station (ISS) is a complex process. Yet, cargo transport is the sole reason for any space mission, be it for ferrying humans, science, or hardware. As the largest such effort in history, the ISS offers a wide variety of payload experience. However, for any payload to reach the Space Station under the current process, Payload Developers face a list of daunting tasks that go well beyond just designing the payload to the constraints of the transport vehicle and its stowage topology. Payload customers are required to prove their payload s functionality, structural integrity, and safe integration - including under less than nominal situations. They must also plan for or provide training, procedures, hardware labeling, ground support, and communications. In addition, they must deal with negotiating shared consumables, integrating software, obtaining video, and coordinating the return of data and hardware. All the while, they must meet export laws, launch schedules, budget limits, and the consensus of more than 12 panel and board reviews. Despite the cost and infrastructure overhead, payload proposals have increased. Just in the span from FY08 to FY09, the NASA Payload Space Station Support Office budget rose from $78M to $96M in attempt to manage the growing manifest, but the potential number of payloads still exceeds available Payload Integration Management manpower. The growth has also increased management difficulties due to the fact that payloads are more frequently added to a flight schedule late in the flow. The current standard ISS template for payload integration from concept to payload turn-over is 36 months, or 18 months if the payload already has a preliminary design. Customers are increasingly requiring a turn-around of 3 to 6-months to meet market needs. The following paper suggests options for streamlining the current payload integration process in order to meet customer schedule

  5. Crashworthiness simulation of composite automotive structures

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, M E; Johnson, N L; Simunovic, S; Zywicz, E

    1998-06-01

    In 1990 the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) began the investigation of crash worthiness simulation methods for composite materials. A contract was given to Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC) to implement a new damage model in LS-DYNA3DTM specifically for composite structures. This model is in LS-DYNA3DTM and is in use by the ACC partners. In 1994 USCAR, a partnership of American auto companies, entered into a partnership called SCAAP (Super Computing Automotive Applications Partnership) for the express purpose of working with the National Labs on computational oriented research. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was signed with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory to work in three distinctly different technical areas, one of which was composites material modeling for crash worthiness. Each Laboratory was assigned a specific modeling task. The ACC was responsible for the technical direction of the composites project and provided all test data for code verification. All new models were to be implemented in DYNA3D and periodically distributed to all partners for testing. Several new models have been developed and implemented. Excellent agreement has been shown between tube crush simulation and experiments.

  6. Coupled multi-disciplinary composites behavior simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of the computer code CSTEM (Coupled Structural/Thermal/Electro-Magnetic Analysis) are discussed and demonstrated. CSTEM computationally simulates the coupled response of layered multi-material composite structures subjected to simultaneous thermal, structural, vibration, acoustic, and electromagnetic loads and includes the effect of aggressive environments. The composite material behavior and structural response is determined at its various inherent scales: constituents (fiber/matrix), ply, laminate, and structural component. The thermal and mechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on various parameters such as temperature and moisture. The acoustic and electromagnetic properties also include dependence on vibration and electromagnetic wave frequencies, respectively. The simulation is based on a three dimensional finite element analysis in conjunction with composite mechanics and with structural tailoring codes, and with acoustic and electromagnetic analysis methods. An aircraft engine composite fan blade is selected as a typical structural component to demonstrate the CSTEM capabilities. Results of various coupled multi-disciplinary heat transfer, structural, vibration, acoustic, and electromagnetic analyses for temperature distribution, stress and displacement response, deformed shape, vibration frequencies, mode shapes, acoustic noise, and electromagnetic reflection from the fan blade are discussed for their coupled effects in hot and humid environments. Collectively, these results demonstrate the effectiveness of the CSTEM code in capturing the coupled effects on the various responses of composite structures subjected to simultaneous multiple real-life loads.

  7. Dynamic Data Integration Using Streamline Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta-Gupta, A.

    2002-12-01

    Recent developments in petroleum reservoir characterization and in the management of uncertainty have lead to the ability of the industry to routinely generate large multimillion-cell detailed geologic models. Reconciling such high-resolution models to dynamic reservoir behavior (transient pressure and tracer response, multiphase production history) still remains an outstanding challenge because of the high computational costs associated with the solution of large inverse problems. Streamline-based flow simulation models can offer significant potential in this regard. In this presentation we will exploit an analogy between streamlines and seismic ray tracing to develop an efficient formalism for dynamic data integration into high-resolution subsurface models. Utilizing concepts from the asymptotic ray theory in seismic and diffusive electromagnetic imaging, we will generalize the streamline approach to incorporate transient pressure, tracer and multiphase production response during subsurface characterization. Data integration will be carried out in a manner analogous to seismic tomography and waveform imaging by first matching the `arrival time' and then the `amplitude' of the production response. Several field examples from the oil field and environmental applications will demonstrate the practical feasibility of the approach.

  8. Dynamic Investigation of Release Characteristics of a Streamlined Internal Store from a Simulated Bomb Bay of the Republic F-105 Airplane at Mach Numbers of 0.8, 1.4, and 1.98, Coord. No. AF-222

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, John B.

    1956-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the 27- by 27-inch preflight jet of the Langley Pilotless Aircraft Research Station at Wallops Island, Va., of the release characteristics of a dynamically scaled streamlined-type internally carried store from a simulated bomb bay at Mach numbers M(sub o) of 0.8, 1.4, and 1.98. A l/17-scale model of the Republic F-105 half-fuselage and bomb-bay configuration was used with a streamlined store shape of a fineness ratio of 6.00. Simulated altitudes were 3,400 feet at M(sub o) = 0.8, 3,400, and 29,000 feet at M(sub o) = 1.4, and 29,000 feet at M(sub o) = 1.98. At supersonic speeds, high pitching moments are induced on the store in the vicinity of the bomb bay at high dynamic pressures. Successful ejections could not be made with the original configuration at supersonic speeds at near sea-level conditions. The pitching moments caused by unsymmetrical pressures on the store in a disturbed flow field were overcome by replacing the high-aspect-ratio fin with a low-aspect-ratio fin that had a 30-percent area increase which was less subject to aeroelastic effects. Release characteristics of the store were improved by orienting the fins so that they were in a more uniform flow field at the point of store release. The store pitching moments were shown to be reduced by increasing the simulated altitude. Favorable ejections were made at subsonic speeds at near sea-level conditions.

  9. Consolidation modelling for thermoplastic composites forming simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, H.; Rusanov, A.; Hamila, N.; Boisse, P.

    2016-10-01

    Pre-impregnated thermoplastic composites are widely used in the aerospace industry for their excellent mechanical properties, Thermoforming thermoplastic prepregs is a fast manufacturing process, the automotive industry has shown increasing interest in this manufacturing processes, in which the reconsolidation is an essential stage. The model of intimate contact is investigated as the consolidation model, compression experiments have been launched to identify the material parameters, several numerical tests show the influents of the temperature and pressure applied during processing. Finally, a new solid-shell prismatic element has been presented for the simulation of consolidation step in the thermoplastic composites forming process.

  10. The design of the Comet streamliner: An electric land speed record motorcycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Ethan Alexander

    The development of the land speed record electric motorcycle streamliner, the Comet, is discussed herein. Its design process includes a detailed literary review of past and current motorcycle streamliners in an effort to highlight the main components of such a vehicle's design, while providing baseline data for performance comparisons. A new approach to balancing a streamliner at low speeds is also addressed, a system henceforth referred to as landing gear, which has proven an effective means for allowing the driver to control the low speed instabilities of the vehicle with relative ease compared to tradition designs. This is accompanied by a dynamic stability analysis conducted on a test chassis that was developed for the primary purpose of understanding the handling dynamics of streamliners, while also providing a test bed for the implementation of the landing gear system and a means to familiarize the driver to the operation and handling of such a vehicle. Data gathered through the use of GPS based velocity tracking, accelerometers, and a linear potentiometer provided a means to validate a dynamic stability analysis of the weave and wobble modes of the vehicle through linearization of a streamliner model developed in the BikeSIM software suite. Results indicate agreement between the experimental data and the simulation, indicating that the conventional recumbent design of a streamliner chassis is in fact highly stable throughout the performance envelope beyond extremely low speeds. A computational fluid dynamics study was also performed, utilized in the development of the body of the Comet to which a series of tests were conducted in order to develop a shape that was both practical to transport and highly efficient. By creating a hybrid airfoil from a NACA 0018 and NACA 66-018, a drag coefficient of 0.1 and frontal area of 0.44 m2 has been found for the final design. Utilizing a performance model based on the proposed vehicle's motor, its rolling resistance, and

  11. Ceramic matrix composite behavior -- Computational simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chamis, C.C.; Murthy, P.L.N.; Mital, S.K.

    1996-10-01

    Development of analytical modeling and computational capabilities for the prediction of high temperature ceramic matrix composite behavior has been an ongoing research activity at NASA-Lewis Research Center. These research activities have resulted in the development of micromechanics based methodologies to evaluate different aspects of ceramic matrix composite behavior. The basis of the approach is micromechanics together with a unique fiber substructuring concept. In this new concept the conventional unit cell (the smallest representative volume element of the composite) of micromechanics approach has been modified by substructuring the unit cell into several slices and developing the micromechanics based equations at the slice level. Main advantage of this technique is that it can provide a much greater detail in the response of composite behavior as compared to a conventional micromechanics based analysis and still maintains a very high computational efficiency. This methodology has recently been extended to model plain weave ceramic composites. The objective of the present paper is to describe the important features of the modeling and simulation and illustrate with select examples of laminated as well as woven composites.

  12. Smart Nanocatalysts with Streamline Shapes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Particulate catalysts with streamline shapes have important impacts on fluid-related reactions, and they need to be properly characterized. However, utilization of streamline-shaped catalysts for heterogeneous catalysis has remained an unexplored area due to the lack of easy-to-use techniques to produce such shaped catalysts, especially at the small length scale of the submicron to micron regime. Herein, we report our recent development of a class of prototype nanocatalysts with streamline shapes. In this research, the kinetic control is adapted to obtain streamline-shaped supports, followed by functionalizing such supports with catalytically active metal nanoclusters (e.g., Au, Pd, Pt, and Ag or their combinations) in a stepwise manner. Advantages related to the streamline morphology of catalysts have been demonstrated with a number of solid–solution systems such as alcohol oxidation, olefin hydrogenation, and Suzuki–Miyaura coupling. We believe these findings will promote new research on the design and synthesis of functional materials with additional fluid-advanced features. PMID:28776022

  13. Computational simulation of hot composites structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1991-01-01

    Three different computer codes developed in-house are described for application to hot composite structures. These codes include capabilities for: (1) laminate behavior (METCAN); (2) thermal/structural analysis of hot structures made from high temperature metal matrix composites (HITCAN); and (3) laminate tailoring (MMLT). Results for select sample cases are described to demonstrate the versatility as well as the application of these codes to specific situations. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate cyclic life in high temperature metal matrix composites; HITCAN can be used to evaluate the structural performance of curved panels as well as respective sensitivities of various nonlinearities, and MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process in order to reduce residual stresses in the matrix upon cool-down.

  14. Streamline segment statistics of premixed flames with nonunity Lewis numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Wang, Lipo; Klein, Markus

    2014-03-01

    The interaction of flame and surrounding fluid motion is of central importance in the fundamental understanding of turbulent combustion. It is demonstrated here that this interaction can be represented using streamline segment analysis, which was previously applied in nonreactive turbulence. The present work focuses on the effects of the global Lewis number (Le) on streamline segment statistics in premixed flames in the thin-reaction-zones regime. A direct numerical simulation database of freely propagating thin-reaction-zones regime flames with Le ranging from 0.34 to 1.2 is used to demonstrate that Le has significant influences on the characteristic features of the streamline segment, such as the curve length, the difference in the velocity magnitude at two extremal points, and their correlations with the local flame curvature. The strengthenings of the dilatation rate, flame normal acceleration, and flame-generated turbulence with decreasing Le are principally responsible for these observed effects. An expression for the probability density function (pdf) of the streamline segment length, originally developed for nonreacting turbulent flows, captures the qualitative behavior for turbulent premixed flames in the thin-reaction-zones regime for a wide range of Le values. The joint pdfs between the streamline length and the difference in the velocity magnitude at two extremal points for both unweighted and density-weighted velocity vectors are analyzed and compared. Detailed explanations are provided for the observed differences in the topological behaviors of the streamline segment in response to the global Le.

  15. A general formulation for compositional reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, F.; Guzman, J.; Galindo-Nava, A. |

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors present a general formulation to solve the non-linear difference equations that arise in compositional reservoir simulation. The general approach here presented is based on newton`s method and provides a systematic approach to generate several formulations to solve the compositional problem, each possessing a different degree of implicitness and stability characteristics. The Fully-Implicit method is at the higher end of the implicitness spectrum while the IMPECS method, implicit in pressure-explicit in composition and saturation, is at the lower end. They show that all methods may be obtained as particular cases of the fully-implicit method. Regarding the matrix problem, all methods have a similar matrix structure; the composition of the Jacobian matrix is however unique in each case, being in some instances amenable to reductions for optimal solution of the matrix problem. Based on this, a different approach to derive IMPECS type methods is proposed; in this case, the whole set of 2nc + 6 equations, that apply in each gridblock, is reduced to a single pressure equation through matrix reduction operations; this provides a more stable numerical scheme, compared to other published IMPCS methods, in which the subset of thermodynamic equilibrium equations is arbitrarily decoupled form the set of gridblock equations to perform such reduction. The authors discuss how the general formulation here presented can be used to formulate and construct an adaptive-implicit compositional simulators. They also present results on the numerical performance of FI, IMPSEC and IMPECS methods on some test problems.

  16. Infrared curing simulations of liquid composites molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakouzi, S.; Pancrace, J.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Berthet, F.

    2011-05-01

    Infrared radiation is an effective energy source to cure thermosetting polymers. Its usage is expected to reduce curing time in comparison with thermal heating and mold thermally regulated. In addition, because of the polymerization mechanism and instant on-off control of this power, an improvement in the final properties of the material is also expected. In this paper, we studied the infrared interaction with carbon (or glass) fibers reinforced epoxy matrix, where Liquid resin infusion (LRI) is used to manufacture the composite. Temperature of the composite is a key parameter that affects its mechanical properties and is controlled by the infrared emitters and the exothermic heat released from the polymerization. Radiative heat flux is computed using the in-lab developed software RAYHEAT. Then, the heat flux (or absorbed energy for glass fibers) is exported to the finite element based program COMSOLMULTIPHYSICS where heat balance equation is solved. This equation is coupled with the exothermic heat released during the curing process in order to predict the composite temperature versus time and degree of cure. Numerical simulations will be performed on planar parts (sheet shape) as well as curvilinear shapes. Experimental validations of the infrared curing carbon (glass)-epoxy composite system are presented in this paper Sheet surface temperature distribution are measured thanks to infrared camera. Kinetic parameters were estimated from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experimental data.

  17. Infrared curing simulations of liquid composites molding

    SciTech Connect

    Nakouzi, S.; Pancrace, J.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Berthet, F.

    2011-05-04

    Infrared radiation is an effective energy source to cure thermosetting polymers. Its usage is expected to reduce curing time in comparison with thermal heating and mold thermally regulated. In addition, because of the polymerization mechanism and instant on-off control of this power, an improvement in the final properties of the material is also expected. In this paper, we studied the infrared interaction with carbon (or glass) fibers reinforced epoxy matrix, where Liquid resin infusion (LRI) is used to manufacture the composite. Temperature of the composite is a key parameter that affects its mechanical properties and is controlled by the infrared emitters and the exothermic heat released from the polymerization. Radiative heat flux is computed using the in-lab developed software RAYHEAT. Then, the heat flux (or absorbed energy for glass fibers) is exported to the finite element based program COMSOLMULTIPHYSICS where heat balance equation is solved. This equation is coupled with the exothermic heat released during the curing process in order to predict the composite temperature versus time and degree of cure. Numerical simulations will be performed on planar parts (sheet shape) as well as curvilinear shapes. Experimental validations of the infrared curing carbon (glass)-epoxy composite system are presented in this paper Sheet surface temperature distribution are measured thanks to infrared camera. Kinetic parameters were estimated from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experimental data.

  18. The Drag of Streamline Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N

    1933-01-01

    Preliminary results are given of drag tests of streamline wires. Full-size wires were tested over a wide range of speeds in the N.A.C.A. high speed tunnel. The results are thus directly applicable to full-scale problems and include any compressibility effects encountered at the higher speeds. The results show how protuberances may be employed on conventional streamline wires to reduce the drag, and also show how the conventional wires compare with others having sections more like strut or symmetrical airfoil sections. Because the new wire sections developed are markedly superior aerodynamically to conventional wires, it is recommended that some of them be tested in service in order to investigate their relative susceptibility to vibration and to fatigue failure.

  19. Rapid analysis of poplar lignin monomer composition by a streamlined thioacidolysis procedure and near-infrared reflectance-based prediction modeling.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew R; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2009-05-01

    Determination of the physico-chemical attributes of plant cell walls, such as lignin content and composition, is of paramount importance in germplasm screening and for evaluating the results of plant breeding and genetic engineering. There are escalating needs for analyses to be robust, reproducible, accurate, and efficient. We have recently modified an established protocol for discrimination of lignin monomers, thioacidolysis, with the goal of increasing sample throughput while maintaining accuracy and reducing equipment load and consumption of reagents. Numerous methodological changes related to volume scaling, selection of the processing vessel, and sample handling were addressed. The revised protocol permitted rapid processing of some 50 or more samples per person per day. A direct comparison between methods using hybrid poplar (Populus alba x tremula) wood samples, resulted in quantities of p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S) lignin monomers that were equivalent to those derived from the original protocol. The revised methodology was then applied to quickly generate phenotypic trait data from 267 hybrid poplar trees (including wild type and eight C4H::F5H transgenic lines), for the development of a near-infrared-based model for predicting the proportion of lignin monomers across a broad phenotypic range of S:G. The resulting partial least squares regression model performed well under full cross-validation, giving strong, linear relationships between actual and predicted monomer proportions, and very high predictive accuracy for the predominant G and S monomers. This research brings considerable refinement to the thioacidolysis procedure, and establishes a method for rapidly and accurately quantifying cell-wall lignin composition that could effectively be employed in routine phenotypic screening platforms.

  20. Surface-Streamline Flow Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langston, L.; Boyle, M.

    1985-01-01

    Matrix of ink dots covers matte surface of polyester drafting film. Film placed against wind-tunnel wall. Layer of methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) sprayed over dotted area. Ink dot streaklines show several characteristics of flow, including primary saddle point of separations, primary horseshoe vortex and smaller vortex at cylinder/ endwall junction. Surface streamline flow visualization technique suitable for use in low-speed windtunnels or other low-speed gas flows.

  1. Scalable Computation of Streamlines on Very Large Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Pugmire, Dave; Garth, Christoph; Childs, Hank; Ahern, Sean; Weber, Gunther H

    2009-01-01

    nderstanding vector fields resulting from large scientific simulations is an important and often difficult task. Streamlines, curves that are tangential to a ve ctor field at each point, are a powerful visualization method in this context. Application of streamline-based visualization to very large vector field data repr esents a significant challenge due to the non-local and data-dependent nature of streamline computation, and requires careful balancing of computational demands placed on I/O, memory, communication, and processors. In this paper we review two parallelization approaches based on established parallelization paradigms (stat ic decomposition and on-demand loading) and present a novel hybrid algorithm for computing streamlines. Our algorithm is aimed at good scalability and performanc e across the widely varying computational characteristics of streamline-based problems. We perform performance and scalability studies of all three algorithms on a number of prototypical application problems and demonstrate that our hybrid scheme is able to perform well in different settings.

  2. Vision and air flow combine to streamline flying honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gavin J.; Luu, Tien; Ball, David; Srinivasan, Mandyam V.

    2013-01-01

    Insects face the challenge of integrating multi-sensory information to control their flight. Here we study a ‘streamlining' response in honeybees, whereby honeybees raise their abdomen to reduce drag. We find that this response, which was recently reported to be mediated by optic flow, is also strongly modulated by the presence of air flow simulating a head wind. The Johnston's organs in the antennae were found to play a role in the measurement of the air speed that is used to control the streamlining response. The response to a combination of visual motion and wind is complex and can be explained by a model that incorporates a non-linear combination of the two stimuli. The use of visual and mechanosensory cues increases the strength of the streamlining response when the stimuli are present concurrently. We propose this multisensory integration will make the response more robust to transient disturbances in either modality. PMID:24019053

  3. Vision and air flow combine to streamline flying honeybees.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Gavin J; Luu, Tien; Ball, David; Srinivasan, Mandyam V

    2013-01-01

    Insects face the challenge of integrating multi-sensory information to control their flight. Here we study a 'streamlining' response in honeybees, whereby honeybees raise their abdomen to reduce drag. We find that this response, which was recently reported to be mediated by optic flow, is also strongly modulated by the presence of air flow simulating a head wind. The Johnston's organs in the antennae were found to play a role in the measurement of the air speed that is used to control the streamlining response. The response to a combination of visual motion and wind is complex and can be explained by a model that incorporates a non-linear combination of the two stimuli. The use of visual and mechanosensory cues increases the strength of the streamlining response when the stimuli are present concurrently. We propose this multisensory integration will make the response more robust to transient disturbances in either modality.

  4. Parallelization of a Compositional Reservoir Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reme, Hilde; Åge Øye, Geir; Espedal, Magne S.; Fladmark, Gunnar E.

    A finite volume dicretization has been used to solve compositional flow in porous media. Secondary migration in fractured rocks has been the main motivation for the work. Multipoint flux approximation has been implemented and adaptive local grid refinement, based on domain decomposition, is used at fractures and faults. The parallelization method, which is described in this paper, strongly promotes code reuse and gives a very high level of parallelization despite low implementation costs. The programming framework is also portable to other platforms or other applications. We have presented computer experiments to examine the parallel efficiency of the implemented parallel simulator with respect to scalability and speedup. Keywords: porous media, multipoint flux approximation, domain decomposition, parallelization

  5. Interactive Streamline Exploration and Manipulation Using Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Xin; Chen, Chun-Ming; Shen, Han-Wei; Wong, Pak C.

    2015-01-12

    Occlusion presents a major challenge in visualizing three-dimensional flow fields with streamlines. Displaying too many streamlines at once makes it difficult to locate interesting regions, but displaying too few streamlines risks missing important features. A more ideal streamline exploration model is to allow the viewer to freely move across the field that has been populated with interesting streamlines and pull away the streamlines that cause occlusion so that the viewer can inspect the hidden ones in detail. In this paper, we present a streamline deformation algorithm that supports such user-driven interaction with three-dimensional flow fields. We define a view-dependent focus+context technique that moves the streamlines occluding the focus area using a novel displacement model. To preserve the context surrounding the user-chosen focus area, we propose two shape models to define the transition zone for the surrounding streamlines, and the displacement of the contextual streamlines is solved interactively with a goal of preserving their shapes as much as possible. Based on our deformation model, we design an interactive streamline exploration tool using a lens metaphor. Our system runs interactively so that users can move their focus and examine the flow field freely.

  6. Simulating the Composite Propellant Manufacturing Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Suzanne; Love, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    There is a strategic interest in understanding how the propellant manufacturing process contributes to military capabilities outside the United States. The paper will discuss how system dynamics (SD) has been applied to rapidly assess the capabilities and vulnerabilities of a specific composite propellant production complex. These facilities produce a commonly used solid propellant with military applications. The authors will explain how an SD model can be configured to match a specific production facility followed by a series of scenarios designed to analyze operational vulnerabilities. By using the simulation model to rapidly analyze operational risks, the analyst gains a better understanding of production complexities. There are several benefits of developing SD models to simulate chemical production. SD is an effective tool for characterizing complex problems, especially the production process where the cascading effect of outages quickly taxes common understanding. By programming expert knowledge into an SD application, these tools are transformed into a knowledge management resource that facilitates rapid learning without requiring years of experience in production operations. It also permits the analyst to rapidly respond to crisis situations and other time-sensitive missions. Most importantly, the quantitative understanding gained from applying the SD model lends itself to strategic analysis and planning.

  7. Simulating the Composite Propellant Manufacturing Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Suzanne; Love, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    There is a strategic interest in understanding how the propellant manufacturing process contributes to military capabilities outside the United States. The paper will discuss how system dynamics (SD) has been applied to rapidly assess the capabilities and vulnerabilities of a specific composite propellant production complex. These facilities produce a commonly used solid propellant with military applications. The authors will explain how an SD model can be configured to match a specific production facility followed by a series of scenarios designed to analyze operational vulnerabilities. By using the simulation model to rapidly analyze operational risks, the analyst gains a better understanding of production complexities. There are several benefits of developing SD models to simulate chemical production. SD is an effective tool for characterizing complex problems, especially the production process where the cascading effect of outages quickly taxes common understanding. By programming expert knowledge into an SD application, these tools are transformed into a knowledge management resource that facilitates rapid learning without requiring years of experience in production operations. It also permits the analyst to rapidly respond to crisis situations and other time-sensitive missions. Most importantly, the quantitative understanding gained from applying the SD model lends itself to strategic analysis and planning.

  8. Compositional and black oil reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Coats, K.H.; Thomas, L.K.; Pierson, R.G.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a three-dimensional, three-phase reservoir simulation model for black oil and compositional applications. Both IMPES and fully implicit formulations are included. The model`s use of a relaxed volume balance concept effectively conserves both mass and volume and reduces Newton iterations. A new implicit well rate calculation method improves IMPES stability. It approximates wellbore crossflow effects with high efficiency and relative simplicity in both IMPES and fully implicit formulations. Multiphase flow in the tubing and near-well turbulent gas flow effects are treated implicitly. Initial saturations are calculated as a function of water-oil and gas-oil capillary pressures which are optimally dependent upon the Leverett J function or initial saturations may be entered as data arrays. A normalization of the relative permeability and capillary pressure curves is used to calculate these terms as a function of rock type and grid block residual saturations. Example problems are presented, including several of the SPE Comparative Solution problems and field simulations. 48 refs.

  9. Streamline-based microfluidic device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides a streamline-based device and a method for using the device for continuous separation of particles including cells in biological fluids. The device includes a main microchannel and an array of side microchannels disposed on a substrate. The main microchannel has a plurality of stagnation points with a predetermined geometric design, for example, each of the stagnation points has a predetermined distance from the upstream edge of each of the side microchannels. The particles are separated and collected in the side microchannels.

  10. Evolutionary origin of a streamlined marine bacterioplankton lineage.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haiwei

    2015-06-01

    Planktonic bacterial lineages with streamlined genomes are prevalent in the ocean. The base composition of their DNA is often highly biased towards low G+C content, a possible source of systematic error in phylogenetic reconstruction. A total of 228 orthologous protein families were sampled that are shared among major lineages of Alphaproteobacteria, including the marine free-living SAR11 clade and the obligate endosymbiotic Rickettsiales. These two ecologically distinct lineages share genome sizes of <1.5 Mbp and genomic G+C content of <30%. Statistical analyses showed that only 28 protein families are composition-homogeneous, whereas the other 200 families significantly violate the composition-homogeneous assumption included in most phylogenetic methods. RAxML analysis based on the concatenation of 24 ribosomal proteins that fall into the heterogeneous protein category clustered the SAR11 and Rickettsiales lineages at the base of the Alphaproteobacteria tree, whereas that based on the concatenation of 28 homogeneous proteins (including 19 ribosomal proteins) disassociated the lineages and placed SAR11 at the base of the non-endosymbiotic lineages. When the two data sets were concatenated, only a model that accounted for compositional bias yielded a tree identical to the tree built with composition-homogeneous proteins. Ancestral genome analysis suggests that the first evolved SAR11 cell had a small genome streamlined from its ancestor by a factor of two and coinciding with an ecological transition, followed by further gradual streamlining towards the extant SAR11 populations.

  11. Probabilistic Simulation of Multi-Scale Composite Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    A methodology is developed to computationally assess the non-deterministic composite response at all composite scales (from micro to structural) due to the uncertainties in the constituent (fiber and matrix) properties, in the fabrication process and in structural variables (primitive variables). The methodology is computationally efficient for simulating the probability distributions of composite behavior, such as material properties, laminate and structural responses. Bi-products of the methodology are probabilistic sensitivities of the composite primitive variables. The methodology has been implemented into the computer codes PICAN (Probabilistic Integrated Composite ANalyzer) and IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures). The accuracy and efficiency of this methodology are demonstrated by simulating the uncertainties in composite typical laminates and comparing the results with the Monte Carlo simulation method. Available experimental data of composite laminate behavior at all scales fall within the scatters predicted by PICAN. Multi-scaling is extended to simulate probabilistic thermo-mechanical fatigue and to simulate the probabilistic design of a composite redome in order to illustrate its versatility. Results show that probabilistic fatigue can be simulated for different temperature amplitudes and for different cyclic stress magnitudes. Results also show that laminate configurations can be selected to increase the redome reliability by several orders of magnitude without increasing the laminate thickness--a unique feature of structural composites. The old reference denotes that nothing fundamental has been done since that time.

  12. Probabilistic simulation of uncertainties in composite uniaxial strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Stock, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite strengths. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using composite mechanics with Monte Carlo simulation. The variables for which uncertainties are accounted include constituent strengths and their respective scatter. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to illustrate the procedure and its effectiveness to formally estimate the probable scatter in the composite uniaxial strengths. The results show that ply longitudinal tensile and compressive, transverse compressive and intralaminar shear strengths are not sensitive to single fiber anomalies (breaks, intergacial disbonds, matrix microcracks); however, the ply transverse tensile strength is.

  13. A streamlined failure mode and effects analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C. Smith, Koren; Terezakis, Stephanie; Croog, Victoria; Gollamudi, Smitha; Gage, Irene; Keck, Jordie; DeWeese, Theodore; Sibley, Greg

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Explore the feasibility and impact of a streamlined failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) using a structured process that is designed to minimize staff effort. Methods: FMEA for the external beam process was conducted at an affiliate radiation oncology center that treats approximately 60 patients per day. A structured FMEA process was developed which included clearly defined roles and goals for each phase. A core group of seven people was identified and a facilitator was chosen to lead the effort. Failure modes were identified and scored according to the FMEA formalism. A risk priority number,RPN, was calculated and used to rank failure modes. Failure modes with RPN > 150 received safety improvement interventions. Staff effort was carefully tracked throughout the project. Results: Fifty-two failure modes were identified, 22 collected during meetings, and 30 from take-home worksheets. The four top-ranked failure modes were: delay in film check, missing pacemaker protocol/consent, critical structures not contoured, and pregnant patient simulated without the team's knowledge of the pregnancy. These four failure modes hadRPN > 150 and received safety interventions. The FMEA was completed in one month in four 1-h meetings. A total of 55 staff hours were required and, additionally, 20 h by the facilitator. Conclusions: Streamlined FMEA provides a means of accomplishing a relatively large-scale analysis with modest effort. One potential value of FMEA is that it potentially provides a means of measuring the impact of quality improvement efforts through a reduction in risk scores. Future study of this possibility is needed.

  14. A streamlined failure mode and effects analysis.

    PubMed

    Ford, Eric C; Smith, Koren; Terezakis, Stephanie; Croog, Victoria; Gollamudi, Smitha; Gage, Irene; Keck, Jordie; DeWeese, Theodore; Sibley, Greg

    2014-06-01

    Explore the feasibility and impact of a streamlined failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) using a structured process that is designed to minimize staff effort. FMEA for the external beam process was conducted at an affiliate radiation oncology center that treats approximately 60 patients per day. A structured FMEA process was developed which included clearly defined roles and goals for each phase. A core group of seven people was identified and a facilitator was chosen to lead the effort. Failure modes were identified and scored according to the FMEA formalism. A risk priority number,RPN, was calculated and used to rank failure modes. Failure modes with RPN > 150 received safety improvement interventions. Staff effort was carefully tracked throughout the project. Fifty-two failure modes were identified, 22 collected during meetings, and 30 from take-home worksheets. The four top-ranked failure modes were: delay in film check, missing pacemaker protocol/consent, critical structures not contoured, and pregnant patient simulated without the team's knowledge of the pregnancy. These four failure modes had RPN > 150 and received safety interventions. The FMEA was completed in one month in four 1-h meetings. A total of 55 staff hours were required and, additionally, 20 h by the facilitator. Streamlined FMEA provides a means of accomplishing a relatively large-scale analysis with modest effort. One potential value of FMEA is that it potentially provides a means of measuring the impact of quality improvement efforts through a reduction in risk scores. Future study of this possibility is needed.

  15. Probabilistic simulation of multi-scale composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, D. G.; Shiao, M. C.; Singhal, S. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    A methodology is developed to computationally assess the probabilistic composite material properties at all composite scale levels due to the uncertainties in the constituent (fiber and matrix) properties and in the fabrication process variables. The methodology is computationally efficient for simulating the probability distributions of material properties. The sensitivity of the probabilistic composite material property to each random variable is determined. This information can be used to reduce undesirable uncertainties in material properties at the macro scale of the composite by reducing the uncertainties in the most influential random variables at the micro scale. This methodology was implemented into the computer code PICAN (Probabilistic Integrated Composite ANalyzer). The accuracy and efficiency of this methodology are demonstrated by simulating the uncertainties in the material properties of a typical laminate and comparing the results with the Monte Carlo simulation method. The experimental data of composite material properties at all scales fall within the scatters predicted by PICAN.

  16. CASE STUDIES EXAMINING LCA STREAMLINING TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pressure is mounting for more streamlined Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methods that allow for evaluations that are quick and simple, but accurate. As part of an overall research effort to develop and demonstrate streamlined LCA, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has funded ...

  17. View-Dependent Streamline Deformation and Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Edwards, John; Chen, Chun-Ming; Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Chris R.; Wong, Pak Chung

    2016-01-01

    Occlusion presents a major challenge in visualizing 3D flow and tensor fields using streamlines. Displaying too many streamlines creates a dense visualization filled with occluded structures, but displaying too few streams risks losing important features. We propose a new streamline exploration approach by visually manipulating the cluttered streamlines by pulling visible layers apart and revealing the hidden structures underneath. This paper presents a customized view-dependent deformation algorithm and an interactive visualization tool to minimize visual clutter in 3D vector and tensor fields. The algorithm is able to maintain the overall integrity of the fields and expose previously hidden structures. Our system supports both mouse and direct-touch interactions to manipulate the viewing perspectives and visualize the streamlines in depth. By using a lens metaphor of different shapes to select the transition zone of the targeted area interactively, the users can move their focus and examine the vector or tensor field freely. PMID:26600061

  18. View-Dependent Streamline Deformation and Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Xin; Edwards, John; Chen, Chun-Ming; Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Chris R.; Wong, Pak Chung

    2016-07-01

    Occlusion presents a major challenge in visualizing 3D flow and tensor fields using streamlines. Displaying too many streamlines creates a dense visualization filled with occluded structures, but displaying too few streams risks losing important features. We propose a new streamline exploration approach by visually manipulating the cluttered streamlines by pulling visible layers apart and revealing the hidden structures underneath. This paper presents a customized view-dependent deformation algorithm and an interactive visualization tool to minimize visual cluttering for visualizing 3D vector and tensor fields. The algorithm is able to maintain the overall integrity of the fields and expose previously hidden structures. Our system supports both mouse and direct-touch interactions to manipulate the viewing perspectives and visualize the streamlines in depth. By using a lens metaphor of different shapes to select the transition zone of the targeted area interactively, the users can move their focus and examine the vector or tensor field freely.

  19. Streamlined Hills of Maja Vallis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 16 May 2003

    Classic catastrophic flood morphology (streamlined hills and longitudinal grooves) is captured in this image of Lunae Planum. Similar features (although much smaller in size) are seen in terrestrial catastrophic flood regions such as Channeled Scabland of Washington state and in Iceland.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 14.8, Longitude 301.8East (58.2). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. An Analysis of Team Composition as It Affects Simulation Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnakumar, Parameswar; Chisholm, Thomas Alexander

    This study investigated the extent to which sex composition and average team academic achievement of student simulation teams affect team effectiveness. Seventy-four students in two sections of a marketing principles class were divided into 20 teams to test their decision-making skills. For 10 weeks, each team operated a simulated supermarket…

  1. An Analysis of Team Composition as It Affects Simulation Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnakumar, Parameswar; Chisholm, Thomas Alexander

    This study investigated the extent to which sex composition and average team academic achievement of student simulation teams affect team effectiveness. Seventy-four students in two sections of a marketing principles class were divided into 20 teams to test their decision-making skills. For 10 weeks, each team operated a simulated supermarket…

  2. Streamline segment scaling behavior in a turbulent wavy channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubbert, A.; Hennig, F.; Klaas, M.; Pitsch, H.; Schröder, W.; Peters, N.

    2017-02-01

    A turbulent flow in a wavy channel was investigated by tomographic particle-image velocimetry measurements and direct numerical simulations. To analyze the turbulent structures and their scaling behavior in a flow undergoing favorable and adverse pressure gradients, the streamline segmentation method proposed by Wang (J Fluid Mech 648:183-203, 2010) was employed. This method yields joint statistical information about velocity fluctuations and length scale distributions of non-overlapping structures within the flow. In particular, the joint statistical properties are notably influenced by the pressure distribution. Previous findings from flat channel flows and synthetic turbulence simulations concerning the normalized segment length distribution could be reproduced and therefore appear to be largely universal. However, the mean streamline segment length of accelerating and decelerating segments varies within one wavelength typically elongating segments of the type which corresponds to the local mean flow. Furthermore, the local pressure gradient was found to significantly impact local joint streamline segmentation statistics as a main influence on their inherent asymmetry.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Textile Composite Stamping On Double Dome

    SciTech Connect

    Xiongqi Peng; Zia Ur Rehman

    2011-05-04

    Stamping is one of the most effective ways to form textile composites in industry for providing high-strength, low-weight and cost-effective products. This paper presents a fully continuum mechanics-based approach for stamping simulation of textile fiber reinforced composites by using finite element (FE) method. A previously developed non-orthogonal constitutive model is used to represent the anisotropic mechanical behavior of textile composites under large deformation during stamping. Simulation are performed on a balanced plain weave composite with 0 deg./90 deg. and {+-}45 deg. as initial yarn orientation over a benchmark double dome device. Simulation results show good agreement with experimental output in terms of a number of parameters selected for comparison.

  4. A Material Model for FE-Simulation of UD Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Composite materials are being increasingly used for industrial applications. CFRP is particularly suitable for lightweight construction due to its high specific stiffness and strength properties. Simulation methods are needed during the development process in order to reduce the effort for prototypes and testing. This is particularly important for CFRP, as the material is costly. For accurate simulations, a realistic material model is needed. In this paper, a material model for the simulation of UD-composites including non-linear material behaviour and damage is developed and implemented in Abaqus. The material model is validated by comparison with test results on a range of test specimens.

  5. Effects of streamline curvature on separation prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arolla, Sunil K.; Durbin, Paul A.

    2009-11-01

    In this study, the effects of streamline curvature on prediction of flow separation are investigated. The geometry is a circulation control airfoil, a high-lift configuration that has been under extensive research for more than two decades. A tangential jet is blown over a thick, rounded trailing edge, using the Coanda effect to delay separation. An attempt is made to understand, through numerical simulations, the dynamics of turbulent separation and reattachment on the Coanda surface. Highly curved, attached recirculation regions are seen to form. A physics based curvature correction proposed by Pettersson-Reif et al. (1999) is used in conjunction with ζ-f turbulence model. The chord-based Reynolds number is Re = 10^6. Two jet momentum coefficients of Cμ=0.03 and 0.1 are computed. In this paper, comparisons between the computed and experimental pressure distributions, velocity profiles and the position of flow detachment are presented. Comparisons with other closures such as Menter's SST model are also discussed.

  6. Streamlined Islands in Ares Valles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 June 2002) The Science Although liquid water is not stable on the surface of Mars today, there is substantial geologic evidence that large quantities of water once flowed across the surface in the distant past. Streamlined islands, shown here, are one piece of evidence for this ancient water. The tremendous force of moving water, possibly from a catastrophic flood, carved these teardrop-shaped islands within a much larger channel called Ares Valles. The orientation of the islands can be used as an indicator of the direction the water flowed. The islands have a blunt end that is usually associated with an obstacle, commonly an impact crater. The crater is resistant to erosion and creates a geologic barrier around which the water must flow. As the water flows past the obstacle, its erosive power is directed outward, leaving the area in the lee of the obstacle relatively uneroded. However, some scientists have also argued that the area in the lee of the obstacle might be a depositional zone, where material is dropped out of the water as it briefly slows. The ridges observed on the high-standing terrain in the leeward parts of the islands may be benches carved into the rock that mark the height of the water at various times during the flood, or they might be indicative of layering in the leeward rock. As the water makes its way downstream, the interference of the water flow by the obstacle is reduced, and the water that was diverted around the obstacle rejoins itself at the narrow end of the island. Therefore, the direction of the water flow is parallel to the orientation of the island, and the narrow end of the island points downstream. In addition to the streamlined islands, the channel floor exhibits fluting that is also suggestive of flowing water. The flutes (also known as longitudinal grooves) are also parallel to the direction of flow, indicating that the water flow was turbulent and probably quite fast, which is consistent with the hypothesized

  7. Numerical simulation of steel-concrete composite Virender beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinggui; Cao, Xinming; Luo, Quanrui

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a new type of steel-concrete composite Vierendeel beam is proposed. The finite element analysis of the new type of steel-concrete composite Vierendeel beam is carried out by using ABAQUS. To compare the mechanical properties with traditional beam, the normal reinforced concrete beam with the same section size is also analyzed by using ABAQUS. The simulation results show that the material strength of the new type steel-concrete composite Vierendeel beam is fully utilized, and the flexural capacity and deformation performance of the new type of steel-concrete composite Vierendeel beam are greatly improved compared with normal reinforced concrete beam.

  8. Analytic streamline calculations on linear tetrahedra

    SciTech Connect

    Diachin, D.P.; Herzog, J.A.

    1997-06-01

    Analytic solutions for streamlines within tetrahedra are used to define operators that accurately and efficiently compute streamlines. The method presented here is based on linear interpolation, and therefore produces exact results for linear velocity fields. In addition, the method requires less computation than the forward Euler numerical method. Results are presented that compare accuracy measurements of the method with forward Euler and fourth order Runge-Kutta applied to both a linear and a nonlinear velocity field.

  9. Compositional Space Parameterization Approach for Reservoir Flow Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskov, D.

    2011-12-01

    Phase equilibrium calculations are the most challenging part of a compositional flow simulation. For every gridblock and at every time step, the number of phases and their compositions must be computed for the given overall composition, temperature, and pressure conditions. The conventional approach used in petroleum industry is based on performing a phase-stability test, and solving the fugacity constraints together with the coupled nonlinear flow equations when the gridblock has more than one phase. The multi-phase compositional space can be parameterized in terms of tie-simplexes. For example, a tie-triangle can be used such that its interior encloses the three-phase region, and the edges represent the boundary with specific two-phase regions. The tie-simplex parameterization can be performed for pressure, temperature, and overall composition. The challenge is that all of these parameters can change considerably during the course of a simulation. It is possible to prove that the tie-simplexes change continuously with respect to pressure, temperature, and overall composition. The continuity of the tie-simplex parameterization allows for interpolation using discrete representations of the tie-simplex space. For variations of composition, a projection to the nearest tie-simplex is used, and if the tie-simplex is within a predefined tolerance, it can be used directly to identify the phase-state of this composition. In general, our parameterization approach can be seen as the generalization of negative flash idea for systems with two or more phases. Theory of dispersion-free compositional displacements, as well as computational experience of general-purpose compositional flow simulation indicates that the displacement path in compositional space is determined by a limited number of tie-simplexes. Therefore, only few tie-simplex tables are required to parameterize the entire displacement. The small number of tie-simplexes needed in a course of a simulation motivates

  10. Computational simulation of intermingled-fiber hybrid composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite-element analysis and a micromechanics based computer code ICAN (Integrated Composite Analyzer) are used to predict the composite properties and microstresses of a unidirectional graphite/epoxy primary composite with varying percentages of S-glass fibers used as hydridizing fibers at a total fiber volume of 0.54. The three-dimensional finite-element model used in the analyses consists of a group of nine fibers, all unidirectional, in a three-by-three unit cell array. There is generally good agreement between the composite properties and microstresses obtained from both methods. The results indicate that the finite-element methods and the micromechanics equations embedded in the ICAN computer code can be used to obtain the properties of intermingled fiber hybrid composites needed for the analysis/design of hybrid composite structures. However, the finite-element model should be big enough to be able to simulate the conditions assumed in the micromechanics equations.

  11. Process to Produce Iron Nanoparticle Lunar Dust Simulant Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; McNatt, Jeremiah

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a method for producing nanophase iron lunar dust composite simulant by heating a mixture of carbon black and current lunar simulant types (mixed oxide including iron oxide) at a high temperature to reduce ionic iron into elemental iron. The product is a chemically modified lunar simulant that can be attracted by a magnet, and has a surface layer with an iron concentration that is increased during the reaction. The iron was found to be -iron and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The simulant produced with this method contains iron nanoparticles not available previously, and they are stable in ambient air. These nanoparticles can be mass-produced simply.

  12. A Simulation Study of Electrical Fiber Composite Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezdour, D.; Sahli, S.

    2008-11-01

    Percolation concept has been used in this study to estimate the amount of conductive fibers embedded in polymeric matrix, necessary to establish conduction in this kind of composites. The resistance of composite materials is calculated by simulating composite samples with different size, containing conductive fibers with various lengths Calculation is based on detecting conductive pathways through the insulating matrix, these pathways are assumed to be resistances in parallel. Electrical resistance curves showed a percolative behavior of the samples versus volume fraction of filler. Lower conduction thresholds are obtained for fiber aspect ratio of 20 and sample size of 100. The electrical resistivity and the conduction thresholds of the carbon fiber reinforced polycarbonate composites have been characterized. Simulation results are in good agreement with an experimental result found in the literature.

  13. Streamlined Islands in Ares Valles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 June 2002) The Science Although liquid water is not stable on the surface of Mars today, there is substantial geologic evidence that large quantities of water once flowed across the surface in the distant past. Streamlined islands, shown here, are one piece of evidence for this ancient water. The tremendous force of moving water, possibly from a catastrophic flood, carved these teardrop-shaped islands within a much larger channel called Ares Valles. The orientation of the islands can be used as an indicator of the direction the water flowed. The islands have a blunt end that is usually associated with an obstacle, commonly an impact crater. The crater is resistant to erosion and creates a geologic barrier around which the water must flow. As the water flows past the obstacle, its erosive power is directed outward, leaving the area in the lee of the obstacle relatively uneroded. However, some scientists have also argued that the area in the lee of the obstacle might be a depositional zone, where material is dropped out of the water as it briefly slows. The ridges observed on the high-standing terrain in the leeward parts of the islands may be benches carved into the rock that mark the height of the water at various times during the flood, or they might be indicative of layering in the leeward rock. As the water makes its way downstream, the interference of the water flow by the obstacle is reduced, and the water that was diverted around the obstacle rejoins itself at the narrow end of the island. Therefore, the direction of the water flow is parallel to the orientation of the island, and the narrow end of the island points downstream. In addition to the streamlined islands, the channel floor exhibits fluting that is also suggestive of flowing water. The flutes (also known as longitudinal grooves) are also parallel to the direction of flow, indicating that the water flow was turbulent and probably quite fast, which is consistent with the hypothesized

  14. A new technique for simulating composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    This project dealt with the development on new methodologies and algorithms for the multi-spectrum electromagnetic characterization of large scale nonmetallic airborne vehicles and structures. A robust, low memory, and accurate methodology was developed which is particularly suited for modern machine architectures. This is a hybrid finite element method that combines two well known numerical solution approaches. That of the finite element method for modeling volumes and the boundary integral method which yields exact boundary conditions for terminating the finite element mesh. In addition, a variety of high frequency results were generated (such as diffraction coefficients for impedance surfaces and material layers) and a class of boundary conditions were developed which hold promise for more efficient simulations. During the course of this project, nearly 25 detailed research reports were generated along with an equal number of journal papers. The reports, papers, and journal articles are listed in the appendices along with their abstracts.

  15. THE COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY OF EXTRASOLAR TERRESTRIAL PLANETS. II. MIGRATION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Carter-Bond, Jade C.; O'Brien, David P.; Raymond, Sean N.

    2012-11-20

    Prior work has found that a variety of terrestrial planetary compositions are expected to occur within known extrasolar planetary systems. However, such studies ignored the effects of giant planet migration, which is thought to be very common in extrasolar systems. Here we present calculations of the compositions of terrestrial planets that formed in dynamical simulations incorporating varying degrees of giant planet migration. We used chemical equilibrium models of the solid material present in the disks of five known planetary host stars: the Sun, GJ 777, HD4203, HD19994, and HD213240. Giant planet migration has a strong effect on the compositions of simulated terrestrial planets as the migration results in large-scale mixing between terrestrial planet building blocks that condensed at a range of temperatures. This mixing acts to (1) increase the typical abundance of Mg-rich silicates in the terrestrial planets' feeding zones and thus increase the frequency of planets with Earth-like compositions compared with simulations with static giant planet orbits, and (2) drastically increase the efficiency of the delivery of hydrous phases (water and serpentine) to terrestrial planets and thus produce waterworlds and/or wet Earths. Our results demonstrate that although a wide variety of terrestrial planet compositions can still be produced, planets with Earth-like compositions should be common within extrasolar planetary systems.

  16. Numerical simulation of damage progression in unidirectional composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Michael

    1997-11-01

    The damage growth in unidirectional composite materials is a complex evolutionary process. The initiation, growth and interaction of these damage mechanisms are strongly influenced by the properties of the constituent materials. In addition, thermal residual stresses are usually induced in composite material during the curing process. Therefore it is essential to consider the effect of the properties of the constituent materials and thermal residual stresses on the fracture behavior of composite materials. In this study, a computational methodology that employs a hybrid micromechanical-anisotropic continuum model developed previously to simulate the damage growth on the constituent level of composite materials has been modified and extended to include the effect of temperature change. The unique features of this methodology is that multiple modes of damage can be simulated simultaneously, and the direction of damage growth, in the form of a crack path, needs not be pre-selected. More specifically, the methodology uses a special purpose finite element program, PSEUDO, with a node splitting and nodal force relaxation algorithm that is capable of generating new crack surfaces to simulate damage initiation and growth in unidirectional fiber reinforced composites. An incremental elastic-plastic algorithm with Jsb2 flow theory and isotropic hardening is incorporated to account for matrix plastic deformation when analyzing damage growth in metal matrix composites. Damage progression in two types of metal matrix composites, namely, the as-received boron/aluminum-5.6/6061-AR and the solution aged and treated boron/aluminum-5.6/6061-T6 metal matrix composites, with thermal residual stresses, have been analyzed. The results show that the thermal residual stresses do have significant effects on the damage initiation, damage progression and the notch strengths of the composite materials.

  17. Simulations of Ferrite-Dielectric-Wire Composite Negative Index Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachford, Frederic J.; Armstead, Douglas N.; Harris, Vincent G.; Vittoria, Carmine

    2007-08-01

    We perform extensive finite difference time domain simulations of ferrite based negative index of refraction composites. A wire grid is employed to provide negative permittivity. The ferrite and wire grid interact to provide both negative and positive index of refraction transmission peaks in the vicinity of the ferrite resonance. Notwithstanding the extreme anisotropy in the index of refraction of the composite, negative refraction is seen at the composite air interface allowing the construction of a focusing concave lens with a magnetically tunable focal length.

  18. Impact assessment: Eroding benefits through streamlining?

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Alan; Pope, Jenny; Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Retief, Francois; Gunn, Jill A.E.

    2014-02-15

    This paper argues that Governments have sought to streamline impact assessment in recent years (defined as the last five years) to counter concerns over the costs and potential for delays to economic development. We hypothesise that this has had some adverse consequences on the benefits that subsequently accrue from the assessments. This hypothesis is tested using a framework developed from arguments for the benefits brought by Environmental Impact Assessment made in 1982 in the face of the UK Government opposition to its implementation in a time of economic recession. The particular benefits investigated are ‘consistency and fairness’, ‘early warning’, ‘environment and development’, and ‘public involvement’. Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom and Western Australia are the jurisdictions tested using this framework. The conclusions indicate that significant streamlining has been undertaken which has had direct adverse effects on some of the benefits that impact assessment should deliver, particularly in Canada and the UK. The research has not examined whether streamlining has had implications for the effectiveness of impact assessment, but the causal link between streamlining and benefits does sound warning bells that merit further investigation. -- Highlights: • Investigation of the extent to which government has streamlined IA. • Evaluation framework was developed based on benefits of impact assessment. • Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and Western Australia were examined. • Trajectory in last five years is attrition of benefits of impact assessment.

  19. Morphometry and core type of streamlined bedforms in southern Sweden from high resolution LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Thomas P. F.; Spagnolo, Matteo; Möller, Per

    2015-05-01

    This paper generates a new data set of streamlined glacial bedforms in southern Sweden, which is used both to test conclusions from previous work on streamlined bedform morphometrics and to advance our knowledge of streamlined bedforms on the Scandinavian Shield. The data set consists of streamlined glacial bedforms in southeast Sweden mapped from the new LiDAR-derived Swedish National Height Model, which has a pixel resolution of 2.0 m with a vertical resolution of 1 cm. We have mapped 10,311 features; of the mapped features, 135 are known to have an unconsolidated sediment core, 2120 a bedrock component, and 8055 whose core composition is unknown. The extracted morphological variables are then subjected to a univariate and bivariate analysis. We find that the extracted characteristics broadly fit into the lower end of the modal and median value spectrum of similar bedforms from around the world. The distribution of the variables is found to be log-normal to a first-order approximation. The covariant relationships between height and length, width and area are examined after the variables have been log-transformed and are found to be significant, if not particularly strong. Rock-cored features are found to have a longer modal length than soft-cored features, which suggests that reconstructions of past flow velocities from streamlined landforms need to closely consider core-type. Additionally, we find no support for a derived scaling law for streamlined features by plotting length, width, and elongation ratio against one another.

  20. 77 FR 14700 - Streamlining Inherited Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ...On December 5, 2011, the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (the Bureau) published in the Federal Register a notice and request for information requesting specific suggestions from the public for streamlining regulations it recently inherited from other Federal agencies (the Streamlining Notice) The Streamlining Notice provided for a two-stage comment process. Initial comments were due March 5, 2012. The Notice then allowed a 30-day period, closing on April 3, 2012, for submitting responses to the comments filed. Due to the likely number and complexity of the comments submitted in the first round and to allow parties more time to consider and craft their responses to those initial submissions, the Bureau has determined that an extension of the comment reply period until June 4, 2012, is appropriate. This action will allow interested persons more time to analyze the submitted comments and prepare their responses. However, the initial comment period is still closed as of March 5, 2012.

  1. Coupled multidisciplinary simulation of composite engine structures in propulsion environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chamis, C.C. ); Singhal, S.N. )

    1993-04-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described for the coupled response of multilayered multimaterial composite engine structural components that are subjected to simultaneous multidisciplinary thermal, structural, vibration, and acoustic loading including the effect of hostile environments. The simulation is based on a three-dimensional finite element analysis technique in conjunction with structural mechanics codes and with the acoustic analysis methods. The composite material behavior is assessed at the various composite scales, i.e., the laminate/ply/fiber and matrix constituents, via a nonlinear material characterization model. Sample cases exhibiting nonlinear geometric, material, loading, and environmental behavior of aircraft engine fan blades are presented. Results for deformed shape, vibration frequencies, mode shapes, and acoustic noise emitted from the fan blade are discussed for their coupled effect in hot and humid environments. Results such as acoustic noise for coupled composite-mechanics/heat transfer/structural/vibration/acoustic analyses demonstrate the effectiveness of coupled multidisciplinary computational simulation and the various advantages of composite materials compared to metals.

  2. Simulating the Response of Composite Plates to Fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, A.; Damiano, M.; Zarrelli, M.; Giordano, M.; Scaramuzzino, F.

    2014-06-01

    The present paper introduces a numerical study on the fire behavior of composites during exposure to a heating source at high incident power. A novel numerical model is proposed which is able to simulate the behavior of composite materials in fire environment providing the composites mass loss rate and heat release rate during heating source application. Two commercial software have been selected as platforms for the implementation of the proposed numerical model COMSOL and ANSYS. In COMSOL the model has been implemented by introducing proper field equations, while a macro, written in Ansys Parametric Design Language, has been used to allow the ANSYS FEM code to numerically simulate, by an incremental procedure, all the relevant physical phenomena related to fire. As an application, an experiment on thermal degradation over a laminated composite plate has been numerically simulated and the numerical model has been validated by comparing the COMSOL and Ansys numerical results to experimental literature data in terms of temperature profile over the panel thickness, Mass Loss Rate and Heat Release Rate. An excellent agreement has been found between the obtained numerical results and the experimental test data for both the adopted numerical platforms. However the ANSYS implementation, which showed to be the most effective in terms of accuracy of results and perspectives of applications to complex numerical models, led to the definition of a powerful tool able to assesses the fire performance of composite structures.

  3. Defect Detection in Composite Coatings by Computational Simulation Aided Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, R. M.; Souza, M. P. V.; Rebello, J. M. A.

    2010-02-01

    Thermography is based on the measurement of superficial temperature distribution of an object inspected subjected to tension, normally thermal heat. This measurement is performed with a thermographic camera that detects the infrared radiation emitted by every object. In this work thermograph was simulated by COMSOL software for optimize experimental parameters in composite material coatings inspection.

  4. Systems Biology and Ecology of Streamlined Bacterioplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannoni, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The salient feature of streamlined cells is their small genome size, but "streamlining" refers more generally to selection that favors minimization of cell size and complexity. The essence of streamlining theory is that selection is most efficient in organisms that have large effective population sizes, and, in nutrient-limited systems, favors cell architecture that minimizes resources required for replication. Regardless of the cause of genome reduction, lost coding potential eventually dictates loss of function, raising the questions, what genome features are expendable, and how do cells become highly successful with a minimal genomic repertoire? One consequence of reductive evolution in streamlined organisms is atypical patterns of prototrophy, for example the recent discovery of a requirement for the thiamin precursor 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine in some plankton taxa. Examples such as this fit within the framework of the Black Queen Hypothesis, which describes genome reduction that results in reliance on community goods and increased community connectivity. Other examples of genome reduction include losses of regulatory functions, or replacement with simpler regulatory systems, and increased metabolic integration. In one such case, in the order Pelagibacterales, the PII system for regulating responses to N limitation has been replaced with a simpler system composed of fewer genes. Both the absence of common regulatory systems and atypical patterns of prototrophy have been linked to difficulty in culturing Pelagibacterales, lending credibility to the idea that streamlining might broadly explain the phenomenon of the uncultured microbial majority. The success of streamlined osmotrophic bacterioplankton suggests that they successfully compete for labile organic matter and capture a large share of this resource, but an alternative theory postulates they are not good resource competitors and instead prosper by avoiding predation. The answers to these

  5. Application of a delumping procedure to compositional reservoir simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Stenby, E.H.; Christensen, J.R.; Knudsen, K.; Leibovici, C.

    1996-12-31

    Characterization and lumping are always performed when dealing with reservoir fluids. The number of pseudocomponents in a compositional reservoir simulation is normally between three and eight. In order to optimize the reservoir performance, it is necessary to know a detailed composition of the product stream from the reservoir. This paper deals with the problems of how to come from the lumped system (for which the reservoir simulation was performed) to a description of the full system (which is important in order to optimize the down-stream facilities). The equations of the delumping procedure are shown and the application of the method is illustrated through examples, including a constant volume depletion experiment and the fifth SPE Comparative example with a fluid description from a North Sea reservoir (with the calculated composition after a lumping, an experiment and a delumping).

  6. Simulation of elastic wave diffraction by multiple strip-like cracks in a layered periodic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    The problem of numerical simulation of the steady-state harmonic vibrations of a layered phononic crystal (elastic periodic composite) with a set of strip-like cracks parallel to the layer boundaries is solved, and the accompanying wave phenomena are considered. The transfer matrix method (propagator matrix method) is used to describe the incident wave field. It allows one not only to construct the wave fields but also to calculate the pass bands and band gaps and to find the localization factor. The wave field scattered by multiple defects is represented by means of an integral approach as a superposition of the fields scattered by all cracks. An integral representation in the form of a convolution of the Fourier symbols of Green's matrices for the corresponding layered structures and a Fourier transform of the crack opening displacement vector is constructed for each of the scattered fields. The crack opening displacements are determined by the boundary integral equation method using the Bubnov-Galerkin scheme, where Chebyshev polynomials of the second kind, which take into account the behavior of the solution near the crack edges, are chosen as the projection and basis systems. The system of linear algebraic equations with a diagonal predominance of components arising when the system of integral equations is discretized has a block structure. The characteristics describing qualitatively and quantitatively the wave processes that take place under the diffraction of plane elastic waves by multiple cracks in a phononic crystal are analyzed. The resonant properties of a system of defects and the influence of the relative positions and sizes of defects in a layered phononic crystal on the resonant properties are studied. To obtain clearer results and to explain them, the energy flux vector is calculated and the energy surfaces and streamlines corresponding to them are constructed.

  7. Numerical simulation of a magnetostatically coupled composite magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabay, A. M.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.

    2007-05-01

    The demagnetization behavior of the hard-soft composite magnet has been simulated with a simple model in order to understand better the magnetization reversal of die-upset composite magnets fabricated from blends of Nd-Fe-B ribbons and coarse Fe powders. The calculations show that soft magnetic inclusions of any size can be fully magnetically coupled with the hard matrix by long-range magnetostatic interactions provided that the inclusions form layers perpendicular to the magnetization direction. Though the magnetostatic coupling along does not lead to enhanced hard magnetic properties of the composite magnets, it makes the full exchange coupling between the hard and soft phases unnecessary and, therefore, relaxes the strict requirements for the size of the soft inclusions. The combination of magnetostatic coupling and partial exchange coupling in a die-upset magnet with layered morphology may facilitate the development of anisotropic hard-soft composite magnets with properties superior to the single-phase permanent magnets.

  8. Simulation of magnetic coupling in die-upset composite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjipanayis, George; Gabay, Alexander

    2007-03-01

    Die-upset composite magnets fabricated from blends of melt-spun Nd-Fe-B ribbons and coarse (micron-size) soft magnetic powders (Fe, Fe-Co) exhibit uniform magnetization behavior despite the fact that the soft magnetic inclusions are too large to be magnetically coupled through inter-phase exchange interactions. In this study, we present the results of numerical simulation showing that in the case of a layered microstructure (typical of the die-upset composites) the long-range magnetostatic interactions assure smooth demagnetization curves. Still, at least partial exchange coupling is required to have an increased remanence. It is argued that the effect of magnetostatic coupling in composite magnets with a layered morphology considerably relaxes the strict requirements for the size of the soft inclusions and it may facilitate the future development of high-performance composite anisotropic permanent magnets.

  9. Macroscopic Simulation of Deformation in Soft Microporous Composites.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jack D; Coudert, François-Xavier

    2017-03-23

    Soft microporous materials exhibit properties, such as gated adsorption and breathing, which are highly desirable for many applications. These properties are largely studied for single crystals; however, many potential applications expect to construct structured or composite systems, examples of which include monoliths and mixed-matrix membranes. Herein, we use finite element methods to predict the macroscopic mechanical response of composite microporous materials. This implementation connects the microscopic treatment of crystalline structures to the response of a macroscopic sample. Our simulations reveal the bulk modulus of an embedded adsorbent within a composite is affected by the thickness and properties of the encapsulating layer. Subsequently, we employ this methodology to examine mixed-matrix membranes and materials of negative linear compressibility. This application of finite element methods allows for unprecedented insight into the mechanical properties of real-world systems and supports the development of composites containing mechanically anomalous porous materials.

  10. Numerical simulation of multi-layered textile composite reinforcement forming

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Hamila, N.; Boisse, P.

    2011-05-04

    One important perspective in aeronautics is to produce large, thick or/and complex structural composite parts. The forming stage presents an important role during the whole manufacturing process, especially for LCM processes (Liquid Composites Moulding) or CFRTP (Continuous Fibre Reinforcements and Thermoplastic resin). Numerical simulations corresponding to multi-layered composite forming allow the prediction for a successful process to produce the thick parts, and importantly, the positions of the fibres after forming to be known. This paper details a set of simulation examples carried out by using a semi-discrete shell finite element made up of unit woven cells. The internal virtual work is applied on all woven cells of the element taking into account tensions, in-plane shear and bending effects. As one key problem, the contact behaviours of tool/ply and ply/ply are described in the numerical model. The simulation results not only improve our understanding of the multi-layered composite forming process but also point out the importance of the fibre orientation and inter-ply friction during formability.

  11. Numerical simulation of multi-layered textile composite reinforcement forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Hamila, N.; Boisse, P.

    2011-05-01

    One important perspective in aeronautics is to produce large, thick or/and complex structural composite parts. The forming stage presents an important role during the whole manufacturing process, especially for LCM processes (Liquid Composites Moulding) or CFRTP (Continuous Fibre Reinforcements and Thermoplastic resin). Numerical simulations corresponding to multi-layered composite forming allow the prediction for a successful process to produce the thick parts, and importantly, the positions of the fibres after forming to be known. This paper details a set of simulation examples carried out by using a semi-discrete shell finite element made up of unit woven cells. The internal virtual work is applied on all woven cells of the element taking into account tensions, in-plane shear and bending effects. As one key problem, the contact behaviours of tool/ply and ply/ply are described in the numerical model. The simulation results not only improve our understanding of the multi-layered composite forming process but also point out the importance of the fibre orientation and inter-ply friction during formability.

  12. Streamlined Plant Operations Save $300,000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikkel, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Describes results of turning to management consulting by Oakland Community College in Bloomfield Hills, Illinois. From an expensive, overstaffed custodial/maintenance department and inadequate work scheduling and supervision, Oakland went to a streamlined operation with procedures and manpower requirements optimized through use of a sophisticated…

  13. Overhead Projection Cell for Streamline Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waage, Harold M.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of an overhead projection apparatus designed to demonstrate streamline flow of a liquid. The apparatus consists of a Plexiglass tank containing water in which plates forming the cell are submerged, a constant level reservoir, an overflow device and a system for marking the flow lines with a dye. (LC)

  14. Novel Nanotube Manufacturing Streamlines Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Nanotubes have novel qualities that make them uniquely qualified for a plethora of uses, including applications in electronics, optics, and other scientific and industrial fields. The NASA process for creating these nanostructures involves using helium arc welding to vaporize an amorphous carbon rod and then form nanotubes by depositing the vapor onto a water-cooled carbon cathode, which then yields bundles, or ropes, of single-walled nanotubes at a rate of 2 grams per hour using a single setup. This eliminates costs associated with the use of metal catalysts, including the cost of product purification, resulting in a relatively inexpensive, high-quality, very pure end product. While managing to be less expensive, safer, and simpler, the process also increases the quality of the nanotubes. Goddard's Innovative Partnerships Program (IPP) Office promoted the technology, and in 2005, Boise-based Idaho Space Materials Inc. (ISM) was formed and applied for a nonexclusive license for the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) manufacturing technology. ISM commercialized its products, and the inexpensive, robust nanotubes are now in the hands of the scientists who will create the next generation of composite polymers, metals, and ceramics that will impact the way we live. In fact, researchers are examining ways for these newfound materials to be used in the manufacture of transistors and fuel cells, large screen televisions, ultra-sensitive sensors, high-resolution atomic force microscopy probes, supercapacitors, transparent conducting films, drug carriers, catalysts, and advanced composite materials, to name just a few of the myriad technologies to benefit.

  15. Computational simulation of high temperature metal matrix composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    Computational procedures are described to simulate the thermal and mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composite (HT MMC) in the following four broad areas: (1) behavior of HT MMC from micromechanics to laminate; (2) HT MMC structural response for simple and complex structural components; (3) HT MMC microfracture; and (4) tailoring of HT MMC behavior for optimum specific performance. Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the computational simulation procedures. Relevant reports are referenced for extended discussion regarding the specific area.

  16. Simulation of Damage Evolution in Discontinously Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.; Hu, Shenyang Y.

    2009-08-01

    First, a phase-field model for elastic-plastic solids obeying von Mises yield criterion will be described. Then, this phase-field model will be extended to simulate the damage evolution due to nucleation and growth of voids in ductile matrix for discontinuously reinforced composites. The role of reinforcement morphology and the modulus effects leading to final failure all included in the simulations in an effort to make a parametric investigation. The advantages and disadvantages of such phase-field modeling approach in comparison to well established other continuum methods will be elucidated.

  17. Design and simulation on the morphing composite propeller (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fanlong; Li, Qinyu; Liu, Liwu; Lan, Xin; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2017-04-01

    As one of the most crucial part of the unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV), the composite propeller plays an important role on the UUV's performance. As the composite propeller behaves excellent properties in hydroelastic facet and acoustic suppression, it attracts increasing attentions all over the globe. This paper goes a step further based on this idea, and comes up with a novel concept of "morphing composite propeller" (MCP) to improve the performance of the conventional composite propeller (CCP) to anticipate the improved propeller can perform better to propel the UUV. Based on the new concept, a novel MCP is designed. Each blade of the propeller is assembled with an active rotatable flap (ARF) to change the blade's local camber with flap rotation. Then the transmission mechanism (TM) has been designed and housed in the propeller blade to push the ARF. With the ARF rotating, the UUV can be propelled by different thrusts under certain rotation velocities of the propeller. Based on the design, the Fluent is exploited to analyze the fluid dynamics around the propeller. Finally, based on the design and hydrodynamic analysis, the structural response for the novel morphing composite propeller is calculated. The propeller blade is simplified and layered with composite materials. And the structure response of an MCP is obtained with various rotation angle under the hydrodynamic pressure. This simulation can instruct the design and fabrication techniques of the MCP.

  18. Streamline similarity analysis using bag-of-features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifei; Wang, Chaoli; Shene, Ching-Kuang

    2013-12-01

    Streamline similarity comparison has become an active research topic recently. We present a novel streamline similarity comparison method inspired by the bag-of-features idea from computer vision. Our approach computes a feature vector, spatially sensitive bag-of-features, for each streamline as its signature. This feature vector not only encodes the statistical distribution of combined features (e.g., curvature and torsion), it also contains the information on the spatial relationship among different features. This allows us to measure the similarity between two streamlines in an efficient and accurate way: the similarity between two streamlines is defined as the weighted Manhattan distance between their feature vectors. Compared with previous distribution based streamline similarity metrics, our method is easier to understand and implement, yet producing even better results. We demonstrate the utility of our approach by considering two common tasks in flow field exploration: streamline similarity query and streamline clustering.

  19. Air Permitting Streamlining Techniques and Approaches for Greenhouse Gases, 2012

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report presents potential GHG permit streamlining options and observations developed by the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee (CAAAC): Permits, New Source Review and Toxics Subcommittee GHG Permit Streamlining Workgroup

  20. Study of the Motion of Particles in Closed Streamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, Hamed; Connington, Kevin; Shojaei-Zadeh, Shahab; Morris, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    The behavior of neutrally-buoyant particles in the closed-streamline flows formed behind bluff bodies of various shapes is studied; the Reynolds numbers studied generate extended closed-streamline wakes but are below the transition to an unsteady wake. Experimental observations have demonstrated that the wake is depleted or completely devoid of particles. Using lattice-Boltzmann simulations, the trajectory of a single particle (small relative to the bluff body) is analyzed and shown to form a limit cycle inside the wake. With increase of the number of particles in the wake, trajectories are distorted due to interactions and particles are pushed out of the wake. Calculation of the fluid pathlines indicates that the presence of particles breaks the steadiness of the wake which results in a particle (and fluid) transfer between the wake and the free stream. The particle trajectories have also been analyzed by simulation of the flow of dilute suspensions over the circular cylindrical, square and thin rectangular (``blade'') shaped posts, for which different levels of particle depletion in the wake are seen experimentally, in order to determine the particle transfer pattern between the wake and the free stream. NSF 0853720.

  1. CO/sub 2/ Huff-Puff simulation using a compositional reservoir simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, H.H.; Brugman, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Increased field application of the CO/sub 2/ Huff-Puff process has resulted in increased laboratory and numerical simulation activity. This paper focuses on numerical simulation of the CO/sub 2/ Huff-Puff process in a light oil reservoir, using a fully-compositional reservoir simulator. A simulation model is first validated by successfully history-matching production data from two huff-puff cycles. A performance prediction is then conducted for a third cycle. A number of parametric runs are performed to determine oil recovery as affected by: 1. The number of cycles; 2. The timing of injection, soak and back-production operations; and 3. The quantity and composition of the injected solvent.

  2. Streamlined Modeling for Characterizing Spacecraft Anomalous Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klem, B.; Swann, D.

    2011-09-01

    Anomalous behavior of on-orbit spacecraft can often be detected using passive, remote sensors which measure electro-optical signatures that vary in time and spectral content. Analysts responsible for assessing spacecraft operational status and detecting detrimental anomalies using non-resolved imaging sensors are often presented with various sensing and identification issues. Modeling and measuring spacecraft self emission and reflected radiant intensity when the radiation patterns exhibit a time varying reflective glint superimposed on an underlying diffuse signal contribute to assessment of spacecraft behavior in two ways: (1) providing information on body component orientation and attitude; and, (2) detecting changes in surface material properties due to the space environment. Simple convex and cube-shaped spacecraft, designed to operate without protruding solar panel appendages, may require an enhanced level of preflight characterization to support interpretation of the various physical effects observed during on-orbit monitoring. This paper describes selected portions of the signature database generated using streamlined signature modeling and simulations of basic geometry shapes apparent to non-imaging sensors. With this database, summarization of key observable features for such shapes as spheres, cylinders, flat plates, cones, and cubes in specific spectral bands that include the visible, mid wave, and long wave infrared provide the analyst with input to the decision process algorithms contained in the overall sensing and identification architectures. The models typically utilize baseline materials such as Kapton, paints, aluminum surface end plates, and radiators, along with solar cell representations covering the cylindrical and side portions of the spacecraft. Multiple space and ground-based sensors are assumed to be located at key locations to describe the comprehensive multi-viewing aspect scenarios that can result in significant specular reflection

  3. Composite system reliability evaluation using sequential Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonnavithula, Annapoorani

    Monte Carlo simulation methods can be effectively used to assess the adequacy of composite power system networks. The sequential simulation approach is the most fundamental technique available and can be used to provide a wide range of indices. It can also be used to provide estimates which can serve as benchmarks against which other approximate techniques can be compared. The focus of this research work is on the reliability evaluation of composite generation and transmission systems with special reference to frequency and duration related indices and estimated power interruption costs at each load bus. One of the main objectives is to use the sequential simulation method to create a comprehensive technique for composite system adequacy evaluation. This thesis recognizes the need for an accurate representation of the load model at the load buses which depends on the mix of customer sectors at each bus. Chronological hourly load curves are developed in this thesis, recognizing the individual load profiles of the customers at each load bus. Reliability worth considerations are playing an ever increasing role in power system planning and operation. Different methods for bus outage cost evaluation are proposed in this thesis. It may not be computationally feasible to use the sequential simulation method with time varying loads at each bus in large electric power system networks. Time varying load data may also not be available at each bus. This research work uses the sequential methodology as a fundamental technique to calibrate other non sequential methods such as the state sampling and state transition sampling techniques. Variance reduction techniques that improve the efficiency of the sequential simulation procedure are investigated as a part of this research work. Pertinent features that influence reliability worth assessment are also incorporated. All the proposed methods in this thesis are illustrated by application to two reliability test systems. In addition

  4. 48 CFR 52.207-2 - Notice of Streamlined Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Competition. 52.207-2 Section 52.207-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....207-2 Notice of Streamlined Competition. As prescribed in 7.305(b), insert the following provision: Notice of Streamlined Competition (MAY 2006) (a) This solicitation is part of a streamlined competition...

  5. 48 CFR 52.207-2 - Notice of Streamlined Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Competition. 52.207-2 Section 52.207-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....207-2 Notice of Streamlined Competition. As prescribed in 7.305(b), insert the following provision: Notice of Streamlined Competition (MAY 2006) (a) This solicitation is part of a streamlined...

  6. 48 CFR 52.207-2 - Notice of Streamlined Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Competition. 52.207-2 Section 52.207-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....207-2 Notice of Streamlined Competition. As prescribed in 7.305(b), insert the following provision: Notice of Streamlined Competition (MAY 2006) (a) This solicitation is part of a streamlined...

  7. 48 CFR 52.207-2 - Notice of Streamlined Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Competition. 52.207-2 Section 52.207-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....207-2 Notice of Streamlined Competition. As prescribed in 7.305(b), insert the following provision: Notice of Streamlined Competition (MAY 2006) (a) This solicitation is part of a streamlined...

  8. 48 CFR 52.207-2 - Notice of Streamlined Competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Competition. 52.207-2 Section 52.207-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....207-2 Notice of Streamlined Competition. As prescribed in 7.305(b), insert the following provision: Notice of Streamlined Competition (MAY 2006) (a) This solicitation is part of a streamlined...

  9. Accurate Simulation of Acoustic Emission Sources in Composite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Gorman, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signals propagate as the extensional and flexural plate modes in thin composite plates and plate-like geometries such as shells, pipes, and tubes. The relative amplitude of the two modes depends on the directionality of the source motion. For source motions with large out-of-plane components such as delaminations or particle impact, the flexural or bending plate mode dominates the AE signal with only a small extensional mode detected. A signal from such a source is well simulated with the standard pencil lead break (Hsu-Neilsen source) on the surface of the plate. For other sources such as matrix cracking or fiber breakage in which the source motion is primarily in-plane, the resulting AE signal has a large extensional mode component with little or no flexural mode observed. Signals from these type sources can also be simulated with pencil lead breaks. However, the lead must be fractured on the edge of the plate to generate an in-plane source motion rather than on the surface of the plate. In many applications such as testing of pressure vessels and piping or aircraft structures, a free edge is either not available or not in a desired location for simulation of in-plane type sources. In this research, a method was developed which allows the simulation of AE signals with a predominant extensional mode component in composite plates requiring access to only the surface of the plate.

  10. Micromechanics-Based Computational Simulation of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mutal, Subodh K.; Duff, Dennis L. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Advanced high-temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) hold an enormous potential for use in aerospace propulsion system components and certain land-based applications. However, being relatively new materials, a reliable design properties database of sufficient fidelity does not yet exist. To characterize these materials solely by testing is cost and time prohibitive. Computational simulation then becomes very useful to limit the experimental effort and reduce the design cycle time, Authors have been involved for over a decade in developing micromechanics- based computational simulation techniques (computer codes) to simulate all aspects of CMC behavior including quantification of scatter that these materials exhibit. A brief summary/capability of these computer codes with typical examples along with their use in design/analysis of certain structural components is the subject matter of this presentation.

  11. Impact and Penetration Simulations for Composite Wing-like Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research project was to develop methodologies for the analysis of wing-like structures subjected to impact loadings. Low-speed impact causing either no damage or only minimal damage and high-speed impact causing severe laminate damage and possible penetration of the structure were to be considered during this research effort. To address this goal, an assessment of current analytical tools for impact analysis was performed. Assessment of the analytical tools for impact and penetration simulations with regard to accuracy, modeling, and damage modeling was considered as well as robustness, efficient, and usage in a wing design environment. Following a qualitative assessment, selected quantitative evaluations will be performed using the leading simulation tools. Based on this assessment, future research thrusts for impact and penetration simulation of composite wing-like structures were identified.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Delamination Growth in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camanho, P. P.; Davila, C. G.; Ambur, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    The use of decohesion elements for the simulation of delamination in composite materials is reviewed. The test methods available to measure the interfacial fracture toughness used in the formulation of decohesion elements are described initially. After a brief presentation of the virtual crack closure technique, the technique most widely used to simulate delamination growth, the formulation of interfacial decohesion elements is described. Problems related with decohesion element constitutive equations, mixed-mode crack growth, element numerical integration and solution procedures are discussed. Based on these investigations, it is concluded that the use of interfacial decohesion elements is a promising technique that avoids the need for a pre-existing crack and pre-defined crack paths, and that these elements can be used to simulate both delamination onset and growth.

  13. Degradation of experimental composite materials and in vitro wear simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givan, Daniel Allen

    2001-12-01

    The material, mechanical, and clinical aspects of surface degradation of resin composite dental restorative materials by in vitro wear simulation continues to be an area of active research. To investigate wear mechanisms, a series of experimental resin composites with variable and controlled filler particle shape and loading were studied by in vitro wear simulation. The current investigation utilized a simulation that isolated the wear environment, entrapped high and low modulus debris, and evaluated the process including machine and fluid flow dynamics. The degradation was significantly affected by filler particle shape and less by particle loading. The spherical particle composites demonstrated wear loss profiles suggesting an optimized filler loading may exist. This was also demonstrated by the trends in the mechanical properties. Very little difference in magnitude was noted for the wear of irregular particle composites as a function of particulate size; and as a group they were more wear resistant than spherical particle composites. This was the result of different mechanisms of wear that were correlated with the three-dimensional particle shape. The abrasive effects of the aggregate particles and the polymeric stabilization of the irregular shape versus the destabilization and "plucking" of the spherical particles resulted in an unprotected matrix that accounted for significantly greater wear of spherical composite. A model and analysis was developed to explain the events associated with the progressive material wear loss. The initial phase was explained by fatigue-assisted microcracking and loss of material segments in a zone of high stress immediately beneath a point of high stress contact. The early phase was characterized by the development of a small facet primarily by fatigue-assisted microcracking. Although the translation effects were minimal, some three-body and initial two-body wear events were also present. In the late phases, the abrasive effects

  14. Streamline curvature effects on turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, D. C.; Chambers, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical tool has been developed for predicting, in a nonempirical manner, effects of streamline curvature and coordinate-system rotation on turbulent boundary layers. The second-order closure scheme developed by Wilcox and Traci has been generalized for curved streamline flow and for flow in a rotating coordinate system. A physically based straightforward argument shows that curvature/rotation primarily affects the turbulent mixing energy; the argument yields suitable curvature/rotation terms which are added to the mixing-energy equation. Singular-perturbation solutions valid in the wall layer of a curved-wall boundary layer and a fully developed rotating channel flow demonstrate that, with the curvature/rotation terms, the model predicts the curved-wall and the rotating coordinate system laws of the wall. Results of numerical computations of curved-wall boundary layers and of rotating channel flow show that curvature/rotation effects can be computed accurately with second-order closure.

  15. Composite materials molding simulation for purpose of automotive industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Ł.; Baier, A.; Majzner, M.; Sobek, M.

    2016-08-01

    Composite materials loom large increasingly important role in the overall industry. Composite material have a special role in the ever-evolving automotive industry. Every year the composite materials are used in a growing number of elements included in the cars construction. Development requires the search for ever new applications of composite materials in areas where previously were used only metal materials. Requirements for modern solutions, such as reducing the weight of vehicles, the required strength and vibration damping characteristics go hand in hand with the properties of modern composite materials. The designers faced the challenge of the use of modern composite materials in the construction of bodies of power steering systems in vehicles. The initial choice of method for producing composite bodies was the method of molding injection of composite material. Molding injection of polymeric materials is a widely known and used for many years, but the molding injection of composite materials is a relatively new issue, innovative, it is not very common and is characterized by different conditions, parameters and properties in relation to the classical method. Therefore, for the purpose of selecting the appropriate composite material for injection for the body of power steering system computer analysis using Siemens NX 10.0 environment, including Moldex 3d and EasyFill Advanced tool to simulate the injection of materials from the group of possible solutions were carried out. Analyses were carried out on a model of a modernized wheel case of power steering system. During analysis, input parameters, such as temperature, pressure injectors, temperature charts have been analysed. An important part of the analysis was to analyse the propagation of material inside the mold during injection, so that allowed to determine the shape formability and the existence of possible imperfections of shapes and locations air traps. A very important parameter received from

  16. The Effect of Variable Composition Equilibrium Thermochemistry in Constant Breech Pressure (CBP) Gun Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    The Effect of Variable Composition Equilibrium Thermochemistry in Constant Breech Pressure (CBP) Gun Simulations by Anthony J. Kotlar...Effect of Variable Composition Equilibrium Thermochemistry in Constant Breech Pressure (CBP) Gun Simulations Anthony J. Kotlar Weapons and...May 1995 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Effect of Variable Composition Equilibrium Thermochemistry in Constant Breech Pressure (CBP) Gun Simulations 5a

  17. Streamlined ratemaking: recognizing challenges for consumers

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Jeffry

    2010-11-15

    Streamlined ratemaking can be problematic if improper ratemaking practices are employed, consumers are forced to bear risks that have traditionally been born by utilities and their shareholders, and utilities are no longer strongly motivated to provide safe and reliable service at the lowest reasonable cost. Measures can be taken that help preserve the regulator's role as a surrogate for competition, thereby ensuring that rates are both just and reasonable. (author)

  18. Fast placement of evenly spaced streamlines on curvilinear grid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaoyang; Higashida, Hidenori; Imamiya, Atsumi

    2000-02-01

    The success of using streamline technique for visualizing a vector field usually depends largely on the choosing of adequate seed points. This paper propose a new technique for automatically placing seed points to create evenly spaced streamlines on 3D parametric surfaces found in curvilinear grids. The new technique extends Jobard and Lefer's distance-based single pass approach for placing streamlines in the 2D computational space of the surface. Experimental result show that the new technique produces streamline images of competitive quality at much lower computational expense image-guided progressive refinement approach. A method for compensating the visual streamline density distortion caused by projection is also presented.

  19. Streamlining the RI/FS process

    SciTech Connect

    Dumas, L.; Doss, R.C.

    1998-07-01

    In 1994, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) contracted with CH2M HILL to manage remedial investigations and feasibility studies (RI/FS) at its former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites in Chico, Willows, and Marysville, California. These three sites had similar histories, MGP-related contaminants, similar geologic settings, and geographically were close together. Recognizing the advantages that may be gained, both in time and money, by streamlining the RI/FS process, PG and E and CH2M HILL combined the sites into one project. From the start of the project, PG and E and CH2M HILL looked for an implemented changes to the RI/FS process to streamline the project. These changes included combining deliverables, linking field programs at the three sites, and negotiating bulk discounts on laboratory and other services by combining the work to be done at the three sites under one contract. CH2M HILL later proposed additional measures to streamline the project that were eventually adopted by both PG and E and the regulatory agencies. PG and E and CH2M HILL are currently working with the regulatory agencies to negotiate realistic measures to address contaminants in soil and groundwater, and are jointly preparing the FS with the regulatory agencies using a unique means of documentation.

  20. Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composite Material Properties for Impact Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Biniendak, Wieslaw K.; Arnold, William A.; Littell, Justin D.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2009-01-01

    The reliability of impact simulations for aircraft components made with triaxial braided carbon fiber composites is currently limited by inadequate material property data and lack of validated material models for analysis. Improvements to standard quasi-static test methods are needed to account for the large unit cell size and localized damage within the unit cell. The deformation and damage of a triaxial braided composite material was examined using standard quasi-static in-plane tension, compression, and shear tests. Some modifications to standard test specimen geometries are suggested, and methods for measuring the local strain at the onset of failure within the braid unit cell are presented. Deformation and damage at higher strain rates is examined using ballistic impact tests on 61- by 61- by 3.2-mm (24- by 24- by 0.125-in.) composite panels. Digital image correlation techniques were used to examine full-field deformation and damage during both quasi-static and impact tests. An impact analysis method is presented that utilizes both local and global deformation and failure information from the quasi-static tests as input for impact simulations. Improvements that are needed in test and analysis methods for better predictive capability are examined.

  1. Assessment of RANS to predict flows with large streamline curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J. L.; Wang, D. Z.; Cheng, H.; Gu, W. G.

    2013-12-01

    In order to provide a guideline for choosing turbulence models in computation of complex flows with large streamline curvature, this paper presents a comprehensive comparison investigation of different RANS models widely used in engineering to check each model's sensibility on the streamline curvature. First, different models including standard k-ε, Realizable k-ε, Renormalization-group (RNG) k-ε model, Shear-stress transport k-ω model and non-linear eddy-viscosity model v2-f model are tested to simulated the flow in a 2D U-bend which has the standard bench mark available. The comparisons in terms of non-dimensional velocity and turbulent kinetic energy show that large differences exist among the results calculated by various models. To further validate the capability to predict flows with secondary flows, the involved models are tested in a 3D 90° bend flow. Also, the velocities are compared. As a summary, the advantages and disadvantages of each model are analysed and guidelines for choice of turbulence model are presented.

  2. Damage properties simulations of self-healing composites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Ji, Hongwei; Wang, Huaiwen

    2013-10-01

    Self-healing materials are inspired by biological systems in which damage triggers an autonomic healing response. The damage properties of a self-healing polymer composite were investigated by numerical simulation in this paper. Unit cell models with single-edge centered crack and single-edge off-centered crack were employed to investigate the damage initiation and crack evolution by the extended finite element method (XFEM) modeling. The effect of microcapsule's Young's modulus on composites was investigated. Result indicates the microcapsule's Young's modulus has little effect on the unit cell's carrying capacity. It was found that during the crack propagation process, its direction is attracted toward the microcapsules, which makes it helpful for the microcapsules to be ruptured by the propagating crack fronts resulting in release of the healing agent into the cracks by capillary action.

  3. Simulating the Impact Response of Composite Airframe Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, NASA Langley Research Center obtained residual hardware from the US Army's Survivable Affordable Repairable Airframe Program (SARAP). The hardware consisted of a composite fuselage section that was representative of the center section of a Black Hawk helicopter. The section was fabricated by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation and designated the Test Validation Article (TVA). The TVA was subjected to a vertical drop test in 2008 to evaluate a tilting roof concept to limit the intrusion of overhead mass items, such as the rotor transmission, into the fuselage cabin. As a result of the 2008 test, damage to the hardware was limited primarily to the roof. Consequently, when the post-test article was obtained in 2010, the roof area was removed and the remaining structure was cut into six different types of test specimens including: (1) tension and compression coupons for material property characterization, (2) I-beam sections, (3) T-sections, (4) cruciform sections, (5) a large subfloor section, and (6) a forward framed fuselage section. In 2011, NASA and Sikorsky entered into a cooperative research agreement to study the impact responses of composite airframe structures and to evaluate the capabilities of the explicit transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA®, to simulate these responses including damage initiation and progressive failure. Finite element models of the composite specimens were developed and impact simulations were performed. The properties of the composite material were represented using both a progressive in-plane damage model (Mat 54) and a continuum damage mechanics model (Mat 58) in LS-DYNA. This paper provides test-analysis comparisons of time history responses and the location and type of damage for representative I-beam, T-section, and cruciform section components.

  4. HPC simulations of the atmospheric composition climate of Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadzhev, Georgi; Ganev, Kostadin; Miloshev, Nikolay; Syrakov, Dimiter; Prodanova, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Some extensive numerical simulations of the atmospheric composition fields in Bulgaria have been recently performed. The US EPA Model-3 system was chosen as a modelling tool. The system consists of three components: MM5 - the 5th generation PSU/NCAR Meso-meteorological Model used as meteorological pre-processor; CMAQ - the Community Multiscale Air Quality System CMAQ; SMOKE - the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions Modelling System - the emission model. As the NCEP Global Analysis Data with 1 degree resolution was used as meteorological background, the MM5 and CMAQ nesting capabilities were applied for downscaling the simulations to a 3 km resolution over Bulgaria. The TNO emission inventory was used as emission input. Special pre-processing procedures are created for introducing temporal profiles and speciation of the emissions. The biogenic emissions of VOC are estimated by the model SMOKE. The numerical experiments have been carried out for different emission scenarios, which makes it possible the contribution of emissions from different source categories to be evaluated. The air pollution pattern is formed as a result of interaction of different processes, so knowing the contribution of each for different meteorological conditions and given emission spatial configuration and temporal behaviour could be interesting. Therefore the Models-3 'Integrated Process Rate Analysis' option is applied to discriminate the role of different dynamic and chemical processes for the air pollution formation. The obtained ensemble of numerical simulation results is extensive enough to allow statistical treatment - calculating not only the mean concentrations and different source categories contribution mean fields, but also standard deviations, skewness, etc. with their dominant temporal modes (seasonal and/or diurnal variations). Thus some basic facts about the atmospheric composition climate of Bulgaria can be retrieved from the simulation ensemble, which makes it possible

  5. Computational simulation of high temperature metal matrix composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Computational procedures were developed for simulating the thermal and mechanical behaviors of high-temperature metal-matrix composites (HT-MMCs) in the following application areas: (1) the behavior of HT-MMCs from micromechanics to laminate, (2) the structural response of HT-MMCs' simple and complex structural components, (3) the HT-MMC microfracture, and (4) the tailoring of HT-MMCs' behavior for optimum specific performances. Representative results are presented from each area of application, illustrating the effectiveness of the computational procedures.

  6. Simulation of Fatigue Behavior of High Temperature Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Mike T.; Singhal, Suren N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1996-01-01

    A generalized relatively new approach is described for the computational simulation of fatigue behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMCs). This theory is embedded in a specialty-purpose computer code. The effectiveness of the computer code to predict the fatigue behavior of HT-MMCs is demonstrated by applying it to a silicon-fiber/titanium-matrix HT-MMC. Comparative results are shown for mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, thermomechanical (in-phase and out-of-phase) fatigue, as well as the effects of oxidizing environments on fatigue life. These results show that the new approach reproduces available experimental data remarkably well.

  7. Comparison of flash calculations in compositional reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Barker, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper compares several recent flash algorithms in the context of compositional reservoir simulation. We evaluate three reduced equation methods: (1) the 3-equation flash of Michelsen, which applies only when all binary interaction coefficients (k{sub ij}) are zero; (2) Hendricks and van Bergen; and (3) Kaul and Thrasher. We also evaluate; (4) the non-iterative flash; and (5) the method of Young. We find that these last two methods, which are similar in concept, work well for reservoir simulation where the flash must be closely coupled with the solution of the pressure equation, and where a good initial guess is generally available. The reduced equation flashes offer no significant improvement over these other methods; this is true even for the 3-equation flash which solves a simpler problem (with k{sub ij} = 0).

  8. Integration of heat transfer effects in simulation of composite stamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Duc Anh; Levy, Arthur; Le Core, Steven

    2016-10-01

    A numerical method for the simulation of heat transfer occurring in thermoplastic composites thermostamping process is proposed. A reduced thermal model, named additive decomposition, is developed. It is based on the operator splitting method under thin shell assumption. A resolution algorithm using this decomposition is proposed, and developed in MATLAB. The approach is validated by comparing solutions obtained with a full 3D resolution and the presented method. Using this method, the computational time is proved to be about over 30 times faster. Eventually, prediction of temperature field is a prerequisite for the prediction of other phenomena, such as crystallization kinetics. Finally, the proposed method is implemented in the simulation software for thermostamping process Plasfib.

  9. An Enriched Shell Element for Delamination Simulation in Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElroy, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A formulation is presented for an enriched shell finite element capable of delamination simulation in composite laminates. The element uses an adaptive splitting approach for damage characterization that allows for straightforward low-fidelity model creation and a numerically efficient solution. The Floating Node Method is used in conjunction with the Virtual Crack Closure Technique to predict delamination growth and represent it discretely at an arbitrary ply interface. The enriched element is verified for Mode I delamination simulation using numerical benchmark data. After determining important mesh configuration guidelines for the vicinity of the delamination front in the model, a good correlation was found between the enriched shell element model results and the benchmark data set.

  10. Simulation of Forming and Wrinkling of Textile Composite Reinforcements

    SciTech Connect

    Hamila, N.; Wang, P.; Vidal-Salle, E.; Boisse, P.

    2011-05-04

    Because of the very weak textile bending stiffness, wrinkles are frequent during composite reinforcement forming. The simulation of the shape of these wrinkles during the forming process permits to verify there is no wrinkle in the useful part of the preform. In this paper the role of tensions, in-plane shear and bending rigidities in wrinkling development are analyzed. In-plane shear plays a main role for onset of wrinkles in double-curved shape forming but wrinkling is a global phenomenon depending on all strains and stiffnesses and on boundary conditions. The bending stiffness mainly determines the shape of the wrinkles and a membrane approach it is not sufficient to simulate wrinkles.

  11. Computational simulation of acoustic fatigue for hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Sutjahjo, Edhi

    1991-01-01

    Predictive methods/computer codes for the computational simulation of acoustic fatigue resistance of hot composite structures subjected to acoustic excitation emanating from an adjacent vibrating component are discussed. Select codes developed over the past two decades at the NASA Lewis Research Center are used. The codes include computation of acoustic noise generated from a vibrating component, degradation in material properties of a composite laminate at use temperature, dynamic response of acoustically excited hot multilayered composite structure, degradation in the first ply strength of the excited structure due to acoustic loading, and acoustic fatigue resistance of the excited structure, including the propulsion environment. Effects of the laminate lay-up and environment on the acoustic fatigue life are evaluated. The results show that, by keeping the angled plies on the outer surface of the laminate, a substantial increase in the acoustic fatigue life is obtained. The effect of environment (temperature and moisture) is to relieve the residual stresses leading to an increase in the acoustic fatigue life of the excited panel.

  12. Concurrent Probabilistic Simulation of High Temperature Composite Structural Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdi, Frank

    1996-01-01

    A computational structural/material analysis and design tool which would meet industry's future demand for expedience and reduced cost is presented. This unique software 'GENOA' is dedicated to parallel and high speed analysis to perform probabilistic evaluation of high temperature composite response of aerospace systems. The development is based on detailed integration and modification of diverse fields of specialized analysis techniques and mathematical models to combine their latest innovative capabilities into a commercially viable software package. The technique is specifically designed to exploit the availability of processors to perform computationally intense probabilistic analysis assessing uncertainties in structural reliability analysis and composite micromechanics. The primary objectives which were achieved in performing the development were: (1) Utilization of the power of parallel processing and static/dynamic load balancing optimization to make the complex simulation of structure, material and processing of high temperature composite affordable; (2) Computational integration and synchronization of probabilistic mathematics, structural/material mechanics and parallel computing; (3) Implementation of an innovative multi-level domain decomposition technique to identify the inherent parallelism, and increasing convergence rates through high- and low-level processor assignment; (4) Creating the framework for Portable Paralleled architecture for the machine independent Multi Instruction Multi Data, (MIMD), Single Instruction Multi Data (SIMD), hybrid and distributed workstation type of computers; and (5) Market evaluation. The results of Phase-2 effort provides a good basis for continuation and warrants Phase-3 government, and industry partnership.

  13. Simulating Future GPS Clock Scenarios with Two Composite Clock Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Matthias; Matsakis, Demetrios; Greenhall, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Using the GPS Toolkit, the GPS constellation is simulated using 31 satellites (SV) and a ground network of 17 monitor stations (MS). At every 15-minutes measurement epoch, the monitor stations measure the time signals of all satellites above a parameterized elevation angle. Once a day, the satellite clock estimates the station and satellite clocks. The first composite clock (B) is based on the Brown algorithm, and is now used by GPS. The second one (G) is based on the Greenhall algorithm. The composite clock of G and B performance are investigated using three ground-clock models. Model C simulates the current GPS configuration, in which all stations are equipped with cesium clocks, except for masers at USNO and Alternate Master Clock (AMC) sites. Model M is an improved situation in which every station is equipped with active hydrogen masers. Finally, Models F and O are future scenarios in which the USNO and AMC stations are equipped with fountain clocks instead of masers. Model F is a rubidium fountain, while Model O is more precise but futuristic Optical Fountain. Each model is evaluated using three performance metrics. The timing-related user range error having all satellites available is the first performance index (PI1). The second performance index (PI2) relates to the stability of the broadcast GPS system time itself. The third performance index (PI3) evaluates the stability of the time scales computed by the two composite clocks. A distinction is made between the "Signal-in-Space" accuracy and that available through a GNSS receiver.

  14. Chaotic streamlines in the ABC flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombre, T.; Frisch, U.; Henon, M.; Greene, J. M.; Soward, A. M.

    1986-06-01

    Arnold-Beltrami-Childress, or 'ABC' flows, constitute a three-parameter family of spatially periodic flows that furnishes a simple steady-state solution of Euler's equations. The streamlines in question have a complex Lagrangian structure which is presently studied with dynamical systems (analytical and numerical) tools. For certain values of the three parameters, strong resonances occur which disrupt the surfaces; the remaining space is occupied by chaotic particle paths. When one of the parameters vanishes, the flow is integrable. A systematic search for integrable cases is conducted by studying complex-time singularities of fluid particle trajectories.

  15. EDITORIAL: Modelling and simulation in polymer and composites processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Josè M.

    2004-05-01

    The general theme of this special section is modelling and simulation in polymer and composite processing. Composite processing in general involves reactive processing. During the last decade there have been numerous advances in modelling and simulation in both thermoplastic and reactive processing. This fact, coupled with the enormous advances in computing capability, has made Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) a reality. Industry nowadays depends on CAE to improve and/or develop new processes. There is no excuse not to take advantage of modelling and simulation. Another tendency is a clear move towards environmentally benign manufacturing; thus several papers in this issue discuss environmentally benign alternatives to traditional manufacturing for both composite and thermoplastics. The first two papers are a review of modelling and simulation; the first paper by Castro, Cabrera Rios and Mount-Campbell focuses on reactive processing, while the second by Kim and Turng discusses thermoplastics moulding. Another important issue is the need to use empirical modelling for cases where physics-based models are not available or are too cumbersome to use. For that reason the paper by Castro et al focuses on empirical modelling and the paper by Kim and Turng discusses exclusively physics-based modelling. The next three papers, two by Advani and collaborators and the third by Srinivasagupta and Kardos, refer to composite manufacturing. Advani's papers cover recent advances in Reactive Liquid Moulding, a process that has gained great acceptance as an environmentally benign alternative to open moulding. The paper by Srinivasagupta and Kardos covers the important issue of addressing simultaneously both environmental and economical design. In general the environmental optimum does not coincide with the economic optimum; this gives rise to the need to compromise. The Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) technique, discussed in the first paper, can be used to identify the best set of

  16. STREAMLINED LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT: A FINAL REPORT FROM THE SETAC-NORTH AMERICA STREAMLINED LCA WORKGROUP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The original goal of the Streamlined LCA workgroup was to define and document a process for a shortened form of LCA. At the time, because of the large amount of data needed to do a cradle-to-grave evaluation, it was believed that in addition to such a "full" LCA approach there w...

  17. STREAMLINED LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT: A FINAL REPORT FROM THE SETAC-NORTH AMERICA STREAMLINED LCA WORKGROUP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The original goal of the Streamlined LCA workgroup was to define and document a process for a shortened form of LCA. At the time, because of the large amount of data needed to do a cradle-to-grave evaluation, it was believed that in addition to such a "full" LCA approach there w...

  18. An overview of computational simulation methods for composite structures failure and life analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    Three parallel computational simulation methods are being developed at the LeRC Structural Mechanics Branch (SMB) for composite structures failure and life analysis: progressive fracture CODSTRAN; hierarchical methods for high-temperature composites; and probabilistic evaluation. Results to date demonstrate that these methods are effective in simulating composite structures failure/life/reliability.

  19. Streamlining Collaborative Planning in Spacecraft Mission Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Dhariti; Bopf, Michel; Fishman, Mark; Jones, Jeremy; Kerbel, Uri; Pell, Vince

    2000-01-01

    During the past two decades, the planning and scheduling community has substantially increased the capability and efficiency of individual planning and scheduling systems. Relatively recently, research work to streamline collaboration between planning systems is gaining attention. Spacecraft missions stand to benefit substantially from this work as they require the coordination of multiple planning organizations and planning systems. Up to the present time this coordination has demanded a great deal of human intervention and/or extensive custom software development efforts. This problem will become acute with increased requirements for cross-mission plan coordination and multi -spacecraft mission planning. The Advanced Architectures and Automation Branch of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is taking innovative steps to define collaborative planning architectures, and to identify coordinated planning tools for Cross-Mission Campaigns. Prototypes are being developed to validate these architectures and assess the usefulness of the coordination tools by the planning community. This presentation will focus on one such planning coordination too], named Visual Observation Layout Tool (VOLT), which is currently being developed to streamline the coordination between astronomical missions

  20. Streamlining environmental product declarations: a stage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Elisabeth; Lefebvre, Louis A.; Talbot, Stephane; Le Hen, Gael

    2001-02-01

    General public environmental awareness and education is increasing, therefore stimulating the demand for reliable, objective and comparable information about products' environmental performances. The recently published standard series ISO 14040 and ISO 14025 are normalizing the preparation of Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) containing comprehensive information relevant to a product's environmental impact during its life cycle. So far, only a few environmentally leading manufacturing organizations have experimented the preparation of EPDs (mostly from Europe), demonstrating its great potential as a marketing weapon. However the preparation of EPDs is a complex process, requiring collection and analysis of massive amounts of information coming from disparate sources (suppliers, sub-contractors, etc.). In a foreseeable future, the streamlining of the EPD preparation process will require product manufacturers to adapt their information systems (ERP, MES, SCADA) in order to make them capable of gathering, and transmitting the appropriate environmental information. It also requires strong functional integration all along the product supply chain in order to ensure that all the information is made available in a standardized and timely manner. The goal of the present paper is two fold: first to propose a transitional model towards green supply chain management and EPD preparation; second to identify key technologies and methodologies allowing to streamline the EPD process and subsequently the transition toward sustainable product development

  1. The length distribution of streamline segments in homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, P.; Gampert, M.; Peters, N.

    2012-04-01

    by Schaefer et al. ["Fast and slow changes of the length of gradient trajectories in homogenous shear turbulence," in Advances in Turbulence XII, edited by B. Eckhardt (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2009), pp. 565-572] we will refer to the morphological part of the evolution of streamline segments as slow changes while the topological part of the evolution is referred to as fast changes. This separation yields a transport equation for the probability density function (pdf) P(l) of the arclength l of streamline segments in which the slow changes translate into a convection and a diffusion term when terms up to second order are included and the fast changes yield integral terms. The overall temporal evolution (morphological and topological) of the arclength l of streamline segments is analyzed and associated with the motion of the above isosurface. This motion is diffusion controlled for small segments, while large segments are mainly subject to strain and pressure fluctuations. The convection velocity corresponds to the first order jump moment, while the diffusion term includes the second order jump moment. It is concluded, both theoretically and from direct numerical simulations (DNS) data of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence at two different Reynolds numbers, that the normalized first order jump moment is quasi-universal, while the second order one is proportional to the inverse of the square root of the Taylor based Reynolds number Re_{λ }^{-1/2}. Its inclusion thus represents a small correction in the limit of large Reynolds numbers. Numerical solutions of the pdf equation yield a good agreement with the pdf obtained from the DNS data. The interplay of viscous drift acting on small segments and linear strain acting on large segments yield, as it has already been concluded for dissipation elements, that the mean length of streamline segments should scale with Taylor microscale.

  2. Similarity-Guided Streamline Placement with Error Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Cohen, J D; Krolik, J H

    2007-08-15

    Most streamline generation algorithms either provide a particular density of streamlines across the domain or explicitly detect features, such as critical points, and follow customized rules to emphasize those features. However, the former generally includes many redundant streamlines, and the latter requires Boolean decisions on which points are features (and may thus suffer from robustness problems for real-world data). We take a new approach to adaptive streamline placement for steady vector fields in 2D and 3D. We define a metric for local similarity among streamlines and use this metric to grow streamlines from a dense set of candidate seed points. The metric considers not only Euclidean distance, but also a simple statistical measure of shape and directional similarity. Without explicit feature detection, our method produces streamlines that naturally accentuate regions of geometric interest. In conjunction with this method, we also propose a quantitative error metric for evaluating a streamline representation based on how well it preserves the information from the original vector field. This error metric reconstructs a vector field from points on the streamline representation and computes a difference of the reconstruction from the original vector field.

  3. Simulating low-cost cameras for augmented reality compositing.

    PubMed

    Klein, Georg; Murray, David W

    2010-01-01

    Video see-through Augmented Reality adds computer graphics to the real world in real time by overlaying graphics onto a live video feed. To achieve a realistic integration of the virtual and real imagery, the rendered images should have a similar appearance and quality to those produced by the video camera. This paper describes a compositing method which models the artifacts produced by a small low-cost camera, and adds these effects to an ideal pinhole image produced by conventional rendering methods. We attempt to model and simulate each step of the imaging process, including distortions, chromatic aberrations, blur, Bayer masking, noise, sharpening, and color-space compression, all while requiring only an RGBA image and an estimate of camera velocity as inputs.

  4. Orthorhombic Titanium Matrix Composite Subjected to Simulated Engine Mission Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.

    1997-01-01

    Titanium matrix composites (TMC's) are commonly made up of a titanium alloy matrix reinforced by silicon carbide fibers that are oriented parallel to the loading axis. These composites can provide high strength at lower densities than monolithic titanium alloys and superalloys in selected gas turbine engine applications. The use of TMC rings with unidirectional SiC fibers as reinforcing rings within compressor rotors could significantly reduce the weight of these components. In service, these TMC reinforcing rings would be subjected to complex service mission loading cycles, including fatigue and dwell excursions. Orthorhombic titanium aluminide alloys are of particular interest for such TMC applications because their tensile and creep strengths are high in comparison to those of other titanium alloys. The objective of this investigation was to assess, in simulated mission tests at the NASA Lewis Research Center, the durability of a SiC (SCS-6)/Ti-22Al-23Nb (at.%) TMC for compressor ring applications, in cooperation with the Allison Engine Company.

  5. Modified sequential fully implicit scheme for compositional flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncorgé, A.; Tchelepi, H. A.; Jenny, P.

    2017-05-01

    The fully implicit (FI) method is widely used for numerical modeling of multiphase flow and transport in porous media. The FI method is unconditionally stable, but that comes at the cost of a low-order approximation and high computational cost. The FI method entails iterative linearization and solution of fully-coupled linear systems with mixed elliptic/hyperbolic character. However, in methods that treat the near-elliptic (flow) and hyperbolic (transport) separately, such as multiscale formulations, sequential solution strategies are used to couple the flow (pressures and velocities) and the transport (saturations/compositions). The most common sequential schemes are: the implicit pressure explicit saturation (IMPES), and the sequential fully implicit (SFI) schemes. Problems of practical interest often involve tightly coupled nonlinear interactions between the multiphase flow and the multi-component transport. For such problems, the IMPES approach usually suffers from prohibitively small timesteps in order to obtain stable numerical solutions. The SFI method, on the other hand, does not suffer from a temporal stability limit, but the convergence rate can be extremely slow. This slow convergence rate of SFI can offset the gains obtained from separate and specialized treatments of the flow and transport problems. In this paper, we analyze the nonlinear coupling between flow and transport for compressible, compositional systems with complex interphase mass transfer. We isolate the nonlinear effects related to transmissibility and compressibility from those due to interphase mass transfer, and we propose a modified SFI (m-SFI) method. The new scheme involves enriching the 'standard' pressure equation with coupling between the pressure and the saturations/compositions. The modification resolves the convergence problems associated with SFI and provides a strong basis for using sequential formulations for general-purpose simulation. For a wide parameter range, we show

  6. Localized and generalized simulated wear of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Takamizawa, T; Erickson, R L; Tsujimoto, A; Latta, M; Miyazaki, M

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to examine the wear of resin composite materials using both a localized and generalized wear simulation model. Twenty specimens each of seven resin composites (Esthet•X HD [HD], Filtek Supreme Ultra [SU], Herculite Ultra [HU], SonicFill [SF], Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill [TB], Venus Diamond [VD], and Z100 Restorative [Z]) were subjected to a wear challenge of 400,000 cycles for both localized and generalized wear in a Leinfelder-Suzuki wear simulator (Alabama machine). The materials were placed in custom cylinder-shaped stainless steel fixtures. A stainless steel ball bearing (r=2.387 mm) was used as the antagonist for localized wear, and a stainless steel, cylindrical antagonist with a flat tip was used for generalized wear. A water slurry of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads was used as the abrasive media. A noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2100) with Proscan software was used to digitize the surface contours of the pretest and posttest specimens. AnSur 3D software was used for wear assessment. For localized testing, maximum facet depth (μm) and volume loss (mm(3)) were used to compare the materials. The mean depth of the facet surface (μm) and volume loss (mm(3)) were used for comparison of the generalized wear specimens. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test were used for data analysis of volume loss for both localized and generalized wear, maximum facet depth for localized wear, and mean depth of the facet for generalized wear. The results for localized wear simulation were as follows [mean (standard deviation)]: maximum facet depth (μm)--Z, 59.5 (14.7); HU, 99.3 (16.3); SU, 102.8 (13.8); HD, 110.2 (13.3); VD, 114.0 (10.3); TB, 125.5 (12.1); SF, 195.9 (16.9); volume loss (mm(3))--Z, 0.013 (0.002); SU, 0.026 (0.006); HU, 0.043 (0.008); VD, 0.057 (0.009); HD, 0.058 (0.014); TB, 0.061 (0.010); SF, 0.135 (0.024). Generalized wear simulation results were as follows: mean depth of facet (μm)--Z, 9.3 (3

  7. Simulation of tensile strength of anisotropic fibre-reinforced composites at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmohsen, H. H.

    This article presents a simulation scheme to predict the effect of fibre anisotropy on composite tensile failure strength at room and low temperatures. The simulation model combines the shear lag equation with the chain of bundles probability model to describe the composite failure behaviour. The effect of fibre anisotropy on thermal stresses developed in composite constituents due to cooling to low temperatures is considered. The failure strength of composites composed of fibres with different degrees of anisotropy is obtained and comparisons are made with experiments. Simulated results for E-glass-, graphite- and Kevlar-epoxy type composites showed close agreement with the experiments.

  8. Leached components from dental composites in oral simulating fluids and the resultant composite strengths.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Huang, H M; Lin, C Y; Shih, Y H

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the leached moieties of dental composites after storage in ethanol and organic acids of plaque and further evaluate the resultant effect on the diametral tensile strength (DTS) of the composites. Three commercial composites were used: Bis-GMA-based Z100, Bis-GMA/UDMA-based Heliomolar, and Bis-MPEPP-based Marathon One. The solutions used were: 99.9% acetic acid, 99% propionic acid and 75% ethanol. Specimens (4 mm diam. x 2 mm thick) were stored at 37 degrees C in 3 mL of solution for up to 30 days. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to characterize the leached moieties and DTS of the specimens after immersion was evaluated. Data were analysed using ANOVA and Tukey LSD test. The eluted substances were not all the same in different solutions and composites but mostly increased with immersion time, and included diluents (TEGDMA and decamethacrylate) and some additives, such as an ultra-violet stabilizer (TINUVINP), plasticizers (dicyclohexyl phthalate and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate), initiator (triphenyl stibine), coupling agent (gamma-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane), and phenyl benzoate. The chief polymerizing monomers were not found. More kinds of components were found in the acetic acid and ethanol groups studied. The fewest kinds and quantities of leached moieties were found for Bis-GMA specimens and then Bis-GMA/UDMA ones, most of which are diluent agents. Bis-MPEPP specimens leached the most substances, which were composed mostly of a short phenyl group chain structure. The BisGMA composite showed the highest DTS (54.8 +/- 5.7 MPa), which was not greatly affected by the length of storage. Bis-GMA/UDMA (36.2 +/- 6.8 MPa) and Bis-MPEPP (26.1 +/- 4.5 MPa) composites were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) after 30 days storage in the ethanol (35-50%), in the propionic acid (25-30%), and in the acetic acid (40-60%). Irreversible processes such as the leaching of components occur in fluids simulating an oral

  9. Quantum mechanical streamlines. I - Square potential barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.; Christoph, A. C.; Palke, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Exact numerical calculations are made for scattering of quantum mechanical particles hitting a square two-dimensional potential barrier (an exact analog of the Goos-Haenchen optical experiments). Quantum mechanical streamlines are plotted and found to be smooth and continuous, to have continuous first derivatives even through the classical forbidden region, and to form quantized vortices around each of the nodal points. A comparison is made between the present numerical calculations and the stationary wave approximation, and good agreement is found between both the Goos-Haenchen shifts and the reflection coefficients. The time-independent Schroedinger equation for real wavefunctions is reduced to solving a nonlinear first-order partial differential equation, leading to a generalization of the Prager-Hirschfelder perturbation scheme. Implications of the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics are discussed, and cases are cited where quantum and classical mechanical motions are identical.

  10. Streamlining Research by Using Existing Tools

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Sarah M.; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Dolor, Rowena J.; Thompson, Ella; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the health research enterprise has matured rapidly, and many recognize an urgent need to translate pertinent research results into practice, to help improve the quality, accessibility, and affordability of U.S. health care. Streamlining research operations would speed translation, particularly for multi-site collaborations. However, the culture of research discourages reusing or adapting existing resources or study materials. Too often, researchers start studies and multi-site collaborations from scratch—reinventing the wheel. Our team developed a compendium of resources to address inefficiencies and researchers’ unmet needs and compiled them in a research toolkit website (www.ResearchToolkit.org). Through our work, we identified philosophical and operational issues related to disseminating the toolkit to the research community. We explore these issues here, with implications for the nation’s investment in biomedical research. PMID:21884513

  11. PASTA: pointwise assessment of streamline tractography attributes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek K; Travis, Adam R; Eden, Greg; Pierpaoli, Carlo; Basser, Peter J

    2005-06-01

    Diffusion tensor MRI tractography aims to reconstruct noninvasively the 3D trajectories of white matter fasciculi within the brain, providing neuroscientists and clinicians with a potentially useful tool for mapping brain architecture. While this technique is widely used to visualize white matter pathways, the associated uncertainty in fiber orientation and artifacts have, to date, not been visualized in conjunction with the trajectory data. In this work, the bootstrap method was used to determine the distributions of diffusion indices such as trace and anisotropy, together with the uncertainty in fiber orientation. A novel visualization scheme was developed to encode this information at each point along reconstructed trajectories. By integrating these schemes into a graphical user interface, a new tool which we call PASTA (Pointwise Assessment of Streamline Tractography Attributes) was created to facilitate identification of artifacts in tractography that would otherwise go undetected.

  12. A Recipe for Streamlining Mission Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Andrew E.; Semancik, Susan K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a project's design and implementation for streamlining mission management with knowledge capture processes across multiple organizations of a NASA directorate. Thc project's focus is on standardizing processes and reports; enabling secure information access and case of maintenance; automating and tracking appropriate workflow rules through process mapping; and infusing new technologies. This paper will describe a small team's experiences using XML technologies through an enhanced vendor suite of applications integrated on Windows-based platforms called the Wallops Integrated Scheduling and Document Management System (WISDMS). This paper describes our results using this system in a variety of endeavors, including providing range project scheduling and resource management for a Range and Mission Management Office; implementing an automated Customer Feedback system for a directorate; streamlining mission status reporting across a directorate; and initiating a document management, configuration management and portal access system for a Range Safety Office's programs. The end result is a reduction of the knowledge gap through better integration and distribution of information, improved process performance, automated metric gathering, and quicker identification of problem areas and issues. However, the real proof of the pudding comes through overcoming the user's reluctance to replace familiar, seasoned processes with new technology ingredients blended with automated procedures in an untested recipe. This paper shares some of the team's observations that led to better implementation techniques, as well as an IS0 9001 Best Practices citation. This project has provided a unique opportunity to advance NASA's competency in new technologies, as well as to strategically implement them within an organizational structure, while wetting the appetite for continued improvements in mission management.

  13. A Recipe for Streamlining Mission Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Andrew E.; Semancik, Susan K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a project's design and implementation for streamlining mission management with knowledge capture processes across multiple organizations of a NASA directorate. Thc project's focus is on standardizing processes and reports; enabling secure information access and case of maintenance; automating and tracking appropriate workflow rules through process mapping; and infusing new technologies. This paper will describe a small team's experiences using XML technologies through an enhanced vendor suite of applications integrated on Windows-based platforms called the Wallops Integrated Scheduling and Document Management System (WISDMS). This paper describes our results using this system in a variety of endeavors, including providing range project scheduling and resource management for a Range and Mission Management Office; implementing an automated Customer Feedback system for a directorate; streamlining mission status reporting across a directorate; and initiating a document management, configuration management and portal access system for a Range Safety Office's programs. The end result is a reduction of the knowledge gap through better integration and distribution of information, improved process performance, automated metric gathering, and quicker identification of problem areas and issues. However, the real proof of the pudding comes through overcoming the user's reluctance to replace familiar, seasoned processes with new technology ingredients blended with automated procedures in an untested recipe. This paper shares some of the team's observations that led to better implementation techniques, as well as an IS0 9001 Best Practices citation. This project has provided a unique opportunity to advance NASA's competency in new technologies, as well as to strategically implement them within an organizational structure, while wetting the appetite for continued improvements in mission management.

  14. Interpreting marine controlled source electromagnetic field behaviour with streamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethick, A. M.; Harris, B. D.

    2013-10-01

    Streamlines represent particle motion within a vector field as a single line structure and have been used in many areas of geophysics. We extend the concept of streamlines to interactive three dimensional representations of the coupled vector fields generated during marine controlled source electromagnetic surveys. These vector fields have measurable amplitudes throughout many hundreds of cubic kilometres. Electromagnetic streamline representation makes electromagnetic interactions within complex geo-electrical setting comprehensible. We develop an interface to rapidly compute and interactively visualise the electric and magnetic fields as streamlines for 3D marine controlled source electromagnetic surveys. Several examples highlighting how interactive use has value in marine controlled source electromagnetic survey design, interpretation and teaching are provided. The first videos of electric, magnetic and Poynting vector field streamlines are provided along with the first published example of the airwave represented as streamlines. We demonstrate that the electric field airwave is a circulating vortex moving down and out from the air-water interface towards the ocean floor. The use of interactive streamlines is not limited to marine controlled source electromagnetic methods. Streamlines provides a high level visualisation tool for interpreting the electric and magnetic field behaviour generated by a wide range of electromagnetic survey configurations for complex 3D geo-electrical settings.

  15. 75 FR 15689 - Streamlined Procedure for Appeal Brief Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Streamlined Procedure for Appeal Brief Review AGENCY: United... Trademark Office (USPTO) is streamlining the procedure for the review of appeal briefs to increase the... responsibility for determining whether appeal briefs filed in patent applications comply with the applicable...

  16. Fabrication of composites via spouted bed granulation process and simulation of their micromechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichner, Eduard; Dosta, Maksym; Heinrich, Stefan; Schneider, Gerold A.

    2017-06-01

    In this contribution numerical simulation of Young's modulus of copper-polymer composites is presented. For the simulation of the composites the Bonded-Particle-Model was applied. The model allows representing of the structure of composite materials realistically. The polymer matrix, which surrounds the particles, was represented as network of solid bonds connecting copper particles. Simulation results were validated based on mechanical determination of modulus of elasticity. The modulus of elasticity was approximated in experiments as well as in simulation by four-point-bending tests. It was observed, that obtained simulation results are in good agreement with experimental results.

  17. Peridynamic modeling and simulation of polymer-nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, Steven F.

    In this document, we develop and demonstrate a framework for simulating the mechanics of polymer materials that are reinforced by carbon nanotubes. Our model utilizes peridynamic theory to describe the mechanical response of the polymer and polymer-nanotube interfaces. We benefit from the continuum formulation used in peridynamics because (1) it allows the polymer material to be coarse-grained to the scale of the reinforcing nanofibers, and (2) failure via nanotube pull-out and matrix tearing are possible based on energetic considerations alone (i.e. without special treatment). To reduce the degrees of freedom that must be simulated, the reinforcement effect of the nanotubes is represented by a mesoscale bead-spring model. This approach permits the arbitrary placement of reinforcement ``strands'' in the problem domain and motivates the need for irregular quadrature point distributions, which have not yet been explored in the peridynamic setting. We address this matter in detail and report on aspects of mesh sensitivity that we uncovered in peridynamic simulations. Using a manufactured solution, we study the effects of quadrature point placement on the accuracy of the solution scheme in one and two dimensions. We demonstrate that square grids and the generator points of a centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) support solutions of similar accuracy, but CVT grids have desirable characteristics that may justify the additional computational cost required for their construction. Impact simulations provide evidence that CVT grids support fracture patterns that resemble those obtained on higher resolution cubic Cartesian grids with a reduced computational burden. With the efficacy of irregular meshing schemes established, we exercise our model by dynamically stretching a cylindrical specimen composed of the polymer-nanotube composite. We vary the number of reinforcements, alignment of the filler, and the properties of the polymer-nanotube interface. Our results suggest

  18. Characterization of an improved 1-3 piezoelectric composite by simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chao; Wang, Likun; Qin, Lei; Zhang, Yanjun

    2017-06-16

    To increase electromechanical coupling factor of 1-3 piezoelectric composite and reduce its bending deformation under external stress, an improved 1-3 piezoelectric composite is developed. In the improved structure, both epoxy resin and silicone rubber are used as polymer material. The simulation model of the improved 1-3 piezoelectric composite was established using the finite element software ANSYS. The relationship of the performance of the improved composite to the volume percentage of silicone rubber was determined by harmonic response analysis and the bending deformation under external stress was simulated by static analysis. The improved composite samples were prepared by cutting and filling methods, and the performance was tested. The feasibility of the improved structure was verified by finite element simulation and experiment. The electromechanical coupling factor of the improved composite can reach 0.67 and meanwhile the characteristic impedance can decline to 13 MRayl. The electromechanical coupling factor of the improved composite is higher than that of the composite with only epoxy resin as the polymer and the improved composite can reduce bending deformation. Comparison of simulation and experiment, the results of the experiment are in general agreement with those from the simulation. However, most experimental values were higher than the simulation results, and the abnormality of the test results was also more obvious than that of the simulation. These findings may be attributed to slight difference in the material parameters of simulation and experiment.

  19. Trace gas composition in the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone: a case study based on aircraft observations and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschaldt, Klaus-D.; Schlager, Hans; Baumann, Robert; Bozem, Heiko; Eyring, Veronika; Hoor, Peter; Jöckel, Patrick; Jurkat, Tina; Voigt, Christiane; Zahn, Andreas; Ziereis, Helmut

    2017-05-01

    We present in situ measurements of the trace gas composition of the upper tropospheric (UT) Asian summer monsoon anticyclone (ASMA) performed with the High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft (HALO) in the frame of the Earth System Model Validation (ESMVal) campaign. Air masses with enhanced O3 mixing ratios were encountered after entering the ASMA at its southern edge at about 150 hPa on 18 September 2012. This is in contrast to the presumption that the anticyclone's interior is dominated by recently uplifted air with low O3 in the monsoon season. We also observed enhanced CO and HCl in the ASMA, which are tracers for boundary layer pollution and tropopause layer (TL) air or stratospheric in-mixing respectively. In addition, reactive nitrogen was enhanced in the ASMA. Along the HALO flight track across the ASMA boundary, strong gradients of these tracers separate anticyclonic from outside air. Lagrangian trajectory calculations using HYSPLIT show that HALO sampled a filament of UT air three times, which included air masses uplifted from the lower or mid-troposphere north of the Bay of Bengal. The trace gas gradients between UT and uplifted air masses were preserved during transport within a belt of streamlines fringing the central part of the anticyclone (fringe), but are smaller than the gradients across the ASMA boundary. Our data represent the first in situ observations across the southern part and downstream of the eastern ASMA flank. Back-trajectories starting at the flight track furthermore indicate that HALO transected the ASMA where it was just splitting into a Tibetan and an Iranian part. The O3-rich filament is diverted from the fringe towards the interior of the original anticyclone, and is at least partially bound to become part of the new Iranian eddy. A simulation with the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model is found to reproduce the observations reasonably well. It shows that O3-rich air is entrained by the outer streamlines of the

  20. Probabilistic Simulation for Combined Cycle Fatigue in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    A methodology to compute probabilistic fatigue life of polymer matrix laminated composites has been developed and demonstrated. Matrix degradation effects caused by long term environmental exposure and mechanical/thermal cyclic loads are accounted for in the simulation process. A unified time-temperature-stress dependent multifactor interaction relationship developed at NASA Glenn Research Center has been used to model the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. The fast probability integration method is used to compute probabilistic distribution of response. Sensitivities of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables (e.g., constituent properties, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply thickness, etc.) computed and their significance in the reliability-based design for maximum life is discussed. The effect of variation in the thermal cyclic loads on the fatigue reliability for a (0/+/- 45/90)s graphite/epoxy laminate with a ply thickness of 0.127 mm, with respect to impending failure modes has been studied. The results show that, at low mechanical cyclic loads and low thermal cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life for 0.999 reliability is most sensitive to matrix compressive strength, matrix modulus, thermal expansion coefficient, and ply thickness. Whereas at high mechanical cyclic loads and high thermal cyclic amplitudes, fatigue life at 0.999 reliability is more sensitive to the shear strength of matrix, longitudinal fiber modulus, matrix modulus, and ply thickness.

  1. A model equation for the joint distribution of the length and velocity difference of streamline segments in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, P.; Gampert, M.; Peters, N.

    2013-11-01

    Streamlines recently received attention as natural geometries of turbulent flow fields. Similar to dissipation elements in scalar fields, streamlines are segmented into smaller subunits based on local extreme points of the absolute value of the velocity field u along the streamline coordinate s, i.e., points where the projected gradient in streamline direction us = 0. Then, streamline segments are parameterized using their arclength l between two neighboring extrema and the velocity difference Δ at the extrema. Both parameters are statistical variables and streamline segments are characterized by the joint probability density function (jpdf) P(l, Δ). Based on a previously formulated model for the marginal pdf of the arclength, P(l), which contains terms that account for slow changes as well as fast changes of streamline segments, a model for the jpdf is formulated. The jpdf's, when normalized with the mean length, lm, and the standard deviation of the velocity difference σ, obtained from two different direct numerical simulations (DNS) cases of homogeneous isotropic decaying and forced turbulence at Taylor based Reynolds number of Reλ = 116 and Reλ = 206, respectively, turn out to be almost Reynolds number independent. The steady model solution is compared with the normalized jpdf's obtained from DNS and it is found to be in good agreement. Special attention is paid to the intrinsic asymmetry of the jpdf with respect to the mean length of positive and negative streamline segments, where due to the kinematic stretching of positive segments and compression of negative ones, the mean length of positive segments turns out to be larger than the mean length of negative ones. This feature is reproduced by the model and the ratio of the two length scales, which turns out to be an almost Reynolds number independent, dimensionless quantity, is well reproduced. Finally, a relation between the kinetic asymmetry of streamline segments and the dynamic asymmetry of the pdf

  2. Microhardness of composites in simulated root canals cured with light transmitting posts and glass-fiber reinforced composite posts.

    PubMed

    Yoldas, Oguz; Alaçam, Tayfun

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the depth of cure of composite resin cured within simulated root canals by means of light-transmitting plastic posts, glass-fiber-reinforced composite posts, and conventional light curing method. Thirty black plastic cylinders measuring 15 mm in length and 4 mm in internal diameter were divided into three groups. The composite resin was packed into simulated canals. The light-transmitting plastic posts and glass-fiber-reinforced composite posts were inserted into simulated canals and light cured for 90 seconds. The control group was light cured directly. To ensure continual change of material properties by increasing the length of material, a surface microhardness test was done 2 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm, 8 mm, 10 mm, 12 mm, and 14 mm from the light exposure surface. The results showed a significant increase in microhardness of composite resin (depth of cure) for both light-transmitting plastic posts and glass-fiber-reinforced composite posts compared with the control group. The microhardness of composite resin was also significantly higher with light-transmitting plastic posts than glass-fiber-reinforced composite posts after 8 mm.

  3. Quantum streamlines within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E

    2008-09-28

    Quantum streamlines are investigated in the framework of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. The local structures of the quantum momentum function (QMF) and the Polya vector field near a stagnation point or a pole are analyzed. Streamlines near a stagnation point of the QMF may spiral into or away from it, or they may become circles centered on this point or straight lines. Additionally, streamlines near a pole display east-west and north-south opening hyperbolic structure. On the other hand, streamlines near a stagnation point of the Polya vector field for the QMF display general hyperbolic structure, and streamlines near a pole become circles enclosing the pole. Furthermore, the local structures of the QMF and the Polya vector field around a stagnation point are related to the first derivative of the QMF; however, the magnitude of the asymptotic structures for these two fields near a pole depends only on the order of the node in the wave function. Two nonstationary states constructed from the eigenstates of the harmonic oscillator are used to illustrate the local structures of these two fields and the dynamics of the streamlines near a stagnation point or a pole. This study presents the abundant dynamics of the streamlines in the complex space for one-dimensional time-dependent problems.

  4. Streamlined expressed protein ligation using split inteins.

    PubMed

    Vila-Perelló, Miquel; Liu, Zhihua; Shah, Neel H; Willis, John A; Idoyaga, Juliana; Muir, Tom W

    2013-01-09

    Chemically modified proteins are invaluable tools for studying the molecular details of biological processes, and they also hold great potential as new therapeutic agents. Several methods have been developed for the site-specific modification of proteins, one of the most widely used being expressed protein ligation (EPL) in which a recombinant α-thioester is ligated to an N-terminal Cys-containing peptide. Despite the widespread use of EPL, the generation and isolation of the required recombinant protein α-thioesters remain challenging. We describe here a new method for the preparation and purification of recombinant protein α-thioesters using engineered versions of naturally split DnaE inteins. This family of autoprocessing enzymes is closely related to the inteins currently used for protein α-thioester generation, but they feature faster kinetics and are split into two inactive polypeptides that need to associate to become active. Taking advantage of the strong affinity between the two split intein fragments, we devised a streamlined procedure for the purification and generation of protein α-thioesters from cell lysates and applied this strategy for the semisynthesis of a variety of proteins including an acetylated histone and a site-specifically modified monoclonal antibody.

  5. Empty test section streamlining of the transonic self-streamlining wind tunnel fitted with new walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    The original flexible top and bottom walls of the Transonic Self-Streamlining Wind Tunnel (TSWT), at the University of Southampton, have been replaced with new walls featuring a larger number of static pressure tappings and detailed mechanical improvements. This report describes the streamling method, results, and conclusions of a series of tests aimed at defining sets of aerodynamically straight wall contours for the new flexible walls. This procedure is a necessary prelude to model testing. The quality of data obtained compares favorably with the aerodynamically straight data obtained with the old walls. No operational difficulties were experienced with the new walls.

  6. Telescoping Mechanics: A New Paradigm for Composite Behavior Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Gotsis, P. K.; Mital. S. K.

    2004-01-01

    This report reviews the application of telescoping mechanics to composites using recursive laminate theory. The elemental scale is the fiber-matrix slice, the behavior of which propagates to laminate. The results from using applications for typical, hybrid, and smart composites and composite-enhanced reinforced concrete structures illustrate the versatility and generality of telescoping scale mechanics. Comparisons with approximate, single-cell, and two- and three-dimensional finite-element methods demonstrate the accuracy and computational effectiveness of telescoping scale mechanics for predicting complex composite behavior.

  7. SMAP: a streamlined methylation analysis pipeline for bisulfite sequencing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shengjie; Zou, Dan; Mao, Likai; Zhou, Quan; Jia, Wenlong; Huang, Yi; Zhao, Shancen; Chen, Gang; Wu, Song; Li, Dongdong; Xia, Fei; Chen, Huafeng; Chen, Maoshan; Ørntoft, Torben F; Bolund, Lars; Sørensen, Karina D

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation has important roles in the regulation of gene expression and cellular specification. Reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) has prevailed in methylation studies due to its cost-effectiveness and single-base resolution. The rapid accumulation of RRBS data demands well designed analytical tools. To streamline the data processing of DNA methylation from multiple RRBS samples, we present a flexible pipeline named SMAP, whose features include: (i) handling of single-and/or paired-end diverse bisulfite sequencing data with reduced false-positive rates in differentially methylated regions; (ii) detection of allele-specific methylation events with improved algorithms; (iii) a built-in pipeline for detection of novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); (iv) support of multiple user-defined restriction enzymes; (v) conduction of all methylation analyses in a single-step operation when well configured. Simulation and experimental data validated the high accuracy of SMAP for SNP detection and methylation identification. Most analyses required in methylation studies (such as estimation of methylation levels, differentially methylated cytosine groups, and allele-specific methylation regions) can be executed readily with SMAP. All raw data from diverse samples could be processed in parallel and 'packetized' streams. A simple user guide to the methylation applications is also provided.

  8. Aerodynamics and interaction noise of streamlined bodies in nonuniform flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atassi, H. M.; Logue, M. M.

    2011-08-01

    The unsteady aerodynamics and interaction noise of streamlined bodies are modeled in terms of the Euler equations linearized about a nonuniform flow. The validity of the inviscid approach is supported by recent LES simulations of an airfoil in a gust indicating that for not-too-small impinging excitations, the interaction process is dominated by inertia forces. Results in the present paper are focused on the aerodynamics and interaction noise of a turbofan modeled as an annular cascade. The model accounts for the inflow-fan-duct coupling and the high frequency of the interaction process. Two high-order numerical algorithms are developed with body-fitted coordinate system. One algorithm uses a primitive variable formulation, the other uses an efficient velocity splitting algorithm and is suitable for broadband computations. Analytical and numerical analysis of disturbances in rotational flows is developed and exact inflow/outflow boundary conditions are derived, yielding directly the radiated acoustics. The upstream disturbances evolve in rotational flows and as a result the aerodynamic-aeroacoustic response of the annular cascade depends on the initial conditions location. Computational results show that the three-dimensional geometry of the annular cascade, the mean flow swirl, and the blade geometry have strong influence on the blade sectional lift and the radiated sound. These results also show the inadequacy of using the popular linear cascade model particularly for realistic fan geometry and inflow conditions.

  9. Micromechanical simulation of damage progression in carbon phenolic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slattery, Kerry T.

    1993-01-01

    understanding of these macro damage mechanisms is that the loading environment and the material response to that environment are extremely complex. These types of damage are usually only observed in actual motor firings. Therefore, it is difficult and expensive to evaluate the reliability of new materials. Standard material tests which measure mechanical and thermal properties of test specimens can only provide a partial picture of how the material will respond in the service environment. The development of the ANALOG test procedure which can combine high heating rates and mechanical loads on a specimen will improve the understanding of the interactive effects of the various loads on the system. But a mechanistic model of material response which can account for the heterogeneity of the material, the progression of various micromechanical damage mechanisms, and the interaction of mechanical and thermal stresses on the material is required to accurately correlate material tests with response to service environments. A model based on fundamental damage mechanisms which is calibrated and verified under a variety of loading conditions will provide a general tool for predicting the response of rocket nozzles. The development of a micromechanical simulation technique was initiated and demonstrated to be effective for studying across-ply tensile failure of carbon/phenolic composites.

  10. Computational simulation of surface waviness in graphite/epoxy woven composites due to initial curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    Several models simulating plain weave, graphite/epoxy woven composites are presented, along with the effects that the simultaneous application of pressure and thermal loads have on their surfaces. The surface effects created by moisture absorption are also examined. The computational simulation consisted of using a two-dimensional finite element model for the composite. The properties of the finite element (FE) model are calculated by using the in-house composite mechanics computer code ICAN (Integrated Composite ANalyzer). MSC/NASTRAN is used for the FE analysis which yields the composite's top surface normalized displacements. These results demonstrate the importance of parameters such as the cure temperature (T sub o) and the resin content in the curing process of polymer-matrix composites. The modification of these parameters will help tailor the composite system to the desired requirements and applications.

  11. Computational simulation of surface waviness in graphite/epoxy woven composites due to initial curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    Several models simulating plain weave, graphite/epoxy woven composites are presented, along with the effects that the simultaneous application of pressure and thermal loads have on their surfaces. The surface effects created by moisture absorption are also examined. The computational simulation consisted of using a two-dimensional finite element model for the composite. The properties of the finite element (FE) model are calculated by using the in-house composite mechanics computer code ICAN (Integrated Composite ANalyzer). MSC/NASTRAN is used for the FE analysis which yields the composite's top surface normalized displacements. These results demonstrate the importance of parameters such as the cure temperature (T sub o) and the resin content in the curing process of polymer-matrix composites. The modification of these parameters will help tailor the composite system to the desired requirements and applications.

  12. Simulated orbital impact of multi-wall composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Eve J.; Schonberg, William P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation in which several different composite materials were tested for their ability to prevent the perforation of multiwall systems under hypervelocity projectile impact. The damage in the composite specimens is compared to the damage in aluminum specimens of similar geometry and weight caused by hypervelocity projectiles with similar impact energies. The analysis shows that using composite materials in combination with metallic materials in multiwall structures can increase the protection afforded a spacecraft against perforation by orbital debris over that provided by traditional, purely metallic multiwall structures.

  13. Combined thermal and bending fatigue of high-temperature metal-matrix composites: Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear behavior of a high-temperature metal-matrix composite (HT-MMC) was simulated by using the metal matrix composite analyzer (METCAN) computer code. The simulation started with the fabrication process, proceeded to thermomechanical cyclic loading, and ended with the application of a monotonic load. Classical laminate theory and composite micromechanics and macromechanics are used in METCAN, along with a multifactor interaction model for the constituents behavior. The simulation of the stress-strain behavior from the macromechanical and the micromechanical points of view, as well as the initiation and final failure of the constituents and the plies in the composite, were examined in detail. It was shown that, when the fibers and the matrix were perfectly bonded, the fracture started in the matrix and then propagated with increasing load to the fibers. After the fibers fractured, the composite lost its capacity to carry additional load and fractured.

  14. Combined bending and thermal fatigue of high-temperature metal-matrix composites - Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear behavior of a high-temperature metal-matrix composite (HT-MMC) was simulated by using the metal matrix composite analyzer (METCAN) computer code. The simulation started with the fabrication process, proceeded to thermomechanical cyclic loading, and ended with the application of a monotonic load. Classical laminate theory and composite micromechanics and macromechanics are used in METCAN, along with a multifactor interaction model for the constituents behavior. The simulation of the stress-strain behavior from the macromechanical and the micromechanical points of view, as well as the initiation and final failure of the constituents and the plies in the composite, were examined in detail. It was shown that, when the fibers and the matrix were perfectly bonded, the fracture started in the matrix and then propagated with increasing load to the fibers. After the fibers fractured, the composite lost its capacity to carry additional load and fractured.

  15. Combined bending and thermal fatigue of high-temperature metal-matrix composites - Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear behavior of a high-temperature metal-matrix composite (HT-MMC) was simulated by using the metal matrix composite analyzer (METCAN) computer code. The simulation started with the fabrication process, proceeded to thermomechanical cyclic loading, and ended with the application of a monotonic load. Classical laminate theory and composite micromechanics and macromechanics are used in METCAN, along with a multifactor interaction model for the constituents behavior. The simulation of the stress-strain behavior from the macromechanical and the micromechanical points of view, as well as the initiation and final failure of the constituents and the plies in the composite, were examined in detail. It was shown that, when the fibers and the matrix were perfectly bonded, the fracture started in the matrix and then propagated with increasing load to the fibers. After the fibers fractured, the composite lost its capacity to carry additional load and fractured.

  16. Composite manufacturing: Simulation of 3-D resin transfer molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Cheng Ping

    1998-10-01

    A technique was developed for simulating the resin transfer molding (RTM) process. The major feature of the technique is a computational steering system that enables the user to make changes during the simulation. Specifically, at any instance, the user can inspect the progress of the resin front. On the basis of the observed resin front position, the user can, as needed, change the port and vent locations, open and close ports and vents, adjust the inlet and exit pressures or flow rates, and reorient the mold with respect to the gravitational field. Additionally, the user can "rewind" the simulator to any previous time in the mold filling process, make any of the above changes and then continue the simulation. The technique is augmented by a computer code which has three main components, the Simulator, the Graphics User Interface (GUI), and the Global Data Storage. The Simulator is a finite element code that calculates the resin flow inside the fiber preform. The GUI serves as the interface between the user and the Simulator; it provides the commands to the Simulator and displays the results. The Global Data Storage is the module that manages the exchange of data between the GUI and the Simulator. The computer code (designated as SUPERTMsb-3D) is suitable for simulating the resin flow inside two-dimensional as well as three-dimensional fiber preforms of arbitrary shapes. The use of this computer code is illustrated through sample problems. These problems demonstrate how (with this code) the designer can establish the port and vent locations, opening and closing sequences of ports and vents such that the fiber preform is filled completely in the shortest time with the fewest number of vents.

  17. Investigation of smoothness-increasing accuracy-conserving filters for improving streamline integration through discontinuous fields.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Michael; Curtis, Sean; Kirby, Robert M; Ryan, Jennifer K

    2008-01-01

    Streamline integration of fields produced by computational fluid mechanics simulations is a commonly used tool for the investigation and analysis of fluid flow phenomena. Integration is often accomplished through the application of ordinary differential equation (ODE) integrators--integrators whose error characteristics are predicated on the smoothness of the field through which the streamline is being integrated--smoothness which is not available at the inter-element level of finite volume and finite element data. Adaptive error control techniques are often used to ameliorate the challenge posed by inter-element discontinuities. As the root of the difficulties is the discontinuous nature of the data, we present a complementary approach of applying smoothness-enhancing accuracy-conserving filters to the data prior to streamline integration. We investigate whether such an approach applied to uniform quadrilateral discontinuous Galerkin (high-order finite volume) data can be used to augment current adaptive error control approaches. We discuss and demonstrate through numerical example the computational trade-offs exhibited when one applies such a strategy.

  18. Tensile strength of simulated and welded butt joints in W-Cu composite sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Watson, Gordon K.

    1994-01-01

    The weldability of W-Cu composite sheet was investigated using simulated and welded joints. The welded joints were produced in a vacuum hot press. Tensile test results showed that simulated joints can provide strength and failure mode data which can be used in joint design for actual weldments. Although all of the welded joints had flaws, a number of these joints were as strong as the W-Cu composite base material.

  19. Challenges of NDE simulation tool validation, optimization, and utilization for composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Juarez, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Rapid, realistic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) simulation tools can aid in inspection optimization and prediction of inspectability for advanced aerospace materials and designs. NDE simulation tools may someday aid in the design and certification of aerospace components; potentially shortening the time from material development to implementation by industry and government. Furthermore, ultrasound modeling and simulation are expected to play a significant future role in validating the capabilities and limitations of guided wave based structural health monitoring (SHM) systems. The current state-of-the-art in ultrasonic NDE/SHM simulation is still far from the goal of rapidly simulating damage detection techniques for large scale, complex geometry composite components/vehicles containing realistic damage types. Ongoing work at NASA Langley Research Center is focused on advanced ultrasonic simulation tool development. This paper discusses challenges of simulation tool validation, optimization, and utilization for composites. Ongoing simulation tool development work is described along with examples of simulation validation and optimization challenges that are more broadly applicable to all NDE simulation tools. The paper will also discuss examples of simulation tool utilization at NASA to develop new damage characterization methods for composites, and associated challenges in experimentally validating those methods.

  20. Chemical composition analysis of simulated waste glass T10-G-16A

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.

    2015-08-01

    In this report, SRNL provides chemical composition analyses of a simulated LAW glass designated T10-G-16A.The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component. No issues were identified in reviewing the analytical data.

  1. Animating streamlines with repeated asymmetric patterns for steady flow visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chih-Kuo; Liu, Zhanping; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2012-01-01

    Animation provides intuitive cueing for revealing essential spatial-temporal features of data in scientific visualization. This paper explores the design of Repeated Asymmetric Patterns (RAPs) in animating evenly-spaced color-mapped streamlines for dense accurate visualization of complex steady flows. We present a smooth cyclic variable-speed RAP animation model that performs velocity (magnitude) integral luminance transition on streamlines. This model is extended with inter-streamline synchronization in luminance varying along the tangential direction to emulate orthogonal advancing waves from a geometry-based flow representation, and then with evenly-spaced hue differing in the orthogonal direction to construct tangential flow streaks. To weave these two mutually dual sets of patterns, we propose an energy-decreasing strategy that adopts an iterative yet efficient procedure for determining the luminance phase and hue of each streamline in HSL color space. We also employ adaptive luminance interleaving in the direction perpendicular to the flow to increase the contrast between streamlines.

  2. Impact Testing and Simulation of Composite Airframe Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Horta, Lucas G.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Seal, Michael D., II

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center on composite airframe structural components of increasing complexity to evaluate their energy absorption behavior when subjected to impact loading. A second objective was to assess the capabilities of predicting the dynamic response of composite airframe structures, including damage initiation and progression, using a state-of-the-art nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. The test specimens were extracted from a previously tested composite prototype fuselage section developed and manufactured by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation under the US Army's Survivable Affordable Repairable Airframe Program (SARAP). Laminate characterization testing was conducted in tension and compression. In addition, dynamic impact tests were performed on several components, including I-beams, T-sections, and cruciform sections. Finally, tests were conducted on two full-scale components including a subfloor section and a framed fuselage section. These tests included a modal vibration and longitudinal impact test of the subfloor section and a quasi-static, modal vibration, and vertical drop test of the framed fuselage section. Most of the test articles were manufactured of graphite unidirectional tape composite with a thermoplastic resin system. However, the framed fuselage section was constructed primarily of a plain weave graphite fabric material with a thermoset resin system. Test data were collected from instrumentation such as accelerometers and strain gages and from full-field photogrammetry.

  3. Finite Element Simulations of Composite Vehicle Structures under Impact Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-08

    heterogeneity and anisotropy within individual laminae and through the laminate thickness, they undergo complex damage process when subjected to impact ...The studies of the damage process of laminated composites subjected to impact loading have been performed both experimentally and computationally...used for impact investigations. Based on the impact energy and absorbed energy and the inspection of the damaged specimens, the damage process can

  4. Application of statistical method for determination of primary mass composition of cosmic rays using simulated data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, D.; Boruah, K.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we have studied the reconstruction of primary mass composition based on simulated longitudinal shower development using a statistical method viz. the multiparametric topological analysis (MTA) and show its applicability for the determination of the primary mass composition. In particular, the sensitivity of X max distribution is tested for simulated data using CORSIKA-6990 code assuming a number of uniform and non-uniform mixed compositions of proton(p), oxygen(O) and iron(Fe) nuclei at primary energies 1017 eV and 1018 eV.

  5. Thermal Performance Simulation of MWNT/NR composites Based on Levenberg-Marquard Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z. Z.; Liu, J. S.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, Levenberg-Marquard algorithm was used to simulate thermal performance of aligned carbon nanotubes-filled rubber composite, and the effect of temperature, filling amount, MWNTs orientation and other factors on thermal performance were studied. The research results showed: MWNTs orientation can greatly improve the thermal conductivity of composite materials, the thermal performance improvement of overall orientation was higher than the local orientation. Volume fraction can affect thermal performance, thermal conductivity increased with the increase of volume fraction. Temperature had no significant effect on the thermal conductivity. The simulation results correlated well with experimental results, which showed that the simulation algorithm is effective and feasible.

  6. Automotive view on forming of continuous fiber reinforced composites and its simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Benedikt; Chambon, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents three projects of Faurecia in the domain of composite part forming and an evaluation of current forming simulation approaches regarding an application in the automotive industry. Via the latter the most performant group of currently available simulation approaches is identified. Their main drawback is however a high computational effort and further research should be done in order to accelerate them. Hereafter recommendations for an ideal forming simulation approach are identified by presenting three projects of Faurecia in the domain of composite part forming.

  7. Determinate Composition of FMUs for Co-Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-18

    pioneered in the Ptolemy Project [9], where multiple models of computation (MoCs) are combined hierarchically. Since an FMU for co-simulation includes its...changes considerably during time integration.” A constant time step size co-simulation interface has for example been implemented in Ptolemy II as part of...and a separate Update function that updates the state of the block. A split-phase API is also used in Ptolemy II [9], where Output and Update are

  8. Computational simulation of reinforced concrete structures enhanced with fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gotsis, P.K.; Chamis, C.C.

    1998-12-31

    Laminate analogy is applied in the structural sections by discretizing them in layers through the thickness. Different layers are used for the concrete, for the reinforcing steel in the concrete, and for the fiber composite laminates. The reinforced concrete structure is synthesized with finite elements where the element stiffness is obtained by using laminate theory to the discretized structural section mentioned earlier. The load carrying capacity of the structure is determined by progressive structural fracture. Results show that with relatively small laminate thickness, equal to 5% of the total thickness, the select arch structure enhanced with fiber composites, improved their strength in fracture, the buckling load and the natural frequencies due to the free vibration.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Creep Characteristic for Composite Rock Mass with Weak Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-guang; Zhang, Zuo-liang; Zhang, Yu-biao; Shi, Xiu-wen; Wei, Jian

    2017-06-01

    The composite rock mass with weak interlayer is widely exist in engineering, and it’s essential to research the creep behavior which could cause stability problems of rock engineering and production accidents. However, due to it is difficult to take samples, the losses and damages in delivery and machining process, we always cannot get enough natural layered composite rock mass samples, so the indirect test method has been widely used. In this paper, we used ANSYS software (a General Finite Element software produced by American ANSYS, Inc) to carry out the numerical simulation based on the uniaxial compression creep experiments of artificial composite rock mass with weak interlayer, after experimental data fitted. The results show that the laws obtained by numerical simulations and experiments are consistent. Thus confirmed that carry out numerical simulation for the creep characteristics of rock mass with ANSYS software is feasible, and this method can also be extended to other underground engineering of simulate the weak intercalations.

  10. Dynamic Response and Simulations of Nanoparticle-Enhanced Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-15

    Maruyama S, Chapter 21, Molecular Dynamics Method for Micro / Nano Systems, Handbook of Numerical Heat Transfer, (2005), in press (available on world wide web...AI-Ostaz, Alexander H.D. Cheng Composite Structures and Nano -Engineering Research University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677 To: Dr. Yapa D.S...wall carbon nano tubes (MWCNT) were characterized. Preliminary investigations were also conducted on Derakane 411-350 vinyl ester thermoset

  11. Optimal fabrication processes for unidirectional metal-matrix composites - A computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for optimizing the fabrication process of unidirectional metal matrix composites. The temperature and pressure histories are optimized such that the residual microstresses of the composite at the end of the fabrication process are minimized and the material integrity throughout the process is ensured. The response of the composite during the fabrication is simulated based on a nonlinear micromechanics theory. The optimal fabrication problem is formulated and solved with nonlinear programming. Application cases regarding the optimization of the fabrication cool-down phases of unidirectional ultra-high modulus graphite/copper and silicon carbide/titanium composites are presented.

  12. Optimal fabrication processes for unidirectional metal-matrix composites: A computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for optimizing the fabrication process of unidirectional metal matrix composites. The temperature and pressure histories are optimized such that the residual microstresses of the composite at the end of the fabrication process are minimized and the material integrity throughout the process is ensured. The response of the composite during the fabrication is simulated based on a nonlinear micromechanics theory. The optimal fabrication problem is formulated and solved with non-linear programming. Application cases regarding the optimization of the fabrication cool-down phases of unidirectional ultra-high modulus graphite/copper and silicon carbide/titanium composites are presented.

  13. The effect of simulated space thermal environment on damping capacity of metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Ouellet, L.; Nikanpour, Darius; Lo, J.

    2003-09-01

    Damping capacity is one of important parameters that engineers need to consider when they select materials for space structure applications. The materials studied in this paper are high performance SiC particulate reinforced aluminum and Al2O3 woven fabric reinforced aluminum composites. Changes in damping capacity of the materials in simulated space thermal environment were studied using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA). Comparing to the conventional aluminum alloy, the composites have significantly higher damping capacity. The experiment demonstrated that thermal cycling to sub-ambient temperature can significantly affects the damping capacity of metal matrix composites. The long-term effects of space thermal cycling on the composites were also discussed.

  14. Compositional differences in simulated root exudates elicit a limited functional and compositional response in soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Michael S; McCulley, Rebecca L; Nelson, Jim A; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Inputs of low molecular weight carbon (LMW-C) to soil - primarily via root exudates- are expected to be a major driver of microbial activity and source of stable soil organic carbon. It is expected that variation in the type and composition of LMW-C entering soil will influence microbial community composition and function. If this is the case then short-term changes in LMW-C inputs may alter processes regulated by these communities. To determine if change in the composition of LMW-C inputs influences microbial community function and composition, we conducted a 90 day microcosm experiment whereby soils sourced from three different land covers (meadows, deciduous forests, and white pine stands) were amended, at low concentrations, with one of eight simulated root exudate treatments. Treatments included no addition of LMW-C, and the full factorial combination of glucose, glycine, and oxalic acid. After 90 days, we conducted a functional response assay and determined microbial composition via phospholipid fatty acid analysis. Whereas we noted a statistically significant effect of exudate treatments, this only accounted for ∼3% of the variation observed in function. In comparison, land cover and site explained ∼46 and ∼41% of the variation, respectively. This suggests that exudate composition has little influence on function compared to site/land cover specific factors. Supporting the finding that exudate effects were minor, we found that an absence of LMW-C elicited the greatest difference in function compared to those treatments receiving any LMW-C. Additionally, exudate treatments did not alter microbial community composition and observable differences were instead due to land cover. These results confirm the strong effects of land cover/site legacies on soil microbial communities. In contrast, short-term changes in exudate composition, at meaningful concentrations, may have little impact on microbial function and composition.

  15. Composition of chitosan-hydroxyapatite-collagen composite scaffold evaluation after simulated body fluid immersion as reconstruction material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verisqa, F.; Triaminingsih, S.; Corputty, J. E. M.

    2017-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) formation is one of the most important aspects of bone regeneration. Because domestically made chitosan-hydroxyapatite-collagen composite scaffolding from crab shell and bovine bone and tendon has potential as a maxillofacial reconstruction material, the material’s HA-forming ability requires evaluation. The aim of this research is to investigate chitosan-hydroxyapatite-collagen composite scaffold’s potential as a maxillofacial reconstruction material by observing the scaffold’s compositional changes. Scaffold specimens were immersed in 37°C simulated body fluid (SBF) for periods of 2, 4, 6, and 8 days. Scaffold composition was then evaluated by using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) percentages of the scaffold were found to increase following SBF immersion. The high Ca/P ratio (3.82) on the scaffold indicated HA formation. Ion exchange played a significant role in the increased percentages of Ca and P, which led to new HA layer formation. The scaffold’s HA acted as a nucleation site of Ca and P from the SBF, with collagen and chitosan as the scaffold’s matrix. Chitosan-hydroxyapatite-collagen composite scaffold shows potential as a maxillofacial reconstruction material, since its composition favors HA formation.

  16. Streamlining of the RELAP5-3D Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, George L; Hykes, Joshua; Guillen, Donna Post

    2007-11-01

    RELAP5-3D is widely used by the nuclear community to simulate general thermal hydraulic systems and has proven to be so versatile that the spectrum of transient two-phase problems that can be analyzed has increased substantially over time. To accommodate the many new types of problems that are analyzed by RELAP5-3D, both the physics and numerical methods of the code have been continuously improved. In the area of computational methods and mathematical techniques, many upgrades and improvements have been made decrease code run time and increase solution accuracy. These include vectorization, parallelization, use of improved equation solvers for thermal hydraulics and neutron kinetics, and incorporation of improved library utilities. In the area of applied nuclear engineering, expanded capabilities include boron and level tracking models, radiation/conduction enclosure model, feedwater heater and compressor components, fluids and corresponding correlations for modeling Generation IV reactor designs, and coupling to computational fluid dynamics solvers. Ongoing and proposed future developments include improvements to the two-phase pump model, conversion to FORTRAN 90, and coupling to more computer programs. This paper summarizes the general improvements made to RELAP5-3D, with an emphasis on streamlining the code infrastructure for improved maintenance and development. With all these past, present and planned developments, it is necessary to modify the code infrastructure to incorporate modifications in a consistent and maintainable manner. Modifying a complex code such as RELAP5-3D to incorporate new models, upgrade numerics, and optimize existing code becomes more difficult as the code grows larger. The difficulty of this as well as the chance of introducing errors is significantly reduced when the code is structured. To streamline the code into a structured program, a commercial restructuring tool, FOR_STRUCT, was applied to the RELAP5-3D source files. The

  17. The Stress-strain Behavior of Polymer-Nanotube Composites from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Harik, V. M.; Odegard, G. M.; Brenner, D. W.; Gates, T. S.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stress-strain curves of polymer-carbon nanotube composites are derived from molecular dynamics simulations of a single-walled carbon nanotube embedded in polyethylene. A comparison is made between the response to mechanical loading of a composite with a long, continuous nanotube (replicated via periodic boundary conditions) and the response of a composite with a short, discontinuous nanotube. Both composites are mechanically loaded in the direction of and transverse to the NT axis. The long-nanotube composite shows an increase in the stiffness relative to the polymer and behaves anisotropically under the different loading conditions. The short-nanotube composite shows no enhancement relative to the polymer, most probably because of its low aspect ratio. The stress-strain curves are compared with rule-of-mixtures predictions.

  18. Compositional grading of CZTSSe alloy using exponential and uniform grading laws in SCAPS-ID simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simya, O. K.; Mahaboobbatcha, A.; Balachander, K.

    2016-04-01

    The SCAPS (Solar cell capacitance simulation) program were employed to analyze the compositional dependence of CZTSSe (Copper Zinc Tin Sulphur Selenium) absorber layers with Cadmium Sulphide (CdS) as buffer layer and Zinc Oxide (ZnO) as window layer for thin film solar cells applications. The primary motivation of this simulation work is to optimize the composition for Se/(S + Se) ratio, which would yield higher efficiency. The exponential and uniform grading law in SCAPS were set for the composition grading y(x) over a layer, as well as to set the composition dependence P(y) of a property. By varying the different compositions with exponential law and by using uniform law for the same composition, best efficiency of 14.97% were achieved for 0.4-0.1 composition of sulphur and selenium with Se/(S + Se) ratio of 0.80. Higher efficiency were obtained with higher Se content. The influences of the band gap of the CZTSSe alloys, which decreases linearly with an increase in its Se content, were further analyzed. The corresponding open circuit voltage, short circuit voltage, fill factor and efficiency of the simulated values on a photovoltaic cell with Mo back contact were studied in detail.

  19. Simulation of stress in an innovative combination of composite with metal sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, A.; Płaczek, M.; Buchacz, A.; Słomiany, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this article research of stress impact in multi-point connection glass epoxy composite with a metal sheet with a rivet nuts was presented. Composite materials are increasingly used because of the good mechanical properties and low price. The laminates are composites of a layer structure, characterized by very high strength in the direction of the fibers, their weakness is not good toughness in a direction perpendicular to the layers. Mainly checking of displacements and stresses generated on the sheet as a result of pneumatic actuators load for composite boards was carried out. Glass-epoxy composite consisting of four layers of glass mat with a weight of 1000 g/m2 and an epoxy resin and hardener HG700 LG700 volume ratio of 38/100 was created. Next composite was fixed with steel plate with a rivet nuts and bolts. A model of laminate samples and plate was simulate in Siemens NX 8.5 software. The simulation results will determine stresses and displacements in conjunction newly designed composite sheet. Strength analysis was performed with the use of the module NX Advanced Simulation. FEM is an advanced method for solving systems of differential equations, based on the division of the field into finite elements for which the solution is approximated by specific functions, and performing the actual calculations only for nodes of this division. Due to the complexity of the created object to simplify the elements made to reduce the calculation time. This article presents the study of stresses and displacements in the composite plates joined with sheet metal, in summary of this article, the authors compare the obtainted results with the computer simulation results in the article: " The study of fix composite panel and steel plates on testing stand".

  20. Effect of food-simulating liquids on surface characteristics of composite and polyacid-modified composite restoratives.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U; Low, J S; Ong, L F

    2000-01-01

    The chemical environment is one aspect of the oral environment that could have an appreciable influence on the in vivo degradation of composite resins. The effects of food-simulating liquids on the surface roughness and hardness of composite (Silux Plus, Z100, Spectrum TPH, and P50) and polyacid-modified composite resins (F2000 and Dyract AP) were thus investigated and compared. Sixty disks of each material were made. Half were used for microhardness testing and the remaining half for studying surface roughness using profilometry. Each group of 30 disks was subdivided into six groups of five and conditioned for one week as follows--Group 1 (control): air at 37 degrees C; Group 2: distilled water at 37 degrees C; Group 3: 0.02 N citric acid at 37 degrees C; Group 4: 0.02 N lactic acid at 37 degrees C Group 5: heptane at 37 degrees C; Group 6: 50% ethanol-water solution at 37 degrees C. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Scheffé's test at a significance level of 0.05. Results showed that the surface roughness of all restoratives evaluated was not significantly affected by food-simulating liquids. No significant change in surface hardness was noted with conditioning of Spectrum TPH, Dyract AP, and F2000 in the various food-simulating liquids. The BIS-GMA-based composites Silux Plus, Z100, and P50 appeared to be more susceptible to the softening effects of some food-simulating liquids.

  1. Aging of composite insulators; Simulation by electrical tests

    SciTech Connect

    de Tourreil, C.H. ); Lambeth, P.J.

    1990-07-01

    To assess the long-term performance of 72 kV and 230 kV composite long rod insulators different laboratory aging tests have been developed. This paper reports two principal diagnostic tests used to measure the performance of the insulators, the quick flashover salt fog (QFO SF), and the rapid flashover clean fog (RFO CF) tests. The aging processes were: cement coating and clean fog, salt fog, and cement coating and salt fog. Similar sets of insulators were aged also in the field for over three years, and all the insulators evaluated in the laboratory. The cement/salt fog aging process was found to be the most controllable and realistic, when the results were assessed by means of the RFO CF test.

  2. Modeling and simulation of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bheemreddy, Venkata

    Finite element modeling framework based on cohesive damage modeling, constitutive material behavior using user-material subroutines, and extended finite element method (XFEM), are developed for studying the failure behavior of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CFCCs) by the example of a silicon carbide matrix reinforced with silicon carbide fiber (SiC/SiCf) composite. This work deals with developing comprehensive numerical models for three problems: (1) fiber/matrix interface debonding and fiber pull-out, (2) mechanical behavior of a CFCC using a representative volume element (RVE) approach, and (3) microstructure image-based modeling of a CFCC using object oriented finite element analysis (OOF). Load versus displacement behavior during a fiber pull-out event was investigated using a cohesive damage model and an artificial neural network model. Mechanical behavior of a CFCC was investigated using a statistically equivalent RVE. A three-step procedure was developed for generating a randomized fiber distribution. Elastic properties and damage behavior of a CFCC were analyzed using the developed RVE models. Scattering of strength distribution in CFCCs was taken into account using a Weibull probability law. A multi-scale modeling framework was developed for evaluating the fracture behavior of a CFCC as a function of microstructural attributes. A finite element mesh of the microstructure was generated using an OOF tool. XFEM was used to study crack propagation in the microstructure and the fracture behavior was analyzed. The work performed provides a valuable procedure for developing a multi-scale framework for comprehensive damage study of CFCCs.

  3. Probabilistic simulation of long term behavior in polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, A. R.; Singhal, S. N.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    A methodology to compute cumulative probability distribution functions (CDF) of fatigue life for different ratios, r of applied stress to the laminate strength based on first ply failure criteria has been developed and demonstrated. Degradation effects due to long term environmental exposure and mechanical cyclic loads are considered in the simulation process. A unified time-stress dependent multi-factor interaction equation model developed at NASA Lewis Research Center has been used to account for the degradation/aging of material properties due to cyclic loads. Fast probability integration method is used to perform probabilistic simulation of uncertainties. Sensitivity of fatigue life reliability to uncertainties in the primitive random variables are computed and their significance in the reliability based design for maximum life is discussed. The results show that the graphite/epoxy (0/+45/90) deg laminate with ply thickness 0.125 in. has 500,000 cycles life for applied stress to laminate strength ratio of 0.6 and a reliability of 0.999. Also, the fatigue life reliability has been found to be most sensitive to the ply thickness and matrix tensile strength. Tighter quality controls must therefore be enforced on ply thickness and matrix strength in order to achieve high reliability of the structure.

  4. Structural, Physical, and Compositional Analysis of Lunar Simulants and Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul; Street, Kenneth W.; Gaier, James

    2008-01-01

    Relative to the prior manned Apollo and unmanned robotic missions, planned Lunar initiatives are comparatively complex and longer in duration. Individual crew rotations are envisioned to span several months, and various surface systems must function in the Lunar environment for periods of years. As a consequence, an increased understanding of the surface environment is required to engineer and test the associated materials, components, and systems necessary to sustain human habitation and surface operations. The effort described here concerns the analysis of existing simulant materials, with application to Lunar return samples. The interplay between these analyses fulfills the objective of ascertaining the critical properties of regolith itself, and the parallel objective of developing suitable stimulant materials for a variety of engineering applications. Presented here are measurements of the basic physical attributes, i.e. particle size distributions and general shape factors. Also discussed are structural and chemical properties, as determined through a variety of techniques, such as optical microscopy, SEM and TEM microscopy, Mossbauer Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman microspectroscopy, inductively coupled argon plasma emission spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence mapping. A comparative description of currently available stimulant materials is discussed, with implications for more detailed analyses, as well as the requirements for continued refinement of methods for simulant production.

  5. Out-of-Core Streamline Visualization on Large Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueng, Shyh-Kuang; Sikorski, K.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1997-01-01

    It's advantageous for computational scientists to have the capability to perform interactive visualization on their desktop workstations. For data on large unstructured meshes, this capability is not generally available. In particular, particle tracing on unstructured grids can result in a high percentage of non-contiguous memory accesses and therefore may perform very poorly with virtual memory paging schemes. The alternative of visualizing a lower resolution of the data degrades the original high-resolution calculations. This paper presents an out-of-core approach for interactive streamline construction on large unstructured tetrahedral meshes containing millions of elements. The out-of-core algorithm uses an octree to partition and restructure the raw data into subsets stored into disk files for fast data retrieval. A memory management policy tailored to the streamline calculations is used such that during the streamline construction only a very small amount of data are brought into the main memory on demand. By carefully scheduling computation and data fetching, the overhead of reading data from the disk is significantly reduced and good memory performance results. This out-of-core algorithm makes possible interactive streamline visualization of large unstructured-grid data sets on a single mid-range workstation with relatively low main-memory capacity: 5-20 megabytes. Our test results also show that this approach is much more efficient than relying on virtual memory and operating system's paging algorithms.

  6. 45 CFR 155.405 - Single streamlined application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Single streamlined application. 155.405 Section 155.405 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE... application— (i) Via an Internet Web site; (ii) By telephone through a call center; (iii) By mail; and (iv) In...

  7. 76 FR 24339 - Streamlining Service Delivery and Improving Customer Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Delivery and Improving Customer Service By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and...). However, with advances in technology and service delivery systems in other sectors, the public's... Federal Government has a responsibility to streamline and make more efficient its service delivery...

  8. Cost-Outcome Analysis: Streamlining Techniques. Evaluation Guide Number 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jana K.

    Streamlining involves the modification of cost-analysis methods to make them more appropriate for the limited time and resources, and immediate information needs, of local-level program evaluations. It can also enhance the reliability and validity of district-level studies. A review of existing texts of cost analysis and of studies of traditional…

  9. Measuring the composition-curvature coupling in binary lipid membranes by computer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Barragán Vidal, I. A. Müller, M.; Rosetti, C. M.; Pastorino, C.

    2014-11-21

    The coupling between local composition fluctuations in binary lipid membranes and curvature affects the lateral membrane structure. We propose an efficient method to compute the composition-curvature coupling in molecular simulations and apply it to two coarse-grained membrane models—a minimal, implicit-solvent model and the MARTINI model. Both the weak-curvature behavior that is typical for thermal fluctuations of planar bilayer membranes as well as the strong-curvature regime corresponding to narrow cylindrical membrane tubes are studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results are analyzed by using a phenomenological model of the thermodynamics of curved, mixed bilayer membranes that accounts for the change of the monolayer area upon bending. Additionally the role of thermodynamic characteristics such as the incompatibility between the two lipid species and asymmetry of composition are investigated.

  10. SAR image simulation from composite sea-ship scene based on a weighted multipath model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Zhao, Ye; Nie, Ding

    2016-10-01

    A weighted multi-path model for the composite electromagnetic (EM) scattering and SAR image application of sea surface with a ship target is presented according to the distribution characteristics of specular reflection facets on a deterministic rough sea surface. This model reasonably includes the influence of non-negligible roughness of sea surface in the coupling scattering calculation, which could avoid the error caused by planar approximation in the traditional four-path model. Numerical simulation results show that the entire simulator could provide a preliminary prediction on the radar cross sections (RCS) for the composite scene with electrically large size. In addition, the total scattering contribution contains both the amplitude and phase information of the scattering facets on the composite ship-sea surface, which can be effectively applied in the scattering characteristics identification of ship target on the sea surface and SAR image simulation.

  11. Measuring the composition-curvature coupling in binary lipid membranes by computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Barragán Vidal, I A; Rosetti, C M; Pastorino, C; Müller, M

    2014-11-21

    The coupling between local composition fluctuations in binary lipid membranes and curvature affects the lateral membrane structure. We propose an efficient method to compute the composition-curvature coupling in molecular simulations and apply it to two coarse-grained membrane models-a minimal, implicit-solvent model and the MARTINI model. Both the weak-curvature behavior that is typical for thermal fluctuations of planar bilayer membranes as well as the strong-curvature regime corresponding to narrow cylindrical membrane tubes are studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results are analyzed by using a phenomenological model of the thermodynamics of curved, mixed bilayer membranes that accounts for the change of the monolayer area upon bending. Additionally the role of thermodynamic characteristics such as the incompatibility between the two lipid species and asymmetry of composition are investigated.

  12. METCAN simulation of candidate metal matrix composites for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    1990-01-01

    The METCAN (Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer) computer code is used to simulate the nonlinear behavior of select metal matrix composites in order to assess their potential for high temperature structural applications. Material properties for seven composites are generated at a fiber volume ratio of 0.33 for two bonding conditions (a perfect bond and a weak interphase case) at various temperatures. A comparison of the two bonding conditions studied shows a general reduction in value of all properties (except CTE) for the weak interphase case from the perfect bond case. However, in the weak interphase case, the residual stresses that develop are considerably less than those that form in the perfect bond case. Results of the computational simulation indicate that among the metal matrix composites examined, SiC/NiAl is the best candidate for high temperature applications at the given fiber volume ratio.

  13. Guided waves in anisotropic and quasi-isotropic aerospace composites: three-dimensional simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Leckey, Cara A C; Rogge, Matthew D; Raymond Parker, F

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) elastic wave simulations can be used to investigate and optimize nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) ultrasonic damage detection techniques for aerospace materials. 3D anisotropic elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) has been implemented for ultrasonic waves in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite laminates. This paper describes 3D EFIT simulations of guided wave propagation in undamaged and damaged anisotropic and quasi-isotropic composite plates. Comparisons are made between simulations of guided waves in undamaged anisotropic composite plates and both experimental laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) wavefield data and dispersion curves. Time domain and wavenumber domain comparisons are described. Wave interaction with complex geometry delamination damage is then simulated to investigate how simulation tools incorporating realistic damage geometries can aid in the understanding of wave interaction with CFRP damage. In order to move beyond simplistic assumptions of damage geometry, volumetric delamination data acquired via X-ray microfocus computed tomography is directly incorporated into the simulation. Simulated guided wave interaction with the complex geometry delamination is compared to experimental LDV time domain data and 3D wave interaction with the volumetric damage is discussed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Simulation of aerosol chemical compositions in the Western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrit, Mounir; Kata Sartelet, Karine; Sciare, Jean; Marchand, Nicolas; Pey, Jorge; Sellegri, Karine

    2016-04-01

    This work aims at evaluating the chemical transport model (CTM) Polair3d of the air-quality modelling platform Polyphemus during the ChArMex summer campaigns of 2013, using ground-based measurements performed at ERSA (Cape Corsica, France), and at determining the processes controlling organic aerosol concentrations at ERSA. Simulations are compared to measurements for concentrations of both organic and inorganic species, as well as the ratio of biogenic versus anthropogenic particles, and organic aerosol properties (oxidation state). For inorganics, the concentrations of sulphate, sodium, chloride, ammonium and nitrate are compared to measurements. Non-sea-salt sulphate and ammonium concentrations are well reproduced by the model. However, because of the geographic location of the measurement station at Cape Corsica which undergoes strong wind velocities and sea effects, sea-salt sulphate, sodium, chloride and nitrate concentrations are strongly influenced by the parameterizations used for sea-salt emissions. Different parameterizations are compared and a parameterization is chosen after comparison to sodium measurements. For organics, the concentrations are well modelled when compared to experimental values. Anthropogenic particles are influenced by emission of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC). Measurements allow us to refine the estimation of those emissions, which are currently missing in emission inventories. Although concentrations of biogenic particles are well simulated, the organic chemical compounds are not enough oxidised in the model. The observed oxidation state of organics shows that the oligomerisation of pinonaldehyde was over-estimated in Polyphemus. To improve the oxidation property of organics, the formation of extremely low volatile organic compounds from autoxidation of monoterpenes is added to Polyphemus, using recently published data from chamber experiments. These chemical compounds are highly oxygenated and are formed rapidly, as first

  15. The effects of simulated space environmental parameters on six commercially available composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.; Sykes, George F., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of simulated space environmental parameters on microdamage induced by the environment in a series of commercially available graphite-fiber-reinforced composite materials were determined. Composites with both thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems were studied. Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) exposures were simulated by thermal cycling; geosynchronous-orbit (GEO) exposures were simulated by electron irradiation plus thermal cycling. The thermal cycling temperature range was -250 F to either 200 F or 150 F. The upper limits of the thermal cycles were different to ensure that an individual composite material was not cycled above its glass transition temperature. Material response was characterized through assessment of the induced microcracking and its influence on mechanical property changes at both room temperature and -250 F. Microdamage was induced in both thermoset and thermoplastic advanced composite materials exposed to the simulated LEO environment. However, a 350 F cure single-phase toughened epoxy composite was not damaged during exposure to the LEO environment. The simuated GEO environment produced microdamage in all materials tested.

  16. Computational simulation of composite structures with and without damage. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, Thomas F.

    1994-01-01

    A methodology is described which uses finite element analysis of various laminates to computationally simulate the effects of delamination damage initiation and growth on the structural behavior of laminated composite structures. The delamination area is expanded according to a set pattern. As the delamination area increases, how the structural response of the laminate changes with respect to buckling and strain energy release rate are investigated. Rules are presented for laminates of different configurations, materials and thickness. These results demonstrate that computational simulation methods can provide alternate methods to investigate the complex delamination damage mechanisms found in composite structures.

  17. Computational Simulation of Damage Propagation in Three-Dimensional Woven Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Dade; Minnetyan, Levon

    2005-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) woven composites have demonstrated multi-directional properties and improved transverse strength, impact resistance, and shear characteristics. The objective of this research is to develop a new model for predicting the elastic constants, hygrothermal effects, thermomechanical response, and stress limits of 3D woven composites; and to develop a computational tool to facilitate the evaluation of 3D woven composite structures with regard to damage tolerance and durability. Fiber orientations of weave and braid patterns are defined with reference to composite structural coordinates. Orthotropic ply properties and stress limits computed via micromechanics are transformed to composite structural coordinates and integrated to obtain the 3D properties. The various stages of degradation, from damage initiation to collapse of structures, in the 3D woven structures are simulated for the first time. Three dimensional woven composite specimens with various woven patterns under different loading conditions, such as tension, compression, bending, and shear are simulated in the validation process of this research. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in these simulations.

  18. Hysteresis in magnetic shape memory composites: Modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Sergio; Lenz, Martin; Rumpf, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloys are characterized by the coupling between the reorientation of structural variants and the rearrangement of magnetic domains. This permits to control the shape change via an external magnetic field, at least in single crystals. Composite materials with single-crystalline particles embedded in a softer matrix have been proposed as a way to overcome the blocking of the reorientation at grain boundaries. We investigate hysteresis phenomena for small NiMnGa single crystals embedded in a polymer matrix for slowly varying magnetic fields. The evolution of the microstructure is studied within the rate-independent variational framework proposed by Mielke and Theil (1999). The underlying variational model incorporates linearized elasticity, micromagnetism, stray field and a dissipation term proportional to the volume swept by the twin boundary. The time discretization is based on an incremental minimization of the sum of energy and dissipation. A backtracking approach is employed to approximately ensure the global minimality condition. We illustrate and discuss the influence of the particle geometry (volume fraction, shape, arrangement) and the polymer elastic parameters on the observed hysteresis and compare with recent experimental results.

  19. Microscale Simulation on Mechanical Properties of Al/PTFE Composite Based on Real Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Chao; Dong, Yongxiang; Maimaitituersun, Wubuliaisan

    2016-01-01

    A novel numerical method at the microscale for studying the mechanical behavior of an aluminum-particle-reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene (Al/PTFE) composite is proposed and validated experimentally in this paper. Two types of 2D representative volume elements (RVEs), real microstructure-based and simulated microstructures, are established by following a series of image processing procedures and on a statistical basis considering the geometry and the distribution of particles and microvoids, respectively. Moreover, 3D finite element modelling based on the same statistical information as the 2D simulated microstructure models is conducted to show the efficiency and effectiveness of the 2D models. The results of all simulations and experiments indicate that real microstructure-based models and simulated microstructure models are efficient methods to predict elastic and plastic constants of particle-reinforced composites. PMID:28773713

  20. Simulation of metal matrix composite solidification in the presence of cooled fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. K.; Amano, R. S.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    2008-09-01

    Metal matrix composite (MMC) has been well known for its superior material properties compared with traditional composite. A new method is introduced to improve the properties of MMC in the sense that the ends of the reinforcement phase of the composite are allowed to extend out of the mold and cooled by a heat sink in order to promote the rate of heat transfer through the fibers and promote the formation of primary alpha phase around the reinforcement. This paper presents the experimental results obtained from the foundry in the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and some numerical simulation results of the solidification process in the cast mold.

  1. 78 FR 21118 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Streamlined Clearance Process for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Streamlined Clearance Process for... process proposed in this information collection request. This information collection request was originally approved by OMB in January of 1997. This information collection streamlines the clearance process...

  2. Tribological behavior study on Ti-Nb-Sn/hydroxyapatite composites in simulated body fluid solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuyong; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xu, Lijuan; Liu, Zhiguang; Kee, Do Woo

    2012-06-01

    In this study, Ti-35Nb-2.5Sn/xhydroxyapatite (HA) composites were sintered by pulse current activated sintering (PCAS) from powders milled for different time. These sintered composites were expected to be potential biomaterials. Ca(3)(PO(4))(2) phase which could increase hardness of sintered composites was found in the Ti-35Nb-2.5Sn/15HA composite sintered from 12 h milled powders. The sintered composites had low elastic modulus (18∼26 GPa) and high compression strength. Due to the importance of friction and wear in biomaterials application, the tribological behavior of sintered composites was studied in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. Results revealed that milling time and HA content of powders could affect wear properties of sintered composites. The major wear mechanism was abrasive wear in the wear test. The wear rate and friction coefficient decreased when milling time and HA content of powders increased. The lowest friction coefficient (0.1223) was obtained in the Ti-35Nb-2.5Sn/15HA composite sintered from 12 h milled powders, and this composite had superior wear resistance.

  3. Recent Advances in VisIt: AMR Streamlines and Query-Driven Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, Wes; Borovikov, Sergey; Childs, Hank; Deines, Eduard; Garth, Christoph; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Joy, Kenneth; Martin, David; Meredith, Jeremy; Prabhat,; Pugmire, David; Rubel, Oliver; Van Straalen, Brian; Wu, Kesheng

    2009-11-12

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a highly effective method for simulations spanning a large range of spatiotemporal scales such as those encountered in astrophysical simulations. Combining research in novel AMR visualization algorithms and basic infrastructure work, the Department of Energy's (DOEs) Science Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) has extended VisIt, an open source visualization tool that can handle AMR data without converting it to alternate representations. This paper focuses on two recent advances in the development of VisIt. First, we have developed streamline computation methods that properly handle multi-domain data sets and utilize effectively multiple processors on parallel machines. Furthermore, we are working on streamline calculation methods that consider an AMR hierarchy and detect transitions from a lower resolution patch into a finer patch and improve interpolation at level boundaries. Second, we focus on visualization of large-scale particle data sets. By integrating the DOE Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center's FastBit indexing technology into VisIt, we are able to reduce particle counts effectively by thresholding and by loading only those particles from disk that satisfy the thresholding criteria. Furthermore, using FastBit it becomes possible to compute parallel coordinate views efficiently, thus facilitating interactive data exploration of massive particle data sets.

  4. Forming simulation of woven composite fibers and its influence on structural performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divine, Vincent; Beauchesne, Erwan; Roy, Subir; Palaniswamy, Hariharasudhan

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, the interest in composite material as a replacement for metals has been growing. The automotive industry, in its constant quest for weight reduction, is now seriously considering composite materials as a substitute for sheet metal components to meet future fuel consumption standards. However, composite forming processes are expensive and difficult to control because of its complex composition with fiber and matrix layers or plies and its dependency on many parameters, such as non-linearity of tensile stiffness, effect of shear rate, temperature and friction. Hence, numerical simulation could be a viable approach to predict material behavior during composite forming. The objective of this study is to highlight capabilities of RADIOSS®, a non-linear finite element analysis based structural solver commonly used for stamping and crash analyses, to simulate forming simulation of composite plies made from woven fibers. For validation the well-known double dome model is used with material data published in NUMISHEET'05 proceedings. It is modeled as a woven fabric with an elastic anisotropic fabric material law available in RADIOSS. This material law is able to consider properties along the two directions of anisotropy, warp and weft. The compared result is the shear angle after stamping that is, the variation of angle between warp and weft fibers, at several prescribed points on the ply. The variation of this angle has a strong impact on material characteristics which severely deteriorates when a critical value is reached. Hence, a study on crash simulations is performed, after mapping fibers angles from stamping simulation.

  5. Simulation Based Low-Cost Composite Process Development at the US Air Force Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Brian P.; Lee, C. William; Curliss, David B.

    2003-01-01

    Low-cost composite research in the US Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Organic Matrix Composites Branch has focused on the theme of affordable performance. Practically, this means that we use a very broad view when considering the affordability of composites. Factors such as material costs, labor costs, recurring and nonrecurring manufacturing costs are balanced against performance to arrive at the relative affordability vs. performance measure of merit. The research efforts discussed here are two projects focused on affordable processing of composites. The first topic is the use of a neural network scheme to model cure reaction kinetics, then utilize the kinetics coupled with simple heat transport models to predict, in real-time, future exotherms and control them. The neural network scheme is demonstrated to be very robust and a much more efficient method that mechanistic cure modeling approach. This enables very practical low-cost processing of thick composite parts. The second project is liquid composite molding (LCM) process simulation. LCM processing of large 3D integrated composite parts has been demonstrated to be a very cost effective way to produce large integrated aerospace components specific examples of LCM processes are resin transfer molding (RTM), vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM), and other similar approaches. LCM process simulation is a critical part of developing an LCM process approach. Flow simulation enables the development of the most robust approach to introducing resin into complex preforms. Furthermore, LCM simulation can be used in conjunction with flow front sensors to control the LCM process in real-time to account for preform or resin variability.

  6. Simulation-based design optimization and control of thick composite laminates manufactured by resin transfer molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Dennis J.

    2000-10-01

    Processing thick-sectioned composites (>1/2″ ) can be difficult due to the exothermic nature of the resin and the low thermal conductivity of the composite. This is particularly true for the Resin Transfer Molding process examined here. The temperature profile used to polymerize the resin, otherwise known as a "cure cycle," must be carefully chosen to reduce thermal gradients within the composite while ensuring satisfactory processing times. Instead of trial and error methods that are expensive, time consuming, and non-optimal, we propose a knowledge-based optimization strategy. In order to be effective, the optimization strategy requires an accurate simulation of the process and supplementary heuristic information. A 1-D finite difference cure simulation was used to simulate the process. Some of the simulation's model input parameters were found directly through experimentation. Other input parameters were identified using a least-squares approach to match the simulation to experimental data from seven test composites. Because an accurate residual stress model for the process was unavailable, a heuristic for predicting the quality of a composite, based on the progression of resin cure within the composite, was used. Four different global optimization schemes were studied: Random Walk, Simulated Annealing, Genetic Algorithms, and Evolutionary Strategies. The optimal cure cycle suggests heating the composite to initiate cure followed by a cooling stage to ensure inside-out curing. An extension of the Evolutionary Strategies optimization method was developed to account for the known variability in the simulation's input parameters and generate an optimum that can withstand some batch to batch variations. In addition to the suggested cure cycle, we propose to implement adaptive control. Through a sensitivity analysis of the optimal cure cycle, the conditions and manner of altering the cure cycle were identified. Furthermore, instead of relying on intrusive sensors

  7. Molecular Simulation Study of Gas Solubility and Diffusion in a Polymer-Boron Nitride Nanotube Composite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congyue; Jagirdar, Preeti; Naserifar, Saber; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2016-02-25

    We study the possibility of using polymer composites made of a polymer and boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) as a new type of membranes for gas separation. The polymer used is amorphous poly(ether imide) (PEI), and zigzag BNNTs are used to generate the composites with the PEI. The solubilities and self-diffusivities of CO2 and CH4 in the PEI and its composites with the BNNTs are calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The molecular models of the PEI and its composites with the BNNTs are generated using energy minimization and MD simulation, and the Universal Force Field is used to represent the interactions between all the atoms. The morhology of the composites are characterized and are compared with that of PEI. The accuracy of the computations is tested by calculating the gases' solubilities and self-diffsivities in the pure PEI and comparing them with the experimental data. Good agreement is obtained with the data. The computed diffusivities and solubilities in the polymer-BNNTs composites are much larger than those in the pure polymer, which are attributed to the changes that the BNNTs induce in the polymer composite's free-volume distribution. As the mechanical properties of the polymer-BNNTs composites are superior over those of the pure PEI, their use as a membrane for gas separation offers distinct advantages over the pure polymer. We also demonstrate that, calculating the diffusion coefficients with MD simulations in the NPT ensemble, as opposed to the common practice of utilizing the NVT ensemble, leads to much more accurate results.

  8. The Magma Chamber Simulator: Modeling Compositional, Temperature and Mass Variations in a Composite Magma-Wallrock System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrson, W. A.; Spera, F. J.; Creamer, J. B.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Elucidation of the spectrum of compositional and mineralogical characteristics that can be generated by assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC) contributes to the goal of defining the thermal and mass characteristics required to develop and maintain magma storage and transport systems in a range of tectonic settings. The Magma Chamber Simulator (MCS) utilizes the thermodynamic functionality of MELTS (Ghiorso & Sack 1995) to assess thermal, compositional and mass variations that develop in a composite magma-wallrock (M-WR) system undergoing AFC. Wallrock of defined initial conditions (e.g., PTX) heats up and potentially melts as magma cools and crystallizes. Energy balance is maintained between magma and wallrock and informs the thermal condition of wallrock, which dictates the amount and composition of anatectic melt that is incorporated into magma. As magma cools through a defined T path, output includes thermal, mass, compositional, and physical parameters for melt and solids in magma and wallrock. The simulation is complete when thermal equilibrium between magma and wallrock is achieved. Key parameters that impact the bulk composition and mineralogy of magma undergoing AFC include the initial wallrock to magma mass ratio, wallrock initial T, and initial compositions of magma and wallrock. While other system parameters are held constant, assimilation of lherzolite vs. granite by high-alumina basalt (HAB) yields differences in the total mass of anatectic melt at thermal equilibrium (e.g., 4 vs. 12% of starting magma mass, respectively) but magma SiO2 range is similar (51-53 wt. %). Thus, basaltic samples with similar Si contents can have different assimilation histories and thus manifest different trace element/isotopic characteristics; caution is therefore required when interpreting the origin of compositional heterogeneity of basalts. Initial mass of wallrock impacts magma chemical evolution as illustrated by two cases in a HAB-granite M-WR system in which

  9. Composition of Irradiation Residue from Jupiter Trojan Laboratory Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poston, Michael; Mahjoub, Ahmed; Blacksberg, Jordana; Brown, Michael E.; Carlson, Robert W.; Ehlmann, Bethany; Eiler, John; Hand, Kevin P.; Hodyss, Robert; Wong, Ian

    2016-10-01

    Today's Jupiter Trojan asteroids may have originated in the Kuiper Belt (eg. Morbidelli et al. Nature 2005, Nesvorny et al. ApJ 2013) and migrated to capture at their present locations. If this is the case, it is expected that their surfaces will contain chemical traces of this history. Our work broadly considers laboratory simulations of this history. In this work we report on the refractory residue left behind when irradiated mixed ice samples were brought to Earth-normal conditions and removed from the vacuum system. Ices that will be discussed include a 3:3:3:1 mixture of H2S:NH3:CH3OH:H2O and a 3:3:1 mixture of NH3:CH3OH:H2O. After deposition at 50K, the ices were irradiated with a beam of 10 keV electrons to form a processed crust mixed with unreacted ices. The films were then warmed to 142K under irradiation over several days. After stopping irradiation, the mixtures were slowly heated through the desorption temperatures of the unreacted ices (about 150-180K), leaving only more-stable compounds behind, and up to room temperature. Some of the reaction products were seen to desorb during heating to room temperature, while a significant amount remained as a refractory residue. After backfilling the vacuum system with nitrogen gas, residues were analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, and Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometry. Results indicate a complex chemistry including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, and nitrogen and sulfur-containing organics. Notably, when sulfur is not present, a number of nitrogen-containing organic candidates are identified, however, in the mixtures containing sulfur, sulfur-containing compounds appear to dominate the chemistry. While these experiments were conducted with Trojan asteroids in mind, the results are also relevant to comets and other cold locations in the solar system that have experienced large swings in temperature.This work has been supported by the Keck Institute for

  10. Strength Analysis and Process Simulation of Subway Contact Rail Support Bracket of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedulov, Boris N.; Safonov, Alexander A.; Sergeichev, Ivan V.; Ushakov, Andrey E.; Klenin, Yuri G.; Makarenko, Irina V.

    2016-10-01

    An application of composites for construction of subway brackets is a very effective approach to extend their lifetime. However, this approach involves the necessity to prevent process-induced distortions of the bracket due to thermal deformation and chemical shrinkage. At present study, a process simulation has been carried out to support the design of the production tooling. The simulation was based on the application of viscoelastic model for the resin. Simulation results were verified by comparison with results of manufacturing experiments. To optimize the bracket structure the strength analysis was carried out as well.

  11. Coupled multi-disciplinary simulation of composite engine structures in propulsion environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chamis, C.C.; Singhal, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described for the coupled response of multi-layered multi-material composite engine structural components which are subjected to simultaneous multi-disciplinary thermal, structural, vibration, and acoustic loadings including the effect of hostile environments. The simulation is based on a three dimensional finite element analysis technique in conjunction with structural mechanics codes and with acoustic analysis methods. The composite material behavior is assessed at the various composite scales, i.e., the laminate/ply/constituents (fiber/matrix), via a nonlinear material characterization model. Sample cases exhibiting nonlinear geometrical, material, loading, and environmental behavior of aircraft engine fan blades, are presented. Results for deformed shape, vibration frequency, mode shapes, and acoustic noise emitted from the fan blade, are discussed for their coupled effect in hot and humid environments. Results such as acoustic noise for coupled composite-mechanics/heat transfer/structural/vibration/acoustic analyses demonstrate the effectiveness of coupled multi-disciplinary computational simulation and the various advantages of composite materials compared to metals.

  12. Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation Tool for Ceramic Matrix and Polymer Matrix Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; Walton, Owen J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic-based, discrete-event progressive damage simulations of ceramic-matrix composite and polymer matrix composite material structures have been enabled through the development of a unique multiscale modeling tool. This effort involves coupling three independently developed software programs: (1) the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), (2) the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program (CARES/ Life), and (3) the Abaqus finite element analysis (FEA) program. MAC/GMC contributes multiscale modeling capabilities and micromechanics relations to determine stresses and deformations at the microscale of the composite material repeating unit cell (RUC). CARES/Life contributes statistical multiaxial failure criteria that can be applied to the individual brittle-material constituents of the RUC. Abaqus is used at the global scale to model the overall composite structure. An Abaqus user-defined material (UMAT) interface, referred to here as "FEAMAC/CARES," was developed that enables MAC/GMC and CARES/Life to operate seamlessly with the Abaqus FEA code. For each FEAMAC/CARES simulation trial, the stochastic nature of brittle material strength results in random, discrete damage events, which incrementally progress and lead to ultimate structural failure. This report describes the FEAMAC/CARES methodology and discusses examples that illustrate the performance of the tool. A comprehensive example problem, simulating the progressive damage of laminated ceramic matrix composites under various off-axis loading conditions and including a double notched tensile specimen geometry, is described in a separate report.

  13. Dielectric permittivity simulation of random irregularly shaped particle composites and approximation using modified dielectric mixing laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calame, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    Finite difference quasielectrostatic modeling is used to predict the dielectric permittivity of composites consisting of irregular particles in a background matrix. Representations of particles having undulating surfaces described by sums of harmonic functions are created on the computer and subsequently packed into a three-dimensional cellular model space. Composite dielectric permittivities as a function of volumetric filling fraction and particle undulation amplitude were simulated using constituent permittivities similar to the low-field behavior of barium titanium oxide (particles) and polyvinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene-chlorofluoroethylene (terpolymer matrix). An increase in particle roughness (undulation amplitude) causes a more rapid increase in composite permittivity than that predicted by random spherical particle simulations. The dielectric behavior of irregular particle composites is also simulated over a wide range of ratios of particle permittivity to matrix permittivity, where both permittivities are purely real. An empirical mixing law, which is a modification of the Hanai equation with an exponent 1/μ instead of 1/3, is investigated and found to be in excellent agreement with the simulations. Additional empirical expressions that provide approximate values of μ in terms of the particle undulation amplitude and the ratio of constituent permittivities are developed. Together, the empirical expressions are potentially useful as a predictive mixing law for irregular particle systems.

  14. Impact of the Fibre Bed on Resin Viscosity in Liquid Composite Moulding Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascons, Marc; Blanco, Norbert; Simacek, Pavel; Peiro, Joaquim; Advani, Suresh; Matthys, Koen

    2012-06-01

    In the past, simulation of liquid composite moulding processes was often based on the assumption that resin viscosity could be implemented as a constant value. However, viscosity can be subject to changes during the infusion process and now, non-constant and process parameter dependent expressions have become more common in simulation practice. Nevertheless, even with the inclusion of more advanced resin viscosity models, the prediction of flow front propagation in large, thick composite parts or in slow infusion processes is often still inaccurate when compared to the real application. Discrepancies are found to be most pronounced in the final stages of the infusion process, exactly where high accuracy predictions are most valued. A new simulation method based on an infusion time-dependent resin viscosity expression is proposed in this work. The method not only incorporates non-linear viscosity behaviour, but also takes into account the impact of reinforcement fibre sizing and fibre bed architecture on resin viscosity characteristics. Such fibre bed effects are not identifiable in neat resin viscosity characterization tests but are thought to have substantial impact on in-situ viscosity values during infusion, especially for large, thick composite part applications and slow infusion processes. An application case study has been included to demonstrate the prediction capability of the proposed simulation method. The design of an infusion process for a composite pressure vessel was selected for this purpose. Results show high predictive power throughout the infusion process, with most pronounced benefit in the final infusion stages.

  15. Compositional simulation and performance analysis of the Prudhoe Bay miscible gas project

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, P.L.; Moritz, A.L. Jr. )

    1992-08-01

    This paper reports that a pseudocomponent method was developed to use fully compositional reservoir simulation results in the interpretation of separator gas samples. The interpretation provided insight into actual EOR performance by quantifying solvent breakthrough and production rates. Field examples of various reservoir mechanisms affecting the efficiency of Prudhoe Bay EOR are examined.

  16. Development of a Neural Network Simulator for Studying the Constitutive Behavior of Structural Composite Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Na, Hyuntae; Lee, Seung-Yub; Üstündag, Ersan; ...

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a recent development and application of a noncommercial artificial neural network (ANN) simulator with graphical user interface (GUI) to assist in rapid data modeling and analysis in the engineering diffraction field. The real-time network training/simulation monitoring tool has been customized for the study of constitutive behavior of engineering materials, and it has improved data mining and forecasting capabilities of neural networks. This software has been used to train and simulate the finite element modeling (FEM) data for a fiber composite system, both forward and inverse. The forward neural network simulation precisely reduplicates FEM results several orders ofmore » magnitude faster than the slow original FEM. The inverse simulation is more challenging; yet, material parameters can be meaningfully determined with the aid of parameter sensitivity information. The simulator GUI also reveals that output node size for materials parameter and input normalization method for strain data are critical train conditions in inverse network. The successful use of ANN modeling and simulator GUI has been validated through engineering neutron diffraction experimental data by determining constitutive laws of the real fiber composite materials via a mathematically rigorous and physically meaningful parameter search process, once the networks are successfully trained from the FEM database.« less

  17. Direct Monte Carlo simulation of the chemical equilibrium composition of detonation products

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, M.S.

    1993-06-01

    A new Monte Carlo simulation method has been developed by the author which gives the equilibrium chemical composition of a molecular fluid directly. The usual NPT ensemble (isothermal-isobaric) is implemented with N being the number of atoms instead of molecules. Changes in chemical composition are treated as correlated spatial moves of atoms. Given the interaction potentials between molecular products, ``exact`` EOS points including the equilibrium chemical composition can be determined from the simulations. This method is applied to detonation products at conditions in the region near the Chapman- Jouget state. For the example of NO, it is shown that the CJ detonation velocity can be determined to a few meters per second. A rather small change in cross potentials is shown to shift the chemical equilibrium and the CJ conditions significantly.

  18. Evaluation of the phase properties of hydrating cement composite using simulated nanoindentation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautham, S.; Sindu, B. S.; Sasmal, Saptarshi

    2017-10-01

    Properties and distribution of the products formed during the hydration of cementitious composite at the microlevel are investigated using a nanoindentation technique. First, numerical nanoindentation using nonlinear contact mechanics is carried out on three different phase compositions of cement paste, viz. mono-phase Tri-calcium Silicate (C3S), Di-calcium Silicate (C2S) and Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) individually), bi-phase (C3S-CSH, C2S-CSH) and multi-phase (more than 10 individual phases including water pores). To reflect the multi-phase characteristics of hydrating cement composite, a discretized multi-phase microstructural model of cement composite during the progression of hydration is developed. Further, a grid indentation technique for simulated nanoindentation is established, and employed to evaluate the mechanical characteristics of the hydrated multi-phase cement paste. The properties obtained from the numerical studies are compared with those obtained from experimental grid nanoindentation. The influence of composition and distribution of individual phase properties on the properties obtained from indentation are closely investigated. The study paves the way to establishing the procedure for simulated grid nanoindentation to evaluate the mechanical properties of heterogeneous composites, and facilitates the design of experimental nanoindentation.

  19. The Experiment and Numerical Simulation of Composite Countersunk-head Fasteners Pull-through Mechanical Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Junwu; Guan, Zhidong; Bian, Tianya; Li, Zengshan; Wang, Kailun; Liu, Sui

    2014-10-01

    Fasteners made of the anisotropic carbon/carbon (C/C) composite material have been developed for joining C/C composite material components in the high-temperature environment. The fastener specimens are fabricated from the C/C composites which are made from laminated carbon cloths with Z-direction carbon fibers being punctured as perform. Densification process cycles such as the thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) technology were repeated to obtain high density C/C composites fastener. The fasteners were machined parallel to the carbon cloths (X-Y direction). A method was proposed to test pull-through mechanical behavior of the countersunk-head C/C composite material fasteners. The damage morphologies of the fasteners were observed through the charge coupled device (CCD) and the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The internal micro-structure were observed through the high-resolution Mirco-CT systems. Finally, an excellent simulation of the C/C composite countersunk-head fasteners were performed with the finite element method (FEM), in which the damage evolution model of the fastener was established based on continuum damage mechanics. The simulation is correspond well with the test result . The damage evolution process and the relation between the countersunk depth and the ultimate load was investigated.

  20. Simulations and measurements of annealed pyrolytic graphite-metal composite baseplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streb, F.; Ruhl, G.; Schubert, A.; Zeidler, H.; Penzel, M.; Flemmig, S.; Todaro, I.; Squatrito, R.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the usability of anisotropic materials as inserts in aluminum-matrix-composite baseplates for typical high performance power semiconductor modules using finite-element simulations and transient plane source measurements. For simulations, several physical modules can be used, which are suitable for different thermal boundary conditions. By comparing different modules and options of heat transfer we found non-isothermal simulations to be closest to reality for temperature distribution at the surface of the heat sink. We optimized the geometry of the graphite inserts for best heat dissipation and based on these results evaluated the thermal resistance of a typical power module using calculation time optimized steady-state simulations. Here we investigated the influence of thermal contact conductance (TCC) between metal matrix and inserts on the heat dissipation. We found improved heat dissipation compared to the plain metal baseplate for a TCC of 200 kW/m2/K and above.To verify the simulations we evaluated cast composite baseplates with two different insert geometries and measured their averaged lateral thermal conductivity using a transient plane source (HotDisk) technique at room temperature. For the composite baseplate we achieved local improvements in heat dissipation compared to the plain metal baseplate.

  1. On the Design, Characterization and Simulation of Hybrid Metal-Composite Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kießling, R.; Ihlemann, J.; Pohl, M.; Stommel, M.; Dammann, C.; Mahnken, R.; Bobbert, M.; Meschut, G.; Hirsch, F.; Kästner, M.

    2017-02-01

    Multi-material lightweight designs are a key feature for the development of innovative and resource-efficient products. In the development of a hybrid composite, the interface between the joined components has to be considered in detail as it represents a typical location of the initialization of failure. This contribution gives an overview of the simulative engineering of metal-composite interfaces. To this end, several design aspects on the microscale and macroscale are explained and methods to model the mechanical behavior of the interface within finite element simulations. This comprises the utilization of cohesive elements with a continuum description of the interface. Likewise, traction-separation based cohesive elements, i.e. a zero-thickness idealization of the interface, are outlined and applied to a demonstration example. Within these finite element simulations, the constitutive behavior of the connected components has to be described by suitable material models. Therefore, inelastic material models at large strains are formulated based on rheological models.

  2. Verification of the isotopic composition of precipitation simulated by a regional isotope circulation model over Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Masahiro; Ichiyanagi, Kimpei; Yoshimura, Kei

    2016-01-01

    The isotopic composition (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) of precipitation simulated by a regional isotope circulation model with a horizontal resolution of 10, 30 and 50 km was compared with observations at 56 sites over Japan in 2013. All simulations produced reasonable spatio-temporal variations in δ(18)O in precipitation over Japan, except in January. In January, simulated δ(18)O values in precipitation were higher than observed values on the Pacific side of Japan, especially during an explosively developing extratropical cyclone event. This caused a parameterisation of precipitation formulation about the large fraction of precipitated water to liquid detrained water in the lower troposphere. As a result, most water vapour that transported from the Sea of Japan precipitated on the Sea of Japan side. The isotopic composition of precipitation was a useful verification tool for the parameterisation of precipitation formulation as well as large-scale moisture transport processes in the regional isotope circulation model.

  3. [Surface roughness and gloss of novel flowable composites after polishing and simulated brushing wear].

    PubMed

    Wang, R L; Yuan, C Y; Pan, Y X; Tian, F C; Wang, Z H; Wang, X Y

    2017-04-09

    Objective: To investigate surface properties of novel flowable composites after polishing and simulated brushing wear, compared to their pasty counterpart. Methods: Composites employed in this study were: three flowable composites (A1: Clearfil Majesty ES Flow; B1: Beautifil Flow Plus F00; C1: Filtek Bulk Fill) and three paste composites (A2: Clearfil Majesty; B2: Beautifil; C2: Filtek Z350. Eleven disk-shaped specimens were made for each material. The specimens were cured, then subjected to sandpaper finishing for 20 s, one-step polishing for 30 s, finally subjected to simulated brushing for 10 000 cycles. Surface roughness and glossiness were measured before finishing, after finishing, after polishing, after 5 000 brushing cycles and after 10 000 brushing cycles, respectively. Data obtained were analyzed using two-way ANOVA method. Scanning electron microscope was employed to examine the microscopic appearance of each material. Results: Surface roughness (0.11~0.22 μm) and glossiness (74.25~86.48 GU) of each material were similar after one-step polishing. After brushing simulation, roughness increased significantly and glossiness decreased significantly for each material (P<0.05). Group A1 presented the best gloss ([50.68±1.58] GU) after final wear (P<0.05). Flowable composites of group A1 and B1 tested in the present setup showed better surface properties compared to their pasty counterpart (group A2 and B2). Conclusions: Within the limit of this study, flowable composites tested in the present research can obtain similar surface polish or even better than the paste composite counterpart.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion of gases in a carbon-nanotube-polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seong Y.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Kim, Nayong

    2007-07-01

    Extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to compute the solubilities and self-diffusivities of CO2 and CH4 in amorphous polyetherimide (PEI) and mixed-matrix PEI generated by inserting single-walled carbon nanotubes into the polymer. Atomistic models of PEI and its composites were generated using energy minimizations, MD simulations, and the polymer-consistent force field. Two types of polymer composite were generated by inserting (7,0) and (12,0) zigzag carbon nanotubes into the PEI structure. The morphologies of PEI and its composites were characterized by their densities, radial distribution functions, and the accessible free volumes, which were computed with probe molecules of different sizes. The distributions of the cavity volumes were computed using the Voronoi tessellation method. The computed self-diffusivities of the gases in the polymer composites are much larger than those in pure PEI. We find, however, that the increase is not due to diffusion of the gases through the nanotubes which have smooth energy surfaces and, therefore, provide fast transport paths. Instead, the MD simulations indicate a squeezing effect of the nanotubes on the polymer matrix that changes the composite polymers’ free-volume distributions and makes them more sharply peaked. The presence of nanotubes also creates several cavities with large volumes that give rise to larger diffusivities in the polymer composites. This effect is due to the repulsive interactions between the polymer and the nanotubes. The solubilities of the gases in the polymer composites are also larger than those in pure PEI, hence indicating larger gas permeabilities for mixed-matrix PEI than PEI itself.

  5. Silver migration from nanosilver and a commercially available zeolite filler polyethylene composites to food simulants.

    PubMed

    Cushen, M; Kerry, J; Morris, M; Cruz-Romero, M; Cummins, E

    2014-01-01

    Polyethylene composites containing Agion(TM) commercial silver ion filler at three different percentage fill rates (0.5, 1.0 and 2% w/w) and polyethylene composites containing laboratory produced silver nanoparticles (Agnps) at two different percentage fill rates (0.1 and 0.5% w/w) underwent migration tests according to Commission Regulation (EU) No. 10/2011. Migrated silver in the two simulants (acidified water with 3% acetic acid and distilled water) was quantified using two techniques: inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES) and Hach Lange spectroscopy. The former had higher sensitivity with mean silver migration from Agion composites (n = 12) ranging from < 0.001 to 1.50 × 10(-2) mg l(-1). Mean silver migration from Agnps composites ranged from 4.65 × 10(-2) to 0.38 mg l(-1) and 8.92 × 10(-2) and 5.15 × 10(-2) mg l(-1) for Hach Lange spectrophotometry and ICPAES, respectively. Both percentage fill rate in the composite and the simulant type, as factors, were found to be significant in both silver migration from Agion (p < 0.0001 and < 0.01, respectively) and Agnps (p < 0.05 and < 0.01, respectively). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imagery showed differences in size distributions and morphology of particles (shape and degree of agglomeration) before and after migration. PE composites containing 0.5% Agion, simulating contact with non-acidic foods, was the only scenario that did not exceed the permitted migration level of non-authorised substances given in EU 10/2011. This study illustrates the need for careful engineering of the composite filler system to conform to limits with cognisance of food pH and percentage fill rate.

  6. Implementation science in the real world: a streamlined model.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Herschel; Anaya, Henry D

    2012-01-01

    The process of quality improvement may involve enhancing or revising existing practices or the introduction of a novel element. Principles of Implementation Science provide key theories to guide these processes, however, such theories tend to be highly technical in nature and do not provide pragmatic nor streamlined approaches to real-world implementation. This paper presents a concisely comprehensive six step theory-based Implementation Science model that we have successfully used to launch more than two-dozen self-sustaining implementations. In addition, we provide an abbreviated case study in which we used our streamlined theoretical model to successfully guide the development and implementation of an HIV testing/linkage to care campaign in homeless shelter settings in Los Angeles County.

  7. Genome streamlining and chemical defense in a coral reef symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Jason C.; Donia, Mohamed S.; Han, Andrew W.; Hirose, Euichi; Haygood, Margo G.; Schmidt, Eric W.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are ubiquitous in bacteria, but by definition, they are thought to be nonessential. Highly toxic secondary metabolites such as patellazoles have been isolated from marine tunicates, where their exceptional potency and abundance implies a role in chemical defense, but their biological source is unknown. Here, we describe the association of the tunicate Lissoclinum patella with a symbiotic α-proteobacterium, Candidatus Endolissoclinum faulkneri, and present chemical and biological evidence that the bacterium synthesizes patellazoles. We sequenced and assembled the complete Ca. E. faulkneri genome, directly from metagenomic DNA obtained from the tunicate, where it accounted for 0.6% of sequence data. We show that the large patellazoles biosynthetic pathway is maintained, whereas the remainder of the genome is undergoing extensive streamlining to eliminate unneeded genes. The preservation of this pathway in streamlined bacteria demonstrates that secondary metabolism is an essential component of the symbiotic interaction. PMID:23185008

  8. Streamlining: Reducing costs and increasing STS operations effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersburg, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    The development of streamlining as a concept, its inclusion in the space transportation system engineering and operations support (STSEOS) contract, and how it serves as an incentive to management and technical support personnel is discussed. The mechanics of encouraging and processing streamlining suggestions, reviews, feedback to submitters, recognition, and how individual employee performance evaluations are used to motivation are discussed. Several items that were implemented are mentioned. Information reported and the methodology of determining estimated dollar savings are outlined. The overall effect of this activity on the ability of the McDonnell Douglas flight preparation and mission operations team to support a rapidly increasing flight rate without a proportional increase in cost is illustrated.

  9. Streamlining: Reducing costs and increasing STS operations effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersburg, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    The development of streamlining as a concept, its inclusion in the space transportation system engineering and operations support (STSEOS) contract, and how it serves as an incentive to management and technical support personnel is discussed. The mechanics of encouraging and processing streamlining suggestions, reviews, feedback to submitters, recognition, and how individual employee performance evaluations are used to motivation are discussed. Several items that were implemented are mentioned. Information reported and the methodology of determining estimated dollar savings are outlined. The overall effect of this activity on the ability of the McDonnell Douglas flight preparation and mission operations team to support a rapidly increasing flight rate without a proportional increase in cost is illustrated.

  10. Streamlined purification of plasmid DNA from prokaryotic cultures.

    PubMed

    Pueschel, Laura; Li, Hongshan; Hymes, Matthew

    2011-01-05

    We describe the complete process of AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates for 96 plasmid preparations, starting from prokaryotic culture and ending with high purity DNA. Based on multi-well filtration for bacterial lysate clearance and DNA purification, this method creates a streamlined process for plasmid preparation. Filter plates containing silica-based media can easily be processed by vacuum filtration or centrifuge to yield appreciable quantities of plasmid DNA. Quantitative analyses determine the purified plasmid DNA is consistently of high quality with average OD(260/280;) ratios of 1.97. Overall, plasmid yields offer more pure DNA for downstream applications, such as sequencing and cloning. This streamlined method of using AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates allows for manual, semi-automated or fully-automated processing.

  11. Streamlined Purification of Plasmid DNA From Prokaryotic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pueschel, Laura; Li, Hongshan; Hymes, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    We describe the complete process of AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates for 96 plasmid preparations, starting from prokaryotic culture and ending with high purity DNA. Based on multi-well filtration for bacterial lysate clearance and DNA purification, this method creates a streamlined process for plasmid preparation. Filter plates containing silica-based media can easily be processed by vacuum filtration or centrifuge to yield appreciable quantities of plasmid DNA. Quantitative analyses determine the purified plasmid DNA is consistently of high quality with average OD260/280 ratios of 1.97. Overall, plasmid yields offer more pure DNA for downstream applications, such as sequencing and cloning. This streamlined method of using AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates allows for manual, semi-automated or fully-automated processing. PMID:21248696

  12. Zephyr: A secure Internet process to streamline engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.W.; Niven, W.A.; Cavitt, R.E.

    1998-05-12

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is implementing an Internet-based process pilot called `Zephyr` to streamline engineering and commerce using the Internet. Major benefits have accrued by using Zephyr in facilitating industrial collaboration, speeding the engineering development cycle, reducing procurement time, and lowering overall costs. Programs at LLNL are potentializing the efficiencies introduced since implementing Zephyr. Zephyr`s pilot functionality is undergoing full integration with Business Systems, Finance, and Vendors to support major programs at the Laboratory.

  13. Zephyr: an internet-based process to streamline engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, F A; Cavitt, R E; Jordan, C W; Mauvais, M J; Niven, W A; Taylor, J M; Taylor, S S; Vickers, D L; Warren, F E; Weaver, R L

    1998-07-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is implementing an Internet-based process pilot called 'Zephyr' to streamline engineering and commerce using the internet. Major benefits have accrued by using Zephyr in facilitating industrial collaboration, speeding the engineering development cycle, reducing procurement time, and lowering overall costs. Programs at LLNL are potentializing the efficiencies introduced since implementing Zephyr. Zephyr"s pilot functionality is undergoing full integration with Business Systems, Finance, and Vendors to support major programs at the Laboratory.

  14. Streamlining the Process of Acquiring Secure Open Architecture Software Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    streamline the acquisition process for secure OA software systems through a focus on doing more with limited resources. Along the way, we pay particular...SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 22 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...be missing this year is the active participation and networking that has been the hallmark of previous symposia. By purposely limiting attendance to

  15. Micromechanics analysis of space simulated thermal deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Space simulated thermally induced deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites were investigated with a micromechanics analysis. The investigation focused on two primary areas. First, available explicit expressions for predicting the effective coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) for a composite were compared with each other, and with a finite element (FE) analysis, developed specifically for this study. Analytical comparisons were made for a wide range of fiber/matrix systems, and predicted values were compared with experimental data. The second area of investigation focused on the determination of thermally induced stress fields in the individual constituents. Stresses predicted from the FE analysis were compared to those predicted from a closed-form solution to the composite cylinder (CC) model, for two carbon fiber/epoxy composites. A global-local formulation, combining laminated plate theory and FE analysis, was used to determine the stresses in multidirectional laminates. Thermally induced damage initiation predictions were also made.

  16. Simulation of Impact Phenomena on the Composite Structures Containing Ceramic Plates and High Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geantă, V.; Cherecheș, T.; Lixandru, P.; Voiculescu, I.; Ștefănoiu, R.; Dragnea, D.; Zecheru, T.; Matache, L.

    2017-06-01

    Due to excellent mechanical properties, high entropy alloys from the system AlxCrFeCoNi can be used successfully to create composite structures containing both metallic and ceramic plates, which resists at dynamic load during high speeds impact (like projectiles, explosion). The paper presents four different composite structures made from a combination of metallic materials and ceramics plates: duralumin-ceramics, duralumin-ceramics-HEA, HEA-ceramics-HEA, HEA-ceramics-duralumin. Numerical simulation of impact behavior of the composite structures was performed by virtual methods, taking into account the mechanical properties of both materials. The best results were obtained using composite structures HEA-ceramics-HEA, HEA-ceramics-duralumin.

  17. Numerical simulations of creep in ductile-phase toughened intermetallic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Henshall, G.A.; Strum, M.J.

    1994-04-07

    Analytical and finite element method (FEM) simulations of creep in idealized ductile-phase toughened intermetallic composites are described. For these strong-matrix materials, the two types of analyses predict similar time-independent composite creep rates if each phase individually exhibits only steady-state creep. The composite creep rate becomes increasingly higher than that of the monolithic intermetallic as the stress exponent of the intermetallic and the volume fraction and creep rate of the ductile phase increase. FEM analysis shows that the shape of the ductile phase does not affect the creep rate but may affect the internal stress and strain distributions, and thus damage accumulation rates. If primary creep occurs in one or both of the individual phases, the composite also exhibits primary creep. In this case, there can be significant deviations in the creep curves computed by the analytical and FEM models. The model predictions are compared with data for the Nb5Si3/Nb system.

  18. The Compositional Diversity of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets. I. In Situ Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Jade C.; O'Brien, David P.; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2010-06-01

    Extrasolar planet host stars have been found to be enriched in key planet-building elements. These enrichments have the potential to drastically alter the composition of material available for terrestrial planet formation. Here, we report on the combination of dynamical models of late-stage terrestrial planet formation within known extrasolar planetary systems with chemical equilibrium models of the composition of solid material within the disk. This allows us to determine the bulk elemental composition of simulated extrasolar terrestrial planets. A wide variety of resulting planetary compositions are found, ranging from those that are essentially "Earth like," containing metallic Fe and Mg silicates, to those that are dominated by graphite and SiC. This shows that a diverse range of terrestrial planets may exist within extrasolar planetary systems.

  19. THE COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY OF EXTRASOLAR TERRESTRIAL PLANETS. I. IN SITU SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Jade C.; Lauretta, Dante S.; O'Brien, David P.

    2010-06-01

    Extrasolar planet host stars have been found to be enriched in key planet-building elements. These enrichments have the potential to drastically alter the composition of material available for terrestrial planet formation. Here, we report on the combination of dynamical models of late-stage terrestrial planet formation within known extrasolar planetary systems with chemical equilibrium models of the composition of solid material within the disk. This allows us to determine the bulk elemental composition of simulated extrasolar terrestrial planets. A wide variety of resulting planetary compositions are found, ranging from those that are essentially 'Earth like', containing metallic Fe and Mg silicates, to those that are dominated by graphite and SiC. This shows that a diverse range of terrestrial planets may exist within extrasolar planetary systems.

  20. Simulation and experimental characterization of polymer/carbon nanotubes composites for strain sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vivo, B.; Lamberti, P.; Spinelli, G.; Tucci, V.; Vertuccio, L.; Vittoria, V.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a numerical model is presented in order to analyze the electrical characteristics of polymer composites filled by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) subject to tensile stress and investigate the possible usage of such materials as innovative sensors for small values of strain. The simulated mechano-electrical response of the nanocomposite is obtained through a multi-step approach which, through different modeling stages, provides a simple and effective tool for material analysis and design. In particular, at first, the morphological structures of the composites are numerically simulated by adopting a previously presented model based on a Monte Carlo procedure in which uniform distributions of the CNTs, approximated as of solid cylinders and ensuring some physical constraints, are dispersed inside a cubic volume representing the polymer matrix. Second, a geometrical analysis allows to obtain the percolation paths detected in the simulated structures. Suitable electrical networks composed by resistors and capacitors associated to the complex charge transport and polarization mechanisms occurring in the percolation paths are then identified. Finally, the variations of these circuit parameters, which are differently affected by the mechanical stresses applied to the composites, are considered to analyze the electromechanical characteristics of the composites and hence their performances as stress sensors. The proposed approach is used to investigate the impact on the electro-mechanical response of some physical properties of the base materials, such as the type of carbon nanotube, the height of energy barrier of polymer resin, as well as characteristics of the composite, i.e., the volume fraction of the filler. The tunneling effect between neighboring nanotubes is found to play a dominant role in determining the composite sensitivity to mechanical stresses. The simulation results are also compared with the experimental data obtained by performing stress tests on

  1. Bathymetry, electromagnetic streamlines and the marine controlled source electromagnetic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethick, Andrew 12Harris, Brett

    2014-07-01

    Seafloor topography must influence the strength and direction of electromagnetic fields generated during deep ocean controlled source electromagnetic surveying. Neither mathematical equation nor rules of thumb provide a clear perspective of how changes in water column thickness alters electromagnetic fields that engulf hundreds of cubic kilometres of air, ocean, host and reservoir. We use streamline visualisation to provide a generalised representation of how electromagnetic fields propagate into a 2D geo-electrical setting that includes strong bathymetry. Of particular interest are: (i)' dead zones' where electric fields at the ocean floor are demonstrated to be weak and (ii) the 'airwave' that appears in the electric field streamlines as circulating vortices with a shape that is clearly influenced by changes in ocean depth. Our analysis of the distribution of electric fields for deep and shallow water examples alludes to potential benefits from placement of receivers and/or transmitters higher in the water column as is the case for towed receiver geometries. Real-time streamline representation probably holds the most value at the survey planning stage, especially for shallow water marine EM surveys where ocean bottom topography is likely to be consequential.

  2. Using streamlines to visualize acoustic energy flow across boundaries.

    PubMed

    Chapman, David M F

    2008-07-01

    For spherical waves that radiate from a point source in a homogeneous fluid and propagate across a plane boundary into a dissimilar homogeneous fluid, the acoustic field may differ significantly from the geometric acoustic approximation if either the source or receiver is near the interface (in acoustic wavelengths) or if the stationary phase path is near the critical angle. In such cases, the entire acoustic field must be considered, including inhomogeneous waves associated with diffraction (i.e., those components that vanish with increasing frequency). The energy flow from a continuous-wave monopole point source across the boundary is visualized by tracing acoustic streamlines: those curves whose tangent at every point is parallel to the local acoustic intensity vector, averaged over a wave cycle. It is seen that the acoustic energy flow is not always in line with the "Snell's law" or stationary phase path. Also, plots of acoustic energy streamlines do not display unusual behavior in the vicinity of the critical angle. Finally, it is shown that there exists a law of refraction of acoustic energy streamlines at boundaries with density discontinuities analogous to Snell's law of refraction of ray paths across sound speed discontinuities. Examples include water-to-seabed transmission and water-to-air transmission.

  3. The self streamlining wind tunnel. [wind tunnel walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    A two dimensional test section in a low speed wind tunnel capable of producing flow conditions free from wall interference is presented. Flexible top and bottom walls, and rigid sidewalls from which models were mounted spanning the tunnel are shown. All walls were unperforated, and the flexible walls were positioned by screw jacks. To eliminate wall interference, the wind tunnel itself supplied the information required in the streamlining process, when run with the model present. Measurements taken at the flexible walls were used by the tunnels computer check wall contours. Suitable adjustments based on streamlining criteria were then suggested by the computer. The streamlining criterion adopted when generating infinite flowfield conditions was a matching of static pressures in the test section at a wall with pressures computed for an imaginary inviscid flowfield passing over the outside of the same wall. Aerodynamic data taken on a cylindrical model operating under high blockage conditions are presented to illustrate the operation of the tunnel in its various modes.

  4. Mineralization behavior and interface properties of BG-PVA/bone composite implants in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanxuan; Zheng, Yudong; Huang, Xiaoshan; Xi, Tingfei; Lin, Xiaodan; Han, Dongfei; Song, Wenhui

    2010-04-01

    Due to the non-bioactivity and poor conjunction performance of present cartilage prostheses, the main work here is to develop the bioactive glass-polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel articular cartilage/bone (BG-PVA/bone) composite implants. The essential criterion for a biomaterial to bond with living bone is well-matched mechanical properties as well as biocompatibility and bioactivity. In vitro studies on the formation of a surface layer of carbonate hydroxyl apatite (HCA) and the corresponding variation of the properties of biomaterials are imperative for their clinical application. In this paper, the mineralization behavior and variation of the interface properties of BG-PVA/bone composites were studied in vitro by using simulated body fluid (SBF). The mineralization and HCA layer formed on the interface between the BG-PVA hydrogel and bone in SBF could provide the composites with bioactivity and firmer combination. The compression property, shear strength and interface morphology of BG-PVA/bone composite implants varying with the immersion time in SBF were characterized. Also, the influence laws of the immersion time, content of BG in the composites and aperture of bones to the mineralization behavior and interface properties were investigated. The good mineralization behavior and enhanced conjunction performance of BG-PVA/bone composites demonstrated that this kind of composite implant might be more appropriate cartilage replacements.

  5. Composition, preparation, and gas generation results from simulated wastes of Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1994-08-01

    This document reviews the preparation and composition of simulants that have been developed to mimic the wastes temporarily stored in Tank 241-SY-101 at Hanford. The kinetics and stoichiometry of gases that are generated using these simulants are also compared, considering the roles of hydroxide, chloride, and transition metal ions; the identities of organic constituents; and the effects of dilution, radiation, and temperature. Work described in this report was conducted for the Flammable Gas Safety Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, (a) whose purpose is to develop information that is necessary to mitigate potential safety hazards associated with waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The goal of this research and of related efforts at the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is to determine the thermal and thermal/radiolytic mechanisms by which flammable and other gases are produced in Hanford wastes, emphasizing those stored in Tank 241-SY-101. A variety of Tank 241-SY-101 simulants have been developed to date. The use of simulants in laboratory testing activities provides a number of advantages, including elimination of radiological risks to researchers, lower costs associated with experimentation, and the ability to systematically alter simulant compositions to study the chemical mechanisms of reactions responsible for gas generation. The earliest simulants contained the principal inorganic components of the actual waste and generally a single complexant such as N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) or ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (EDTA). Both homogeneous and heterogeneous compositional forms were developed. Aggressive core sampling and analysis activities conducted during Windows C and E provided information that was used to design new simulants that more accurately reflected major and minor inorganic components.

  6. Streamline based design guideline for deterministic microfluidic hydrodynamic single cell traps

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Aditi; Smith, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A prerequisite for single cell study is the capture and isolation of individual cells. In microfluidic devices, cell capture is often achieved by means of trapping. While many microfluidic trapping techniques exist, hydrodynamic methods are particularly attractive due to their simplicity and scalability. However, current design guidelines for single cell hydrodynamic traps predominantly rely on flow resistance manipulation or qualitative streamline analysis without considering the target particle size. This lack of quantitative design criteria from first principles often leads to non-optimal probabilistic trapping. In this work, we describe an analytical design guideline for deterministic single cell hydrodynamic trapping through the optimization of streamline distributions under laminar flow with cell size as a key parameter. Using this guideline, we demonstrate an example design which can achieve 100% capture efficiency for a given particle size. Finite element modelling was used to determine the design parameters necessary for optimal trapping. The simulation results were subsequently confirmed with on-chip microbead and white blood cell trapping experiments. PMID:25825618

  7. Computational simulation of matrix micro-slip bands in SiC/Ti-15 composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, S. K.; Lee, H.-J.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation procedures are used to identify the key deformation mechanisms for (0)(sub 8) and (90)(sub 8) SiC/Ti-15 metal matrix composites. The computational simulation procedures employed consist of a three-dimensional finite-element analysis and a micromechanics based computer code METCAN. The interphase properties used in the analysis have been calibrated using the METCAN computer code with the (90)(sub 8) experimental stress-strain curve. Results of simulation show that although shear stresses are sufficiently high to cause the formation of some slip bands in the matrix concentrated mostly near the fibers, the nonlinearity in the composite stress-strain curve in the case of (90)(sub 8) composite is dominated by interfacial damage, such as microcracks and debonding rather than microplasticity. The stress-strain curve for (0)(sub 8) composite is largely controlled by the fibers and shows only slight nonlinearity at higher strain levels that could be the result of matrix microplasticity.

  8. Meso-Scale Damage Simulation of 3D Braided Composites under Quasi-Static Axial Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Mao, Chunjian; Zhou, Yexin

    2017-01-01

    The microstructure of 3D braided composites is composed of three phases: braiding yarn, matrix and interface. In this paper, a representative unit-cell (RUC) model including these three phases is established. Coupling with the periodical boundary condition, the damage behavior of 3D braided composites under quasi-static axial tension is simulated by using finite element method based on this RUC model. An anisotropic damage model based on Murakami damage theory is proposed to predict the damage evolution of yarns and matrix; a damage-friction combination interface constitutive model is adopted to predict the interface debonding behavior. A user material subroutine (VUMAT) involving these damage models is developed and implemented in the finite element software ABAQUS/Explicit. The whole process of damage evolution of 3D braided composites under quasi-static axial tension with typical braiding angles is simulated, and the damage mechanisms are revealed in detail in the simulation process. The tensile strength properties of the braided composites are predicted from the calculated stress-strain curves. Numerical results agree with the available experiment data and thus validates the proposed damage analysis model. The effects of certain material parameters on the predicted stress-strain responses are also discussed by numerical parameter study.

  9. Composite End Points in Acute Heart Failure Research: Data Simulations Illustrate the Limitations.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul M; Anstrom, Kevin J; Felker, G Michael; Ezekowitz, Justin A

    2016-11-01

    Composite end points are frequently used in clinical trials of investigational treatments for acute heart failure, eg, to boost statistical power and reduce the overall sample size. By incorporating multiple and varying types of clinical outcomes they provide a test for the overall efficacy of the treatment. Our objective is to compare the performance of popular composite end points in terms of statistical power and describe the uncertainty in these power estimates and issues concerning implementation. We consider several composites that incorporate outcomes of varying types (eg, time to event, categorical, and continuous). Data are simulated for 5 outcomes, and the composites are derived and compared. Power is evaluated graphically while varying the size of the treatment effects, thus describing the sensitivity of power to varying circumstances and eventualities such as opposing effects. The average z score offered the most power, although caution should be exercised when opposing effects are anticipated. Results emphasize the importance of an a priori assessment of power and scientific basis for construction, including the weighting of individual outcomes deduced from data simulations. The interpretation of a composite should be made alongside results from the individual components. The average z score offers the most power, but this should be considered in the research context and is not without its limitations. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Multi-scale simulations of apatite-collagen composites: from molecules to materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2017-03-01

    We review scale-bridging simulation studies for the exploration of atomicto-meso scale processes that account for the unique structure and mechanic properties of apatite-protein composites. As the atomic structure and composition of such complex biocomposites only partially is known, the first part (i) of our modelling studies is dedicated to realistic crystal nucleation scenarios of inorganic-organic composites. Starting from the association of single ions, recent insights range from the mechanisms of motif formation, ripening reactions and the self-organization of nanocrystals, including their interplay with growth-controlling molecular moieties. On this basis, (ii) reliable building rules for unprejudiced scale-up models can be derived to model bulk materials. This is exemplified for (enamel-like) apatite-protein composites, encompassing up to 106 atom models to provide a realistic account of the 10 nm length scale, whilst model coarsening is used to reach μm length scales. On this basis, a series of deformation and fracture simulation studies were performed and helped to rationalize biocomposite hardness, plasticity, toughness, self-healing and fracture mechanisms. Complementing experimental work, these modelling studies provide particularly detailed insights into the relation of hierarchical composite structure and favorable mechanical properties.

  11. Multi-scale simulations of apatite-collagen composites: from molecules to materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    We review scale-bridging simulation studies for the exploration of atomicto-meso scale processes that account for the unique structure and mechanic properties of apatite-protein composites. As the atomic structure and composition of such complex biocomposites only partially is known, the first part (i) of our modelling studies is dedicated to realistic crystal nucleation scenarios of inorganic-organic composites. Starting from the association of single ions, recent insights range from the mechanisms of motif formation, ripening reactions and the self-organization of nanocrystals, including their interplay with growth-controlling molecular moieties. On this basis, (ii) reliable building rules for unprejudiced scale-up models can be derived to model bulk materials. This is exemplified for (enamel-like) apatite-protein composites, encompassing up to 106 atom models to provide a realistic account of the 10 nm length scale, whilst model coarsening is used to reach μm length scales. On this basis, a series of deformation and fracture simulation studies were performed and helped to rationalize biocomposite hardness, plasticity, toughness, self-healing and fracture mechanisms. Complementing experimental work, these modelling studies provide particularly detailed insights into the relation of hierarchical composite structure and favorable mechanical properties.

  12. Full-Scale Crash Test and Finite Element Simulation of a Composite Prototype Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2003-01-01

    A full-scale crash test of a prototype composite helicopter was performed at the Impact Dynamics Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center in 1999 to obtain data for validation of a finite element crash simulation. The helicopter was the flight test article built by Sikorsky Aircraft during the Advanced Composite Airframe Program (ACAP). The composite helicopter was designed to meet the stringent Military Standard (MIL-STD-1290A) crashworthiness criteria and was outfitted with two crew and two troop seats and four anthropomorphic dummies. The test was performed at 38-ft/s vertical and 32.5-ft/s horizontal velocity onto a rigid surface. An existing modal-vibration model of the Sikorsky ACAP helicopter was converted into a model suitable for crash simulation. A two-stage modeling approach was implemented and an external user-defined subroutine was developed to represent the complex landing gear response. The crash simulation was executed with a nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Predictions of structural deformation and failure, the sequence of events, and the dynamic response of the airframe structure were generated and the numerical results were correlated with the experimental data to validate the simulation. The test results, the model development, and the test-analysis correlation are described.

  13. Convectively coupled Kelvin waves in aquachannel simulations: 1. Propagation speeds, composite structures, and comparison with aquaplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Joaquín. E.; Nolan, David S.; Tulich, Stefan N.

    2016-10-01

    Convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) represent a significant contribution to the total variability of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). This study analyzes the structure and propagation of CCKWs simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using two types of idealized domains. These are the "aquachannel," a flat rectangle on a beta plane with zonally periodic boundary conditions and length equal to the Earth's circumference at the equator, and the "aquapatch," a square domain with zonal extent equal to one third of the aquachannel's length. A series of simulations are performed, including a doubly nested aquapatch, in which convection is solved explicitly along the equator. The model intercomparison is carried out throughout the use of several techniques such as power spectra, filtering, wave tracking, and compositing, and it is extended to some simulations from the Aquaplanet Experiment (APE). Results show that despite the equatorial superrotation bias produced by the WRF simulations, the CCKWs simulated with this model propagate with similar phase speeds (relative to the low-level mean flow) as the corresponding waves from the APE simulations. Horizontal and vertical structures of the CCKWs simulated with aquachannels are also in overall good agreement with those from aquaplanet simulations and observations, although there is a distortion of the zonal extent of anomalies when the shorter aquapatch is used.

  14. Optimization of VO2 nanowire polymer composite thermochromic films by optical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoi, Yuki; Amano, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Thermochromic films with high efficiency, transparency, and flexibility are highly desirable for energy-efficient smart window films. Vanadium oxide (VO2)-nanoparticle-embedded flexible polymer composite films are the most promising thermochromic films because of the sharp phase transition of insulating to metallic phases of VO2 at 68 °C with visible transparency and a large change in transmittance at near-infrared wavelengths before and after the metal-insulator phase transition. This paper describes the simulation of high-efficiency thermochromic polymer composite films embedded with VO2 nanoparticles of various sizes to investigate the optimum VO2 nanowire size and length.

  15. Microcracking in Composite Laminates: Simulation of Crack-Induced Ultrasound Attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, C. A. C.; Rogge, M. D.; Parker, F. R.

    2012-01-01

    Microcracking in composite laminates is a known precursor to the growth of inter-ply delaminations and larger scale damage. Microcracking can lead to the attenuation of ultrasonic waves due to the crack-induced scattering. 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) has been implemented to explore the scattering of ultrasonic waves due to microcracks in anisotropic composite laminates. X-ray microfocus computed tomography data was directly input into the EFIT simulation for these purposes. The validated anisotropic 3D EFIT code is shown to be a useful tool for exploring the complex multiple-scattering which arises from extensive microcracking.

  16. Quantification of InxGa1-xP composition modulation by nanometric scale HAADF simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, C. E.; Gutiérrez, M.; Araújo, D.; Rodríguez-Messmer, E.

    2013-03-01

    Multijunction solar cell efficiency is highly sensitive to structural and chemical variations. These variations can be quantified at nm scale in InGaP/InGaAs/Ge multijunctions using transmission electron microscopy modes, e.g. diffraction contrast (DC-CTEM) and high angle annular dark field (STEM-HAADF). These studies determined the structure and the composition modulation of InGaP layers with sensitivity below 1% of In composition. To quantify the In-related variation, STEM-HAADF profiles are compared to numerically simulated ones. The fit with the experimental contrast shows local variations of 4.25%In for distances below 30 nm.

  17. Simulations of Fiber Distribution Effects in Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bolander, John E.; Lim, Yun Mook

    2008-02-15

    This paper describes a lattice model for coupled moisture transport/stress analyses of fiber-reinforced cement composites (FRCC). Each fiber, and its interface with the matrix material, is explicitly represented within the three-dimensional material volume. This enables the direct study of fiber orientation and distribution effects on composite performance. Realistic, nonuniform fiber distributions can be specified as model input. Basic applications of the model are presented, with emphasis toward simulating the durability mechanics of FRCC exposed to drying environments. The modeling of functionally graded FRCC is an obvious potential extension of this work.

  18. Simulations of Fiber Distribution Effects in Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolander, John E.; Lim, Yun Mook

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes a lattice model for coupled moisture transport/stress analyses of fiber-reinforced cement composites (FRCC). Each fiber, and its interface with the matrix material, is explicitly represented within the three-dimensional material volume. This enables the direct study of fiber orientation and distribution effects on composite performance. Realistic, nonuniform fiber distributions can be specified as model input. Basic applications of the model are presented, with emphasis toward simulating the durability mechanics of FRCC exposed to drying environments. The modeling of functionally graded FRCC is an obvious potential extension of this work.

  19. Deformation behavior of metallic glass composites reinforced with shape memory nanowires studied via molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şopu, D.; Stoica, M.; Eckert, J.

    2015-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the deformation behavior and mechanism of Cu64Zr36 composite structures reinforced with B2 CuZr nanowires are strongly influenced by the martensitic phase transformation and distribution of these crystalline precipitates. When nanowires are distributed in the glassy matrix along the deformation direction, a two-steps stress-induced martensitic phase transformation is observed. Since the martensitic transformation is driven by the elastic energy release, the strain localization behavior in the glassy matrix is strongly affected. Therefore, the composite materials reinforced with a crystalline phase, which shows stress-induced martensitic transformation, represent a route for controlling the properties of glassy materials.

  20. Multidisciplinary Simulation of Graphite-Composite and Cermet Fuel Elements for NTP Point of Departure Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Mark E.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares the expected performance of two Nuclear Thermal Propulsion fuel types. High fidelity, fluid/thermal/structural + neutronic simulations help predict the performance of graphite-composite and cermet fuel types from point of departure engine designs from the Nuclear Thermal Propulsion project. Materials and nuclear reactivity issues are reviewed for each fuel type. Thermal/structural simulations predict thermal stresses in the fuel and thermal expansion mis-match stresses in the coatings. Fluid/thermal/structural/neutronic simulations provide predictions for full fuel elements. Although NTP engines will utilize many existing chemical engine components and technologies, nuclear fuel elements are a less developed engine component and introduce design uncertainty. Consequently, these fuel element simulations provide important insights into NTP engine performance.

  1. Brownian dynamics simulations of colloidal suspensions containing polymers as precursors of composite electrodes for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Cerbelaud, Manuella; Lestriez, Bernard; Guyomard, Dominique; Videcoq, Arnaud; Ferrando, Riccardo

    2012-07-24

    Dilute aqueous suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and sodium carboxymethylcellulose salt (CMC) are studied experimentally and numerically by brownian dynamics simulations. The study focuses on the adsorption of CMC on silicon and on the aggregation state as a function of the suspension composition. To perform simulations, a coarse-grained model has first been developed for the CMC molecules. Then, this model has been applied to study numerically the behavior of suspensions of silicon and CMC. Simulation parameters have been fixed on the basis of experimental characterizations. Results of brownian dynamics simulations performed with our model are found in qualitative good agreement with experiments and allow a good description of the main features of the experimental behavior.

  2. Ecosystem composition changes over the past millennium: model simulations and comparison with paleoecological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Rollinson, C.; Dietze, M.; McLachlan, J. S.; Poulter, B.; Quaife, T. L.; Raiho, A.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Schaefer, K. M.; Steinkamp, J.; Moore, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Over multi-decadal to multi-centennial timescales, ecosystem function and carbon storage is largely influenced by vegetation composition. The predictability of ecosystem responses to climate change thus depends on the understanding of long-term community dynamics. Our study aims to quantify the influence of the most relevant ecological factors that control plant distribution and abundance, in contemporary terrestrial biosphere models and in paleo-records, and constrain the model processes and parameters with paleoecological data. We simulated vegetation changes at 6 sites in the northeastern United States over the past 1160 years using 7 terrestrial biosphere models and variations (CLM4.5-CN, ED2, ED2-LU, JULES-TRIFFID, LINKAGES, LPJ-GUESS, LPJ-wsl) driven by common paleoclimatic drivers. We examined plant growth, recruitment, and mortality (including other carbon turnover) of the plant functional types (PFTs) in the models, attributed the responses to three major factors (climate, competition, and disturbance), and estimated the relative effect of each factor. We assessed the model responses against plant-community theories (bioclimatic limits, niche difference, temporal variation and storage effect, and disturbance). We found that vegetation composition were sensitive to realized niche differences (e.g. differential growth response) among PFTs. Because many models assume unlimited dispersal and sometimes recruitment, the "storage effect" constantly affects community composition. Fire was important in determining the ecosystem composition, yet the vegetation to fire feedback was weak in the models. We also found that vegetation-composition changes in the simulations were driven to a much greater degree by growth as opposed to by turnover/mortality, when compared with those in paleoecological records. Our work suggest that 1) for forecasting slow changes in vegetation composition, we can use paleo-data to better quantify the realized niches of PFTs and associated

  3. Penetration of tungsten-alloy rods into composite ceramic targets: Experiments and 2-D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Z.; Dekel, E.; Hohler, V.; Stilp, A. J.; Weber, K.

    1998-07-01

    A series of terminal ballistics experiments, with scaled tungsten-alloy penetrators, was performed on composite targets consisting of ceramic tiles glued to thick steel backing plates. Tiles of silicon-carbide, aluminum nitride, titanium-dibroide and boron-carbide were 20-80 mm thick, and impact velocity was 1.7 km/s. 2-D numerical simulations, using the PISCES code, were performed in order to simulate these shots. It is shown that a simplified version of the Johnson-Holmquist failure model can account for the penetration depths of the rods but is not enough to capture the effect of lateral release waves on these penetrations.

  4. Simulation of Damage Evolution in Composites: A Phase-field Model

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.; Hu, Shenyang Y.

    2009-04-01

    First, a phase-field model for elastic-plastic solids obeying von Mises yield criterion will be described. Then, this phase-field model will be extended to simulate the damage evolution due to nucleation and growth of voids in ductile matrix for discontinuously reinforced composites. The role of reinforcement morphology and the modulus effects leading to final failure all included in the simulations in an effort to make a parametric investigation. The advantages and disadvantages of such phase-field modeling approach in comparison to well established other continuum methods will be elucidated.

  5. Nanoindentation of a new graphene/phospholipid composite: a numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Slepchenkov, M. M.; Shmygin, D. S.

    2017-02-01

    By means of an AMBER/AIREBO hybrid method we investigated indentation of layered graphene/phospholipids composite in which the individual phospholipid molecules arranged between the graphene layers. As a result of calculations it was established that such composite is characterized by negative enthalpy of formation. An armchair carbon nanotube approaching with the speed of 10 m/s to the considered composite was used as an indenter. During the simulation it was found that under the action of indenter upper graphene layer in the composite starts to sag, exerting the pressure on the phospholipids which are located under it. Under the influence of pressure phospholipids begins to move on graphene trying to get away from the indenter. Therefore, by placing the phospholipids under improvised press it is possible to achieve their selective localization on graphene platform. The results of the calculations of the total energy of the studied molecular system showed that the value of energy begins to increase as the tube penetration deep inside the composite, indicating the loss of the structure stability. It was found that the strength of the layered graphene/phospholipids composite will increase with the increase in the number of graphene layers.

  6. 3D finite element simulation of non-crimp fabric composites ultrasonic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Saffari, N.; Fromme, P.

    2012-05-01

    Composite materials offer many advantages for aerospace applications, e.g., good strength to weight ratio. Different types of composites, such as non-crimp fabrics (NCF), are currently being investigated as they offer reduced manufacturing costs and improved damage tolerance as compared to traditional pre-impregnated composite materials. NCF composites are made from stitched fiber bundles (tows), which typically have a width and thickness of less than a millimeter. This results in strongly inhomogeneous and anisotropic material properties. Different types of manufacturing imperfections, such as porosity, resin pockets, tow crimp and misalignment can lead to reduced material strength and thus to defects following excessive loads or impact, e.g., fracture and delaminations. The ultrasonic non-destructive testing of NCF composites is difficult, as the tow size is comparable to the wavelength, leading to multiple scattering in this inherently three-dimensional structure. For typical material properties and geometry of an NCF composite, a full three-dimensional Finite Element (FE) model has been developed in ABAQUS. The propagation of longitudinal ultrasonic waves has been simulated and the effect of multiple scattering at the fiber tows investigated. The influence of porosity in the epoxy matrix as a typical manufacturing defect on the ultrasonic wave propagation and attenuation has been studied.

  7. Simulation of ultrasonic NCF composites testing using 3D finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Saffari, N.; Fromme, P.

    2012-04-01

    Composite materials offer many advantages for aerospace applications, e.g., good strength to weight ratio. Different types of composites, such as non-crimp fabrics (NCF), are currently being investigated as they offer reduced manufacturing costs and improved damage tolerance as compared to traditional pre-impregnated composite materials. NCF composites are made from stitched fiber bundles (tows), which typically have a width and thickness in the order of millimeter. This results in strongly inhomogeneous and anisotropic material properties. Different types of manufacturing imperfections, such as porosity, resin pockets, tow crimp and misalignment can lead to reduced material strength and thus to defects following excessive loads or impact, e.g. fracture and delaminations. The ultrasonic non-destructive testing of NCF composites is difficult, as the tow size is comparable to the wavelength, leading to multiple scattering in this inherently three-dimensional structure. For typical material properties and geometry of an NCF composite, a full three-dimensional Finite Element (FE) model has been developed in ABAQUS. The propagation of longitudinal ultrasonic waves has been simulated and the effect of multiple scattering at the fiber tows investigated. The effect of porosity as a typical manufacturing imperfection has been considered. The potential for the detection and quantification of such defects is discussed based on the observed influence on the ultrasonic wave propagation and attenuation.

  8. Simulation Based Investigation of Hidden Delamination Damage Detection in CFRP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Guided wave (GW) based damage detection methods have shown promise in structural health monitoring (SHM) and hybrid SHM-nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. Much previous GW work in the aerospace field has been primarily focused on metallic materials, with a growing focus on composite materials. The work presented in this paper demonstrates how realistic three-dimensional (3D) GW simulations can aid in the development of GW based damage characterization techniques for aerospace composites. 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique is implemented to model GW interaction with realistic delamination damage. A local wavenumber technique is applied to simulation data in order to investigate the detectability of hidden delamination damage to enable accurate characterization of damage extent.

  9. Surface Roughness of Composite Resins after Simulated Toothbrushing with Different Dentifrices

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Bruna; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to evaluate, in vitro, the surface roughness of two composite resins submitted to simulated toothbrushing with three different dentifrices. Materials and Methods: Totally, 36 samples of Z350XT and 36 samples of Empress Direct were built and randomly divided into three groups (n = 12) according to the dentifrice used (Oral-B Pro-Health Whitening [OBW], Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief [CS], Colgate Total Clean Mint 12 [CT12]). The samples were submitted to 5,000, 10,000 or 20,000 cycles of simulated toothbrushing. After each simulated period, the surface roughness of the samples was measured using a roughness tester. Results: According to three-way analysis of variance, dentifrice (P = 0.044) and brushing time (P = 0.000) were significant. The composite resin was not significant (P = 0.381) and the interaction among the factors was not significant (P > 0.05). The mean values of the surface roughness (µm) followed by the same letter represent no statistical difference by Tukey's post-hoc test (P <0.05): Dentifrice: CT12 = 0.269a; CS Pro- Relief = 0.300ab; OBW = 0.390b. Brushing time: Baseline = 0,046ª; 5,000 cycles = 0.297b; 10,000 cycles = 0.354b; 20,000 cycles = 0.584c. Conclusion: Z350 XT and Empress Direct presented similar surface roughness after all cycles of simulated toothbrushing. The higher the brushing time, the higher the surface roughness of composite resins. The dentifrice OBW caused a higher surface roughness in both composite resins. PMID:26229362

  10. Surface Roughness of Composite Resins after Simulated Toothbrushing with Different Dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Bruna; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate, in vitro, the surface roughness of two composite resins submitted to simulated toothbrushing with three different dentifrices. Totally, 36 samples of Z350XT and 36 samples of Empress Direct were built and randomly divided into three groups (n = 12) according to the dentifrice used (Oral-B Pro-Health Whitening [OBW], Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief [CS], Colgate Total Clean Mint 12 [CT12]). The samples were submitted to 5,000, 10,000 or 20,000 cycles of simulated toothbrushing. After each simulated period, the surface roughness of the samples was measured using a roughness tester. According to three-way analysis of variance, dentifrice (P = 0.044) and brushing time (P = 0.000) were significant. The composite resin was not significant (P = 0.381) and the interaction among the factors was not significant (P > 0.05). The mean values of the surface roughness (µm) followed by the same letter represent no statistical difference by Tukey's post-hoc test (P <0.05): Dentifrice: CT12 = 0.269(a); CS Pro- Relief = 0.300(ab); OBW = 0.390(b). Brushing time: Baseline = 0,046ª; 5,000 cycles = 0.297(b); 10,000 cycles = 0.354(b); 20,000 cycles = 0.584(c). Z350 XT and Empress Direct presented similar surface roughness after all cycles of simulated toothbrushing. The higher the brushing time, the higher the surface roughness of composite resins. The dentifrice OBW caused a higher surface roughness in both composite resins.

  11. On composite-structure weaknesses: Part I. Simulation, properties, and numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xu-Dong

    2002-07-01

    Composite material samples were created by means of computer simulation to duplicate short-fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composites (MMCs). Each sample contains a fairly large number of Voronoi grains and ellipsoidal short fibers, which orient and distribute in a random manner, to mimic composite microstructures for investigating the coherent interconnections of composite-structure weaknesses (CSWs) with local microstructure. It is supposed that the samples are subjected to coupled boundary traction due to mechanical loading and thermal cycling. A Kröner-Kneer structure-based model and Waldvogel-Rodin algorithm were used for numerical computations of the mesoscopic stress distribution in constituent grains. The computations are based on the grain-volume average of local fields. Polycrystal elastic/thermal properties and effective elastic/thermal properties of simulated MMC samples were predicted, respectively, in terms of micromechanics models, in favor of incorporating the influences of macroscopic material properties on the formation of CSWs. An analytically-numerically-based approach is proposed for analyzing peak mesoscopic stress and strain distributions in short fibers. Three crucial aspects constitute a kernel of the approach, i.e., (1) segmentation of short fibers, (2) establishment of the geometric relations of a short fiber to the surrounding grains, and (3) the local nature of micromechanics. The analytically-numerically-based approach takes into account the grain orientation, fiber orientation, grain geometry, fiber geometry, and macroscopic properties of simulated MMC samples. The Numerical Assessment of Computer-Imitated Weaknesses-MMCs (NACIW-MMCs) software program has been developed for performing simulation of the microstructure of short-fiber-reinforced MMCs and executing all involved numerical computations.

  12. The Use of Sprint Interface Element Delamination Simulation of Sandwich Composite Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Geng; Yan, Renjun

    2016-12-01

    Sandwich composite beams have been more and more used in various industries because of their excellent mechanical properties. However, the mismatched performance between face sheet and foam core always lead to such as cracks and damages in the core or face/core interface during the processes of manufacturing or service. Delamination damage at the adhesive interface is the most dangerous and could be one main source that the mechanical capability of the structure is serous degenerated. In this paper, a simple and natural model to evaluate the stiffness of the spring interface elements, which is based on the physics and the geometry of the adhesive layers, is proposed. In order to validate the model, cantilever beam bending test were conducted for marine sandwich composite I-beam. A good comparison has been found between predictions and experimental results, and results indicate that the spring interface element can provide an efficient model for the delamination simulation of sandwich composite structures.

  13. Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings onto Carbon/carbon Composites in Simulated Body Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Jin-Ling; Bo, Wu; Hai, Zhou; Cao, Ning; Li, Mu-Sen

    Two types of hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings onto carbon/carbon composite (C/C composites) substrates, deposited by plasma spraying technique, were immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) in order to determine their behavior in conditions similar to the human blood plasma. Calcium ion concentration, pH value, microstructure, and phase compositions were analyzed. Results demonstrated that both the crystal Ca-P phases or the amorphous HA do dissolve slightly, and the dissolution of CaO phases in SBF was evident after 1 day of soaking. The calcium-ion concentration was decreased and the pH value of SBF was increased with the increasing of the immersing time. The precipitation was mainly composed of HA, which was verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron-probe microanalyzer.

  14. Simulating Progressive Damage of Notched Composite Laminates with Various Lamination Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, B.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2017-05-01

    A three dimensional finite element based progressive damage model has been developed for the failure analysis of notched composite laminates. The material constitutive relations and the progressive damage algorithms are implemented into finite element code ABAQUS using user-defined subroutine UMAT. The existing failure criteria for the composite laminates are modified by including the failure criteria for fiber/matrix shear damage and delamination effects. The proposed numerical model is quite efficient and simple compared to other progressive damage models available in the literature. The efficiency of the present constitutive model and the computational scheme is verified by comparing the simulated results with the results available in the literature. A parametric study has been carried out to investigate the effect of change in lamination scheme on the failure behaviour of notched composite laminates.

  15. An integrated computational framework for simulating the failure response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadian, Hossein; Liang, Bowen; Soghrati, Soheil

    2017-08-01

    A new computational framework is introduced for the automated finite element (FE) modeling of fiber reinforced composites and simulating their micromechanical behavior. The proposed methodology relies on a new microstructure reconstruction algorithm that implements the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) to generate an initial uniform distribution of fibers with desired volume fraction and size distribution in a repeating unit cell of the composite. The genetic algorithm (GA) is then employed to optimize locations of fibers such that they replicate the target spatial arrangement. We also use a non-iterative mesh generation algorithm, named conforming to interface structured adaptive mesh refinement (CISAMR), to create FE models of the CFRPC. The CVT-GA-CISAMR framework is then employed to investigate the appropriate size of the composite's representative volume element. We also study the strength and failure mechanisms in the CFRPC subject to varying uniaxial and mixed-mode loadings.

  16. Probabilistic Simulation of Progressive Fracture in Bolted-Joint Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, L.; Singhal, S. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes computational methods to probabilistically simulate fracture in bolted composite structures. An innovative approach that is independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness was used to simulate progressive fracture. The effect of design variable uncertainties on structural damage was also quantified. A fast probability integrator assessed the scatter in the composite structure response before and after damage. Then the sensitivity of the response to design variables was computed. General-purpose methods, which are applicable to bolted joints in all types of structures and in all fracture processes-from damage initiation to unstable propagation and global structure collapse-were used. These methods were demonstrated for a bolted joint of a polymer matrix composite panel under edge loads. The effects of the fabrication process were included in the simulation of damage in the bolted panel. Results showed that the most effective way to reduce end displacement at fracture is to control both the load and the ply thickness. The cumulative probability for longitudinal stress in all plies was most sensitive to the load; in the 0 deg. plies it was very sensitive to ply thickness. The cumulative probability for transverse stress was most sensitive to the matrix coefficient of thermal expansion. In addition, fiber volume ratio and fiber transverse modulus both contributed significantly to the cumulative probability for the transverse stresses in all the plies.

  17. Comprehensively simulating the mixed-mode progressive delamination in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhenyuan

    Delamination, or interlaminar debonding, is a commonly observed failure mechanism in composite laminates. It is of great significance to comprehensively simulate the mixed-mode progressive delamination in composite structures because by doing this, people can save a lot of effort in evaluating the safe load which a composite structure can endure. The objective of this thesis is to develop a numerical approach to simulating double-cantilever beam (DCB) and mixed-mode bending (MMB) tests and also of specifying/validating various cohesive models. A finite element framework, which consists of properly selecting time integration scheme (explicit dynamic), viscosity, load rate and mass scaling, is developed to yield converged and accurate results. Two illustrative cohesive laws (linear and power-law) are programmed with a user- defined material subroutine for ABAQUS/Explicit, VUMAT, and implemented into the finite element framework. Parameters defined in cohesive laws are studied to evaluate their effects on the predicted load-displacement curves. The finite element model, together with the predetermined model parameters, is found to be capable of producing converged and accurate results. The finite element framework, embedded with the illustrative cohesive laws, is found to be capable of handling various interfacial models. The present approach is concluded to be useful in simulating delamination with more sophisticated material models. Together with the method for determining model parameters, it can be used by computer codes other than ABAQUS.

  18. Tomography based numerical simulation of the demagnetizing field in soft magnetic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Arzbacher, S.; Petrasch, J.; Amann, P.; Weidenfeller, B.; Loerting, T.; Ostermann, A.

    2015-04-28

    The magneto-static behaviour of soft magnetic composites (SMCs) is investigated using tomography based direct numerical simulation. The microgeometry crucially affects the magnetic properties of the composite since a geometry dependent demagnetizing field is established inside the composite, which lowers the magnetic permeability. We determine the magnetic field information inside the SMC using direct numerical simulation of the magnetic field based on high resolution micro-computed tomography data of the SMC's microstructure as well as artificially generated data made of statistically homogeneous systems of identical fully penetrable spheres and prolate spheroids. Quasi-static electromagnetic behaviour and linear material response are assumed. The 3D magnetostatic Maxwell equations are solved using Whitney finite elements. Simulations show that clustering and percolation behaviour determine the demagnetizing factor of SMCs rather than the particle shape. The demagnetizing factor correlates with the slope of a 2-point probability function at its origin, which is related to the specific surface area of the SMC. Comparison with experimental results indicates that the relatively low permeability of SMCs cannot be explained by demagnetizing effects alone and suggests that the permeability of SMC particles has to be orders of magnitude smaller than the bulk permeability of the particle material.

  19. Composition and Simulation of Tank WM-180 Sodium Bearing Waste at INTEC

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Jerry Dale

    2001-04-01

    The 1-million liters of sodium-bearing waste in the WM-180 tank at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center has been concentrated and will be the first to be processed, at its current composition, by vitrification to prepare the radioactive waste for disposition. The waste has been sampled and analyzed for cations, anions, and radionuclides in the liquid and in the small amount of solids that were entrained with the liquid during sampling. The analytical results have been evaluated and a non-radioactive simulant composition and preparation procedure developed and demonstrated to result in a clear solution. The evaluation and results are reported here. This simulant is suitable for performing laboratory and pilot-scale tests in order to develop the vitrification technology. The solids entrained from the tank with the liquid sample amount to 0.06% of the dissolved solids in the liquid. While their elemental and radionuclide composition was determined, qualitative characterization using x-ray diffraction was not possible. Because of the interest in the properties of solids that may be in the bottom of the WM-180 tank, for tank closure activities, thermodynamic modeling was performed of potential precipitates that may be in equilibrium with the solution. The results were used to derive a possible chemical composition of the solids.

  20. A Numerical Method for Simulating the Microscopic Damage Evolution in Composites Under Uniaxial Transverse Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Jie; Zhao, Libin; Zhang, Jianyu; Liu, Zhanli

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new numerical method that combines a surface-based cohesive model and extended finite element method (XFEM) without predefining the crack paths is presented to simulate the microscopic damage evolution in composites under uniaxial transverse tension. The proposed method is verified to accurately capture the crack kinking into the matrix after fiber/matrix debonding. A statistical representative volume element (SRVE) under periodic boundary conditions is used to approximate the microstructure of the composites. The interface parameters of the cohesive models are investigated, in which the initial interface stiffness has a great effect on the predictions of the fiber/matrix debonding. The detailed debonding states of SRVE with strong and weak interfaces are compared based on the surface-based and element-based cohesive models. The mechanism of damage in composites under transverse tension is described as the appearance of the interface cracks and their induced matrix micro-cracking, both of which coalesce into transversal macro-cracks. Good agreement is found between the predictions of the model and the in situ experimental observations, demonstrating the efficiency of the presented model for simulating the microscopic damage evolution in composites.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of AP/HMX composite with a modified force field.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Xijun; Xiao, Jijun; Zhu, Weihua; Sun, Huai; Xiao, Heming

    2009-08-15

    An all-atom force field for ammonium perchlorate (AP) is developed with the framework of pcff force field. The structural parameters of AP obtained with the modified force field are in good agreement with experimental values. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to investigate AP/HMX (1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane) composite at different temperatures. The binding energies, thermal expansion coefficient, and the trigger bond lengths of HMX in the AP/HMX composite have been obtained. The binding energies of the system increase slightly with temperature increasing, peak at 245K, and then gradually decrease. The volume thermal expansion coefficient of the AP/HMX composite has been derived from the volume variation with temperature. As the temperature rises, the maximal lengths of the trigger bond N-NO(2) of HMX increase gradually. The simulated results indicate that the maximal length of trigger bond can be used as a criterion for judging the sensitivity of energetic composite.

  2. Using a personal digital assistant to streamline the OR workload.

    PubMed

    McCord, Lisa

    2003-12-01

    PERSONAL DIGITAL ASSISTANTS (PDAs), are handheld minicomputers used for tasks such as referencing, documentation, and data storage and retrieval. THESE DEVICES can help perioperative nurses solve problems associated with updating, maintaining, and retrieving surgical preference cards and accessing treatment and medication references. CHOOSING A PDA and accessories, finding basic software, and writing a perioperative nursing program can be painless, even for a novice. NURSING DOCUMENTATION can be accelerated and streamlined with the use of PDAs, which leaves perioperative nurses more time for quality patient care.

  3. Studies of self streamlining wind tunnel real and imaginary flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, S. W. D.; Goodyer, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Testing in the low speed flexible walled tunnel in an effort to explain the reasons for data discrepancies at high angles of attack are presented. Automated transonic test sections were developed. The flexible walled tunnel was used in a new operating mode to a generated curved flow around the airfoil, allowing the extraction of purely rotary derivatives. Some straight wall, low speed pressure data, for wall and model, which is used for checking interference correction methods were reported. Computer software which includes an old streamlining algorithm and a prediction algorithm was examined.

  4. Streamlining the NRC`s waste management program

    SciTech Connect

    Federline, M.V.

    1996-03-01

    In an effort to optimize protection of the public health and safety and the environment and minimize the burden on licensees in a period of declining budgets, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated efforts to streamline the licensing process in high-level waste, uranium recovery, and decommissioning program areas. In each of these areas the staff has evaluated the regulatory approach and identified improvements directed at enhancing public protection, improving public participation in the regulatory process, facilitating communication with licensees, and improving the timeliness of regulatory actions.

  5. Simulation of Thermographic Responses of Delaminations in Composites with Quadrupole Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Howell, Patricia A.; Cramer, K. Elliott

    2016-01-01

    The application of the quadrupole method for simulating thermal responses of delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites materials is presented. The method solves for the flux at the interface containing the delamination. From the interface flux, the temperature at the surface is calculated. While the results presented are for single sided measurements, with ash heating, expansion of the technique to arbitrary temporal flux heating or through transmission measurements is simple. The quadrupole method is shown to have two distinct advantages relative to finite element or finite difference techniques. First, it is straight forward to incorporate arbitrary shaped delaminations into the simulation. Second, the quadrupole method enables calculation of the thermal response at only the times of interest. This, combined with a significant reduction in the number of degrees of freedom for the same simulation quality, results in a reduction of the computation time by at least an order of magnitude. Therefore, it is a more viable technique for model based inversion of thermographic data. Results for simulations of delaminations in composites are presented and compared to measurements and finite element method results.

  6. Simulating the Response of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber. Part 2; Full-Scale Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Annett, Martin S.; Jackson, Karen E.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has sponsored research to evaluate an externally deployable composite honeycomb designed to attenuate loads in the event of a helicopter crash. The concept, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA), is an expandable Kevlar(Registered TradeMark) honeycomb. The DEA has a flexible hinge that allows the honeycomb to be stowed collapsed until needed during an emergency. Evaluation of the DEA began with material characterization of the Kevlar(Registered TradeMark)-129 fabric/epoxy, and ended with a full-scale crash test of a retrofitted MD-500 helicopter. During each evaluation phase, finite element models of the test articles were developed and simulations were performed using the dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA(Registered TradeMark). The paper will focus on simulations of two full-scale impact tests involving the DEA, a mass-simulator and a full-scale crash of an instrumented MD-500 helicopter. Isotropic (MAT24) and composite (MAT58) material models, which were assigned to DEA shell elements, were compared. Based on simulations results, the MAT58 model showed better agreement with test.

  7. [Combined simulated weightlessness and noise affect cell cycles and composition in rat thymocytes].

    PubMed

    Si, Shaoyan; Song, Shujun; Hua, Nan; Han, Haolun; Xu, Bingxin; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Chi; Wu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    To observe the combined effects of simulated weightlessness and noise on the cell cycles of thymocytes and cell compositions of thymus in rats and to explore the possible mechanism of immune function depression in space flight. SD rats were stimulated by simulated weightlessness and/or noise. On the 3rd, 7th and 14th day, the rats were weighed and then killed. The thymuses were taken, weighed and cell suspensions were made. Cell cycles and compositions in thymocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Compared with control group, the weights of rats were reduced in combined group and simulated weightlessness group, but the weights of rats increased or did not change in noise group. Rats in the three groups showed thymus atrophy. The ratio of cells increased in G0/G1 phase and decreased in S and G2/M phases. The ratios of CD4(-) CD8(-), CD4(+) CD8(-) and CD4(-) CD8(+) T lymphocytes increased and CD4(+) CD8(+) T lymphocytes decreased. However, these changes occurred at different time points in different groups. Simulated weightlessness and noise have significant effects on thymus, but the severity are different. The combined factors have superimposed effects. Maybe this is one of the reasons for depressed functions of T lymphocytes in space flight.

  8. Prediction of airfoil stall using Navier-Stokes equations in streamline coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, D. H.; Sohn, C. H.; Oh, C. S.

    1992-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes procedure to calculate the flow about an airfoil at incidence was developed. The parabolized equations are solved in the streamline coordinates generated for an arbitrary airfoil shape using conformal mapping. A modified k-epsilon turbulence model is applied in the entire domain, but the eddy viscosity in the laminar region is suppressed artificially to simulate the region correctly. The procedure was applied to airfoils at various angles of attack, and the results are quite satisfactory for both laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that the present choice of the coordinate system reduces the error due to numerical diffusion, and that the lift is accurately predicted for a wide range of incidence.

  9. Numerical simulation of two-dimensional heat transfer in composite bodies with application to de-icing of aircraft components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, D. F. K.

    1983-11-01

    Transient, numerical simulations of the de-icing of composite aircraft components by electrothermal heating were performed for a two dimensional rectangular geometry. The implicit Crank-Nicolson formulation was used to insure stability of the finite-difference heat conduction equations and the phase change in the ice layer was simulated using the Enthalpy method. The Gauss-Seidel point iterative method was used to solve the system of difference equations. Numerical solutions illustrating de-icer performance for various composite aircraft structures and environmental conditions are presented. Comparisons are made with previous studies. The simulation can also be used to solve a variety of other heat conduction problems involving composite bodies.

  10. A Selection of Composites Simulation Practices at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2007-01-01

    One of the major areas of study at NASA Langley Research Center is the development of technologies that support the use of advanced composite materials in aerospace applications. Amongst the supporting technologies are analysis tools used to simulate the behavior of these materials. This presentation will discuss a number of examples of analysis tools and simulation practices conducted at NASA Langley. The presentation will include examples of damage tolerance analyses for both interlaminar and intralaminar failure modes. Tools for modeling interlaminar failure modes include fracture mechanics and cohesive methods, whilst tools for modeling intralaminar failure involve the development of various progressive failure analyses. Other examples of analyses developed at NASA Langley include a thermo-mechanical model of an orthotropic material and the simulation of delamination growth in z-pin reinforced laminates.

  11. An Enriched Shell Finite Element for Progressive Damage Simulation in Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElroy, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    A formulation is presented for an enriched shell nite element capable of progressive damage simulation in composite laminates. The element uses a discrete adaptive splitting approach for damage representation that allows for a straightforward model creation procedure based on an initially low delity mesh. The enriched element is veri ed for Mode I, Mode II, and mixed Mode I/II delamination simulation using numerical benchmark data. Experimental validation is performed using test data from a delamination-migration experiment. Good correlation was found between the enriched shell element model results and the numerical and experimental data sets. The work presented in this paper is meant to serve as a rst milestone in the enriched element's development with an ultimate goal of simulating three-dimensional progressive damage processes in multidirectional laminates.

  12. 3D Simulation of the Growth of Alloy Semiconductor Quantum Dots Considering Morphological and Compositional Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junyan; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Narayanaswamy, Sridhar

    2012-02-01

    Fabrication of quantum dots (QDs) with high density may be realized by self-assembly via heteroepitaxial growth of thin films. Since the electronic and optoelectronic properties of QDs are sensitive to size, morphology, strain and especially composition, it is of great importance to control their composition profiles and morphology, and engineer the strain in them. Since the growth is a dynamic process, which carries out via surface diffusion driven primarily by strain relaxation and entropy change due to chemical intermixing, a strong coupling between morphological and composition evolutions during this process leads to a rather complex dynamics, which has not been fully understood. In this work, a 3-D finite element model is developed, which is capable of modeling the formation, self-assembly and coarsening of hetero-epitaxial alloy islands by considering the coupling of morphological and compositional evolution. Several interesting experimental observations, such as fast coarsening kinetics; asymmetries in composition profile and island shape; lateral motion of alloy islands have been observed in our simulations. Our model predictions have painted a rather complete picture for the entire dynamic evolution during the growth of nanoscale heteroepitaxial islands.

  13. Removal of arsenic from simulation wastewater using nano-iron/oyster shell composites.

    PubMed

    Fan, Liwei; Zhang, Shuili; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Hua; Lu, Zexiang; Wang, Siqun

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a nano-iron/oyster shell composite (NI/OS) was firstly prepared by an in-situ synthesis method to explore an efficient treatment technology for arsenic (As) contaminated wastewater. The micromorphologies and composition of the composite were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The effects of the preparation parameters, as well as the treatment conditions, on the removal of As(Ⅲ) were also investigated. The characterization results showed that iron nanoparticles with a diameter of 60 nm were introduced into the composite by an in-situ reduction method. The physicochemical properties of the iron nanoparticles, such as diameter and aggregation, were influenced by the iron source more than the choice of reductant and temperature in the synthesis process, and these properties were closely related to the treatment performance of the composite. Under the suitable reaction conditions of a pH value of 6.8, a temperature of 20 °C, and an initial concentration of As(Ⅲ) of 1.8 mg/L, As(Ⅲ) was almost completely removed from the simulation wastewater.

  14. Modeling of composite latex particle morphology by off-lattice Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Duda, Yurko; Vázquez, Flavio

    2005-02-01

    Composite latex particles have shown a great range of applications such as paint resins, varnishes, water borne adhesives, impact modifiers, etc. The high-performance properties of this kind of materials may be explained in terms of a synergistical combination of two different polymers (usually a rubber and a thermoplastic). A great variety of composite latex particles with very different morphologies may be obtained by two-step emulsion polymerization processes. The formation of specific particle morphology depends on the chemical and physical nature of the monomers used during the synthesis, the process temperature, the reaction initiator, the surfactants, etc. Only a few models have been proposed to explain the appearance of the composite particle morphologies. These models have been based on the change of the interfacial energies during the synthesis. In this work, we present a new three-component model: Polymer blend (flexible and rigid chain particles) is dispersed in water by forming spherical cavities. Monte Carlo simulations of the model in two dimensions are used to determine the density distribution of chains and water molecules inside the suspended particle. This approach allows us to study the dependence of the morphology of the composite latex particles on the relative hydrophilicity and flexibility of the chain molecules as well as on their density and composition. It has been shown that our simple model is capable of reproducing the main features of the various morphologies observed in synthesis experiments.

  15. Impact of filler size and distribution on roughness and wear of composite resin after simulated toothbrushing

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, Gabriela Ulian; MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; CHARANTOLA RODRIGUES, Marcela; FRANCO, Eduardo Batista; ISHIKIRIAMA, Sérgio Kiyoshi; WANG, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Nanofilled composite resins are claimed to provide superior mechanical properties compared with microhybrid resins. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare nanofilled with microhybrid composite resins. The null hypothesis was that the size and the distribution of fillers do not influence the mechanical properties of surface roughness and wear after simulated toothbrushing test. Material and methods Ten rectangular specimens (15 mm x 5 mm x 4 mm) of Filtek Z250 (FZ2), Admira (A), TPH3 (T),Esthet-X (EX), Estelite Sigma (ES), Concept Advanced (C), Grandio (G) and Filtek Z350 (F) were prepared according to manufacturer's instructions. Half of each top surface was protected with nail polish as control surface (not brushed) while the other half was assessed with five random readings using a roughness tester (Ra). Following, the specimens were abraded by simulated toothbrushing with soft toothbrushes and slurry comprised of 2:1 water and dentifrice (w/w). 100,000 strokes were performed and the brushed surfaces were re-analyzed. Nail polish layers were removed from the specimens so that the roughness (Ra) and the wear could be assessed with three random readings (µm). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's multiple-comparison test (α=0.05). Results Overall outcomes indicated that composite resins showed a significant increase in roughness after simulated toothbrushing, except for Grandio, which presented a smoother surface. Generally, wear of nanofilled resins was significantly lower compared with microhybrid resins. Conclusions As restorative materials suffer alterations under mechanical challenges, such as toothbrushing, the use of nanofilled materials seem to be more resistant than microhybrid composite resins, being less prone to be rougher and worn. PMID:23138735

  16. Impact of filler size and distribution on roughness and wear of composite resin after simulated toothbrushing.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gabriela Ulian de; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Charantola Rodrigues, Marcela; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Wang, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Nanofilled composite resins are claimed to provide superior mechanical properties compared with microhybrid resins. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare nanofilled with microhybrid composite resins. The null hypothesis was that the size and the distribution of fillers do not influence the mechanical properties of surface roughness and wear after simulated toothbrushing test. Ten rectangular specimens (15 mm x 5 mm x 4 mm) of Filtek Z250 (FZ2), Admira (A), TPH3 (T),Esthet-X (EX), estelite sigma (ES), concept advanced (C), Grandio (G) and Filtek Z350 (F) were prepared according to manufacturer's instructions. Half of each top surface was protected with nail polish as control surface (not brushed) while the other half was assessed with five random readings using a roughness tester (Ra). Following, the specimens were abraded by simulated toothbrushing with soft toothbrushes and slurry comprised of 2:1 water and dentifrice (w/w). 100,000 strokes were performed and the brushed surfaces were reanalyzed. Nail polish layers were removed from the specimens so that the roughness (Ra) and the wear could be assessed with three random readings (µm). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's multiple-comparison test (α=0.05). Overall outcomes indicated that composite resins showed a significant increase in roughness after simulated toothbrushing, except for Grandio, which presented a smoother surface. Generally, wear of nanofilled resins was significantly lower compared with microhybrid resins. As restorative materials suffer alterations under mechanical challenges, such as toothbrushing, the use of nanofilled materials seem to be more resistant than microhybrid composite resins, being less prone to be rougher and worn.

  17. Simulation of mechanical behavior and optimization of simulated injection molding process for PLA based antibacterial composite and nanocomposite bone screws using central composite design.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Behzad Shiroud; Oliaei, Erfan; Shayesteh, Hadi; Davachi, Seyed Mohammad; Hejazi, Iman; Seyfi, Javad; Bahrami, Mozhgan; Rashedi, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    In this study, injection molding of three poly lactic acid (PLA) based bone screws was simulated and optimized through minimizing the shrinkage and warpage of the bone screws. The optimization was carried out by investigating the process factors such as coolant temperature, mold temperature, melt temperature, packing time, injection time, and packing pressure. A response surface methodology (RSM), based on the central composite design (CCD), was used to determine the effects of the process factors on the PLA based bone screws. Upon applying the method of maximizing the desirability function, optimization of the factors gave the lowest warpage and shrinkage for nanocomposite PLA bone screw (PLA9). Moreover, PLA9 has the greatest desirability among the selected materials for bone screw injection molding. Meanwhile, a finite element analysis (FE analysis) was also performed to determine the force values and concentration points which cause yielding of the screws under certain conditions. The Von-Mises stress distribution showed that PLA9 screw is more resistant against the highest loads as compared to the other ones. Finally, according to the results of injection molding simulations, the design of experiments (DOE) and structural analysis, PLA9 screw is recommended as the best candidate for the production of biomedical materials among all the three types of screws.

  18. Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation of Ceramic Matrix Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The Finite Element Analysis-Micromechanics Analysis Code/Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (FEAMAC/CARES) program was used to characterize and predict the progressive damage response of silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix (SiC/RBSN) composite laminate tensile specimens. Studied were unidirectional laminates [0] (sub 8), [10] (sub 8), [45] (sub 8), and [90] (sub 8); cross-ply laminates [0 (sub 2) divided by 90 (sub 2),]s; angled-ply laminates [plus 45 (sub 2) divided by -45 (sub 2), ]s; doubled-edge-notched [0] (sub 8), laminates; and central-hole laminates. Results correlated well with the experimental data. This work was performed as a validation and benchmarking exercise of the FEAMAC/CARES program. FEAMAC/CARES simulates stochastic-based discrete-event progressive damage of ceramic matrix composite and polymer matrix composite material structures. It couples three software programs: (1) the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), (2) the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program (CARES/Life), and (3) the Abaqus finite element analysis program. MAC/GMC contributes multiscale modeling capabilities and micromechanics relations to determine stresses and deformations at the microscale of the composite material repeating-unit-cell (RUC). CARES/Life contributes statistical multiaxial failure criteria that can be applied to the individual brittle-material constituents of the RUC, and Abaqus is used to model the overall composite structure. For each FEAMAC/CARES simulation trial, the stochastic nature of brittle material strength results in random, discrete damage events that incrementally progress until ultimate structural failure.

  19. Eco-friendly streamlined process for sporopollenin exine capsule extraction.

    PubMed

    Mundargi, Raghavendra C; Potroz, Michael G; Park, Jae Hyeon; Seo, Jeongeun; Tan, Ee-Lin; Lee, Jae Ho; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-28

    Sporopollenin exine capsules (SECs) extracted from Lycopodium clavatum spores are an attractive biomaterial possessing a highly robust structure suitable for microencapsulation strategies. Despite several decades of research into SEC extraction methods, the protocols commonly used for L. clavatum still entail processing with both alkaline and acidolysis steps at temperatures up to 180 °C and lasting up to 7 days. Herein, we demonstrate a significantly streamlined processing regimen, which indicates that much lower temperatures and processing durations can be used without alkaline lysis. By employing CHN elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and dynamic image particle analysis (DIPA), the optimum conditions for L. clavatum SEC processing were determined to include 30 hours acidolysis at 70 °C without alkaline lysis. Extending these findings to proof-of-concept encapsulation studies, we further demonstrate that our SECs are able to achieve a loading of 0.170 ± 0.01 g BSA per 1 g SECs by vacuum-assisted loading. Taken together, our streamlined processing method and corresponding characterization of SECs provides important insights for the development of applications including drug delivery, cosmetics, personal care products, and foods.

  20. Eco-friendly streamlined process for sporopollenin exine capsule extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundargi, Raghavendra C.; Potroz, Michael G.; Park, Jae Hyeon; Seo, Jeongeun; Tan, Ee-Lin; Lee, Jae Ho; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Sporopollenin exine capsules (SECs) extracted from Lycopodium clavatum spores are an attractive biomaterial possessing a highly robust structure suitable for microencapsulation strategies. Despite several decades of research into SEC extraction methods, the protocols commonly used for L. clavatum still entail processing with both alkaline and acidolysis steps at temperatures up to 180 °C and lasting up to 7 days. Herein, we demonstrate a significantly streamlined processing regimen, which indicates that much lower temperatures and processing durations can be used without alkaline lysis. By employing CHN elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and dynamic image particle analysis (DIPA), the optimum conditions for L. clavatum SEC processing were determined to include 30 hours acidolysis at 70 °C without alkaline lysis. Extending these findings to proof-of-concept encapsulation studies, we further demonstrate that our SECs are able to achieve a loading of 0.170 ± 0.01 g BSA per 1 g SECs by vacuum-assisted loading. Taken together, our streamlined processing method and corresponding characterization of SECs provides important insights for the development of applications including drug delivery, cosmetics, personal care products, and foods.

  1. Analysis of Jupiter's Oval BA: A Streamlined Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sussman, Michael G.; Chanover, Nancy J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Beebe, Reta F.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel method of constructing streamlines to derive wind speeds within jovian vortices and demonstrate its application to Oval BA for 2001 pre-reddened Cassini flyby data, 2007 post-reddened New Horizons flyby data, and 1998 Galileo data of precursor Oval DE. Our method, while automated, attempts to combine the advantages of both automated and manual cloud tracking methods. The southern maximum wind speed of Oval BA does not show significant changes between these data sets to within our measurement uncertainty. The northern maximum dries appear to have increased in strength during this time interval, tvhich likely correlates with the oval's return to a symmetric shape. We demonstrate how the use of closed streamlines can provide measurements of vorticity averaged over the encircled area with no a priori assumptions concerning oval shape. We find increased averaged interior vorticity between pre- and post-reddened Oval BA, with the precursor Oval DE occupying a middle value of vorticity between these two.

  2. SafetyNet: Streamlining and Automating QA in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Scott W; Kessler, Marc L; Litzenberg, Dale W; Lee, Choonik; Irrer, Jim; Chen, Xiaoping; Acosta, Eduardo; Weyburne, Grant; Keranen, Wayne; Lam, Kwok; Covington, Elizabeth; Younge, Kelly C; Matuszak, Martha M; Moran, Jean M

    2016-01-08

    Proper quality assurance (QA) of the radiotherapy process can be time-consuming and expensive. Many QA efforts, such as data export and import, are inefficient when done by humans. Additionally, humans can be unreliable, lose attention, and fail to complete critical steps that are required for smooth operations. In our group we have sought to break down the QA tasks into separate steps and to automate those steps that are better done by software running autonomously or at the instigation of a human. A team of medical physicists and software engineers worked together to identify opportunities to streamline and automate QA. Development efforts follow a formal cycle of writing software requirements, developing software, testing and commissioning. The clinical release process is separated into clinical evaluation testing, training, and finally clinical release. We have improved six processes related to QA and safety. Steps that were previously performed by humans have been automated or streamlined to increase first-time quality, reduce time spent by humans doing low-level tasks, and expedite QA tests. Much of the gains were had by automating data transfer, implementing computer-based checking and automation of systems with an event-driven framework. These coordinated efforts by software engineers and clinical physicists have resulted in speed improvements in expediting patient-sensitive QA tests.

  3. Analysis of Jupiter's Oval BA: A Streamlined Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sussman, Michael G.; Chanover, Nancy J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Beebe, Reta F.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel method of constructing streamlines to derive wind speeds within jovian vortices and demonstrate its application to Oval BA for 2001 pre-reddened Cassini flyby data, 2007 post-reddened New Horizons flyby data, and 1998 Galileo data of precursor Oval DE. Our method, while automated, attempts to combine the advantages of both automated and manual cloud tracking methods. The southern maximum wind speed of Oval BA does not show significant changes between these data sets to within our measurement uncertainty. The northern maximum dries appear to have increased in strength during this time interval, tvhich likely correlates with the oval's return to a symmetric shape. We demonstrate how the use of closed streamlines can provide measurements of vorticity averaged over the encircled area with no a priori assumptions concerning oval shape. We find increased averaged interior vorticity between pre- and post-reddened Oval BA, with the precursor Oval DE occupying a middle value of vorticity between these two.

  4. Study of streamline flow in the portal system

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, H.L.; Deitch, J.S.; Oster, Z.H.; Perkes, E.A.

    1985-05-01

    The study was undertaken to determine if streamline flow occurs in the portal vein, thus separating inflow from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and the inferior mesenteric artery. Previously published data on this subject is inconsistent. Patients undergoing abdominal angiography received two administrations of Tc-99m sulfur colloid, first via the SMA during angiography and, after completion of the angiographic procedure, via a peripheral vein (IV). Anterior images of the liver were recorded over a three minute acquisition before and after the IV injection without moving the patient. The image from the SMA injection was subtracted from the SMA and IV image to provide a pure IV image. Analysis of R to L ratios for selected regions of interest as well as whole lobes was carried out and the shift of R to L (SMA to IV) determined. Six patients had liver metastases from the colon, four had cirrhosis and four had no known liver disease. The shift in the ratio was highly variable without a consistent pattern. Large changes in some patients could be attributed to hepatic artery flow directed to metastases. No consistent evidence for streamlining of portal flow was discerned.

  5. Eco-friendly streamlined process for sporopollenin exine capsule extraction

    PubMed Central

    Mundargi, Raghavendra C.; Potroz, Michael G.; Park, Jae Hyeon; Seo, Jeongeun; Tan, Ee-Lin; Lee, Jae Ho; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Sporopollenin exine capsules (SECs) extracted from Lycopodium clavatum spores are an attractive biomaterial possessing a highly robust structure suitable for microencapsulation strategies. Despite several decades of research into SEC extraction methods, the protocols commonly used for L. clavatum still entail processing with both alkaline and acidolysis steps at temperatures up to 180 °C and lasting up to 7 days. Herein, we demonstrate a significantly streamlined processing regimen, which indicates that much lower temperatures and processing durations can be used without alkaline lysis. By employing CHN elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and dynamic image particle analysis (DIPA), the optimum conditions for L. clavatum SEC processing were determined to include 30 hours acidolysis at 70 °C without alkaline lysis. Extending these findings to proof-of-concept encapsulation studies, we further demonstrate that our SECs are able to achieve a loading of 0.170 ± 0.01 g BSA per 1 g SECs by vacuum-assisted loading. Taken together, our streamlined processing method and corresponding characterization of SECs provides important insights for the development of applications including drug delivery, cosmetics, personal care products, and foods. PMID:26818918

  6. Stratified Flow Past a Hill: Dividing Streamline Concept Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Laura S.; Thompson, Michael Y.; Di Sabatino, Silvana; Fernando, Harindra J. S.

    2016-06-01

    The Sheppard formula (Q J R Meteorol Soc 82:528-529, 1956) for the dividing streamline height H_s assumes a uniform velocity U_∞ and a constant buoyancy frequency N for the approach flow towards a mountain of height h, and takes the form H_s/h=( {1-F} ) , where F=U_{∞}/Nh. We extend this solution to a logarithmic approach-velocity profile with constant N. An analytical solution is obtained for H_s/h in terms of Lambert-W functions, which also suggests alternative scaling for H_s/h. A `modified' logarithmic velocity profile is proposed for stably stratified atmospheric boundary-layer flows. A field experiment designed to observe H_s is described, which utilized instrumentation from the spring field campaign of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program. Multiple releases of smoke at F≈ 0.3-0.4 support the new formulation, notwithstanding the limited success of experiments due to logistical constraints. No dividing streamline is discerned for F≈ 10, since, if present, it is too close to the foothill. Flow separation and vortex shedding is observed in this case. The proposed modified logarithmic profile is in reasonable agreement with experimental observations.

  7. SafetyNet: streamlining and automating QA in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, Scott W.; Kessler, Marc L.; Litzenberg, Dale W.; Lee, Choonik; Irrer, Jim; Chen, Xiaoping; Acosta, Eduardo; Weyburne, Grant; Keranen, Wayne; Lam, Kwok; Covington, Elizabeth; Younge, Kelly C.; Matuszak, Martha M.; Moran, Jean M.

    2017-01-01

    Proper quality assurance (QA) of the radiotherapy process can be time-consuming and expensive. Many QA efforts, such as data export and import, are inefficient when done by humans. Additionally, humans can be unreliable, lose attention, and fail to complete critical steps that are required for smooth operations. In our group we have sought to break down the QA tasks into separate steps and to automate those steps that are better done by software running autonomously or at the instigation of a human. A team of medical physicists and software engineers worked together to identify opportunities to streamline and automate QA. Development efforts follow a formal cycle of writing software requirements, developing software, testing and commissioning. The clinical release process is separated into clinical evaluation testing, training, and finally clinical release. We have improved six processes related to QA and safety. Steps that were previously performed by humans have been automated or streamlined to increase first-time quality, reduce time spent by humans doing low-level tasks, and expedite QA tests. Much of the gains were had by automating data transfer, implementing computer-based checking and automation of systems with an event-driven framework. These coordinated efforts by software engineers and clinical physicists have resulted in speed improvements in expediting patient-sensitive QA tests. PMID:26894365

  8. Analysis of Jupiter’s Oval BA: A streamlined approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Michael G.; Chanover, Nancy J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Beebe, Reta F.

    2010-11-01

    We present a novel method of constructing streamlines to derive wind speeds within jovian vortices and demonstrate its application to Oval BA for 2001 pre-reddened Cassini flyby data, 2007 post-reddened New Horizons flyby data, and 1998 Galileo data of precursor Oval DE. Our method, while automated, attempts to combine the advantages of both automated and manual cloud tracking methods. The southern maximum wind speed of Oval BA does not show significant changes between these data sets to within our measurement uncertainty. The northern maximum does appear to have increased in strength during this time interval, which likely correlates with the oval's return to a symmetric shape. We demonstrate how the use of closed streamlines can provide measurements of vorticity averaged over the encircled area with no a priori assumptions concerning oval shape. We find increased averaged interior vorticity between pre- and post-reddened Oval BA, with the precursor Oval DE occupying a middle value of vorticity between these two.

  9. Spectral singularity in composite systems and simulation of laser resonant chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xizheng

    A non-Hermitian system with spectral singularity (SS) exhibits fascinating phenomena which never appear in a Hermitian system. We investigate the existence of SS for a composite system which is consisted of two separated scattering centers A and B embedded in a one-dimensional free space, one of which is non-Hermitian at last. We show that the composite system has a SS at kc if the reflection amplitudes rAkc and rBkc of two scattering centers satisfy the condition rRAkcrLBkce i 2kcxB -xA = 1 , based on the theorem proposed by Ali (PRL 102, 220402 (2009). Multi-scattering-centers generalization of the theorem is also obtained. As an application, we construct a simple system to simulate the resonant chamber for generating laser light. Spectral singularity in composite systems and simulation of laser resonant chamber.

  10. Simulation of Complex Cracking in Plain Weave C/SiC Composite under Biaxial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Ron-Bin; Hsu, Su-Yuen

    2012-01-01

    Finite element analysis is performed on a mesh, based on computed geometry of a plain weave C/SiC composite with assumed internal stacking, to reveal the pattern of internal damage due to biaxial normal cyclic loading. The simulation encompasses intertow matrix cracking, matrix cracking inside the tows, and separation at the tow-intertow matrix and tow-tow interfaces. All these dissipative behaviors are represented by traction-separation cohesive laws. Not aimed at quantitatively predicting the overall stress-strain relation, the simulation, however, does not take the actual process of fiber debonding into account. The fiber tows are represented by a simple rule-of-mixture model where the reinforcing phase is a hypothetical one-dimensional material. Numerical results indicate that for the plain weave C/SiC composite, 1) matrix-crack initiation sites are primarily determined by large intertow matrix voids and interlayer tow-tow contacts, 2) the pattern of internal damage strongly depends on the loading path and initial stress, 3) compressive loading inflicts virtually no damage evolution. KEY WORDS: ceramic matrix composite, plain weave, cohesive model, brittle failure, smeared crack model, progressive damage, meso-mechanical analysis, finite element.

  11. Finite Element Simulation of Low Velocity Impact Damage on an Aeronautical Carbon Composite Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemanle Sanga, Roger Pierre; Garnier, Christian; Pantalé, Olivier

    2016-12-01

    Low velocity barely visible impact damage (BVID) in laminated carbon composite structures has a major importance for aeronautical industries. This contribution leads with the development of finite element models to simulate the initiation and the propagation of internal damage inside a carbon composite structure due by a low velocity impact. Composite plates made from liquid resin infusion process (LRI) have been subjected to low energy impacts (around 25 J) using a drop weight machine. In the experimental procedure, the internal damage is evaluated using an infrared thermographic camera while the indentation depth of the face is measured by optical measurement technique. In a first time we developed a robust model using homogenised shells based on degenerated tri-dimensional brick elements and in a second time we decided to modelize the whole stacking sequence of homogeneous layers and cohesive interlaminar interfaces in order to compare and validate the obtained results. Both layer and interface damage initiation and propagation models based on the Hashin and the Benzeggagh-Kenane criteria have been used for the numerical simulations. Comparison of numerical results and experiments has shown the accuracy of the proposed models.

  12. Simulating the Impact Response of Full-Scale Composite Airframe Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Seal, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center obtained a composite helicopter cabin structure in 2010 from the US Army's Survivable Affordable Repairable Airframe Program (SARAP) that was fabricated by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation. The cabin had been subjected to a vertical drop test in 2008 to evaluate a tilting roof concept to limit the intrusion of overhead masses into the fuselage cabin. Damage to the cabin test article was limited primarily to the roof. Consequently, the roof area was removed and the remaining structure was cut into test specimens including a large subfloor section and a forward framed fuselage section. In 2011, NASA and Sikorsky entered into a cooperative research agreement to study the impact responses of composite airframe structures and to evaluate the capabilities of the explicit transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA®, to simulate these responses including damage initiation and progressive failure. Most of the test articles were manufactured of graphite unidirectional tape composite with a thermoplastic resin system. However, the framed fuselage section was constructed primarily of a plain weave graphite fabric material with a thermoset resin system. Test data were collected from accelerometers and full-field photogrammetry. The focus of this paper will be to document impact testing and simulation results for the longitudinal impact of the subfloor section and the vertical drop test of the forward framed fuselage section.

  13. Numerical Simulations of Carbon and Nitrogen Composition-Depth Profiles in Nitrocarburized Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaoting; Michal, Gary M.; Ernst, Frank; Kahn, Harold; Heuer, Arthur H.

    2014-09-01

    Unusual composition-depth profiles have been observed after low-temperature nitrocarburization of austenitic stainless steels. When nitridation is performed after carburization, the carbon concentration in the nitrogen diffusion zone is reduced from ≈10 to ≈2 at. pct. Conversely, the carbon concentration in advance of the nitrogen diffusion zone is as high as 10 at. pct. This has been called a "push" effect of nitrogen on carbon, but this concept is non-physical. The profiles can be better understood from conventional thermodynamic principles, recognizing that (1) diffusion always occurs in response to gradients in chemical potentials and (2) the diffusivity of interstitial solutes in austenite is strongly concentration dependent, increasing dramatically with higher solute concentrations. Parameters from the CALPHAD literature quantitatively indicate that interstitial nitrogen and carbon in austenitic stainless steel mutually increase their chemical potentials. Based on these data, we have conducted numerical simulations of composition-depth profiles that correctly account for the chemical potential gradients and the concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficients for nitrogen and carbon. The simulations predict the "push" effect observed on nitridation after carburization, as well as the corresponding composition-depth profiles for other scenarios, e.g., carburization followed by nitridation or simultaneous nitridation and carburization (nitrocarburization).

  14. Simplifying the task of grouping fluid components in compositional reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lomeland, F.; Harstad, O.

    1995-04-01

    The main results from a compositional reservoir simulation are the production rates. Normally, these are stable oil and dry gas streams, but other streams may also be reported. The detailed description of the fluid compositions can therefore be reduced to some extent if the overall description of the fluid properties is acceptable. This is achieved by lumping the components into component groups called pseudocomponents. This reduces the computation time and the needed memory. The traditional way to prepare a fluid model with pseudocomponents is to group them based on personal experience and parameter regression. This requires a lot of experience and continues practice, and probably represents one of the greatest obstacles for a reservoir engineer confronted with compositional reservoir simulation for the first time. This paper presents an automatic method of selecting pseudocomponents. The authors will compare the new method with other existing methods that automatically group components into pseudocomponents. The existing methods used in the comparison follow: (1) the method of mole-weighted average with components grouped to have approximately equal mole fraction; (2) the method of mass-weighted average with components grouped to have approximately equal mass fraction; (3) the method of Newly et al.

  15. Influence of the polymerization process on composite resistance to chemical degradation by food-simulating liquids.

    PubMed

    Yap, Adrian U J; Wattanapayungkul, P; Chung, S M

    2003-01-01

    This study determined the influence of curing lights and modes on composite resistance to chemical degradation by various food-simulating liquids. Two different types of curing light (Halogen [H]-Elipar Trilight, 3M-ESPE; LED [L]-Freelight, 3M-ESPE) and two curing modes (standard [S]; exponential [E) were evaluated in the study. Forty-five composite (Z100 [3M-ESPE]) specimens were made for each light-curing mode combination (HS, HE, LS and LE). The specimens were randomly divided into five groups of nine and exposed to the following food-simulating liquids (FSL) for one week at 37 degrees C: distilled water, 50% aqueous ethanol solution, heptane and citric acid. Specimens stored in air were used as control. After the one week conditioning period, hardness testing was conducted with a digital microhardness tester (load = 500 gf; dwell time = 15 seconds). Mean hardness (HK)/hardness deterioration (deltaHK) were subsequently computed and data was subjected to analysis using ANOVA/Scheffe's test (p < 0.05). The resistance of composite to chemical degradation by FSL was light/curing mode dependent. Significant differences in HK and deltaHK were observed among the four curing techniques after conditioning in some FSL and air. After conditioning in water and citric acid, specimens polymerized with HE underwent significantly more softening compared to specimens polymerized with HS, LS and LE.

  16. 77 FR 36289 - Implementation of Indian Reservation Roads Program and Streamlining the Federal Delivery of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... Delivery of Tribal Transportation Services AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... (IRR) funding among tribes; (2) streamlining BIA delivery of transportation program services to...

  17. COMPOSITION STRUCTURE OF INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS FROM MULTISPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS, MODELING, AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Reinard, Alysha A.; Mulligan, Tamitha E-mail: blynch@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2012-12-20

    We present an analysis of the ionic composition of iron for two interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed on 2007 May 21-23 by the ACE and STEREO spacecraft in the context of the magnetic structure of the ejecta flux rope, sheath region, and surrounding solar wind flow. This analysis is made possible due to recent advances in multispacecraft data interpolation, reconstruction, and visualization as well as results from recent modeling of ionic charge states in MHD simulations of magnetic breakout and flux cancellation coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation. We use these advances to interpret specific features of the ICME plasma composition resulting from the magnetic topology and evolution of the CME. We find that, in both the data and our MHD simulations, the flux ropes centers are relatively cool, while charge state enhancements surround and trail the flux ropes. The magnetic orientations of the ICMEs are suggestive of magnetic breakout-like reconnection during the eruption process, which could explain the spatial location of the observed iron enhancements just outside the traditional flux rope magnetic signatures and between the two ICMEs. Detailed comparisons between the simulations and data were more complicated, but a sharp increase in high iron charge states in the ACE and STEREO-A data during the second flux rope corresponds well to similar features in the flux cancellation results. We discuss the prospects of this integrated in situ data analysis and modeling approach to advancing our understanding of the unified CME-to-ICME evolution.

  18. Compositional reservoir simulation on CM-5 and KSR-1 parallel machines

    SciTech Connect

    Ghori, S.G.; Wang, C.H.; Lim, M.T.; Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Wheeler, M.F.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, use of parallel machines in reservoir simulation has received considerable attention from the petroleum industry. This paper presents parallelization of a 3D compositional, equation-of-state reservoir simulator on the CM-5 and KSR-1. To the best of the authors` knowledge, this is the first time that the parallelization of a compositional reservoir simulator has been performed on both the CM-5 and KSR-1. For new users of the CM-5 machines, the software and hardware of CM-5 architecture is presented, as well as details of the parallelization techniques. For example, domain decomposition, I/O`s, phase equilibrium computations, and well model are described. The parallelism techniques on the KSR-1 are presented with the emphasis on the porting of the phase equilibrium calculation. The performance of each machine is evaluated by showing the speedup on different sets of processing nodes. Two test problems were used to explore the capability of the parallelized version of the code; one is a waterflood problem and the other is a CO{sub 2} multiple contact miscible flood, both in a West Texas oil field. These field problems were run on 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 processors to get insight into the locations of communication bottlenecks, generally occurring in the programming with distributed memory machines. The problems of latency and bandwidth which are associated with communication efficiency of the CM-5 are also addressed.

  19. On Complexities of Impact Simulation of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites: A Simplified Modeling Framework

    PubMed Central

    Alemi-Ardakani, M.; Milani, A. S.; Yannacopoulos, S.

    2014-01-01

    Impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites is a complex and challenging task, in particular for practitioners with less experience in advanced coding and user-defined subroutines. Different numerical algorithms have been developed over the past decades for impact modeling of composites, yet a considerable gap often exists between predicted and experimental observations. In this paper, after a review of reported sources of complexities in impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites, two simplified approaches are presented for fast simulation of out-of-plane impact response of these materials considering four main effects: (a) strain rate dependency of the mechanical properties, (b) difference between tensile and flexural bending responses, (c) delamination, and (d) the geometry of fixture (clamping conditions). In the first approach, it is shown that by applying correction factors to the quasistatic material properties, which are often readily available from material datasheets, the role of these four sources in modeling impact response of a given composite may be accounted for. As a result a rough estimation of the dynamic force response of the composite can be attained. To show the application of the approach, a twill woven polypropylene/glass reinforced thermoplastic composite laminate has been tested under 200 J impact energy and was modeled in Abaqus/Explicit via the built-in Hashin damage criteria. X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the presence of delamination inside the impacted sample. Finally, as a second and much simpler modeling approach it is shown that applying only a single correction factor over all material properties at once can still yield a reasonable prediction. Both advantages and limitations of the simplified modeling framework are addressed in the performed case study. PMID:25431787

  20. On complexities of impact simulation of fiber reinforced polymer composites: a simplified modeling framework.

    PubMed

    Alemi-Ardakani, M; Milani, A S; Yannacopoulos, S

    2014-01-01

    Impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites is a complex and challenging task, in particular for practitioners with less experience in advanced coding and user-defined subroutines. Different numerical algorithms have been developed over the past decades for impact modeling of composites, yet a considerable gap often exists between predicted and experimental observations. In this paper, after a review of reported sources of complexities in impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites, two simplified approaches are presented for fast simulation of out-of-plane impact response of these materials considering four main effects: (a) strain rate dependency of the mechanical properties, (b) difference between tensile and flexural bending responses, (c) delamination, and (d) the geometry of fixture (clamping conditions). In the first approach, it is shown that by applying correction factors to the quasistatic material properties, which are often readily available from material datasheets, the role of these four sources in modeling impact response of a given composite may be accounted for. As a result a rough estimation of the dynamic force response of the composite can be attained. To show the application of the approach, a twill woven polypropylene/glass reinforced thermoplastic composite laminate has been tested under 200 J impact energy and was modeled in Abaqus/Explicit via the built-in Hashin damage criteria. X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the presence of delamination inside the impacted sample. Finally, as a second and much simpler modeling approach it is shown that applying only a single correction factor over all material properties at once can still yield a reasonable prediction. Both advantages and limitations of the simplified modeling framework are addressed in the performed case study.

  1. Dissecting the Effects of Simulated Cattle Activity on Floristic Composition and Functional Traits in Mediterranean Grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Dobarro, Iker; Pérez Carmona, Carlos; Peco, Begoña

    2013-01-01

    Livestock exerts direct and indirect effects on plant communities, changing colonization and extinction rates of species and the surrounding environmental conditions. There is scarce knowledge on how and to what extent these effects control the floristic and functional composition of plant communities in grasslands. We performed an experiment that included several treatments simulating trampling, defoliation, faeces addition and their combinations in a Mediterranean scrub community grazing-abandoned for at least 50 years. We monitored the plots for four years, and collected data on species composition, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and red∶far-red ratio (R∶FR), soil moisture and compaction. We estimated community weighted means (CWM) for height, habit, life cycle, seed mass and SLA. Neither compaction nor soil moisture were modified by the treatments, while PAR and R∶FR increased in all treatments in comparison to the Control and Faeces treatments. The floristic composition of all treatments, except for Faeces, converged over time, but deviated from that of the Control. The functional traits displayed the trends expected in the presence of grazing: loss of erect species and increased cover of short species with light seeds, with rosettes and prostrate habit. However, contrary to the results in literature, SLA was lower in all the treatments than Control plots. Like the results for floristic composition, all treatments except for Faeces converged towards a similar functional composition at the end of the four year period. The results of this study show the initial evolution of a Mediterranean plant community in the presence of grazing, driven primarily by the destructive action of livestock. These actions seem to directly affect the rates of extinction/colonization, and indirectly affect the light environment but not the soil conditions. However, their effects on floristic and trait composition do not seem to differ, at least at the small spatio

  2. Dissecting the effects of simulated cattle activity on floristic composition and functional traits in Mediterranean grasslands.

    PubMed

    Dobarro, Iker; Carmona, Carlos Pérez; Peco, Begoña

    2013-01-01

    Livestock exerts direct and indirect effects on plant communities, changing colonization and extinction rates of species and the surrounding environmental conditions. There is scarce knowledge on how and to what extent these effects control the floristic and functional composition of plant communities in grasslands. We performed an experiment that included several treatments simulating trampling, defoliation, faeces addition and their combinations in a Mediterranean scrub community grazing-abandoned for at least 50 years. We monitored the plots for four years, and collected data on species composition, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and red∶far-red ratio (R∶FR), soil moisture and compaction. We estimated community weighted means (CWM) for height, habit, life cycle, seed mass and SLA. Neither compaction nor soil moisture were modified by the treatments, while PAR and R∶FR increased in all treatments in comparison to the Control and Faeces treatments. The floristic composition of all treatments, except for Faeces, converged over time, but deviated from that of the Control. The functional traits displayed the trends expected in the presence of grazing: loss of erect species and increased cover of short species with light seeds, with rosettes and prostrate habit. However, contrary to the results in literature, SLA was lower in all the treatments than Control plots. Like the results for floristic composition, all treatments except for Faeces converged towards a similar functional composition at the end of the four year period. The results of this study show the initial evolution of a Mediterranean plant community in the presence of grazing, driven primarily by the destructive action of livestock. These actions seem to directly affect the rates of extinction/colonization, and indirectly affect the light environment but not the soil conditions. However, their effects on floristic and trait composition do not seem to differ, at least at the small spatio

  3. Self-assembly of nanocomponents into composite structures: derivation and simulation of Langevin equations.

    PubMed

    Pankavich, S; Shreif, Z; Miao, Y; Ortoleva, P

    2009-05-21

    The kinetics of the self-assembly of nanocomponents into a virus, nanocapsule, or other composite structure is analyzed via a multiscale approach. The objective is to achieve predictability and to preserve key atomic-scale features that underlie the formation and stability of the composite structures. We start with an all-atom description, the Liouville equation, and the order parameters characterizing nanoscale features of the system. An equation of Smoluchowski type for the stochastic dynamics of the order parameters is derived from the Liouville equation via a multiscale perturbation technique. The self-assembly of composite structures from nanocomponents with internal atomic structure is analyzed and growth rates are derived. Applications include the assembly of a viral capsid from capsomers, a ribosome from its major subunits, and composite materials from fibers and nanoparticles. Our approach overcomes errors in other coarse-graining methods, which neglect the influence of the nanoscale configuration on the atomistic fluctuations. We account for the effect of order parameters on the statistics of the atomistic fluctuations, which contribute to the entropic and average forces driving order parameter evolution. This approach enables an efficient algorithm for computer simulation of self-assembly, whereas other methods severely limit the timestep due to the separation of diffusional and complexing characteristic times. Given that our approach does not require recalibration with each new application, it provides a way to estimate assembly rates and thereby facilitate the discovery of self-assembly pathways and kinetic dead-end structures.

  4. Self-assembly of nanocomponents into composite structures: Derivation and simulation of Langevin equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankavich, S.; Shreif, Z.; Miao, Y.; Ortoleva, P.

    2009-05-01

    The kinetics of the self-assembly of nanocomponents into a virus, nanocapsule, or other composite structure is analyzed via a multiscale approach. The objective is to achieve predictability and to preserve key atomic-scale features that underlie the formation and stability of the composite structures. We start with an all-atom description, the Liouville equation, and the order parameters characterizing nanoscale features of the system. An equation of Smoluchowski type for the stochastic dynamics of the order parameters is derived from the Liouville equation via a multiscale perturbation technique. The self-assembly of composite structures from nanocomponents with internal atomic structure is analyzed and growth rates are derived. Applications include the assembly of a viral capsid from capsomers, a ribosome from its major subunits, and composite materials from fibers and nanoparticles. Our approach overcomes errors in other coarse-graining methods, which neglect the influence of the nanoscale configuration on the atomistic fluctuations. We account for the effect of order parameters on the statistics of the atomistic fluctuations, which contribute to the entropic and average forces driving order parameter evolution. This approach enables an efficient algorithm for computer simulation of self-assembly, whereas other methods severely limit the timestep due to the separation of diffusional and complexing characteristic times. Given that our approach does not require recalibration with each new application, it provides a way to estimate assembly rates and thereby facilitate the discovery of self-assembly pathways and kinetic dead-end structures.

  5. Computational Simulation of Damage Progression of Composite Thin Shells Subjected to Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, P. K.; Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    1996-01-01

    Defect-free and defected composite thin shells with ply orientation (90/0/+/-75) made of graphite/epoxy are simulated for damage progression and fracture due to internal pressure and axial loading. The thin shells have a cylindrical geometry with one end fixed and the other free. The applied load consists of an internal pressure in conjunction with an axial load at the free end, the cure temperature was 177 C (350 F) and the operational temperature was 21 C (70 F). The residual stresses due to the processing are taken into account. Shells with defect and without defects were examined by using CODSTRAN an integrated computer code that couples composite mechanics, finite element and account for all possible failure modes inherent in composites. CODSTRAN traces damage initiation, growth, accumulation, damage propagation and the final fracture of the structure. The results show that damage initiation started with matrix failure while damage/fracture progression occurred due to additional matrix failure and fiber fracture. The burst pressure of the (90/0/+/- 75) defected shell was 0.092% of that of the free defect. Finally the results of the damage progression of the (90/0/+/- 75), defective composite shell was compared with the (90/0/+/- theta, where theta = 45 and 60, layup configurations. It was shown that the examined laminate (90/0/+/- 75) has the least damage tolerant of the two compared defective shells with the (90/0/+/- theta), theta = 45 and 60 laminates.

  6. Monte Carlo Simulation of Thermal Conductivity in Randomly Distributed Nanowire Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.; Yang, R.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we investigated the thermal conductivity of composites made of two types of randomly stacked nanowires with high contrast ratio of bulk thermal conductivity. Thermal conductivity predictions based on solving the phonon Boltzmann transport equation by using the Monte Carlo method are presented for different contrast ratios of thermal conductivity, sizes of nanowires and the volumetric fractions in the composites. For composites made of nanowires with high contrast ratio thermal conductivity, the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites increase dramatically when the volumetric fraction of high thermal conductivity nanowire is higher than the geometry percolation threshold, although existing correlations in percolation theory do not fit the results due to the phonon interface scattering. On the other hand, when the the size of nanowires is small and the volumetric fraction of high thermal conductivity nanowire is less than percolation threshold, the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites decreases with increasing the volumetric fraction of the high thermal conductivity nanowires. The results of this study may help the development of nanoscale thermoelectric materials in which the figure of merit is optimized by choosing appropriate nanowire size, property contrast and composition. RY acknowledges the funding support for this work by DoD/AFOSR MURI grant FA9550-06-1-0326. The simulation was conducted on a 24-node cluster supported by Intel Corporation and managed by Prof. Gang Chen and Mr. Lu Hu at MIT.

  7. Plausible Compositions of the Seven TRAPPIST-1 Planets Using Long-term Dynamical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, B.; Quintana, E. V.; Lopez, E.; Schlieder, J. E.; Barclay, T.

    2017-06-01

    TRAPPIST-1 is a nearby ultra-cool dwarf that is host to a remarkable planetary system consisting of seven transiting planets. The orbital properties and radii of the planets have been well constrained, and recently, the masses of the inner six planets have been measured with additional ground- and space-based photometric observations. Large uncertainties in these mass measurements have prevented a robust analysis of the planetary compositions. Here, we perform many thousands of N-body dynamical simulations with planet properties perturbed from the observed values and identify those that are stable for millions of years. This allows us to identify self-consistent orbital solutions that can be used in future studies. From our range of dynamical masses, we find that most of the planets are consistent with an Earth-like composition, where TRAPPIST-1f is likely to have a volatile-rich envelope.

  8. A Damage Model for the Simulation of Delamination in Advanced Composites under Variable-Mode Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turon, A.; Camanho, P. P.; Costa, J.; Davila, C. G.

    2006-01-01

    A thermodynamically consistent damage model is proposed for the simulation of progressive delamination in composite materials under variable-mode ratio. The model is formulated in the context of Damage Mechanics. A novel constitutive equation is developed to model the initiation and propagation of delamination. A delamination initiation criterion is proposed to assure that the formulation can account for changes in the loading mode in a thermodynamically consistent way. The formulation accounts for crack closure effects to avoid interfacial penetration of two adjacent layers after complete decohesion. The model is implemented in a finite element formulation, and the numerical predictions are compared with experimental results obtained in both composite test specimens and structural components.

  9. Plate impact simulations of polymeric composites using an anisotropic material model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, A. M.; Grove, D. J.

    1997-07-01

    Recently, an elastic-plastic anisotropic model based on the Tsai-Hill failure surface has been implemented in the 1995 version of the EPIC code. In the model, a strain rate dependent behavior has been assumed in the thickness direction. We simulated several plate impact experiments and analyzed the shock wave propagation in S-2 glass fiber/polyester matrix composite targets under one dimensional strain loading conditions. The modified Mie-Gruneisen equation of state includes the deviatoric part of the normal strain components. Since the deviatoric strains are calculated using a strain rate dependent strength model, this indirectly introduces a weak strain rate dependency in the bulk behavior of the composite. We also investigated the effect of strain rate dependency on the attenuation of the shock wave under one dimensional strain.

  10. Spectral singularity in composite systems and simulation of a resonant lasing cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Z.; Li, G. R.; Song, Z.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate herein the existence of spectral singularities (SSs) in composite systems that consist of two separate scattering centers A and B embedded in one-dimensional free space, with at least one scattering center being non-Hermitian. We show that such composite systems have an SS at kc if the reflection amplitudes rA≤ft(kc\\right) and rB≤ft(kc\\right) of the two scattering centers satisfy the condition rR A≤ft(kc\\right) rLB≤ft(kc\\right) ei2kc≤ft(xB-xA\\right) =1 . We also extend the condition to the system with multi-scattering centers. As an application, we construct a simple system to simulate a resonant lasing cavity.

  11. A Streamline-Upwind Model for Filling Front Advection in Powder Injection Moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Guillaume; Cheng, Zhi Qiang; Barriere, Thierry; Liu, Bao Sheng; Gelin, Jean-Claude

    2010-06-01

    The filling process of powder injection molding is modeled by the flows of two variably adjacent domains in the mold cavity. The feedstock is filled into the cavity while the air is expelled out by the injected feedstock [1]. Eulerian description is adopted. The filling patterns are determined by the solution of an advection equation, governed by the velocity field in both the feedstock flow and air flow [2]. In the real physics, the advance of filling front depends mainly on the flow of feedstock that locates behind the front. The flow of air in front of the injected material plays in fact no meaningful effect. However, the actual algorithm for solution of the advection equation takes equally the importance for both the flow of viscous feedstock and that of the slight air. Under such a condition, the injection flow of feedstock in simulation may be misdirected unrealistically by the velocity field in the air portion of the mold cavity. To correct this defect, an upwind scheme is proposed to reinforce the effect of upwind flow and reduce the effect of downstream flow. The present paper involves the investigation of an upwind algorithm for simulation of the filling state during powder injection molding. A Petrov-Galerkin upwind based method (SUPG) is adopted for numerical simulation of the transport equation instead of the Taylor-Galerkin method in previous work. In the proposed implementation of the Streamline-Upwind/Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) approach. A stabilization method is used to prevent oscillations in the convection-dominated problems. It consists in the introduction of an artificial diffusion in streamline direction. Suitable modification of the test function is the important issue. It ensures the stable simulation of filling process and results in the more realistic prediction of filling patterns. The implementation of upwind scheme in mould filling state simulation, based on an advection equation and the whole velocity field of feedstock and air flow, makes

  12. EVALUATION OF AP-FARM SIMULANT COMPOSITION FOR ROTARY MICROFILTER TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    HUBER HJ

    2011-09-19

    This document identifies the feed composition of a Hanford AP tank farm simulant for rotary microfiltration testing. The composition is based on an Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model run in combination with Tank Waste Information Network (TWINS) data and mineralogical studies of actual waste solids. The feed simulant is intended to be used in test runs at SRNL. The simulant will be prepared in two parts: (1) A supernate, composed of water-soluble salts and (2) The undissolved (actually, undissolvable) solids. Test slurries with distinct solids concentrations (e.g., 0.5, 5 and 10 wt%) are then prepared as needed. The base for the composition of supernate and solids is the modeled feed sequence for a deployment scenario of the Supplemental Pretreatment units within AP-farm. These units comprise a filtration part, the RMF, and a Cesium-removal part, a Small Column Ion Exchange. The primary use of this simulant is for filtration testing - however, in case that it is also used for ion-exchange tests, the amount of Cs-137 that would need to be added is available in Table 1 and Attachment 3. A modified model run (MMR-049) of the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) system plan 6 case 3 was performed to identify the feed sequence. Case 3 assumed supplemental treatment besides the low activity waste (LAW) melter with supplemental pretreatment supporting the pretreatment facility. The MMR did not cap the duration of supplemental pretreatment to 15 months, but rather used it throughout the entire treatment mission as an add-on option to the pretreatment facility at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tank 241-AP-105 (AP-105) was chosen as the feed tank to the filtration unit. Other parameters included a fixed minimum of 0.5 wt% solids in the feed and a maximum Na-concentration of 5M in the supernate. The solids rejection from the filtration unit was set to 99.99% and the maximum allowed amount of solids within tank AP-105 was set

  13. Viscoelastic stability of resin-composites aged in food-simulating solvents.

    PubMed

    Marghalani, Hanadi Y; Watts, David C

    2013-09-01

    To study time-dependent viscoelastic deformation (creep and recovery) of resin-composites, after conditioning in food-simulating solvents, under a compressive stress at 37°C. Five dimethacrylate-based composites: (Spectrum TPH, Premise Body, Tetric Ceram HB, Filtek P60, X-tra fil), and two Ormocers (Experimental Ormocer V 28407, Admira) were studied. Three groups of cylindrical specimens (4mm×6mm) were prepared and then conditioned in 3 solvents: methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), ethanol, and water for 1 month at 37°C. The compressive creep-strain under 35MPa in 37°C water was recorded continuously for 2h and then the unloaded recovery-strain was monitored for another 2h. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni's test. The materials all exhibited classic creep and recovery curves, with most parameters being significantly different (p<0.0001) for each solvent condition. All materials showed lower creep-strain in water than in ethanol or MEK solvents. Maximum creep-strain and permanent-set gave negative linear-regression (r(2)>0.98) with logarithm of the solvent solubility-parameter. The % mean (SD) creep-strain ranged from a minimum of 0.82 (0.01) for the Exp. Ormocer in water to the maximum of 4.19 (0.30) for Admira in MEK. Similar trends were found for permanent-set. The dimethacrylate-based composites behaved as an intermediate group, apart from X-tra fil that had similar stability to the Exp. Ormocer. The viscoelastic stability (low creep and permanent-set) of the Exp. Ormocer, compared to many dimethacrylate-based composites, in food-simulating solvents may be due to its diluent-free formulation. This was closely matched by a highly-filled dimethacrylate material (X-tra fil). Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  14. Harmonization and streamlining of research oversight for pragmatic clinical trials.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, P Pearl; Carrithers, Judith; Patrick-Lake, Bray; Rice, Todd W; Corsmo, Jeremy; Hart, Raffaella; Drezner, Marc K; Lantos, John D

    2015-10-01

    The oversight of research involving human participants is a complex process that requires institutional review board review as well as multiple non-institutional review board institutional reviews. This multifaceted process is particularly challenging for multisite research when each site independently completes all required local reviews. The lack of inter-institutional standardization can result in different review outcomes for the same protocol, which can delay study operations from start-up to study completion. Hence, there have been strong calls to harmonize and thus streamline the research oversight process. Although the institutional review board is only one of the required reviews, it is often identified as the target for harmonization and streamlining. Data regarding variability in decision-making and interpretation of the regulations across institutional review boards have led to a perception that variability among institutional review boards is a primary contributor to the problems with review of multisite research. In response, many researchers and policymakers have proposed the use of a single institutional review board of record, also called a central institutional review board, as an important remedy. While this proposal has merit, the use of a central institutional review board for multisite research does not address the larger problem of completing non-institutional review board institutional review in addition to institutional review board review—and coordinating the interdependence of these reviews. In this article, we describe the overall research oversight process, distinguish between institutional review board and institutional responsibilities, and identify challenges and opportunities for harmonization and streamlining. We focus on procedural and organizational issues and presume that the protection of human subjects remains the paramount concern. Suggested modifications of institutional review board processes that focus on time

  15. Simulation on friction taper plug welding of AA6063-20Gr metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Nithin, Abeyram M.

    2016-05-01

    Friction taper plug welding a variant of friction welding is useful in welding of similar and dissimilar materials. It could be used for joining of composites to metals in sophisticated aerospace applications. In the present work numerical simulation of friction taper plug welding process is carried out using finite element based software. Graphite reinforced AA6063 is modelled using the software ANSYS 15.0 and temperature distribution is predicted. Effect of friction time on temperature distribution is numerically investigated. When the friction time is increased to 30 seconds, the tapered part of plug gets detached and fills the hole in the AA6063 plate perfectly.

  16. Simulating Initial and Progressive Failure of Open-Hole Composite Laminates under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhangxin; Zhu, Hao; Li, Yongcun; Han, Xiaoping; Wang, Zhihua

    2016-12-01

    A finite element (FE) model is developed for the progressive failure analysis of fiber reinforced polymer laminates. The failure criterion for fiber and matrix failure is implemented in the FE code Abaqus using user-defined material subroutine UMAT. The gradual degradation of the material properties is controlled by the individual fracture energies of fiber and matrix. The failure and damage in composite laminates containing a central hole subjected to uniaxial tension are simulated. The numerical results show that the damage model can be used to accurately predicte the progressive failure behaviour both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  17. Wear simulation of resin composites and the relationship to clinical wear.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, Wayne W; Latta, Mark A; Erickson, Robert L; Wilwerding, Terry M

    2008-01-01

    This study used a new generalized wear model to examine the relationship between wear simulation and the clinical wear of two resin composites. Ten specimens each of P50 and Z100, were subjected to 100,000, 400,000 and 800,000 cycles in a spring-loaded piston-type wear simulator. Wear was generated using flat, cylindrically-shaped stainless steel antagonists on the resin composites, which were placed in custom stainless steel fixtures. A slurry of polymethyl methacrylate beads was used as the abrasive media. Wear was determined using profilometry, and the parameters examined included volume loss (mm3), maximum depth (microm), mean maximum depth (microm) and mean depth (microm). Statistical analysis of the laboratory wear data using ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test showed a significant difference (p<0.05) for wear between the two materials and the number of cycles. Mean maximum wear (microm) values (100K--P50--11.5 +/- 1.8; Z100--4.9 +/- 1.0; 400K--P50--17.2 +/- 2.7; Z100--6.0 +/- 1.7; 800K--P50--20.5 +/- 4.6; Z100--9.6 +/- 2.5) were used for comparisons with clinical data. Previous clinical studies of P50 and Z100 were used to examine the relationship between laboratory and clinical wear. Linear regression analysis was used to predict laboratory and clinical wear rates. The laboratory wear rate for P50 was 1.3 microm/100K cycles and the rate for Z100 was 0.7 microm/100K cycles. The clinical wear rates for P50 and Z100 were 8.3 microm/year and 4.0 microm/year, respectively. The ratio of wear rates of P50 to Z100 for wear simulation was 1.9 and the ratio of P50 to Z100 for clinical rates was 2.1. These ratios showed good agreement between the relative wear rates of laboratory and clinical wear. For the two composite materials examined, this new simulation model appears to be effective for evaluating the relative wear of resin composites.

  18. Simulations of composite reinforcement forming taking into account local fiber bending stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, S.; Hamila, N.; Boisse, P.

    2016-10-01

    The extension of the simulation of composite forming to the three-dimensional case of thick woven reinforcements brings to light new modeling challenges. The inability of the 3D continuous model to take into account the local stiffness of the fibers can be highlighted. An improved modeling approach is proposed by including additional curvature-related internal loads in the 3D element. The approach, based on a rotation free formulation, is efficient. The enhancement is shown in the case of a three point bending test and a hemispherical forming process.

  19. Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation Tool for Ceramic Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel; Bednarcyk, Brett; Pineda, Evan; Arnold, Steven; Mital, Subodh; Murthy, Pappu

    2015-01-01

    Reported here is a coupling of two NASA developed codes: CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) with the MAC/GMC (Micromechanics Analysis Code/ Generalized Method of Cells) composite material analysis code. The resulting code is called FEAMAC/CARES and is constructed as an Abaqus finite element analysis UMAT (user defined material). Here we describe the FEAMAC/CARES code and an example problem (taken from the open literature) of a laminated CMC in off-axis loading is shown. FEAMAC/CARES performs stochastic-strength-based damage simulation response of a CMC under multiaxial loading using elastic stiffness reduction of the failed elements.

  20. FEAMAC/CARES Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation Tool for Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel; Bednarcyk, Brett; Pineda, Evan; Arnold, Steven; Mital, Subodh; Murthy, Pappu; Bhatt, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Reported here is a coupling of two NASA developed codes: CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) with the MAC/GMC (Micromechanics Analysis Code/ Generalized Method of Cells) composite material analysis code. The resulting code is called FEAMAC/CARES and is constructed as an Abaqus finite element analysis UMAT (user defined material). Here we describe the FEAMAC/CARES code and an example problem (taken from the open literature) of a laminated CMC in off-axis loading is shown. FEAMAC/CARES performs stochastic-strength-based damage simulation response of a CMC under multiaxial loading using elastic stiffness reduction of the failed elements.

  1. Finite rotation FE-simulation and active vibration control of smart composite laminated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. N.; Schmidt, R.; Schröder, K.-U.

    2015-04-01

    The present article focuses on the nonlinear finite element simulation and control of large amplitude vibrations of smart piezolaminated composite structures. Full geometrically nonlinear finite rotation strain-displacement relations and Reissner-Mindlin first-order shear deformation hypothesis to include the transverse shear effects are considered to derive the variational formulation. A quadratic variation of electric potential is assumed in transverse direction. An assumed natural strain method for the shear strains, an enhanced assumed strain method for the membrane strains and an enhanced assumed gradient method for the electric field is incorporated to improve the behavior of a four-node shell element. Numerical simulations presented in this article show the accurate prediction capabilities of the proposed method, especially for structures undergoing finite deformations and rotations, in comparison to the results obtained by simplified nonlinear models available in references and also with those obtained by using the C3D20RE solid element for piezoelectric layers in the Abaqus code.

  2. Stability of 3D Textile Composite Reinforcement Simulations: Solutions to Spurious Transverse Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, S.; Hamila, N.; Dupé, F.; Descamps, C.; Boisse, P.

    2016-08-01

    The simulation of thick 3D composite reinforcement forming brings to light new modeling challenges. The specific anisotropic material behavior due to the possible slippage between fibers induces, among other phenomena, the development of spurious transverse modes in bending-dominated 3D simulations. To obtain coherent finite element responses, two solutions are proposed. The first one uses a simple assumed strain formulation usually prescribed to prevent volumetric locking. This solution avoids spurious transverse modes by stiffening of the hourglass modes. Nevertheless the deformation obtained by this approach still suffers from the inability of the standard continuum mechanics of Cauchy to describe fibrous material deformation. The second proposed approach is based on the introduction of a bending stiffness which both avoids the spurious transverse modes and also improves the global behavior of the element formulation by enriching the underlying continuum. To emphasize the differences between different formulations, element stiffnesses are explicitly calculated and compared.

  3. The simulation of circuit breaker switching using a composite Cassie-modified Mayr model

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.W.P.; Pereira, E.T.; Christopoulos, C.; Howe, A.F.

    1995-10-01

    In substation electromagnetic compatibility studies or insulation coordination studies it is desirable to get as accurate a representation as possible of the transients generated by faults and switching events. A method of simulating the voltage and current transients generated by a gas blast circuit breaker operation using a composite Cassie-modified Mayr model of the circuit breaker arc is described. It is demonstrated that this gives good agreement with published laboratory measurements of the circuit breaker voltage and current. The transmission line modeling method is used int the construction of the simulation algorithm of the circuit breaker circuit. A method, based on describing the circuit breaker by a transmission-line model (TLM), is used to decouple the non-linear characteristics from the rest of the network.

  4. Simulation of High Velocity Impact on Composite Structures - Model Implementation and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueler, Dominik; Toso-Pentecôte, Nathalie; Voggenreiter, Heinz

    2016-08-01

    High velocity impact on composite aircraft structures leads to the formation of flexural waves that can cause severe damage to the structure. Damage and failure can occur within the plies and/or in the resin rich interface layers between adjacent plies. In the present paper a modelling methodology is documented that captures intra- and inter-laminar damage and their interrelations by use of shell element layers representing sub-laminates that are connected with cohesive interface layers to simulate delamination. This approach allows the simulation of large structures while still capturing the governing damage mechanisms and their interactions. The paper describes numerical algorithms for the implementation of a Ladevèze continuum damage model for the ply and methods to derive input parameters for the cohesive zone model. By comparison with experimental results from gas gun impact tests the potential and limitations of the modelling approach are discussed.

  5. The Effect of Depth on Drag During the Streamlined Glide: A Three-Dimensional CFD Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Novais, Maria L.; Silva, António J.; Mantha, Vishveshwar R.; Ramos, Rui J.; Rouboa, Abel I.; Vilas-Boas, J. Paulo; Luís, Sérgio R.; Marinho, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of depth on drag during the streamlined glide in swimming using Computational Fluid Dynamics. The Computation Fluid Dynamic analysis consisted of using a three-dimensional mesh of cells that simulates the flow around the considered domain. We used the K-epsilon turbulent model implemented in the commercial code Fluent® and applied it to the flow around a three-dimensional model of an Olympic swimmer. The swimmer was modeled as if he were gliding underwater in a streamlined prone position, with hands overlapping, head between the extended arms, feet together and plantar flexed. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent® code and the drag coefficient and the drag force was calculated for velocities ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 m/s, in increments of 0.50m/s, which represents the velocity range used by club to elite level swimmers during the push-off and glide following a turn. The swimmer model middle line was placed at different water depths between 0 and 1.0 m underwater, in 0.25m increments. Hydrodynamic drag decreased with depth, although after 0.75m values remained almost constant. Water depth seems to have a positive effect on reducing hydrodynamic drag during the gliding. Although increasing depth position could contribute to decrease hydrodynamic drag, this reduction seems to be lower with depth, especially after 0.75 m depth, thus suggesting that possibly performing the underwater gliding more than 0.75 m depth could not be to the benefit of the swimmer. PMID:23487502

  6. The Effect of Depth on Drag During the Streamlined Glide: A Three-Dimensional CFD Analysis.

    PubMed

    Novais, Maria L; Silva, António J; Mantha, Vishveshwar R; Ramos, Rui J; Rouboa, Abel I; Vilas-Boas, J Paulo; Luís, Sérgio R; Marinho, Daniel A

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of depth on drag during the streamlined glide in swimming using Computational Fluid Dynamics. The Computation Fluid Dynamic analysis consisted of using a three-dimensional mesh of cells that simulates the flow around the considered domain. We used the K-epsilon turbulent model implemented in the commercial code Fluent(®) and applied it to the flow around a three-dimensional model of an Olympic swimmer. The swimmer was modeled as if he were gliding underwater in a streamlined prone position, with hands overlapping, head between the extended arms, feet together and plantar flexed. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent(®) code and the drag coefficient and the drag force was calculated for velocities ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 m/s, in increments of 0.50m/s, which represents the velocity range used by club to elite level swimmers during the push-off and glide following a turn. The swimmer model middle line was placed at different water depths between 0 and 1.0 m underwater, in 0.25m increments. Hydrodynamic drag decreased with depth, although after 0.75m values remained almost constant. Water depth seems to have a positive effect on reducing hydrodynamic drag during the gliding. Although increasing depth position could contribute to decrease hydrodynamic drag, this reduction seems to be lower with depth, especially after 0.75 m depth, thus suggesting that possibly performing the underwater gliding more than 0.75 m depth could not be to the benefit of the swimmer.

  7. Equation-of-State Based Tie-Simplex Parameterization for Multiphase Thermal-Compositional Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iranshahr, A.; Voskov, D.; Tchelepi, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) processes usually involve complex phase behaviors between the injected fluid (e.g., steam, hydrocarbon, CO2, sour) and the in-situ rock-fluid system. Several fundamental questions remain regarding equation-of-state computations for mixtures than can form three, or more, phases at equilibrium. In addition, numerical and computational issues related to proper coupling of the thermodynamic phase-behavior with multiphase flow multi-component transport must be resolved in order to model the behaviors of large-scale EOR processes accurately and efficiently. We describe a general negative-flash method for multi-component, thermal systems that can form three, or more, fluid phases. We prove that the new method is convergent to the unique solution. Based on our multiphase negative-flash technique, we have developed an adaptive tie-simplex parameterization framework for thermal-compositional simulation. We also prove that the tie-simplexes change continuously as a function of pressure, temperature, and composition. The continuity of the parameterized compositional space allows for interpolation in pressure and temperature using a limited number of tie-simplexes. We show that the tie-simplex framework constrains thermodynamic computations, and converges to the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The extended negative-flash approach accounts rigorously for tie-simplex degeneration (critical behavior) across phase boundaries. We study the behaviors of thermal-compositional reservoir displacement processes across a wide range of fluid mixtures, pressures, and temperatures. The focus is on the complex behaviors of the tie-triangles and tie-lines associated with three-phase, thermal steam-injection problems in heterogeneous formations. The algorithms that capture the complex combinations of the appearance and disappearance of multiple phases are described in detail. This tie-simplex based parameterization framework is integrated with a general

  8. A Simulated Annealing Procedure for the Joint Inversion of Spectroscopic and Compositional Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelos, F. P.; Arvidson, R. E.

    2001-12-01

    A simulated annealing algorithm capable of inverting thermal emission spectra and compositional data acquired from a common geologic target has been developed. The inversion allows for the identification and proportion estimation of low concentration mineral endmembers. This method will be especially applicable to the 2007 Mars Mobile Geobiology Explorer equipped with an emission spectrometer for mineralogical analyses and a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectrometer for the remote acquisition of elemental information. The coupled inversion is cast as a multidimensional minimization problem where the hyperspace volume to be investigated is defined by the library endmembers at the disposal of the algorithm. This is a vector space in which exists all possible combinations of the library endmembers, with the endmember suite serving as an orthogonal set of basis vectors that span the hyperspace. The goal of the minimization is to locate the hyperspace coordinate that has the lowest associated model error value. This will correspond to the best possible model composition and mineralogy that can be generated by linearly mixing members of the endmember mineral suite. As opposed to standard unmixing routines, the simulated annealing algorithm is flexible enough to minimize any type of model error function. This allows the algorithm to interpret elemental analyses at any level of rigor, including elemental presence, relative abundances, abundance ratios, or exact mole percent. A synthetic data set was developed and systematically degraded with noise of various form and magnitude prior to being inverted with the simulated annealing algorithm as well as two purely spectral unmixing procedures. The simulated annealing procedure outperformed both of the alternate algorithms with an overall factor of two improvement in the mean sum of squares of deviations in the solution parameters. The detailed results from synthetic data inversions as well as the analysis of laboratory data will be

  9. Computational simulation of the creep-rupture process in filamentary composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slattery, Kerry T.; Hackett, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    A computational simulation of the internal damage accumulation which causes the creep-rupture phenomenon in filamentary composite materials is developed. The creep-rupture process involves complex interactions between several damage mechanisms. A statistically-based computational simulation using a time-differencing approach is employed to model these progressive interactions. The finite element method is used to calculate the internal stresses. The fibers are modeled as a series of bar elements which are connected transversely by matrix elements. Flaws are distributed randomly throughout the elements in the model. Load is applied, and the properties of the individual elements are updated at the end of each time step as a function of the stress history. The simulation is continued until failure occurs. Several cases, with different initial flaw dispersions, are run to establish a statistical distribution of the time-to-failure. The calculations are performed on a supercomputer. The simulation results compare favorably with the results of creep-rupture experiments conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  10. Carbon isotope composition of ambient CO2 and recycling: a matrix simulation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    da Silveira Lobo Sternberg, Leonel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between isotopic composition and concentration of ambient CO2 in a canopy and its associated convective boundary layer was modeled. The model divides the canopy and convective boundary layer into several layers. Photosynthesis, respiration, and exchange between each layer can be simulated by matrix equations. This simulation can be used to calculate recycling; defined here as the amount of respired CO2 re-fixed by photosynthesis relative to the total amount of respired CO2. At steady state the matrix equations can be solved for the canopy and convective boundary layer CO2 concentration and isotopic profile, which can be used to calculate a theoretical recycling index according to a previously developed equation. There is complete agreement between simulated and theoretical recycling indices for different exchange scenarios. Recycling indices from a simulation of gas exchange between a heterogeneous vegetation canopy and the troposphere also agreed with a more generalized form of the theoretical recycling equation developed here.

  11. Multi-Million-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polymer Nanoparticle Composites using Explicit Solvent Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Sanket; Kamath, Ganesh; Mancini, Derrick; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian

    2014-03-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) is a thermosensitive polymer that is well-known for its lower critical solution temperature (LCST) around 305K. Below the LCST, PNIPAM is soluble in water, and above this temperature, polymer chains collapse and transform into a globule-state. Our simulations of systems consisting of single polymer chains in presence of explicit water molecules (~ 50 K atoms) predicted the LCST of PNIPAM close to the observed experimental value of ~ 305 K. This study also suggested the importance of using an explicit water model in studying the coil-to-globule transition in thermo-sensitive polymers. In the current studies, we are carrying out MD simulations of composites of PNIPAM inorganic nanoparticles in the aqueous solution using an explicit solvent treatment. We study the effect of grafting density on the coil-to-globule transition of the PNIPAM brushes. We graft PNIPAM polymer chains consisting of 60 monomer units onto a gold nanoparticle with varying grafting densities. Studied system consisted of ~3 million atoms. All the simulations were carried out below (275K) and above (325K) the LCST of PNIPAM. Simulation trajectories are analyzed for structural and dynamical properties. In particular, we look at the morphology of the uncollapsed and collapsed structures, and relate this to observation in scattering measurements. Future work will expand this approach to studying the dynamics of agglomeration of such brush structures to form self-assembled nanocomposites.

  12. Color Stability of Composites After Short-term Oral Simulation: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Özdaş, Didem Öner; Kazak, Mağrur; Çilingir, Aylin; Subaşı, Meryem Gülce; Tiryaki, Murat; Günal, Şölen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although most of the studies investigated color stability of different restorative materials, evaluation of color stability of composites after immersion in multiple beverages in the same day by an in vitro oral simulation study is unclear. Objective: To assess color change of different restorative materials at the end of days 1, 14, and 30 of immersion in multiple liquid types to mimic the oral environment in vitro. Method: Ten disc-shaped specimens were made from each of four different resin composites (Filtek Z250, Voco x-tra base, Beautifil Flow Plus, Beautifil II). Baseline color value of each sample was measured using a spectrophotometer. Each composite was respectively immersed in coffee, an orange/pomegranate juice mixture, black tea, and a mouth rinse on the same day to mimic daily liquid consumption of individuals. Color measurements were taken after 1, 14, and 30 days by spectrophotometer and color change values were calculated. Statistical analyses were executed by one-way ANOVA/Tukey HSD and repeated-measures ANOVA. Results: All materials showed significant color change after 1, 14, and 30 days (P < 0.01) of immersion in liquids, with the lowest color alteration observed at the 1st day and the highest observed after the 30th day. Among the materials tested, at each time point (1, 14, and 30 days), the lowest color alteration was detected in Filtek Z250 and the highest color alteration was detected in Beautifil II. Conclusion: Color alteration of composite resins is affected by composite type and storage time. With the exception of 1 day of storage, color changes of all materials were substantial and clinically unacceptable. PMID:27733871

  13. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with an Alkaliphilic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A; Wall, Judy D.; Mormile, Dr. Melanie R.; Begemann, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, biohydrogen production remains inefficient and heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobium strain sapolanicus, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. sapolanicus ferments a variety of 5- and 6- carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen and acetate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources.

  14. Streamlining Software Aspects of Certification: Report on the SSAC Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Dorsey, Cheryl A.; Knight, John C.; Leveson, Nancy G.; McCormick, G. Frank

    1999-01-01

    The aviation system now depends on information technology more than ever before to ensure safety and efficiency. To address concerns about the efficacy of software aspects of the certification process, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) began the Streamlining Software Aspects of Certification (SSAC) program. The SSAC technical team was commissioned to gather data, analyze results, and propose recommendations to maximize efficiency and minimize cost and delay, without compromising safety. The technical team conducted two public workshops to identify and prioritize software approval issues, and conducted a survey to validate the most urgent of those issues. The SSAC survey, containing over two hundred questions about the FAA's software approval process, reached over four hundred industry software developers, aircraft manufacturers, and FAA designated engineering representatives. Three hundred people responded. This report presents the SSAC program rationale, survey process, preliminary findings, and recommendations.

  15. Streamlined Genome Sequence Compression using Distributed Source Coding

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuang; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Feng; Cui, Lijuan; Cheng, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    We aim at developing a streamlined genome sequence compression algorithm to support alternative miniaturized sequencing devices, which have limited communication, storage, and computation power. Existing techniques that require heavy client (encoder side) cannot be applied. To tackle this challenge, we carefully examined distributed source coding theory and developed a customized reference-based genome compression protocol to meet the low-complexity need at the client side. Based on the variation between source and reference, our protocol will pick adaptively either syndrome coding or hash coding to compress subsequences of changing code length. Our experimental results showed promising performance of the proposed method when compared with the state-of-the-art algorithm (GRS). PMID:25520552

  16. Classical free-streamline flow over a polygonal obstacle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elcrat, A. R.; Trefethen, L. N.

    1986-01-01

    In classical Kirchhoff flow, an ideal incompressible fluid flows past an obstacle and around a motionless wake bounded by free streamlines. Since 1869 it has been known that in principle, the two-dimensional Kirchhoff flow over a polygonal obstacle can be determined by constructing a conformal map onto a polygon in the log-hodograph plane. In practice, however, this idea has rarely been put to use except for very simple obstacles, because the conformal mapping problem has been too difficult. This paper presents a practical method for computing flows over arbitrary polygonal obstacles to high accuracy in a few seconds of computer time. We achieve this high speed and flexibility by working with a modified Schwarz-Christoffel integral that maps onto the flow region directly rather than onto the log-hodograph polygon. This integral and its associated parameter problem are treated numerically by methods developed earlier by Trefethen for standard Schwarz-Christoffel maps.

  17. Classical free-streamline flow over a polygonal obstacle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elcrat, A. R.; Trefethen, L. N.

    1984-01-01

    In classical Kirchhoff flow, an ideal incompressible fluid flows past an obstacle and around a motionless wake bounded by free streamlines. Since 1869 it has been known that in principle, the two-dimensional Kirchhoff flow over a polygonal obstacle can be determined by constructing a conformal map onto a polygon in the log-hodograph plane. In practice, however, this idea has rarely been put to use except for very simple obstacles, because the conformal mapping problem has been too difficult. This paper presents a practical method for computing flows over arbitrary polygonal obstacles to high accuracy in a few seconds of computer time. We achieve this high speed and flexibility by working with a modified Schwarz-Christoffel integral that maps onto the flow region directly rather than onto the log-hodograph polygon. This integral and its associated parameter problem are treated numerically by methods developed earlier by Trefethen for standard Schwarz-Christoffel maps.

  18. Ancient Streamlined Islands of the Palos Outflow Channel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-24

    This image shows the northern terminus of an outflow channel located in the volcanic terrains of Amenthes Planum. The channel sources from the Palos impact crater to the south, where water flowed into the crater from Tinto Vallis and eventually formed a paleo lake. As rising lake levels breached through the crater's rim and inundated the plains to the north, the resulting high velocity, large discharge floods plucked out and eroded the volcanic plains scouring out the "Palos Outflow Channel" and the streamlined mesa-islands on its floor. These streamlined forms are the eroded remnants of plains material sculpted by catastrophic floods and are not sediment deposits emplaced by lower magnitude stream flows. Both the fluvial channel floor and the volcanic island surfaces are densely cratered by impacts suggesting that both the surfaces and the flood events are ancient. The morphology (shape) of the channel system and its islands have been preserved through the eons, but water has long been absent from this drainage system. Since then, winds have transported light-toned sediments across this terrain forming extensive dune fields within the channel system, on the floors of impact craters, and in other protected locations in the Palos Outflow Channel region. A closer look shows chevron, or fish-bone shaped, light-toned dunes located near the top of the image where numerous smaller channels have cut through the landscape. These dunes likely started out as Transverse Aeolian Ridges (TAR) that form perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction where the wind-blown sediment supply is scarce. This intriguing morphology likely reflects changes in the prevailing wind environment over time. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21023

  19. Streamlined bioreactor-based production of human cartilage tissues.

    PubMed

    Tonnarelli, B; Santoro, R; Adelaide Asnaghi, M; Wendt, D

    2016-05-27

    Engineered tissue grafts have been manufactured using methods based predominantly on traditional labour-intensive manual benchtop techniques. These methods impart significant regulatory and economic challenges, hindering the successful translation of engineered tissue products to the clinic. Alternatively, bioreactor-based production systems have the potential to overcome such limitations. In this work, we present an innovative manufacturing approach to engineer cartilage tissue within a single bioreactor system, starting from freshly isolated human primary chondrocytes, through the generation of cartilaginous tissue grafts. The limited number of primary chondrocytes that can be isolated from a small clinically-sized cartilage biopsy could be seeded and extensively expanded directly within a 3D scaffold in our perfusion bioreactor (5.4 ± 0.9 doublings in 2 weeks), bypassing conventional 2D expansion in flasks. Chondrocytes expanded in 3D scaffolds better maintained a chondrogenic phenotype than chondrocytes expanded on plastic flasks (collagen type II mRNA, 18-fold; Sox-9, 11-fold). After this "3D expansion" phase, bioreactor culture conditions were changed to subsequently support chondrogenic differentiation for two weeks. Engineered tissues based on 3D-expanded chondrocytes were more cartilaginous than tissues generated from chondrocytes previously expanded in flasks. We then demonstrated that this streamlined bioreactor-based process could be adapted to effectively generate up-scaled cartilage grafts in a size with clinical relevance (50 mm diameter). Streamlined and robust tissue engineering processes, as the one described here, may be key for the future manufacturing of grafts for clinical applications, as they facilitate the establishment of compact and closed bioreactor-based production systems, with minimal automation requirements, lower operating costs, and increased compliance to regulatory guidelines.

  20. Streamlined analysis of lactose-free dairy products.

    PubMed

    Morlock, Gertrud E; Morlock, Lauritz P; Lemo, Carot

    2014-01-10

    Functional food for lactose-intolerant consumers and its global prevalence has created a large market for commercially available lactose-free food products. The simplest approach for detection and quantitation of lactose in lactose-free dairy products was developed. A one-step sample preparation was employed and the resulting 10% sample solution was directly subjected to the chromatographic system. LODs down to 0.04 mg/L were obtained for dairy products by application volumes up to 250 μL on a rectangular start zone, which is the lowest LOD reported in matrix so far. The highly matrix-robust, streamlined approach was demonstrated for a broad range of dairy products, even with high fat and protein contents. The mean recovery rate for 11 types of dairy products spiked at the strictest lactose content discussed (0.01%) was 90.5±10.5% (n=11). The mean repeatability for 11 dairy products spiked at the 0.01% level was 1.3±1.0% (n=11). It is the simplest approach with regard to sample preparation at low running costs (0.3 Euro or 0.4 USD/analysis) and fast analysis time (3 min/analysis). It enabled an efficient product screening, and at the same time, the quantitation of lactose in relevant samples. This streamlined analysis is highly attractive to the field of food safety and quality control of lactose-free dairy products, for which a limit value for lactose is expected soon in the EU. This methodological concept can be transferred to other challenging fields.

  1. The Cassini Solstice Mission: Streamlining Operations by Sequencing with PIEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandermey, Nancy; Alonge, Eleanor K.; Magee, Kari; Heventhal, William

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini Solstice Mission (CSM) is the second extended mission phase of the highly successful Cassini/Huygens mission to Saturn. Conducted at a much-reduced funding level, operations for the CSM have been streamlined and simplified significantly. Integration of the science timeline, which involves allocating observation time in a balanced manner to each of the five different science disciplines (with representatives from the twelve different science instruments), has long been a labor-intensive endeavor. Lessons learned from the prime mission (2004-2008) and first extended mission (Equinox mission, 2008-2010) were utilized to design a new process involving PIEs (Pre-Integrated Events) to ensure the highest priority observations for each discipline could be accomplished despite reduced work force and overall simplification of processes. Discipline-level PIE lists were managed by the Science Planning team and graphically mapped to aid timeline deconfliction meetings prior to assigning discrete segments of time to the various disciplines. Periapse segments are generally discipline-focused, with the exception of a handful of PIEs. In addition to all PIEs being documented in a spreadsheet, allocated out-of-discipline PIEs were entered into the Cassini Information Management System (CIMS) well in advance of timeline integration. The disciplines were then free to work the rest of the timeline internally, without the need for frequent interaction, debate, and negotiation with representatives from other disciplines. As a result, the number of integration meetings has been cut back extensively, freeing up workforce. The sequence implementation process was streamlined as well, combining two previous processes (and teams) into one. The new Sequence Implementation Process (SIP) schedules 22 weeks to build each 10-week-long sequence, and only 3 sequence processes overlap. This differs significantly from prime mission during which 5-week-long sequences were built in 24 weeks

  2. The Cassini Solstice Mission: Streamlining Operations by Sequencing with PIEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandermey, Nancy; Alonge, Eleanor K.; Magee, Kari; Heventhal, William

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini Solstice Mission (CSM) is the second extended mission phase of the highly successful Cassini/Huygens mission to Saturn. Conducted at a much-reduced funding level, operations for the CSM have been streamlined and simplified significantly. Integration of the science timeline, which involves allocating observation time in a balanced manner to each of the five different science disciplines (with representatives from the twelve different science instruments), has long been a labor-intensive endeavor. Lessons learned from the prime mission (2004-2008) and first extended mission (Equinox mission, 2008-2010) were utilized to design a new process involving PIEs (Pre-Integrated Events) to ensure the highest priority observations for each discipline could be accomplished despite reduced work force and overall simplification of processes. Discipline-level PIE lists were managed by the Science Planning team and graphically mapped to aid timeline deconfliction meetings prior to assigning discrete segments of time to the various disciplines. Periapse segments are generally discipline-focused, with the exception of a handful of PIEs. In addition to all PIEs being documented in a spreadsheet, allocated out-of-discipline PIEs were entered into the Cassini Information Management System (CIMS) well in advance of timeline integration. The disciplines were then free to work the rest of the timeline internally, without the need for frequent interaction, debate, and negotiation with representatives from other disciplines. As a result, the number of integration meetings has been cut back extensively, freeing up workforce. The sequence implementation process was streamlined as well, combining two previous processes (and teams) into one. The new Sequence Implementation Process (SIP) schedules 22 weeks to build each 10-week-long sequence, and only 3 sequence processes overlap. This differs significantly from prime mission during which 5-week-long sequences were built in 24 weeks

  3. Streamlining cardiovascular clinical trials to improve efficiency and generalisability.

    PubMed

    Zannad, Faiez; Pfeffer, Marc A; Bhatt, Deepak L; Bonds, Denise E; Borer, Jeffrey S; Calvo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Fiore, Louis; Lund, Lars H; Madigan, David; Maggioni, Aldo Pietro; Meyers, Catherine M; Rosenberg, Yves; Simon, Tabassome; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Zalewski, Andrew; Zariffa, Nevine; Temple, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Controlled trials provide the most valid determination of the efficacy and safety of an intervention, but large cardiovascular clinical trials have become extremely costly and complex, making it difficult to study many important clinical questions. A critical question, and the main objective of this review, is how trials might be simplified while maintaining randomisation to preserve scientific integrity and unbiased efficacy assessments. Experience with alternative approaches is accumulating, specifically with registry-based randomised controlled trials that make use of data already collected. This approach addresses bias concerns while still capitalising on the benefits and efficiencies of a registry. Several completed or ongoing trials illustrate the feasibility of using registry-based controlled trials to answer important questions relevant to daily clinical practice. Randomised trials within healthcare organisation databases may also represent streamlined solutions for some types of investigations, although data quality (endpoint assessment) is likely to be a greater concern in those settings. These approaches are not without challenges, and issues pertaining to informed consent, blinding, data quality and regulatory standards remain to be fully explored. Collaboration among stakeholders is necessary to achieve standards for data management and analysis, to validate large data sources for use in randomised trials, and to re-evaluate ethical standards to encourage research while also ensuring that patients are protected. The rapidly evolving efforts to streamline cardiovascular clinical trials have the potential to lead to major advances in promoting better care and outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Cross-streamline migration of a semiflexible polymer in a pressure driven flow.

    PubMed

    Reddig, S; Stark, H

    2011-10-28

    Experiments and simulations on single α-actin filaments in the Poiseuille flow through a microchannel show that the center-of-mass probability density across the channel assumes a bimodal shape as a result of pronounced cross-streamline migration. We reexamine the problem and perform Brownian dynamics simulations for a bead-spring chain with bending elasticity. Hydrodynamic interactions between the pointlike beads are taken into account by the two-wall Green tensor of the Stokes equations. Our simulations reproduce the bimodal distribution only when hydrodynamic interactions are taken into account. Numerical results on the orientational order of the end-to-end vector of the model polymer are also presented together with analytical hard-needle expressions at zero flow velocity. We derive a Smoluchowski equation for the center-of-mass distribution and carefully analyze the different contributions to the probability current that causes the bimodal distribution. As for flexible polymers, hydrodynamic repulsion explains the depletion at the wall. However, in contrast to flexible polymers, the deterministic drift current mainly determines migration away from the centerline and thereby depletion at the center. Diffusional currents due to a position-dependent diffusivity become less important with increasing polymer stiffness.

  5. Evaluation of intensity of artefacts in CBCT by radio-opacity of composite simulation models of implants in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kuusisto, N; Vallittu, P K; Lassila, L V J; Huumonen, S

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to compare the intensity of artefacts in CBCT images caused by different percentages of radio-opacifying material in composite simulation models of implants. Titanium and zirconia models of implants were used as a reference for the evaluation of the intensity of artefacts. Seven different percentages of radio-opacifying BaAlSiO2 fillers were added to composite resin to fabricate seven step wedges and simulation models of implants. Titanium and zirconia simulation models of implants were also fabricated. Aluminium step wedge was used as a reference for the measurement of grey values in intraoral radiographs. Step wedges were exposed with a Planmeca Intra X-ray machine (Planmeca Oy, Helsinki, Finland). All composite, titanium and zirconia simulation models of implants were exposed with a SCANORA(®) 3D dental X-ray machine (Soredex, Tuusula, Finland). Images and grey values were analysed with ImageJ software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD). To demonstrate possible artefacts between all the simulation models of implants, the images were also visually compared with each other using ImageJ software. Artefacts were clearly present in CBCT images caused by titanium and zirconia and when the composite material consisted at least 20% BaAlSiO2. The intensity of artefacts increased when the radio-opacity of the composite material increased. Materials containing less radio-opacity produce less pronounced artefacts. The cut-off point for artefacts is at 20% radio-opaque filling material in composite material.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Impact Damage Induced by Orbital Debris on Shielded Wall of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniaev, Aleksandr; Telichev, Igor

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a methodology for numerical simulation of the formation of the front wall damage in composite overwrapped pressure vessels under hypervelocity impact. Both SPH particles and Lagrangian finite elements were employed in combination for numerical simulations. Detailed numerical models implementing two filament winding patterns with different degree of interweaving were developed and used to simulate 2.5 km/s and 5.0 km/s impacts of 5 mm-diameter spherical aluminum-alloy projectile. Obtained results indicate that winding pattern may have a pronounced effect on vessel damage in case of orbital debris impact, influencing propagation of the stress waves in composite material.

  7. 77 FR 32034 - Policies To Promote Rural Radio Service and To Streamline Allotment and Assignment Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Policies To Promote Rural Radio Service and To Streamline Allotment and Assignment... policies to promote rural radio service and to streamline allotment and assignment procedures. This notice...

  8. 16 CFR 610.3 - Streamlined process for requesting annual file disclosures from nationwide specialty consumer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... have a streamlined process for accepting and processing consumer requests for annual file disclosures... disclosures by a toll-free telephone number that: (i) Provides clear and prominent instructions for requesting... streamlined process required by this part; (ii) Is published, in conjunction with all other published numbers...

  9. A Vocabulary Approach to Partial Streamline Matching and Exploratory Flow Visualization.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jun; Wang, Chaoli; Shene, Ching-Kuang; Shaw, Raymond A

    2016-05-01

    Measuring the similarity of integral curves is fundamental to many important flow data analysis and visualization tasks such as feature detection, pattern querying, streamline clustering, and hierarchical exploration. In this paper, we introduce FlowString, a novel vocabulary approach that extracts shape invariant features from streamlines and utilizes a string-based method for exploratory streamline analysis and visualization. Our solution first resamples streamlines by considering their local feature scales. We then classify resampled points along streamlines based on the shape similarity around their local neighborhoods. We encode each streamline into a string of well-selected shape characters, from which we construct meaningful words for querying and retrieval. A unique feature of our approach is that it captures intrinsic streamline similarity that is invariant under translation, rotation and scaling. We design an intuitive interface and user interactions to support flexible querying, allowing exact and approximate searches for partial streamline matching. Users can perform queries at either the character level or the word level, and define their own characters or words conveniently for customized search. We demonstrate the effectiveness of FlowString with several flow field data sets of different sizes and characteristics. We also extend FlowString to handle multiple data sets and perform an empirical expert evaluation to confirm the usefulness of this approach.

  10. 75 FR 29321 - Streamlined Procedure for Appeal Brief Review in Ex Parte Reexamination Proceedings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Streamlined Procedure for Appeal Brief Review in Ex Parte Reexamination... States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is streamlining the procedure for the review of appeal briefs... whether appeal briefs filed in ex parte reexamination proceeding appeals comply with the applicable...

  11. Self streamlining wind tunnel: Low speed testing and transonic test section design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, S. W. D.; Goodyer, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Comprehensive aerodynamic data on an airfoil section were obtained through a wide range of angles of attack, both stalled and unstalled. Data were gathered using a self streamlining wind tunnel and were compared to results obtained on the same section in a conventional wind tunnel. The reduction of wall interference through streamline was demonstrated.

  12. 48 CFR 13.005 - Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 list of inapplicable laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 list of inapplicable laws. 13.005 Section 13.005 Federal Acquisition Regulations... PROCEDURES 13.005 Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 list of inapplicable laws. (a) The following...

  13. 48 CFR 13.005 - Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 list of inapplicable laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 list of inapplicable laws. 13.005 Section 13.005 Federal Acquisition Regulations... PROCEDURES 13.005 Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 list of inapplicable laws. (a) The following...

  14. 48 CFR 13.005 - Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 list of inapplicable laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 list of inapplicable laws. 13.005 Section 13.005 Federal Acquisition Regulations... PROCEDURES 13.005 Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 list of inapplicable laws. (a) The following...

  15. 48 CFR 13.005 - Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 list of inapplicable laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 list of inapplicable laws. 13.005 Section 13.005 Federal Acquisition Regulations... PROCEDURES 13.005 Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 list of inapplicable laws. (a) The following...

  16. Simulation of ultrasonic inspection of curved composites using a hybrid semi-analytical/numerical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverdy, Frédéric; Mahaut, Steve; Dominguez, Nicolas; Dubois, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Carbon Fiber reinforced composites are increasingly used in structural parts in the aeronautics industry, as they allow to reduce the weight of aircrafts while maintaining high mechanical performances. However, such structures can be complicated to inspect due to their complex geometries and complex composite properties, leading to highly heterogeneous and anisotropic materials. Different potential damages and manufacturing flaws related to these parts are to be detected: porosities, ply waviness, delaminations after impact. Ultrasonic inspection, which is commonly used to test the full volume of composite panels, thus has to cope with both complex wave propagation (within anisotropic parts whose crystallographic orientation varies according to the layers structure) and flaw interaction (local distortion of plies such as ply waviness, small pores, structural noise due to periodicity patterns…). Developing NDT procedures for those parts therefore requires simulation tools to help for understanding those phenomena, and to optimize probes and techniques. Within the CIVA multi-techniques platform, CEA-LIST has developed semi-analytical tools for ultrasonic techniques, which have the advantages of high computational efficiency (fast calculations), but with limited range of application due to some hypothesis (for instance, homogenization approaches which don't allow to take account of structural noise). On the other hand, numerical methods such as finite element (FEM) or finite difference in time domain (FDTD) are more suitable to compute ultrasonic wave propagation and defect scattering in complex materials such as composite but require more computational efforts. Hybrid methods couple semi-analytical solutions and numerical computations in limited spatial domains to handle complex cases with high computation performances. In CIVA we have integrated a hybrid model that combines the semi-analytical methods developed at CEA to FDTD codes developed at Airbus Group

  17. Local Elastic Constants for Epoxy-Nanotube Composites from Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Gates, T. S.

    2007-01-01

    A method from molecular dynamics simulation is developed for determining local elastic constants of an epoxy/nanotube composite. The local values of C11, C33, K12, and K13 elastic constants are calculated for an epoxy/nanotube composite as a function of radial distance from the nanotube. While the results possess a significant amount of statistical uncertainty resulting from both the numerical analysis and the molecular fluctuations during the simulation, the following observations can be made. If the size of the region around the nanotube is increased from shells of 1 to 6 in thickness, then the scatter in the data reduces enough to observe trends. All the elastic constants determined are at a minimum 20 from the center of the nanotube. The C11, C33, and K12 follow similar trends as a function of radial distance from the nanotube. The K13 decreases greater distances from the nanotube and becomes negative which may be a symptom of the statistical averaging.

  18. Simulation of an Impact Test of the All-Composite Lear Fan Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockwell, Alan E.; Jones, Lisa E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An MSC.Dytran model of an all-composite Lear Fan aircraft fuselage was developed to simulate an impact test conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF). The test was the second of two Lear Fan impact tests. The purpose of the second test was to evaluate the performance of retrofitted composite energy-absorbing floor beams. A computerized photogrammetric survey was performed to provide airframe geometric coordinates, and over 5000 points were processed and imported into MSC.Patran via an IGES file. MSC.Patran was then used to develop the curves and surfaces and to mesh the finite element model. A model of the energy-absorbing floor beams was developed separately and then integrated into the Lear Fan model. Structural responses of components such as the wings were compared with experimental data or previously published analytical data wherever possible. Comparisons with experimental results were used to guide structural model modifications to improve the simulation performance. This process was based largely on qualitative (video and still camera images and post-test inspections) rather than quantitative results due to the relatively few accelerometers attached to the structure.

  19. Measurements and simulations of the near-surface composition of evaporating ethanol-water droplets.

    PubMed

    Homer, Christopher J; Jiang, Xingmao; Ward, Timothy L; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Reid, Jonathan P

    2009-09-28

    The evolving composition of evaporating ethanol-water droplets (initially 32.6 or 45.3 microm radius) is probed by stimulated Raman scattering over the period 0.2 to 3 ms following droplet generation and with a surrounding nitrogen gas pressure in the range 10 to 100 kPa. The dependence of the evaporation rate on the relative humidity of the surrounding gas phase is also reported. The measured data are compared with both a quasi-steady state model and with numerical simulations of the evaporation process. Results from the numerical simulations are shown to agree closely with the measurements when the stimulated signal is assumed to arise from an outer shell with a probe depth of 2.9+/-0.4% of the droplet radius, consistent with a previous determination. Further, the time-dependent measurements are shown to be sensitive to the development of concentration gradients within evaporating droplets. This represents the first direct measurement of the spatial gradients in composition that arise during the evaporation of aerosol droplets and allows the influence of liquid phase diffusion within the condensed phase on droplet evaporation to be examined.

  20. Numerical simulation on the seismic absorption effect of the cushion in rigid-pile composite foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaolei; Li, Yaokun; Ji, Jing; Ying, Junhao; Li, Weichen; Dai, Baicheng

    2016-06-01

    In order to quantitatively study the seismic absorption effect of the cushion on a superstructure, a numerical simulation and parametric study are carried out on the overall FEA model of a rigid-pile composite foundation in ABAQUS. A simulation of a shaking table test on a rigid mass block is first completed with ABAQUS and EERA, and the effectiveness of the Drucker-Prager constitutive model and the finite-infinite element coupling method is proved. Dynamic time-history analysis of the overall model under frequent and rare earthquakes is carried out using seismic waves from the El Centro, Kobe, and Bonds earthquakes. The different responses of rigid-pile composite foundations and pile-raft foundations are discussed. Furthermore, the influence of thickness and modulus of cushion, and ground acceleration on the seismic absorption effect of the cushion are analyzed. The results show that: 1) the seismic absorption effect of a cushion is good under rare earthquakes, with an absorption ratio of about 0.85; and 2) the seismic absorption effect is strongly affected by cushion thickness and ground acceleration.

  1. Simulation of Degraded Properties of 2D plain Woven C/SiC Composites under Preloading Oxidation Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xihui; Sun, Zhigang; Sun, Jianfen; Song, Yingdong

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a numerical model which incorporates the oxidation damage model and the finite element model of 2D plain woven composites is presented for simulation of the oxidation behaviors of 2D plain woven C/SiC composite under preloading oxidation atmosphere. The equal proportional reduction method is firstly proposed to calculate the residual moduli and strength of unidirectional C/SiC composite. The multi-scale method is developed to simulate the residual elastic moduli and strength of 2D plain woven C/SiC composite. The multi-scale method is able to accurately predict the residual elastic modulus and strength of the composite. Besides, the simulated residual elastic moduli and strength of 2D plain woven C/SiC composites under preloading oxidation atmosphere show good agreements with experimental results. Furthermore, the preload, oxidation time, temperature and fiber volume fractions of the composite are investigated to show their influences upon the residual elastic modulus and strength of 2D plain woven C/SiC composites.

  2. Simulation of Low Velocity Impact Induced Inter- and Intra-Laminar Damage of Composite Beams Based on XFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Guan, Zhidong; Li, Zengshan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the Inter-Fiber Fracture (IFF) criterion of Puck failure theory based on the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) was implemented in ABAQUS code to predict the intra-laminar crack initiation of unidirectional (UD) composite laminate. The transverse crack path in the matrix can be simulated accurately by the presented method. After the crack initiation, the propagation of the crack is simulated by Cohesive Zoom Model (CZM), in which the displacement discontinuities and stress concentration caused by matrix crack is introduced into the finite element (FE) model. Combined with the usage of the enriched element interface, which can be used to simulate the inter-laminar delamination crack, the Low Velocity Impact (LVI) induced damage of UD composite laminate beam with a typical stacking of composite laminates [05/903]S is studied. A complete crack initiation and propagation process was simulated and the numerical results obtained by the XFEM are consistent with the experimental results.

  3. Production of particulate Composition B during simulated weathering of larger detonation residues.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Mark E; Schaefer, Charles E; Andaya, Christina; Fallis, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Explosives and energetics continue to be prominent contaminants on many military installations. This research was undertaken to understand the extent to which microscale (10's of μm) particles are produced when macroscale residues are weathered by artificial precipitation. Initial experiments, in which artificial rainwater was applied drip-wise to single chunks of Composition B detonation residues from multiple heights, confirmed that microscale particles were produced during precipitation-driven aging, with 30% of the explosive mass collected detected as particulate Composition B (e.g., particles >0.45 μm in diameter). Follow-on experiments, during which multiple cm-sized residue chunks were subjected to realistic simulated precipitation, demonstrated an initial large pulse of particulate Composition B, followed by sustained production of microscale particles that represented 15-20% of recovered explosives. These findings indicate that the effective footprint of detonation residues likely increases as particulates are produced by the production and spreading of microscale particles across the soil surface. Combined with results published elsewhere that microscale particles can move into porous media to become a distributed source term, these findings point to the need for inclusion of these processes in explosive contaminant fate and transport modeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of irradiation damage of SiC/Gra/SiC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Song, Huai-Zhi; Mao, Fei; Wang, Cheng-Jun; Wang, Dong-Qi; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2017-09-01

    Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites have been investigated for their use as structural materials for advanced nuclear reactor. Although quite a number of researches have been devoted to probe the effects of irradiation on various properties of the composites, there is little known about the atomistic mechanism for irradiation resistance. In this study, a two-temperature model has been used to investigate the irradiation damage of SiC/Gra/SiC composites, which includes three parts and two SiC/C interfaces, two single crystal cubic silicon carbide on two sides and a few graphene sheets in the middle part. By simulating 100 keV displacement cascades, we find that the number of defects in the reinforcement is larger than that in the matrix, which indicates the damage in the reinforcement is more serious than that in the matrix. Moreover, we explicitly investigate the damage behavior of the interphase graphene layers and find that some atoms in one graphene sheet form many new chemical bonds with atoms in another one, which leads to the transition from sp2 to sp3 hybridization. The newly formed chemical bonds link the different graphene layers and make graphene-like electronic structure more ;diamond-like;, enhancing the irradiation resistance of the matrix.

  5. Food Simulating Organic Solvents for Evaluating Crosslink Density of Bulk Fill Composite Resin

    PubMed Central

    Bahgat, Hala A.; Al Kaba, Eman Hussain; Buholayka, Maryam Hussain

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate crosslink densities of two bulk fill composite resins and determine if the used Food Simulating Organic Solvent (FSOS) affected them. Methods. Forty specimens were prepared from SureFill and SonicFill bulk fill composite resins, 20 each. All specimens were stored dry for 24 h. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups: stored in ethanol (E) 75% or in methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) 100% for 24 h. Crosslink density was evaluated by calculating the difference between the Vickers hardness numbers of the specimens stored dry and after their storage in FSOS. The data were statistically analyzed using t-test. Results. The means of crosslink density in E and MEK were 6.99% and 9.44% for SureFill and 10.54% and 11.92% for SonicFill, respectively. t-test displayed significant differences between crosslink densities of SureFill and SonicFill: (P < 0.0001) in E and (P = 0.02) in MEK and between crosslink densities of SureFill in E and MEK (P = 0.02). Conclusions. Crosslink density of bulk fill composite resin can be evaluated using E or MEK. SureFill has higher crosslink density than SonicFill in both E and MEK. PMID:28487739

  6. A Tow-Level Progressive Damage for Simulating Carbon-Fiber Textile Composites: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zywicz, E.

    2000-07-01

    A numerical approach to model the elasto-plastic and tensile damage response of tri-axially braided carbon-fiber polymeric-matrix composites is developed. It is micromechanically based and consists of a simplified unit cell geometry, a plane-stress tow-level constitutive relationship, a one-dimensional undulation constitutive law, and a non-traditional shell element integration rule. The braided composite lamina is idealized as periodic in the plane, and a simplified three-layer representative volume (RV) is assembled from axial and braider tows and pure resin regions. The constituents in each layer are homogenized with an iso-strain assumption in the fiber-direction and an iso-stress condition in the other directions. In the upper and lower layers, the fiber-direction strain is additively decomposed into an undulation and a tow portion. A finite-deformation tow model predicts the plane-stress tow response and is coupled to the undulation constitutive relationship. The overall braid model is implemented in DYNA3D and works with traditional shell elements. The finite-deformation tow constitutive relationship is derived from the fiber elasticity and the isotropic elasto-plastic power-law hardening matrix response using a thermodynamic framework and simple homogenization assumptions. The model replicates tensile damage evolution, in a smeared sense, parallel and perpendicular to the fiber axis and is regularized to yield mesh independent results. The tow-level model demonstrates reasonable agreement, prior to damage, with detailed three-dimensional FE (finite element) elasto-plastic simulations of aligned, periodically arranged, uni-directional composites. The 3-layer braid model response is compared with predictions obtained from detailed micromechanical simulations of the braid's unit cell in uni-axial extension, shear, and flexure for three braid angles. The elastic properties show good agreement as does the non-linear response for loadings dominated by the axial

  7. The Impact of Simulated Nature on Patient Outcomes: A Study of Photographic Sky Compositions.

    PubMed

    Pati, Debajyoti; Freier, Patricia; O'Boyle, Michael; Amor, Cherif; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-01-01

    To examine whether incorporation of simulated nature, in the form of ceiling mounted photographic sky compositions, influences patient outcomes. Previous studies have shown that most forms of nature exposure have a positive influence on patients. However, earlier studies have mostly focused on wall-hung nature representations. The emergence of simulated nature products has raised the question regarding the effects of the new product on patient outcomes. A between-subject experimental design was adopted, where outcomes from five inpatient rooms with sky composition ceiling fixture were compared to corresponding outcomes in five identical rooms without the intervention. Data were collected from a total of 181 subjects on 11 outcomes. Independent sample tests were performed to identify differences in mean outcomes. Significant positive outcomes were observed in environmental satisfaction and diastolic blood pressure (BP). Environmental satisfaction in the experimental group was 12.4% higher than the control group. Direction of association for diastolic BP, nausea/indigestion medication, acute stress, anxiety, pain, and environmental satisfaction were consistent with a priori hypothesis. A post hoc exploratory assessment involving patients who did not self-request additional pain and sleep medication demonstrated confirmatory directions for all outcomes except Systolic BP, and statistically significant outcomes for Acute Stress and Anxiety-Acute Stress and Anxiety levels of the experimental group subjects was 53.4% and 34.79% lower, respectively, than that of the control group subjects. Salutogenic benefits of photographic sky compositions render them better than traditional ceiling tiles and offer an alternative to other nature interventions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Dynamic analysis of bulk-fill composites: Effect of food-simulating liquids.

    PubMed

    Eweis, Ahmed Hesham; Yap, Adrian U-Jin; Yahya, Noor Azlin

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of food simulating liquids on visco-elastic properties of bulk-fill restoratives using dynamic mechanical analysis. One conventional composite (Filtek Z350 [FZ]), two bulk-fill composites (Filtek Bulk-fill [FB] and Tetric N Ceram [TN]) and a bulk-fill giomer (Beautifil-Bulk Restorative [BB]) were evaluated. Specimens (12 × 2 × 2mm) were fabricated using customized stainless steel molds. The specimens were light-cured, removed from their molds, finished, measured and randomly divided into six groups. The groups (n = 10) were conditioned in the following mediums for 7 days at 37°C: air (control), artificial saliva (SAGF), distilled water, 0.02N citric acid, heptane, 50% ethanol-water solution. Specimens were assessed using dynamic mechanical testing in flexural three-point bending mode and their respective mediums at 37°C and a frequency range of 0.1-10Hz. The distance between the supports were fixed at 10mm and an axial load of 5N was employed. Data for elastic modulus, viscous modulus and loss tangent were subjected to ANOVA/Tukey's tests at significance level p < 0.05. Significant differences in visco-elastic properties were observed between materials and mediums. Apart from bulk-fill giomer, elastic modulus was the highest after conditioning in heptane. No apparent trends were noted for viscous modulus. Generally, loss tangent was the highest after conditioning in ethanol. The effect of food-simulating liquids on the visco-elastic properties of bulk-fill composites was material and medium dependent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular Simulation of Ionic Polyimides and Composites with Ionic Liquids as Gas-Separation Membranes.

    PubMed

    Abedini, Asghar; Crabtree, Ellis; Bara, Jason E; Turner, C Heath

    2017-08-30

    Polyimides are at the forefront of advanced membrane materials for CO2 capture and gas-purification processes. Recently, ionic polyimides (i-PIs) have been reported as a new class of condensation polymers that combine structural components of both ionic liquids (ILs) and polyimides through covalent linkages. In this study, we report CO2 and CH4 adsorption and structural analyses of an i-PI and an i-PI + IL composite containing [C4mim][Tf2N]. The combination of molecular dynamics (MD) and grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations is used to compute the gas solubility and the adsorption performance with respect to the density, fractional free volume (FFV), and surface area of the materials. Our results highlight the polymer relaxation process and its correlation to the gas solubility. In particular, the surface area can provide meaningful guidance with respect to the gas solubility, and it tends to be a more sensitive indicator of the adsorption behavior versus only considering the system density and FFV. For instance, as the polymer continues to relax, the density, FFV, and pore-size distribution remain constant while the surface area can continue to increase, enabling more adsorption. Structural analyses are also conducted to identify the nature of the gas adsorption once the ionic liquid is added to the polymer. The presence of the IL significantly displaces the CO2 molecules from the ligand nitrogen sites in the neat i-PI to the imidazolium rings in the i-PI + IL composite. However, the CH4 molecules move from the imidazolium ring sites in the neat i-PI to the ligand nitrogen atoms in the i-PI + IL composite. These molecular details can provide critical information for the experimental design of highly selective i-PI materials as well as provide additional guidance for the interpretation of the simulated adsorption systems.

  10. Clustered streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles, Mars: Evidence for sediment deposition during floodwater ponding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burr, D.

    2005-01-01

    A unique clustering of layered streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles is hypothesized to reflect a significant hydraulic event. The forms, interpreted as sedimentary, are attributed to extensive sediment deposition during ponding and then streamlining of this sediment behind flow obstacles during ponded water outflow. These streamlined forms are analogous to those found in depositional basins and other loci of ponding in terrestrial catastrophic flood landscapes. These terrestrial streamlined forms can provide the best opportunity for reconstructing the history of the terrestrial flooding. Likewise, the streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles may provide the best opportunity to reconstruct the recent geologic history of this young Martian outflow channel. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Simulating the Black Saturday 2009 UTLS Smoke Plume with an Interactive Composition-Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. D.; Luo, M.; Fromm, M. D.; Voulgarakis, A.; Mangeon, S.; Worden, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Pyroconvective smoke plumes from large fires can be injected directly into the geostrophic flow and dry air at high altitudes. As a result, they are usually longer-lived, can be transported thousands of kilometers, and can cross the tropopause into the lower stratosphere. Because the emissions pulses are so abrupt relative to other non-volcanic sources, their evolution and decay can be easily separated from background levels of aerosols and trace gases. This makes them interesting natural experiments against which to evaluate models, and understand the fate and effects of surface emissions pulses. We have simulated the well-observed February 2009 Black Saturday smoke plume from southeast Australia using the NASA GISS Earth System Model. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first simulation of a high altitude smoke plume with a full-complexity composition-climate model. We compared simulated CO to a joint retrieval from the Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Microwave Limb Sounder instruments. Using an upper tropospheric injection height, we were able to simulate the plume's eastward transport and ascent over New Zealand, anticyclonic circulation and ascent over the Coral Sea, westward transport in the lower tropical stratosphere, and arrival over Africa at the end of February. Simulations were improved by taking into account hourly variability in emissions associated with extreme fire behavior observed by fire management agencies. We considered a range of emissions amounts, based on different assumptions about which of the Black Saturday fires were explosive enough to inject smoke to high altitudes, and accounting for emissions factor uncertainty. The best agreement between plume concentrations at the end of February was found for the highest emissions scenario. Three days after the fire, there was a linear relationship between emissions amount and plume concentration. Three weeks after the fire, the relationship was non-linear; we discuss

  12. Understanding Differences in the Response to Composition Change as Simulated by CCMVal Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Strahan, Susan E.; Oman, Luke D.

    2012-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) have a common conceptual basis. Differences in implementation lead to differences in the stratospheric ozone response to changes in composition and climate. Although evaluation by CCMVal-2 identified strengths and weaknesses of participant models, the evaluation results were not used to discriminate among projections for future ozone evolution, at least in part because the overall diagnostic evaluation did not cleanly relate to the differences in CCM response. Here we use a subset of CCMVal diagnostics and additional analysis to understand the differences in response. In the upper stratosphere, differences in simulated temperature and total odd nitrogen prior to increases in chlorine loading explain the large differences in CCM sensitivity. In the lower atmosphere, there are two principle contributions to differences in CCM sensitivity to chlorine and climate change. First, differences in the lower stratospheric ClO affect simulated sensitivity to chlorine. CCMs with best transport performance match NDACC column HCl measurements at a broad range of latitudes. Other CCMs disagree with observations due to differences in total inorganic chlorine, partitioning between HCl and ClONO2, or both. Differences in ClONO2 are directly related to differences in simulated ClO. Second, although all CCMs predict increased tropical upwelling, the rate of increase varies and contributes to differences in tropical ozone and the 60N-60S column average.

  13. Impact of eliminating fracture intersection nodes in multiphase compositional flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Kenneth M.; Unger, Andre J. A.; Ioannidis, Marios A.; Parker, Beth L.

    2017-04-01

    Algebraic elimination of nodes at discrete fracture intersections via the star-delta technique has proven to be a valuable tool for making multiphase numerical simulations more tractable and efficient. This study examines the assumptions of the star-delta technique and exposes its effects in a 3-D, multiphase context for advective and dispersive/diffusive fluxes. Key issues of relative permeability-saturation-capillary pressure (kr-S-Pc) and capillary barriers at fracture-fracture intersections are discussed. This study uses a multiphase compositional, finite difference numerical model in discrete fracture network (DFN) and discrete fracture-matrix (DFM) modes. It verifies that the numerical model replicates analytical solutions and performs adequately in convergence exercises (conservative and decaying tracer, one and two-phase flow, DFM and DFN domains). The study culminates in simulations of a two-phase laboratory experiment in which a fluid invades a simple fracture intersection. The experiment and simulations evoke different invading fluid flow paths by varying fracture apertures as oil invades water-filled fractures and as water invades air-filled fractures. Results indicate that the node elimination technique as implemented in numerical model correctly reproduces the long-term flow path of the invading fluid, but that short-term temporal effects of the capillary traps and barriers arising from the intersection node are lost.

  14. Aerosol microphysics simulations of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption with the UKCA composition-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhomse, S. S.; Emmerson, K. M.; Mann, G. W.; Bellouin, N.; Carslaw, K. S.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Hommel, R.; Abraham, N. L.; Telford, P.; Braesicke, P.; Dalvi, M.; Johnson, C. E.; O'Connor, F.; Morgenstern, O.; Pyle, J. A.; Deshler, T.; Zawodny, J. M.; Thomason, L. W.

    2014-01-01

    We have enhanced the capability of a microphysical aerosol-chemistry module to simulate the atmospheric aerosol and precursor gases for both tropospheric and stratospheric conditions. Using the Mount Pinatubo eruption (June 1991) as a test case, we evaluate simulated aerosol properties in a composition-climate model against a range of satellite and in-situ observations. Simulations are performed assuming an injection of 20 Tg SO2 at 19-27 km in tropical latitudes, without any radiative feedback from the simulated aerosol. In both quiescent and volcanically perturbed conditions, simulated aerosol properties in the lower stratosphere show reasonable agreement with the observations. The model captures the observed timing of the maximum aerosol optical depth (AOD) and its decay timescale in both tropics and Northern Hemisphere (NH) mid-latitudes. There is also good qualitative agreement with the observations in terms of spatial and temporal variation of the aerosol effective radius (Reff), which peaks 6-8 months after the eruption. However, the model shows significant biases against some observational data sets. Simulated AOD and Surface Area Density (SAD) in the tropics are substantially higher than the gap-filled satellite data products during the first 6 months after the eruption. The model shows consistently weaker enhancement in Reff compared to satellite and in-situ measurements. Simulated aerosol particle size distribution is also compared to NH mid-latitude in-situ balloon sounding measurements of size-resolved number concentrations. Before the eruption, the model captures the observed profiles of lower stratospheric particle number concentrations with radii larger than 5, 150 and 250 nm (N5, N150 and N250) very well. However, in the first 6 months after the eruption, the model shows high bias in N5 concentrations in the lower stratosphere, suggesting too strong nucleation. Following particle growth via condensation and coagulation, this bias in the finest

  15. Chemistry Simulations using the MERRA-2 Reanalysis with the GMI CTM and Replay in Support of the Atmospheric Composition Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, Luke D.; Strahan, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Simulations using reanalysis meteorological fields have long been used to understand the causes of atmospheric composition change in the recent past. Using the new MERRA-2 reanalysis, we are conducting chemistry simulations to create products covering 1980-2016 for the atmospheric composition community. These simulations use the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical mechanism in two different models: the GMI Chemical Transport Model (CTM) and the GEOS-5 model in Replay mode. Replay mode means an integration of the GEOS-5 general circulation model that is incrementally adjusted each time step toward the MERRA-2 reanalysis. The GMI CTM is a 1 deg x 1.25 deg simulation and the MERRA-2 GMI Replay simulation uses the native MERRA-2 grid of approximately 1/2 deg horizontal resolution on the cubed sphere. A specialized set of transport diagnostics is included in both runs to better understand trace gas transport and its variability in the recent past.

  16. Development of a 2-D large-scale micellar/polymer simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.

    1982-01-01

    A large-scale, two-dimensional, multicomponent, multiphase, compositional simulator for micellar/polymer flooding has been developed and applied. It can be used to calculate the areal sweep with any well pattern and any irregular reservoir boundary. This model involves both streamline and finite-difference techniques. Time invariant streamlines without transverse dispersion are assumed. The change in the flow rates into each streamline is accounted for as a function of mobility ratio. The sensitivity of the oil recovery for micellar/polymer flood to several reservoir and process variables was investigated. The reservoir variables included the well spacing, pattern type, pattern orientation in an anisotropic reservoir, and degree of confinement. The process variables included the salinity gradient, surfactant content of the slug, slug and polymer bank sizes, mobility ratio of polymer drive to oil bank, and polymer shear thinning effect. In order to demonstrate that this model is capable of handling large field problems, a large-scale simulation of the north lease of the El Dorado micellar/polymer pilot test was made. The simulated final oil recovery and the production histories of each producer are illustrated.

  17. Hardness gradients of dual-polymerized flowable composite resins in simulated root canals.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong; Meng, Xiangfeng; Luo, Xiaoping

    2014-11-01

    Information is lacking of the polymerization depth of dual-polymerized flowable composite resin foundation materials in simulated root canals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hardness gradients and the polymerization depth of dual-polymerized flowable composite resin foundation materials in simulated root canals. Slots in steel split cylinders with 1 open end were filled with the following 6 materials: Luxa Core, Para Core, Clearfil DC Core, Multi Core Flow, Gradia Core, and Core-Flo DC. After filling, they were subjected to a light intensity of 1250 mWcm(-2) with a light-emitting diode light through their open ends for 20 seconds. The resulting specimens were stored in a light-proof box at 37°C, and the Knoop hardness gradients of each polymerized material were measured after 0.5 hour, 24 hours, and 120 hours. The surface readings were obtained in 1-mm intervals at 1 mm to 10 mm away from the open ends. The collected data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (α=.05). Before the Knoop hardness numbers of the 6 materials became stable, they decreased gradually in depth at each time point (P<.001). However, the depths at which they became stable differed. The Knoop hardness numbers of Luxa Core and Core-Flo DC reached stability at a depth of 3 mm, Para Core at 4 mm, and Clearfil DC Core, Multi Core Flow, and Gradia Core at 5 mm. Additionally, at 120 hours after exposure, the ratios of the Knoop hardness numbers at a depth of 5 mm to those at 1 mm were 63.08% for Luxa Core, 70.48% for Clearfil DC Core, 81.38% for Para Core, 80.49% for Gradia Core, 86.30% for Multi Core Flow, and 96.28% for Core-Flo DC. In simulated root canals, the flowable composite resin foundation materials tested had better polymerization under dual polymerizing than under chemical polymerizing, and their chemical-polymerized capabilities could determine the definitive polymerization depth. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of

  18. Streamlined islands and the English Channel megaflood hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, J. S.; Oggioni, F.; Gupta, S.; García-Moreno, D.; Trentesaux, A.; De Batist, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recognising ice-age catastrophic megafloods is important because they had significant impact on large-scale drainage evolution and patterns of water and sediment movement to the oceans, and likely induced very rapid, short-term effects on climate. It has been previously proposed that a drainage system on the floor of the English Channel was initiated by catastrophic flooding in the Pleistocene but this suggestion has remained controversial. Here we examine this hypothesis through an analysis of key landform features. We use a new compilation of multi- and single-beam bathymetry together with sub-bottom profiler data to establish the internal structure, planform geometry and hence origin of a set of 36 mid-channel islands. Whilst there is evidence of modern-day surficial sediment processes, the majority of the islands can be clearly demonstrated to be formed of bedrock, and are hence erosional remnants rather than depositional features. The islands display classic lemniscate or tear-drop outlines, with elongated tips pointing downstream, typical of streamlined islands formed during high-magnitude water flow. The length-to-width ratio for the entire island population is 3.4 ± 1.3 and the degree-of-elongation or k-value is 3.7 ± 1.4. These values are comparable to streamlined islands in other proven Pleistocene catastrophic flood terrains and are distinctly different to values found in modern-day rivers. The island geometries show a correlation with bedrock type: with those carved from Upper Cretaceous chalk having larger length-to-width ratios (3.2 ± 1.3) than those carved into more mixed Paleogene terrigenous sandstones, siltstones and mudstones (3.0 ± 1.5). We attribute these differences to the former rock unit having a lower skin friction which allowed longer island growth to achieve minimum drag. The Paleogene islands, although less numerous than the Chalk islands, also assume more perfect lemniscate shapes. These lithologies therefore reached island

  19. Alignment of carbon iron into polydimethylsiloxane to create conductive composite with low percolation threshold and high piezoresistivity: experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shuai; Wang, Xiaojie

    2017-04-01

    In this study, various amounts of carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) were cured into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix under a magnetic field up to 1.0 T to create anisotropy of conductive composite materials. The electrical resistivity for the longitudinal direction was measured as a function of filler volume fraction to understand the electrical percolation behavior. The electrical percolation threshold (EPT) of CIPs-PDMS composite cured under a magnetic field can be as low as 0.1 vol%, which is much less than most of those studies in particulate composites. Meanwhile, the effects of compressive strain on the electrical properties of CIPs-PDMS composites were also investigated. The strain sensitivity depends on filler volume fraction and decreases with the increasing of compressive strain. It has been found that the composites containing a small amount of CI particles curing under a magnetic field exhibit a high strain sensitivity of over 150. Based on the morphological observation of the composite structures, a two-dimensional stick percolation model for the CIPs-PDMS composites has been established. The Monte Carlo simulation is performed to obtain the percolation probability. The simulation results in prediction of the values of EPTs are close to that of experimental measurements. It demonstrates that the low percolation behavior of CIPs-PDMS composites is due to the average length of particle chains forming by external magnetic field.

  20. Control software for two dimensional airfoil tests using a self-streamlining flexible walled transonic test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, S. W. D.; Goodyer, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    Operation of the Transonic Self-Streamlining Wind Tunnel (TSWT) involved on-line data acquisition with automatic wall adjustment. A tunnel run consisted of streamlining the walls from known starting contours in iterative steps and acquiring model data. Each run performs what is described as a streamlining cycle. The associated software is presented.

  1. Simulation of Mechanical Behavior and Damage of a Large Composite Wind Turbine Blade under Critical Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarfaoui, M.; Nachtane, M.; Khadimallah, H.; Saifaoui, D.

    2017-07-01

    Issues such as energy generation/transmission and greenhouse gas emissions are the two energy problems we face today. In this context, renewable energy sources are a necessary part of the solution essentially winds power, which is one of the most profitable sources of competition with new fossil energy facilities. This paper present the simulation of mechanical behavior and damage of a 48 m composite wind turbine blade under critical wind loads. The finite element analysis was performed by using ABAQUS code to predict the most critical damage behavior and to apprehend and obtain knowledge of the complex structural behavior of wind turbine blades. The approach developed based on the nonlinear FE analysis using mean values for the material properties and the failure criteria of Tsai-Hill to predict failure modes in large structures and to identify the sensitive zones.

  2. Mass transfer model liquid phase catalytic exchange column simulation applicable to any column composition profile

    SciTech Connect

    Busigin, A.

    2015-03-15

    Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) is a key technology used in water detritiation systems. Rigorous simulation of LPCE is complicated when a column may have both hydrogen and deuterium present in significant concentrations in different sections of the column. This paper presents a general mass transfer model for a homogenous packed bed LPCE column as a set of differential equations describing composition change, and equilibrium equations to define the mass transfer driving force within the column. The model is used to show the effect of deuterium buildup in the bottom of an LPCE column from non-negligible D atom fraction in the bottom feed gas to the column. These types of calculations are important in the design of CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) water detritiation systems.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Inter-laminar Damage Evolution in a Composite Wing Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, A.; Raimondo, A.; Borrelli, R.; Mercurio, U.; Tescione, D.; Scaramuzzino, F.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a numerical study has been carried out on skin delamination and skin-stringer debonding growth in a composite wing-box under compressive loading conditions. The adopted numerical models use the Virtual Crack Closure Technique to simulate the inter-laminar damage evolution and the numerical analyses have been performed by means of the FEM code ABAQUS and B2000++. The obtained numerical results have been assessed and compared each other in terms of delaminated area evolution, delamination growth initiation load and strain distributions. In order to investigate the effectiveness of the adopted numerical platforms in predicting the evolution of inter-laminar damages, comparisons with experimental data, in terms of load displacement curves and strains in the debonding area, have been also introduced.

  4. Damage Simulation in Non-Crimp Fabric Composite Plates Subjected to Impact Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip B.; Aitharaju, Venkat; Aashat, Satvir; Kia, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Progressive failure analysis (PFA) of non-crimp fabric (NCF) composite laminates subjected to low velocity impact loads was performed using the COmplete STress Reduction (COSTR) damage model implemented through VUMAT and UMAT41 user subroutines in the frame works of the commercial finite element programs ABAQUS/Explicit and LS-DYNA, respectively. To validate the model, low velocity experiments were conducted and detailed correlations between the predictions and measurements for both intra-laminar and inter-laminar failures were made. The developed material and damage model predicts the peak impact load and duration very close with the experimental results. Also, the simulation results of delamination damage between the ply interfaces, in-plane matrix damages and fiber damages were all in good agreement with the measurements from the non-destructive evaluation data.

  5. Carbon fiber composites inspection and defect characterization using active infrared thermography: numerical simulations and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Henrique; Zhang, Hai; Figueiredo, Alisson; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Guimarares, Gilmar; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    Composite materials are widely used in the aeronautic industry. One of the reasons is because they have strength and stiffness comparable to metals, with the added advantage of significant weight reduction. Infrared thermography (IT) is a safe nondestructive testing technique that has a fast inspection rate. In active IT, an external heat source is used to stimulate the material being inspected in order to generate a thermal contrast between the feature of interest and the background. In this paper, carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers are inspected using IT. More specifically, carbon/PEEK (polyether ether ketone) laminates with square Kapton inserts of different sizes and at different depths are tested with three different IT techniques: pulsed thermography, vibrothermography, and line scan thermography. The finite element method is used to simulate the pulsed thermography experiment. Numerical results displayed a very good agreement with experimental results.

  6. GPU-based simulations of fracture in idealized brick and mortar composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    William Pro, J.; Kwei Lim, Rone; Petzold, Linda R.; Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R.

    2015-07-01

    Stiff ceramic platelets (or bricks) that are aligned and bonded to a second ductile phase with low volume fraction (mortar) are a promising pathway to produce stiff, high-toughness composites. For certain ranges of constituent properties, including those of some synthetic analogs to nacre, one can demonstrate that the deformation is dominated by relative brick motions. This paper describes simulations of fracture that explicitly track the motions of individual rigid bricks in an idealized microstructure; cohesive tractions acting between the bricks introduce elastic, plastic and rupture behaviors. Results are presented for the stresses and damage near macroscopic cracks with different brick orientations relative to the loading orientation. The anisotropic macroscopic initiation toughness is computed for small-scale yielding conditions and is shown to be independent of specimen geometry and loading configuration. The results are shown to be in agreement with previously published experiments on synthetic nacre.

  7. Accelerated equilibrium core composition search using a new MCNP-based simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, Jeffrey E.; Gorman, Phillip M.; Vujic, Jasmina L.; Greenspan, Ehud

    2014-06-01

    MocDown is a new Monte Carlo depletion and recycling simulator which couples neutron transport with MCNP and transmutation with ORIGEN. This modular approach to depletion allows for flexible operation by incorporating the accelerated progression of a complex fuel processing scheme towards equilibrium and by allowing for the online coupling of thermo-fluids feedback. MocDown also accounts for the variation of decay heat with fuel isotopics evolution. In typical cases, MocDown requires just over a day to find the equilibrium core composition for a multi-recycling fuel cycle, with a self-consistent thermo-fluids solution-a task that required between one and two weeks using previous Monte Carlo-based approaches.

  8. Multi-Terrain Impact Testing and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Sparks, Chad E.; Sareen, Ashish K.

    2007-01-01

    Comparisons of the impact performance of a 5-ft diameter crashworthy composite fuselage section were investigated for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts. The fuselage concept, which was originally designed for impacts onto a hard surface only, consisted of a stiff upper cabin, load bearing floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor. Vertical drop tests were performed at 25-ft/s onto concrete, soft-soil, and water at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse durations, and onset rates were evaluated for each test at specific locations on the fuselage. In addition to comparisons of the experimental results, dynamic finite element models were developed to simulate each impact condition. Once validated, these models can be used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of subfloor components for improved crash protection for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts.

  9. Multi-Terrain Impact Testing and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Sparks, Chad E.; Sareen, Ashish K.

    2004-01-01

    Comparisons of the impact performance of a 5-ft diameter crashworthy composite fuselage section were investigated for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts. The fuselage concept, which was originally designed for impacts onto a hard surface only, consisted of a stiff upper cabin, load bearing floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor. Vertical drop tests were performed at 25-ft/s onto concrete, soft-soil, and water at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse durations, and onset rates were evaluated for each test at specific locations on the fuselage. In addition to comparisons of the experimental results, dynamic finite element models were developed to simulate each impact condition. Once validated, these models can be used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of subfloor components for improved crash protection for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts.

  10. Earthworm activity in a simulated landfill cover soil shifts the community composition of active methanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Deepak; Héry, Marina; Bodrossy, Levente; Singer, Andrew C; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Thompson, Ian P; Murrell, J Colin

    2011-12-01

    Landfills represent a major source of methane in the atmosphere. In a previous study, we demonstrated that earthworm activity in landfill cover soil can increase soil methane oxidation capacity. In this study, a simulated landfill cover soil mesocosm (1 m × 0.15 m) was used to observe the influence of earthworms (Eisenia veneta) on the active methanotroph community composition, by analyzing the expression of the pmoA gene, which is responsible for methane oxidation. mRNA-based pmoA microarray analysis revealed that earthworm activity in landfill cover soil stimulated activity of type I methanotrophs (Methylobacter, Methylomonas, Methylosarcina spp.) compared to type II methanotrophs (particularly Methylocystis spp.). These results, along with previous studies of methanotrophs in landfill cover soil, can now be used to plan in situ field studies to integrate earthworm-induced methanotrophy with other landfill management practises in order to maximize soil methane oxidation and reduce methane emissions from landfills.

  11. Experimental evaluation and simulation of volumetric shrinkage and warpage on polymeric composite reinforced with short natural fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Jonnathan D.; Fajardo, Jorge I.; Cuji, Alvaro R.; García, Jaime A.; Garzón, Luis E.; López, Luis M.

    2015-09-01

    A polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composite is developed by extrusion and injection molding process. The shrinkage and warpage of high-density polyethylene reinforced with short natural fibers of Guadua angustifolia Kunth are analyzed by experimental measurements and computer simulations. Autodesk Moldflow® and Solid Works® are employed to simulate both volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts at different configurations: 0 wt.%, 20 wt.%, 30 wt.% and 40 wt.% reinforcing on shrinkage and warpage behavior of polymer composite. Become evident the restrictive effect of reinforcing on the volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts. The results indicate that volumetric shrinkage of natural composite is reduced up to 58% with fiber increasing, whereas the warpage shows a reduction form 79% to 86% with major fiber content. These results suggest that it is a highly beneficial use of natural fibers to improve the assembly properties of polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composites.

  12. [Coagulation characteristics of polyferric chloride-poly (epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine) composite flocculant for simulated water treatment].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-xin; Yang, Zhong-lian; Gao, Bao-yu; Wang, Yan; Yue, Qin-yan; Li, Qian

    2013-09-01

    Polyferric chloride (PFC) and poly (epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine) [P(EPI-DMA)] were applied as raw materials to prepare a novel inorganic-organic flocculant [PFC-P(EPI-DMA)] with various intrinsic viscosities (eta), basicity (B, OH/Fe molar ratio), and organic component fractions [omega(E)]. The PFC-P(EPI-DMA) prepared was then evaluated for the coagulation treatment of synthetic active dying wastewater and simulated ground water. Effects of B, and omega (E) on the Fe speciation distribution and coagulation performance of PFC-P(EPI-DMA) were comparatively examined as a function of coagulant dosage. The coagulation mechanism of PFC-P(EPI-DMA) was also discussed in this paper. Experimental results indicated the interaction effect of PFC and P (EPI-DMA) component in composite PFC-P (EPI-DMA). The effective Fe speciation content of PFC-EPI-DMA decreased with increasing omega(E), while it was maximized when eta = 850 mPa x As B value increased gradually, the Fe(b) concentration initially increased and then decreased, but the Fe(c) concentration kept continuously increasing. To some extent, higher eta and lower B value was favorable for the improvement of coagulation performance for coagulation treatment of both synthetic dyeing wastewater and simulated ground water. The omega (E) influence on the coagulation performance of PFC-P(EPI-DMA) was related to the treatment target. Both charge neutralization and adsorption bridging effect played roles in the coagulation process of the composite PFC-P(EPI-DMA).

  13. Genetic algorithm for design and manufacture optimization based on numerical simulations applied to aeronautic composite parts

    SciTech Connect

    Mouton, S.; Ledoux, Y.; Teissandier, D.; Sebastian, P.

    2010-06-15

    A key challenge for the future is to reduce drastically the human impact on the environment. In the aeronautic field, this challenge aims at optimizing the design of the aircraft to decrease the global mass. This reduction leads to the optimization of every part constitutive of the plane. This operation is even more delicate when the used material is composite material. In this case, it is necessary to find a compromise between the strength, the mass and the manufacturing cost of the component. Due to these different kinds of design constraints it is necessary to assist engineer with decision support system to determine feasible solutions. In this paper, an approach is proposed based on the coupling of the different key characteristics of the design process and on the consideration of the failure risk of the component. The originality of this work is that the manufacturing deviations due to the RTM process are integrated in the simulation of the assembly process. Two kinds of deviations are identified: volume impregnation (injection phase of RTM process) and geometrical deviations (curing and cooling phases). The quantification of these deviations and the related failure risk calculation is based on finite element simulations (Pam RTM registered and Samcef registered softwares). The use of genetic algorithm allows to estimate the impact of the design choices and their consequences on the failure risk of the component. The main focus of the paper is the optimization of tool design. In the framework of decision support systems, the failure risk calculation is used for making the comparison of possible industrialization alternatives. It is proposed to apply this method on a particular part of the airplane structure: a spar unit made of carbon fiber/epoxy composite.

  14. A hierarchical lattice spring model to simulate the mechanics of 2-D materials-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brely, Lucas; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola

    2015-07-01

    In the field of engineering materials, strength and toughness are typically two mutually exclusive properties. Structural biological materials such as bone, tendon or dentin have resolved this conflict and show unprecedented damage tolerance, toughness and strength levels. The common feature of these materials is their hierarchical heterogeneous structure, which contributes to increased energy dissipation before failure occurring at different scale levels. These structural properties are the key to exceptional bioinspired material mechanical properties, in particular for nanocomposites. Here, we develop a numerical model in order to simulate the mechanisms involved in damage progression and energy dissipation at different size scales in nano- and macro-composites, which depend both on the heterogeneity of the material and on the type of hierarchical structure. Both these aspects have been incorporated into a 2-dimensional model based on a Lattice Spring Model, accounting for geometrical nonlinearities and including statistically-based fracture phenomena. The model has been validated by comparing numerical results to continuum and fracture mechanics results as well as finite elements simulations, and then employed to study how structural aspects impact on hierarchical composite material properties. Results obtained with the numerical code highlight the dependence of stress distributions on matrix properties and reinforcement dispersion, geometry and properties, and how failure of sacrificial elements is directly involved in the damage tolerance of the material. Thanks to the rapidly developing field of nanocomposite manufacture, it is already possible to artificially create materials with multi-scale hierarchical reinforcements. The developed code could be a valuable support in the design and optimization of these advanced materials, drawing inspiration and going beyond biological materials with exceptional mechanical properties.

  15. Genetic algorithm for design and manufacture optimization based on numerical simulations applied to aeronautic composite parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouton, S.; Ledoux, Y.; Teissandier, D.; Sébastian, P.

    2010-06-01

    A key challenge for the future is to reduce drastically the human impact on the environment. In the aeronautic field, this challenge aims at optimizing the design of the aircraft to decrease the global mass. This reduction leads to the optimization of every part constitutive of the plane. This operation is even more delicate when the used material is composite material. In this case, it is necessary to find a compromise between the strength, the mass and the manufacturing cost of the component. Due to these different kinds of design constraints it is necessary to assist engineer with decision support system to determine feasible solutions. In this paper, an approach is proposed based on the coupling of the different key characteristics of the design process and on the consideration of the failure risk of the component. The originality of this work is that the manufacturing deviations due to the RTM process are integrated in the simulation of the assembly process. Two kinds of deviations are identified: volume impregnation (injection phase of RTM process) and geometrical deviations (curing and cooling phases). The quantification of these deviations and the related failure risk calculation is based on finite element simulations (Pam RTM® and Samcef® softwares). The use of genetic algorithm allows to estimate the impact of the design choices and their consequences on the failure risk of the component. The main focus of the paper is the optimization of tool design. In the framework of decision support systems, the failure risk calculation is used for making the comparison of possible industrialization alternatives. It is proposed to apply this method on a particular part of the airplane structure: a spar unit made of carbon fiber/epoxy composite.

  16. Study of strength properties of ceramic composites with soft filler based on 3D computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolin, Alexey Yu.; Smolin, Igor Yu.; Smolina, Irina Yu.

    2016-11-01

    The movable cellular automaton method which is a computational method of particle mechanics is applied to simulating uniaxial compression of 3D specimens of a ceramic composite. Soft inclusions were considered explicitly by changing the sort (properties) of automata selected randomly from the original fcc packing. The distribution of inclusions in space, their size, and the total fraction were varied. For each value of inclusion fraction, there were generated several representative specimens with individual pore position in space. The resulting magnitudes of the elastic modulus and strength of the specimens were scattered and well described by the Weibull distribution. We showed that to reveal the dependence of the elastic and strength properties of the composite on the inclusion fraction it is much better to consider the mathematical expectation of the corresponding Weibull distribution, rather than the average of the values for the specimens of the same inclusion fraction. It is shown that the relation between the mechanical properties of material and its inclusion fraction depends significantly on the material structure. Namely, percolation transition from isolated inclusions to interconnected clusters of inclusions strongly manifests itself in the dependence of strength on the fraction of inclusions. Thus, the curve of strength versus inclusion fraction fits different equations for a different kind of structure.

  17. Multibreed genetic evaluation in bovines using simulated data employing a composite population.

    PubMed

    Bocchi, A L; Oliveira, H N; Ferraz, J B S; Eler, J P

    2016-10-05

    Genetic evaluations in Brazil are performed within each animal breed; however, with the wide range of extant genetic groups in the country and the increased use of genetic crossing as a form of rapid meat production, more elaborate programs that can jointly evaluate animals of different genetic groups are needed. Genetic evaluation of a composite breed is difficult because of the variation in the genetic composition of a given herd, as well as the inclusion of non-additive genetic effects among breeds that can be important for selecting traits in certain breed combinations. Newer models include additive and non-additive effects; however, few studies have investigated these aspects in tropical breeds. The aim of this study was to simulate genetic values to compare different models. Non-inclusion of maternal effects in models leads to overestimation of variance and direct heritability. Estimates of the biological additive effects are influenced by the maternal effects; however, estimates of the non-additive effects are minimally influenced by the maternal effects and are well estimated in any situation. The studied models effectively predict the direct genetic values.

  18. Laboratory analogues simulating Titan's atmospheric aerosols: Compared chemical compositions of grains and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Jomard, François; Vigneron, Jackie; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Cernogora, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Two sorts of solid organic samples can be produced in laboratory experiments simulating Titan's atmospheric reactivity: grains in the volume and thin films on the reactor walls. We expect that grains are more representative of Titan's atmospheric aerosols, but films are used to provide optical indices for radiative models of Titan's atmosphere. The aim of the present study is to address if these two sorts of analogues are chemically equivalent or not, when produced in the same N2-CH4 plasma discharge. The chemical compositions of both these materials are measured by using elemental analysis, XPS analysis and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The main parameter probed is the CH4/N2 ratio to explore various possible chemical regimes. We find that films are homogeneous but significantly less rich in nitrogen and hydrogen than grains produced in the same experimental conditions. This surprising difference in their chemical compositions could be explained by the efficient etching occurring on the films, which stay in the discharge during the whole plasma duration, whereas the grains are ejected after a few minutes. The higher nitrogen content in the grains possibly involves a higher optical absorption than the one measured on the films, with a possible impact on Titan's radiative models.

  19. Higher Order Finite Element Methods for Compositional Simulation in 3D Multiphase Multicomponent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahraeeni, E.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a 3D model for fully compositional multi-phase multi-component flow in porous media with species transfer between the phases. Phase properties are modeled with the Peng-Robinson equation of state. Because phase properties may exhibit strong discontinuities, we approximate the mass transport update by the means of discontinuous Galerkin method. Pressure and velocity fields are continuous across the whole domain of solution, which is guaranteed by using the mixed hybrid finite element method. Complexity of the flow necessitates the use of either very fine mesh or higher-order schemes. The use of higher-order finite element methods significantly reduces numerical dispersion and grid orientation effects that plague traditional finite difference methods. We have shown that in 3D the convergence rate of our scheme is twice as first order method and the CPU time may improve up to three orders of magnitude for the same level of accuracy. Our numerical model facilitates accurate simulation of delicate feature of compositional flow like fingering and CO2 injection in complex reservoirs for a broad range of applications, including CO2 sequestration in finite aquifer and water flooded reservoirs with transfer of all species between the phases.

  20. Influence of Copolyester Composition on Adhesion to Soda-Lime Glass via Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Ben; Hofmann, John; Pasquinelli, Melissa A

    2016-06-01

    Copolyesters are a subset of polymers that have the desirable properties of strength and clarity while retaining chemical resistance, and are thus potential candidates for enhancing the impact resistance of soda-lime glass. Adhesion between the polymer and the glass relates to the impact performance of the system, as well as the longevity of the bond between the polymer and the glass under various conditions. Modifying the types of diols and diacids present in the copolyester provides a method for fine-tuning the physical properties of the polymer. In this study, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the influence of the chemical composition of the polymers on adhesion of polymer film laminates to two soda-lime glass surfaces, one tin-rich and one oxygen-rich. By calculating properties such as adhesion energies and contact angles, these results provide insights into how the polymer-glass interaction is impacted by the polymer composition, temperature, and other factors such as the presence of free volume or pi stacking. These results can be used to optimize the adhesion of copolyester films to glass surfaces.

  1. Simulations reveal the role of composition into the atomic-level flexibility of bioactive glass cements.

    PubMed

    Tian, Kun Viviana; Chass, Gregory A; Di Tommaso, Devis

    2016-01-14

    Bioactive glass ionomer cements (GICs), the reaction product of a fluoro-alumino-silicate glass and polyacrylic acid, have been in effective use in dentistry for over 40 years and more recently in orthopaedics and medical implantation. Their desirable properties have affirmed GIC's place in the medical materials community, yet are limited to non-load bearing applications due to the brittle nature of the hardened composite cement, thought to arise from the glass component and the interfaces it forms. Towards helping resolve the fundamental bases of the mechanical shortcomings of GICs, we report the 1st ever computational models of a GIC-relevant component. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were employed to generate and characterise three fluoro-alumino-silicate glasses of differing compositions with focus on resolving the atomic scale structural and dynamic contributions of aluminium, phosphorous and fluorine. Analyses of the glasses revealed rising F-content leading to the expansion of the glass network, compression of Al-F bonding, angular constraint at Al-pivots, localisation of alumino-phosphates and increased fluorine diffusion. Together, these changes to the structure, speciation and dynamics with raised fluorine content impart an overall rigidifying effect on the glass network, and suggest a predisposition to atomic-level inflexibility, which could manifest in the ionomer cements they form.

  2. Fatty acid composition of plasma lipids and erythrocyte membranes during simulated extravehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skedina, M. A.; Katuntsev, V. P.; Buravkova, L. B.; Naidina, V. P.

    Ten subjects (from 27 to 41 years) have been participated in 32 experiments. They were decompressed from ground level to 40-35 kPa in altitude chamber when breathed 100% oxygen by mask and performed repeated cycles of exercises (3.0 Kcal/min). The intervals between decompressions were 3-5 days. Plasma lipid and erythrocyte membrane fatty acid composition was evaluated in the fasting venous blood before and immediately after hypobaric exposure. There were 7 cases decompression sickness (DCS). Venous gas bubbles (GB) were detected in 27 cases (84.4%). Any significant changes in the fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes and plasma didn't practically induce after the first decompression. However, by the beginning of the second decompression the total lipid level in erythrocyte membranes decreased from 54.6 mg% to 40.4 mg% in group with DCS symptoms and from 51.2 mg% to 35.2 mg% (p < 0.05) without DCS symptoms. In group with DCS symptoms a tendency to increased level of saturated fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes (16:0, 18:0), the level of the polyunsaturated linoleic fatty acid (18:2) and arachidonic acid (20:4) tended to be decreased by the beginning of the second decompression. Insignificant changes in blood plasma fatty acid composition was observed in both groups. The obtained biochemical data that indicated the simulated extravehicular activity (EVA) condition is accompanied by the certain changes in the blood lipid metabolism, structural and functional state of erythrocyte membranes, which are reversible. The most pronounced changes are found in subjects with DCS symptoms.

  3. Effect of food and oral simulating fluids on structure of adhesive composite systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Greener, E H; Mueller, H J

    1995-02-01

    This work evaluates the degradation of three adhesive/composite systems (Tenure/Marathon One. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose/Z100 and Optibond/Herculite XRV) upon immersion in 75% ethanol solution and in an artificial saliva (Moi-Stir). Shear bond strength (SBS) and diametral tensile strength (DTS) specimens were employed for this study. For the SBS specimens, the bonded interface and composite were exposed to food and oral simulating fluids at 37 degrees C for up to 30 days. A similar control series was stored in air. DTS specimens were stored in 75% ethanol at 37 degrees C for up to 30 days. The SBS specimens were sheared to failure. Small quantities of bonding resin were removed from the tooth side of the fractured surface and from the non-fractured fractured end of the composite for Fourier transform infrared microscopic evaluation. Similar scrapings were taken from DTS specimen surfaces. The infrared absorbance intensity (AI) of the major peaks was measured as a function of storage time and ratioed against the aromatic C = C (1609.4 cm-1) peak. The data were analysed using ANOVA and the Tukey LSD test. The AI of major peaks was similar for the materials stored either in air or in Moi-Stir for all testing periods. Storage in ethanol caused the AI of aliphatic C = C (1638 cm-1) and of O-H (approximately 3500 cm-1) bonds to significantly decrease (30-50%) for specimens of bonding resin while the AI of C = O bonds (1730 cm-1) increased (60-120%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Fatty acid composition of plasma lipids and erythrocyte membranes during simulated extravehicular activity.

    PubMed

    Skedina, M A; Katuntsev, V P; Buravkova, L B; Naidina, V P

    1998-01-01

    Ten subjects (from 27 to 41 years) have been participated in 32 experiments. They were decompressed from ground level to 40-35 kPa in altitude chamber when breathed 100% oxygen by mask and performed repeated cycles of exercises (3.0 Kcal/min). The intervals between decompressions were 3-5 days. Plasma lipid and erythrocyte membrane fatty acid composition was evaluated in the fasting venous blood before and immediately after hypobaric exposure. There were 7 cases decompression sickness (DCS). Venous gas bubbles (GB) were detected in 27 cases (84.4%). Any significant changes in the fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes and plasma didn't practically induce after the first decompression. However, by the beginning of the second decompression the total lipid level in erythrocyte membranes decreased from 54.6 mg% to 40.4 mg% in group with DCS symptoms and from 51.2 mg% to 35.2 mg% (p<0.05) without DCS symptoms. In group with DCS symptoms a tendency to increased level of saturated fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes (16:0, 18:0), the level of the polyunsaturated linoleic fatty acid (18:2) and arachidonic acid (20:4) tended to be decreased by the beginning of the second decompression. Insignificant changes in blood plasma fatty acid composition was observed in both groups. The obtained biochemical data that indicated the simulated extravehicular activity (EVA) condition is accompanied by the certain changes in the blood lipid metabolism, structural and functional state of erythrocyte membranes, which are reversible. The most pronounced changes are found in subjects with DCS symptoms.

  5. Streamlining Collaboration for the Gravitational-wave Astronomy Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koranda, S.

    2016-12-01

    In the morning hours of September 14, 2015 the LaserInterferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) directlydetected gravitational waves from inspiraling and coalescingblack holes, confirming a major prediction of AlbertEinstein's general theory of relativity and beginning the eraof gravitational-wave astronomy. With the LIGO detectors in the United States, the Virgo andGEO detectors in Europe, and the KAGRA detector in Japan thegravitational-wave astrononmy community is opening a newwindow on our Universe. Realizing the full science potentialof LIGO and the other interferometers requires globalcollaboration not only within the gravitational-wave astronomycommunity but also with the astronomers and astrophysicists acrossmultipe disciplines working to realize and leverage the powerof multi-messenger astronomy. Enabling thousands of researchers from around the world andacross multiple projects to efficiently collaborate, share,and analyze data and provide streamlined access to services,computing, and tools requires new and scalable approaches toidentity and access management (IAM). We will discuss LIGO'sIAM journey that began in 2007 and how today LIGO leveragesinternal identity federations like InCommon and eduGAIN toprovide scalable and managed access for the gravitational-waveastronomy community. We will discuss the steps both largeand small research organizations and projects take as theirIAM infrastructure matures from ad-hoc silos of independent services to fully integrated and federated services thatstreamline collaboration so that scientists can focus onresearch and not managing passwords.

  6. Unexpectedly Streamlined Mitochondrial Genome of the Euglenozoan Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Dobáková, Eva; Flegontov, Pavel; Skalický, Tomáš; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-11-20

    In this study, we describe the mitochondrial genome of the excavate flagellate Euglena gracilis. Its gene complement is reduced as compared with the well-studied sister groups Diplonemea and Kinetoplastea. We have identified seven protein-coding genes: Three subunits of respiratory complex I (nad1, nad4, and nad5), one subunit of complex III (cob), and three subunits of complex IV (cox1, cox2, and a highly divergent cox3). Moreover, fragments of ribosomal RNA genes have also been identified. Genes encoding subunits of complex V, ribosomal proteins and tRNAs were missing, and are likely located in the nuclear genome. Although mitochondrial genomes of diplonemids and kinetoplastids possess the most complex RNA processing machineries known, including trans-splicing and editing of the uridine insertion/deletion type, respectively, our transcriptomic data suggest their total absence in E. gracilis. This finding supports a scenario in which the complex mitochondrial processing machineries of both sister groups evolved relatively late in evolution from a streamlined genome and transcriptome of their common predecessor.

  7. The Single Habitat Module Concept a Streamlined Way to Explore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Many concepts have been proposed for exploring space. In early 2010 presidential direction called for reconsidering the approach to address changes in exploration destinations, use of new technologies and development of new capabilities to support exploration of space. Considering the proposed new technologies and capabilities that NASA was directed to pursue, the Single Habitathabitat module (SHMSHM) concept for a more streamlined approach to the infrastructure and conduct of exploration missions was developed. The SHM concept combines many of the new promising technologies with a central concept of mission architectures that uses a single habitat module for all phases of an exploration mission. Integrating mission elements near Earth and fully fueling them prior to departure of the vicinity of Earth provides the capability of using the single habitat both in transit to an exploration destination and while exploring the destination. The concept employs the capability to return the habitat and interplanetary propulsion system to Earth vicinity so that those elements can be reused on subsequent exploration missions. This paper describes the SHM concept, and the advantages it provides to accomplish exploration objectives.

  8. Damage Detection with Streamlined Structural Health Monitoring Data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Deng, Jun; Xie, Weizhi

    2015-01-01

    The huge amounts of sensor data generated by large scale sensor networks in on-line structural health monitoring (SHM) systems often overwhelms the systems’ capacity for data transmission and analysis. This paper presents a new concept for an integrated SHM system in which a streamlined data flow is used as a unifying thread to integrate the individual components of on-line SHM systems. Such an integrated SHM system has a few desirable functionalities including embedded sensor data compression, interactive sensor data retrieval, and structural knowledge discovery, which aim to enhance the reliability, efficiency, and robustness of on-line SHM systems. Adoption of this new concept will enable the design of an on-line SHM system with more uniform data generation and data handling capacity for its subsystems. To examine this concept in the context of vibration-based SHM systems, real sensor data from an on-line SHM system comprising a scaled steel bridge structure and an on-line data acquisition system with remote data access was used in this study. Vibration test results clearly demonstrated the prominent performance characteristics of the proposed integrated SHM system including rapid data access, interactive data retrieval and knowledge discovery of structural conditions on a global level. PMID:25884788

  9. Application of Clinical Intelligence to Streamline Care in Aortic Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Moats, Susan K; Richard, B Jeffery

    2017-10-01

    This article discusses the lessons learned by an interdisciplinary team in a large metropolitan specialty hospital during the implementation of the Code Aorta protocol for aortic emergencies and the subsequent application of technological enhancements to improve data transfer. Aortic dissections require rapid diagnosis and surgical treatment; thus, in order to optimize patient outcomes, clinicians must be accessible, data must be readily available, and proper prompts and notifications must be made to alert and ready teams. An interdisciplinary team reviewed our hospital's processes and architecture of systems to define how we provide care during aortic emergencies. Based on this insight into patient flow, we ultimately developed a Code Aorta protocol to streamline provision of care during aortic emergencies. This process focused on protocol development, human-technology interfaces, and outcome-oriented metrics. The team also aimed to heighten awareness of the emergent process and to understand relevant outcomes data. After introduction of the Code Aorta protocol, a 78% reduction was achieved in time-to-treatment from the previous year's average time. In addition, the average length of stay was reduced by 2.4 days (18%). The team's efforts focused on clinical communication, aiming to link technology to maximize clinical efficiency. The initial results of our Code Aorta protocol show promise that continual refinement of patient care processes during aortic emergencies will improve outcomes for patients suffering aortic dissection.

  10. The Single Crew Module Concept a Streamlined Way to Explore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Many concepts have been proposed for exploring space. In early 2010 presidential direction called for reconsidering the approach to address changes in exploration destinations, use of new technologies and development of new capabilities to support exploration of space. Considering the proposed new technology and capabilities that NASA was directed to pursue, the single crew module (SCM) concept for a more streamlined approach to the infrastructure and conduct of exploration missions was developed. The SCM concept combines many of the new promising technologies with a central concept of mission architectures that uses a single habitat module for all phases of an exploration mission. Integrating mission elements near Earth and fully fueling them prior to departure of the vicinity of Earth provides the capability of using the single habitat both in transit to an exploration destination and while exploring the destination. The concept employs the capability to return the habitat and interplanetary propulsion system to Earth vicinity so that those elements can be reused on subsequent exploration missions. This paper describes the SCM concept, and the advantages it provides to accomplish exploration objectives.

  11. A Streamlined Artificial Variable Free Version of Simplex Method

    PubMed Central

    Inayatullah, Syed; Touheed, Nasir; Imtiaz, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a streamlined form of simplex method which provides some great benefits over traditional simplex method. For instance, it does not need any kind of artificial variables or artificial constraints; it could start with any feasible or infeasible basis of an LP. This method follows the same pivoting sequence as of simplex phase 1 without showing any explicit description of artificial variables which also makes it space efficient. Later in this paper, a dual version of the new method has also been presented which provides a way to easily implement the phase 1 of traditional dual simplex method. For a problem having an initial basis which is both primal and dual infeasible, our methods provide full freedom to the user, that whether to start with primal artificial free version or dual artificial free version without making any reformulation to the LP structure. Last but not the least, it provides a teaching aid for the teachers who want to teach feasibility achievement as a separate topic before teaching optimality achievement. PMID:25767883

  12. A streamlined artificial variable free version of simplex method.

    PubMed

    Inayatullah, Syed; Touheed, Nasir; Imtiaz, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a streamlined form of simplex method which provides some great benefits over traditional simplex method. For instance, it does not need any kind of artificial variables or artificial constraints; it could start with any feasible or infeasible basis of an LP. This method follows the same pivoting sequence as of simplex phase 1 without showing any explicit description of artificial variables which also makes it space efficient. Later in this paper, a dual version of the new method has also been presented which provides a way to easily implement the phase 1 of traditional dual simplex method. For a problem having an initial basis which is both primal and dual infeasible, our methods provide full freedom to the user, that whether to start with primal artificial free version or dual artificial free version without making any reformulation to the LP structure. Last but not the least, it provides a teaching aid for the teachers who want to teach feasibility achievement as a separate topic before teaching optimality achievement.

  13. Streamlining Building Efficiency Evaluation with DOE's Asset Score Preview

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, Supriya; Wang, Nora; Gonzalez, Juan; Horsey, Henry; Long, Nicholas

    2016-08-26

    Building Energy Asset Score (Asset Score), developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is a tool to help building owners and managers assess the efficiency of a building's energy-related systems and encourage investment in cost-effective improvements. The Asset Score uses an EnergyPlus model to provide a quick assessment of building energy performance with minimum user inputs of building characteristics and identifies upgrade opportunities. Even with a reduced set of user inputs, data collection remains a challenge for wide-spread adoption, especially when evaluating a large number of buildings. To address this, Asset Score Preview was developed to allow users to enter as few as seven building characteristics to quickly assess their buildings before a more in-depth analysis. A streamlined assessment from Preview to full Asset Score provides an easy entry point and also enables users who manage a large number of buildings to screen and prioritize buildings that can benefit most from a more detailed evaluation and possible energy efficiency upgrades without intensive data collection.

  14. Streamlining Metadata and Data Management for Evolving Digital Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D.; Miller, S. P.; Peckman, U.; Smith, J.; Aerni, S.; Helly, J.; Sutton, D.; Chase, A.

    2003-12-01

    What began two years ago as an effort to stabilize the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) data archives from more than 700 cruises going back 50 years, has now become the operational fully-searchable "SIOExplorer" digital library, complete with thousands of historic photographs, images, maps, full text documents, binary data files, and 3D visualization experiences, totaling nearly 2 terabytes of digital content. Coping with data diversity and complexity has proven to be more challenging than dealing with large volumes of digital data. SIOExplorer has been built with scalability in mind, so that the addition of new data types and entire new collections may be accomplished with ease. It is a federated system, currently interoperating with three independent data-publishing authorities, each responsible for their own quality control, metadata specifications, and content selection. The IT architecture implemented at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) streamlines the integration of additional projects in other disciplines with a suite of metadata management and collection building tools for "arbitrary digital objects." Metadata are automatically harvested from data files into domain-specific metadata blocks, and mapped into various specification standards as needed. Metadata can be browsed and objects can be viewed onscreen or downloaded for further analysis, with automatic proprietary-hold request management.

  15. How flexibility induces streamlining in a two-dimensional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alben, Silas; Shelley, Michael; Zhang, Jun

    2004-05-01

    Recent work in bio-fluid dynamics has studied the relation of fluid drag to flow speed for flexible organic structures, such as tree leaves, seaweed, and coral beds, and found a reduction in drag growth due to body reconfiguration with increasing flow speed. Our theoretical and experimental work isolates the role of elastic bending in this process. Using a flexible glass fiber wetted into a vertical soap-film flow, we identify a transition in flow speed beyond which fluid forces dominate the elastic response, and yield large deformations of the fiber that greatly reduce drag. We construct free-streamline models that couple fluid and elastic forces and solve them in an efficient numerical scheme. Shape self-similarity emerges, with a scaling set by the balance of forces in a small "tip region" about the flow's stagnation point. The result is a transition from the classical U2 drag scaling of rigid bodies to a new U4/3 drag law. We derive an asymptotic expansion for the fiber shape and flow, based on the length-scale of similarity. This analysis predicts that the fiber and wake are quasiparabolic at large velocities, and obtains the new drag law in terms of the drag on the tip region. Under variations of the model suggested by the experiment—the addition of flow tunnel walls, and a back pressure in the wake—the drag law persists, with a simple modification.

  16. Global Vorticity Shedding on Rectangular and Streamlined Foil Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Stephanie; Dahl, Jason; Weymouth, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2012-11-01

    We explore several aspects of the fluid phenomenon we call global vorticity shedding. Global vorticity shedding occurs when an object in a fluid with circulation suddenly vanishes, shedding the entirety of the boundary layer vorticity into the wake at once. Global vorticity shedding is in distinct contrast with traditional massive separation shedding, in which vorticity is shed from a body from only a few separation points into the fluid. In our experiments, we approximate the disappearance of a towed foil by rapidly retracting the foil in the span-wise direction. We show that for a square-tipped vanishing foil at an angle of attack, the globally shed boundary layer vorticity forms into primary vortices, which evolve and eventually amalgamate with secondary vortices to leave two lasting vortices in the wake. The secondary vortices are a result of three-dimensionality in the flow. We further explore streamlined foil geometries to achieve a simpler and less three-dimensional wake. Vortex formation times are small, with vortices fully formed nearly instantaneously in the flow, making the application of global vorticity shedding promising for a force transducer to impart large and fast maneuvering forces on an underwater vehicle. This research was made with Government support under and awarded by DoD, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship, 32 CFR 168a.

  17. VISMASHUP: streamlining the creation of custom visualization applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, James P; Santos, Emanuele; Lins, Lauro; Freire, Juliana; Silva, Cl'audio T

    2010-01-01

    Visualization is essential for understanding the increasing volumes of digital data. However, the process required to create insightful visualizations is involved and time consuming. Although several visualization tools are available, including tools with sophisticated visual interfaces, they are out of reach for users who have little or no knowledge of visualization techniques and/or who do not have programming expertise. In this paper, we propose VISMASHUP, a new framework for streamlining the creation of customized visualization applications. Because these applications can be customized for very specific tasks, they can hide much of the complexity in a visualization specification and make it easier for users to explore visualizations by manipulating a small set of parameters. We describe the framework and how it supports the various tasks a designer needs to carry out to develop an application, from mining and exploring a set of visualization specifications (pipelines), to the creation of simplified views of the pipelines, and the automatic generation of the application and its interface. We also describe the implementation of the system and demonstrate its use in two real application scenarios.

  18. Applying an 8-bit multispectral color-composite image simulation technique to operational real-time AVHRR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klaes, K. D.; D'Entremont, Robert P.; Thomason, Larry W.

    1992-01-01

    The Geophysics Directorate's 8-bit multispectral color-composite image display technique has been installed on the Satellite Data Processing System at the German Military Geophysical Office in Traben-Trarbach, Germany. The technique simulates 24-bit full-color composites on 8-bit color workstations, combining image data from the NOAA multispectral Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The real-time application of this technique to operational satellite data is discussed.

  19. Enhanced Performance of Streamline-Traced External-Compression Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    2015-01-01

    A computational design study was conducted to enhance the aerodynamic performance of streamline-traced, external-compression inlets for Mach 1.6. The current study explored a new parent flowfield for the streamline tracing and several variations of inlet design factors, including the axial displacement and angle of the subsonic cowl lip, the vertical placement of the engine axis, and the use of porous bleed in the subsonic diffuser. The performance was enhanced over that of an earlier streamline-traced inlet such as to increase the total pressure recovery and reduce total pressure distortion

  20. Numerical simulation of the nonlinear response of composite plates under combined thermal and acoustic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Moorthy, Jayashree

    1995-01-01

    A time-domain study of the random response of a laminated plate subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads is carried out. The features of this problem also include given uniform static inplane forces. The formulation takes into consideration a possible initial imperfection in the flatness of the plate. High decibel sound pressure levels along with high thermal gradients across thickness drive the plate response into nonlinear regimes. This calls for the analysis to use von Karman large deflection strain-displacement relationships. A finite element model that combines the von Karman strains with the first-order shear deformation plate theory is developed. The development of the analytical model can accommodate an anisotropic composite laminate built up of uniformly thick layers of orthotropic, linearly elastic laminae. The global system of finite element equations is then reduced to a modal system of equations. Numerical simulation using a single-step algorithm in the time-domain is then carried out to solve for the modal coordinates. Nonlinear algebraic equations within each time-step are solved by the Newton-Raphson method. The random gaussian filtered white noise load is generated using Monte Carlo simulation. The acoustic pressure distribution over the plate is capable of accounting for a grazing incidence wavefront. Numerical results are presented to study a variety of cases.

  1. Failure Behavior Simulation for Bolted Composite Joints Based on Damage Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yi; Ishikawa, Takashi

    This paper presents the development of an accumulative damage model based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to simulate the bearing failure and response in the bolted composite joints. The simulation is implemented into a general-purpose FEM code ABAQUS. The main damage mechanisms observed from experimental study are described as accumulated compressive damage that appeared by matrix compression failure and fiber compression-shear failure. The fundamental approach consists of contact problem at the pin/hole interface, progressive damage, large deformation problem and material nonlinear problem. A complex approach based on a nonlinear shear elasticity theory combined with a continuum damage mechanics approach can be also utilized to represent the material nonlinear behavior during loading. The damage accumulation criteria using the hybrid method based on Hashin and Yamada-Sun’s failure criteria are adopted, and the stress redistribution analysis using a degradation model for the damaged ply is performed. The accurate prediction results include progressive damage and strength response of the joints that agrees well with the existing experimental data.

  2. Modeling and simulation of the debonding process of composite solid propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tao; Xu, Jin-sheng; Han, Long; Chen, Xiong

    2017-07-01

    In order to study the damage evolution law of composite solid propellants, the molecular dynamics particle filled algorithm was used to establish the mesoscopic structure model of HTPB(Hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene) propellants. The cohesive element method was employed for the adhesion interface between AP(Ammonium perchlorate) particle and HTPB matrix and the bilinear cohesive zone model was used to describe the mechanical response of the interface elements. The inversion analysis method based on Hooke-Jeeves optimization algorithm was employed to identify the parameters of cohesive zone model(CZM) of the particle/binder interface. Then, the optimized parameters were applied to the commercial finite element software ABAQUS to simulate the damage evolution process for AP particle and HTPB matrix, including the initiation, development, gathering and macroscopic crack. Finally, the stress-strain simulation curve was compared with the experiment curves. The result shows that the bilinear cohesive zone model can accurately describe the debonding and fracture process between the AP particles and HTPB matrix under the uniaxial tension loading.

  3. Validation of composite finite elements efficiently simulating elasticity of trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Schwen, Lars Ole; Wolfram, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Patient-specific analyses of the mechanical properties of bones become increasingly important for the management of patients with osteoporosis. The potential of composite finite elements (CFEs), a novel FE technique, to assess the apparent stiffness of vertebral trabecular bone is investigated in this study. Segmented volumes of cylindrical specimens of trabecular bone are compared to measured volumes. Elasticity under uniaxial loading conditions is simulated; apparent stiffnesses are compared to experimentally determined values. Computational efficiency is assessed and recommendations for simulation parameters are given. Validating apparent uniaxial stiffnesses results in concordance correlation coefficients 0.69 ≤ r(c) ≤ 0.92 for resolutions finer than 168 μm, and an average error of 5.8% between experimental and numerical results at 24 μm resolution. As an application, the code was used to compute local, macroscopic stiffness tensors for the trabecular structure of a lumbar vertebra. The presented technique allows for computing stiffness using smooth FE meshes at resolutions that are well achievable in peripheral high resolution quantitative CT. Therefore, CFEs could be a valuable tool for the patient-specific assessment of bone stiffness.

  4. Simulation Based Optimization of Complex Monolithic Composite Structures Using Cellular Core Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickmott, Curtis W.

    Cellular core tooling is a new technology which has the capability to manufacture complex integrated monolithic composite structures. This novel tooling method utilizes thermoplastic cellular cores as inner tooling. The semi-rigid nature of the cellular cores makes them convenient for lay-up, and under autoclave temperature and pressure they soften and expand providing uniform compaction on all surfaces including internal features such as ribs and spar tubes. This process has the capability of developing fully optimized aerospace structures by reducing or eliminating assembly using fasteners or bonded joints. The technology is studied in the context of evaluating its capabilities, advantages, and limitations in developing high quality structures. The complex nature of these parts has led to development of a model using the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software Abaqus and the plug-in COMPRO Common Component Architecture (CCA) provided by Convergent Manufacturing Technologies. This model utilizes a "virtual autoclave" technique to simulate temperature profiles, resin flow paths, and ultimately deformation from residual stress. A model has been developed simulating the temperature profile during curing of composite parts made with the cellular core technology. While modeling of composites has been performed in the past, this project will look to take this existing knowledge and apply it to this new manufacturing method capable of building more complex parts and develop a model designed specifically for building large, complex components with a high degree of accuracy. The model development has been carried out in conjunction with experimental validation. A double box beam structure was chosen for analysis to determine the effects of the technology on internal ribs and joints. Double box beams were manufactured and sectioned into T-joints for characterization. Mechanical behavior of T-joints was performed using the T-joint pull-off test and compared to traditional

  5. Simulation for Carbon Nanotube Dispersion and Microstructure Formation in CNTs/AZ91D Composite Fabricated by Ultrasonic Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuansheng; Zhao, Fuze; Feng, Xiaohui

    2017-10-01

    The dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in AZ91D melt by ultrasonic processing and microstructure formation of CNTs/AZ91D composite were studied using numerical and physical simulations. The sound field and acoustic streaming were predicted using finite element method. Meanwhile, optimal immersion depth of the ultrasonic probe and suitable ultrasonic power were obtained. Single-bubble model was used to predict ultrasonic cavitation in AZ91D melt. The relationship between sound pressure amplitude and ultrasonic cavitation was established. Physical simulations of acoustic streaming and ultrasonic cavitation agreed well with the numerical simulations. It was confirmed that the dispersion of carbon nanotubes was remarkably improved by ultrasonic processing. Microstructure formation of CNTs/AZ91D composite was numerically simulated using cellular automation method. In addition, grain refinement was achieved and the growth of dendrites was changed due to the uniform dispersion of CNTs.

  6. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals insights into the streamlined genomes of haplosclerid demosponges

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Christine; Conaco, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Sponges (Porifera) are one of the most ancestral metazoan groups. They are characterized by a simple body plan lacking the true tissues and organ systems found in other animals. Members of this phylum display a remarkable diversity of form and function and yet little is known about the composition and complexity of their genomes. In this study, we sequenced the transcriptomes of two marine haplosclerid sponges belonging to Demospongiae, the largest and most diverse class within phylum Porifera, and compared their gene content with members of other sponge classes. We recovered 44,693 and 50,067 transcripts expressed in adult tissues of Haliclona amboinensis and Haliclona tubifera, respectively. These transcripts translate into 20,280 peptides in H. amboinensis and 18,000 peptides in H. tubifera. Genes associated with important signaling and metabolic pathways, regulatory networks, as well as genes that may be important in the organismal stress response, were identified in the transcriptomes. Futhermore, lineage-specific innovations were identified that may be correlated with observed sponge characters and ecological adaptations. The core gene complement expressed within the tissues of adult haplosclerid demosponges may represent a streamlined and flexible genetic toolkit that underlies the ecological success and resilience of sponges to environmental stress. PMID:26738846

  7. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals insights into the streamlined genomes of haplosclerid demosponges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Christine; Conaco, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Sponges (Porifera) are one of the most ancestral metazoan groups. They are characterized by a simple body plan lacking the true tissues and organ systems found in other animals. Members of this phylum display a remarkable diversity of form and function and yet little is known about the composition and complexity of their genomes. In this study, we sequenced the transcriptomes of two marine haplosclerid sponges belonging to Demospongiae, the largest and most diverse class within phylum Porifera, and compared their gene content with members of other sponge classes. We recovered 44,693 and 50,067 transcripts expressed in adult tissues of Haliclona amboinensis and Haliclona tubifera, respectively. These transcripts translate into 20,280 peptides in H. amboinensis and 18,000 peptides in H. tubifera. Genes associated with important signaling and metabolic pathways, regulatory networks, as well as genes that may be important in the organismal stress response, were identified in the transcriptomes. Futhermore, lineage-specific innovations were identified that may be correlated with observed sponge characters and ecological adaptations. The core gene complement expressed within the tissues of adult haplosclerid demosponges may represent a streamlined and flexible genetic toolkit that underlies the ecological success and resilience of sponges to environmental stress.

  8. Prevalent genome streamlining and latitudinal divergence of planktonic bacteria in the surface ocean.

    PubMed

    Swan, Brandon K; Tupper, Ben; Sczyrba, Alexander; Lauro, Federico M; Martinez-Garcia, Manuel; González, José M; Luo, Haiwei; Wright, Jody J; Landry, Zachary C; Hanson, Niels W; Thompson, Brian P; Poulton, Nicole J; Schwientek, Patrick; Acinas, Silvia G; Giovannoni, Stephen J; Moran, Mary Ann; Hallam, Steven J; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2013-07-09

    Planktonic bacteria dominate surface ocean biomass and influence global biogeochemical processes, but remain poorly characterized owing to difficulties in cultivation. Using large-scale single cell genomics, we obtained insight into the genome content and biogeography of many bacterial lineages inhabiting the surface ocean. We found that, compared with existing cultures, natural bacterioplankton have smaller genomes, fewer gene duplications, and are depleted in guanine and cytosine, noncoding nucleotides, and genes encoding transcription, signal transduction, and noncytoplasmic proteins. These findings provide strong evidence that genome streamlining and oligotrophy are prevalent features among diverse, free-living bacterioplankton, whereas existing laboratory cultures consist primarily of copiotrophs. The apparent ubiquity of metabolic specialization and mixotrophy, as predicted from single cell genomes, also may contribute to the difficulty in bacterioplankton cultivation. Using metagenome fragment recruitment against single cell genomes, we show that the global distribution of surface ocean bacterioplankton correlates with temperature and latitude and is not limited by dispersal at the time scales required for nucleotide substitution to exceed the current operational definition of bacterial species. Single cell genomes with highly similar small subunit rRNA gene sequences exhibited significant genomic and biogeographic variability, highlighting challenges in the interpretation of individual gene surveys and metagenome assemblies in environmental microbiology. Our study demonstrates the utility of single cell genomics for gaining an improved understanding of the composition and dynamics of natural microbial assemblages.

  9. Prevalent genome streamlining and latitudinal divergence of planktonic bacteria in the surface ocean

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Brandon K.; Tupper, Ben; Sczyrba, Alexander; Lauro, Federico M.; Martinez-Garcia, Manuel; González, José M.; Luo, Haiwei; Wright, Jody J.; Landry, Zachary C.; Hanson, Niels W.; Thompson, Brian P.; Poulton, Nicole J.; Schwientek, Patrick; Acinas, Silvia G.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.; Moran, Mary Ann; Hallam, Steven J.; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2013-01-01

    Planktonic bacteria dominate surface ocean biomass and influence global biogeochemical processes, but remain poorly characterized owing to difficulties in cultivation. Using large-scale single cell genomics, we obtained insight into the genome content and biogeography of many bacterial lineages inhabiting the surface ocean. We found that, compared with existing cultures, natural bacterioplankton have smaller genomes, fewer gene duplications, and are depleted in guanine and cytosine, noncoding nucleotides, and genes encoding transcription, signal transduction, and noncytoplasmic proteins. These findings provide strong evidence that genome streamlining and oligotrophy are prevalent features among diverse, free-living bacterioplankton, whereas existing laboratory cultures consist primarily of copiotrophs. The apparent ubiquity of metabolic specialization and mixotrophy, as predicted from single cell genomes, also may contribute to the difficulty in bacterioplankton cultivation. Using metagenome fragment recruitment against single cell genomes, we show that the global distribution of surface ocean bacterioplankton correlates with temperature and latitude and is not limited by dispersal at the time scales required for nucleotide substitution to exceed the current operational definition of bacterial species. Single cell genomes with highly similar small subunit rRNA gene sequences exhibited significant genomic and biogeographic variability, highlighting challenges in the interpretation of individual gene surveys and metagenome assemblies in environmental microbiology. Our study demonstrates the utility of single cell genomics for gaining an improved understanding of the composition and dynamics of natural microbial assemblages. PMID:23801761

  10. Streamlining and Large Ancestral Genomes in Archaea Inferred with a Phylogenetic Birth-and-Death Model

    PubMed Central

    Miklós, István

    2009-01-01

    Homologous genes originate from a common ancestor through vertical inheritance, duplication, or horizontal gene transfer. Entire homolog families spawned by a single ancestral gene can be identified across multiple genomes based on protein sequence similarity. The sequences, however, do not always reveal conclusively the history of large families. To study the evolution of complete gene repertoires, we propose here a mathematical framework that does not rely on resolved gene family histories. We show that so-called phylogenetic profiles, formed by family sizes across multiple genomes, are sufficient to infer principal evolutionary trends. The main novelty in our approach is an efficient algorithm to compute the likelihood of a phylogenetic profile in a model of birth-and-death processes acting on a phylogeny. We examine known gene families in 28 archaeal genomes using a probabilistic model that involves lineage- and family-specific components of gene acquisition, duplication, and loss. The model enables us to consider all possible histories when inferring statistics about archaeal evolution. According to our reconstruction, most lineages are characterized by a net loss of gene families. Major increases in gene repertoire have occurred only a few times. Our reconstruction underlines the importance of persistent streamlining processes in shaping genome composition in Archaea. It also suggests that early archaeal genomes were as complex as typical modern ones, and even show signs, in the case of the methanogenic ancestor, of an extremely large gene repertoire. PMID:19570746

  11. Water Impact Test and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Sparks, Chad; Sareen, Ashish

    2003-01-01

    In March 2002, a 25-ft/s vertical drop test of a composite fuselage section was conducted onto water. The purpose of the test was to obtain experimental data characterizing the structural response of the fuselage section during water impact for comparison with two previous drop tests that were performed onto a rigid surface and soft soil. For the drop test, the fuselage section was configured with ten 100-lb. lead masses, five per side, that were attached to seat rails mounted to the floor. The fuselage section was raised to a height of 10-ft. and dropped vertically into a 15-ft. diameter pool filled to a depth of 3.5-ft. with water. Approximately 70 channels of data were collected during the drop test at a 10-kHz sampling rate. The test data were used to validate crash simulations of the water impact that were developed using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic codes, MSC.Dytran and LS-DYNA. The fuselage structure was modeled using shell and solid elements with a Lagrangian mesh, and the water was modeled with both Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques. The fluid-structure interactions were executed using the fast general coupling in MSC.Dytran and the Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) coupling in LS-DYNA. Additionally, the smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) meshless Lagrangian technique was used in LS-DYNA to represent the fluid. The simulation results were correlated with the test data to validate the modeling approach. Additional simulation studies were performed to determine how changes in mesh density, mesh uniformity, fluid viscosity, and failure strain influence the test-analysis correlation.

  12. Environmental and Mechanical Stability of Environmental Barrier Coated SA Tyrannohex SiC Composites Under Simulated Turbine Engine Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Halbig, Michael Charles; Sing, Mrityunjay

    2014-01-01

    The environmental stability and thermal gradient cyclic durability performance of SA Tyrannohex composites were investigated for turbine engine component applications. The work has been focused on investigating the combustion rig recession, cyclic thermal stress resistance and thermomechanical low cycle fatigue of uncoated and environmental barrier coated Tyrannohex SiC SA composites in simulated turbine engine combustion water vapor, thermal gradients, and mechanical loading conditions. Flexural strength degradations have been evaluated, and the upper limits of operating temperature conditions for the SA composite material systems are discussed based on the experimental results.

  13. Low velocity impact monitoring of composite wing structure under simulated wing loading condition using fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Pratik; Park, Yurim; Kwon, Hyunseok; Kim, Chun-Gon

    2017-04-01

    A low velocity impact onto a composite structure can result in the occurrence of barely visible impact damage (BVID), which is difficult to detect. Therefore, the low velocity impact monitoring of composite structures is highly desirable for impact detection and localization. In this paper, low velocity impacts on a composite wing under a simulated wing loading condition were monitored using six multiplexed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and localized using error outlier based impact localization algorithm. The impact response signals from the FBG sensors were sampled at a rate of 100 kHz using high-speed interrogator. The impacts were localized with an average error of 18.4 mm.

  14. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Brnjamin, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) finite element simulations of compressible flows is presented. The topics include: 1) Introduction; 2) SUPG Galerkin Finite Element Methods; 3) Applications; and 4) Bibliography.

  15. Design, Simulation and Experimental Evaluation of Tri-Phasic Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamez, Juan Pedro

    Piezoelectric ceramics exhibit excellent piezoelectric and dielectric properties that is the basis of practically all transducers and piezoelectric devices, but their inherent properties, such as brittleness, non-ductility and poor shapeability may limit their applications in areas such as vibration sensing, impact detection, structural health monitoring and other reinforced structures and energy harvesting. To compensate for such limitations, the 1-3 piezoelectric composites transducers have become the material of choice for many high performance ultrasound transducers since it was invented in the late 1970's [ref. Newnham/Cross]. Extensive studies on 1-3 composites have been performed since then to improve the performance of a transducer by modifying their electromechanical coupling, bandwidth, quality factor, and flexibility and by reducing or eliminating the cross talk, i.e., induced noise between the active piezoelectric elements, especially in high power and low frequency applications. These fundamental issues, their possible solutions and their wide impact underline the motivation of the current work in this dissertation report. The motivation for this dissertation was to study and provide a foundation to designing multiphasic piezoelectric transducers that could be useful for multitude of applications. The goal was to improve the 1-3 diphasic composite transducer by eliminating the cross talk between the active piezoelectric elements while maintaining and improving the figures of merit of the design. To achieve the ultimate goal, the steps outlined below were followed: i. Understanding the theoretical and mathematical modeling for tri-phasic piezoelectric composite. ii. Implement Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and simulations of tri-phasic piezoelectric composites where the different active piezoelectric material PZT-5H and PMN-30%PT is surrounded by a vacuum phase that is enclosed by a hexagonal polymer walls. iii. Propose a redesign of the tri

  16. Damage Simulation in Composite Materials: Why It Matters and What Is Happening Currently at NASA in This Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElroy, Mack; de Carvalho, Nelson; Estes, Ashley; Lin, Shih-yung

    2017-01-01

    Use of lightweight composite materials in space and aircraft structure designs is often challenging due to high costs associated with structural certification. Of primary concern in the use of composite structures is durability and damage tolerance. This concern is due to the inherent susceptibility of composite materials to both fabrication and service induced flaws. Due to a lack of general industry accepted analysis tools applicable to composites damage simulation, a certification procedure relies almost entirely on testing. It is this reliance on testing, especially compared to structures comprised of legacy metallic materials where damage simulation tools are available, that can drive costs for using composite materials in aerospace structures. The observation that use of composites can be expensive due to testing requirements is not new and as such, research on analysis tools for simulating damage in composite structures has been occurring for several decades. A convenient approach many researchers/model-developers in this area have taken is to select a specific problem relevant to aerospace structural certification and develop a model that is accurate within that scope. Some examples are open hole tension tests, compression after impact tests, low-velocity impact, damage tolerance of an embedded flaw, and fatigue crack growth to name a few. Based on the premise that running analyses is cheaper than running tests, one motivation that many researchers in this area have is that if generally applicable and reliable damage simulation tools were available the dependence on certification testing could be lessened thereby reducing overall design cost. It is generally accepted that simulation tools if applied in this manner would still need to be thoroughly validated and that composite testing will never be completely replaced by analysis. Research and development is currently occurring at NASA to create numerical damage simulation tools applicable to damage in

  17. Evaluation of intensity of artefacts in CBCT by radio-opacity of composite simulation models of implants in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kuusisto, N; Vallittu, P K; Lassila, L V J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to compare the intensity of artefacts in CBCT images caused by different percentages of radio-opacifying material in composite simulation models of implants. Titanium and zirconia models of implants were used as a reference for the evaluation of the intensity of artefacts. Methods: Seven different percentages of radio-opacifying BaAlSiO2 fillers were added to composite resin to fabricate seven step wedges and simulation models of implants. Titanium and zirconia simulation models of implants were also fabricated. Aluminium step wedge was used as a reference for the measurement of grey values in intraoral radiographs. Step wedges were exposed with a Planmeca Intra X-ray machine (Planmeca Oy, Helsinki, Finland). All composite, titanium and zirconia simulation models of implants were exposed with a SCANORA® 3D dental X-ray machine (Soredex, Tuusula, Finland). Images and grey values were analysed with ImageJ software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD). To demonstrate possible artefacts between all the simulation models of implants, the images were also visually compared with each other using ImageJ software. Results: Artefacts were clearly present in CBCT images caused by titanium and zirconia and when the composite material consisted at least 20% BaAlSiO2. The intensity of artefacts increased when the radio-opacity of the composite material increased. Conclusions: Materials containing less radio-opacity produce less pronounced artefacts. The cut-off point for artefacts is at 20% radio-opaque filling material in composite material. PMID:25283364

  18. Composite Cure Process Modeling and Simulations using COMPRO(Registered Trademark) and Validation of Residual Strains using Fiber Optics Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Hudson, Tyler B.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Grimsley, Brian W.

    2016-01-01

    Composite cure process induced residual strains and warping deformations in composite components present significant challenges in the manufacturing of advanced composite structure. As a part of the Manufacturing Process and Simulation initiative of the NASA Advanced Composite Project (ACP), research is being conducted on the composite cure process by developing an understanding of the fundamental mechanisms by which the process induced factors influence the residual responses. In this regard, analytical studies have been conducted on the cure process modeling of composite structural parts with varied physical, thermal, and resin flow process characteristics. The cure process simulation results were analyzed to interpret the cure response predictions based on the underlying physics incorporated into the modeling tool. In the cure-kinetic analysis, the model predictions on the degree of cure, resin viscosity and modulus were interpreted with reference to the temperature distribution in the composite panel part and tool setup during autoclave or hot-press curing cycles. In the fiber-bed compaction simulation, the pore pressure and resin flow velocity in the porous media models, and the compaction strain responses under applied pressure were studied to interpret the fiber volume fraction distribution predictions. In the structural simulation, the effect of temperature on the resin and ply modulus, and thermal coefficient changes during curing on predicted mechanical strains and chemical cure shrinkage strains were studied to understand the residual strains and stress response predictions. In addition to computational analysis, experimental studies were conducted to measure strains during the curing of laminated panels by means of optical fiber Bragg grating sensors (FBGs) embedded in the resin impregnated panels. The residual strain measurements from laboratory tests were then compared with the analytical model predictions. The paper describes the cure process

  19. Streamlining staging of lung and colorectal cancer with whole body MRI; study protocols for two multicentre, non-randomised, single-arm, prospective diagnostic accuracy studies (Streamline C and Streamline L).

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stuart A; Mallett, Sue; Miles, Anne; Beare, Sandy; Bhatnagar, Gauraang; Bridgewater, John; Glynne-Jones, Rob; Goh, Vicky; Groves, Ashley M; Janes, Sam M; Koh, Dow Mu; Morris, Steve; Morton, Alison; Navani, Neal; Oliver, Alf; Padhani, Anwar R; Punwani, Shonit; Rockall, Andrea G; Halligan, Steve

    2017-05-02

    Rapid and accurate cancer staging following diagnosis underpins patient management, in particular the identification of distant metastatic disease. Current staging guidelines recommend sequential deployment of various imaging platforms such as computerised tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) which can be time and resource intensive and onerous for patients. Recent studies demonstrate that whole body magnetic resonance Imaging (WB-MRI) may stage cancer efficiently in a single visit, with potentially greater accuracy than current staging investigations. The Streamline trials aim to evaluate whether WB-MRI increases per patient detection of metastases in non-small cell lung and colorectal cancer compared to standard staging pathways. The Streamline trials are multicentre, non-randomised, single-arm, prospective diagnostic accuracy studies with a novel design to capture patient management decisions during staging pathways. The two trials recruit adult patients with proven or highly suspected new diagnosis of primary colorectal (Streamline C) or non-small cell lung cancer (Streamline L) referred for staging. Patients undergo WB-MRI in addition to standard staging investigations. Strict blinding protocols are enforced for those interpreting the imaging. A first major treatment decision is made by the multi-disciplinary team prior to WB-MRI revelation based on standard staging investigations only, then based on the WB-MRI and any additional tests precipitated by WB-MRI, and finally based on all available test results. The reference standard is derived by a multidisciplinary consensus panel who assess 12 months of follow-up data to adjudicate on the TNM stage at diagnosis. Health psychology assessment of patients' experiences of the cancer staging pathway will be undertaken via interviews and questionnaires. A cost (effectiveness) analysis of WB-MRI compared to standard staging pathways will be performed. We describe a novel approach to radiologist and

  20. 49 CFR 1503.421 - Streamlined civil penalty procedures for certain security violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... security violations. 1503.421 Section 1503.421 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ADMINISTRATIVE AND... Streamlined civil penalty procedures for certain security violations. (a) Notice of violation. TSA, at...